Citation
Miami New Times (Florida)

Material Information

Title:
Miami New Times (Florida)
Uniform Title:
Miami New Times (Florida) (Online)
Place of Publication:
Miami, FL
Publisher:
New Times, Inc.
Village Voice Media Holdings LLC.
Voice Media Group
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Miami ( fast )
Florida -- Miami-Dade County ( fast )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Newspapers ( fast )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Creation/Production Credits:
Print began in 1995.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright, Voice Media Group. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
891087301 ( OCLC )

Related Items

Succeeded by:
New times

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
February IG-2Z. 1995 FREE
Metro: Conservative
lawmakers have nudists
fighting to save their skins
Volume 9 . Number 44
Theater: Fast games, hard dames, and crying shames
Sink your teeth
into “Taste”:
Pull-out menu
guide inside!


Contents
is Issue
Letters
Reel racism
News of the Weird
Faux poo
12
Program Notes
Live cultures
Swelter
Cogs in a wheel
On the cover:
photo by
«I.K. Yearick
Metro: Exposed facto 7
Proposed anti-nudity legislation has local naturists
hollering, ‘Take it all off!”
By Art Levine
Learning to Scrawl .....15
Handwriting is never merely handwriting. Ask
Miami Beach graphologist Charlotte Leibel.
By Art Levine
Black in the Red 24
Three years after opening, Miami’s only black-owned
department store is in Chapter 11, and owner Charles
Howze is trying his best to sink positively.
By Kirk Semple
Making Whoopi 55
Schmaltz filmmaker Herbert Ross casts Goldberg as a
lesbian lounge singer stuck on straight women. Get us
rewrite!
By Todd Anthony
Volume 9
Number 44
February
16-22, 1995
Metro
Page 7
Troubletown
Page 12
Calendar
Page 38
Life in Hell
Page 40
Ernie Pook
Page 42
Film
Page 55
Shnwtimes
Page 59
Cafe
Page G5
Staff
Editor Jim Mullin
Managing Editor Tom Finkel
Associate Editor Michael Yockel
Assistant Editor Art Levine
Music Editor Greg Baker
Staff Writers Elise Ackerman,
Steven Almond, Todd Anthony,
Tom Austin, Judy Cantor, Jim DeFede,
Kathy Glasgow, Donald W. Pine, Kirk Semple
Copy Editors Ann Clark Espuelas,
Bob Weinberg
Calendar Editor Georgina Cárdenas
listings Specialist Elizabeth Martinez
Proofreader Christine Tague
Contributors Jen Karetnick,
Pamela Gordon
Editorial Department Administrator
Estela Cabrero
Art Director Brian M. Stauffer
Production Manager Carla Peters
Assistant Production Manager
Charles Masella
Editorial Layout Ray Villarosa
Production Sara Kubik, Marcy Mock,
Denise Serrano
Production Intern Brandi Montgomery
Circulation Manager Clarence Jones
Advertising Director Patrick Rood
Senior Account Executives Carolina Falla,
Shari Gherman-Rance
Account Executives Alina Blanco,
Beth Brandes, Luis de Cardenas, Doug Fenimore,
Kara Harris, Steen Lawson, Jacqueline Lim,
Kyle Martell, Jenni Price, Richard Santelises,
Frank Tomasino, Claudia Valencia
Account Managers Hillary Crane,
Andrew Polsky
House Account Manager Jennifer Granat
Sales Assistant Shifra Abramson
Sales Administrator Diane Maxwell
Sales Secretary Julie Ahern
Ad Designer J.P. Robinson
Contributing Ad Designer
Vivian Galainena
Classified Advertising Director
Maureen Bohannon-Olson
Classified Department Administrator
Juan Saborido
Senior Classified Account Representative
Joanne Morrow
Classified Advertising Representatives
Carl Brunswick, Alex Budyszewick,
Tracey Burger, Emilio Cernuda,
Kevin Montgomery, Henry Pinto, Edward Reid,
Jeff Saylor
Romance Director Gaby Rios
Romance Administrators
Jennifer Velazquez, Cory Ramirez
Business Manager Maria Cabrera
Accounting Supervisor Michelle Fabelo
Classified Accountant Moses A. Betancourt
Accounting Clerks Beatriz Avellan,
Orlando Hislop
Computer Systems Specialist
Kevin Mitchell
Front Desk Administrator
Barbara C. Garcia
General Manager Irene T. Bustamante
Publisher Greg Stier
New Times mailing address:
P.0. Box 011591, Miami, FL 33101-1591
Street address:
330 Biscayne Blvd, 10th Floor
Miami, FL 33132-2220
For general information call:
372-0004 or 763-2422 (Broward)
For advertising call: 372-3380
For classified advertising call: 372-9393
For romance information call: 579-1550
Page 2 New Times
February 16-22, 1995


Your Film Festival Hosts: Uncle
Tom and Stepin Fetchit
From time to time, one is rudely reminded in
this city that Florida was indeed a member of
the Confederacy and that the hideous beast of
systematic racism assumes many shapes and
forms. One of those manifestations was
revealed in the programming thrust of the
twelfth Miami Film Festival (“Foreign
Intrigues,” February 9).
While festival organizers espouse the pre¬
sentation of cinematic works from throughout
the world, one could not help but ask: In what
world do these people live? The schedule of
official events is reminiscent of the “unrecon¬
structed” American South, where lavish
expenditures are allocated to appease and
promote Anglo-American-based values and
aesthetic tastes while the needs of the African
diaspora are woefully underfunded and mar¬
ginalized.
The activities devoted to the African diaspo¬
ra cinema, “Cinema and Culture: Black World
Cinema in the Americas,” appears decidedly
malnourished when juxtaposed against the
world cinema. And by the way, where were
the African filmmakers? Where were the
black British filmmakers? Where is Man on
the Shore by Haitian filmmaker Raoul Peck?
One gets the nauseous feeling that the world
of the Miami Film Festival organizers is one
in which the Confederate Stars and Bars-
waves proudly atop a United Nations building
where delegates who have too much melanin
are forced to sit in the back of the general
assembly, the kind of global community in
which Russian racist Vladimir Zhirinovsky
would win the Nobel Peace Prize for his abili¬
ty to bring people together, and the authors of
The Bell Curte would be heralded for their
exemplary work in the field of social research.
Consigning the works of African diaspora
filmmakers to the cinematic equivalent of the
outhouse not only demeans the accomplish¬
ments of these artists (both past and present),
it also arrests the progress of the world cine¬
matic community.
The “Dixie Internationalism” that the
Miami Film Festival has chosen to exhibit is
contemptuous of the cultures ‘created by
members of the African diaspora. In fact, the
undertone of the Old South was so strong that
upon his arrival at the opening-night gala,
someone asked the distinguished and influen¬
tial film critic Clyde Taylor if he was a chauf¬
feur. Maybe the always diplomatic Taylor can
forgive the woman for being so completely
stupid in her yearnings for black servitude.
' But no one should forgive the Miami Film
Festival.
Adrian Anderson,
Miami
Redundancy of the Week:
Dysfunctional Idiotic Racist Nazi
Trash
It’s sad to see how ignorant, jealous, and envi¬
ous is this group of readers writing about
Cubans. The fact is they are wrong. They
should try to read about Cubans and their
struggle to free Cuba before writing stupid let¬
ters with racist overtones. Cubans cannot
leave U.S. soil to fight Castro; they will go to
jail as they have in the past
Stop spreading blame around for your own
dysfünctional lives. I work very hard to live in
a good, clean environment, away from idiotic
Nazi trash. People like Susan Williams and
Mark Scott need to get a life — or get out of it
They will do the nation a favor. Who needs
racists anyway?
Sergio Gonzalez
Miami
Talking About No Revolution
In response to Mark Scott and Eva Louise L
regarding we Cubans being to blame for Cas¬
tro’s takeover, I grant you that as a society we
bear some responsibility for his takeover.
However, history tells a different story. After
the Spanish-American War, the U.S. placed
the Platt Amendment in Cuba’s constitution
(it was repealed subsequently). Said amend¬
ment granted the U.S. the right to intervene
in Cuban affairs. As such, throughout the
years (and two U.S. interventions), we
Cubans grew to rely on the U.S. for support
When people like [the late-television talk-
show host] Jack Paar and other highly placed
Americans and politicians said Castro was
great what were we to think? And when Cas¬
tro took over, who were we to look to for
help?
With respect to the reason for Castro’s
takeover being the “huge” gap between rich'
and poor, think again. The U.N. report on
Cuba for 1959 shows that Cuba had one of the
largest middle classes in Latin America, one
of the lowest infant mortality rates, and one of
the highest literacy rates.
The fact is that no communist revolution
occurred the way Marx predicted. Marx
Continued on page 4
Distribution; New Times is available free of
charge, limited to one copy per reader. Additional
copies of the current issue of New Times may be
. purchased for $1.00, payable at the New Tunes
office in advance. New Times may be distributed
only by New Times’s authorized distributors. No.
person may, without prior written permission of
New Times, take more than one copy of each
New Times weekly issue.
Subscriptions: Domestic subscriptions may be pur¬
chased for $50 yearly or $30 for six months. Mail
to: Subscriptions/New Times, P.O. Box 011591,
Miami, Florida 33101. Delivery may take one
week.
New Times: (ISSN 10723331) (USPS 010669) is
published by New Times, Inc., 330 Biscayne
Boulevard, Miami, FL 33132, weekly, 52 times per
year. Second-class postage rate is paid at Miami,
Florida 33152.
Postmaster: Send address changes to New Times,
Post Office Box 011591, Miami, Florida 33101-
1591. | '•
Copyright The entire contents of New Times are
Copyright 1995 by New Times, Inc. No portion
February ±6—22, 1995
may be reproduced in whole or part by any
means including electronic retrieval systems
without the express written permission of the
Publisher, New Times, 330 Biscayne Blvd., Tenth
Floor, Miami, FL 33132. Please call the New
Times office for back issue information.
I ?J VERIFIED
A m AUDIT CIRCULATION
New Times, Inc.
Executive Editor Michael Lacey,
Design Director Kim Klein, Executive Managing
Editors Christine Fleming, Deborah Laake,
Corporate Editorial Assistant Alex McCall,
Operations Director Marjorie Rothrock,
Computer Systems Dave Ritter,
Corporate Administrator Kathy Ziegler, Director
of Human Resources Yolanda Celis, Financial
Coordinator Michelle Anderson, Sales Director
Michele Laven, Chief Financial Officer Jed Rrunst,
Executive Vice President Scott Spear, President
and Chief Operating Officer Hal Smith,
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Jim Larkin
Treasures of Pompeii...
Classic reproductions, custom upholstery
and finishes, accessories. Complete
Interior services.Centrally Located at
12413 Biscayne Blvd. North Miami.
Call today for our new arrivals, 895-1207


'ALE
5É¡ H°m5. Il§f Lincoln Road Miami Beach • 531-1321
the Beach 1149 Washington Ave Miami Beach • 672-0171
DETAILS
Goodbye. So Long. AuRevoir. Adiós.
Farewell. Afaha. Arrivederd, Adieu.
Sayonara. Auf Wiedersehen,
Cheerio. See Ya Later Alligator.
Bon. Voyage. Bye Bye.
50% Off
Every Wonderful
Thing In Our Store
You’ve got a few weeks to get fabulous deals on the
best vintage clothing and collectibles you’ll ever
encounter...anywhere! Together with an eclectic mix of
mannequins, antique fixtures and props we wouldn’t
have dreamed of parting with before. All because after
8 years of selling the best of 8 decades...we’re closing
the store to do some shopping of our own. Look for us
this spring and summer at major shows throughout
the country or call us for a private appointment. And
watch for our opening ads at our new location this fall.
LAST TANGO
1214"Washington Ave., Miami Beach, (305)532-4228
All Major Credit Cards Accepted
Page 4 New Times
Letters
Continued from page 3
wrote during the Industrial Revolution; an
ideal setting for a Marxist revolution would
have been either Germany or England (a
look at Dickens would tell you why). Howev¬
er, what Marx failed to recognize was that
capitalism would evolve, that history is an
ever-changing and dynamic process. His
dialectical theory was incorrect in that there
is no finality to history (it certainly does not
end in a dictatorship of the proletariat). He
did not see that legislatures, pressured by
electorates, would enact reforms such as
wage-and-bour regulations, child-labor laws,
and so on Does anyone really think the
Cuban revolution was really a “proletarian”
revolution?
José L Lopez-Tariche
Miami
Ah, Those Delicious Trembling
Meatballs
In reference to the recent letter from Sergio
Acosta, who was offended by an opinion from
another of your readers: There is a big differ¬
ence between a soldier of fortune and a plain
soldier. The first is a paid individual, a subject
usually of very bad character, a paranoiac, a
killer, a man without a clear personality. He
does anything for money — even killing the
innocent. The second soldier is a common
individual, too. But he is chosen by an estab¬
lished military system to perform duties with
honor.
The Bay of Pigs was not a clean war, not a
clean invasion. It was an invasion mounted
illegally, in which a bunch of paid soldiers,
usually called mercenaries, were used. Their
good salary was the price. The killings they
could commit were their trophies. Ill bet Ser¬
gio Acosta was there — paranoiac, insensi¬
tive to any good cause. But very well paid, of
course! And with his meatballs hanging but
trembling.
Now he is living in America and ignoring
the very basis of democracy.
Thomas Medigar
Miami Shores
Isolationists R Us
While American citizens are not eating prop¬
erly, going to bed hungry, unable to afford
decent shelter, and can’t find decent-paying
jobs, the government has given away our tax
dollars to help “defend” and “support” those
who won’t do for themselves in foreign lands.
Refugees, both political and economic,
enter our country at will, yet our government
does little or nothing. Then, to add insult to
injury, these same people who did nothing in
their country demand that America do for
them — that we send our loved ones to fight
and die for their country while they sit safely
here in our country, collecting from us tax¬
payers, or displacing our own citizens from
jobs.
Haven’t we, the citizens of this country,
heard enough and done enough for the rest
of the world? Isn’t it time for the people in
places like Haiti, Cuba, et cetera to do for
themselves? If they’re not willing to fight and
die for their own country, why should we?
Why should our loved ones have to sacrifice,
or be sacrificed, to do for them? It’s time for
these people to stay home and do for them¬
selves!
Richard Beattie, state secretary
Populist Party of Florida
Dania
Erratum
In the chart accompanying last week’s article
“Hired Gums,” the Simpson-trial commenta¬
tor information for Channel 10 and Channel
23 was switched inadvertently. New Times
regrets the error.
Conservative.
What
Do
You Think?
February 16-22, 1995


Buries Reports is now
a 1 hour TV fashion
show with a special
appearance bif Lauren
Hutton! See the latest
fashion trends, designer
interviews, stvli
suggestions
makeup tips and much
pore. Plus, you can
order the fashions you
love, as vou watch! Not
going tone home? Be
ire to set vour VCR...
Is an event you don’t
want to miss!


Thinking about buying a fabulous
South Beach Art Deco Condo?
But you're worried about
• Parking • Interest Rates
• Maintaining Older Condos
Vintage Properties wants you to stop
worrying and just enjoy the
South Beach Lifestyle.
That's why our Condos come with:
* Below market 7 3/4% Financing - Fixed Rate forv5 years
(for qualified buyers)
* One year Buyer's Warranty Program covering all
appliances, plumbing, electrical.
* Free one-year residential parking permit usable,
anywhere in the Art Deco District Zone 2
Any more questions?!!
Call Eddy (305) 538-1118
VINTAGE
REALTY
CROUP. INC.
1601 Jefferson Ave. • Miami Beach, FL 33139
Your Authorized COLOR NET Member Broker
To receive above benefits: purchase contract must be signed by 3-15-95
&
like a designer.
Athina Design A.Rtera Made in Spain
180 NE 39 STREET #112. MIAMI. FLORIDA 33137
MIAMI DESIGN DISTRICT
TELEPHONE (305) 573-7711. FAX (305) 576-5229
OPEN SATURDAYS


"I find it offensive that anyone can just
throw down their totoel beside me and
my family and get buck-naked.”
State Rep. Mark Flanagan.
No Butts?
With state lawmakers renewing their threats to ban au naturel
sunbathing, local nudists are undressing for battle
By Art Levine
Nudists of the world unite!
That, in fact, is exactly what hap¬
pened when Miami Shores resident
Richard Mason, president of South
Florida Free Beaches, sounded the alarm
over a bill to restrict public nudity that’s
being considered by the House Criminal
Justice Commjttee in Tallahassee. “This is
more than a nudist issue — it’s a tourist
issue,” says Mason. “When you’re saying to
European tourists, Tour sunbathing customs
are criminal,’ this will literally drive people to
Cuban beaches. This will be the Cuban Relief
Act of’95!”
Using this passionate rhetoric, Mason,
along with lobbyist and fellow nudist Ramon
Maury, launched a grassroots campaign that
has deluged the committee with hundreds of
messages and letters from outraged naturists
in Florida and abroad.
The committee flinched. Slightly. Although
a watered-down bill that restricted nudity in
state parks passed in a close vote, the
proposed measure — which has not yet
been considered by the full House or
Senate — would not affect the most pop¬
ular clothing-optional beaches in South
Florida, Haulover Beach and South
Beach. Even so, Mason and Maury
remain vigilant. “Once this bill goes to
the floor, it’s fair game for anyone who
wants to amend it,” Maury warns. “The
mood of the new legislature is to take
away this freedom from families and con¬
senting adults.”
If the wrangling in committee is any
guide, a citizen’s right to sunbathe in the
altogether won’t be stripped away with¬
out a fight In the state capital, the legisla¬
tive equivalent of mud-wrestling over
nudity is becoming an annual tradition.
This latest bill, as proposed by State
Rep. Buddy Johnson (R-Plant City), Origi¬
nally aimed to prohibit anyone from
being “naked or in a nude state in public
except in any place provided or set apart
for that purpose,” making that offense a
first-degree misdemeanor punishable by
up to one year in jail. It was amended in
committee to cover only state parks. The
measure seeks to remedy what advo¬
cates see as a loophole in the state’s inde¬
cent-exposure statute; state and federal
courts have ruled that the section of that
statute dealing with “exposure of sexual
organs” does not bar nudity unless
accompanied by “vulgar and indecent”
behavior. In 1993, for instance, a federal
magistrate overturned the arrests of
eight nude sunbathers at Canaveral
National Seashore (f/.S. v. A Naked
Person Issued Notice of Violation No.
P41940), prompting state and national park
officials, along with the religious right, to
push for new legislation to sharply limit pub¬
lic nudity. That set off a fusillade of lobbying
in the last legislative session, with the conser¬
vative American Family Association of
Florida summoning its troops and allies to do
battle with a variety of nudist organizations.
The anti-nudists’ main argument is this:
Anyone can walk naked anywhere without
getting arrested. Baloney, say nude-niks, who
point out that the state’s disorderly conduct
statute permits such arrests. Though a
Senate committee approved an anti-nudity
bill, no new law resulted. “That [nudity issue]
assault grabbed everyone’s attention, and we
had no time to attend to other issues,” com¬
plains one legislative staffer rubbed raw by
the politicking.
This year Criminal Justice Committee
chairman Elvin Martinez (D-Tampa) said he
wanted to avoid any distractions by bringing
up the matter early in January. (The bill was
quietly introduced by the chairman himself,
in part because Johnson, its chief supporter,
doesn’t sit on the committee.) Richard
Mason hints at a darker motivation: ‘The
leadership engendered the bill quickly before
we could know about it because they didn’t
want to put up with our lobbying.” Indeed,
the “nonclothing community” didn’t learn
ist clubs that have a combined membership
of 45,000. Those leaders contacted their
members and began bombarding members
of the committee with letters and faxes. Dade
tourist industry officials were also notified,
leading some, including Don Meginley of the
Ocean Drive Association, to pen blistering
missives. “Does everyone in Talláhassee
insist on being offensive to our European visi¬
tors to South Beach, or is everyone in
Tallahassee just stu¬
pid?” Meginley wrote.
“Either way, the Flori¬
da legislature should
be working on getting
people to come to Flor-
ida, not create bills
which chase them
away.”
At the same time,
Mason prepared 4500
copies of an inflamma¬
tory leaflet and distrib¬
uted it at local beaches. /
“LEGISLATIVE ALERT!” it virtually scream¬
ed. “If you are reading this on Miami Beach
or Haulover Beach and you are. nude or top-
free, you will be a criminal on October 1,
1995,” referring to the date on which a new
law, if passed, would take effect The back of
each leaflet listed committee members to
contact Mason also arranged to post similar
and derided the bill as unnecessary ánd
costly. “We do not want our tax dollars
wasted on such a preposterous boondoggle!”
wrote Bruce Frendahl, a former president of
South Florida Free Beaches.
To Cobb, the nudists’ apprehension is
unwarranted. “The bill wouldn’t stop nudity,
or stop tourists from taking off their clothes
in appropriate places,” she asserts. (Nudism
advocates say that without a formal local gov¬
“Saying to European tourists
‘Your sunbathing customs are
criminal' will literally drive
people to Cuban beaches.”
Naked came the lobbyists: Richard Mason (right) is fighting the state's proposed anti-nudity legislation along
with unclothed allies Larry Fleischman and "Silva"
about the bill and the committee’s plans for a
January 24 hearing until the second week of
January — but then they quickly swung into
action.
Hell, it seems, hath no fury like a nudist
scorned. Beginning on the weekend of
January 13, Mason and Maury, among oth¬
ers, contacted members of the “Non-Groiip,”
a coalition representing about 40 Florida nud¬
information on the Internet and America
On-Line.
“The lobbying was very heavy, from all
over the world,” confirms Lynn Cobb, staff
director of thé Criminal Justice Committee.
“My chairman used up an entire ream of fax
paper [receiving messages].” Arriving from
as far away as Australia, the protests warned
that foreign visitors wouldn’t come to Florida
ernment vote permitting nudity in certain
places — a political impossibility — the prac¬
tice might indeed be banned.)
The committee room was packed on
January 24, when proponents and supporters
lined up to testify. Legislators spoke up, too.
Rep. Mark Flanagan (R-Bradenton) fumed, “I
find it offensive that anyone can just throw
down their towel beside me and my
family and get buck-naked.” Chairman
Elvin Martinez, apparently swayed by
the religious right’s propaganda,
intoned, “My understanding of the cur¬
rent status of the law is there’s nothing
illegal, about anyone in this audience
standing up and taking off all their
clothes and sitting here naked.” (In fact,
nobody did so, but anyone who had
would have risked arrest for disor¬
derly conduct; court rulings upheld
such arrests in 1976 and 1986.) On the
other hand, Rep. Sally Heyman (D-
North Miami Beach) argued, “We
don’t have enough money for prisons,
but what do we do? Pass legislation
that makes skinny-dippers sex offend¬
ers. We don’t need to create new crim¬
inals, we need to deal with the crimi¬
nals we have.”
Buddy Johnson and his supporters
sought to downplay the scary eco¬
nomic side effects cited by critics.
“This bill would not put South Beach
out of business,” he said before the bill
was amended to covef only state
parks, adding that the measure is
needed because Florida is a “family-
friendly” state. David Catón, executive
director of the American Family
Association of Florida and a self-
described “former pom addict,” built on
those themes. “Family tourism is the
largest industry in our state,” Catón
declared. ‘We can see that nudists are
very organized, .they’re encroaching on
the beaches, and they’re demanding
more places to show their.. .wares.”
Master strategist Ramon Maury
knows that the fight for preserving truth, jus¬
tice, and the American T & A is a never-end¬
ing one. The bill may reach the floor when the
legislature returns next month, but Maury is
hoping to sidetrack it to other committees
and then work to kill it. “The battle has just
begun,” he promises. We have a long way to
go, and we hope the people of Florida wake
up and tajre action.” |JJ
February lQ-^2, 1995.
New Times Page 7


Competitive Poces
• Dive Classes
• All Major Bran
• Wet Suits • Mas’
• Snorkels • BC’s & Regulators
• Tanks • Instruments
| Let the trained staff at Bubbles help
you put your dive package together.
ubbles
Dive Center
2671 S.W. 27th Ave
Coconut Grove
8564)565
From an array of living
crafts at their most vital
and delightful we bring
you from Indonesia and
India a collection of
objects made for
everyday use.
Seats woven in rattan,
painted cupboards,
latticed windows,
architectural details and
ornamented trunks
are part of our latest
arrivals.
MASALA
3021 SW 28th Lane • 567-1510 • open Monday thru Saturday 11am-6pm
GO AWAY
and take us with you!
A
Sul
Xces .
DAY-OFF
Seachu/eaz
a**:*
1BÉ ; $
Going away this holiday weekend ?
See Alices Day-Off first,
for the best swimwear & coverups anywhere
We make baying swimwear easy.
mm US n
SOUTH MIAMI MIAMI INT'L MALL CORAL SQUARE MALL PEMBROKE LAKES MALL
5900 Sunset Drive 1455 NW 107 Ave. 9149 W Atlantic Blvd. 11401 Pines Blvd.
(corner of U.S. 1 & Sunset) (Near Burdines) Coral Springs Pembroke Pines
10am-ópm Open 10am-9pm Open 10am-9pm Open 10am-9pm
2840301 4770393 345-8141 437-5428
February 16-22, 1995


In the Paint
The Heat didn't hook up with Greg “Bald Eagle" Jackson so
they could sit him on the bench. He’s their first-string
billboard model.
The Miami Heat's newest star, Greg “Bald Eagle" Jackson
By Steven Almond
nn San Antonio seven-foot Spurs cen¬
ter David Robinson glowers from an
assortment of billboards. The image
that towers over Seattle’s highways
is that of fierce all-star forward Shawn
Kemp. The Houston Rockets decorate
their boards with a battery of NBA champi¬
ons — Hakeem Olajuwon, Vernon
Maxwell, Otis Thorpe.
Here in Miami, the player who domi¬
nates the skyline is Greg Jackson.
Jackson’s bald head and muscular upper
body are the star attraction in a trio of
promo billboards sponsored by WBFS-TV
(Channel 33) and WINZ-AM (940), the sta¬
tions that broadcast Heat games. Jackson
is the figure in the Heat uniform who
bursts rocketlike through the word
Smmmoookiri.
Given all the trades the
franchise has made this
season, it’s probably
worth supplying a little
background on the team’s
newest and most visible
star. Jackson is a South
Florida native who
starred as a point guard at
Boca Raton High, and
later logged time at Palm
Beach Junior College
before moving on to
Florida State. At six feet
and 185 pounds, he’s a strong outside
shooter and has excellent ball-handling
skills. His nickname is “Bald Eagle.”
One other thing about Jackson — he
doesn’t actually play for the Heat. He
works for Motorola, in the purchasing
department.
“I buy materials,” explains the 35-year-
old Jackson. “Like for pagers and stuff.”
Confused?
So were we.
So we called Channel 33 to find out what
the deal was. The deal, according to art
director Stacey Panson, is this: “With all
the trades they’ve made, our management
and the Heat were worried about putting a
specific player on the billboard. So we
decided to go with a generic-type player.
He’s a very nice guy,” Panson stresses.
“He just doesn’t happen to be a Heat
player.”
Brian Fein is the award-winning Broward
illustrator who created the billboard — and
discovered Jackson. “He works out at the
same gym as me,” Fein says. “I paid him 50
bucks.”
Jackson is thrilled with the arrangement.
"I haven’t actually seen the billboards
because I live in Plantation, but Brian did
give me some of the pocket-size TV sched¬
ules, and a lot of my friends have called to
tell me they’ve seen my billboard.” (Two
billboards are located along 1-95, one near
the Griffin Road exit in Broward, a second
at 79th Street. A third resides on Biscayne
Boulevard, at the MacArthur Causeway
exit just north of downtown. A fourth is in
the heart of Downtown, off Second
Avenue.)
For those who don’t know Jackson, how¬
ever, the billboard has caused confusion,
according to an informal survey conducted
by New Times this past week at the inter¬
section facing the Biscayne Boulevard bill¬
board. The question: Do you recognize the
man on that billboard?
Respondent 1: “It’s the bald guy —
Harold Miner, right?”
Respondent 2: “That’s Derek Strong,
from the Milwaukee Bucks. Did the Heat
trade for him?”
Respondent 3: “Glen Rice.”
Respondent 4: "Miner.”
Respondent 5: “Get away from my car.”
Jackson himself, who still plays pickup
ball, says he used to be called “Jordan” in
college. ‘These days people say I remind
them of Montel Williams. You know, the
guy on the talk show.”
The confusion is not likely to diminish
come next season. According to Mark
Pray, the Heat’s director of public rela¬
tions, the team will continue to discourage
the use of players’ images on promotional
material. But Pray insists the reason has.
less to do with trades than with “the impor¬
tance of emphasizing the team concept.”
The Heat’s preseason billboard, which
lined 1-95 for weeks, featured another
generic player. “Basically the board was
based on a photo of [guard] Steve Smith,
but the number was airbrushed out,” Pray
says. Smith was subsequently traded to the
Atlanta Hawks.
The Heat, as it turns out, are at the fore¬
front of a movement away from using
actual players to promote. Orlando and
Charlotte also refuse to use players on
their billboards; spokesmen for both clubs
cite the same reason as Pray —' team unity.
But NBA officials are more forthright.
“With trades becoming so prevalent, it’s
foolhardy to sell your product based on an
attraction that may be gone tomorrow,” says
Peter Land, a staffer at NBA headquarters in
New York.
The peril of staking a promotional campaign
on real players in this era of transience was
perfectly demonstrated by the Miami Herald
earlier this year. In their annual special sec¬
tion about the Heat, they ran a full-page photo
of three players: Steve Smith, forward Glen
Rice, and center Rony Seikaly.
Smith, as mentioned, later moved on to
the Hawks. And on the very morning the
special section hit the streets, Seikaly was
traded to the Golden State Warriors. [Q
“He's a very nice guy” stresses
art director Stacey Panson.
“He just doesn't happen to
be a Heat player.”
ROBERT’S
f 0[ ñ
WESTERN WERE
Is Jifl LJ l
The Largest
Jf Accessory éjevíeírij Salon.
Lucchese Dealer
./Y 'mm
in the Southeast
Justin
M[ Durango
Code West
Pnce
&*le
Boots • Jeans
Shirts • Hats
1 â–  *â–  V
5854 South Dixie Hwy
Martines
Valero
South Miami
666:664y
710 WashingtonJtveJAiaroi $010(1 552—2295
February 16-22, 1995
New Times Page 9


INe Day Only
W4
m&t
Our
50W0
O/
/o
¿g$fei$Fetfruary 18th
MM 0AM to 5PM
Í-. !!/'•: •*!Í-í^¿:**",X'¡^l
Furniture Lighting Accessories
Warehouse Address:
2144 SW 38 ST.
FT. LAUDERDALE
a«i.í
N
E
£2
MAKE YOUR
FAVORITE
PHOTO THE
PERFECT GIFT
JUST BRING US YOUR ;
J* PHOTO OR ARTWORK AND
WE'LL CREATE A FULL COLOR
TRANSFER ON A T-SHIRT,
HAT, SWEATSHIRT, ETC
THE PERFECT GIFT THIS
HOUDAY SEASON.
craft.
/ w ^H*d
INC.
Kendall Drive at SW 107th Ave. Miami. 279-2424
Open 7 Days\ â– 
ANNUAL SKI
m
Si-
tCLEARANCE!
the
W¡
m
JUST
PROPpgp
Universal.
Outlet
8789 S. W. 132nd Street (Near the Falls in
South Kendall) 255-1166 UmHod to stock on
hand. Interim markdowns may have been taken.
Dor
Color
ytás
91
NOW
pof
50%
¿tí%
40%
pa%
30%
©
V”
/Kf%r
%mm
20%
It’s
Simple
Leather Boots
NOW
$19.99
your choice
Gregory’s
Discount Designer Shoes
333 Miracle Mile,Coral Gables
461-5195
MIAMI AIR TOUR
Your adventure begins with the unique excitement
of a water take-off. Like a fun park ride the seaplane,
skips across the wave tops, salt spray splashing
your window as you gain speed until the boat
leaves the water and transforms into a plane to
offer you an awesome view of the watery world
below. This 25 minute flight will allow you a whole
new perspective of the coastal city.
BIMINI, BAHAMAS PACKAGES
Nestled amidst balmy tropical breezes, set against
the backdrop of a stunning turquoise sea, Bimini is
a casual barefoot hideaway. Famous for world class
deep sea fishing, these trophy size fish don't need
a‘good story about the one that got away. Lots of
brilliantly colored tropical fish make scuba diving
and snorkeling great, Bimini is only a 25 minute
flight, but it feels like a world away.
A SPLASHDOWN CERTIFICATE
This full color photo is personalized with your name
as a momento of your adventure. It is matted and
framed, and ready to hang. (Other gift items are
also available; call for a brochure.)
GIFT CERTIFICATES ARE
AVAILABLE NOW!
MIAMI: 305-371-8628
FT. LAUDERDAUh 305-359-7980
CHAUCr
J¡g|n¡S canMly h^causfe’they
takefthemselves so 1 i gh1Tv
MCMXCV
RED ROAD
KIDS
Celebrating Childrliff
Past •Pmsfcdát • Future
kdjtoocfe
p
Miami • >6613163 • Mon Sat 10-6
Page lO New Times
February 16^-22, 1995


etro
20,000 Geezers Under
the SeaP
A promoter’s tale of top-secret Euthanasia
cruises" doesn’t hold water
By Dewey Wtebb
hen it comes to bedside manner,
“suicide doctor” Jack Kevorkian
really missed the boat.
At least that’s the opinion of a rival
ji assisted-suicide advocate who claims to
- operate secret “euthanasia cruises” — sui-
'â–  cide voyages for which terminally ill passen-
e gérs from around the nation pay $500 for
[ the privilege of being, wined, dined,
i sedated, and tossed overboard. Harrison T.
f Rogers, the man who purports to have
dreamed up the death cruises, likens
| Kevorkian’s methodology to something
! out of a 1940s horror movie.
“He’s sort of like Dr. Cyclops with all
; his tubes, his syringes, and his
machine,” says cruise director Rogers,
¿ who identifies himself only as a psychol-
I ogist in an uniiamed Midwestern city.
“What he’s doing is a little grisly.”
Many people would undoubtedly say
i the same thing about Rogers’s bizarre
boat rides, which, according to his
claims, set sail from a Fort Lauderdale
marina once a month with up to 25 ter¬
minal patients and their loved ones
aboard. Rogers claims that since 1993,
when he and a handful of like-minded
“trained medical professionals” first
began offering the nonprofit cruises,
he’s helped usher more than 100 grate¬
ful passengers to watery graves.
“The way we set this program up, it’s an
adventure,” insists Rogers. “It’s kind of like
going to the theater and having the last sup¬
per and just going out partying. Then sud¬
denly you go down into Davy Jones’s locker
and it’s all over. And it’s great, because you
planned it that way.”
Noting the wide array of luxuries —
optional amenities include the' round-the-
clock services of licensed sex surrogates of
both genders — Rogers says, “We’re
delighted to offer an innovative and humani¬
tarian plan that circumvents the archaic
laws of the land.”
According to Rogers, practically all of his
passengers have been elderly and suffering
from debilitating, life-threatening disease;
he says most have been recruited through
lectures directed to underground senior-cit¬
izen organizations and euthanasia groups
across the U.S.
To book passage, a would-be client calls a
toll-free number and leaves his own phone
number on a message machine. (New
Times learned of the 800 number, which is
believed to be based in a private home in
Hoboken, New Jersey, through a press
release that arrived in the mail earlier this
month.)
After arrangements are made and legal
paperwork completed (owing to the illegal
nature of his operation, Rogers naturally
H can’t elaborate on details), clients and their
guests rendezvous in Fort Lauderdale,
where they participate in a daylong orienta¬
tion session. On Saturday passengers board
a yacht for a four-hour
cruise into international
waters off the coast. At
noon on Sunday, the
terminally ill voyagers
enjoy a gourmet
brunch spiked with
euphoric drugs before
being dropped into the
ocean with weights
strapped to their
ankles. Celestial organ music drones in the
background. Says Rogers, “People aré
really interested and excited about the pos¬
sibility of terminating this way.”
Well, not everyone. Those in the know
seem to agreé that as a viable euthanasia
technique, Rogers’s lethal Love Boat is just
a bunch of bilge. Members of the Hemlock
Society, a national organization that sup¬
ports voluntary euthanasia through nonvio¬
lent assisted suicide, could scarcely control
their laughter upon hearing of Rogers’s
cruises. “We’ve certainly never heard of this
outfit,” says Carlos Hudson, co-director of
the Hemlock Society’s Fort Lauderdale
chapter. “A lot of people will probably get a
chuckle out of-this,” he adds, suspecting a
college prank in the making, “but it doesn’t
have anything to do with reality.
Somebody’s pulling your leg.”
Asked why the biggest euthanasia organi¬
zation in the world has absolutely no knowl¬
edge of his activities, Rogers (who, to judge
from his telephone voice, is
middle-age) counters that the Hemlock
Society is well aware of what he’s up to;
.‘They’ll never admit it, though, because
we’re kind of competition for them,” main¬
tains the self-styled suicide czar. “They kind
of frown on the fact that we’re making such
a joyous occasion out of this.”
But Rogers is far less successful in
explaining away a glaring flaw in his luxury-
suicide scenario: After one of his passen¬
gers has taken the plunge, how will sur¬
vivors ever hope to settle the estate or
deal with life insurance companies with¬
out benefit of a body, a death certificate,
or even documentation that an accident
at sea actually occurred?
In the eighteen months he’s been feed¬
ing customérs to the fishes, Rogers
insists, no insurance company has ever
rejected a claim resulting from one of his
cruises. “From what I understand, there
have been no challenge3"because the
deceased was lost at sea,” he says. “Keep
in mind that in almost every instance
where there has been insurance
\ involved, the people have been in their
! seventies or eighties, so they are at an
» age when it’s not questionable that they
! would terminate.”
Explaining that he’s late for a top-
secret appointment with Oprah
Winfrey’s people (so secret, in fact, that,
just as Rogers predicts, no one in Winfrey’s
production office will admit to knowing any¬
thing about it), the suicide skipper prepares
to sign off.
But not before first promising to alert the
media: the minute he hammers out a deal to
broadcast one of his seagoing terminations
on national television. CD
“People are really Interested and
excited about the possibility of
terminating this way.”


I
ews
ÍSÍif&SSJv? 'v‘®®W@(!J3'P©W[ai
By uoyt>
DANSlF
TRou8ifroww Finally starts to see
SKins of pecoveny/ a Few New
Bvsinfssfs start and hundríos
of croes arc crFatfd/
Pfopif Start
gVYING ISvm Rocíos
ano Putt in 6
FRIVOLOUS THINGS
OH CkeOlT CARPS/
ALAN GiRfFNSPAN
WAkCS VP WITH GAS
PAINS— WHICH CAN
only tufan one
THING'/
pepueuCAN HA FAT
OfRFGvLATION
EXC/TfS gvSiNfSS-
WHflf CoNiumfR
FPARS THOVNT.'
pRFS IJ)CnT CLINTON
BAIL S-OUT IHexiCAu
6ANKFAS, HI A KING
bankprs bvfrv-
WHf»f pfLlRlOUS!
CRfoiTcards
Cost Nil/CH NlORF
To PAY OFF,
Causing BvRAFR.
Sal(s To t>fciiNe/
THF INFLUX OF
Cash froiyi Bahaa
Strfisand to Bin
Clinton’s 3 lfgal
OFFFNSf TPAHi j
CAVSfS A SHORTARF
IN THF HAONFYa
SutPiY:
TAlr, of Raising
THf nuNiHtinv
wag F cavscsthf
WFAK BlRGFR To
Fall AGainst THF
SPIRALING TACO.'
¿¡¡¡pfel
SHORT ORbtR COOKS
And FRYCHFFS HIT
THF StR(FTS.
TSuzu DFAlFRS
0RACF FOR weL-
fARepe FoRmi
GRCCNSPAN sees
AN APPARITION IN
A FISH tank at a
CkINtse ReSTAURAHT'i
/Jfi
guSiNfSSFS START
TO HAAH6 lonG-
VffDfo CAPITAL
impAove ho fntS
A monitor Litard
SPFAKS TO ALAN
GRcenspani" a
one Am/
FANiILIFS WITH
adji/stabif
IVORTGAGfS COOK
For orphanagfs
For THFIR KIOS/
Lead Story
• In December a jury in Ellsworth, Wisconsin,
deliberated for three hours before ruling
against Stewart Blair in his lawsuit against his
friend, Maurice Poulin, for injuries incurred
when Blair tripped over a snowplow blade.
Blair claimed that Poulin caused the fall when
he startled Blair by accidentally passing gas in
his face. And in a postscript to the trial, as the
jurors ceremoniously exited the courtroom,
the foreman accidentally and audibly passed
gas as he walked by the judge.
The Entrepreneurial Spirit
•In August police in Sao Paulo, Brazil,
arrested master thief Robson Augusto Araujo
and confiscated a stash of his business cards
with the firm name (in Portuguese) “Thefts
and Robberies, Ltd.” and his job title “Thief.”
Though the card’s address was fake, the cel¬
lular phone number was real, along with the
legend “325 iS,” which is the model of BMW
he specializes in stealing.
•And in August police in Chandler, Arizona,
confiscated a videotape allegedly made by
four teenage boys known as the Insane Skate
Posse and containing inspirational promo¬
tional messages of mayhem and destruction
designed to recruit new members for their
gang. They are shown having fun by smoking
marijuana, drinking beer, destroying a parked
car, and making harassing phone calls.
•In October the New York Times reported
that Kimberly-Clark Corp. had received a
patent for chemically realistic, synthetic feces
that it regards as crucial for testing diapers
and incontinence garments.
Technicians had concluded that
makeshift substances, such as
mashed potatoes, peanut butter and
canned pumpkin-pie mix were inade¬
quate because they separated into liquids and
solids more quickly than feces do.
• In December Dr. Henry Abrams of
Loveladies, New Jersey, who was Albert
Einstein’s ophthalmologist and who removed
Einstein’s eyes during his autopsy in 1955
(storing them in a safe-deposit box ever
since), announced the eyes were for sale and
said he expected they could bring five million
dollars.
Overreactions
•Recent Sensitive People: Brenda L Hunter,
age 31, Zion, Illinois, allegedly shot her
brother because she did not like the kind of
cheese he was putting on their chili dinner;
Michael R. Waggoner, age 37, Knoxville,
Tennessee, allegedly shot a man five times in
a bar because he thought the man had asked
“Have you got a light, baby?” when the man
actually ended the question with “buddy”;
Anthony'Foti, age 35, Missasauga, Ontario,
was charged with severely punching and
kicking an elementary school principal
because one of his kid’s teachers was wearing
a skirt that was too short
•The Charlotte Observer reported in June that
a Sanford, North Carolina, man drove to City
Hall wearing only a towel to complain that his
water had been shut off in the middle of his
shower. After the city pointed out that his
account was overdue and that two warnings
had been mailed, the man stood in line, paid
his bill, and drove home to finish his shower.
• In June in Liberty, Ohio, police officer
Bradley L Sebastian, tired of waiting for his
food order at Denny’s, stormed into the
kitchen, held his service revolver to the
cook’s head, and told her he would kill her if
she didn’t hurry up.
•Christian-oriented radio station WKID in
Vevay, Indiana, was burglarized and set afire
in September, probably by the man who
became angry earlier in the day when a DJ
refused to play his request. (The song was
“Don’t Take the Girl” by Tim McGraw. DJs
seeking to avoid trouble are advised to honor
all requests to play that song.)
- By Chuck Shepherd
It's National ¥ Month
The American Heart Association has designated February as "NATIONAL
HEART MONTH". The SPA would like to invite you to participate in Seriously
Affordable Fitness.
Join during the month of February and we'll give you:
1. 50% Off on your Enrollment Fee to get your heart beating.
2. Receive your choice of either One FREE Massage, One FREE Tennis Lesson
or a FREE SPA-Boutique Gift.
3. FREE Computerized Fitness Evaluation.
4. 3 FREE One-On-One Personal Training Sessions.
5. FREE Nutritional Evaluation.
6. FREE Cholesterol screening by Miami Heart Institute.
At the Fontainebleau Hilton Resort
4441 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach
1007 Lincoln Road, South Beach 535-3003
SO ARE
WE!
9P fyffinbfonj
page 12 New Times
February 16—22, 1995


ADVANCING THE ART OF
HOME ACCESSORIES
AVENTURA SOUTH MIAMI KENDALL FT. LAUDERDALE
18721 Biscayne Blvd. 11301 S. Dixie Hwy.'”^ 8514 Mills Drive - 2000 N. Federal Hwy.
(Loehman's Fashion Island) (Suniland Shopping Center) (Town & Country Center). (Capital-Bank Plaza)
937-2638 238-8085 274-7268 566-1969
BOCA RATON
9882 Glades Road
(Westwinds of Boca)
451-1128
Appoint yourself to
The Sup
reme
Courts
Supremely situated.
Tke Courts at S.outk Beack is in tke
keart of Soutk Béack, across from tke
Miami Beack Marina, only steps away
from tke finest skopping and dining
in tke world, two klocks to tke wkite
sandy keack, and a few minutes stroll
from tke kottest nigkt spots, first-rate
tkeater, art galleries and museums.
Supremely spacious.
Resident^ can ckoose from, a wide
selection of tke most luxurious,
inteüigently designed and spacious
floorplans, featuring expansive
private terraces, kalconies and ample
storage room.
The Courts
AT SOUTHBEACH
Exquisitely designed 1 to 4 bedroom condominium townhomes and apartments.
Priced from $159,000 to over $600,000.
Supremely original.
Tkis casually elegant, self-contained
residential community is designed
around tropical gardens and intimate
Courtyards reminiscent of tke
Mediterranean. Everything wraps
around a magnificent 3 1/2 acre
piazza. It even features an on-site
likrary and convenient retail stores.
Supremely appointed.
Tke kigk-teck security, fitness
center, lap and recreational pools,
and indoor racquetkall courts exceed
tke most demanding expectations.
And at Tke Courts, all parking is
Secured and under covér.
Visit us today at First Street and Alton Road or call (305) 53,2-1700. Sales Office open 7 days, 10:00 am to 6:00 pm
Under construction, occupancy Summer of 1995.
. EQUAL HOUSING
Broker Participation Invited. Another development by a subsidiary of the PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL EQUITIES. INC., Group of Companies and an affiliate of COBB PARTNERS. INC. Your assurance of quality from Miami Beach's largest developer, opportunity
Februa r y~ i-0^2 2-j
New" TimSs*Page i3


The World of
FMonnKijw
isrufes n¡v»í
m
nusounn
â– iitrhwav
Florida’s Lowest Prices on
Lexington, American Drew,
Bassett, Singer, Riverside,
Vaughn Basset & Many More
ISKSS!fHB5i3B«l
Mon-Sat 10:(K)-7:(H)
Sunday 12HX) - 5:00
Closed Wednesday
Tenemos
assistentes que
hablan el Español
los fines de la semans
m
No Lie...
Big, Big, Big, Savings
Blaclcwelclers
â– â– â– â– â– hf u r I t u r e
12475 S. Dixie Hwy • Miami • 238-5379
Hours: Mon-Thurs 10-6 • Fri 10-8 • Sat 10-5 • Sun 12-5
The Original Solid Wood Furniture Store.
67 N.W. 167TH STREET • NORTH MIAMI BEACH 33169
651-4999 • FAX 651-3547
Page. 14 New Times
February 16-22, 199 5


Leibel claims to detect your innermost personality traits when examining yoiir handwriting
w r / T £
Inside a cramped studio apartment on South Beach, a
tiny 95-year-old woman in white polyester pants and a
white jacket is watching some of the preliminary skir¬
mishings in the O J. Simpson trial on TV. Hunched
over in her rocking chair, peering intently at the
screen, Charlotte Leibel, like millions of other
Americans, holds strong opinions about the case. As
deputy district attorney Marcia Clark talks on-screen,
Leibel suddenly bursts out, “He’s guilty as hell!” But
unlike most observers of the trial, this particular
viewer has unique insights into O.J.’s personality,
perceptions so special that the tabloid TV show Hard
Copy featured her in December as an expert com¬
mentator on...O.J. Simpson’s handwriting. And this
past Tuesday, she appeared on The Tonight Show
with Jay Leno, right alongside Tom Arnold.
Leibel, it turns out, has about 50 years’ experience
analyzing the handwriting of thousands of people for
clues to the human personality. Her Simpson find¬
ings were ballyhooed at the top of the Hard Copy
show as OJ.’s “Secret Message” contained in the
“suicide note” he wrote on the day he fled in A1
Cowlings’s notorious white Bronco. The note, first
read aloud by his friend Robert Kardashian at a news
conference last June, proclaimed OJ.’s innocence
and love for his ex-wife, Nicole, but Charlotte Leibel
didn’t care about any of that — she just looked at
the individual letters and the style of Simpson’s
penmanship. •
She based her analysis on a careful examination of
BY ART LEVINE
what she and other handwriting analysts say are tell¬
tale signs, such as the slant and size of letters and'
the way loops and strokes are formed. During
Leibel’s segment on Hard Copy, the TV announcer
breathlessly intoned, “Now one of America’s leading
handwriting experts has just finished examining the
note, and what she has to say may shock some of O J.
Simpson’s supporters.” From her couch in her apart¬
d 5 5 e
ment in a public housing project on Alton Road,
Leibel told the TV interviewer, “When I saw his writ¬
ing, I was pretty well convinced that he was capable
of violence.”
Her views on O.J. are discussed in more detail in a
book one of her acolytes arranged to publish this
month, Change Your Handwriting...Change Your
Life. It is a revised version of a 1972 book that.illus-
trates not only how to analyze handwriting but how to
change your personality by altering your handwriting.
This supposedly is accomplished through
“graphotherapy,” an obscure self-help technique.
(Personal problems can be solved, Leibel contends,
by spending 30 minutes a day for several months
practicing new handwriting styles. “It’s the only way
they [people] can really help themselves,” she says in
a forceful manner. “Handwriting is brainwriting. By
changing it, you’re changing the brain.”)
As for O.J., Leibel never had the opportunity to
work directly with him to change his handwriting, so
Continued on page 16
Charlotte Leibel knows all about the handwriting on the
WALL, AND SHE USES IT TO UNLOCK THE SECRETS OF PERSONALITY
Fébrirary^íe-^i'/iléSS New TÍñies Page 15


Writes
Continued from page 15
he remains stuck with the unique stylistic
quirks that mark him, in Leibel’s view, as a
dangerous man. “I’ve never seen such vio¬
lence,” asserts Leibel, who’s also studied
Charles Manson and other sociopaths, as well
as nobler celebrities. “OJ.’s jealousy is seen in
the wavering of pressure as he writes,” she
notes. “His printing is disconnected” —
which, she explains, indicates his indepen¬
dence, stubbornness, and strong feelings that
could lead to violence. Our grade school
teachers were right: Penmanship, it seems,
does count
Over time, Leibel claims, she has discov¬
ered traits in celebrities that were not widely
known at the time she did her analysis. For
instance, in the 1960s, Leibel studied Eleanor
Roosevelt’s signature closely and discovered
that she had homosexual tendencies. The
giveaway, to Leibel, was the distorted way the
former first lady made her lower loops in let¬
ters, such as f which supposedly reflect sex¬
ual impulses; hers had a squarelike appear¬
ance. In recent years, historians have
discussed the possibility of a homosexual
friendship between Roosevelt and journalist
Lorena Hickok. Whatever she discovers,
Leibel holds no doubts about the general
accuracy of her methods.
“It’s the most valuable science in detecting
personality that there is,” she says. (Although
enthusiastic clients and handwriting experts
back up her view, critics point out that few
well-designed studies exist .to confirm
the validity of “graphology,” or handwriting
analysis.)
As in the case of Eleanor Roosevelt, Leibel’s
purported ability to probe the innermost
depths of the human spirit often leads her to
discover hidden truths about people’s sex
lives. When John F. Kennedy was still in
office, Leibel took one look at the enormous y
stem in his signature and concluded, “He had
the most outstanding sexual appetite I ever
saw.” (Only after his death did the country
learn that he was what today would be called
a “sex addict.”)’
Indeed, Leibel doesn’t pull her punches
when making any of her pronouncements,
whether you’re one of the common folk or a
candidate for higher office. For example,
Leibel recalls speaking to a local women’s
Republican club in 1968 when one of the
members handed her a handwriting sample
of a politician about whom she claims she
knew virtually nothing: Richard Nixon. After
glancing at the paper, Leibel told the stunned
audience, “What an opportunist!” Nixon was
elected president, but after he resigned in the
wake of the Watergate scandal, she remem¬
bers, one of the club officials told her, “By
golly, you were right!”
Leibel doesn’t claim to be foolproof, but she
ends most of these tales of her powers by not¬
ing, “I was 100 percent right” It’s no accident
that she makes sure to cross her fs near the
top of the stem: It’s a sign, she says, of high
self-esteem.
There are plenty of people who hold Leibel in
the same high regard. In fact she still has a
handful of clients and friends who see her for
handwriting analysis, counseling, and
graphotherapy. On a recent weekday morn¬
ing, she is working with a woman we’ll call
Louise, a rather tense middle-age recovering
alcoholic. Leibel first analyzed Louise’s hand¬
writing last spring, when the woman was hav¬
ing drinking problems, then began “treating”
her after she left an addiction treatment cen¬
ter last summer. (Leibel usually charges a $35
fee for a 90-minute session.) Louise has
sobered up, joined Alcoholics Anonymous
(AA), and for this session has brought along a
sample of her handwriting from December.
Despite the presence of onlookers, Leibel
mercilessly dissects Louise’s writing — and
personality.
Leibel also remembers clearly the way
Louise’s handwriting once looked. She has,
amazingly enough, the
same vivid memory for
a person’s handwriting
that some people have
for faces. “Her original
writing was entangled
in the lines below,”
Leibel explains. “She
was very confused.”
She turns to
Louise:“You needed
graphotherapy very
badly. I showed you
how to abandon [writ¬
ing] entanglements.
You began to untangle
yourself and think
clearly.”
Louise bristles a bit at
this.-T also stopped the intake of alcohol,” she
points out
Leibel then takes the pages of Louise’s
recent writing and brings them close to her
face, staring at each little detail of the writing
with a circular magnifying glass that she
keeps hung around her neck with a string.
‘Tour writing now shows you are thinking
pretty clearly,” she says. “You’ve shortened
your loops and you’ve begun to regain con¬
trol.” Then she adds, “You still have compul¬
sions and obsessions. That would require a
little psychotherapy.” Louise murmurs in
assent.
Leibel offers Louise more bad news gleaned
from the writing. ‘Tour feelings of inferiority
are no good, either,” she says. “Instead of haw
ing a small I, you should lift it up.” As the ses¬
sion continues, Leibel asks Louise to write a
few more lines on the spot. Using both
samples, she finds that Louise is resentful,
guarded, and repressed — all of which
prompts Louise’s agreement
Suddenly Leibel squints her eyes at the writ¬
ing, looks up, and announces, “Your sex life is
stunted.” Louise is briefly taken aback, then
regains her composure and says, ‘Tes, I live a
celibate lifestyle.”
Leibel blithely moves on, scanning the lines
with her magnifier and continuing to list
Louise’s strengths and weaknesses. Near the
end, Leibel concludes, “You still need treat¬
ment. I can help you accelerate your psy¬
chotherapy. Their costs at $110 an hour are
quite expensive, but if you work with me, I
can help you in a couple of months.”
Leibel advises Louise to spend 30 minutes a
day writing about her problems and hopes,
along with copying an “affirmation” that
Louise selects herself: the “serenity prayer”
widely used in AA.
When it’s all over, Louise is rather noncha¬
lant about the apparent
accuracy and value of
Leibel’s analysis. “None of
it struck me as surpris¬
ing,” she shrugs. “I totally
believe in what she’s
doing. Everything she
said is true.”
“What’s my bat¬
ting average with you?”
Leibel asks.
“As far as your
being right-on? I’d say 100
percent”
“Isn’t that some¬
thing?” Leibel beams,
preening a bit at her
kitchen table.
And Louise
credits her handwriting work with Leibel as
helping her to think more clearly.
Whatever its value, Leibel’s odd therapeutic
approach — as improbable and unaccepted as
it is — actually has won plaudits from a sur¬
prisingly respectable variety of adherents.
“It’s, not hocus-pocus,” says 25-year-old Reed
Martin, currently studying for his master’s in
business administration at Columbia
University in New York City. Martin began
Continued on next page
iedl
* He
k
15 5 ee*\ lrK
or
fre„«re a*
wrf/'¿5* / \ i5
prin/ir^ i 5
a I 5 c- oi~C a*
Secrets of
the Stars
Revealed!
Celebs mind their p's and q’s
What’s pop star Jon Secada really like? One
person who says she knows the answer to
that burning question is graphologist
Charlotte Leibel, who was asked by New
Times to analyze anonymous handwriting
samples from Secada, singer Albita
Rodríguez, and other lesser-knowns, includ¬
ing one of the world’s leading skeptics of
handwriting analysis. What she discovered
about them might amaze and shock you —
or maybe not, depending on your views of
the “science” she practices.
Leibel was handed the unsigned writing
samples by her publisher and promoter, Jeff
Starkffian, who in turn recorded her com¬
ments. She looked at the writing of the
famous (and not-so-famous) closely, examin¬
ing the script with her trusty magnifying
glass. In doing so, she seemingly penetrated
into the hidden recesses of the psyches of
her subjects. Here’s what she found:
Hunky Jon Secada seems to crave what
Freud said all male artists really want: fame,
money, and the love of beautiful women. He
likes “variety, money, and sex...admiration
and attention,” and, to further those goals,
he’s “constantly on the go.” As befits a skilled
song stylist, he’s'“highly imaginative” and
“probably has some technical aptitude.” But
Leibel points out he’s also “quite restless,”
“doesn’t always complete his jobs,” and
“finds it difficult to concentrate.” His emo¬
tional reactions create a “constant need of
expressing himself in words', actions, and
projects.” Lourdes Lopez, a spokesman for
Estefan Enterprises, which manages Secada,
says of these conclusions: “It’s fine, no
problem,”
The charismatic Cuban singer
Albita Rodriguez gives her
blessing — with one excep¬
tion — to Leibefs report ón J
her. A fiery vocalist who fled 1
Cuba for freedom here, it’s!
not surprising that Leibell
concluded that she “wants to]
be independent and individ- ,
ualistic, insists on her opin-i
ions and opposes those that!
don’t agree with her.” As a!
creative entertainer, “many
ideas come surging in her mind
which she likes to execu
quickly.” Still, all is not well: She
has “some disturbance in emotions and __
sex life,” and although she “puts on a little
charm,” she can become “easily withdrawn.”
And she’s a “bluffer.” Albita concurred with
Leibel, although she pointed out, through a
spokesperson, Tm not a bluffer.” (After see¬
ing the results» another staffer, Becky
Fajardo, Gloria Estefan’s sister, was
so impressed that she was
eager to have her handwrit¬
ing analyzed, too.)
Leibel also gave a fairly
precise reading on our
own hawk-eyed managing
editor, Tom Finkel.
Without knowing anything
. about him or where he
worked, she found him to
have such traits as “good
in detail, efficient, good
memory, good level of intelli¬
gence... rather frank and can¬
did.” As those who work with him
W know, he also can be “highly crit¬
ical...obstinate.” The reading contra¬
dicted itself, though, because it said he pro¬
crastinated and was “efficient — gets down
to brass tacks.” What we didn’t know about
him was that he “likes to cuddle.” “She cast a
wide net,” Finkel said, “but yes, I do like to
Continued on next page
Page 16 New Times
February 16-22, 1995


Secrets
Continued from previous page
cuddle.”
She wasn’t so accurate when analyz¬
ing the writing of Barry Beyerstein, a
psychology professor at Simon Fraser
University in British Columbia who co¬
authored a skeptical book on graphol¬
ogy. But then her assessment was
muddied by his obnoxious insistence
on deliberately tilting the paper so his
lines slanted downward — as a result,
Leibel concluded that Beyerstein was
“depressed” when he wasn’t. Other¬
wise, the sneaky professor insisted, he
didn’t change his handwriting. Leibel
said that his effort to fool her “doesn’t
disrupt” her ability to read his personal¬
ity. She found him to have only an
“average education and culture,” and
was a “slow thinker” who needs to
gather data before drawing conclu¬
sions, as well as “possibly [being] a
slow readjer.” She also labeled him as a
“somewhat secretive” man who
“doesn’t express his feelings” and
“doesn’t like the example of his father.”
On almost all counts, Leibel missed
the mark, the wily Beyerstein main¬
tained. “It’s pseudoscientific twaddle,”
he contended. “It’s the kind of stuff you
get from palm readers, full of weasel
Leibel concludes
Albita “insists on
her opinions and
opposes those that
don’t agree with her.”
words.” He pointed to her use of words
such as somewhat and possibly:
“Everyone is somewhat secretive
sometimes.” As for keeping his feelings
bottled up, he’s appeared' on Oprah
challenging psychics: “I’m more open
than the average person.” He was par¬
ticularly appalled by her mediocre
rankings for his intelligence and cul¬
tural background: “I was trained as a
concert pianist.... I have a Ph.D. from
the . University of California at
Berkeley.... I read six to eight books a
week.... I regularly attend the opera,
symphony, and art galleries.” And he
claims to have scored high on reading
and I.Q. tests.
He also admired and loved his late
father, a former member of the
Canadian Parliament and delegate to
the United Nations. Beyerstein’s book
on graphology is dedicated to his
father, although, the professor admits,
he was troubled by his father’s unwill¬
ingness to seek more lucrative work.
Leibel’s analysis, he laughs, “is a hoot.”
Leibel is equally dismissive of
Beyerstein. After learning that he was a
prominent skeptic who derides her
life’s work, graphology, she added
more bite to her original reading. “He’s
got no insight,” she sneered as she
examined his handwriting sample a bit
more. “He’s got a low I.Q. He doesn’t
know what he’s talking about!”
—Art Levine
February 16-22, 1995
Writes
Continued from previous page
visiting Leibel for handwriting counseling
when he was a Miami teenager troubled by
mediocre grades, mercurial moods, and a cer¬
tain aimlessness in life. Today, he notes, “I
cross my fs at the top and now look at me” —
a successful Georgetown University and
Columbia Journalism School graduate seek¬
ing his MBA He compares the new discipline
that has emerged in his life to the benefits
that come from any regimen, even organizing
the socks in your drawer. And he credits
Leibel’s wisdom about life with helping him,
too: “She’s a Yoda-like character in my child¬
hood, teaching me self-discipline and goal ori¬
entation.”
In addition to having his own script ana¬
lyzed, Martin began showing Leibel the hand¬
writing of different women he had dated over
the years. “At first I dismissed what she said,
but she was always dead-on,” he contends. In
one case, he was surprised to learn that a
woman he dated briefly was viewed by Leibel
as having homosexual tendencies; that same
woman later became an active bisexual on the
campus of the college they attended.
“It all sounds ridiculous and fanciful,”
Martin admits, “but handwriting does relate to
certain things in your life.”
Weston Agor, now a professor of public
administration at the University of Texas in El
Paso, is equally fervent in his belief in Leibel’s
abilities. When he first consulted her in 1980,
he was researching how intuition could be
applied in executive decision-making, but he
didn’t have the courage to follow his own intu¬
ition. Leibel told him he ought to break up
some of the connecting script within some of
his words, because that would somehow
work to strengthen his intuition. He followed
her suggestions, then summoned the deter¬
mination to write three books, and in 1990
won a $462,000 research grant for his work.
Did Leibel’s graphotherapy contribute to his
success? “Definitely,” he says.
Despite such testimonials, the use of hand¬
writing analysis and handwriting therapy is
usually ridiculed or, at the very least, con¬
ducted in sécret. “After looking at over 170
well-done studies on graphology, there is no
evidence whatsoever that it can detect the
human traits they [advocates] say is encoded
in handwriting,” says Barry Beyerstein, co-
editor of a book on the topic, The Write Stuff,
and an associate professor of psychology at
Simon Fraser University in British Columbia.
Whether it involves comparing handwriting
analysis with such accepted personality evalu¬
ation techniques as the Myers-Briggs Type
Indicator or matching their findings with the
known attributes of employees, “Grapholo¬
gists can’t perform better than chance,”
asserts Beyerstein. Last fall a report commis¬
sioned by the British Psychological Society
concluded that graphology was a waste of
money and had “zero predictive effective¬
ness.” (In contrast, Robert Backman, curator
pf the Handwriting Analysis Research
Library, in Greenfield, Massachusetts, con¬
tends that there have been 4000 studies over
the last century validating elements of the
method, although they apparently haven’t
been well designed enough to mollify critics.)
Graphology is most widely used in Europe,
particularly in France, where many compa¬
nies employ it to analyze job applicants’per¬
sonalities. Handwriting expert Ron Rice of
New England Legal Investigations, a private
investigation and document-examination firm,
says some American companies—reportedly
including Ford Motors — use the method for
that purpose, as do the FBI and some police
departments around the country; none of
these organizations, though, will confirm that
they’ve used graphology in that fashion. Rice
has handled about 50 business clients that
Continued on page 18
MY VIEW PLAZA CONDOMINIUM
Overlooking Biscayne Bay and Downtown Miami
UNDER CONSTRUCTION
SALE
MMIS
111 â–  i lili:
1 mm it H 8 g.
: • *; *5«i S- m '
mkm. m m m B-.flSj *> "••¡IP1
m si wmüálm . m mH*
• Free Assigned Covered Parking
1 Swimming Pool & Sauna
’ Gym and Outdoor Jacuzzi
1 Meeting Room & Billiards
1 Completely Fenced with
Electric Gate
‘Maintenance from $104
2BR/
2 BA fromi
3 BR fromi
$99,000
116,000
169,000
16 models to choose from
Full amenities, FREE assigned parking, Art Deco area
1621 Bay Road (South of Lincoln.Road) South Miami Beach
538-7488
New times Page 17


Writer's
Cramp
My penmanship, my life
I didn’t know quite what to expect from 95-
year-old Charlotte Leibel, master grapholo¬
gist, when I visited her at her Rebecca
Towers efficiency apartment on South
Beach. Frail-looking, soft-spoken, and wear¬
ing a magnifying glass around her neck, she
didn’t appear to be someone who could pen¬
etrate to the depths of my soul merely by
looking at a few lines of
my notoriously sloppy
handwriting. Indeed, !
was worried that my
handwriting was so poor
that she might mistake
me for, say, a mass mur¬
derer who dabbled in
Satanism.
As a youngster, after
all, I regularly was be¬
rated by menacing nuns
who whacked me with a
ruler for my poor pen¬
manship. (Actually I’m a Jew who went to
public school, but I was so humiliated over
my handwriting it felt like I was being tor¬
mented by nuns.) Now I faced the dreaded
prospect of having my handwriting critiqued
for its appearance and for what it said about
the guilty secrets of my subconscious. I
wasn’t sure I could take the bad news she
might deliver.
Even before I met Leibel in person, her
promoter-cum-publisher Jeff Starkman fast-
talked me into giving him a handwriting
sample he said he’d analyze in conjunction
with her, By the next day, he faxed back to
me a laundry list of my various purported
weaknesses, salted with a few complimen¬
tary phrases; the few positive descriptions
were, I assumed, designed to reassure me
that my life was still worth living.
Nevertheless, as a paragon of strength and
stability, a man for whom the phrase “hap¬
pily well-adjusted” might have been
invented, I was shocked — yes, shocked —
to discover that I was being caricatured as a
demented neurotic. The list of descriptive
phrases he sent me bore an uncanny resem¬
blance, no doubt, to the FBI psychiatric
profile of Sirhan Sirhan, minus the violent
tendencies.
One phrase was listed underneath another
ad nauseam, in a cascade of largely dispirit¬
ing adjectives. Among other things, I was
labeled “secretive,” “obses¬
sive-compulsive neurotic,”
“easily irritated,” and “inde¬
cisive” — and that wasn’t
the worst of it (I’d tell you
more, but I’d like to hold on
to the few shreds of dignify
I have left. If you want to
see the full list please send
$150 to the Art Levine
Psychiatric Fund c/o New
Times, P.O. Box 011591,
Miami, FL 33101.) On the
plus side, I was told I “see
things clearly,” was “versa¬
tile,” and have “good self¬
esteem” (before I read
their graphoanalysis, of
course). After reading the
list I was tom about what I
should do next: commit
myself to a psychiatric hos¬
pital or just go ahead and
make plans to stalk elected
officials with a high-pow¬
ered rifle? I decided it
would be best to get her
judgments on me in
person.‘
As Leibel sat on a couch looking closely at
a few sentences I had scribbled for her, she
glanced up at me and asked, “Are you
fatigued?" As I looked pale and rather
exhausted, it didn’t take a handwriting
expert to see that I was tired. Then she said,
“You may have borderline anemia,” a per¬
ception gleaned from the light pressure of
my handwriting. (Later, when I had a thor¬
ough blood workup done, which I was plan¬
ning to do anyway, I swear, I learned that
while I had a normal blood count, it was on
the low side.) I may have been on the verge
of physical collapse, Leibel indicated, but, to
look on the bright side, at least my different
lines of script weren’t entangled with each
other — these separated lines meant I
Continued on next page
“All these have to change,”
she told me, before
helpfully adding, “You need
psychological assistance.”
Writes
Continued from page 17
have hired his company to analyze the writing
of employee's or applicants. “You can laugh,
but the phone rings and the checks keep
coming in,” he says. ‘They keep us busy.”
(Assessing Leibel, he adds, “She’s a great ana¬
lyst and a great teacher.”)
American businesses, while generally keep¬
ing quiet about their activities in this field,
occasionally have made discreet inquiries to
Leibel about hiring her, she notes. About six
years ago, Leibel says, a Washington person¬
nel firm — she forgets the name — made
overtures to bring her onboard to supplement
their own handwriting analysis staff. And
about twenty years ago, a representative from
Bethlehem Steel made similar inquiries. “I
could have had many positions,” she says, but
she didn’t want to move from the sunny cli¬
mate of Florida.
It’s no surprise that Leibel has been sought
after: Her level of skill is relatively rare. As
she surveys the state of graphology today,
she’s.-dismayed by what she terms the “super¬
ficial” and “shallow” types who have degraded
the technique in recent times. “They used to
do their acts in nightclubs,” she observes with
biting disdain. “They ruined it—and the best
[practitioners] have left.” She’s now one of
just a few widely respected graphologists in
the country, and that bothers her: “It makes
me feel bad. It’s a great science, but I don’t
see it growing.”
When Charlotte Leibel took up graphology in
the 1940s, she’d already had enough careers
and pursuits for a half-dozen lives. Bom to the
prosperous Pollack family in 1899 in Boston
(her father was an importer-exporter of feath¬
ers), she graduated from the New England
School of Law in 1922, joined the state bar,
and became one of the few women lawyers in
the region—just two years after women were
granted the vote. “I couldn’t get a job,” she
recalls. “Nobody wanted to hire a woman.”
She handled only a few cases, and then
decided to audit courses in everything from
psychology to anthropology at Harvard
University, which generally didn’t admit
women at the time. Her professors and fellow
students viewed her as an oddity. “I was such
a rare bird,” she says now.
Indeed, she became a proto-new ager
before the concept
even existed. While at
law school, Leibel took
up the study of mysti¬
cism and became an
adherent of theosophy,
with its teachings
about karma and inner
guidance and supernat¬
ural dimensions. “It
showed me that within
you was every possibil¬
ity you could ever
know,” she explains.
“It was very inspiring.”
Her eclectic pursuits
continued when she became a caseworker
with juvenile delinquents at a Boston social
services agency. After she married a pharma¬
cist in 1931, she became a pharmacist, too.
However, her work allowed her to see first¬
hand the dangers of drugs, and as a result she
turned to alternative therapies. (The switch
has paid off: Although she moves especially
slowly since being injured in an accident last
July, Leibel is in strik¬
ingly good health and
remarkably lucid.)
Back in the. early
1940s, she was, there¬
fore, just the sort of
open-minded person
who would' respond
to a book entitled
Handwriting: The Key
to Personality, which
she found in the Boston
public library. “I took
the book and tried it out
— and found things
about people nobody
knew,” she remembers. In her typical quest¬
ing spirit, she soon tracked down one of the
country’s leading teachers on the subject,
Continued on next page
a YoJa-Ííke
oklrZofcr fry V*-\ ^
o l\ I I J í\ 0 0 J, C cl o (\ I
y+yC Jitciol ¡r\C
clr\J ‘j 0 cl j
or I C0 r\*u
MIAMI BEACH CONDOS
•SOUTH BEACH
•MID-BEACH
•NORTH BEACH
BRET TAYLOR, PRESIDENT, UC. REAL ESTATE BROKER
"THE MIAMI BEACH CONDO SPECIALIST"â„¢
BRET TAYLOR
REAL ESTATE INC.
420 LINCOLN RD • SUITE 2 60 •
531-BRET
5 3 1-2 73 8
MIAMI BEACH • 33139
change your style
IT Foliage frenz^i
Thai-Stule Cushions
at Cornell's
d y * Interior Plants to 8' (j (J
VStfvl • Exterior Flowers & Plants
• Topiary's
I « J ) • Roses on Fortuniana root
Uh • Herbs & Vegetables \u \J]
¿/\) Family Run Since 1959 n
1 Cornell's Nursery M
{imported directly fromThailand
Reasonably Priced.
5 Different Colors!®
rTVl 17091 Biscayne Blvd \\(\
l ' y North Miami Beach \ \
\y 947-4454 SL
C**~~-*T Open 7 days
. 945-8079 - 10am-ltpm Wk
V â– . 3455 NE 163id Street NMB
Page 18 New Times
Fe.l^rupry. 16—22,199 5


C r a m p
Continued from previous page
exhibited clear thinking.
That was just a temporary respite of
good news, however. “Do you waste
time before you get down to essentials?”
she asked suddenly. I always thought
my regimen would be considered the
time-consuming but vital mental prepa¬
ration needed for good writing: a thor¬
ough reading of several newspapers to
keep me abreast of all the latest develop¬
ments, then a brief nap and a brisk walk
to clear the mind, followed by a long
lunch to hone my thoughts. She appar-
?ently thought otherwise. “Before you
make the letter t or i, you make a begin¬
ning stroke,” she pointed out, a sign that
I wasn’t being efficient “Cut that out”
By the time my first session with her
was over, I discovered that I had an infe¬
riority complex (that didn’t square, of
course, with the earlier analysis done
with Starkman that found good self¬
esteem) and that I was moody and rest¬
less at times. The signposts for these
problems, Leibel found, were easy to
spot the varying slants of my writing,
different size letters, too many extra
strokes. “All these have to change,” she
told me, before helpfully adding, “You
need psychological assistance,”
In lieu of the expensive psychological
tr* clinic nt" her handwriting diagnosis
seemed to indicate, I thought I might be
a prime candidate for the cheap, short¬
term approach: graphotherapy, a
method that supposedly changes behav¬
ioral problems by changing one’s hand¬
writing. Given how seriously disturbed
she said I was, I was willing to try
anything.
At our next session, Leibel told me I
had even more problems to tackle,
including thinking loo slowly. I always
had prided myself on my intellect, but
evidently my handwriting indicated that
I took too long to reach conclusions,
perhaps was even a bit slow-witted. “If
you work with me, yóur LQ.-rises,” she
assured me. (One possible solution she
suggested: Make the rounded top of the
m far sharper.) For now, though, she
wanted me to work primarily on ending
those pesky beginning strokes. She also
stressed the importance of making a
consistent, slightly rightward slant, to
help erase shitting moods from my emo¬
tional makeup.
“It takes work,” she warned me.'
Too much work, at least for someone
as moody, fatigued, and restless as me
(if her handwriting analysis of me was to
be believed). I was supposed to spend
30 minutes a night writing in my new
style, including 10 minutes writing an
“affirmation” I selected from a book she
gave me. It began, “The will to accom¬
plish all that I want to do is mine to draw
upon. 1 have the energy to make quick
decisions and to act when action is
called for....” I wrote it only one or .two
times,, then gave up.
.1 was in a Catch-22 limbo peculiar to
graphotherapy. Only by changing my
writing, Leibel believed, would 1 become
the focused, efficient, energetic person I
could be. But to practice the new hand¬
writing style consistently required me to
have the same positive qualities —
energy, efficiency, focus, et cetera —
she said I lacked.
The handwriting, I guess, was on the
wall: Graphotherapy wasn’t for me.
-Art Levine
February ¿’6—22, 1995
Writes
Continued from previous page
Irene Marcuse, and traveled back and forth
to New York to take private classes with
her. “It changed my life,” Leibel proclaims.
She studied Marcuse’s material for five
years, while taking other classes she con¬
tends taught her how to discern health
problems, including cancer, by examining
handwriting.
Handwriting analysis, although derided
by most psychology experts today, had
greater prestige when Leibel first started
practicing it. Her first teacher, Marcuse,
had served as a consultant to famed psy¬
chiatrist Carl Jung and had helped pro¬
mote the concept of handwriting as a key
to unlocking the subconscious. Leibel later
learned the tenets of graphotherapy — as
opposed to just handwriting analysis —
from á variety of books.,
Using all those insights, she slowly
began establishing a client base, first in
Boston, then in Miami after she moved
here in 1946. She gave lectures at Kiwanis
and Lions clubs as well as to members of
other civic groups, impressing those in the
audience and gaining a following that
brought her as many as three clients a day.
A Steel Quisp Clock â–º Spandex Light Sculptures
« 1
a
Crt i? r^O
CuiJc
t\o
i wU/jeftiir
fi?t
¡1
L o2lt\ Jcfcof
tic
t
uK-vílr^ trilito
el Ju
0 o
htc* tdy ' h
Lincoln Road Mall
1671 Michigan Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
305/534-8585
LUNAHKA -
A Lighting and Clock Gallery
i
tr\c, 0 J C J 11\
wr iti »\5*w
â–  After one talk, for instance, she studied a
woman’s handwriting and determined that
the rigid stroke leading into some letters
indicated a strong resentment against a
family member (her husband, the woman
admitted). Leibel asked her, “Do you have
ulcers?”
“I sure do,” the woman answered.
Leibel’s prescription: Abandon the rigid
stroke and steer clear of disturbing situa¬
tions. As Leibel tells it, about a year later,
she again met the woman, who reported
that her ulcers had disappeared along with
the writing stroke that Leibel decried.
Much of Leibel’s work over the years has
served men and women seeking to deter¬
mine the compatibility of potential mates
— she firmly believes it’s all revealed in
the writing. At various times, Leibel
claims, she’s forecast ill-fated relationships
that have ended in divorce, and warned
men against “gold diggers” (the giveaway:
enlarged lower loops). Sometimes she
even has found people who were well
matched. But often her clients are not
happy to hear what she has to say. Even
her own niece complained “that I was hor¬
rible and interfered with her relation¬
ships.” Leibel pauses for a moment and
then adds, “She finally had to admit I was
right.”
Given Leibel’s zeal, though, she never has
been content with merely counseling others,
but rather always has sought to spread the
graphology gospel. By the 1960s, she had
close to two dozen students she taught pri-
Contlnued on page 21
36 Nt First Street • in the Seybold building • Miami • d/d-6zed
Specializing in OIA Cciiiliccl Diamond Engagement and Anniveifiai
r— i
m
diamond!"!
riot in the rough
BÜCHWALD’S
JEWELERS SINCE. 19X2
MIAMI
New Times Page 19


to a Full Service Marina at your Doorstep!
ious one bedroom
s from prices
starting at
just
$79,900,
these deluxe
residences are complete with
and one and a half baths.
Venetia offers an array of ameni¬
ties including 2 swimming
pods, fitness center, tennis &
racquetball courts, 24 hour
security, shop¬
ping on premises
full kitchens, panoramic
bay views, oversized
windows, spacious terraces,
$79,900
CRESCENT
and access
to a full
service marina!
HEIGHTS
Studios, townhomes & 2 bedrooms available!.
IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY
1-800-327-0555
555 N.E. 15TH STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132
Sales office hours: Mon. - Thur. 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. Fri. 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Closed
Oral representations cannot lx; relied upon for accuracy and/or details. For correct representation by the developer, refer to the documents which are to he furnished by the developer to a buy»
or leasee as required by section 718.303. Florida Statutes: All contracts ate subject to tenants fust right of refusal and developer's approval.
EQUAL HOUSING
Page 20 New Times
February 16-22,
1995


Marketing consultant Jeff Starkman championed Leibel's
book after they met by chance
Writes
Continued from page 19
: vately in Miami Beach, and in 1972 Stein and
Day published about 2500 copies of her book,
; Change Your Handwriting... Change Your Life,
: a summation of her 30 years of work in the
field. It still can be found in many public
libraries around the country. She also devel-
I oped a flair for self-promotion, appearing a
[ few dozen times on local radio and lectur¬
ing widely to civic groups.
I Eventually, however, she drifted into
[ obscurity, and after her husband lost virtu-
f ally all their life’s savings through bad
investments in the commodities market
and then died about
r fifteen years ago,
Charlotte Leibel
faced a seemingly
grim existence. “We
were wiped out,” she
recalls, and, at agé
80, she went to work
part-time as an adult
education teacher
for Dade County
Public Schools, a job
she held until she
was 93 years old.
Through it all, her
feistiness and opti¬
mism remained
undiminished, even
as she found it nec¬
essary to move into a housing project for
the elderly about two years ago. (She likes
the amenities, but “as soon as I get a little
money, I’m out of here,” she declares, hop¬
ing for profits from sales of her book.)
About a year and a half ago, she met a
man who would put her back in the lime¬
light. At her chiropractor’s office, she
struck up a conversation with Jeff
Starkman, a long-haired, hard-charging
marketing consultant and real estate
investor. Skeptical at first when he scrib¬
bled a few lines for her, Starkman was *
wowed by Leibel’s ability to determine a “
variety of his traits and problems, from his
fondness for fast cars to his confused
thinking that led to serious mistakes (he
recently had lost a bundle in real estate).
He .remembers, “I’m thinking like, ‘Fuck,
this old lady is practically taking my
clothes off”, [by pinpointing so many per¬
sonal attributes]. She even spotted — but
didn’t tell him then — his bisexuality.
Starkman, now 44 years old, was so im¬
pressed that he vowed
to republish her book.
He also became a loyal
student and client,
changing his script to
write more clearly and
with smaller letters, in
order to improve his
concentration and men¬
tal clarity. But his goal
of putting out a revised
version of her book
remained an unrealized
ambition. “The book
was filled with great
material, but it had no
sizzle,” he says. He
needed a fresh angle,
and then he got his
lucky break: O.J. Simpson was arrested for
murder last June.
“He’s a great salesman,” Leibel now says
of her publisher and promoter. The new
book includes two analyses of Simpson’s
handwriting, including one by forensic
handwriting expert Ron Rice of Boston.
Additionally, its cover is emblazoned with
a pink headline about an “exclusive Q.J.
Simpson profile” and a reproduction of
O.J.’s famous note. Starkman and the
book’s printer, Sol Roskin of Miami-based
Hallmark Press, invested the funds needed
to produce a first run of about 7000 copies.
Along the way, Starkman has become a
skilled novice handwriting analyst himself.
During a recent meal, he casually asks the
waiter to write a few lines, and then begins
reeling off personality traits to the dumb¬
founded worker. “You do a lot of
self-preservation, keeping people
at a distance,” Starkman says.
“Very true,” the waiter, Alex
Pacallao, responds. Starkman
recites other personal features:
“You’re a most loyal friend....
You’re in control of your emo¬
tions.... You live a hermetic
lifestyle....” The waiter keeps
saying yes, and finally exclaims,
“This is scary. You’ve read me
more accurately than anyone has
ever come close to. I got goose
bumps listening to you.”
The real expert, of course,
remains Charlotte Leibel, who
Starkman successfully has placed
on Hard Copy, Channel 7, and in
the ultimate promotional coup,
The Tonight Show. He contacted a
producer on the show, hyped
Leibel’s Hard Copy appearance as
if everyone knew about it, and
managed to convince The Tonight
Show people that, based on tapes
of her broadcast appearances,
she’d be a hit on their program.
The days prior to her appear¬
ance seemed like a gobd omen.
On the flight out to Los Angeles
to do the show, she analyzed the
pilot’s and the crew’s handwrit¬
ing, impressing the pilot enough that he
sat down to chat with her for a while after
the flight was over. Leibel believes, “If I
could examine pilots’ handwriting, I could
find those pilots that are confused and
prone to accidents.” And the day before
Leibel taped her Tonight Show segment,
the ever-hustling Starkman talked his way
into the Los Angeles District Attorney’s
Continued on page 22
A f 5 iV
I Ou'u i
'¿c'bry
rehJ
Ha i Ha orC
cfcouTcl f £ I
cfr\^ 0 r\C A cD
ever ooy^c o¡ 05Í
fos
Magnaâ„¢ Deluxe
All the power and performance of Honda’s legendary V-4 Magna,”
but with a look all its own.
• Powerful V-4 engine offers performance no other custom can match.
• Quarter fairing, flat-style handlebar and chromed four-pipe exhaust
for a hot custom look.
• Special two-tone paint scheme on tank and fenders in your choice
of two color combinations.
• Long 65-inch wheelbase.
• Low, comfortable 28-inch seat height.
Come in and see the new Magna” Deluxe today.
GABLES HONDA
7300Bid Road (2 Blocks East of the Paknetto j
(305)266*8300
Rhonda
Come ride with us.
ALWAYS WEAR A HELMET. EYE PROTECTION AND PROTECTIVE CLOTHING. AND PLEASE RESPECT THE ENVIRONMENT. Obey the law. and read
your owner’s manual thoroughly. Magna” is a Honda trademark. For rider training information, call the Motorcycle Safety Foundation
at 1-800-447-4700.
â– 
at
Zero down.
|Zip.Zil(h.
Nada.
^dealer rightmow apd
buy a brand pew-
1994 Sea • Doo water-
craft with no money
¿own! 'Fhat’s right.
Zero down. Just apply
for your Sea • Doo
Action Credit
and in most cases, get
approval within 30
minutes. Then use
your credit for your
new boat and keep
using it for Sea* Doo..;
'“foshipris^ accessaries
arid service whenever
you want ft’s that
easy. Hey, no wonder
Everybody’s Doin’ It.
EVERYBODY'S DOIN' !T.M
1995 SP&SPI
NOW IN STOCK
â–  mi
â– â– 
â– rrsstfc.
*‘r
HI | -
;||p§ t r • -
llF
GABLES MARINE
7300SW 41 st (Behind Gables Honda) (305)267*2628
® Trademarks Bombardier Inc. © 1992 Bombardier Inc.
February 16-22, 1995
New Times Page 21


Need
A
Psychiatrist?
1 st Consultation Free.
(The Chair is on Sale for $575)
• THE CONNECTION •
DESIGN FURNITURE FOR LESS
5850 SOUTH DIXIE HWY • SOUTH I
661-9345*661-8077
.1 a¿.t. ■? Wmil nv’rtf#
Page 22 New Times
Writes
Continued from page 21
office and managed to present a copy of
the book — and a spiel about Leibel and
her TV appearance — to Marcia Clark’s
assistant. He says he actually was treated
courteously.
On the big day, Leibel came out lash after
Tom Arnold and a comedian. Leno held up
her book for millions to see and said, “From
Miami Beach, Florida, of course, please wel¬
come 95-year-old Charlotte Leibel.” He then
helpéd her walk to her chair, a little lady in a
colorful red jacket. She got the audience on
her side from the* outset, telling how she
analyzed the handwriting of the pilot and
crew on the flight out, to which Leno joked,
“A little late to find that out, isn’t it?”
“That’s true,” she answered, “but it’s good
to know you have capable men running
planes. I haven’t seen but one, but it was
very encouraging.” The audience howled
with laughter.
She patiently explained to Leno, as she’s
done for years, that handwriting analysis is a
science and is used widely in Europe. “Is
that right? Really?” Leno replied, treating
her respectfully.
He soon turned his attention to .the evalua¬
tions she’d done on different celebrities,
including himself. “I was very impressed
with you,” she said, and the audience burst
into raucous applause. Leno posed in mock
vanity as she continued, “You’re distinctly
above average in intelligence, ability, and
personality.”
“A lovely woman,” he said with the faint
air of a boulevardier.
“If I was very much younger, I’d make a
beeline for you,” Leibel told him with a new¬
found comic flair. It brought down the
house.
Leibel smiled broadly and, after the whis¬
tles and applause died down, Leno
remarked, “Now you know how she got on
the show — but don’t tell my wife.”
She then reviewed the anonymous
celebrity handwriting samples that had been
given to her earlier. The first was Tom
Arnold’s, and Leibel looked over at him and
asked, “Is that him?” After the crowd
stopped laughing, she began the matter-of-
fact evaluation, just like those countless
kitchen-table sessions back home. “What I
see here is that you like to be involved in big
deals,” she said. “I got a divorce, actually,”
Arnold offered, “and at one time I was fairly
involved in a big deal.” The audience
laughed, but Leibel, no follower of celebrity
trends, seemed unaware of his famous
breakup with Roseanne. Leibel continued,
“You need recognition...attention...and
admiration,” with which Arnold agreed. A
bit later she looked at the sample for Arnold
Schwarzenegger (with his name embla¬
zoned on the back of the card), but she
talked about him as if she was unaware of
his identity. “He’s a very ambitious and opti¬
mistic person, and wants big things, too.
There’s probably some dramatic ability,
too.”
Before ending with another plug for
.. Leibel’s book, Leno mentioned that she ana¬
lyzed 0 J.’s handwriting in it, but he avoided
discussing the specifics of her findings: “I
don’t want to be prejudicial.” As he held up
the book one last time, he said, “It’s fascinat¬
ing, it really is fascinating.” The segment
closed to loud applause. When she left the
stage, the producer who booked her gave
her a big hug.
A day later Leibel was back in her South
Beach public housing project efficiency,
ready to analyze some more handwriting. “It
was unbelievable to get all that notice,” she
said, and, as always, she’s looking to the
future: “I hope it boosts sales — and I think
Ill go on other shows.” CD
Vented Scenti
for that Spea'dl
Someone.
Women 1
Dept Store
Our Price
Caroline Herrera EDPSploz.
$35.00
$23.00
Champagne EDT Sp ,85oz.
$38.50
$32.00
Dune EDT Sp 3.4oz.
$60.00
$44.00
Poison Tenore EDT Sp 3.4oz.
$58.00
$38.00
273 EDPSploz.
$35.00
$19.95
Perry EHis 360° EDT Sp 1.7oz.
$48.00
$27.00
Sun, Moon, Stars EDT Sp loz.
$30.00
$24.95
H20 EDT Sp 2oz.
$32.00
$22.00
Men
Dept Store
Our Price
Boucheron EDTSp loz.
$35.00
$22.00
Carafma Herrera EDT Sp 1.7oz. $36.00
$26.00
Náutico EDT Sp 3.4oz.
$37.00
$25.00
Paco XS EDT 1.7oz.
$32.00
$19.95
Vented Seed»
8787 SW 132st Miami, 235-7058
1 blk North of the Falls
11401 Pines Blvd. Pembroke Lakes Mall, FL
(305)4300913
2103 Le Jeune Road,
Coral Gables, 305*447*8843
2 c jj- -e i \ t i si;*
February 1.6—>22» 1995


Only 10% Down
1BR from
Penthouses & Deep Water
Marina Slips Available
It’s the lifestyle that’s got all Miami Beach buzzing. Sunset Harbour’s
first waterfront residential tower made history, selling out in less
than 180 days, and is now under construction. Now the South Tower
is open for sales, offering even more of the spectacular Bay, City and
Ocean views, and outstanding at-home amenities just steps from
South Beach. Don’t wait! Visit today for superb pre-construction
prices, and the absolute best choice of floors, views, and floorplans.
Incomparable living, amid the most exciting of locations.
• Magnificent luxury waterfront towers_
with valet parking, 24-hr. security,
Existing world-class marina with baywalk
Sensational floorplans offering spacious living areas, fully
equipped kitchens, marble batns, washer and diyer, ample closets,
state-of-the-art security system
. ,|fa
acqi
media, meeting and
billiard rooms,
and more
•^paciFic^
B3
ffiewóoiM'
Condominiums, Townhomes and Yacht Club
(305)531-1150 1-800-940-1165
• Nearby championship golf course and tournament-quality
tennis courts
• Minutes from Coconut Grove,
Downtown Miami, Bal
Harbour and beyond
Models open daily 10 a.m. to
6 p.m. at 1928 Purdy Avenue
(Sunset Harbour Dr.), Miami
Beach, FL 33139. From the
Venetian Causeway, turn left
on Purdy Ave. Or from Alton
Road, go west on 20th St.
Another development of THE PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL EQUITIES, INC., GROUP OF COMPANIES. Your assurance of quality from Miami Beach's largest developer. Prices subject to change without notice. Broker participation invited.
ORAL REPRESENTATIONS CANNOT BE RELIED UPON TO CORRECTLY STATE THE REPRESENTATIONS OF THE DEVELOPER. FOR CORRECT REPRESENTATIONS, REFERENCE SHOULD BE MADE TO THE PURCHASE AGREEMENT AND TO THE DOCUMENTS REQUIRED BY EQUAL HOUSING
SECTION 718.503, FLORIDA STATUTES, TO BE FURNISHED BY A DEVELOPER TO A BUYER. OPPORTUNITY


f £ í' í »-■ fPO » ill'-i j’i l!<> O
Page 24 New Times
* o7í' i eviftfT


' _ ah» ^ „
imi]
8
VIH
fe "i si? * . v^;
■ »... - ItlJ
<*"»i - ' - r t. - - <
Mlf
\ ■; >- : .':->£/■ £’-■ ::-i;;:::i
um.
• ■.■-i.-, ¿j.. .-■
1
ÍÜÜÉ
I
ia^Mi*B®iiia
«
â– â– 
Everyone expected Charles Howze's Z Mart
to be a model for minority-run businesses in Dade.
In a sad way it was: It went bankrupt.
By Kirk Semple
his isn’t the way it was
supposed to turn out. The vast space on NW 54th
Street in Liberty City once teemed with colorful
merchandise that stretched from the clothing and shoe
departments on one side, through sporting goods and
electronics, to housewares, toys, and health-and-beauty
aids half a city block away. But barren racks and shelves
are about all that’s left now, metal skeletons scattered
across an endless landscape of linoleum. Like a stadium
after a devastating home-team loss, the life has all but
gone out of Z Mart, whose owner filed for bankruptcy last
November. On this cool winter afternoon during its last
weekend of business, the discount store is a cavernous
shell of its former self, littered with the detritus of failed
commerce.
The dregs that remain are strewn along the few short
aisles that are still intact-A smattering of cosmetics, a mot¬
ley assortment of hardware and auto parts. Toys and clean¬
ing solvents. Some of the merchandise is opened and dam¬
aged, elsewhere husks of empty packaging recall other
goods that presumably have been pilfered. Where a staff
of 75 employees once saw to customers’ needs, today a few
workers drag dollies loaded with salvaged inventory des¬
tined for a storage facility in Opa-locka and an uncertain
future. A few doubtful shoppers who’ve wandered in sift
through heaps of half-price odds and ends, looking for
nothing. A lone cashier absently sucks at a soda; the other
*131
February 16-22, 1966
eight checkout counters are empty, their shiny cash regis¬
ters like so many third-stringers sitting dejectedly in
unsoiled uniforms.
Surely no one who attended the store’s August 17,1991,
grand opening foresaw such a fate for this enterprise,
which had sprung from the ambitions of three former
department store managers, all of whom were black, all of
whom had staked their life savings and reputations on
Miami’s only black-owned department store. The trio had
pulled together a diverse team of private financial institu¬
tions to invest in a depressed area that long had been
shunned by most big retailers and financial lenders.
Z Mart was to be an unprecedented community-oriented
enterprise, one that would keep Liberty City dollars in
Liberty City by employing residents, buying merchandise
from local distributors, and gearing inventory toward
black consumers. It was going to provide,a needed boost
to the ailing community and set an example for the devel¬
opment of black-run businesses throughout Dade.
What actually came to pass, however, was three years of
lagging sales that led to major cutbacks in retail space and
staff, and, finally, Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection from
creditors. Charles Howze, the only founder still involved
in the company, has been forced to vacate the massive
retail space. Now, under the supervision of a U.S. bank¬
ruptcy court judge, he hopes to reconstitute his store else¬
where, in a significantly smaller form.
Z Mart’s failures have provoked considerable self-reflec¬
tion in the business community and accelerated an ongo¬
ing reassessment of the way minority businesses, specifi¬
cally black-owned enterprises, are nurtured and financed
in Miami. ‘This was the Super Bowl,” says Bill Wynn, a
long-time Liberty City business leader. “It’s a travesty,
because it had in its dream the potential to really establish
in Miami a visible, high-profile model for the black mer¬
chant class, which is what we really need.”
Indeed, some now wonder whether Miami will ever have
a healthy black entrepreneurial class. Even John Hall, an
executive vice president of the Beacon Council, a quasi-
governmental organization whose purpose is to promote
local businesses, is far from confident. ‘Think about it:
How long have we had to go to get to 1995 and not have
one?” Hall asks, shaking his head. “Are we going to go
another ten years and still not have one?”
â–  0 VISIT Z MART ON ITS
inaugural day was to understand the sense of hope
wrapped up in the enterprise. It’s not every day, after
all, that mayors, commissioners, civic leaders, and business
big shots — not to mention reporters and cameramen and
thousands of community residents — turn out for the open¬
ing of a store.
Continued on page 27
" New Times ^ágé 25


BEAUTY BY PRESCRIPTION
When was the last time anyone called you Babyface?
Is your skin damaged by the sun,
acne prone, oily? Do you have
uneven pigmentation (brown
spots)? BioMedic Ts a clinical skin
care and dermal rejuvenation pro¬
gram that helps smooth wrinkles,
retards the skin’s aging, improves
acne scarring and break outs, age
spots and discolorations all under
the supervision of a Plastic
Surgeon. Appointments available
Mon-Fri 9-6
BioMedic
clinical care lyit:. Sinai Medical Staff Building
* 4302 Alton Rd • Suite 620 • Miami Beach
Wr
i
V
S M ’
...ii#
\
(305)538-8658
FOUR POINTS
International Gifts
Folk Art
Native American Handcrafts
Southwestern Jewelry
Conveniently Located in
Downtown Miami Shores
9608 NE 2nd Ave
Miami Shores, FL • (305) 757-3897
Ree Gift Wrapping Available
Find a car fast in New Times Classified’s
Motor section!' All cars are listed alpha¬
betically, so it’s easy to find the wheels
you’ve been wishing for. You’ll also find
a variety of boats, motorcycles, trucks
and vans, and even Motor services like
car repair, window tinting and more. So
take a ride through Classified’s revved
up Motor section. To sell your car, call
an Advertising Representative today at
372-9393. Cost is only $10 for 2 weeks,
plus free renewal until your auto sells!
c
Representing over 50 Craft Groups from 16 Countries
If You* liked (Ik In San Jam,
You U low (Ik in South Beach! jdSm
Sterling, Vermei from Turkey
Vermeil & Semi-Precious f
Stones from India AK&Ksr _ ?L
932 Lincoln Rd. 534-6087
between meridian & Jefferson
Arnold Preston
Attorney At Law
441-9900
FREE CONSULTATION
Q PAYMENT PLANS Se Habla Español
999 Ponce De Leon Blvd, Suite 1040, Coral Gables, FL 33134
Criminal Law • Felonies • Driver License Suspensions • Misdemeanors
The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements.
Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information about our qualifications and experience.
The Finest
Now you can step out of the
shower every morning with:
• Eyes perfectly lined
• Brows neatly defined
• Lips flawlessly shaped
with a subtle shade of color
Hassle Free Day After Day...
Trained in Europe with seven years experience exclusively in
permanent cosmetic enhancement.
MIRINKA
Cosmetic Creations
...is a prime example of what Redbook Magazine cited as the ideal situation for
permanent make-up application -a clinical environment with a well-trained
technician applying make-up under the general supervision of a physician.
PLEASE CALL FOR A COMPLIMENTARY CONSULTATION
932-5557
One Tumberry-Place * 19495 Biscayne. Blyd.-«Suite 200 • Aventura.; Complimentary Valet Parking
- ■ - - - * - -■ " - - - •’ - 2: - * 4 - -r ^ " I 4 t ^ t ~ i f f * r 7 'F - r jr
NOT A LONG DRIVE
Only Minutes from your
hotel you'll find 2 of Miami
Beach's Finest Golf Courses.
No Clubs? No Problem
Pro-Line Rental
•Clubs Available
ñtt)
Call for Tee Times
532-3350 868-6502
2301 Alton Road 2401 Biarritz Dr.
Miami Beach Miami Beach
Present Coupon
and receive
$5 Off Green Fees
- Good Mon-Sun *
Expires 2/28/95
1 not gooddurinK Twilight
• American Coif.
Page.26 New Times -
February 16-22, 1995


Red
Continued from page 25
Amid all the celebrants, the balloons, and
the streamers, Z Mart had its biggest day of
business ever, recalls 45-year-old Charles
Howze, a man of medium build and a soft-
spoken yet direct demeanor. In a rare seden¬
tary moment, Howze is sitting in a small, win¬
dowless room in the rafters of the Z Mart
â– building, recounting the laborious birth of
the store he now must close. These days he
has been in constant motion, hammering out
the final details of his reorganization plan,
meeting with creditors, attempting to sell
them on his strategies for saving the corpora¬
tion while dismantling the existing store.
He’s so busy he’s had to cancel two sched¬
uled interviews and finally, reluctantly, he
has set aside a couple of hours on a Sunday,
his “rest day” as he calls it But even then, as
he charts Z Mart’s troubled history and unre¬
alized promise, business phone calls inter¬
rupt constantly.
Howze says he hatched the idea of owning
his own store while scaling the corporate lad¬
der. As an undergraduate at Miles College in
Birmingham, Alabama, he’d been recruited
in 1972 to join the Zayre department store
chain. Hiring on ajs a
manager trainee, Howze
rose through the ranks;
in his last position for
the corporation, he man¬
aged 24 stores in Dade,
Broward, and Monroe
counties. When the
department store divi¬
sion was sold to the
Ames chain in 1988,
Howze retained essen¬
tially the same job. Two
years later, Ames filed
for bankruptcy under
Chapter 11 and closed
82 of its Florida stores.
The company invited
Howze to transfer to
Baltimore, but rather
. than uproot his wife and
two kids and move
again, Howze and two of his store managers,
John Kilby and Joan Donaldson, joined forces
to open their own store. To the partners,
there was no question as to the site: Zayre,
and later Ames, had maintained a store at
1100 NW 54th St. in Liberty City, and all
three had worked as managers at that loca-
- (ion. (Howze says the Liberty City Zayre was
particularly successful, turning a profit of
about one million dollars per year at its
peak.) But when Ames pulled out, the neigh¬
borhood lost 100 jobs and for the first time in
eleven years was without a large retail dis¬
count store.
Set on eight acres of parking next to a large
indoor flea market, the new store was to pro¬
vide a commercial and aesthetic boost to a
shoddy corridor. Howze envisioned a thriv¬
ing mall that in addition to Z Mart as an
anchor tenant would include a grocery store
and smaller retail shops.
Howze, Donaldson, and Kilby pooled about
$500,000 in cash, deferred salaries, and prop¬
erty in order to raise collateral for a loan.
(Howze, Z Mart’s president, says his contri¬
bution was $300,000.) They agreed to forgo
vacations and incomes until the store, was up
and running, which meant radical changes in
lifestyles: Howze’s wife, an accountant,
returned to work after several years away.
Kilby’s son, at that time a 24-year-old assis¬
tant manager for Phar-Mor, became his fam¬
ily’s sole source of income. "We worked
every day for a year without a salary, she or
seven days a week,” recalls Donaldson. “I
couldn’t afford to do anything else — no
going out”
For help in clos¬
ing the deal, the three
called on Roderick
Petrey, a partner in the
legal firm of Holland &
Knight, who a decade
earlier had helped form
Tacolcy Economic De¬
velopment Corporation
in Liberty City.
(Founded by Otis Pitts,
who is now deputy
assistant secretary of
the U.S. Department of
Housing and Urban De¬
velopment, Tacolcy has
won national praise for
its efforts in housing
and commercial revital¬
ization.) Having leased
the space on NW 54th
Street, the group began approaching local fin¬
ancial institutions, hoping to raise sufficient
capital to open for business by year’s end.
But the reception wasn’t particularly warm.
‘We’d get commitments, then the commit¬
ments would fall through,” Howze remem¬
bers. “Then they’d renege on other commit¬
ments.”
Then-Miami mayor Xavier Suarez (right) joins Z Mart founders (foreground, from far left) Joan
Donaldson, John Kilby, and Charles Howze at the store's opening in 1991
The partners pushed back their target date,
first to February 1991, and later to May. Both
dates had to be rescheduled. Finally, at the
end of June, they signed a $1.38 million loan
agreement with eight lenders, and hired 75
people, most of whom were liberty City resi¬
dents. “There was a sense of pride, being part
of a startup operation like this,” says Howze,
contrasting the experience with his prior
stints at Zayre and Ames. “It is a lot easier to
feel part of an organization when if s all in one
location. It creates a close-knit organization,
more than if you’re working for a corporation
somewhere else.”
Business realities soon superseded the
communal optimism. In its first year, Z Mart
pulled in about $3.5 million in sales, Howze
says, well below the owners’ original projec¬
tion of $5.4 million. In July 1992 they sought
additional funding from the City of Miami,
which had provided $325,000 of the original
loan. Howze scaled back the staff to 60 and
reduced the retail space from 54,000 to
40,000 square feet As sales continued to flag,
the store subleased space to a hair salon, a
pharmacy, and an insurance business in an
effort to draw more customers. Z Mart also
expanded its niche marketing, opening an
African boutique and augmenting its selec¬
tion of clothing and paraphernalia decorated
with insignias of black colleges, sororities,
and fraternities. (That same year, John Kilby
left the business. While Kilby, now a store
manager for Office Max, refused to comment
for this stoiy, Howze says his former partner
was hard hit by Hurricane Andrew and left Z
Mart to take care of personal matters.)
Sales continued to fall. Second-year rev¬
enues dropped to about $2.5 million, while
third-year earnings hit $1.5 million. By the
third anniversary, the staff had been cut back
to twenty and the retail space to about 25,000
square feet. .Howze’s proposals to create a
mall were rejected by the lenders and devel¬
opment groups he approached. This past
Continued on page 29
<*■*»**%!•
Brimi '
FLORIDA
CORPORATION
INCORPORATE OVER THE PHONE... ITS EASY
COMPLETE - INCLUDES: Articles of
Incorporation, Corporate Minutes, By
Laws, Corporate Book, Corporate Seal,
Stock Certificate, Preliminary Name
Search, State Filing Fees, Attorney’s Fees
Corps also immediately available W/Tax I.D.#
Abo Sub S Corps., Non Profit Corps., Limited Partnerships, Lease
Reviews, LLCs, DBAs, Trademarks, or Business Sale/Purchase
*93, *94, & ’95 Corps also available for immediate delivery
@AMERÍLAWYER® 445-2700 792-8600
Counselor and Attorney at Law visa • m.* rrc.rd •normr-AmEx • Mum a.k
The hiring of â–  lawyer b an important dccWon (hat itinuld nnt be haxd ttArj upon
•drcribcacab. Before jroo decide, ask ni In «cod you free writtca Information about nor
qualification, mod experience. • Lawrnct J. Splegd,Eaq. - Cond Gabies
w
BETTER
HOMES &
BARGAINS
New Times Classified has
the best Real Estate
Listings in Town.
Neu/Ttmes
CLASSIFIED
372r9393
YójpuyGiftfor
the Body & the Mind.
NEW 5 WEEK
BEGINNERS
CLASS STARTING TUES.
FEB. 21 AT 5:45PM
callior more-info.
4
Vj
CLASSES IN HATHA
YOGA WITH
IYENGAR -
AWARENESS
JULIE SHULM AN
DIRECTOR
THE YOGA CENTER
OF MIAMI BEACH
960 Arthur Godfrey Rd, Suite 206
.' Phone: 673-8380
LEVI’S*9»
CD
UP
C0WB0YMTÍ
â–  II P I
ANOMS-JEWELRY-WATCHES
VINTAGE CL0THNG
MILITARY/OVERALLS
1950 FABRIC
1920-1970 S PARTY RENTALS
CHUnreNSL£vrs$5
February 16-22, 1995 â– 
New Times Page 27


"The Exclusive Ocean Drive Address"
ActDeco District, South
Beach-At last a brand new
building on famed Ocean
Drive! Only 50 condominium
villas. This location and
dramatic Mediterranean
architecture ensures the
value of owning one of these
spacious one or two bedroom
residences.
Stroll to the restaurants, dubs
and shops that have made
South Beach the hottest
report spot in the world today.
The details are beyond
ordinary. Large foyers set the
stage for sweeping living
areas. French doors open to
expansive terraces. Oversized
bathrooms enhanced by
degant imported marble
floors and walls.
A lavishly landscaped rooftop
pool and Colonnade Pteza
with dramatic views of
the ocean.
Sales Modd Center open
daily 10 am to 6 pm
Sundays 11 am
Parking on site.
One bedroom residences
from $195,900. Two bedroom
residences from $279900.
1458 Ocean Drive,
Miami Beach, FL 33139
Td: (305) 5353550,
1-800-237-5234.
Condominium Residences
February 16-22, 1995
Page 29 New Timas


Red
Continued from page 27
June, Donaldson, too, left the company
because, she says, “We couldn’t afford to have
both of us on salary.” (She is now a store man¬
ager for Marshall’s.) Finally, on November 15,
Z Mart filed for reorganization under Chapter
11, citing debts of $1.9 million and assets of
$135,499.
The news shook the black business com¬
munity. Under the headline “Z Mart failure is
ours too,” the Miami Times published an edi¬
torial lamenting “the painful process” of the
store’s existence. ‘This Christmas season, as
for any other, our community mil be spend¬
ing millions of dollars. Z Mart should get
some of those dollars,” the editorial urged.
“Mr. Howze and Z Mart should be given
every support For the failure of Z Mart will be
the failure of all of us black people in Miami.”
JS HOWZE AND HIS
creditors sift through the remains of
Z Mart, there emerges a primary —
and unsurprising — reason for the failure:
The store never had enough money. Howze
points out that it took nine months longer
than he had anticipated to finalize a loan,
during which time he paid rent and utilities
on an empty space.
A shortage of money meant shelves
couldn’t be adequately stocked. Howze
admits Z Mart was too big when it opened;
20,000 square feet was probably all that was
needed from the start “We intended to have
roughly $1.3 million worth of inventory, but
we actually opened with $700,000,” notes
the owner. “We could never build up the
inventory across the board:”
This shortcoming may have contributed a
deleterious psychological side effect, says
Elaine Black, executive director of Tools for
Change, a Liberty City-based organization
that provides technical assistance to fledg¬
ling businesses in predominantly black
Dade neighborhoods. “People like to see
well-stocked shelves,” Black asserts. “You
feel good about it, even if you’re only going
to buy one ink pen. People want to walk into
a department store and think they can get
everything they Want”
Money wasn’t the only factor. A full year
elapsed between the time Ames closed and
Z Mart opened. Some, Howze included, con¬
jecture that the delay eroded much of the
loyal customer base Z Mart had hoped to
capitalize on. Simultaneously, a powerful
commercial force was sucking customers
away from stores like Z Mart: a boom in
giant discount and wholesale stores/includ¬
ing Wal-Mart and Kmart. Competing against
these megacorporations, particularly in the
realms of advertising and inventory, was vir¬
tually impossible for a relátively minuscule
operation.
That said, Howze doesn’t fault the neigh-
borhood for not supporting the effort.
“Everybody wants to blame the consumers,”
he says. "If you can convince the world that
the community won’t support its own orga¬
nization, what better excuse is there for
banks and other investors not to invest in
the community? The reason black busi¬
nesses don’t survive in Liberty City is that
we don’t have enough resources to
compete.”
The Z Mart president faults the various
lenders and community-based organizations
for refusing to commit more money in the
beginning, then failing to support his
revised business plans. “They talked about
doing this shopping center, there was a lot
of lip service. But they never came
through,” Howze grumbles, adding that Z
Mart never should have opened without a
grocery store alongside it
The fact that the store opened at all says a
great deal about how emotion dominated
logic when it came to financing Z Mart.
Many observers and some participants say
the desire to open Miami’s only black-
owned department store prevailed over the
meticulous strategizing necessary to open a
financially healthy black-owned department
store.
While reliable statistics are hard to come
by, business leaders generally agree that
blacks own disproportionately few busi¬
nesses in Dade. According to the U.S.
Census Minority Business Enterprise
Survey of 1987, the most recent available,
blacks accounted for twenty percent of the
county’s population, whereas less than six
percent of Dade businesses were black-
owned. Of those firms, less than fifteen per¬
cent (981) had employees. The average
black business employed between two and
three people, far below the county average,
which fell between seven and eight.
(Leaders in the black community say the
numbers probably haven’t changed drasti¬
cally since 1987.)
“This was a chance you don’t see too often
among African-American entrepreneurs,”
observes Roderick Petrey, the Holland &
Knight attorney who helped put together Z
Mart. “They came forward with this plan
and banks thought it would be a good thing
to be involved with. It became a self-rein-
forcing thing. And it had symbolic impor¬
tance way beyond its economic importance.”
Adds Tools for Change’s Elaine Black: “I
think a lot of people realized going into it
that there wasn’t enough money. But do you
kill the business because you don’t have
enough money? Everybody wanted it so
much. We did a lot of soul-searching and we
Continued on page 31
805 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach
(305)673*0023
3117 Commodore Plaza
Coconut Grove
(305)446*5478
- .j§t -
February 16-22, 1995
New-Times Page 29


This is your opportunity
to purchase an ocean
view condominium right
on South Beach
Why rent?
When you can own
at Octagon Towers.
Visit us today.
In the heart of everything,
South Beach Prime location, ocean and city
views, pool, exercise facility, private
parking, walking distance from the beach,
security, and much more. Available Now.
2 bedrooms
from only
$79,900.
As Little As
$3900 Down
Corner of
Washington Ave. & 19th St.
Office Hours Sunday-Friday
Sales Models open daily
9:00am • 8:00pm, Sun. - Thurs.
9:00am - 3:00pm, Fri.
(Closed Saturdays)
1881 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
673-1700
Oral representations cannot be relied upon as correctly stating the representations of the Developer. For
LZüJ representations, reference should be made to the Purchase Agreement and the documents required
equal housing by section 718.503 Ronda Statutes, to be furnished by a developer to a buyer.
AUHMRIE WAYS TO HY
The All New S[9 Five] Schwinn
Aerospace Aluminum Mountain Bike
Come Fly With Us.
Take A Flight
In the All New Macro Maxxum
or the the All New Tarmac
by Rollerblade •
SKATE SHOP
2 Locations 726 Lincoln Road * 532-1954 * Fifth Street and Ocean Drive
532-0054 South Beach... Your Complete Bike and Skate Service.
SCHWINN
CYCLING AND FITNESS
If Your Space Isn't Working
For You, We Should Be
We'll give you exactly what you need to make the most of
the space in every room of your home
• California Closets
• Wall Beds
• Home Offices
• Garages
• Kids' Playrooms
• Laundry Rooms/Utility Rooms
• Entertainment Centers
• Pantries
• Workshops
• Hobby Centers
• Storage Areas
CLOSET COMPANY*
Simplify Your Life
WE EXPORT
CALL FOR A FREE
IN-HOME CONSULTATION
3301NW168 Street, Miami
(305) 623-8282
SE HABIA ESPAÑOL
O 1994 Califomta Coser Company Al Rights Reserved.
Wbdc?w»c» NeNvork Of Independently Owned And Operand franchises
February 16—22, 1995
Page 30 New Times


■¿Some feeTlfj
®re was doomed'
â–  the minute 1
shrewd business!
Judgment tookfl
s
Red
Continued from page 29
decided to take the leap of faith.”
Some feel the store was doomed the
minute shrewd business judgment took a
back seat to passion. “It’s not true business
assistance, it’s char¬
ity,” argues George
Knox, a black lawyer
who is a member of
the board of directors
of Barnett Bank, one
of the institutions that
loaned money to Z
Mart. “The concept
has to be changed
from charity to sen¬
sible investment”
T. Willard Fair,
president and CEO of
the Urban League of
Greater Miami, be¬
lieves too much of Z
Mart’s hope depend¬
ed on the hollow as¬
sumption that blacks
would shop at the
store simply because
it was black-owned.
“Anybody who gave an impression to the Z
Mart owners that they could make this
project work were doing a disservice,” Fair
says. “I think politicians, especially, got
caught up with being part of the announce¬
ment rather than the understanding."
The result, Fair warns, is that Z Mart’s
collapse may do more harm than good to
ongoing efforts to develop black busi¬
nesses in Miami: “It was destructive to the
participants and destructive to the image-
building we have to do in the black com¬
munity. We can ill-afford to continue not to
-be successful.”
a HILE MONEY ALONE
might not have been the answer, it
may have given Howze some time to redirect
the business when it began to fizzle.
Unfortunately, there isn’t
much flexible working capital
in the black community. “For
a long time, African
Americans have been locked
out of traditional sources of
financing,” observes Gregory
Hobbs, president of the BAC
Funding Corporation, another
entity that loaned Z Mart
money. “And we don’t have
‘rich uncles’ — wealthy indi¬
vidual private investors, ven¬
ture capitalists.”
The feet that banks always
have been loath to invest in
black businesses and black
neighborhoods is what
prompted the federal Com¬
munity Reinvestment Act
(CRA) of 1977,. which re¬
quires banks to make loans in
all communities where they
accept deposits. Still, South
Florida banks have an abys¬
mal record in this realm.
Citing federal data, Kenneth
Thomas, a local banking con-1
sultant, says Miami’s CRA
record is third-worst in the
nation, behind only Los
Angeles and Chicago.
Largely in response to pres¬
sure from the Clinton adminis¬
tration, some of South Florida’s biggest finan¬
cial institutions have made gestures to close
the lending gap. This past year, for example, a
group of banks tried to develop the so-called
Overtown Community Banking Center, a
branch office in which several banks would
provide basic services at the same location.
(Despite a population of about 14,000, the
impoverished downtown Miami neighbor¬
hood doesn’t have a single bank.) While
boosters argued that the plan would allow par¬
ticipants to survey the
market before committing
to a fulFservice branch,
critics called the move a
cowardly effort by power¬
ful institutions that have
the ability to do a lot
more. The plans were
shelved this past fall,
when the project was
deemed too cumbersome
to operate. Since then,
two local banks have
announced their inten¬
tions to open branches in
inner-city neighborhoods.
Without banks, minority
entrepreneurs must rely
on community-based pro¬
grams such as the Beacon
Council, Miami Capital (a
lending arm of the City of
Miami), and the BAC.
Once these organizations agree to loan
money to a venture, the thinking goes, banks
are confident enough to sign on, too. The
trouble is, the community organizations
themselves don’t have all that much money,
and what they do have isn’t always conve¬
niently available. The Beacon Council, for
instance, received $1.5 million in posthurri¬
cane aid through We Will Rebuild, but
although those funds were earmarked for
black businesses, they were restricted to pro¬
jects in South Dade.
Financial limitations have forced the BAC,
too, to restrict its program, according to presi¬
dent Gregory Hobbs. A nonprofit develop¬
ment organization established with private
contributions after the McDuffie riots of 1980,
the BAC is now almost exclusively devoting
its resources to financing investments associ¬
ated with minority set-aside governmental
Consultant John Copeland and attorney Roderick Petrey want to
see more “projects of scale" in the black business community
contracts. (Hobbs says the organization
changed its name from Business Assistance
Center to BAC “because we’re trying to stay
away from‘assistance’.”)
Continued on page 33
February 16—22, 1995
Miami 593-6800 CU I ICDf—)C^-T-\v'| fZ Mon-Fri 10-7
Outside Miami Call â–  1 ' â–  â–  ' ' * 1 1 1 Sat 10 - 6
1-800-588-2224 8349 NW 36th St. Sun 1-5
Imported
Sideboards
Available in
Black or Beech
Frames
with fronts in
Beech, Cherry,
Mahogany, Black,
Blue, Green or Red
sizes: 36", 58" & 75"
starting at
Italian'Counter Stools
3 piece entertainment system $1249 or purchase pieces individually:
. Armoire $699 & Bookcases $275 each
/■ y ill SO 4077 Ponce De Leon • Coral Gables
1 vcicwMib fejgr 445-3848
r//. • 'XJ Mon-Thurs 10am-6pm • Fri 10am-Xpm
'-W'K'HUM/tte ¿pf Sat & Sun llam-5pm
New Times Page 31


Incredible
ALL
DESIGNS ARE
EXCLUSIVELY
MADE WITH
TOP GRAIN
LEATHERS &
HARDWOOD
OAK FRAMES
WITHIN. .
..JI MtJl
1423 ALTON ROAD
Leather
305-534-9355
0% TO 30% G
ms
iMLHOor
nsu it
t0rrra K
RLS10MC
FINE SCANDINAVIAN FURNITURE FOR HOME & OFFICE
MAIN STORE: 450 Biltmore Way, Coral Gables, Call: 444-7469 E C© Wt, g£
PLAZA WEST: 12821 North Kendall Drive, Miami. Call: 386-3666
Page 32 New Ti
February 16-22, 1995


Community leader George Knox says banks must stop treating inner
city loans as “charity”
For his part, Charles ethnic communities in Dade County.
Red
Continued from page 31
John Copeland, staff director of Miami
Partners for Progress, argues that Miami
needs a large-scale equity fund for black
entrepreneurs. He envisions contributions
from a variety of private sources, all of which
would have a limited partnership in the ven¬
ture, and thus a stake in its investments. "The
idea is that all the folks would be sitting
around the same table, literally,” notes
Copeland, whose organization was estab¬
lished to help implement the “economic blue¬
print” that emerged from the black tourism
boycott that ushered in the 1990s in Miami.
The Beacon Council is trying to develop
such a fund, using the $1.5 million of hurri¬
cane money as a cornerstone to attract limited
partners from the private sector. The coun¬
cil’s goal: $25 million. “We want banks to be
able to leverage our deals and loan money to
the companies we invest in,” explains Beacon
Council vice president John Hall. Still, the
venture is crippled by its utter lack of a track
record.
Barnett Bank board member George Knox
cautions against viewing a venture capital
fund as a substitute for bank financing. It’s
more likely individual investors will step for¬
ward to participate in a business investment
once a bank has declared its interest in the
project, rather than vice versa, Knox argues:
“A bank’s level of scrutiny is necessary to give
confidence not only to potential investors but
to the community at large that this is a worth¬
while project”
Regardless, he continues, banks must radi¬
cally chánge the way they invest in black busi¬
nesses and low-income communities. As it
stands, many loans are made simply to com¬
ply with federal guidelines, with no hope of
return. “I think if s a recipe for disaster,” Knox
complains. “It’s just play money; no one is
really committed. The attitude here is, “What
can we dp in order to comply? How can we
keep federal regulators off of our backs?’
There’s no heartfelt equity on the part of the
investors. The banks satisfy their minority¬
lending commitments and write it off as a
business loss.”
Knox believes that if change is to occur,
banks must become partners in their invest¬
ments, financially and psychologically: “They
can be more proactive. They can help put
packages together rather than waiting for the
package to come to them. They have to step
forward and become team members. They’ve
got to have a stake in the outcome. They have
to go into it with a reasonable expectation that
there’s a return and that their investment is
big enough to inspire them to get involved.”
Howze welcomes any
movement of parties tak¬
ing a stock in their invest¬
ments. “If you’re serious
about economic develop¬
ment, you’re going to get
that dealing with people
who are interested in tak¬
ing dollars and getting a
return on that invest¬
ment,” he notes. “You’re
not going to get that deal¬
ing with [impersonal]
organizations.”
In recent weeks, the de¬
bate about boosting black
business development has
been informed by two lists
that appeared in the South
Florida Business Journal.
One list shows the 25
largest Hispanic-owned
businesses in South Flori¬
da. With 1993 revenues of
$236,520,000, Sedano’s Supermarkets of
Hialeah is the top-ranked firm. Personnel One
Inc., a temp agency that ranked 25th, showed
revenues of $36,890,000.
The second list ranked South Florida’s
largest black-owned businesses. Toyota of
Homestead topped the rankings with pro¬
jected 1994 revenues of $35 million, lower
than the 25th-place Hispanic firm.
“By and large I think it’s a function of the
lack of wealth in the black community,” con¬
cludes John Copeland of Miami Partners for
Progress, adding that the charts illustrate
how difficult it is for blacks to compete for
minority-designated funds.
Observes Knox: “Those lists are the most
visible expression of truth I’ve ever seen
about the state of the economy among the
HARLES HOWZE WASN’T
trying to save the world, not even a
small slice of it. And he doesn’t need
all the newspaper articles and editorials and
communal fretting and boardroom theoriz¬
ing and Monday-morning quarterbacking
that he and his enterprise have been sub¬
jected to.
“I didn’t really want the burden of having
to be held up as a btisiness that the develop¬
ment of the rest of Liberty City rides on. It
was an unexpected burden heaped on us
right from the\beginning,” he grumbles. “I
guess in a way I was naive. I guess I was
sheltered by corporate life; I perceived this
as a business venture to do something
that’s being done everywhere else. It’s just
a business, quite frankly. This is not a big
project. It’s no big deal.
“Somebody asked me, ‘Well, what if the
business isn’t going to survive?’And I said,.
‘So what if it don’t? Don’t I have a right to
fail?”’
Howze knows his failure might have a
chilling effect on loans to other businesses,
particularly black-owned businesses, that
wish to locate in predominantly black
neighborhoods. In fact, when he was apply¬
ing for funding, at least one bank used the
collapse of another black-owned business
venture — Long’s Office Supply Company
— as a justification for not participating in
the Z Mart project. (Long’s was acquired by
a local black businessman in the early 1980s
with the support of several financial institu¬
tions, but filed for bankruptcy and liqui¬
dated a couple of years later.) ‘This bank
said to me, *We don’t want to get into a deal
like that because this might be another
Continued on page 35
!FREE TO CALL*!
mJrimm mmm*
WITH
LIVE CONNECTIONS
Call and Listen
to very personal descriptions of as many
as 80 people online. Whatever your
mood,send private messages or
connect live. Your discretion
is always assured.
In Broward call: 749-1111
‘.Free call, long-distance charges may apply.For help or information call Customer Service 24|irs @ (305)749-2000. Credit Card memberships available;
Medial does not pre-screen callers and assumes no liability when meeting through this service. For adults only.18 & over. ©1995 Medial®
February 16-22, 1995
Nkw Ti mas i Page 33


Bow - WOW!
5.00 any purchase of
201bs or more ol
• A & A A V*
any purchase of
OFF 201bs or more of
I AMS*5 EUKANUBA*5
OK Feed Stored
Fet. Feed, Lawn G Carden CENTERS
SOUTH MIAMI • 1594 S. DIXIE HWY.
667-3456
HOMESTEAD • 22801KROME AVE.
246-3333
Dog Training Classes
Puppy Class
Basic Obedience
Advanced Obedience
Wednesday Nights
Taught by Canine Connection
Expires 2/23/95
‘WILL YOU JOIN IN OUR CRUSADE?”
Les Miserables
Scenes from past AIDS WALKS
.» AIDS VMtK Miami
Your p I e d g e t o help others
Help us reach our fund raising goal of $1,000,000!
First, take these steps:
* GET AN APPLICATION (AND GET YOUR FRIENDS’, TOO!)
(available at Dade County Public libraries, Spec’s Music, Blockbuster Video & TicketMaster outlets)
* GET YOUR SPONSORS’ COMMITMENTS EARLY
* COME TO SOUTH POINTE PARK FOR AIDS WALK MIAMI AND REGISTER
Sunday, February 26,1995
This year’s guest, Grand Marshall
Rosie O'Donnell
FOR MORE INFO. CALL 757-4444
Sponsors:
DIMENSION
Baptist Hospital of Miami, Hialeah Hospital, Mercy Hospital,
Miami Children’s Hospital, Mount Sinai Medical Center, North Shore Medical Center
Southern BeH
lSOUTH Company
" â– â–  â–  i. JUU//M company
6 jmU23WLTV ®
tJJletUtnvn/ ^eri/ei
(NAYA) 1 N9^¡E9,DN
TheOunkySoufco ^5=====,““**=““i^
PÍA ü! Rejal Caribbean Cruise Line PACE
\ A III 1
Aspen Towers Hotel
MUSI cl PVT Airlines AVuT'“*icmaoncom,
-AlR SOUTH STATSCRIPT Pharmacy IK ¿inii\;rti"^une.s
The year’s most Important fund raising event beneflttlng Health Crisis Network
FEB. 3RD TO MARCH 3RD. MON-SAT 10-6
1940 PONCE DE LEON BLVD. CORAL GABLES (305)567-9191
Living in the nineties means having an active, healthier lifestyle.
Imagine being able to live that lifestyle without being
hindered by thick glasses or bothersome contact lenses.
Don’t let Nearsightedness or Astigmatism keep you in corrective lenses!
TODAY, THERE’S RADIAL KERATOTOMY!
For qualified candidates, RK is an effective, outpatient procedure that
can reduce or eliminate your dependency on glasses and contact lenses.
RK has been improving the vision of nearsighted people for over 15 years!
If you’d like to learn more about the benefits of RK and live an active
lifestyle without glasses or contacts, call the Jaffe Eye Institute today.
We’ll schedule a FREE screening to determine if you’re a
candidate for RK, or send you a FREE RK audiotape brochure.
JAFFE 945-7433
EYE INSTITUTE, P.A.
CALL 945-7433 TO SCHEDULE
YOUR FREE RK SCREENING
Page 34 New Times
February 16-22, 1995


n—
So. Florida’s Premier
Adult Department Store
• leathers
• oils
• lotions
• lingerie
•gifts
• teddies
• new hot
sexy dresses
• dancewear
• sexy men’s
briefs
• adult novelties
• 3000 mature
theme videos
Discreet & Convenient Shop by Mail
from Something Sexy
â–¡ Adult Toy Catalog
$5™ per catalog • Si?1 off first order
â–¡ I lingerie Catalog
$3'°per catalog S3 w off first order
Send check or M.O. to:
Something Sexy
48 NE 167 St • No. Miami Beach 33162
WE EXPORT
&
WHOLESALE
Sexy-We’ve got it"
Something Sexy
for Him & Her
48 NE 167 St. NMB
949-6775
Fax:936-1352
(located 1/4 mile East of
Golden Glades Interchange)
President’s Day
get caught
with your
pants down.
I
1
$
to*
%
to
n
$
|
n
LIBRA
sou/A\6eacA
629 Lincoln Rd.Mall
Miami Beach • 531-1884
Red
Continued from page 33
Long’s,’” Howze remembers. “I said, “What
does that have to do with me?’ It’s amazing
how big Miami is and how small people
think when it comes to black business and,
in general, business in Liberty City.”
Howze’s observation notwithstanding,
some people are trying to think big. “In the
private sector, we have an awful lot of failure.
So one in Liberty City shouldn’t scare any¬
one off,” says attorney Roderick Petrey, who
is also the executive director of Miami
Partners for Progress. “It’s going to, I’m
afraid, but it shouldn’t. It’s too easy not to
make investments in this field. We need 100
more experiments like Z Mart”
Petrey and others hope that along with Z
Mart’s endeavor, projects such as the hotels
planned for Miami Beach and Overtown
signal a trend toward more ambitious black-
owned developments — “projects of scale” in
business-speak. But they want even more.
The Beacon Council’s John Hall has a goal of
a dozen in the next year, with the Beacon
Council financing more than $50,000 per
project.
While this will require new sources of
funding, if not the opening up of traditional
ones, it will also require careful planning —
or to employ another buzzword, “niche-ing,”
Explains BAC’s Gregory Hobbs: “With lim¬
ited sources of financing, it puts more pres¬
sure on the importance of technical assis¬
tance to define the niche for the black
business owner, and says, “You can survive
in this niche, but you have to work this niche
expertly.’”
In 1993 the Beacon Council undertook an
effort to encourage black businesses by rais¬
ing their public profile. The group created
the Network 100, a list of the area’s top 100
black-owned enterprises, ranked by revenue.
“We were trying to create the aura, the per¬
sonality in the black business community,
that success is in and success is good,”
explains Hall. ‘We were also trying to identify
candidates for either the black venture funds
or other sources of funds.”
The Beacon Council went even further,
picking a Network 10 — ten businesses with
the greatest potential to reach Black
Enterprise magazine’s “B.E. 100,” a list of the
top black-owned industrial and service com¬
panies nationwide. (Only two local compa¬
nies figure in the magazine’s current roster:
Urban Organization Inc., a general contract¬
ing firm, and Solo Construction Corp., a gen¬
eral engineering construction firm, which
rank 87 and 90 respectively.) Representatives
from each of the Network 10 companies were
enrolled in a minority-executive seminar at
the University of Miami. In addition, each
firm was given $10,000 worth of consulting
services to design a five-year strategic plan,
and assured of $250,000 in equity funding.
The money, unfortunately, only material¬
ized for South Dade projects. And a spot on
the list has been anything but a guarantee. At
number fifteen on the Network 100, and
included among the Network 10, was Z Mart.
Howze isn’t giving up, and he says he’s
more frustrated than discouraged by all the
talk of Z Mart’s demise and its resonance in
the black business community. As he sees it,
there ought to be a little more action and a lit¬
tle less blather. “I happen not to be impres¬
sed with people who talk about black eco¬
nomic development, unless you put it on the
line,” he says. “If you take the resources that
you have, and the time and talent you have,
and go put it on the line in a place like Liberty
City, then I believe you’re interested in eco¬
nomic development”
But on this-Saturday, the last weekend of Z
Mart’s tenure at 1100 NW 54th St, the nearly
vacant store is anything but alive with hope.
Continued on page 37
COME JOIN US AT THE
I LINCOLN ROAD
FARMERS MARKET
Lincoln Road between Meridian and Euclid'
LINCOLN ROAD
PARTNERSHIP. INC.
SUNDAYS, 10AM - 2PM
Through the end of March
CALENDAR OF FEBRUARY ACTIVITIES
Children's Activities at 11am
19: Books & Books presents Jo Bridges, storyteller
26: "Growing Herbs" with Claire Tomlin
Plant Workshops for Adults at Noon
19: "Floivering Plants" with Donald Rummelhoff
26: "Flowering Shrubs, Vines & Butterfly Plants" with
Glenn Patterson of Island Gardens Nursery
Also, don't miss BRUNCH ON THE BEACH !
- this Sunday hear Othello's Steel Jazz Quaitet
.February 19, llam-2pm, at SunBank Plaza .
For more information on this and other Lincoln Road
events call the Lincoln Road Partnership at 531-3442.
The Lincoln Road Fanners Market is produced as a service
of the Lincoln Road Partnership with the support of the
Miami Beach Visitor & Convention Authority
and the City of Miami Beach.
Miami
Beach
VISITOR AND
CONVENTION
AUTHORITY
"TALKPAK
a
We Are Just What You Always
Wanted from a Cellular Company...
285 NW 27th Avenue • Suite 13 • Miami
649-0260
FB
Pvte's Paging
February 16—22, 1995
New
Times Page 35


INVENTORY BLOWOUT!
The new models are coming! Get spectacular savings and
free installation on all remaining inventory while it lasts!
$128
installed*
Sony AM/FM Cassette with auto
reverse, 18 presets & digital clock
SONY
Sony AM/FM CD player with detachable face,
. 4x20 watt amp., dock & line output. Factory
Reconditioned. Full 1 Year Warranty
installed* SONY
Sony Universal 10 Disc
changer with handheld remote
SONY
AUTO ALARMS
CQDE^IL/IRm
$149 Installed
Systems from ,
Available Features: Remote arm-disarm • active/passive aiming
•motion/shock sensor • Ignition kill • (lashing LED • valet switch • remote
trunk release • power door locks • remote panic • MV-1 interior motion sen¬
sor for open vehicles (Jeeps, Convertibles, etc.)
Auto Alarm from
$
149
Available Features: Remote auto alarm • active/passive aiming
•motion/shock sensor • open door sensor • hashing lights • LED status
. indicator • valet switch • ignition kill • power door locks • remote panic
120 DB siren • Tornado
CLIFFORD
99 insi'
Systems from'
Available Features: 120 DB siren • remote arm-disarm • remote panic
shock sensor • (lashing lights • glass break sensor • flashing LED • valet
switch ignition kill • power door locks • remote trunk release • air horn kit
Cliflalarm AT made in usa
>0Z01LPINE.
Systems from JM
L^tU Installed
F*1
IV
$148
installed*
Kenwood AM/FM cassette with
auto reverse, digital clock
KENWOOD
installed
Kenwood AM/FM CD player with
detachable face, dock, dual
illumination & line output
KENWOOD
Kenwood HFpower AM/FM
cassette w/detachable face
plus 10 disc changer
KENWOOD
installed*
*208
installed*
Alpine AM/FM cassette player w/
detachable face 8 built-in 60 watt
amp. 7510
/////A\JP\WE
$338
installed*
Alpine AM/FM CD player w/ full
detachable face & built-in 100 watt
amp /////A\JP\VVE
Alpine universal 6 disc changer
w/ wireless remote. 5970
/////AVPXNE
â– installed
$248
installed*
Premier AM/FM cassette
with detachable face.24
presets & 88 watt amp.
KEH-490
aA A A Pioneer AM/FM CD player with 60
^8 ^8 wati hi-power amp, clock & line
installed* output OiD PIONEER4
. . DEH-520
$498
installed*
Pioneer Universal 12 Disc
changer with wireless remote
fij) PIONEER'
CDX-FArt 121
H
Portable cell phone (req activation) 1c
Kenwood eq w/ sub-out *49
ADS 6x20w AMP. 5149
Pyramid Gold Series 600w AMP. s149
Sony XR-7400 RAD/CASS/CD Control .'. s129
Punch 15" woofer{2) s65ea.
Boston Dome Tweeters -$50/pr.
Yamaha AM/FM CASS pull-out....; $129
Kenwood Speakers (new in box) From s29/pr.
Sony Speakers (new in box) From s29/pr.
7 DAY FULL CREDIT- Return purchase Within 7 days with all boxes, manuals, warranty
cards etc and receive full store credit. No additional installation charges either for a compara¬
ble unit (radio for radio, amp for amp, etc). Sorry, doesn't include olorms or phones.
30 DAY UPGRADE- Return your purchase within 30 days with all boxes, manuals
warranty cords etc. and pay only the difference between old and new unit, installation is
free! Sorry, doesn't include alarms or phones.
LIFETIME ALARM UPGRADE- Upgrade your auto alarm at any time with new feotures or
sensors for only the cost of the product, installation is free!
LIFETIME WARRANTY- Our trained installers and the highest quality installation
materials allows us to make this offer. Any work we. perform on your cor is guaranteed
under normal use or we will fix it for free as long as you own the cor
There&OnlyOne
SUPERIOR BUILDING PENETRATION
UNSURPASSED PORTABLE COVERAGE
MOTOROLA FUR PHONE
V
Requires new octivgtion en W
Cellular One /
AA2, AA3, or AA4 /
SCRATCH & DENT
Rockford Fosgote XV-2 Crossover
*99
Sony Det. Face AM/FM/CASS./CD CONT...
s219
ADS PS-5 2x40w AMP.
s199
Rockford Speakers
...From s40/pr.
Hi Fonics woofers.....
Closeout
RATE PLANS FROM ONLY
$19.95 A MONTH
GUARANTEED LOWEST
PRICES ON ALL
DIGITAL PHONES
Requires 12 month service agreement with
Cellular One and Sounds Good.
Penalties for early cancellation.
CELLULARONE'
Authorized Dealer
DIGITAL NETWORK
Sounds Good Stereo
2227 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami
"Existing wiring. Trim kits and custom installation extra.
576-4665
EST.1983
Mon.-Sat. 9-5:30pm • All major credit cards
Page 36 New Times
February 16—22, 1995


¡CUBA COCINA!
Joyce Lafray
20%Off All
NY Times Hardcover Best Sellers
BOOKWORKS
RED ROAD & SUNSET DRIVE
SOUTH MIAMI
661-5080
/'Now & Then'/
á Collectibles I
& Prints
4832 SW 72nd Avenue
10:30 to 5 Monday through Saturday
Miami (305) 667-5997
<, Opening Soon p
f in . <§
South Miami v*
Red
Continued from page 35
What hope exists is tucked away inside
Charles Howze, who is spending the day
tending to the last-minute details of reloca¬
tion. Good inventory needs to go to the Opa-
locka warehouse. Heap the other stuff up
front for the eleventh-hour scavengers.
Dismantle all the shelving and fixtures;
throughout the weekend, other merchants
with visions of their own success will be stop¬
ping by to cannibalize.
“It’s never pleasant to go through some¬
thing like this,” Howze says without dis¬
cernible emotion. “But one thing I’ve learned
is that there aré different stages of develop¬
ment you have to go through in life. And this,
I guess, is one of those stages.” He plants his
loafered feet firmly and crosses his arms in a
posture thafs equal parts defiant and defen¬
sive. Above him hangs a sign that reads,
“HAPPY HOLIDAYS, MERRY CHRIST¬
MAS.”
Wincing at the notion that his company has
failed, he prefers to use the phrase “a difficult
transition” to describe his straits. “The major¬
ity of businesses fail within the first two
years, a bigger percentage drop off within
three years,” he points out. “We’re in our
fourth year now. We beat the odds in staying
around as long as we have. There’s no doubt
the company will go on in some form.”
He knows it won’t be easy. Clearing out of
the store by Monday is one hurdle, but the
next involves persuading his creditors and
the bankruptcy judge to accept his reorgani¬
zation plan. He has already opened a T-shirt
stand at the I63rd Street Mall and is eyeing a
storefront in, a strip mall in Richmond
Heights for more of the same. He has also
begun discussing terms with the City of
Miami regarding the opening of a scaled-
down Z Mart in a 2500-square-foot space at
the Overtown Shopping Center. His credi¬
tors, he says, have given him “a good
response” so far. (Several creditors subse¬
quently voted against the plan during a bank¬
ruptcy hearing January 25, after which
Howze was given another month to gather
the support he needs to continue. “I’m wor¬
ried to death,” sighs former partner Joan
Donaldson, who still has her house tied up in
the business. “At this point in my life, I don’t
want to start over.”)
Howze says he isn’t agonizing about the
state of his enterprise. “I have a firm philoso¬
phy; Once I make a decision, man, I don’t
look back. I made the decision to reorganize.
And now I’m more convinced than ever this
project is doable and can be replicated in a lot
of locations. As soon as we get back on track,
believe me, this thing’s going to be done.”
Asked how he feels, he quickly responds,
‘Tired.” With that he turns and strides back
among the remains of his enormous store,
its emptiness making it look more vast
than ever. ED
$20.75 per month*
Well Equipped Gym with free Weights.
Body Building For Men and Women.
Pool, Showers, Lockers & Free (Marking.
Personalized Training.
BARCADO
Beach Club
At The Roney Plaza
Hours: Mon-Fri 7am-10pm
Sat 8am-8pm Sun 9am-2pm
2377 Collins Ave. • Miami Beach • 531-7357
* Based on Annual Rale
‘Best'Varietyof
Shoes onTheTJeach
‘Bonnie & Clyde
Shoes for iMen &‘Women
829‘Washington ¡Ave. • (Miami‘Beach
6749676
Open 7 ‘Days • lOam-lOpm,
Dedicated to making
you look your best.
Each and everyday.
GDSs?
BEAUTY SUPPLY
SERVICE « VALUE 'SELECTION
Coral Gables
Valencia Center 352 Andalusia,-446-6654
North Miami Beach
Rodeo Shops 18545 W. Dixie Hwy, 931-5291
Plantation
Shops at Broward 8136 W Broward Blvd., 473-2304
Boca Baton
Town Square Shopping Center 21302 St.
Andrews Blvd., (407) 394-8123
BUY ONI
EYED
IB
KI3MI
DNIH
IS
FBI
E!
THE GRIDIRON CLDB
FOR TOTAL
FITNESS
1676 ALTON I0AD MB, FL 33146 S3M743
GYM IBUIS M-F S:30AMT1PM SGI 8AM 8PM SUN SAM-CPM
February 16-22, 1995
New Times Page 37


Principal Dancers of the New York City Ballet set the pace Monday
Clown around at the Coconut Grove Arts Festival Saturday
n7
h
u
r
s
d
a
in
f
e
b
r
u
a
r
College Theater Wrapup: College
I” theater is B.M.O.C. this week as
three area colleges open three
I outstanding dramas. Tonight at
8:00 Florida International Univer¬
sity’s theater department presents Michel
Tremblay’s Bonjour, la bonjour, about a
Canadian family caught in a second gener¬
ation of .incest, abuse, and deception. The
play runs through February 26 at the Uni¬
versity Park Campus (Viertes Haus 100,
SW Eighth Street and 107th Avenue), with
showtimes Thursday through Saturday at
8:00, and a 2:00 Sunday matinee. Admis¬
sion ranges from four to eight dollars; call
348-3789. Tomorrow night at 7:30 New
World 'School of the Arts theater division
(25 NE Second St.) opens a new tangoized
version of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Broad¬
way smash hit Evita, also running through
February. 26. Tickets to tonight’s gala
opening cost $25; regular performances
cost $12. Call 237-3541 for times. The Uni¬
versity of Miami’s Ring Theatre is closed
for renovations, but that won’t stop its stu¬
dent theater company from presenting
Harvey Fierstein’s Torch Song Trilogy,
opening Wednesday at 8:00 p.m. at the
James L. Knight Center’s Ashe Auditorium
(400 SE Second Ave.). Tickets range from
$9 to $12; performances continue each
night at 8:00 through February 25, with
matinees at 2:00 on February 25 and at
3:00 on February 26. To gaze at the stage
call 284-3355. (GC)
Veterans Night: Some might write
them off as dinosaurs rehashing
the work of their long-past
primes. Others recognize them
as two of the most influential gui¬
tarists in contemporary rock. Jorma
Kaukonen — who appears tonight at 8:00
at the Stephen Talkhouse (616 Collins
Ave., Miami Beach; 531-7557) — made his
bones with Jefferson Airplane and Hot
Tuna. Throughout those heady'days,
Kaukonen’s guitar innovations (he was one
of the few musicians ever to use fuzz pedal
effectively) led several critics to call him
America’s answer to Eric Clapton. Admis¬
sion is $22. Roger McGuinn — performing
tonight and tomorrow night at the Musi¬
cians Exchange (729 W. Sunrise Blvd.,
Fort Lauderdale; 764-1912) at 9:00 — was
equally (if not more) innovative, taking the
Byrds to legendary heights with his trade¬
mark twelve-string Rickenbacker sound
(reference “Eight Miles High”). Many
attribute the very existence — or at least
the success — of acts such as the Eagles
and collaborator Tom Petty to McGuinn’s
influence. Kathy Fleischmann and John
the Cop open. Admission is $14. All this
history is júst dandy, but the fact is that
both of these 50-something artists can still
put on a hell of a live show. (GB)
Jane Olivor: New York chanteuse Jane
Olivor enjoyed a period of fierce popularity
in the late Seventies and early Eighties, fol¬
lowing the release of her 1976 album First
Night. Six years and four records later, she
retired from the spotlight, but her army of
admirers — enchanted by her breathy
vibrato and diverse repertoire — contin¬
ued to grow steadily through word of
mouth. In 1991 Olivor returned to perform¬
ing, and tonight at 8:00 she takes the stage
at the Gusman Center for the Performing
Arts (174 E. Flagler St.). Tickets cost $23
and $26. Discover a rediscovery at
372-0925. (GC)
Mirando al tendido: Painter Leandro Soto
has turned the Carrusel Theatre (235
Alcazar Ave., Coral Gables) into a bullring
for Teatro Avante’s production of this
award-winning Spanish-language play by
Venezuelan writer Rodolfo Santana. Miran¬
do al tendido combines the sacred Spanish
art of the bulls with Latin American mag¬
ical realism for a morality play in which
bullfighter and bull each plead their case
against each other with darkly comic dia¬
logue. Soto’s murals cover the theater
walls, depicting an audience of small-town
characters sitting in the stands of a slightly
dilapidated plaza. Magaly Agüero is the
smart-mouthed young bullfighter; Juan
David Ferrer is the swaggering macho
bull, leaping about the stage wrapped in a
ragged artificial hide. Shows are Friday
and Saturday night at 9:00 and Sunday at
3:00 p.m. through February 26. Tickets
cost $15. Give them two ears and a tail at
446-7144. (JC)
Miami International Boat Show: Boat-lovers
come together and rejoice as all manner of
watercraft, equipment, and nautical gear is
on display at the Miami Beach Convention
Center (1901 Convention Center Dr.,
Miami Beach), the Biscayne Bay Marriott
Marina (1633 N. Bayshore Dr.), and the
Watson Island Marina (off MacArthur
Causeway) today through Wednesday.
Admission is $20 for tonight’s “Red Car¬
pet” sneak preview; all other days, adults
pay $10 ($16 for a two-day pass), and kids
under age twelve enter for $3. The show
runs today from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.,
tomorrow from 10:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.,
Sunday and Monday from 10:00 a.m. to
9:00 p.m., and Tuesday and Wednesday
from noon to 9:00 p.m. (marina locations
close at 6:00 p.m. daily). Do whatever
floats your boat at 531-8410. (GC)
a
t
u
r
d
a
y
f
e
b
r
u
a
r
fpTt Coconut Grove Arts Festival: All
Hm kinds of visual and musical arts
are represented this weekend at
I Peacock Park (2820 McFarlane
w Rd.) as the 32nd annual Coconut
February 16-22, 1995
Page 38 New Times


College theater explodes with shows like Evita Thursday
Roger McGuinn flies again Friday
On Monday Maya Angelou looks back on her multifaceted career
Grove Arts Festival gets under way, featur¬
ing works by more than 300 artists and
craftspersons. But there’s art for your ears
as well as your eyes: Today Gary King and
the Dream (12:30), Nil Lara (2:00), and
Mary Karlzen (3:30) take the stage; tomor¬
row, Sha-Shaty (12:30), Lefty Perez (2:00),
and Miles Peña (3:30) perform; and on
Monday, check out headliners Roberto
Perera (1:00) and Dave Koz (3:00).
The festival runs today through Monday
from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Admission is
free. Put a little art in your heart at
447-0401. (GC)
Bill Baird: Veteran pro-choice activist Bill
Baird has faced off against some of the
biggest guns in the holy war over abortion
and reproductive rights during the past 30
years. In 1965, Baird was arrested for
“crimes against chastity” when he handed
a condom and contraceptive foam to a
Boston University student; the subsequent
case went to the Supreme Court and set
the precedent for Roe v. Wade. Baird also
opened the first legal abortion clinic in the
nation and debated militant pro-lifer Paul
Hill two months béfore Hill gunned down a
Pensacola abortion doctor and his escort.
Tonight at 7:30 Baird discusses his experi1
enees at the Unitarian Universalist Church
(3970 NW 21st Ave., Oakland Park).
Admission is free. Step onto the frontline
at 484-6734. (GC)
Legacy AIDS Benefit: Vocalist and musician
Ellen Bukstel-Segal named her six-piece
folk-pop-rock band Legacy in memory of
her husband, Doug Segal, a hemophiliac
who died of AIDS six years ago after con¬
tracting the disease from contaminated
blood-clotting medication. Tonight at 8:30
Legacy performs a benefit concert for local
AIDS service and research organizations
at the Dave and Mary Alper Jewish Com¬
munity Center (11155 SW 112th Ave.).
Tickets cost $25 and include dessert and
coffee. His legacy lives on at 271-9000,
ext. 273. (GC)
Stars on Ice: Just when you thought you’d
gotten through the winter without hearing
about malevolent ice skaters, the Stars on
Ice tour comes to the Miami Arena (721
NW First Ave.) tonight at 7:30, featuring
Olympic gold medalists Kristi “the Face”
Yamaguchi, Scott “the Enforcer” Hamilton,
Katarina “Bugsy” Witt, Paul Wylie “Coy¬
ote,” and Ekaterina “Bonnie” Gordeeva
and Sergei “Clyde” Grinkov, plus a mob of
fellow Olympians. Protection money (tick¬
ets) will set you back $24 and $36. Leave
the crowbar in the tool chest when you call
530-4444. (GC)
s
u
n
d
a
y
f e
b
r
u
a
r y
Run Away From Drugs SK: Run, walk,
or skate in the Run Away From
Drugs 5K today at the Hollywood
Beach Broadwalk Bandshell
Johnson Street and Hollywood
Beach Boulevard, Hollywood). The event
benefits the Starting Place drug rehabilita¬
tion center. Registration begins at 6:30
a.m. and costs $15; race time is 8:00 a.m.
Let your fingers do the running at
926-6923. (GC)
May the Circle Be Unbroken: Miami-born,
New York-based actor-playwright Lehman
Beneby presents this original musical
revue covering 50 years of gospel music
and documenting the careers of such
gospel acts ás the Harmonettes, Clara
Ward and the Famous Ward Singers, Ruth
Davis and the Davis Sisters, and Dorothy
Love Coates today at 4:00 at the Miami
Shores Performing Arts Center (9806 NE
Second Ave., Miami Shores). Tickets cost
$18 and $20. Performances continue
Thursday through Sunday until February
26; call for times. Sing their praises at
835-0321. (GC)
m
o
n
d
a y
f e
b
r
u
ary
Principal Dancers of the New York
City Ballet: Twenty top dancers
from the nation’s most-loved
classical dance company —
including Jock Soto, Heather
Watts, Lindsay Fischer, and Natalia
Bashkatova — perform works by artistic
director Peter Martins and master choreo¬
graphers George Balanchine, Marius Peti¬
pa, and others tonight at 8:00 at the
Broward Center for the Performing Arts
(201 SW Fifth Ave., Fort Lauderdale). The
program includes Balanchine’s Minkus pas
de trois and Tarantella, Martins’s Jazz, and
selections from Swan Lake by Petipa and
Lev Ivanov. Tickets range from $20 to $60.
They do the pas de deux at 532-3491. (GC)
Maya Angelou: Poet laureate and all-around
amazing woman Maya Angelou discusses
her multifaceted career as an author, play¬
wright, actress, producer, educator, and
civil rights activist tonight at 7:30 at Flori¬
da International University’s University
Park Campus (Graham Center Ballroom,
SW Eighth Street and 107th Avenue) as
part of FIU’s Black Heritage Festival.
Admission is free. They will rise at
348-2137. (GC)
German Expressionists: From the
turn of the century until the mid-
1920s, expressionism flourished
in Europe, especially in Ger¬
many. Expressionists turned to
their inner turmoil for inspiration and sub¬
ject matter, channeling their intense emo¬
tions into a representational terror (think
of Norwegian painter Edvard Munch’s
Scream). Through March 25, the Center
for Visual Communication (4021 Laguna
St., Coral Gables) presents the stark and
affecting prints and drawings of twenty
German expressionists, including Otto
Dix, Kathe Kollwitz, and Max Beckmann.
The show can be seen Tuesday through
Saturday from noon to 5:30 p.m., with free
admission. It’s all there in black and white
at 446-6811. (MY)
Becks + 4: Four Miámi-area artists have
joined together to form a group based on
mindless painting and a taste for beer
(they all drink Becks). Sergio Garcia, Luis
Delgado, Eduardo da Rosa, and Aldo Fari-
nati like to describe themselves as latter-
day fauvists, whose approach to art is vis¬
ceral rather than conceptual. The artists’
bright-colored, hectic paintings are on dis¬
play at Victoria Galleries (245 Giralda Ave.,
Coral Gables) through the end of the
month in a group show titled “No Food for
the Brain.” Admission is free. Play dumb at
442-2424. (JC)
|w e d n e s d a y|
february
Joe Clark: Joe Clark, the con¬
troversial former principal of
Eastside High School in Pater¬
son, New Jersey (actor Mor¬
gan Freeman portrayed Clark
in the critically acclaimed movie Lean on
Me), and author of Laying Down, speaks
tonight at 8:00 at Florida International Uni¬
versity’s North Campus (Wolfe University
Center, NE 151st Street and Biscayne
Boulevard, room 100) as part of the Wolfe
Pack Lecture Series. Clark discusses his
current plans to establish an inner-city
school in which self-respect is lesson one.
Admission is free. They’re laying down the
law at 940-5804. (GC)
The Calendar is written by
Greg Baker, Judy Cantor,
Georgina Cárdenas, Bob Weinberg,
and Michael VbckeL
For more listings, turn the page
February 16-22, 1995
New Times Page 39


SPECIAL CLEARANCE Full WT
FUTON MATTRESS Queen t3UK
TV & VCR STAND
DINETTES:
5 PIECES
3 PIECE COFFEE TABLES
m
iiiiiii
COMPLETE FULL SIZE SOLID WOOD FRAME
FRAME & FUTON & FUTON
ALSO AVAILABLE IN BLÁCK $159
STUDENT DESK/
CHAIR/ LAMP/ HUTCH
COMPLETE!
HEAD/FOOT/CANOPY
$
BUY SOFA AND GET
MATCHING LOVESEAT FREE
5 PIECE DINNETTE
149 $
LEATHER RECLINER
& OTTOMAN
â– 
509 NW 72ND STREET MIAMI, 754-7618
OPEN EVERYDAY
HALOGEN LAMP
$
19
SB
Calendar listings are offered as a
free service to New Times readers
and are subject to space restrictions.
Submissions should be mailed to
Calendar Editor, New Times, P.0. Box
011591, Miami, FL 33101. Items must be received ten days
prior to date of issue.
Music
Thursday, February 16
Florida Philharmonic: Guest conductor Eduardo
Diazmuñoz leads the orch in a performance of
Stravinsky’s Petrushka and Beethoven’s Symphony
no. 7. $12-$60.8:00, with a preconcert lecture at 6:45
p.m. Gusman Center, 174 E Flagler St; 930-1812.
God's Trombone: This stirring drama by James Weldon
Johnson captures the essence of the African American
preacher. Free. 11:00 a.m. MDCC-North, Lehman
Theatre, 11380 NW 27th Ave; 237-1082.
Israel Philharmonic Orchestra: Conductor Zubin Mehta
and the orch perform Mozart’s Symphony no. 40,
Ravel’s La valse, and Brahms’s Symphony no. 1
tonight at 8:00 at the Broward Center (201SW 5th
Ave, Ft Lauderdale; 532-3491). $20-$60: On Sunday
night, Mehta leads the orch in a performance of
Mozart’s Symphony no. 40 and Strauss’s Ein
heldenleben, at 8:00; on Monday at 2:00, the orch
performs Ravel’s La valse, and Brahms’s Symphony
no. 1. $30-$75. Both shows aré at the Kravis Center
(701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach;
800-KRAVIS-l).
Loehmann's Music Festival: Loehmann’s Fashion Island
hosts an ongoing series of community concerts
featuring local and national artists. Tonight’s show
features the Jack Siegel Trio; tomorrow, Hugo
Martinez performs. Free. 6:00 p.m. Loehmann’s
Fashion Island, 18815 Biscayne Blvd; 932-0520.
Friday, February 17
“Jazz on tfie Beach”: .Long-time SoFla jazz pianist Tony
Castellano and his quartet bring bop to the Broadwalk
alongside tenor saxman supreme Turk Mauro. $5.
9:00 p.m. Sugar Reef, 600 Surf Rd, Hollywood Beach;
922-1119.
Miami Symphony Orchestra: The Civic Chorale of
Greater Miami joins conductor Manuel Ochoa and
the orch to perform Brahms’s Uebeslieder Waltzes,
Lehár’s Waltzes from the Merry Widow, and pieces by
Richard and Johann Strauss. $10-$25. Tonight at 8:00 j
at Gusman Hall (1314 Miller Dr, Coral Gables) and I
tomorrow at 3:00 p.m. at the Lincoln Theatre (555 - j
Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach); 447-9500.
Bob Mover and Randy Johnston: Mover, an alto-
saxophonist in the Yardbird Parker mode, and
guitarist Johnston jam with the Mojazz rhythm
section tonight and tomorrow night. $10.9:00 p.m. |
Mojazz Cafe, 928 71st St, Miami Beach; 865-2636. :
Jane Olivor: See “Calendar.”
Rob Friedman-Lynne Noble Duo: This twosome blends 4
jazz and blues in original tunes. Free. 8:00 p.m.
Borders Book Shop, 9205 S Dixie Hwy; 665-8800.
Roméo et Juliette: The Florida Grand Opera celebrates!
the spirit of love with its first production in twenty
years of Charles Gounod’s operatic interpretation of |
the Shakespearean tragedy (in French with English |
projections). $18-$100. Tonight at 8:00, with a 2:00
p.m. matinee Sunday. Dade County Auditorium, 29011
W Flagler St; 854-7890.
Veterans Night See “Calendar.”
Saturday, February 18
Canadian Brass Ensemble: This five-member group
performs classical, jazz, and pop selections. $16.2:00
and 8:00 p.m. Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church, 5555:r
N Federal Hwy, Ft Lauderdale; 491-1103.
Candomblé Percussion: Brazilian percussion master
Caboquinho leads a workshop on this Afro-Brazilian
percussive style. $5.4:00 p.m. Scharf Schop, 435 -
Española Way, Miami Beach; 673-9308.
Close Encounters With Music: The Center for the Fme
Arts’s chamber-music series continues as pianist
James Tocco and cellist Yehuda Hanani perform the
complete cycle of Beethoven’s piano and cello
sonatas. $25. Tonight and tomorrow at 5:00 p.m.
Center for the Fme Arts, 101W Flagler St; 375-3000.
Fairfield Four Perhaps the most influential gospel
group ofthe Twentieth Century, the Four performs
compelling, inspiring selections. $20.8:00 p.m. Coral
Gables Congregational Church, 3010 De Soto Blvd,
Coral Gables; 448-7421.
Legacy AIDS Benefit See “Calendar.”
Juan Mercadal: Master guitarist Mercadal performs
favorite selections. $10.8:00 p.m. FIU University Park
Campus, SW 8th Street and 107th Avenue, DM-100;
348-2896.
Sunday, February 19
Alhambra Orchestra: The orch and guests Jubilate
perform works by William Grant Still, Ulysses Kay,
and Duke Ellington. $5.8:00 p.m. First Presbyterian
Church, 121 Alhambra Plaza, Coral Gables; 668-9260.
Atlantic Coast West Quintet This wind-and-brass
fivesome performs selections by Bach, Haydn, and
contemporary composers. $5.2:30 p.m. Art and
Culture Center of Hollywood, 1650 Harrison St,
Hollywood; 921-3274.
Brunch on the Beach: Othello Molineaux and his steel-
drum jazz quartet perform. Free. 11:00 a.m. Sunbank
H£LU
©iw
gy MAnT
6£.o£ni nO
I'M F6€.u*J6 MUCH
ftetrce. nod. bou
ICNOU). Foft ADMIRE
l X THOUGHT
I Ml GfiAiw IOAÍ 60I*»G/
TO fcXPUTOt.
I REMEMBER TH0SÉ OX**r.
THW TASTEO LouSy. I
ATE HAtF OF 'EM Amo FEO
THE REST TO THE P06.
X ftEAUXE^Ou) I DAS
JOST PROJECTING ONTO
you all My uNtxPRtsito
NEGATWE FEEUM6Í.
Page 40 New Times
February 16-22, 1995


LONG DISTANCE
only $179/mo.
anywhere anytime
(cont. USA)
WHY MBS HUT GUI?
I VOICE MAIL ANSWERING SERVICE I
7
ss
*9
/12 MONTH
/6 MONTH
/3 MONTH
BASIC SERVICE
BASIC SERVICE
BASIC SERVICE
S89.46 total
$51.12 total
$28.76 total
$127.80 with paging
$70.29 with paging
$38.34 with paging
I,
BEEPERS 45 LOW AS WANDAS LOW AS W/MONTH
(mammKLnmmm
Adult CD Roms 30% off. $20-‘55 each
DAD&9^4053BROWARDj35^88^|
BesfRolex & Cartier
*$ in Miami
No-Makeup
Makeup
MAJOR
SERVICE
INTERVAL
Recommended at
15,000 • 30,000 • 45,000 etc
‘Fuel injected models slghtty higher.
‘ Legends and Vigors are
sightly higher
Exp. 3-16%. Must present ad.
Exp3-16%MustpresentacL ¡ ¡_ ^ I L in LTL i
EXPERT HONDA & ACURA SERVICE
We wftutti likft to thank all of our customers for making Jap. Tech, a success since lg I
200lipstick colors • 63 lipliner colors
379eye shadows & blushes
73 eye pencil colors
Water, aloe, oil and
poivder-basefoundations * Wigs
I Eyebrow Shaping $10.00 |
1111
South Hvciclt Makeup
439Española Way ’• Miami Beam
5380805
IjP
rS
¡I , |1
mmm
■ u üi^H
*ow|
â– 
I 1 â– 
Open Saturday 8am-2pm
Miami location only
By appointment only
Monday-Friday 8arr>6pm: 3625 S. State Road 7 (441) Hollywood. 652-0959 Brwd. 981-1700
7311 S.W. 41 Street (2 blkseastof826, behind Gables Honda) 2610040 Brwd. Go. Lie# AR0404
A return to the Classics
Not just another futon store.
New Dawn brings you handcrafted Hardwood Furniture. Not steel and plastic. We serve the New Generation.
For those with a sense of Classic Style. Not the same old thing.
MH
BnujF
fefi
â– 
NEW DAWN
FUTON & FURNITURE
Contemporary Designs Classic Hardwood Furniture
Rounded comers. Soft colors. Each piece is a unique combination’of
I ’ warm .tte^fcmdí[nrá^eáll-^jpeáoih.Qar vte£ga.ttfe. futfltt xoiasaranasa.
comfortable as they áre beautiful. Come explore%ur éñtireííéiectíon
of Affordable Classic Furniture. And see die light of a New Dawn.
SOUTH MIAMI 5820 South Dixie Highway • 667-8830
PLANTATION South University Drive/The Fountains • 667-8830
February 16-22, X995
New Times Page 41


down to earth furniture
and objects from around the
wo r 1 d.
south beach
719 lincoln road 5349095
miami design district
56 NE 4 0 s t 5 76 8 799
Super Anniversary Maxima Savings!
Maxima Luxury,
Minima Moola.
Take advantage of our unbelievable anniversary savings! Bring this ad to Pass
Rent A Car and drive offin a new.1995 Nissan Maxima for only $33.95per
day with FREE UNLIMITED MILEAGE. Gas, Taxes, airport imposed fess if
any CDW ($12.95/day or less) and other options are not included. Restrictions
apply This offer is valid until March 19, 1995. 24 hour advance reservation
Plaza, lincoln Road at Lenox Avenue, Miami Beach;
531-3442.
Cuerpo a cuerpo: Cuban singers-songwriters Sergio
Fiallo and Sergio Rafart perform romantic Latin
songs. $20.8:30 p.m. Teatro Casanova, 21st Avenue
and SW 8th Street; 642-9171.
Erin O’Donnell Trio: This three-piece band performs jazz
standards. Free. 7:00 p.m. Barnes & Noble Bookstore,
7710 N Kendall Dr; 598-7292.
May the Circle Be Unbroken: Set “Calendar.”
Silver Nightingale: Flautist Laura Sue Wilansky
performs classical and contemporary music that
combines pop, jazz, rock, and Celtic influences. Free.
1:00 p.m. Sterling Worth Café, 801S University Dr,
Plantation; 474-7738. *
Singout in the Park: Grab your guitar, harmonica, or
other acoustic thing and share your original works or
just sit back and listen. Free. 1:00 p.m. Secret Woods
Nature Center, 2701W State Rd 84, Ft Lauderdale;
563-3328.
U.S. Navy Band: The Navy Band from Washington, D.C.
presents a variety of popular and classical marches,
symphonic selections, and patriotic works. Free.
Today at 3:00 at Young Circle Park (U.S. 1 and
Hollywood Boulevard, Hollywood) and Tuesday at
8:00 p.m. at Bayfront Park Amphitheater (301
Biscayne Blvd); 538-7550.
Monday, February 20
Afro-Cuban Percussion: Learn how to beat the bongos
and other percussion instruments with master
percussionist Lazaro Alfonso. $10. Beginning classes
at 6:30 p.m.; intermediate at 7:30. Higher Ground
Studio, Roney Plaza Hotel, ste PH A-31,2301 Collins
Ave, Miami Beach; 864-7943.
FIU Jazz Combo: The combo performs a free concert of
jazz selections tonight at 8:00 at the University Park
Campus (SW 8th Street and 107th Avenue, DM-100)
and tomorrow at 8:00 at the North Campus (Biscayne
Boulevard and NW 151st Street); 348-2896.
Greater Miami Youth Symphony: The winner of the
annual Piano Concerto Competition joins the
symphony for a piano concert. $10.3:00 p.m. Lincoln
Theatre, 555 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 263-8699.
Sergio Daniel Tiempo and Karin Lechner Pianists Tiempo
and Lechner join the Miami Chamber Symphony for a
performance of Saint-Saéns’s Carnival of the Animals,
Shostakovich’s Piano Concerto no. 1, Ravel’s Piano
Concerto in G major, and Mendelssohn’s Concerto for
Two Pianos and Orchestra. $12-$30.8:15 p.m. Gusman
Hall, 1314 Miller Dr, Coral Gables; 858-3500.
Tuesday, February 21
The Crowning Touch: The FIU Concert Choir presents
an evening of music for coronations. Free. 8:00 p.m.
St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, 8670 Byron Ave, Miami
Beach; 328-3359.
Florida Philharmonic: Violinist Viktoria Mullova joins
conductor James Judd and the orch in a performance
of music from Mendelssohn’s Midsummer Night’s
Dream, Tchaikovsky’s Romeo andjuliet, and Mozart’s
Violin Concerto no. 4. $12-$35.8:00 p.m. Bailey Hall,
3501 SW Davie Rd, Davie; 930-1812.
Rampart Street Jazz Band: This Dixieland jazz band
performs as part of the Nationsbank Noontime
Musicals series. Free. Noon. Broward Main Library .«
plaza, 100 S Andrews Ave, Ft Lauderdale; 761-5363. V,
Wednesday, February 22
Diaz String Trio: This chamber trio performs an artists-,
in-residence recital. $10.8:00 p.m. FIU’s Graham
Center Ballroom, SW 8th Street and 107th Avenue; '
348-2896.
Mostly Matinees: Martin Bookspan and Florida
Philharmonic conductor James Judd host a lecture
and a performance of Mozarf s Overture to Don
Giovanni and Symphony no. 41 Jupiter. $10-$35.2:00 1
p.m. Broward Center, 201 SW 5th Ave, Ft Lauderdale;
930-1812.
Theater
Bermuda Avenue Triangle: Two strong-willed widows,
roommates by circumstance in a South Florida condo,
vie for the affections of a “younger” man. Written by
and starring husband-and-wife team Renée Taylor and
Joseph Bologna (of Lovers and Other Strangers fame);
also with Bea Arthur. Through February 26. Evening
performances Thursday through Saturday, Tuesday
and Wednesday at 8:15; Sunday at 7:15; matinees
Wednesday, Thursday, and Sunday at 2:00. Coconut
.Grove Playhouse, 3500 Main Hwy, Coconut Grove,
442-4000.
Bopjour, la boqjour: French Canadian playwright
Michel Tremblay’s drama about a family caught in the
second generation of incest, deception, and abuse.
See “Calendar” for more info. Through February 26.
Evening performances Thursday through Saturday at
8:00; matinee Sunday at 2:00 p.m. Florida
International University Department of Theatre and
Dance, Vierte Haus 100, University Park Campus;
348-3789.
A Chorus Line: Twentieth anniversary production of
longest running play in Broadway history, chronicling
the trials and triumphs of seventeen Broadway
dancers. Conceived, choreographed, and originally
directed by the late Michael Bennett. Preview
February 16. Opening night February 17. Through
March 19. Evening performances Wednesday
through Saturday at 8:00; matinee Sunday at 2:00 p.m.
Actors’ Playhouse, 8851 SW 107th Ave; 5950010.
Come Blow Your Horn: Two bachelor brothers share a
pad in Neil Simon’s first Broadway hit Through
February 26. Evening performances Friday and
Ernie Pook’s Comeek
by Lynda J. Barry
^omtONE É t S e s
ITy ly/VQAflAgRtt- KA w VL.A'1^
WE NfcVER Se/vr
^ FLOWERS
ut neve ft» Cave
» CANDY
ME fv*vER TALKED orjl
Trtfc PHONE
M4D ttt ESPec/AUY
tiMtb SNNT VAUNT/Nb's
DAY r
WHEN HE \
•TOSSED OVT *
HER CARD.
Just coulonj
AX CALM
OR Little per
.NAMES
I
- L Do ft*» ) —
/a£ i
r\\\ $ 0 VTLooK
v WAS M /
Ü
V\g NEVER OA/C£
( \au6HeP WHEN
// * CA^HT RAIN
U\S FAVoRite
grey
Avid thats WHeA/
SHE LEfT HIM %
m
HÓW His PooH.
heart DID PINS
4 A
COM* back valewnvi
Ott 'r mine, Please ge MWE
Page 42 New Times
February 16-22, 1995


Saturday at 8:00; matinee Sunday at 2:00 p.m. Goodlet
Theatre, 4200 W 8th Ave, Hialeah; 651-5653.
Conversations With My Father Reviewed in this issue.
Through February 19. Evening performances
Thursday through Saturday at 8:00; matinee Sunday
at 2:00. Hollywood Performing Arts, 1938 Hollywood
Blvd, Hollywood; 9266065.
Crimes of the Heart: Beth Henley’s Pulitzer Prize¬
winning comedy-drama about one manic day in the
life of three eccentric sisters attempting to ward off
accident and tragedy as they reunite in their
Mississippi family home. Previews February 19,21,
22,23. Opening night February 24. Through April 2.
Evening performances Tuesday through Saturday at
8:00, Sunday at 7:00; matinees Wednesday and
Sunday at 2:00 p.m. Caldwell Theatre Company, 7873
N Federal Hwy, Boca Raton; 407-241-7432..
Dark Rapture: Reviewed in {his issue. Through
February 19. Evening performances Thursday
through Saturday, Tuesday, and Wednesday at 8:00;
matinees Sunday and Wednesday at 2:00 p.m. Pope
Theatre Company, Plaza del Mar, 262 S Ocean Blvd,
Manalapan; 407-585-3404. .
Dividends: Sentimental story of a grandson urging his
grandpa to have his bar mitzvah at age 83. Ongoing.
Evening performances Thursday through Saturday
and Wednesday at 8:00; matinees Saturday, Sunday,
and Wednesday at 2:00. Off Broadway Theatre, 1444
NE 26th St, Ft Lauderdale; 5660554.
Fools: In Neil Simon’s comedy, Leon Tolchinsky is
hired as schoolmaster in the Russian village of
Kulyenchikov, his dream job until he realizes the
townspeople have been cursed with chronic stupidity
for 200 years and hope the new teacher will break the
curse. February 24 through March 12. Evening
performances Friday and Saturday at 8:00; matinee
Sunday at 2:00 p.m. New River Repertory, 640 N
Andrews Ave, Ft Lauderdale; 523-0507.
Funny, You Don't Look Like My Grandmother Musical
revue starring Carol Lawrence based on Lois Wyse’s
best-selling book about thoroughly modem
grandmothers. Through February 26. Evening
performances Tuesday through Saturday at 8:00;
matinees Wednesday and Saturday at 2:00-p.m.
Parker Playhouse, 707 NE 8th St, Ft Lauderdale;
764-1441.
How the Other Half Loves: Three couples and their
domestic complications are explored in this bedroom
farce by Éngfish dramatist Alan Ayckbourn. Through
March 5. Evening performances Thursday through
Saturday at 8:00; matinees Thursday, Saturday, and
Wednesday at 2:00 p.m. Drama Center of Deerfield
Beach, 2345 W Hillsboro Blvd, Deerfield Beach;
570-9115.
Into the Woods: Tony Award-winning musical fairy tale
by Stephen Sondheim explores what happens when
wishes come true. Through February 19. Evening
performances Thursday through Saturday at 8:00;
matinee Sunday at 2:00 p.m. Barry University Theatre,
Broad Auditorium, 11300 NE 2nd Ave; 899-3186.
Itsel and Sophia: Itsel Levine falls in love with a 79-year-
old hippie in this stage adaption of the film Harold and
Maude, presented by the Maayan Tikva Theater
Company, a newly formed alternative Jewish theater.
Through February 20. Evening performance Sunday
at 7:30. Maayan Tikva Theater Company, University
Drive at Sample Road, Coral Springs; 407-278-1608.
Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat The Old
Testament goes high-tech in a revival of Andrew
Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice’s first musical, about
Joseph, his eleven brothers, and that infamous coat of
many colors. Through February 19. Evening
performances Thursday through Saturday, Tuesday
and Wednesday at 8:00; matinees Thursday, Saturday,
and Sunday at 2:00 p.m. Jackie Gleason Theater, 1700
Washington Ave, Miami Beach; 673-7300. February
28 through March 12. Evening performances
Thursday through Saturday, Tuesday and Wednesday
at 8:00; matinees Saturday, Sunday, and Wednesday at
2:00 p.m. Broward Center for the Performing Arts,
201SW 5th St, Ft Lauderdale; 462-0222.
Mirando al tendido: Venezuelan playwright Rodolfo
Santana’s theatrical meditation on life and death,
using the ritualistic spectacle of the bullfight as the
arena for a discourse between matador and bull. See
“Calendar” for more info. (In Spanish.) Through
February 26. Evening performances Friday and
Saturday at 9:00; matinee Sunday at 3:00 p.m. Teatro
Avante at El Carrusel Theatre, 235 Alcazar Ave, Cord
Gables; 4467144.
Old Business: Father and son wrestle for control of the
family business in Joe Cacaci’s play, with a twist The
two men never appear on stage together; their
struggle is conducted over the telephone. Through
April 23. Evening performances Tuesday through
Saturday at 8:15, Sunday, February 19, at 7:30;
WE WIU MM
OR BEAT Alii
COMPETnORSl
PRICE!
8 Piece -
Package
Sale Price
$199.00
Complete Metal Futon w/8" Mattress
Sale Price $159.00 -
60" Bar w/2 Bar Stools
Choice of Colors
Sale Price $149.00
BUY THE ROOM, SAVE A BUNDLE!
Entire Bedroom Set $599*00
(Excludes Boxspring & Mattress)
Individual Pieces Also Available IS
Barstool
Sale Price $29.00
5 pc Bedroom Set Sale Price $599.00
(Available in Black & Green w/ European Slides)
St
pi wMMMmm». «
W 1 ¡i
¡ip |¡
1
Buy the Sola; Get the
Matching Love Seat FRÉE j
(Choice of Fabricar Boltaflex Colors)
Sale Price $369.00
7 Tile Top Dining Room SiHlBI
w/4 Chairs
Sale Price 5229.00
Matching-Hutch & Larger-Table Avail.
b «mar
1 . Emm
, JE¡
n
â– m
ñ
' llif
I
11
declinen Choir & Ottoman
Sofa & Love Seat Sate Price $399.00
Sofa, Love Seat & Chair Sale Prioe $499.00
. B Piece Group Sale Price $599.00
Choice of Color
(available in 3 boltaflex colors)
Sole Price $129.Q€fll7
Mirror, Lamp, CD Racks
Each Individual Piece $25.00
Stone Table w/4 Parson Chairs
(Choice of Finish) Sale Price $299.00
HI - TECH WALL UNITS
w/ color combinations
Sale Price $299.00
Sale Price $399.00
Sale Price $499.00
Matching cocktail tables available
I lii 111 I
ONLY
$49
Desk, Chair
TV/VCR Stand
Major credit cards
accepted
Delivery Available
ultimate
furniture collection
6833 SW 59th PI
South Miami 663-1102
(next to S. Miami Post Office)
6326 Johnson St.
Hollywood 963-0073
(4 blocks west of 441)
Screens/Room
Divider
(Available in
Natural, Whitewash
+ Black)
Slim Cheval
Minor
30328 Old Dixie Hwy
Homestead 246-5364
(next to Scotty's)
February 16-22, 1995
« i . ÍÜ-Í5 A i '■ r, 'IT
New. Times Page 43
! ti-AVi. ai! -y, .-O*'- -»i*S- f-Té •} »


Why 3TC Lamivudine?
Lamivudine is especially useful for persons who cannot tolerate adverse
reactions to AZT. Depending on the situation, it is three to twenty times
more potent than AZT without adverse side affects and toxicity.
Free Medication.
During the Mayer Foundations clinical trials of 3TC*Lamivudinef
volunteers can receive this medication free of charge. There are absolutely
NO PLACEBOS used in this trial.
The Leader in HIV Care.
We provide some of the most comprehensive treatments and clinical trials
available anywhere. Our staff includes a research scientist fom the Pasteur
Institute in Paris and dedicated doctors who will develop a treatment plan
just for you. For more information on all that we offer.; call or visit one of
our two South Florida locations.
Miami Clinic
109N.E. 199 St.
(Ives Dairy Rd.) Suite 207
North Miami
652-6130
Ft Landerdalc Clinic
1749 N.E. 26 St.
Suite C
Ft. Lauderdale
5654030
Foundation for
Medical Therapies
Medicaid, Medicare, Private and Group
Insurance Accepted. Convenient Hours
by appointment.
Newest Approach
to Beautiful Skin
ERNEST M.
^WlQero^
ADVANCED PLASTIC &
RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY
' Remove outer, damaged
layers of skin
’ Improves fine lines
1 Doctor strength glycolic wash
& professional makeover
’ Evens pigmentation
’ Improves skin texture and acne
1 No scabbing or recovery period
1 Go back to work the same day
1 Enjoy a healthier fresher appearance & deeply cleansed face
COMPLIMENTARY GLYCOLIC WASH AND
COMPLIMENTARY MAKEOVER WITH THIS AD
19495 Biscayne blvd. Suite 200
Aventura, FL
Phone (305) 932-5557
The Patient and any person responsible, for payment has the right to refuse to pay,
CANCEL PAYMENT OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY SERVICE, EXAMINATION OR
TREATMENT WHICH IS PERFORMED WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO ADVERTISEMENT FOR
THE FREE, DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION OR TREATMENT.
This program is designed
FOR THE PERSON WHO WISHES
TO CONCENTRATE EXCLUSIVELY
ON COMPUTER GRAPHICS
TRAINING, CRAMMING ALL
THAT’S POSSIBLE IN THE
SHORTEST TIME POSSIBLE.
The COMPUTER PROGRAMS
ARE TAUGHT BY PRACTICING
PROFESSIONALS IN THE
ADVERTISING AND DESIGN
PROFESSIONS, ON EQUIPMENT
THAT’S TYPICALLY FOUND IN
OR GRAPHIC DESIGN STUDIOS.
Classes for the 6 month „
Computer Graphics
PROGRAM ARE TAUGHT
DURING THE DAY OR NIGHT
WITH SOME CLASSES
AVAILABLE ON THE WEEKEND.
A STUDENT WILL TAKE 4,
THREE-HOUR CLASSES EACH
WEEK, WITH AN ADDITIONAL 6
HOURS OF COMPUTER LAB
TIME AVAILABLE FOR PRACTICE.
l~FIRST SESSION—I
Electronic Publishing (Quark 3.3 ) 1
Digital Image Manipulation (Photoshop 3.0) 1
Computer Illustration (Freehand 5.0 / Illustrator 5.5 ) 1
Computer Illustration (Strata Studio Pro 1.5)
l-SECOND SESSION1
Electronic Publishing (Quark 3.3 ) 2
Digital Image Manipulation (Photoshop 3.0 ) 2
Computer Illustration (Freehand 5.0 / Illustrator 5.5 ) 2
interactive Multi-media (Macromind Director 4.0)
NEXT QUARTER BEGINS APRIL 3, MIAMI AD SCHOOL, 055 ALTON ROAD ON SOUTH BEACH, 538-3183
Page 44 New Times
February 1.6—22, ±995


BEAUTY SUPPLY
SERVICE • VALUE •SELECTION
Coral Gables
Valencia Center 352 Andalusia, 446-6654
North Miami Beach
Rodeo Shops 18545 W Dixie Hwy, 931-5291
Plantation
Shops at Broward 8136 W Broward Blvd., 423-2304
Boca Baton
Tbwn Square Shopping Center 21302 St.
Andrews Blvd., (407) 394-6123
Picture
Perfect
Skin
You can spend a lifetime trying to correct
the appearance of your skin by covering
it up. But modern technology has discov¬
ered the healthiest, most effective way to
better skin is to "uncover" it.
Today that way is MicroPeel
This 3-step twenty minute procedure
gently, safely, effectively and painlessly
rids the skin of its damaged, micro-thin
top layer, and unlike the traditional,
intense chemical peels, the Micro-Peel
can show improvement immediately.
For a free brochure or consultation regarding
your skin care or plastic surgery you may be
considering.
Please contact
Baruch Jacobs, M.D.,
Board Certified Plastic Surgeon
674-8586 • 524 Arthur Godfrey Rd. • Suite 204
Miami Beach, FL 33140
matinees Wednesday, Thursday, and Sunday at 2:15
p.m. Encore Room, Coconut Grove Playhouse, 3500
Main Hwy, Coconut Grove; 442-4000.
Ruthless!: Movie references and over-the-top musical
numbers run rampant through this deliciously campy
sendup about doing anything to become a star.
Winner of the 1993 Outer Critics Circle Award for
best off-Broadway musical. Through March 5.
Evening performances Thursday, Friday, and
Wednesday at 8:00, Saturday at 8:30, Sunday at 7:30;
matinees Wednesday at 2:00 and Saturday at 5:00.
Colony Theater, 1040 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
674-1026.
Torch Song Trilogy: Harvey Fierstein’s 1983 Tony
Award-winning comedy about the irrepressible
Arnold, who insists on leading a mainstream life as a
gay man. A landmark in gay theater. February 22-26.
Evening performances Wednesday through Saturday
at 8:00; matinees Saturday at 2:00 and Sunday at 3:00
p.m. University of Miami’s Ring Theatre, James L
Knight Center’s Ashe Auditorium; 284-3355.
The Value of Names: Jeffrey Sweet’s drama about two
former friends, separated by blacklisting in the 1950s;
who are reunited when one directs and produces a
play that stars the other’s daughter. Performed in a
double bill with George’s File, a companion piece
about another blacklisting victim. February 24
through April 2. Evening performances Thursday
through Saturday at 8:00; matinee Sunday at 3:00,
with a lecture on the play and playwright every
Sunday at 2:30 p.m. New Theatre, 65 Almería Ave,
Coral Gables; 443-5909.
Yiddle With a Fiddle: Jewish girl masquerades as a boy
in order to travel with her father as a musical duo in
1936 Poland; Isaiah Sheffer’s paean to Yiddish musical
theater. Through February 19. Evening performances
Tuesday through Saturday at 8:00, Sunday at 7:00;
matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday at 2:00
p.m. Royal Poinciana Playhouse, 70 Royal Poindana,
Palm Beach; 407-659-3310.
Film
Sunday, February 19
Cinema Vortex: The Alliance Film/Video Coop
presents screenings of milestone films; tonighf s
program features Jean Cocteau’s Testament of
Orpheus. $4 donation suggested. 7:00 p.m. BAR.,
1663 Lenox Ave, Miami Beach; 531-8504.
Wednesday, February 22
Cinema Wednesdays: Florida International University
reprises its weekly classic-film series with The Wizard
ofOz. Free. 8:00 p.m. FIU’s Graham Center 140, SW
Eighth Street and 107th Avenue; 348-2461.
Events
Thursday, February 16
Brokerage Yacht Show: More than 300 preowned luxury
yachts are on display and sale. Free. Today through
Monday from 10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Collins Avenue
and 47th Street, Miami Beach; 764-7642.
College Theater Wrapup: See “Calendar.”
Festa Italiana: Bask in the culture of Italy at this food
and fun festival. Free. Today from 5:00 to 10:00 p.m.,
tomorrow from 4:00 to 10:00 p.m., Saturday from
11:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m., and Sunday from 11:00 a.m.
to 9:00 p.m. Annabel Perry Park, 3200 SW 68th Ave,
Miramar; 966-9598.
Network Beach Party: The South Beach Business
Network hosts a networking party for small and large
businesses. Free. 6:30 p.m. 151 Ocean Dr, Miami
Beach; 531-3003.
Thursday Night Live: Have a night on the town in
downtown Miami with happy hours at area hotels,
restaurant specials, and cultural activities and
entertainment at various venues; tonight, the Florida
Philharmonic hosts a preconcert talk at the Gusman
Center (174 E Flagler St) , while Bayside Marketplace
(401 Biscayne Blvd) features live music and the
Center for the Fine Arts and the Historical Museum of
Southern Florida areopen. Free. 5:30 p.m. For details,
call 579-6675.
Friday, February 17
Harrison Street Art Walk: Galleries and artists’ studios in
the downtown Hollywood area open their doors for a
three-hour open house. Free. 6:00 p.m. Along
Harrison Street one block south of Hollywood
Boulevard, Hollywood; 920-4801.
Miami International Boat Show: See “Calendar.”
Mirando ai tendido: See “Calendar.”
Saturday, February 18
Children's Immunization: AvMed Health Plan,
All New Inventory
Sale
Full Size
Deco Frame
and Futon
now $339
reg. $699
Magic Frame
Full Size Couch Frame
and Futon $299
Magic Import is proud to
introduce our new line of Italian Futon
Frames, transformable couches and love-
seats with a Front Sliding device, support¬
ing structure Is made of steei tubu¬
lar bars, wheeled opening and closing
device. The metal is
finished in black power paint.
Our framés have been designed using
natural birchwood slals
for orthopedic comfort.
Genuine
Hand Made Rugs
from India Starting
at $65 reg. $129
-We Deliver-
Magic Import, Co. Hours: Mon-Thur 10-6, Fri 10-5, Sun 124
A New Concept in Futon Pricing Huge In-stock Selection‘Visit Our
2630 NW 2nd Ave • Miami • 576-2765 Warehouse‘Wholesale Orders Invited
iWAV
/¡Jaa,
Day Excursion from Ft. Lauderdale
to Grand Bahama
Includes: Round Trip Air,
$ 10 Casino Match Play, Free
Gaming Lessons, Unlimited
Tennis at Lucayan Beach
Resort & Casino
TO BREAKAWAY TODAY
CALL YOUR TRAVEL AGENT OR
CLUB BAHAMAS VACATIONS AT
1-800-447-9467
Your Best
Vacation
Value to the
Bahamas!
From Miami or Ft. Lauderdale
Nassau
FROiflS9
3 DAYS/2 NKjHTS
Grand Bahama
flovflÓP
3 DAYS/2 NKSHTS
Paradise Paradise
J229
3 DAYS/2 MGHT5
Eachoftheatxwe packages indudes: Round Trip
Airfare from either Miami or Ft Laúdentele, Hotel
Accomodations, and ground transfers. Bahamas
and other taxes addftonal. FMce6 subject to change
without notice. Subject to avaBabity. Prices per
person double occupancy. Vaíd to 4/1995.
Air Service Provided By
Bahamasair
VACATIONS
"RELAX. YOU'RE ON VACATION.
•Taxes where applicable are additional. Hotel Stay Required, 1 Night Min.
Expires 3/31/95. Fare subject to change without notice.
Tours operated by Uplink Investments.
Reg. No.19732
New Times Page 45
February 16-22, 1995


McDonald’s, and local hospitals are providing free
immunization for kids at area malls. 10:00 a.m. to 1:00
p.m. Mall of the Americas, 7795 W Flagler St;
261-8772,
Coconut Grove Arts Festival: See “Calendar.”
Coral Gables Farmers Market Local growers, bakeries,
and florists display their wares, while landscape
expert Dan Wood of Tropical Environments discusses
landscape trees at 9:00 a.m., and Parrot Jungle
presents a kids’ show at 11:00 a.m. Free. 8:00 a.m. to
1:00 p.m. Merrick Park, Miracle Mile and Lejeune
Road, Coral Gables; 460-5311.
Florida Renaissance Festival: Step almost 500 years into
the past as the Florida Renaissance Festival re-creates
a sixteenth-century village fair featuring hundreds of
costumed minstrels, musicians, artisans, jousters,
courtiers, and wenches, plus medieval rides and
games, a human chessboard, and authentic food and
drink. $10 adults, $5 kids under twelve. Today,
tomorrow, and Monday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Snyder Park, 3299 SW 4th Ave, Fort Lauderdale;
800-REN-FEST.
Latin Dance Party: Dance the afternoon away to Latin,
jazz, and world music every Saturday. $3.4:00 p.m.
Surfcomber Hotel, 1717 Collins Ave, Miami Beach;
538-5567.
Sunday, February 19
Autograph Show: Tommy “Butch” Bond (The Little
Rascals) and Russell Johnson (the Professor from
Gilligan's Island) are on hand as autograph dealers
from around the world display and sell tons of
autographed collectors’ items. $3.9:00 a.m. Holiday
Inn Calder, 21485 NW 27th Ave; 437-5562.
Shake-a-Leg Benefit Celebrities José Canseco, Romero
Britto, model Hunter Reno, and others host this
benefit for Shake-a-Leg, a sailing facility for the
disabled. $75.6:30 p.m. Grove Isle Club, 4 Grove Isle
Dr; 8580617.
Museums.
Art and Culture Center of Hollywood, 1650 Harrison St,
Hollywood; 921-3274. Through March 19—“Major
League/Minor League,” photographs of America’s
baseball stadiums by Jim Dow, and "Turning Twenty,”
selections from the center’s collection spanning two
decades.
Art Museum at Fill, University Park, SW 8th Street and
107th Avenue, PC rm 110; 3482890. Through
February 18 — “American Art Today: Night
Paintings.”
Bass Museum of Art 2121 Park Ave, Miami Beach;
6787530. Through February 26 — “Tomie Ohtake:
The Creation of the World, New Paintings, 1989-
1994.”
Boca Raton Museum of Art 801W Palmetto Park Rd,
Boca Raton; 407-392-2500. Through March 1 —
“Photography and Beyond: New Expressions From
France,” avant-garde photo-based art by Christian
Boltanski, Annette Messeger, Sophie Calle, and
others.
Center for the fine Arts, 101W Flagler St 375-1700:
Through February 26—Dade County Scholastic Art
Exhibition. Through March 12 — “life in a Boundless
Land: The Gaucho Scenes of Juan Manuel Blanes.”
Through April 16—“Burning Beds: Guillermo
Kuitca, A Survey of 1982-1994.” Through April 30 —
“Roberto Juarez: They Entered the Road.”
Center for Visual Communication, 4021 Laguna St Coral
Gables; 4486811. Through March 25—Twentieth-
century German Expressionist prints and drawings
from the Earn Collection. (See “Calendar.”)
Center of Contemporary Art 12340 NE 8th Ave, North
Miami; 893-6211. Through March 25—“Art +
Architecture = Miami,” a multimedia exhibition of
works by various artists that captures Miami’s visual
excitement.
Florida Museum of Hispanic and Latin American Art 1 NE
40th Sfr 5785171. Through March 4—Works by
Haitian artist Fenol Marcelin.
Historical Museum of Southern Florida, 101W Flagler St
3781492. February 17 through June 7 — ‘The Great
Ships: Ocean Liners and Cruise Ships,” an exhibition
of rare and antique models, paintings, and
memorabilia about Miami’s maritime history.
Through February 26—"The Golden Era of Gum
Cards.”
Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami, 1301 Stanford
Dr, Coral Gables; 284-3536. February 16 (lecture 8:00
p.m.) through April 2 — “Russian Imperial Porcelain,
1744-1917,” and “A Selection of Antique Russian
Icons.”
Main Library, 101W Flagler St 3782665. Through
April 28 — “Muhammad Ali: A Thirty-Year Journey,”
photographs by Howard L Bingham, and “Miami
Ringside: Muhammad Ali Boxing Memorabilia from
South Florida Collections.”
Metro-Dado Art in Public Places - Miami International
Airport Concourse E, Departure Level; 3785362.
Page' 4-6 New Times
f L ajyh
START THE NEW YEAR
WITH A NEW YOU NOW!
GET 12 MONTHS FREE SERVICE*
Nothing but skin between
you and your new hair...
UNIDERM, the revolution in hair replacement.
Hair applied cSrectly to your scalp through the amaz-
ing skin-to-skin™ technique. That’s what makes
Unfcleim evaything hair replacement should be. with
none of the drawbacks: • no bulky attachments* no
"built up" look • nothing to fed
if . . except your scalp. Ifyouwanta
v® natural hairline, if you want to
see thiuugh to your scalp, if you
<. want to fed nothing but hair
and skin, you want Uniderm,
the revolution in non-surgical
hair replacement. Call today or
XliHr send in the coupon bdow for a
free color brochure.
• some icssictuis apply see consta» for mac rtunraion Ufa Expíes 2-2805
r 1
j Name
11440 SW 88th SL,#111
(N. Kendall Dr.),
Kendall, FL 33176
598-5234
l Address.
I
I City
Cosmetic Laser
Surgery
Yellow/Green Laser
removes
• Sunspots • Freckles • Age Spots
• Spider Veins on Legs and Face
SilkTouch Laser
removes
Wrinkles • Scars
Collagen Injections
Biomedic Skin Peels
South Miami
598-0091
Bal Harbor
865-2281
DARRYL J. BLINSKI, MD, PA
Board Certified Plastic
& Cosmetic Laser Surgeon
STRATOGEN HEALTH
OF
MIAMI BEACH
comprehensive and compassionate
medical treatment and care
for
HIV/AIDS
Lori Bell, Acupuncture Physician
Ken Christiansen, M.S., L.M.H.C., Licensed Psycnotherapist
Fabian Escobar, Licensed Massage Therapist
Tom Fought, R.N., B.S.N., Clinical Coordinator
Susan Luck, R.N.. Health Educator
Patrece Frisbee, Doctor of Chiropractic
Joseph Piperate, M.D., Primary Care Physician
David Schmitt, M.D., Medical Director
Ray Vlasek, L.P.N., Medical Assistant
Melanie Walgrenj R.D., L.D.N., Nutritionist
Stratogen Health of Miami Beach
300 Arthur Godfrey Road, Suite 200
Miami Beacti, Florida
305^538-1400
Through May 12 — “Midnight’s Trees,” photographs
by Lori Robbins.
Metro-Dade Cultural Resource Center, 111 NW 1st St;
375-4635. Through March 1— Works by Gigi
Lilavois.
Miami Museum of Science and Space Transit Planetarium,
3280 S Miami Ave; 8544247. Through May 29 —
“Dinosaurs!” an interactive exhibition about those
prehistoric reptiles.
Museum of Art 1E Las Olas Blvd, Ft Lauderdale; 528
5500- Through March 5—Works by Dalva Duarte.
Through March 19 — “Alfred Eisenstaedt
Photographs from Life" Through April 2 — “My
People: The Portraits of Robert Henri,” and “Henri’s
Disciples: William Glackens and John Sloan.”
Through May 7 — “Fernando Botero: Monumental
Sculptures and Drawings.
Museum of Discovery and Science, 401 SW 2nd St Ft
Lauderdale; 467-6637. Through April 23 — “Backyard
Monsters: The World of Insects,” an interactive
exhibition featuring giant robotic bugs and an exotic
insect collection. Ongoing—Seven interactive
exhibition areas featuring “Florida Ecoscapes,”
“KidScience,” “Space Base,” “Choose Health,”
“Sound,” and “No Place Like Home.”
Young at Art - A Children's Museum, 801S University Dr,
Plantation; 424-0085. Through April 23 — “Spirit of
Native America,” a hands-on exhibition of authentic
Native American artifacts.
Galleries
Abacus Fine Art 1659 Michigan Ave, Miami Beach; 531-
3210. Through March 9 — “Ivan Santos and Lina
Velazquez: Landscapes and Nudes.”
Adamar Fine Arts, 177 NE 39th St 5781355. Through
April 1 — New works by Jack Amoroso.
Alliance Frangaise, 1414 Coral Way, Coral Gables; 859-
8760. Through February 16—"The Art of Love,”
paintings and writings by Melinda Porter.
Alliance Gallery, 927 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 531-
7912. Through March 4 — “Valentines,” an
installation by artist Dina and poet Jeffrey Knapp.
Americas Collection, 126 Aragon Ave, Coral Gables;
4485578. Through February 28—Recent works by
Costa Rican artist Rodolfo Stanley.
Art Collectors, 4200 Aurora St Coral Gables; 4486624.
Through February 25 — “A Passion for Color,” recent
paintings by Jean Messagier.
Art 800,800 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 674-8278.
Through February 28 (reception, Saturday, February
18, at 7:00 p.m.) — “Body and Soul,” paintings by
Cynthia Goodman.
Artefacts Galtety, 609 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 674-
3233. Through March 9—Original movie posters
from 1920 to 1994’s Pulp Fiction.
Artist's Studio. 2897 SW 69th Ct 261-0888. Through
March-18—“Southwestern Collection.”
Artspace/Virginia Miller Galleries, 169 Madeira Ave,
Coral Gables; 444-4493. Through February 28—
“Figuration,” works by Michael Collins, Tom
Hopkins, Lucas Johnson, and others.
Artworks Gallery, Omni International Mall, 1601
Biscayne Blvd; 539-1012. Through March 17 — “New
Media, Future Images: Printmaking and Technology
Exhibition,” a juried exhibition of experimental
printmaking techniques by Dade County public-
school students.
Astoria Fine Art, 2980 Ponce de Leon Blvd, Coral
Gables; 461-1212. Through February 28—Paintings
by Jaime Camacho.
Aureus Art and Jewelry Gallery, -2914 Ponce de Leon
Blvd, Coral Gables; 442-0098. Through Februaiy 28
— ‘Wooden Vessels,” works by Bill Carr.
BCC Fine Arts Gallery, 3501S Davie Rd, Davie; 4786517.
Through February 16—Works by sculptor Dean
Roman and painteF Carlos Hidalgo.
BCC South Campus Art Gallery, 7200 Pines Blvd,
Pembroke Pines; 963-8895. Through March 31 —
“Raymond Olivero: Tropical Tropes.”
Bakehouse Art Complex, 561 NW 32nd St; 5782828.
Through March 4 — Eighth Annual Anniversary
Exhibition, and “One-Man Exhibit Jack Hopkins.”
Barbara Gillman Gallery, 939 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
534-7872. Through March 8—“Boats: From Picture
to Object,” works by Sam Cady. Through March 7 —
“Martyrs and Saints,” recent works by Rosario
Marquardt
Barbara Scott Gallery, 1055 Kane Concourse, Bay
Harbor Islands; 8689393. February 17 (reception 7:00
p.m.) through March 12 — “Willy Heeks: Recent
Paintings.”
Barry University, Library Gallery, 11300 NE 2nd Ave,
Miami Shores; 899-3424. Through March 17 —
Recent works by Angi Curreri and Rick Yasko.
Belvetro Glass Gallery, 934 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
673-6677. Through February 28—Glass sculpture by
Louis Sclafani.
Bianca Lanza, 1633 Jefferson Ave, Miami Beach; 672-
4940. Through March 9 — Works on paper by Pascal
February 1,6-2?, 1995


ROUNDTRIP
FARES
SPECIALS
New York *178
Montreal $238
San Jose, C.R. $299
Plus tax certain restrictions apply
Many more destinations available.
We provide service on all major airlines
Don’t forget we have Great Cruise
Specials also!!
899-9123
11900 Biscayne Blvd
TOP 10 REASONS WHY
YOU SHOULD CALL
JEWISH MATCHMAKING CO.
#10. Personal ads, computers and single
dances just aren’t your*style.
#9. Jewish moms across the country
recommend us.
#8. We offer a complimentary consultation.
#7. Because we all are looking for a "Mench”.
#6. We have over 13 years of experience.
#5. Anyone can do the Hora but only
two can Tango.
#4. Matchmaking works, we’ve helped
match over 400 clients.
#3. Because your parents are hocking you to
China about Grandchildren.
#2. Most people actually meet through
an introduction.
AND THE NUMBER ONE REASON
IT IS THE PERFECT ALTERNATIVE
FOR JEWISH SINGLES WHO WISH
TO SEE THEMSELVES IN A
SINCERE RELATIONSHIP.
(305) 9894202 or (305) 9890828
mvESMmiEm
QUEST
I I
É¡ü
1 LJVB CONNÉ
m
FREE TO CALL*
mSlSMimS
In Broward call: 749-1111 |
Me? SÍ °n9^,Stance Gorges may apply. For help or information call Customer Service 24hrs @ (305)892-7777. Credit Card memberships available.
,ia. 065 00 Pre*screen callers and assumes no liability when meeting through this service. For adults only 18 & over. ©1995 Media 1® *


CIVIL WAR
DAYS
FEB. 25 & 26
FORT ZACHARY TAYLOR
KEY WEST
Visitors wanted for the 9th Annual Civil War Days, at Fort Zachary Taylor,
Key West, Florida. This two day event will feature reenactments, skills
demonstrations, sea skirmish, and a candle-light tour. See what life was
like in 1863 when Union troops occupied the fort.
An opportunity not to be missed!
FOR INFORMATION
CALL (305) 292-6713
Sponsored by the Florida Park Service, Friends of Fort Taylor and
THE FLORIDA KEYS'
& KEY WEST € >
lC«y largo. IsKmcxoda, Morcithyn. Lower Sponsored by the Florida Park
Service, and Friends of Fort Taylor
The Chopin Foundation of the U.S.
Presents
The Fifth American National Chopin Piano Competition
March 4 - 12,1995
Featuring America's Future Master Pianists!
Gusman Center For the Performing Arts
174 East Flagler Street
Miami, Florida
Preliminary & Quarterfinal Rounds - March 4 - 7,10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Open to the public. Please call the Chopin Foundation for details.
Semifinal Rounds - March 8 and 9,10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
General Admission $10
Final Rounds - March 11,7 p.m. and March 12,3 p.m.
Six finalists will be accompanied by the Florida Philharmonic Orchestra under the
direction of Stanislaw Skrowaczewski.
Reserved Seating $37.50 to $10.
For information and ticket reservations contact the Chopin Foundation,
305-868-0624. Tickets to the Final Rounds may also be purchased through
TicketMaster, 305-358-5885.
The Chopin Foundation deeply appreciates the support of:
â– H MIAMI TRANS 1 BRASIL Noftl H TI I
El)C lltinmi Herald cmSAA/«? KF Kn^tF^ndauon £07"
Metro-Dade County Cultural Affairs Council and Metro-Dade County Board of County
Commissioners; Metro-Dade County Tourist Development Council; Metro-Dade County
Public School Board; City ofMiami and City ofMiami Board of Commissioners; Stale of
Florida-Division of Cultural Affairs; Chopin Foundation Councils; Gusman Center for
the Performing Arts; Coral Gables Congregational Church; Morgan Music; Batchelor
. and Rosenstiel Foundations; Steinway and Sons.
Ferandou.
Books & Books, 296 Aragon Ave, Coral Gables; 442-
4408. Through February 27 — “The Goggle Series,”
photographs by Cindy Seip.
Britto Central, 818 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 531-8821.
Through March 9 — “Boom Britto.”
C. Firgau Art Gallery, 1940 Ponce de Leon Blvd, Coral
Gables; 567-9191. Through March 3 — “Figurative
Art,” featuring nine Latin American artists.
Carefully Chosen Gallery, 827 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
531-2627. Through March 10—Judaica gift art
Carel Gallery, 928 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 5344384.
Through March 9—“Post-Impressionists,”
nineteenth- and twentieth-century masters, including
works by Bernard Buffet and new acquisitions.
Caroline Gallery, 2920 Ponce de Leon Blvd, Coral
Gables; 443-8989. Through February 25—Works by
Jorge Ramos.
Chad Elliott Gallery, 922 Lincoln Rd; 534-8547. Through
March 9 — Recent works and works-in-progress by
Chad Elliot and works by photographer Ali.
Coconut Grove Gallery, 2790 Bird Rd, Coconut Grove;
445-7401. Through February 20.— “Memories of the
Sky,” paintings by Karen Vernon and Ken
Muenzenmayer.
Common Space, 1655 Lenox Ave, Miami Beach; 674-
8278. Through March 9 — Collaborations by James
Herring andCesarTrasobares.
Continuum Gallery, 927 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 538-
3455. Through March 9—Group show.
Design Gallery of the Americas, 1NE 40th St; 573-6508.
Through March 4—“Grupo Perspective,” works by
Brazilian artists Claudia Cámera, Alexandra de
Cárdenas, Perla Egan, and Annunciata Morelli.
Donald Brecker and Klein/Brecker Galleries, 1019 Lincoln
Rd, Miami Beach; 673-6559. Through March 5 —
“Missing Pieces,” photographs by Olivia Parker.
Through March 12 — ‘Treasures: Small Works by
Studio Furniture Makers and Contemporary
Metalsmiths.”
Dorsch Gallery, 2157 SW 13th Ave; 8564080. February
17 (recéption 6:00 p.m.) through March 9— “Franklin
Einspruch: Painting With Drawing.”
Elite Fine Art Gallery, 3140 Ponce de Leon Blvd, Coral
Gables; 448-3800. Through February 24—Works by
Panamanian artist Guillermo Trujillo.
Engman International, 2111 Ponce de Leon Blvd, Coral
Gables; 445-5125. Through February 24—Works by
Orlando Agudelo-Botero.
Exit Gallery, 904 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 672-1280.
Through March 9 — Paintings by Peter Staniek.
Fredric Snitzer Gallery, 1810 Ponce de Leon Blvd, Coral
Gables; 4488976. Through February 28 — Recent
sculpture by Carol K. Brown.
Gallery of the Eccentric, 233 Aragon Ave, Coral Gables;
446-5550. Through February 27—“Angels and
Devils: Forces in Folk Art,” works by U.S., Haitian,
and Latin American artists.
Gallery of the Dnknown Artist 745 Washington Ave,
Miami Beach; 532-2265. February 17 (reception 9:00
p.m.) through March 17 — “Sex, Sin, and Crime in a
Southern Slum,” works by underground artists
Andrea Anderson, Albert Sgambati, and Joseph
Seeman. Through February 18—“UFO in South
Beach,” a daily video presentation (11:00 am.) about
extraterrestrials by the U.S. Raelian Movement.
Gutierrez Fine Arts, 1628 Pennsylvania Ave, Miami
Beach; 674-0418. Through March 9 — “Jorge Pantoja:
Uterodoxias.”
Hetzer Gallery, 4030 N-Miami Ave; 576-9141. Through
March 6—“Posturas hartas (Many Postures),” recent
works by Peruvian artist Rossana Montoya.
Jacques Harvey Gallery, 815 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
672-6427. Through March 9—“Dogs and Cats.”
Jeanine Cox Fine Art 1029 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
534-9003. Through March 4 — New work by Oscar
Lakeman and Louis Mueller.
Joel Kessler Fine Art 927 Lincoln Rd, ste 208, Miami
Beach; 5328075. Through March 8 — Recent works
by Venezuelan artist Elba Damast.
Joya, 527 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 534-5191.
Through March 9—“J.W. Paclipan: Latex on
Canvas.”
Kirschnertiaack Gallery, 1014-A Lincoln Rd, Miami
Beach; 531-7730. Through March 9—“Christian
Pierre: Swamp Root Series and Other Delights.”
Latin American Art Center, 3301 Coral Way, level U; 444-
8890. Through February 28—“En junio como en
enero (In June as in January),” an exhibition of works
by fifteen Latin American artists honoring the
birthday of José Marti.
LeMar Gallery, 856 Washington Ave, Miami Beach; 665-
4380. Ongoing—Recent works by Alain Despert
MDCC Centre Gallery, 300 NE 2nd Ave, ste 1365; 237-
3278. Through February 25—“Forces of Change:
Women Artists of the Arab World.”
MDCC Gallery North, 11380 NW 27th Ave, Collins
Campus Center, rm 4207-1; 237-1532. TTirough
February 23—“American Beach: A Haven in the
Time of Storm,” photographs by Bob Self.
MDCC InterAmerican Art Gallery, 627 SW 27th Ave, ste
3104; 237-3278. Through February 25—“Forces of
Change: Women Artists of the Arab World.”
MDCC Kendall Campus Art Gallery, 11011 SW 104th St;
237-2322. Through February 24—“Zimbabwe Now,”
contemporary sculpture.
Margulles Tapiin Gallery. 3310 Ponce de Leon Blvd,
’’'Coral Gables; 447-1199. Through February 25—
Works by artists Michael David and James del
Grosso.
Mayfair Fine Art 701 Lincoln Rd, ste 701, Miami Beach;
534-1004. Through March 9 — Russian oils and
tempera.
Menelik I & II, 1661 Michigan Ave, Miami Beach; 534-
5556. Through March 9—“Life Scenes of Haiti,”
works by Haitian artists Sophia Lacroix and Lionel
Sammy.
Metamorphosis, 9463 Harding Ave, Surfside; 864-9484.
Through February 25—“Nonoo.”
Meza Fine Arts, 275 Giralda Ave, Coral Gables; 461-
2723. Through February 27—“Southern Hybrids III,”
works by Guillermo Kuitca, Bill Albertini, Natalia
BabarOvic, and others, and “Origin and Construction,”
paintings by Gabriel Orenstein.
Miami Institute of Expanding Light 8905 SW 87th Ave;
279-0052, ext 201. February 17 (reception 8:00 p.m.)
through March 15—“Magram Deux: A Celebration
of Family Art” works by Selma and Ron Magram.
One Man Sho Gallery and Studio, 166 Alhambra Cij, 2nd
fl, Coral Gables; 461-9911. Through March 1 —
“Ready to Wear Women and Men of Fashion and
Taste,” new works by Julio Blanco; ‘The Object
Named Delirium,” furniture and sculpture by Louis
Durot; and “Europe 1994,” photographs by Joe
Blanco.
Photogroup Center, 130 Madeira Ave, Coral Gables;
444-0198. Through February 17—“Evon Streetman:
Recent Works,” and “Photowork ’95,” works from the
national juried photography competition.
Photo's and Photo's, 1037 Kane Concourse, Bay Harbor
Islands; 864-2624. February 17 (reception 6:00 p.m.)
through March 14—“Eclectic Views,” photographs
by Louis A. Williams.
Rita Gombinski Contemporary Art 900 Lincoln Rd,
Miami Beach; 5324141. Through March 9—“Group
' Show,” and a collection of Israeli art
Salon 1000,1000 West Ave, Miami Beach; 5314614.
Through February 28—Art Deco Weekend posters
from 1987 to 1994.
Sher Galleries, 3585 NF 207th St North Miami Beach;
932-9930. Through February 17—“Russian Artists,”
works by Martiros, Yuroz, and Erte. February 18
(réception tonight at 8:00 and tomorrow at 5:00 p.m.)
through February 26—“Gregory Hawthorne.”
Sky Gallery, International Place, 100 SE 2nd St 539-
7100. Through February 28—“In Full Bloom,”
paintings by Bonnie Bloom.
South Florida Art Center - ClaySpace, 1035 Lincoln Rd,
Miami Beach; 534-3339. Through March 4 — “Clay
Art for the Garden.”
South Florida Art Center - Ground Level, 1035 Lincoln Rd,
Miami Beach; 674-8278. Through March 4 — ‘Trees,”
works by José Bedia, Carol Brown, Tome Downs,
Roberto Juarez, and others.
South Florida Art Center - Upper Story, 924 Lincoln Rd,
Miami Beach; 567-2416. Through March 4—“Fresh
Paint Studio: A One-Man Group Show,” works by Alan
Pimentel.
Southeast Collection Gallery, 3211 Ponce de Leon Blvd,
Coral Gables; 371-2711. Through March 1 —
“Florida’s Own,” works by local and state artists.
Steiner Galleries, 9700 Collins Ave, Bal Harbour, 866-
1816. February 16 (reception 6:00 p.m.) through
March 31— “Ma Jaya: Newest Series.” Ongoing—
Contemporary artworks by several gallery artists.
SunBank International Gallery, 1SF 3rd Ave; 444-7618.
Through February 28—American Artists
Professional League Juried Exhibition.
Susane R. Gallary, 93 NE 40th St; 573-8483. Through
February 20 — French Art Deco furniture from the
1920s.
Tap Tap Restaurant 819 5th St Miami Beach; 672-2898.
Through March 1 — “Haiti: New Wall Paintings,”
photographs of Haitian street art
Tom Seghi Fine Arts, 920 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 672-
4549. Through March 9—“Brush Series.”
UM New Gallery, 1300 Campo Sano Dr, AR101, Coral
Gables; 284-2542. Through February 17—
“Photowork ’95,” works from the national juried
photography competition.
Victoria Galleries, 254 Giralda Ave, Coral Gables; 442-
2424. Through February 28—“Becks + 4: No Food
for the Brain,” works by Sergio Garcia, Luis Delgado,
Eduardo da Rosa, and Aldo Farinati. See “Calendar.”
Wirtz Gallery, 5750 Sunset Dr, 667-5511. Through
February 28—“Atifice,” a traveling exhibition of
works by local and international artists.
World Resources Gallery, 719 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
534-9095. Through March 9 — Wood carvings from
the Sepik River tribes of Papua, New Guinea
Readings & Discussions
Page 48 New Times
February 18—22, 1995


Echoes of Change Celebrity Series /African American History Month
Invited Speaker:
Í William H. Gray,III
i President &Chief Executive Officer
of the United Negro College Fund
i Saturday, Feb. 25th 8pm
Joseph Calup Auditorium
1 5400 NW 22nd Ave.
FREE RECEPTION 6 7:30pm
$ 5 pet* person *•> *•>* >«
, » * Blockbuster Music & select Fckerds
or CALL:
(305)358-5885 1305)511-3309 (307)906-3309
In May 1994, Mr. Gray accepted a request from President Bill Clinton to
serve in a temporary, non-compensated position as special advisor to the President on
Haiti. In that role, Mr. Gray assists the President in developing and cartying out policy
to restore democracy to Haiti. He continues to serve as president and CEO of the
College Fund.
1
• •UPCOMINGEVENTS* • •
PMarch31
6:30pm
“In the Company of Women”
Women’s History Month Celebration at Vizcaya
1 June 23
8pm
Club Night Series: Jazz Night
African Heritage Cultural Arts Center
1 October 28
8pm
Masquerade Ball at the African Heritage Cultural Arts Center
Christmas Celebration at the African Heritage Cultural I
Arts Center
for more info call
638-6771
LAWRENCE FELDMAN* IVID
KARENRABEtt,MD ||5t
ALBERT CAMAS, MB M
HI*. vtl * * '
£ EN^LÍJItlQNS:
; < > '.4MlQN>topüS^iV'tES™^$30
SOUTH BEACH ||
30S-B73-3555
777 IT ST. SUITS 400
SOUTH MIAMI
BwaL 305-665-0585
7000 S.W.62AVB. SUITS 400
JAZZAT LINCOLN CENTER
The Majesty of
Louis Armstrong
’99 5 U nited Stotes Tour ^^
“...a consistently
swinging affair.'
San Francisco
Chronicle 2/7/94
Jon Faddis,
Music Director
Featuring the music
of Armstrong's Hot
Fives, Hot Sevens
and All Stars.
February 25
8 p.m.
Tickets available at the Gusman Box Office (372-0925) or
77QCaf^
AT SEARS, BLOCKBUSTER MUSIC,
SPEC'S, RICKY'S RECORDS
& SELECT ECKERDS
DADE (305) 358-5885
broward (305) 523-3309
Sponsored by O MotrOpONtSil Life Foundation AEEHAA1RUNES is the official airline of Jazz a! Lincoln Cantor.
GUSMAN 174
UUUlVliiiV Downtown Miami
CENTER Free Parkizig
This event is sponsored with the support of the Metropolitan Dade County Cultural Affairs Council and the Metropolitan Dade County Board of Commissioners.
February
16-22, 1995
&&M .úibMti# 1 A fe'- *
age 49


Russian Arts
Gallery
LUDMILA
retrospective exhibition
"A Thousand Artists In One Name'
TANKA
Opening Reception
THURSDAY, FEB 16TH
7PM-MIDNIGHT
Through March 31 st 11 am - 6pm
FIRST ANNIVERSARY
BIG AUCTION
SATFEB25TH 1PM
SUN, FEB26TH 1PM
Gallery open for display
from 11 am-6pm
LUDMILA • 90 Miracle Mile * 529-1936
1%^
Saturday &
Sunday
Feb. 18th & 19th
10am - 8pm
"TT
fllAklNA
Live Music
Original Art & Crafts
Artists in Action
Free Admission
344 Alton Road • Miami Beach Marina
Ongoing every Thursday 5-1 Opm
A
If you didn't
register for the
winter term,
ms NOT
TOO LATE!
Register now
for the winter
mini-term!
MIAMI-DADE COMMUNITY COLLEGE, NORTH CAMPUS will offer
• Credit/short-term occupational courses during the daytime and evening hours
. • One-to-one advisement
• Financial aid for those who qualify
CREDIT COURSES
Classes start
February 27.
Accounting/business
Microcomputers
Chemistry
Spanish
Economics
English
Reading
Health Analysis
First Aid
Humanities
Human Growth and Development
Algebra
College Math
Tennis
Nautilus
Aerobic Dance
Writing
Energy/Natural Environment
Individuals in Transition
Social Environment
College Survival Seminar
Student Development
For information call
— North Campus 237-1 111
— Hialeah Center 237-1800
— Liberty City Entrepreneurial Education Center 237-1903
directly or through the Florida Relay Service TDD at 1-800-955-8771.
SIX- TO EIGHT-WEEK OCCUPATIONAL COURSES FOR MANY WELL-PAYING CAREERS
in
Miami-Dade
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
[North Campus
r-O
* Certified childcare worker
237-1731
» Security guard
237-1683
.A-
Cruise line reservationist
» WordPerfect 6.0 operator
237-1668
237-1668
w Mortgage broker
237-1668
Courses taught by college professors
No high school draloma or GED needed for these occupational areas
Cost from only $25 to $250 depending on area
To register, just call numbers Indicated directly. No lines, no waiting, no crowds
Advertisement'
Slim Science
Finally, a Natural Weight Loss Program That Really Does Work
“Slim Science™ really does work”, •
says Alina Purrinos Perez, Manager of
Deel Volvo, In Coral Gables. “I have
tried everything over the years. Slim
Science™ works. I don’t suffer, I don’t
have cravings. I eat what I want to - I
just eat less now. I went from a size 18
to a size 10 in 8 weeks.”
Kathy Casper, formerly of The
Doral Saturnia Spa, now Director of
Marketing for The Delano, the revolu¬
tionary resort set to open on Miami
Beach, is a true believer in the results
of Slim Science™. “Now my body has
that cut and toned look. I am tighter
and firmer than ever before. After only
one month on Slim Science™, I compet¬
ed in my first triathalon. The increase in
my level of energy, strength and
endurance is incredible. I have tried
everything in the eternal search for per¬
fection. This is it.”
“Alina and Kathy are just two of my
many success stories”, says Denise
Chatman of Slim Scienceâ„¢. Denise
herself, discovered Slim Scienceâ„¢ after
having her third child and turning 42. “It
seemed impossible to shed those last
10 pounds.”
“I couldn’t believe it,” says Denise.
“I must have jumped three feet when I
measured myself and discovered I had
lost 2 1/2” from my waist, 2” inches
from my thighs and 1 ” from my upper
arms.” She had lost 10 pounds without
really dieting. “I felt like my metabolism
has been given a kick start.”
Denise wanted to know why Slim
Scienceâ„¢ was more effective than other
herbal products on the market. “I met
with the founders of Nature’s Best
Secrets, Inc.” and was very impressed
with their integrity and determination to
create a product that was superior,
effective and healthy.”
She discovered how Slim Scienceâ„¢
speeds up your metabolism, burns
stored fat, retains and builds muscle,
decreases appetite and sugar cravings,
and, most importantly, is healthy and
safe to use.
“From my experience, they have
definitely succeeded. A chemist, an
herbal botanist and a PhD in nutrition
formulated Slim Scienceâ„¢ by blending
present day knowledge from bio-chemi¬
cal and scientific fields with ancient
Chinese and Ayurvedic herbal
traditions. They spared no expense in
creating the finest weight loss program
possible. Other companies use a
‘sprinkling’ of herbs so they can list
them on the label. They may not
include any of the very effective ingredi¬
ents like L-Carnatine, L-Tyrosine,
Vanadyl Sulfate and Chromemateâ„¢
because they’re too expensive,” says
Denise.
“In my opinion, Slim Science™ is
the highest quality natural weight loss
and body fat reduction program avail¬
able today,” says Dr. Mark Saginore,
Director of the Metabolic Resource
Group, in Beverly Hills, who has had
tremendous results prescribing Slim
Scienceâ„¢ to his patients.
Available at selected stores
For more information on Slim Science ‘
Call Denise Chatman at (305)667-3639
WE SHIP ANYWHERE
1-800218-7546
Page 50 New.Times
February 16—22, 1995 '


1
I
\w
a
Thursday, February 16
Black Leaders of the '90s Symposium: Local African-
American community leaders discuss their lives and
accomplishments. Free. 6:00 p.m. North Dade
Regional Library, 2455 NW 183rd St; 6254)424.
BrowivBag History Series: The Broward County
Historical Commission hosts a series of monthly
brown-bag lunch lectures about the history of the
county; today’s lecture features writer Stuart B.
Mclver. Free. Noon. Broward Historical Museum,
: 1551SW 2nd St, Ft Lauderdale; 7654670.
Florida Trinity: USF professor MozeDa Mitchell
' presents a dramatic reading about the liwes of
Howard Thurman, Mary McLeod Bethune, and Zora
• Neale Hurston. Free. 7:30 p.m. MDCC-Nofth, 11380
: NW 27th Ave, rm 4207; 237-1634.
Getting to the Point Naylor Communications Programs
â–  rep Marlene Naylor provides tips for expressing
oneself effectively in letters and memos. $Í6 (lunch
included). Noon. Holiday Inn Golden Glades, 148 NW
167th St; 94^3355.
Graduate School Tips: UM School of Continuing Studies
rep Barbara Calev discusses everything you need to •
know to apply to grad school: Free: 7:00 p.m.'Borders
Book Shop, 9205 S Dixie Hwy; 665-8800.
Lifelines: Lifestyle educator Sharon Silver, author of
Singleland and Lifelines, shares practical advice for
making the most of life. Free. Tonight at7:00 at
Bookstop (801S University Dr, Plantation; 370-2456)
and Saturday af 8:00 p.m. at Bookworks (6935 Red Rd,
Coral Gables; 661-5080).
Music Video From A to 2: The Music and Entertainment
Industry Student Association hosts a panel discussion
featuring local music industry executives. Free. 7:00
p.m. UM Rathskeller, off Miller Dr, Coral Gables; 800-
695-3840.
Reading Circles: The Center hosts two circles—one in
English, the other in Spanish — reading from Jorge
' Luis Borges’s Ficciones (Fictions). Free. 7:30 p.m.
Center for the Fine Arts, 101W Flagler St; 375-3000. '
Russian Porcelain and the Czars: Hillwood Museum
curator Anne Odom discusses porcélain in the lives of
the Russian czars. $5.8:00 p.m. Lowe Art Museum,
1301 Stanford Dr, Coral Gables; 284-3536.
Philip Singerman: Mystery writer Singerman reads
from his latest thriller, Prancing Tiger. Free. 8:00 p.m.
Tonight at Books & Books (296 Aragon Ave, Coral
Gables; 442-4408) and tomoirow night at Barnes &
Noble Bookstore (7710 N Kendall Dr; 598-7292).
Katy Sorenson: Metro-Dade County Commissioner
Sorenson discusses idealism and public policy at this
South Dade Professional and Business Forum
breakfast $7,7:30 am. Miami Dadeland Marriott,
9090 Dadeland Blvd; 595-5151.
Writers in the Sand: Serious writers meet every
Thursday for this weekly writers’ workshop. Free.
8:00 pjn. 405 Española Way, 3rd fl, Miami Beach; 442-
1497..
Friday, February 17
Neil Baldwin: Baldwin discusses his book, Edison:
: Inventing the Century, which chronicles the life of
. inventor Thomas Edison. Free. 8:00 p.m. Books &
i â–  Books, 296 Aragon Ave, Coral Gables;442-4408.
j - The Meaning of Dreams: Psychologist and author Joan
/1 Mazza delves into dreams and how to gain insight
f- through their interpretation. Free. 8:00 p.m. Barnes &
â–  ! Noble Bookstore, 4170 Oakwood Blvd, Hollywood; '
f 9234738.
The Power of Coming Out Psychologist Hope Wine
tt discusses how coming out can empower gays and
' lesbians at this Friday Night Womyn’s Group
meeting. $2 donation requested. 8:00 p.m. Lesbian,
- Gay, and Bisexual Community Center, 1335 Alton Rd,
| Miami Beach; 672^2347/ ^
Soul Mates and Lovers: Matthew Anderson discusses
; finding one’s other half; Free. 7:30 pm. Bookstop, 801
I S University Dr, Plantation; 370-2456:
Brian Weiss: Dr. Wéiss, Internationally known -
. psychotherapist and author of the best-selling Many
y Lives, Many Masters, discusses past-life regression f
' and the concept of soul mates. Free! 7:30 p.m. Barnes
I & Noble Bookstore, 18711 Biscayne Blvd, Aventura;
II 935-9770.
Saturday, February 18
Ted Andrews: Andrews, author of The Healer’s Manual
- and fourteen other books, discusses a variety of new-
age topics. Free. 2:00 p.m. Bookstop, 801S University
-Dr, Plantation; 370-2456.
Awesome Arthropods: Get close up to real insects and
learn how to dissect and classify them. $6. Today and
. tomorrow at noon. Museum of Science and
Discovery, 401 SW 2nd St, Ft Lauderdale; 467-6637.
Bill Baird: See “Calendar.’’
Bicycle Poets: Poets Geoffrey Philip, Jeffrey Knapp, and
Adrian Castro read original poetry with Afro-Cuban
and Haitian influences. Free. 2:30 p.m. Homestead
Branch Library, 700 N Homestead Blvd, Homestead;
2464)168.
The Black Heritage Trail: Magazine publisher Dorothy
Jenkins-Field discusses the many Black historical
sites in South Florida. Free. 2:00 p.m. Borders Book
Shop, 9205 S Dixie Hwy; 665-8800.
From Potato Chips to Computer Chips: A panel of local
educators discusses the critical contributions of
African-American inventors in the fields of science
and technology. Free. 2:00 p.m. North Dade Regional
library, 2455 NW 183rd St; 625-6424.
Holistic Healing: Experts from the Circle of Holistic
Healing share techniques for achieving well-being.
Free. 1:00 to 5:00 p.m. Barnes & Noble Bookstore,
7710 N Kendall Dr; 598-7292. .
Irreverent Voices: The Theater Within presents an
evening of performance art and improvisation! $10.
Tonight and tomorrow at 8:00 p.m. Miami Beach
Senior Center, 610 Española Way, Miami Beach; 868-
3800.
The Jewish Author and!historiaii.Michael Shapiro
. discusses the top 100 persons of Jewish ancestry
whose contributions have changed the world. Free.
8:00 pm. Bamés & Noble Bookstore, L87Í1 Biscayne
Blvd; Aventura; 9359770:: ' ;
Peace Through Meditation: Learn to find inner peace
through meditation arid music. Free: 2:00 pjn. Miami
. Friends Meeting House, 1185 Suriset Dr, COral
. Gables; 86441046. . :.
Women and Heart Disease: Dr. Karen; E. Peterson and
medical journalist Carol Cohan discuss women and
stress, heart disease,. personal risk, and treatment
Free. 10:00 a.m. Miami Women’s Healthcenter, 1190
NW 95th St ste 301; 835^165;
Sunday, February 19
Mark Atwell: Atwell, adventurer and author of Falcon’s
Nest, reads from this thriller and discusses his
adventures. Free. 11:00 am. Barnes & Noble
Bookstore, 18711 Biscayne Blvd, Aventura; 935-9770.
Haitians Against Occupation: Haitian progressive
organizations and artists speak out against foreign
occupation. Free» 6:30 p.m. Tap Tap, 2nd fl, 819 5th St,
Miami Beach; 672-2898.
Jazz: Author David Spitzer discusses this photo
anthology and some of the jazz greats featured. Free.
3:00 pm. Borders Book Shop, 9205 S Dixie Hwy;
665-8800.
Stop Blaming the World: Motivational speaker Alina
Pantera shares tips for personal growth. $20.1:30 pm.
Holiday Inn, 2201 Collins Ave, Miami Beach; 532-
1216.
Monday February 20
African Science: Temple University professor and
historian Molefi Kete Asante discusses African
contributions to science. $5.7:00 p.m. Museum of
Science and Discovery, 401 SW 2nd St, Ft Lauderdale;
467-6637.
Maya Angelou: See “Calendar.”
Love: Rabbi Tzvi Nightingale discusses love and how
to know when you’re really in it as part of Aish
Hatorah’s ongoing lecture series. Free. 8:00 p.m.
Inter-American School, 1025 NE Miami Gardens Dr,
North Miami Beach; 945-2155.
Tuesday, February 21
Baby-Care Seminar: Moms- and dads-to-be won’t want
to miss this class on infant bathing, feeding, clothing,
and safety. $15 per couple. 7:00 p.m. Mercy Hospital,
3663 S Miami Ave; 285-2770.;
Butterfly Lightning Series: Poets and fiction writers from
the University of Miami, Florida International
University, Miami-Dade Community College, and all
over Dade and Broward counties read their works
aloud eveiyTuesday night; tonightis program
features Andrew Glaze and Cheryl Clark) Free. 8:00
pm. Tobacco Road, 626 S Miami Ave; 826Í8596.
Civil Rights Lecture:. UM Law $chool dean Samuel C.
Thompson discusses,the historyof .and changes in
American civil rights, Fréé. 10:00 aim. MDCC Kendall
Campus, McCarthy Theater, 11011SW 104th St;237-.
2854. ;
Decline of AmphRrians: UM professor Jay Savage
discusses the worldwide decline in population of
frogs, toads, and other amphibians. Free! 7:35p.m.
Doc Thomas House, 5530 Sunset Dr; 666-5111.
The High Renaissance: Education curator Wanda Texon
discusses this active period in the history of art Free
with $5 museum admission. 10:30 ám. and noon.
Bass Museum, 2121 Park Ave, Miami Beach; 673-
7530;
Intangible Tax Workshop: Learn about the Florida
intangible tax and how it affects you. Free. 2:00 pm.
Miami Lakes Branch Library, 6699 Windmill Gate Rd,
Miami Lakes; 643-7276.
Malcolm X: The Conspiracy: Lawyer and UM professor
Donald Jones discusses the conspiracy theories
behind the black political leader’s assassination,
which occurred 30 years ago today. Free. 7:00 pm.
Borders Book Shop, 9205 S Dixie Hwy; 665-8800.
Hip Schulke: Photojoumalist Schulke discusses his
close friendship with Martin Luther King, Jr., as
explored in his book, He Had a Dream. Free. 8:00
pm. Books & Books, 296 Aragon Ave, Coral Gábles;
Presidential Saving
. dp
Mnk Beds
choice 6t colors
Metal Futon Frame
5 Piece Dinette Daybed w/Link Spring
$17Q AA a Mattress
179.09 *±49M^
Lamp
choice of af¬
ferent shapes
CD Rack
w/Halogen
Lamp
$59.00
7 pc. Living Room Bar w/ 2 Stools
*129.00
’539*00 (Stoofe sóktsep! at $29.95)
Chair Available for ,—
***>â– <* \m :
with Love
Seat
I Sold Sep.
; $369.00
Your Choice $249.00 Fgll/Queen
Includes:
Bed[/Mattress
Box/Frame
(Bed also sold sep
at $119“)
Sleigh Bed
Canopy Bed
Lean
Against
Wall Desk &
Bookshelf
Your Choice $95.00
3 Pc. Coffee Table
$89.95
Wall Unit
Black
Vanity,
Stool
& Mirror
5 Piece Dinette
*139.00
3 pc. Dinette
*99.00
Leather Reclfner
w/Ottoman
*139.00
Major credit cards accepted
Beitopry Available
Financing*/ approved Credit
Free layaway Plan Available
222 NE 79th Street • Miami, FL • (East of l-é¿ • 79th St Exit)
(305) 757-7277 • Mon-Fri 9:30 am-6:30 pm • Sat. 9:30 am-6 pm
5 Drawer Chest (choice of colors) $129.°°
February 16-22, 1995
New Times Pag^ 51


You’re the
Plot!
Are you up to the challenge?
ONLY THE ADVENTUROUS
NEED APPLY
> \JZ Hour Ground Instruction
Hour In Hie Mr
1 Sift Certificates Available
MtA Part L4i Certified i.
7499 Pembroke Rd. North Peny Airport (305) 981-4000
PAID PREFERRED PARKING
GOOD FOR ONE ENTRY ONLY
MUST BE PRESENTED ON
DAY OF PARKING
Open Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday All Year.
FOOD. FUN. FASHION
SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE
12705 NW 42nd Avenue • 688-0500
Accepted
ELEVENTH ANNUAL
SOUTH.MIAMI
ARTS & CRAFTS FESTIVAL
SAT & SUN FEB 25 & 26
9 AM-6 PM
SUNSET DRIVE
&US1
"Ranked In The Top 35 T.C. Shows In The U5A"|
Sunshine Artist Magazine
Free Parking at Metrorail Station
City of South Miami • Red/Sunset Merchants Assoc.
Rotary Club of South Miami • The Miami Herald
442-4408.
Telemedicine: Three national and local experts discuss
the future of this technology and its role in care
delivery, its cost effectiveness, and its legal issues.
$20.6:00 p.m. Mercy Hospital 3663 S Miami Ave, 6th
fl; 949-8869.
Wednesday, February 22
The Abraham Lincoln of Art Delaware Museum of Art
curator Jeanette Toohey discusses John Sloan’s essay
on Robert Henri and his legacy. $8.1:30 p.m. Museum
of Art, 1E Las Olas Blvd, Ft Lauderdale; 525-5500.
Joe Clark: See “Calendar.”
Jennifer Egan: Egan reads from and discusses her
novel The Invisible Circus, about two sisters and their
memories of the Sixties. Free. 8:00 p.m. Books &
Books, 296 Aragon Ave, Coral Gables; 442-4408.
Investing Tips Grandpa Taught Us: Retired accountant
and financial advisor Victor Eber gives a mini¬
workshop on strategies for long-term financial gain.
Free. 7:00 p.m. Borders Book Shop, 9205 S Dixie
Hwy; 6658800.
Pre-Columbian Art and Architecture: Institute of Maya
Studies member Ray Stewart discusses pre-
Columbian architecture and 600 A.D. art deco. $2.
8:00 p.m. Miami Museum of Science, 3280 S Miami
Ave; 7548955.
Prospective Homebuyers Workshop: This seminar
demystifies the mortgage process and compares
buying and renting options. Free. 6:00 p.m. Miami
Airport Marriott, 1202 Le Jeune Rd, Coral Gables; 661-
4663.
Russian Imperial Architecture: Architect Kenneth
Treister discusses imperial architecture of St
Petersburg, Russia. $5.8:00 p.m. Lowe Art Museum,
1301 Stanford Dr, Coral Gables; 284-3536.
Tea, Talk, and Tour: Tour the Center’s galleries and sit
down for an art talk over tea. $2.2:00 p.m. Art and
Culture Center of Hollywood, 1650 Harrison St
Hollywood; 921-3274.
Dance
Thursday, February 16
African Dance and Drumming Workshops: Move to some
invigorating rhythms as Bamba Febrissy and
Adeyemi O lamina host an African and Caribbean
dance and drumming class. $5. Tonight at 7:00 and
Saturday at 4:00 p.m. Miami Beach Community
Center, 2100 Washington Ave, Miami Beach; 673-
7730.
Friday, February 17
Demetrius Klein: Modem dancer Klein leads a
workshop performance. $3.7:30 p.m. FIU University
Park Campus, SW 8th Street and 107th Avenue, bldg
W-6; 348-3789.
Student Choreographers Dance Concert Miami-Dade
Community College’s North Campus presents
original works by four dance students. $7. Today and
tomorrow at 8:00 p.m., with a matinee today at noon.
$4. MDCC-North Lehman Theatre, 11380 NW 27th
Ave; 237-1494.
Monday, February 20
Principal Dancers of the New York City Ballet See
“Calendar.”
Wednesday, February 22
Capoeira Workshop: Brazilian dance and percussion
master Caboquinho leads a workshop on Angolan-
style capoeira. $10.4:00 p.m. Mideastem Dance
Exchange, 350 Lincoln Rd, ste 505, Miami Beach; 538-
1608.
Kids
Friday, February 17
fools: The Children’s Theatre presents Neil Simon’s
hilarious tale about a town whose people are cursed
with chronic stupidity. $6 adults, $5 kids. Tonight at
7:30 p.m. and tomorrow and Sunday at 2:00 p.m. Fort
Lauderdale Children’s Theatre, 640 N Andrews Ave,
Ft Lauderdale; 7638882.
Saturday, February 18
Actors' Playhouse's Charlotte's Web-Join that
magnificent pig, Wilbur, and his spider friend
Charlotte for this musical production of the classic
tale. $7 adults, $6 kids. 2:00 p.m. 8851 SW 107th Ave;
5958010.
Florida Playwrights' Theatre's Charlotte's Waft;The
Children’s Professional Theatre presents the story of
Wilbur the pig, Templeton the rat, Charlotte the
spider, and all their barnyard friends. Adults $7, kids
$5. Today at 11:00 a.m. and tomorrow at 2:00 p.m.
1936 Hollywood Blvd, Hollywood; 9258123.
Sunday, February 19
Dental Health Day. Meet Mr. Sparkle, get a new
toothbrush, and learn how to care for those pearly
whites. Ages three and up. $3.1:00 and 2:15 p.m.
Miami Youth Museum, 5701 Sunset Dr; 661-3046.
Monday, February 20
African Heritage Day Spend Presidents' Day off
celebrating the cultures of Africa through Adrinka
cloth printing, mask making, and West African
games. Ages four and up. $3 admission plus $1 fee per
workshop. 11:00 am. to 3:00 p.m. Miami Youth
Museum, 5701 Sunset Dr; 661-3046.
African Impressions: Kids can leam about the African
influence on traditional and innovative art $25.9:00
am. to 5:00 p.m. Young at Ait, 801S University Dr,
Plantation; 4248085.
Presidents' Day Leam about the presidents and their
interest in nature and animals. Ages six to twelve. $20.
8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Bill Sadowski Park, Old Cutler
Hammock, 17555 SW 176th St; 2554767.
Sports
Thursday, February 16
Miami Heat The Heat nix the New York Knicks. $17-
$23.7:30 p.m. Miami Arena, 721 NW 1st Ave; 530-
4444.
Friday, February 17
Florida Panthers: The Panthers bash Boston tonight at
7:35 p.m., then face off against Quebec Sunday at 6:05
p.m., and ruffle the New York Rangers Tuesday at
7:35 p.m. $22-$27. Miami Arena, 721 NW 1st Ave; 530-
4444.
Saturday, February 18
Bodybuilding Championship and Fitness Expo: Thirteen
world-renowned athletes, including national aerobics
champ Suzy Stone and actor-boxer Mickey Rourke,
host this fitness expo, seminar series, and
bodybuilding competition. $25 prejudging; $25$75
show. Noon to 10:00 p.m. James L Knight Center, 400
SE 2nd Ave; 372-0929.
Red Cross Bike-a-Thon: Jump on your bike and pedal to
benefit the Red Cross. $15 (plus pledges). 7:00 am.
Harris Field, Campbell Drive and S Dixie Highway,
Homestead; 644-Í200.
Skate Fest Strap on your in-line skates and zip around
with other skaters of every ability. Free. 4:00 p.m. The
Velodrome, Brian Piccolo Park, 9501 Sheridan St,
Cooper City; 436-2600.
Stars on Ice: See “Calendar.”
Sunday, February 19
Run Away From Drugs 5K: See “Calendar.”
Wednesday, February 22
Hurricanes Basketball: The University of Miami
basketball team slams Seton Hall. $9-$13.7:30 p.m.
Miami Arena, 721 NW 1st Ave; 5304444.
On the Road 6 Sea
Thursday, February 16
Amazing Alligators: Curator Bill Zeigler provides
background information on crocodiles, alligators, and
the unique white alligator. $14.7:30 p.m. Metrozoo,
12400 SW 152nd St; 255-5551.
Friday, February 17
Astronomical Observations: Astrocartographers Bill
Williams and Helmut Schaffer present the findings of
their observations in South America and Africa. Free.
8:00 p .m. FIU Physics Bldg, im 145,1400 SW 107th
Ave; 661-1375.
The Best of Miami Tour. Somebody stole our idea!
Historian Pal George leads a bus tour of Art Deco
South Beach, Coral Gables, and Little Havana. $45.
For details and reservations, call 475-7699.
Saturday, February 18
Commercial Nursery Tour Tour the park’s private
tropical fruit and vegetable farms. $10.10:00 am. Fruit
and Spice Park, 24801 SW 187th Ave; call 247-5727 to
reserve.
Introduction to Birdwatching: Learn the basics for
viewing and identifying birds quickly and accurately.
$8.8:30 am. Fern Forest Nature Center, 201 Lyons
Rd, Pompano Beach; 9708150.
Lichen Looking: Hike the forest and learn about lichens
and other nonflowering plants. Free. 10:00 am. Fern
Forest Nature Center, 201 Lyons Rd, Pompano Beach;
.9708150. ... , • i
Page 52 New Times
February 16—22, 1995


The Ultimate Gift
We Buy
& Trade
Skates
EáSI
Iji' Hours
Mon-Th I! am-! Opm
Fri IOam-5j30pm |
Sat 6:30pm-Í2am
Suit 10am-10pm
Choose from 999 skates!
King of Skates
1465 C0LLIN5 AV€, MIAMI BEACH
30 Day ediange fifty
Thursday >
â–  J Night 3
Reading Circles
Jorge Luis Borges
44T?* 4 9?
Ficciones
Spanish and English
♦ in the galleries
Thurs Feb 16 at 7:30pm
Tour 7pm
Free
Tange Dance Party
Howard Marlow &
Lois Walser
Professional dancers
demonstrate the tango
7:30pm
Tour 7pm
Thurs Feb 23 at 7:30pm
Free
. Stimulatiixg programs every Thursday
l Night. Produced by Tjgertail Productions,
MKI
CENTER FOR THE FINE ARTS
101 WEST FLAGLER STREET • MIAMI
305 3753000
THE CENTER FOR THE FINE ARTS IS RECOGNIZED AS A MAJOR. CULTURA! NSItlÚDON AND
P.ECBVES MAJOR FUNDING FROM IHE STATE Of FLORIDA THROUGH THE F103DA DEPARTMENT
Of STATE. THE FLORIDA ARTS COUNOl AND THE DMSON Of CUITURA1 AFFAIRS. THE 199493
EXHBIHON PROGRAMS ARE SPONSORED IN PART BY THE DADE COUNTY CUITURAI AfFAJRS
CXJUNQI. AND THE METROPOUTAN DADE COUNIY BOARD Of COUNTY COMMISSfONKS.
Sunday, February 19
“How-to..." Series: Nature experts lead monthly hands-
on demonstrations; this month: “How to Identify
Poisonous Plants.” $1.2:00 p.m. Tree Tops Park, 3900
SW 100th Ave, Davie; 370-3750.
Interpretive Horseback Tour Explore the equestrian
trails that wind through dense woodlands and live oak
hammocks. $1 (horse rental $25). 8:30 a.m. Tree Tops
Park, 3900 SW 100th Ave, Davie; to register, call 370-
3750. J
Sailboat Village House and Garden Festival: Tour seven .
historic homes and gardens in the Sailboat Village
area of Fort Lauderdale. $9.9:00 a.m. Meet at the
Esplanade, SW 2ndStreet and 5th Avenue, Ft
Lauderdale; 522-4523.
Hotlines
AIDS Housing Hotline: 652-8281 (Dade); 800-652-8284
(outside Dade)'
Al-Anon: 6874049
Broward and Palm Beach HELP: 476-2240;
Broward County Public Health Unit (HRS): 467:4882
GDC National AIDS Hotiirie: 800-342-2437 (English); 800-
344-7432 (Spanish); 800-243-7889 (T1Y services for
the deaf) ;
Cancer Information: 358-8000 .
Childhelp I0F Foresters Hotline: 8004-A-CHILD
Coalition for Hypertension Education and Control: 800-664-
4447
Cocaine Hotline: 80000CAINE
Crisis Intervention/Suicide Hotline: 358-HELP
Dade County Citizens Safety Council: 592-3232
Domestic Violence Hotline: 547-3170 -
Drugs, Alcohol, and Troubled Teens: 8004436784
Family Counseling Services: (provide in-home
counseling to people with HIV) 573-2500
Florida Bar Lawyer Referral Service: 800-342-8011
Florida HIV/AIDS Hotline: 800-FLA-AIDS (English); 800-
545-SIDA (Spanish); 80OAIDS-101 (Creóle)
Greater Miami Jewish Federation Information and Referral
Hotline: 5764000 ext 283
Guardian Ad Litem: (to assist abused and neglected
children in court) 6386861.
Habitat for Humanity: 670-2224
Health Crisis Network/AIDS Hotline: 751-7751
Helping Hands: Hands in Action (for victims of physical,
sexual, or emotional abuse) 9526785
Hepatitis-B Hotline: 800-HEP-B-873
Herpes Speak-Easy Hotline: 895-5555
HIV + National Support Group: 441-9860
Homeless Hotline: 379-HOME
Hospice Care: (support for terminally ill patients) 591-
1606
Housing Opportunities for Excellence: 3744660
Hunger Hotline: (helps locate emergency food
resources) 800-329-FOOD
I.C.A.R.E.: (HIV outreach program) 324-9042
Jewish Family Service of Droward County: 7494505 or
9666956
Legal Hotline for Older Floridians: 5766997 (Dade); 800-
252-5997 (outside of Dade)
Mental Health Crisis Center 643-1400
Metro-Dade Cultural Affairs Arts and Culture Hotline; 557-
5600
Miami Bridge: (runaways, abused, abandoned, and
neglected youth shelter) 324-8953
Miami Women's Health Center 8356165
Narcotics Anonymous; 6626280
National AIDS Hotline: 800-342-AÍDS
National Cancer Institute Hotline: 5476920 (Dade); 721-
7600 (Broward)
National Food Addiction Hotline; 8008726088
Office Paper Recycling Hotline: 594-1680
Overeaters Anonymous: 274-8800
Planned Parenthood; 441-2022
Pregnancy and Drug Abuse Information: 5484528
Rape Treatment Center at Jackson: 585-7273 (to report a
rape); 5856949 (for recovery support)
Senior Center Hotline: (referral service for all elderly,
services) 6284354
Seniors Hotline; (assistance with daily tasks) 3586060
SHE Center (Sex Health Education and women’s
medical care, including abortion information) 895-
5555
SIDS Hotline: (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome) 800-
221-SIDS
South Florida HealthUne: 8256269 (Dade); 800624-3365
(outside Dade)
Spinal Cord UvingAssistance Development (support .
services for physically disabled persons) 887-8838
Survivors of Authority Abuse: (support for those sexually
victimized by trusted professionals) 583-5833
Switchboard of Miami; (suicide hotline) 358-HELP
Vietnam Veterans Hotline: 646-VETS
Women in Distress: (domestic violence hotline) 761- .
1133
Women of Miami Beach (WOMB) Helpline: 5346900
Women's Resource Counseling Center 448-8325
WE'RE
SHAPING UP
SOUTH BEACH
FOR JUST S19,5/M0NTH'NO CONTRACT
ERIC MCDUFFIE’S
SHAPEUP
IIIII III I UNLIMITED
FITNESS & AEROBIC CENTER
1SOO WEST AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH'538-0660
'Golf's'Best Local'Value
Great Golf!
Great Greens!
Great Price!
Green Fee & 7/2 Cart
25^
Includes
Tax .
After 3pm
Not valid for Holidays or ' Must present coupon.
Tournaments. Valid M-F, Expires February 23rd, 1995
After 11:30.Sat./Sun.
^¡Vdale iÁ***
Golf & Country Club
6401 Kendale Lakes Drive
American Golf.
Tee Times 382-3935
â–  k. \ presents the Eighth Annual
^ • featuring
M *4 NESTOR
\n7X TORRES
IV* dots
with special guests
.derM0'5
New Concert Field outside of MetroZoo
12400 SW 152 St., Miami
(concert field directly across from parking area of zoo)
Admission $12.50 advance, $15.00 at gate
Children 5 & under free
Sorry, no other discounts, for info, call 238-0703
¿OUkHDADc
LiGHCmG
piCd
tSKT
Ticket Sales Locations
Chamber South - 900 Perrine Ave - 238-7192
Miami Acura - S. Dixie Hwy at 166St. - 232-1400
Curbside Florist - 30382 Dixie Shopping Center - 247-2668
& 16115 SW 117 Ave. #10 - 233-2668
Largo Honda - mm 100 - 374-5499
Coconut Grove Playhouse - 442-4000
Esserman Acura - 10455 MW 12St. - 477-6666
Esserman Missan - 16725 MW 57th Ave. - 626-2600
r. (305) 358-5885
it <305) 523-3309
ii (407) 966-3309
Student Center Bldg. - MDCC north, room 4208 - 11380 nw 27 Ave. - 237-1250 Cash Only
MetroZoo - 12400 SW 152St. - 251-0401
jF,e|»|ru^rv 16-22, 1995
I'l-S IsSI
New Times Page 53
,7 t)ft w < ? -3 ^ r k « F : - S


The Award-Winning School
1 737 North Bayshore Drive, Miami, FL 33132
(305) 995-5000 1-(800)-225-9023 FAX (305) 374-5933
John Andexler Edward Wiseman Rosie Perez Rosanna Reyes Iggy Virgin
Commercial Art' Computer Graphics Fashion Design FashionMerchandising Interior Design
WINNER WINNER WINNER WINNER WINNER
Register Now - Classes begin Late August - Financial Aid available
O Commercial Art
O Computer Graphics
O Fashion Design
- Accredited by SACS and FIDER
SEND FOR FREE CATALOG!
I'd Like More Information
International Fine arts College
1737 North Bayshore Drive
Miami, FL 33132
Tel: (305) 995-5000 1 - (8Ó0)- 225-9023
Fax: (305) 374-5933 -
O Fashion Merchandising
O Interior Design
Name . / â–  _ _ ,
Address
City - _State 'Zip
Tel: ( ) HS Grad. YR.
page 54 New ‘Times
February iflM22; 1995


A By the time they
get to Tucson:
Whoopi Goldberg
and Mary-Louise
Parker make
beautiful music
together
Boys on the Side.
With Whoopi
Goldberg,
Mary-Louise
Parker,and
Drew Barrymore.
â– 
the odds and drum up something akin to real chem¬
istry. Barrymore, in particular, is a treat. But just
when the film threatens to become interesting, Ross
and Roos stop it dead in its tracks. Robin’s illness
kicks in, she is hospitalized, and the women are
forced to spend a few months in Tucson while she
convalesces. Like their road trip, the movie
screeches to an immediate halt
To say that this rickety vehicle gets stuck in idle
would be hyping it. Boys on the Side runs out of gas,
throws a rod, blows a tire, loses oil, rusts, rolls over,
and dies. And I haven’t even mentioned the nonsen¬
sical courtroom drama (which gives the filmmakers
a chance to add Philadelphia to the list of films they
rip off) or the ridiculously racially and ethnically har¬
monious lesbian cowboy bar where politically cor¬
rect Tucsonians can dance to live sets by the Indigo
Girls.
If you really want to see Herbert Ross at his pan¬
dering, button-pushing, manipulative worst, the last
half hour of this film is your ticket. It’s a treacly,
phony, sentimental mess. The director couldn’t have
topped it if he’d had his entire cast hold hands, turn
to the camera, and sing, “We are family/I got all my
sisters with me!” But I suppose he had to hold some¬
thing in reserve for his next project. CD
Side Dishes
By Todd Anthony
Somebody please shoot me the next time I decide to
attend a Herbert Ross movie. It seems like a century
ago that the veteran hack made his best film, 1971’s
Play It Again, Sam. And even then the picture’s suc¬
cess was undoubtedly attributable in greater mea¬
sure to Woody Allen’s contributions than to Ross’s.
After all, the movie was adapted from Allen’s play
and starred the bespectacled little schlemiel. Hell, I
could have directed it, and it still would have been
good.
Ross’s career peaked in 1977 with The Turning
Point and The Goodbye Girl, both of which were oth¬
erwise mediocre films redeemed by marvelous,
unconventional performances: Mikhail Barysh¬
nikov’s dancing in the former film, and Richard
Dreyfuss’s Academy Award-winning comic turn as a
struggling actor forced to play a gay Richard III in
the latter movie. More damningly, Ross is the culprit
responsible for two of the wretehedest wastes of cel¬
luloid to find popular audiences in the Eighties:
Flashdance and Footloose. And as if those tasteless,
brainless schlockfests weren’t enough to secure his
place in filmmaking infamy, Ross perpetrated
{directed is too kind a word) what may have been the
prototypical weepy, contrived, cliché-ridden, politi¬
cally correct women’s film: the indefensible Steel
Magnolias.
Like that 1989 poor woman’s Terms of Endear¬
ment, Ross’s new film, Boys on the Side, borrows heav¬
ily from another funnier, darker, edgier, all-round
better predecessor: Thelma & Louise. At least this
time out Ross has the grace to acknowledge the
debt owed to his film’s role model. Early on in Boys,
Whoopi Goldberg’s Jane, a lesbian lounge singer,
alludes to the fate that awaited Thelma and Louise.
After teaming up with two. traveling companions
(Robin and Holly) to serve a cretinous male his
comeuppance, she tells her new pals, “I am not
going over a cliff for you two, so
just forget it”
Once again, Ross gets unex¬
pected help from a cast that looks,
on paper, like a disaster waiting to
happen. When was the last time
Whoopi Goldberg was actually
funny in a movie? (Come to think
of it, was she ever?) There are a
few surprising moments here —
nearly all of them in the early
going—when Goldberg drops the
wisecracking-world-weary-street-
sawy-mama shtick and displays an
appealing vulnerability. Flashes of
acting ability are better than none
at all. If you’ve seen either of the
Sister Act movies, you know what I
mean.
Jane has a tendency to develop
killer crushes on straight women.
Against all logic, she agrees to
ride-share across country with
Robin, "the whitest woman in
America,” played by Mary-Louise
Parker. Gust in case the visual con¬
trast between Goldberg and Park¬
er isn’t striking enough, the
honky honey drives a mini-
van, worships the Carpen¬
ters, and forces Goldberg to
watch The Way We Were.
Subtlety? Who needs it?) Formula dictates
that the two will clash at first, only to bond
later on, and Ross is nothing if not a formula-
followin’ fool. Ross’s accomplice, screen¬
writer Don Roos {Single White Female),
stacks the melodrama deck by giving
Parker’s character a secret incurable illness
(see if you can guess which one — remem¬
ber, this is a topical film). By the way,
Parker’S character is straight, so while you’re pon¬
dering her illness, see if you can figure out what
other layer of complication this adds to their inter¬
personal dynamic. „
Ross and Roos aren’t finished yet. Our intrepid
duo stops in Pittsburgh (home of Flashdance!) to
pick up Holly (Drew Barrymore), an old friend of
Jane’s. Holly is the token nymphet of the group. Of
course, she has a secret, too. (Hey, these are the
Nineties. No one has premarital sex without paying
for it.) She also has an abusive, drug-dealing
boyfriend who must be overcome and accidentally
killed to generate tension when our intrepid trio hits
the road.
Amazingly, the film works in spite of itself for a
while. It’s a sort of 3 Women meets Thelma & Louise
via Fried Green Tomatoes, but the three stars defy
When was the last time
Whoopi Goldberg was funny
in a movieP Come to think
of it, was she ever?
Seeing Red
You can’t get much of a feel for any of the films in
Polish auteur Krzysztof Kiéslowski’s three-colors
trilogy from an examination of their respective
plots. It would be like trying to guess the color of
a man’s eyes by looking at his skeleton.
Red is the final installment in Kiéslowski’s trip¬
tych (it follows 1993’s Blue, with Juliette Binoche
and Benoit Regent, and last year’s White, with
Zbigniew Zamachowski and Julie Delpy). Each of
the three is loosely based on one of the ideals of
the French Revolution — liberty, equality, and
fraternity. So loosely, in fact, that some of Kiés¬
lowski’s detractors have labeled the whole trilogy
concept little more than art elaborate marketing
gimmick.
To each his own. What one critic labels “scam”
another considers “genius.” While I really
wouldn’t want to defend Kiéslowski in a court¬
room against charges of pretentiousness and arti¬
fice, neither would I want to prosecute him for
fraudulent moviemaking. Kiéslowski is more
impressionist than realist; Red is more, tone
poem than novel.
What story exists is set in motion when
Valentine, a twentysomething Geneva fashion
model (played to melancholy perfection by the
softly luminous Irene Jacob), hits a dog with
her car. The wounded German shepherd
belongs to a crusty, reclusive, misanthropic
retired judge. (The illustrious French actor
Jean-Louis Trintignant plays the judge’s role
with compelling gravity and restraint.) While
not readily apparent, the young woman and
the old man share some significant common
ground. Both have loved and lost (the judge
smarts from a romantic betrayal suffered decades
earlier; the model’s boyfriend lives in England
and does not reciprocate her- affection) and both
battle paralyzing guilt. Her brother is an incorri¬
gible drug addict; the judge regrets sentencing to
prison scores of people for whom he felt a pro-
Kiéslowski is more
impressionist than
realist; Red is more tone
Red.
Written by
Krzysztof
Piesiewicz and
Krzysztof
Kiéslowski;
directed by
Krzysztof
Kiéslowski; with
poem than novel.
Jean-Louis
Trintignant.
found empathy. “In their place, I’d lie, I’d cheat,
I’d steal,” he admits.
Both model and judge have become emotion-
Continued on page 56
February. ¡L6-72JS, 1995
New fimes Page 55


ti* AMERICAN PAWN $
^“PAWNOGRAPHY”-""’
(pon áq’ re fe) n the study of human nature under extreme financial stress
"Voted Best Pawn Shop by New Times 1993 & 1994”
BUY • SELL' PAWN • All Items of Value
Jewelry Sold Below Wholesale
No Guns
PROFESSIONAL • CONFIDENTIAL
769-1501
13009 NW 7th Ave N Miami
N 0 M I
INCLUDING
BEST PICTURE
Best Director
ROBERT ZEMECKIS
Best Actor
TOM HANKS
GOLDEN GLOBE WINNER
A T I 0 N S
Tom HankSis
Forrest
Geesrd Qaira't
INTRACOASTALTHEATRE
Soney kiss Mvd.
3701 ILL 163rd SI.
MS-741 i
Cobb Theatres
KENDALL 9
Ktndal drive
W. OF FL Turnpike
S98-S000
Wometco's
FLORIDA 4
Holywood Mail
987-9350
General Cinema's
PEMBROKE PINES 8
S.W. Pines Blvd. 8
Flamingo Rood
437-7790
Cobb'»
MAYFAIR 10 CINEMAS
3370 Mary St., Surto 380
Above Planet Holywood
447-9969
United Artist»
MOVIES AT
THE FALLS
U.S. 1 8 S.W. 136th St.
255-5200
United Artist»
MOVIES AT
HIALEAH
780 West 49* Street
826-7242
Cobb Theatres
MIAMI LAKES 10
AT Main 8 ludlam
558-3810
Wometco's
MIRACLE 4
280 Mirado Ml#
Coral Gable»
443-5201
AMC Theatres
BAKERY CENTRE 7
U S. 1 At Red Road
(57* Ave.)
662-4041
Cobb Theatres
MILLER SQUARE 8
S.W. 138 Ave.
387-3494
Cobb Theatres
BYRON/CARLYLE 7
500-71 Street
Miami Beads
866-9623
1 Alto in Broward ah Coral Springs, Gateway, Moños at Lauderhill, Movies
1 Sown rats. Weston. Swap» hop. Coral Square. Shodowood. Delray 10.
at Plantation, Movies at Pompano, Movies at Townconter, Invorrary,
1
| NO ROSSES OR COUPONS ACCEPTED | |
Seeing
Continued from page 55
ally isolated. Kiéslowski takes great pains
to define the spaces between characters
who have painted themselves into spiritual
corners. Valentine’s contact with her
absent lover is limited to the telephone.
The judge lives alone and spends a lot of
time on the telephone, as well — eaves¬
dropping on his neighbors via a wiretap.
But when Valentine returns the injured
dog to its owner, a spark of connection
crackles between the winsome model and
the cranky, cynical old man. He cajoles
and provokes; she sees through the verbal
abuse and returns fire in her own kinder,
gentler way. Ever so slowly they draw each
other out of their respective shells. The
two form a strong bond that, were it not for
their age difference, might evolve from pla¬
tonic friendship into romantic love.
Meanwhile a diligent young law student
named Auguste (Jean-Pierre Lorit) pre¬
pares for exams to become a judge. He and
Valentine live in apartments a few doors
apart from one another but never have spo-
Red light: Irene Jacob illuminates Krzysztof
Kiéslowski’s Red
ken in spite of the fact that they probably
pass each other every day. Auguste has a
girlfriend who is cheating on him. When
he finds out about the affair, the resultant
grief threatens to consume him just as the
elder judge’s did. The young man’s life
eerily parallels the judge’s, and the suspi¬
cion grows that he and Valentine are
meant for each other. But will destiny
intervene and introduce Valentine into
Auguste’s life in time to save him from the
older man’s fate?
Red turns on chance. Valentine’s colli¬
sion with the dog gets the narrative
rolling; the series of near-meetings
between Valentine and Auguste seems to
suggest a higher authority at work, an
invisible hand guiding the characters’
lives. A freak accident in the final act not
only tidily closes Red, but also serves as a
postscript for Blue and White, even as it
links the three installments.
In the words of Polish poet Wislawa
Szymborska, whom Kiéslowski quotes in
the press notes for the movie, “The book
of fate is always open in the middle.”
Krzysztof Kiéslowski is one of the few film¬
makers alive today who understand that
book well enough to add a few pages of his
own. And he underlines them in Red.
- Todd Anthony
TIMELESS STARS
IN A NEW LIGHT
JAZZ AT LINCOLN
CENTER:THE
MAJESTY
OF LOUIS
ARMSTRONG
February 25
$24.50/19.00
THE BEST OF
LATIN JAZZ!
Eddie Palmieri Octet
& Poncho Sanchez
with special guest
Mongo
Santamaría
Saturday, April 8
$29.00/26.00
Tickets available at
the Gusman Box
Office 372-0925 or
mm: (305) 358-5885
brou akp (305)523-3309
'alai bk-u ii (407) 966-3309
GUSMAN
CENTER
.174 Flagler Street Downtown Miami
o
These events are sponsored with the support
of the Metropolitan Dade County Cultural
Affairs Council and the Metropolitan Dade
County Board of Commissioners
February 16—22, 1995
Page 56 New Times


Fill
m
m
Fil
m S
j a p s u
les
The following are capsule reviews of movies opening this
week, or currently showing, in the Greater Miami area. For
information about movie times and locations, see
"Showtimes,” contact local theaters, or call 888-FILM, a
free service.
Openings
The Brady Bunch Movie (PG-13): America’s inexorable
slide into complete cultural debasement takes another
step forward with this third-rate movie derived from a
witless TV series.
Guaguasi (U): Revival of a black comedy about the
Cuban revolution. The film, which boasts Andy Garcia
in a bit part, ignited controversy over its even-
handedness (both sides take their lumps) when it first
played Miami in 1987.
Heavyweights (PG): A movie about misfit kids sent
away to “fat camp.” No Meatballs jokes, please.
Just Cause (IQ: Remember when the MacArthur
Causeway was closed for six nights last summer? It
was to shoot a scene for this movie. Sean Conneiy
plays against type as a Harvard law professor opposed
to capital punishment who agrees to help a death-row
inmate (Blair Underwood) with his last-minute appeal.
Connery butts heads with the small-town police
detective (Laurence Fishbume) who put the convict
away and remains convinced of his guilt The thriller,
shot in and around South Florida, is from the novel by
former Miami Herald reporter John Katzenbach.
Mr. Payback (PG-13) : Billed as “the world’s first
interactive movie,” the gimmick here is that the
audience dictates the on-screen action. Written and
directed by Bob. Gale, who co-wrote the Back to the
Future series.
Strawberry and Chocolate (IQ: Sex and politics are the
flavors of the day in a Havana ice cream parlor. Co¬
directors Tomás Gutierrez Alea (.Memories of
Underdevelopment) and Juan Carlos Tabio spoon on
plenty of sweet comedy, and top their tropical
confection off with a dash of compassion.
Ongoing
Bad Company (R): A sort of Spy vs. Spy with a
Hollywood sheen. Out-of-fávor CIA operative
Laurence Fishbume infiltrates a private company
whose stock-in-trade is industrial espionage. The
catch: He finds the financial rewards available in the
private sector extremely tempting, to say nothing of -
his ruthless new mentor Ellen Barkjn.
Before Sunrise (IQ: Director Richard Linklater
(Slacker, Dazed and Confused) plays it straight (by his
standards) in this strangers-on-a-train romance. Ethan
Hawke is an American student with a Eurail pass,
Julié Delpy his French counterpart They share the
Nineties equivalent of a long-term relationship:
fourteen hours in Vienna.
Billy Madison (PG-13): In ord^to win his father’s
respect control of his family’s multi-million dollar
business, and freedom from his Saturday Night Live
contract Adam Sandler must repeat all twelve grades
of school in less than six months.
Boys on the Side (R): Reviewed in this issue.
Bullets Over Broadway (R): Woody Allen takes bn the
Roaring Twenties in this deft and droll exercise in
tomfoolery on the Great White Way. With Allen
pulling the trigger, the one-liners fly like lead from a
bootlegger’s Tommy gun.
Death and the Maiden (IQ: Sigourney Weaver stars as
an emotionally scarred avenging angel who meets a
man she believes raped and tortured her fifteen years
éarlier as part of a government crackdown on leftists.
Roman Polanski washes away the aftertaste left by
Bitter Moon with this riveting allegorical three-
character drama that questions the line between
revenge and justice.
Heavenly Creatures (R): An intense, exhilarating
friendship between two imaginative teenage girls
leads to murder. Based on New Zealand’s notorious
Parker-Hulme murder case.
Higher Learning (R): John Singleton (Boys N the Hood,
Poetic Justice) directs a heavy-handed polemic about
racial tensions that explode into violence on the
campus of fictitious Columbus University. While it’s
undoubtedly meant to serve as a microcosm for
American society, the college backdrop allows
Singleton-te address-topical issues-such asdafe rape, 5
cultural alienation, and the conflict between sports
and academics.
Immortal Beloved (R): Let no one accuse Gary Oldman
of playing it safe. After redefining sleaze as a
psychotic pimp in True Romance and a corrupt narc in
The Professional, Oldman trades white kilos for ivory
keys as the tempestuous, hard-of-hearing,
womanizing composer Ludwig Van Beethoven in this
pseudo-biopic. Apparently Oldman took the period
romance to heart; during filming he popped the
question to onscreen love interest Isabella Rossellini.
In the Mouth of Madness (IQ: An investigation into the
disappearance of the world’s most popular horror
writer leads to a fictional village that can only be found
in the author’s books. John Carpenter (Halloween, The
Fog) directs from a screenplay written by New Line
Cinema wonder-boy studio exec Michael De Luca.
(Wait a minute — a studio honcho who can read and
write? Must be an inside joke.)
Little Women (PG): No, the title doesn’t refer to the
smurf-like physical stature of stars Winona Ryder,
Kirsten (Interview With the Vampire) Dunst, or Claire
(My So-Called Life) Danes. This is the third cinematic
adaptation of Louisa May Alcotfs beloved 1868 novel.
Director Gillian Armstrong (My Brilliant Career, The
Last Days of Chez Nous) puts a Nineties feminist spin
on the classic tale of Mrs. March’s four daughters
growing up in New England during the Civil War.
The Madness of King George.(U): As Charles and Di and
Fergie and Andy and the whole soddy lot have
proven, the British Royal Family has never had much
success keeping its scandals under wraps. Back in
1788, King George III had a few problems of his own.
This cinematic adaptation of Alan Bennett’s droll,
cynical stage play The Madness ofGebrge III examines
the power struggle that must Have erupted when, 30
years into his reign and obsessed by his loss of the
colonies in North America, George slid fitfully into
dementia while various members of the Royal. Family
did their best to either capitalize on or coyer up the
king’s condition.
Miami Rhapsody (PG-13): Gwyn (Sarah Jessica Parker),
the film’s pessimistic copywriting protagonist, is a
woman whose earnest zoologist fiancé cannot defrost
her cold feet at the prospect of marriage. The
extramarital shenanigans of her parents and siblings
don’t help. As it did in his short-lived (but critically
acclaimed) TV series Grapevine, modem Miami
provides the setting and informs the gestalt of writer-
director David Frankel’s witty, spunky, glossy look at
love and infidelity in the Nineties. While Woody Allen
£ comparisons are probably inevitable (a wisecracking,
mildly neurotic main character kvetches about the
foibles of modem relationships; Mia Farrow-costars),
Frankel’s work has more in common with Paul
Mazursky’s (Blume in Love, Scenes From a Mall) than
it does with the Woodman’s. And Whatdaya know—
Mazursky plays Gwyn’s father in this film.
Murder in the first (R): Kevin Bacon is the con and
Christian Slater is the suit in this drama based on a
true story. An unlikely friendship arises between a
privileged, idealistic attorney and his troubled client, a
prisoner who murdered a snitch in front of 200
witnesses. By citing the unspeakable brutality and
inhumanity of the jailbird’s incarceration the noble
lawyer (hey, it’s a movie) sparks a fierce legal battle
that marks the beginning of the end ofAlcatraz as a
penal institution. Your basic light, escapist holiday
fare.
Nobody's Fool (IQ: Paul Newman playing an
unemployed construction worker rings about as true
as Brace Springsteen singingabout the hardships of
blue-collar life. Still, the man can act, and writer-
director Robert Benton (Kramer vs. Kramer, Places in
the Heart) knows a thing or two about
characterization and snappy dialogue. The movie tries
so hard to make you like it that ultimately it’s easier to
concede than it is to hold out
The Quick and the Dead (R): Redemption isn’t just the
theme of this gender-bending fantasy western from
cult director Sam (Evil Dead, Darkmart) Raimi, it’s
also the nadie of the town where a mysterious
gunslinger (Sharon Stone) seeks revenge against the
despotictownbully, Herod (Gene Hackman).
Red (IQ : Reviewed in this issue.
Too Outrageous Animation (NC-17): One good thing
about having the country run by rabid conservative pit
bulls like Jesse Helms and Newt Gingrich is that it
feels like you’re doing something naughty—
subversive, even — when you view compilations Jike
this. How outrageous is Too Outrageous? To quote the
film’s own publicity materials: “as many revolting,
disgusting, painful, and obscene images as [the
animators] can conjure.. .crowd-pleasing topics such
as: blood, guts, hospitals, sex, amputation,
masturbation, extra-terrestrials, killers, animal torture)
drunkenness, butt jokes, penises, sexual inadequacy,
rock and roll, electrocution, nymphomania, bestiality,
oral sex, auto-eroticism, taxes, Witchcraft, internal -
organs, bird feces, vomiting, tooth decay, parking
tickets, birth defects, scabs, farting, and people of East
Indian descent” Take a Republican.
“A TRIUMPHANT SUCCESS!
A stinging comedy of s«x and politics.,.‘Strawberry and
Chocolate* kicks off the movie year on a high note,**
KOLUKC STOW
"A TASTY SUNDAE!
A bittersweet love story,
iftwxws Htm *©5T ;
IRRESISTIBLE!
Warm, funny and wise.
A triumphant taler
STRAWBERRY
“CHOCOLATE
SAVOR THE FLAVOR
/HUcuicee Gln&ma,
927 Lincoln Road • Miami Beach. • 531-8504
. Miami's Only Art Cinema • Call For Showtimes
SHEREAN PLAZA 12
4909 SHE ROAN STREET
HOLLYWOOO
967-4680
AMC THEATRES
BAKERY CENTRE 7
US-' AT RED no
(S.W.STTHAVE.)
662-4841
KENDALL TOWN
& COUNTRY 10
FIATM «KENDALL OR
271-8198
MALL OF THE
AMERICAS 14
HWMETTOXWYM*
266-6646
OCEAÑWALK10
OCEAMMALKIMU.
HOU3ANOOO BUD • A1A
920-6330
OMN110
OMNI MTERNAnQNAL.
NEXT TO FOOTLOCKER
372-3430
AMC THEATRES
SOUTH DADE 8
03.1 AT B.W. ttSTH ST.
238-4424
WWICO THEATERS
CALIFORNIA CLUB 6
â– so web oury no.
(1MUWOMB5)
652-6558
oooa
MIAMI LAKES 10
AT MAIN A LUOLAM
558-3810
MAYFAIR 10
CMEMA8
ABOVE PLANET HOU.YWO
IN THE GROVE
447-9960
UNIVERSITY 7
SW H>7 AVE-OPP Flu
223-2700
MILLER SQUARE 8
13B3B SW SBTH ST. .
387-3484
MAM BEACH
COBB
BYRON-CAHLYLE
MO-71 STREET
866-9623
N. MAM BEACH
OMRALCMOM
INTRACOASTAL 8
3701NE1MROST
945-7416
SOUTH BROA ARO
OCN0ULCMEMA
PEMBROKE PINES
sw rtet auesnAUMdo no
437-7790
OENBULCMEMA
CINEMA 10 •
MIRACLE CENTER
3301 CORAL WAY
442-2299
UMTEDAfmSTS
MOVIES AT
HIALEAH
7MW.46THST.
826-7242
UMTEDARTSTS
MOVIES AT
THE FALLS
U.S. 1 a S.W. 138TH ST.
255-5200
OCEAN CBCMAS
LEJEUNE CINEMA 6
7TH 8T B NW IE JUENTRO
5298883
ALSO Ah MOWESRAWWnON. AME BO. -MARKETPLACE.
BOYNTON. OETJtAY 10. CORAL ROOE 10. FCK FESTIVAL. FOK
SOMUSE COBB SAWORA3S COBB tHAOOWOOO. COBB
LAAEWORIH MZNERMRK.POA. CORAL80.CINEMA.
DEEBRELD OHMM. WESTON. MOWCS OP DELRAY, SWAP
SHOP ai. GATEWAY MERCEDES. PONRANOCMMA.
SEAN CONNERY
LAURENCE FISHBURNE
JUST CAUSE
co¬
mm
MB
n
ii
M-uunuiu oimmiii “imimmi
„««»»»• ’ | SOUNDTRAOL AlH-OJ OX VAREg SARASANDE CDs CASSETTES |
NOW SHOWING
“EXTRAORDINARY!
The best thriller since
'Silence of the Lambs'!'
-Susan Granger,
CRN & AMERICAN MOVIE CLASSICS
'A riveting,
ACTION-PACKED
thriller! Brimming
with suspense.
Sean Connery,
Laurence Fishbume
and Blair Underwood
shine."
-Ne« Rosen. NY 1-NEWS
"An edge-of-the-seal
psychological, thriller
That keeps you guess¬
ing until the final
scenes."
-Bobbie Wygant,
KXAS-TV (NBC)
'The first MUST-SEE
picture of 1995!. .
Brilliant, exciting and
provocative. First-
class entertainment.
Don’t miss it!"
-Paul Wunder. WBAI RADIO
“EXPLOSIVE.
RIVETING.”
-Jules Peimer. WKDM RADIO
February 16-22, 1995
New Times Page 57


STARTS FRIDAY
COBB THEATRES
BYRON/CARLYLE 7
500-71 STREET v
MIAMI BEACH
866-9623
COBB THEATRES
MILLER SQUARE 8
S.W. 138 AVE.
387-3494
AMC THEATRES
KENDALL TOWN
ft COUNTRY 10
HA. TPKE. AT KENDALL DR.
271-8198
AMC THEATRES
-BAKERY CENTRE 7
U.S.1 AT RED ROAD
(57TH AVE.)
662-4841
COBB THEATRES
MIAMI LAKES 10
AT MAIN ft LUDLAM
558-3810
AMC
MALL OF
THE AMERICAS
PALMETTO X-WAY ft 836
266-6646
COBB THEATRES
UNIVERSITY 7
S.W. 107THAVE.
OPP.FIU
223-2700
AMC THEATRES
FASHION ISLAND 16
18741 BISCAYNE
BLVD.
931-2873
WOMETCO’S
MIRACLE 4
280 MIRACLE MILE
CORAL GABLES
443-5201
OCEAN CINEMA
LEJEUNE CINEMA 6
N.W.7THST.
ft LEJEUNE RD.
529-8883
UNITED ARTISTS
MOVIES AT
THE FALLS
U.S.1 ft S.W.136TH ST.
255-5200
AMC THEATRES
SOUTH DADE 8
U.S. lftS.W. 185THST.
238-4424
AMC THEATRES
SHERIDAN PLAZA 12
4999 SHERIDAN ST.
HOLLYWOOD
987-4680
AMC THEATRES
OCEAN WALK 10
333 HARRISON ST.
HOLLYWOOD BEACH
920-6330
UNITED ARTISTS
MOVIES AT PEMBROKE
3 Ml. W. UNIV.BLVD.
ON PINES BLVD.
435-3700
MUV1CO THEATERS
CALIFORNIA CLUB 6
850 IVES DAIRY RD.
652-8558
ET
AMC THEATRES
OMNI 10
OMNI INTERNATIONAL
358-2304
AMC THEATRES
COCO WALK 16
3015 GRAND AVE.
448-6641
GENERAL CINEMA'S
HIALEAH 8
PALMETTO EXPWY., ft
N.W. 103RO.ST.
557-9888
Also In Broward at: Coral Ridge, Fox Sunrise, Movies at
Plantation, Sawgrass, Weston, Mercedes, Swapshop, Fox
Pompano, Sun Vista Pompano, Coral Springs, Mlzner,
Shaaowood, Delray 10.
I NO PASSES CR COUPONS ACCEPTED] UMt IIMrU.
Offering full HIV related services related to
foot & leg, burning feet, all skin problems ofthe
feet and legs, Corns, Callouses, Bunions,
Hammertoes, Heelspurs, Ingrown Toe Nails,
Sport related injuries, Nutritional Counseling
and Exercise Programs. Medicare, Medicaid &
Private Insurance Accepted. Free Consultation
upon request
D O’ C T O R
AQAMD.AUSIER
P O D 1 A T R I C
PHYSICIAN
S. Miami, 7000 SW 62nd Avenue. Suite 400,665-0585
Miami Beach,777 17th St Suite 400 673-3555
ACUPUNCTURE
MASSAGE
PROGRAM
* Last chance for
Two year
Acupuncture
Physican program
* Six month
Massage
Therapy program
Classes Begin
Feb. 20th, 1995
Refreshments served
The above minimal fees only. The patient and any other person
responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment
or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination
or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours
and responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee, or
reduced fee service, examination or treatment
ACUPRESSURE
ACUPUNCTURE INSTITUTE
98-35 Sunset Dr. 595-9500
STARTS FRIDAY,FEBRUARY 17!
AMC THEATRES
FASHION ISLAND 16
18741 Biscayne BM. 0 187th St
931-2873
AMC THEATRES
C0C0WALK 16
3015 Grand Ave.
448-6641
GENERAL CINEMA
HIALEAH CINEMA 8
103rd St Opposite Westland Mall
57-9888
ALLIANCE CINEMA
927 Lincoln Rd. Miami Beach
531-8504
WOMETCO
MIRACLE 4
280 Miracle Mile, Coral Gables
443-5201
IN BROWARD: FOX SUNRISE. IN BOCA: SHAD0W00D
AN ARTIÍ!. A ROMANTIC. A REVOLUTIONARY.
WITH THE PROPER MM! Li CAN II DELICIOUS
“TRIUMPHANT!
A stinging comedy of sex and politics.
-Peter Travers, ROLLING STONE
“A TASTY SUNDAE!
A bittersweet love story.”
•Thelma Adams, NEW YORK POST
MIRAMAX
“IRRESISTIBLE!
Warm, funny and wise.
A triumphant tale!"
-Kevin Thomas, LOS ANGELES TIMES
ROBERT REDFORD and MIRAMAX FILM! meient
STRAWBERRY
"CHOCOLATE
SAVOR THE FLAVOR
ARTWORK 01994 MIRAMAX FILMS. ALL RKJMT8 RESERVED
*n irf'tlWIF* w 1 â–  x ARTWORK 01994 MIRAMAX FILMS. ALL HIUHT5 ntstnvcl
JKJ|VI»TWA«>TBWOl 01994 FRANCA pelster FILMS, all rights reserved
Body Beautifid
~ Surgery ofthe Breast
~ Liposuction
~ Tummy Tucks
%
~ Facelifts
~ Plastic Surgery of the nose
~ Plastic Surgery of the chin
~ Financing Available
Aesthetic Surgery by
Joel L.Roskind, M.D., F.A.C.S.
o.
American Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeons, Inc.
Certified by The American Board of Plastic Surgery
8700 North Kendall Drive • Suite 101 • (305) 595-4281
I
Page 58 New Times
FebrMaryül6-122^ 1995


Fi
lm
|13?|
Showtimes
Following is a schedule for movies opening and currently
screening at local theaters. All times p.m. unless otherwise
noted. A * indicates a movie that opens this week. All movie
times are subject to change without notice; please call
individual theaters or 8.88-FILM (a free service) to confirm.
Downtown-Gables-Grove
Astor Art Cinema
4120 Laguna St; 4436777
Red (R) Thur 2/16 only 6:00,8:00
Heavenly Creatures (R) Thur 2/16 only 10:00
«You Men Are All the Same (U) Daily 6:00,10:00 (Sat-Sun
matinee 2:00)
«Guaguasi (U) Daily 8:00 (Sat-Sun matinee 4:00)
CocoWalk 16
3015 Grand Ave; 448-6641
Pulp Fiction (R) Thur 1:05,4:30,7:30,10:25; Fri-Sun 1:05,
4:10,7:30,10:40; Mon-Wed 1:05,4:30,7:30,10:25.
Disclosure (R) Thur 2:05,5:20,8:00,10:35; Fri-Sun 2:05,
5:15,8:00,10:45; Mon-Wed 2:05,5:20,8:00,10:35
Richie Rich (PG) Thur 2/16 only 1:15,5:15,7:45,9:55
Hie Last Seduction (U) Thur 2/16 only 1:20,5:10,7:40,
10:05
Hie Jungle Book (PG) Thur 2/16 only 2:00,5:00
Little Women (PG) Thur 1:35,5:05,7:35,10:00; Fri-Sun
1:30,5:05,7:35,9:55 (Fri-Sat late show 12:10a); Mon-Wed
1:35,5:05,7:35,9:55
Immortal Beloved (R) Thur 2:00,5:20,7:55,10:30; Fri-Sun
12:30,2:55,5:25,7:55,10:30 (FriSatlate show 12:45a);
Mon-Wed 2:00,5:20,7:55,10:30
Highlander - Hie Final Dimension (PG-13) Thur 1:50,5:40,
8:10,10:20; Fri-Sun 3:30,8:35; Mon-Wed 5:00,10:35'
To Live (II) Thur 1:30,4:45,7:30,10:15; Fri-Sun 1:30,4:30,
7:30,10:30; Mon-Wed 1:30,4:45,7:30,10.T5
Boys on the Side (R) Thur 1:40,5:15,7:50,10:15; Fri-Sun
12:30,2:50,5:20,7:50,10:20 (Fri-Sat late show 12:40a);
Mon-Wed 1:40,5:15,7:50,10:15
Miami Rhapsody (PG-13) Thur 2:00,5:30,7:45,10:00; Fri-
Sun 12:50,2:45,5:00,7:45,10:05 (FriSat late show
12:15a); Mon-Wed 2:00,5:30,7:45,10:00
Billy Madison (PG-13) Thur 1:45,5:40,7:55,9:55; Fri-Sun
1:15,3:15,5:30,7:55,9:55 (FriSat late show 12:00m);
Mon-Wed 1:45,5:40,7:55,9:55
Houseguest (PG) Thur 2/16 only 1:30,5:30,8:00,10:10
«Strawberry and Chocolate (R) Fri-Sun 12:30, l:3t), 3:00,
4:30,5:30,7:30,8:00,10:00,10:30 (Fri-Sat late show
12:30a); Mon-Wed 1:00,1:30,4:30,5:30,7:30,8:00,10:00,
10:30
«Heavyweights (PG) Fri-Sun 1:00,3:05,5:30,7:45,9:55
(FriSatlate show 12:00m); Mon-Wed 1:30,5:30,7:45,
9:55
«Quiz Show (PG-13) Fri-Sun 1:30,4:45,7:30,10:30; Mon-
Wed 1:30,4:45,7:30,10:15
«Murder in the first (R) FriSun 12:45,5:45,10:45; Mon-
Wed 1:15,7:45
«The Quick and the Dead (R) FriSun 12:45,3:05,5:35,8:05,
10:35 (Fri-Sat late show 12:45a); Mon-Wed 1:15,5:35,
8:00,10:20
•Bullets Over Broadway (R) FriSun 2:00,5:45,8:05,10:20
(Fri-Sat late show 12:25a); Mon-Wed 2:00,5:45,8:05,
10:20
«Mr. Payback (PG-13) Daily 1:00,1:30,2:00,2:30,3:00,
3:30,4:00,4:30,5:00,5:30,6:00,6:30,7:00,7:30,8:00,8:30,
9:00,9:30,10:00,10:30 (Fri-Sat late shows 11:00,11:30,
12:00m, 12:30a)
LeJeune Cinemas 6
782 LeJeuneRd; 529-8883
The Jerky Boys (R) Thur 2/16 only 2:15,4:15,6:15,8:15,
10:15;
In the Mouth of Madness (R) Thur 2:05,4:05,6:05,8:10,
10:15; FriWed 2:05,6:05,8:05,10:10 (FriSat late show
12:15a)
Highlander - The Final Dimension (P6-13) Thur 2:00,4:00,
6:05,8:10,10:10; FriWed 4:05
Streetfighter (PG-13) Thur 2/16 only 2:00,4:00,6:05,8:10,
10:15
Billy Madison (PG-13) Thur 2:00,4:00,6:05,8:10,10:15;
FriWed 2:00,4:00,6:05,8:05,10:05 (FriSat late show
12:05a)
The Quick and the Dead (R) Daily 2:30,5:00,7:30,9:50
(Thur 9:55) (FriSat late show 12:10a)
•Legends of the Fall (R) Daily 2:00,4:40,7:15,9:40 (FriSat
late show 12:05a)
«Heavyweights (PG) Daily 2:00,4:00,6:05,8:10,10:15 (Fri-
Sat late show 12:15a)
«Just Cause (R) Daily 2:30,5:00,7:30,9:50
February 16-22, 1995
(Fri-Sat late show 12:10a)
Cobb's Mayfair 10 Cinema
3390 Mary Street; 447-9969
Dumb and Dumber (PG-13) Daily 12:10,2:40,5:20 (Thur
5:10), 7:50,10:20 (Thur 10:40) (FriSat late show 12:40a)
Legends of the Fall (R) Daily 12:00n, 2:30,5:00,7:40 (Ihur
7:35), 10:20 (FriSatlate show 12:45a)
Nobody’s Fool (R) Thur 12:00n, 2:40,5:00,7:40,10:30; Fri¬
Wed 12:00n, 2:20,4:40,7:30,10:00 (Fri-Sat late show
12:20a)
Murder in the first (R) Thur 2/16 only 12:00n, 2:30,5:00,
7:40,10:20.
Before Sunrise (R) Thur 12:10,2:50,5:10,7:50,10:40; Fri¬
Wed 12:10,5:10,10:40
Death and the Maiden (R) Thur 12:10,2:50,5:20,8:00,
10:40; Fri-Wed 12:20,2:40,5:00, .7:30,9:50 (FriSatlate
show 12:10a)
The Rocky Horror Picture Show (R) Fri-Sat 12:00m only
The Jerky Boys (R) Thur 12:20,2:50,5:30,8:00,10:50; Fri¬
Wed 2:50,7:50’(FriSat late show!2:45a)
In Die Mouth of Madness (R) Thur 2/16 only 12:20,2:50,
5:30,8:00,10:30
The Madness of King George (U) Daily 12:0On, 2:30,5:00,
7:35,10:20 (Fri-Sat late show 12:45a)
Hoop Dreams (R) Thur 12:00n, 3:00,8;10; Fri-Wed 12:40,
5:00,8:30
«Forrest Gump (PG-13) Daily 12:30,3:30,7:00,10:00 (Fri¬
Sat late show 12:40a)
«The Brady Bunch Movie (PG-13) Daily 12:30,2:30,5:00,
7:30,10:00 (FriSatlate show 12:30a)
«Just Cause (R) Daily 12:20,2:40', 5:00,7:50,10:10 (Fri¬
Sat late show 12:30a)
Miracle Center 10
3301 Coral Way; 442-2299
Dumb and Dumber (PG-13) Daily 2:00,5:00,8:00,10:30
Pulp Fiction (R) Daily 2:15,5:30,9:30
Houseguest (PG) Daily 2:00,5:05,7:30,-10:00
Higher Learning (R) Thur 2/16 only 1:45,7:30
Legends of the Fall (R) Daily 1:30,4:20,7:15 (Thur 7:20),,
10:15
Nobody's Fool (R) Thur 2/16 only 1:30,4:15,7:15,10:00
Murder in the First (R) Thur 2/16 only 4:35,10:20
The Jerky Boys (R) Daily 1:30,3:30,5:30,7:40 (Thur 7:45),
10:00 (Thur 10:30)
Boys on the Side (R) Daily 1:40,4:40,7:25 (Thur 7:30),
10:10
In the Mouth of Madness (R) Thur 2:00,5:00,7:50,10:20;
Fri-Wed 1:00,3:00,5:10,7:45,10:25
The Quick and the Dead (R) Thur 1:00,3:10,5:25,7:50,
10:25; FriWed 1:10,3:20,5:35,8:00,10:30
«The Brady Bunch Movie (PG-13) Daily 1:15,3:25,5:35,
8:00,10:15
«Just Cause (R) Daily 1:00,3:10,5:25,7:50,10:25
Miracle IV
280 Miracle Mile; 443-5201
Highlander - The final Dimension (R) Thur 2/16 only 4:45,
7:20,9:20
Little Women (PG) Thur 2/16 only 4:50,7:00,9:15
Immortal Beloved (R) Thur 4:45,7:00,9:15; Fri-Sat 11:00a;
Sun-Mon 11:45a
Billy Madison (PG-13) Thur 5:00,7:30,9:30; Fri 5:00,7:10,
9:00; Sat 1:00,3:00,5:00; 7:10,9:00; Sun-Mon 2:00,3:50,
5:40,7:30,9:30; Tue-Wed 5:00,7:30,9:30
•Forrest Gump (PG-13) Daily 4:30,7:00,9:30 (Sat-Mon
matinee 1:00)
«Heavyweights (PG) Daily 4:50,7:20,9:20 (Sat-Mon
matinees 12:50,2:50; Fri-Sat late show 11:20)
♦Strawberry and Chocolate (R) Daily 4:45,7:15,9:15 (Sat-
Mon matinees 12:45,2:45; FriSat late show 11:15)
Omni 4 and 6
1601 Biscayne Blvd; 372-3439 and 358-2304
Dumb and Dumber (PG-13) Thur 2/16 only 1:40,5:10,7:30,
9:50
Houseguest (PG) Thur 2/16 only 1:40,7:40
Higher Learning (R) Thur 1:30,2:00,5:00,5:30,7:35,8:00, '
10:10,10:30; FriMon 1:30,4:45,7:20,9:55 (Sat early
show 10:00a); Tue-Wed 1:50,4:45,7:20,9:55
Demon Knight (R) Thur 2/16 only 5:10,10:10
Bad Company (R) Thur 1:50,5:40,8:10,10:25; Fri-Mon
1:50,5:45,8:10,10:30 (Sat early show 10:50a); Tue-Wed
1:55,5:45,8:05,10:20
Highlander - The final Dimension (PG-13) Thur 1:45,5:30,
8:00,10:15; FriMon 1:00,3:05,5:10,7:50,10:20 (Sat early
show 10:45a); Tue-Wed 2:00,5:10,7:50,10:10
Boys on the Side (R) Thur 2:00,5:20,7:50,10:20; Fri-Mon
1:40,5:00,8:00,10:35 (Sat early show 10:20a); Tue-Wed
1:40,5:00,7:35,10:05
In the Mouth of Madness (R) Thur 1:50,5:20,7:50,10:20;
FriMon 1:45,5:15,8:00,10:30 (Sat early show 10:30a);
Tue-Wed 1:40,5:15,8:00 (Tue only), 10:20
Billy Madison (PG-13) Thur 1:35,5:30,7:40,10:00; FriMon
1:20,3:20,5:20,7:30,9:40 (Sat-early show 10:55a); Tue-
Wed 1:30,5:20,7:30,9:45
The Quick and the Dead (R) Thur 1:30,5:00,7:30,10:00;
FriMon 1:00,5:00,7:30,10:15 (Sat early show 10:20a);
Tue-Wed 2:00,5:00,7:30,10:10
«Just Cause (R) FriMon 1:00,3:15,5:30,7:45,10:15 (Sat
early show 10:40a); Tue-Wed 1:45,5:30,7:45,10:00
•Heavyweights (PG) Fri-Mon 1:15,3:25,5:30,7:40,9:45
(Sat early show 10:40a); Tue-Wed 1:50,5:30,7:40,9:45
«The Brady Bunch Movie (PG-13) Fri-Mon 1:30,3:35,5:45,
7:50,10:00 (Sat early show 10:50a); TuéWed 1:30,5:45,
7:50,10:00
Riviera
1560 S Dixie Hwy; 666-8514
The Quick and the Dead (R) Daily 1:00,3:10,5:20,7:40,
10:00 (Fri-Sat late show 12:25a)
Nobody's Fool (R) Daily 1:30,4:00,7:00,9:50 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:25a) â– 
Highlander - The Final Dimension (PG-13) Thur 2/16 only
5:40,10:00
Boys on the Side (R) Daily 1:30,4:10,7:00,9:35 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:10a)
The Jerky Boys (R) Thur 2/16 only 1:00,3:15,5:30,7:25,
9:40
Billy Madison (PG-13) Daily 1:00,3:00,5:15,7:30,9:50 (Fri¬
Sat late show 12:00m)
«The Brady Bunch Movie (PG-13) Daily 1:00,3:10,5:20,
7:20,9:30 (Fri-Sat late show 11:45)
Kendall-South Miami-South Dade
Bakery Centre 7
5701 Sunset Dr; 6624841
Dumb and Dumber (PG-13) Thur 2/16 only 1:50,5:30,8:00,
10:25,
Legends of the Fail (R) Thur 1:35,4:50,7:40,10:30; FriSat
1:50,4:50,7:45,10:45; Sun-Mon 1:50,4:50,7:45,10:35;
Tue-Wed 1:55,4:50,7:45,10:35
Pulp Fiction (R)Thur 1:30,4:45,7:40,10:35; FriWed 1:30,
4:45,7:40
In the Mouth of Madness (R) Thur 1:55,5:20,7:55,10:10;
FriWed 10:35 (FriSat late show 12:40a)
Miami Rhapsody (PG-13) Thur 2:00,5:25,7:45,10:00; Fri-
Mon 12:55,3:00,5:15,7:30,10:00 (FriSat late show
12:20a); Tue-Wed 1:55,5:15,7:30,10:00
Highlander-The final Dimension (PG-13)Thur 1:40,5:15,
7:30,10:15; FriSat 12:25a
Quiz Show (PG-13) Daily 1:45,4:55,7:35,10:20 (Thur
10:25)
«Forrest Gump (PG-13) Daily 2:00,5:00,7:50,10:30 (Fri¬
Sat 10:40)
«Just Cause (R) FriMon 1:00,3:15,5:30,8:00,10:30 (Fri¬
Sat late show 12:45a); Tue-Wed 1:40,5:30,' 8:00,
10:30
«Heavyweights (PG) FriMon 1:10,3:20,5:35,7:55,10:15;
Tue-Wed 1:35,5:35,7:55,10:15
Kendall 9
12090 Kendall Dr; 598-5000
Disclosure (R)Thur 1:30,4:20,7:00,9:30; Fri-Wed 1:45,
7:00
Drop Zone (R) Thur 2/16 only 4:00,9:30
Higher Learning (R) Thur 2:25,4:15,7:15,9:45; Fri-Wed
4:15,9:45 (Fri-Sat late show 12:15a)
Nobody's Fool (R) Daily 2:30,4:45,7:15,9:30 (SatSun
matinee 12:15; Fri-Sat late show 12:00m)
Immortal Beloved (R) Thur 2/16 only 1:30,7:00.
Highlander - The final Dimension (R) Daily 2:15,4:30,7:30,
9:40 (Sat-Sun matinee 12:00n; FriSat late show
12:00m)
The Jerky Boys (R) Thur 230,4:30,7:30,9:40; FriWed
2:15,4:45,7:45,10:00 (Sat-Sun matinee 12:00n; Fri-Sat
late show 12:00m)
Boys on the Side (R) Daily 1:30,4:00,7:00,9:30 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:00m)
The Quick and the Dead (R) Daily 2:30,5:00,7:30,9:50 (Sat-
Sun matinee 12:10; FriSat late show 12:00m)
Billy Madison (PG-13) Thur 2:10,4:05,6:00,8:00,10:00;
Fri-Wed 2:15,4:15,6:15,8:15,10:15 (Sat-Sun matinee
12:15; FriSat late show 12:15a) ,
«Forrest Gump (PG-13) Daily 1:30,4:15,7:00,9:45
«The Brady Bunch Movie (PG-13) Daily 2:00,4:00,6:05,
8:00,10:00 (Sat-Sun matinee 12:00n; Fri-Sat late show
12:00m)
Kendall Town & Country
8400 Mills Dr; 271-8198
Richie Rich (PG) Thur 2/16 only 1:25,3:15,5:20
Pulp Fiction (R) Daily 1:45,4:50,7:50,10:40 .
(Ihur 10:35)
Little Women (PG) Thur 1:50,5:15,7:35,9:55; Fri-Wed
1:55 (Sat early show 10:50a)
Houseguest (PG) Thur 1:15,3:20,5:50,8:25,10:30; Fri¬
Wed 1:15,3:25,5:50,8:20,10:35 (Sat early show 10:45a;
Fri-Sat late show 12:40a)
Legends of the Fall (R) Thur 2:00,5:25,8:05,10:25; Fri¬
Wed 2:00,5:05,8:05,10:50
Demon Knight (R) Thur 2/16 only 7:30,9:45
Murder in the first (R)Thur 1:55,5:30,8:05,10:25; Fri¬
Wed 5:35,8:10,10:40 (FriSat late show 12:50a)
Before Sunrise (R) Thur 1:40,3:45,6:00,8:10,10:20; Fri¬
Sat 12:35a
In the Mouth of Madness (R) Daily 1:35,3:40,5:45,8:00,
10:20 (Fri-Sat 10:10) (Sat early show 11:00a; Fri-Sat late
show 12:15a)
Dumb and Dumber (PG-13) Daily 1:20,3:35,5:55,8:15,
10:30 (Thur 10:35) (Sat early show 10:35a)
Miami Rhapsody (PG-13) Daily 1:30,3:30,5:40,7:45,10:00
(Sat early show 10:45a; Fri-Sat late show
12:05a)
«Quiz Show (PG-13) Daily 1:40,5:00,7:40,10:20 (Sat early
show 10:30a; Fri-Sat late show 12:45a)
•Just Cause (R) Daily 1:10,3:20,5:30,7:55,10:15 (Sat
early show 10:55a; FriSat late show 12:25a)
♦Heavyweights (PG) Daily 1:25,3:15,5:20,7:30,9:50 (Sat
early show 10:30a; FriSatlate show 11:55)
Miller Square VIII
13838 Miller Rd; 387-3494
Dumb and Dumber (PG13) Thur 7:10,9:40; FriWed 7:05,
9:40 (Sat-Mon matinees 1:05,4:20; Fri-Sat late show
12:00m)
Legends of the Fall (R) Daily 7:00,9:30 (Sat-Mon matinees
1:10,4:15; Fri-Sat late show 12:00m)
Highlander - The final Dimension (PG-13) Thur 2/16 only
7:00,9:20
The Jerky Boys (R) Thur 2/16 only 7:15,9:15
The Quick and the Dead (R) Thur 7:20,9:40; Fri-Wed 7:10,
9:15 (Sat-Mon matinees 1:20,4:10; FriSatlate show
11:30)
Billy Madison (PG13) Thur 7:25,9:35; FriWed 7:00,9:00
(Sat-Mon matinees 1:00,3:00,5:00; FriSatlate show
11:00)
Houseguest (PG) Thur 2/16 only 7:05,9:25
•Just Cause (R) Daily 7:00 (Sat-Mon 7:40), 10:00 (Sát-
Mon matinees 1:30,4:30; Fri-Sat late show
12:15a)
•Forrest Gump (PG13) FriSat 7:30,11:00 (Sat matinees
1:00,4:00); Sun-Wed 7:00,9:45 (Sun-Mon matinees 1:00,
4:00)
«Heavyweights (PG) Daily 7:45,10:00 (Sat-Mon matinees
1:00,3:15,5:30; FriSatlate show 12:00m)
Movies at the Falls
8888 Howard Dr; 255-5200
Little Women (PG) Thur 12:45,4:15,7:10,9:40; FriWed
2:00,7:00
Nobody's Fool (R) Daily 1:00,4:00,7:00,9:30
Dumb and Dumber (PG-13) Thur 2/16 only 12:00n, 2:40,
5:00,7:20,10:00
Legends of the Fall (R) Daily 1:30,4:20,7:15,9:50 (Thur
10:00)
Murder in the First (R) Thur 2/16 only 11:45a, 2:15,4:45,
7:15,9:45
Highlander - The final Dimension (PG13) Thur 12:50,3:00,
5:10,7:40,10:00; FriWed 12:30,5:10 (FriSatlateshow
11:45)
Before Sunrise (R) Thur 12:00n, 2:10,4:20,7:00,9:20; Fri¬
Wed 12:00n, 4:20,9:30
Boys on the Side (R) Daily 11:45a, 2:15,4:40,7:10,9:45
(Thur 10:00) (FriSat late show 12:00m)
In the Mouth of Madness (R)Thur 11:50a, 2:00,4:10,7:30,
9:45; FriWed 2:40,7:20,9:30
Miami Rhapsody (PG13) Thur 12:00n, 2:30,4:50,7:20a;
10:00; FriWed 11:50a, 2:15,4:40,7:10,9:50
The Quick and the Dead (R) Daily 11:50a, 3:00,5:15,7:45
(Thur 7:30), 10:00 (Ihur 9:50) (Fri-Sat late show
12:00m)
Billy Madison (PG13)Thur 12:15,2:20,4:45,7:15,9:20;
FriWed 12:15,2:20,4:30,7:30,9:40 (Fri-Sat late show
12:00m)
•Forrest Gump (PG13) Daily 2:00,5:00,8:00 (Fri-Sat late
show 11:20)
•The Brady Bunch Movie (PG13) Daily 12:00n, 2:00,4:15,
7:20,9:20 (FriSatlate show 11:30)
«Heavyweights (PG) Daily 12:00n, 2:20,4:30,7:00,9:15
(Fri-Sat late show 11:30)
«Just Cause (R) Daily 11:45a, 2:15,4:45,7:40,10:00 (Fri¬
Sat late show 12:00m)
South Dade 8
18591 South Dixie Hwy; 2384424
Dumb and Dumber (PG13) Thur 2:05,5:20,7:35,9:50; Fri¬
Mon 1:30,5:05,7:55,10:05 (FriSat 10:25); Tue-Wed 2:10,
5:05,7:55,10:05
Houseguest (PG) Thur 2:10,5:10,7:40,10:00; FriMon
1:40,5:35,7:50,10:10 (FriSat 10:20); Tue-Wed 2:30,5:35,
7:50,10:10
Higher Learning (R) Thur 2/16 only 2:00,4:45,7:20,9:55
Highlander - The final Dimension (PG13) Thur 2:15,5:15,
7:30,9:40; FriMon 1:20,3:15,5:20,7:40,9:50; Tue-Wed
2:20,5:20,7:40,9:45
Boys on the Side (R) Thur 2:20,5:00,7:45,10:10; FriMon
1:50,5:10,7:35,10:05; Tue-Wed 2:05,5:10,7:35,10:05
The Jerky Boys (R) Thur 2/16 only 2:30,5:40,41:05,
10:20
In the Mouth of Madness (R) Thur 2/16 only 2:25,5:35,
7:50,10:05
The Quick and the Dead (R) Thur 2:30,5:30,7;55,10:15;
FriSat 1:45,5:40,8:10,10:30; Sun-Mon 1:45,5:40,8:05,
10:20; Tue-Wed 2:25,5:40,8:05,10:20
«Heavyweights (PG) FriMon 1:00,3:00,5:00,7:30,9:45;
Tue-Wed 2:00,5:00,7:30,9:45
•The Brady Bunch Movie (PG13) FriMon 1:15,3:10,5:15,
7:45,9:55; Tue-Wed 2:15,5:15,7:45,9:55
«Just Cause (R) FriMon 2:00,5:30,8:00,10:15; Tue-Wed
2:30,5:30,8:00,10:15
New Times Page 59


Beaches
Alliance Cinema
927 Lincoln Rd, Suite 119; 531-8504
You Men Are All the Same (U) Thur 2/16 only 7:00
Too Outrageous Animation (U) Thur 2/16 only 9:30
«Strawberry and Chocolate (R) Daily 5:40,7:50,10:00
(Sat-Sun matinees 1:20,3:30; Fri-Sat late show 12:10a)
At 1663 Lenox Ave:
«The Testament of Orpheus (II) Sun 7:00 only
Bay Harbor IV
1170 Kane Concourse; 866-2441
Nobody's Fool (R) Daily 2:00,4:45,7:30,9:50
Soys on the Side (R) Daily 1:45,4:30,7:20,9:45
Miami Rhapsody (P6-13) Daily 2:15,5:00,7:50,10:00
Quiz Show (PC-13) Daily 1:30,4:15,7:00,9:40
Byron-Carlyle VII
500 71st St; 866-9623
Dumb and Dumber (PG-13) Thur 2/16 only 2:00,4:45,7:40,
10:05
Legends of the Fall (R) Daily 1:30,4:15,7:00,9:40 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:10a)
Murder in the First (R) Thur 2/16 only 4:30,9:50
Highlander - The Final Dimension (PG-13) Thur 2/16 only
1:50,4:40,7:45,10:10
In the Mouth of Madness (R) Thur 2/16 only 1:45,4:40,
7:30,9:50
Disclosure (R) Thur 2/16 only 1:40,7:15
Billy Madison (PG-13) Daily 1:50,4:45,7:40,10:00 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:15a)
The Quick and the Dead (R) Daily 1:40,4:30,7:20,9:45 (Fri-
Sat late show 12:00m)
«Heavyweights (PG) Daily 1:45,4:45,7:50,10:05 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:05a)
•Just Cause (R) Daily 1:45,4:20,7:40,10:00 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:10a)
«Pulp Fiction (R) Daily. 1:15,4:10,7:00,9:50
•Forrest Gump (PG-13) Daily 1:30,4:15,7:20,9:45
North Dade
California Club VI
850 Ives Dairy Rd; 652-8558
Legends of the Fall (R) Thur 2/16 only 12:40,4:45,7:35,
10:20
Nobody's Fool (R) Daily 12:20,2:50,5:20,8:05 (Thur 8:00),
10:35 (Sat early show 10:00a)
Bad Company (R) Thur 2/16 only 12:25
Highlander - The Final Dimension (PG-13) Thur 2/16 only
12:25,2:45,5:00,7:40
In the Mouth of Madness (R) Thur 2/16 only 12:10,2:35,
5:05,7:45,10:15
Boys on the Side (R) Daily 12:15,2:45 CIhur 2:40), 5:15,
7:50,10:25 (Sat early show 10:00a)
The Quick and the Dead (R) Thur 12:05,2:30,4:55,7:30,
10:00; Fri-Wed 12:35,3:00,5:10,7:35,10:05 (Sat early
show 10:00a)
•Just Cause (R) Daily 12:00n, 2:30,5:00,7:45,10:30
«Heavyweights (PG) Daily 12:30,3:05,5:30,8:00,10:15
(Sat early show 10:00a)
«The Brady Bunch Movie (PG-13) Daily 12:05,2:35,5:05,
7:30,10:00 (Sat early show 10:00a)
Fashion Island
18741 BiscayneBlvd; 931-2873
Richie Rich (PG)Thur 1:55,5:00,7:35,9:50; Fri-Wed 1:35,
5:05 (Sat early show 10:45a)
The Last Seduction (R) Thur 2/16 only 1:50,5:15,7:50,
10:25
Little Women (PG)Thur 2:00,4:45,7:25,9:55; Fri-Wed
1:40,5:10,7:45,10:15 (Fri-Sat late show 12:35a)
Higher Learning (R) Thur 1:35,5:30,7:00,8:30,10:00; Fri-
Wed 1:30,5:15,8:30 (Fri-Sat late show 11:30)
Legends of the Fall (R) Thur 1:30,4:15,7:20,10:15; Fri-
Wed 1:15,4:30,7:30,10:15 (Sat early show 10:30a)
Far From Home (PG) Thur 2/16 only 1:30,5:00
Bad Company (R) Thur 1:50,5:10,8:00,10:30; Fri-Wed
7:35,10:00 (Fri-Sat late show 12:10a)
Pulp Fiction (R) Daily 1:00,4:00,7:10,10:40 (Thur 10:10)
Death and the Maiden (R) Thur 2/16 only 7:40,10:15
Demon Knight (R) Thur 2/16 only 1:55,5:00
Before Sunrise (R)Thur 2:05,4:30,7:45,10:25,10:30; Fri-
Wed 12:45a
Highlander - The Final Dimension (PG-13) Thur 1:00,5:05,
7:55,10:05; Fri-Wed 5:30,10:30
The Jerky Boys (R)Thur 1:30,5:30,8:10,10:30; Fri-Wed
1:20,8:05 (Sat early show 10:30a; Fri-Sat late show
12:30a)
In the Mouth of Madness (R) Thur 1:45,5:30,8:05,10:35;
Fri-Wed 1:10,5:10,8:10,10:25 (Fri-Sat late show 12:20a)
Boys on the Side (R) Thur 1:40,4:45,7:25,10:10; Fri-Wed
1:45,4:45,7:55,10:25 (Sat early show 10:40a; Fri-Sat late
show 12:45a)
The Madness of King George (II) Thur 1:40,4:30,7:15,
10:00; Fri-Wed 1:30,4:15,7:40,10:20 (Fri-Sat late show
12:35a)
Billy Madison (PG-13) Thur 1:35,5:15,8:00,10:20; Fri-Wed
1:15,5:05,7:50,10:05 (Sat early show 10:35a; Fri-Sat late
show 12:00m)
•Dumb and Dumber (PG-13) Daily 2:00,4:50,7:30,10:10
(Sat early show 10:35a; Fri-Sat late show 12:20a)
«Heavyweights (PG) Daily 1:50,5:00,7:30,9:50 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:00m)
«Cobb (R) Daily 1:05,4:00,7:00,10:00 (Fri-Sat late show
12:45a)
•Strawberrry and Chocolate (R) Daily 1:50,5:15,8:00,
10:35 (Sat early show 10:45a; Fri-Sat late show 12:45a)
«Disclosure (R) Daily 1:05,4:20,7:25,10:20 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:45a)
•Mr. Payback (PG-13) Daily 1:00,1:30,2:00,2:30,3:00,
3:30,4:00,4:30,5:00,5:30,6:00,6:30,7:00,7:30,8:00,8:30,
9:00,9:30,10:00,10:30 (Sat early shows 10:00a, 10:30a;
Fri-Sat late shows 11:00,11:30,12:00m, 12:30a)
Intracoastal
3701 NE 163rd St; 945-7416
Disclosure (R) Thur 2/16 only 1:40,4:15,7:15,9:50
Dumb and Dumber (PG-13) Thur 2/16 only 2:20,7:45
Houseguest (PG) Thur 2/16 only 5:00,10:10
Nobody's Fool (R) Thur 2:10,4:40,7:10,9:35; Fri-Wed 2:00,
4:20 (Fri-Satlate show 12:00m)
Immortal Beloved (R) Thur 2:15,4:50,7:40,10:10; Fri-Wed
12:45,5:30,10:30
Murder in the First (R)Thur 1:20,4:10,7:20,9:50; Fri-Wed
3:05,8:10
Miami Rhapsody (PG-13) Daily 1:50 (Thur 2:00), 4:30,7:00,
9:20 (Fri-Sat late show 11:30)
The Quick and the Dead (R) Thur 1:30,4:00,7:30,10:00;
Fri-Wed 1:30,4:00,7:20,9:30 (Fri-Sat late show 12:20a)
Quiz Show (PG-13) Thur 1:00,4:10,7:15,10:05; Fri-Wed
1:15,4:00,7:05,10:05
«Forrest Gump (PG-13) Daily 12:45,3:45,7:00,9:45
•The Brady Bunch Movie (PG-13) Daily 1:40,4:10,7:10,
9:15 (Fri-Satlate show 11:15)
«Just Cause (R) Daily 2:30,5:00,7:45,10:15 (FriSat late
show 12:30a)
Skylake II
1720 NE Miami Gardens Dr; 944-2810
The Lion King (G) Thur 4:30,7:50; Fri-Wed 3:30,8:30
A Low Down Dirty Shame (R) Daily 2:00,6:10,10:15
Interview With the Vampire (R) Daily 3:55,8:05
The Santa Clause (PG-13) Thur 2:30,6:00,9:30; Fri-Wed
5:10,10:05
•Farfrom Home (PG) Daily 1:45,7:00
Westchester-West Dade
Mall of the Americas 14
7775 W Flagler St; 2666664
Dumb and Dumber (PG-13) Thur 1:30,5:15,7:45,10:15;
Fri-Mon 12:15,2:45,5:15,7:45,10:15,12:25; Tue-Wed
2:00,5:30,7:45,10:15
Richie Rich (PG) Thur 2:00,5:00; Fri-Mon 12:45,3:00,5:15;
Tue-Wed 2:00,5:00
The Jungle Book (PG) Thur 1:15,5:15,7:45,10:15; Fri-Mon
12:00n, 2:30,5:00; Tue-Wed 1:00,5:35 •
Houseguest (PG) Thur 2:00,5:30,7:45,10:10; Fri-Mon
12:30,3:00,5:30,8:00,10:30,12:45; Tue-Wed 1:30,5:30,
8:00,10:30
Higher Learning (R) Thur 1:00,4:30,7:15,9:55; Fri-Mon
7:15,10:00,12:30a; Tue-Wed 7:45,10:20
The Quick and the Dead (R) Fri-Mon 12:00n, 2:30,5:00,
7:30,10:15,12:45a; Tue-Wed 1:30,5:30,8:15,10:30
Legends of the Fall (R) Fri-Mon 1:00,4:00,7:00,9:55,
12:30a; Tue-Wed 1:00,4:45,7:30,10:15
Murder in the First (R) Thur 1:15,5:10,7:50,10:30; Fri-
Mon 7:30,10:15,12:40a; Tue-Wed 8:00,10:30
Highlander-The Final Dimension (PG-13) Thur 1:45,5:30,
8:00,10:20; Fri-Mon 12:30,2:45,5:15,7:45,10:20,12:45a;
Tue-Wed 2:00,5:00,7:30,10:15
Boys on the Side (R) Thur 1:15,4:15,7:00,10:00; Fri-Mon
12:30,4:00,7:00,10:00,12:20a; Tue-Wed 1:00,5:15,7:45,
10:20
In the Mouth of Madness (R)Thur 1:15,5:45,8:00,10:15;
Fri-Mon 12:30,2:45,5:10,7:45,10:10,12:30; Tue-Wed
1:45,5:45,8:00,10:10
The Jerky Boys (R) Thur 1:00,5:45,8:15,10:30; Fri-Mon
12:15,3:00,5:30,8:00,10:30,12:30
Billy Madison (PG-13) Thur 1:30,5:25,8:00,10:25; Fri-Mon
12:10,3:15,5:45,8:00,10:15,12:30; Tue-Wed 1:30,5:45,
8:00,10:15
«The Brady Bunch Movie (PG-13) Fri-Mon 12;00n, 2:30,
5:15,7:30,9:55,12:15; TueWed 1:30,5:45,8:00,10:00
♦Just Cause (R) Fri-Mon 12:15,2:45,5:15,8:00,10:30,
12:45; TueWed 1:45,5:30,8:00,10:25
•Heavyweights (PG) Fri-Mon 12:15,2:45,5:10,7:45,10:20,
12:30a; TueWed 1:15,4:30,7:45,10:00
University VII
1645 SW 107th Ave; 223-2700
Dumb and Dumber (PG-13) Thur 2/16 only 7:20
Legends of the Fall (R) Thur 2/16 only 7:00,9:40
Highlander - The Final Dimension (PG-13) Thur 2/16 only
9:50
Boys on the Side (R) Daily 7:10,9:40 (Sat-Mon matinees
1:10,4:10; Fri-Sat late show 12:00m)
The Jerky Boys (R) Thur 2/16 only 7:00,9:30
In the Mouth of Madness (R) Daily 7:30,10:00 (Sat-Mon
matinees 1:30,4:20, Fri-Sat late show 12:00m)
Billy Madison (PG-13) Thur 7:10,9:30 Fri-Wed 7:10,9:40
(Sat-Mon matinees 1:30,4:10; Fri-Sat late show 11:30)
The Quick and the Dead (R) Daily 7:20,9:50 (Sat-Mon
matinees 1:20,4:20 Fri-Sat late show 12:00m)
•Just Cause (R) Daily 7:30,1000 (Sat-Mon matinees
1:20,4:30 Fri-Sat late show 12:00m)
•The Brady Bunch Movie (PG-13) Daily 7:00,9:30 (Sat-Mon
matinees 1:00,3:00,5:00; Fri-Sat late show 11:30)
•Heavyweights (PG) Daily 7:20,9:30 (Sat-Mon matinees
1:00,3:10,5:10, FriSat late show 11:30)
Super Saver Cinema
11501 Bird Rd; 227-0277
The Mask (PG-13) Thur 1:15,3:15,5:15,7:45,10:00 Fri-
Wed 3:15,7:45
Stargate (PG-13) Daily 7:45,1015
The Specialist (R) Thur 2/16 only 1:00,3:15,5:15,8:00,
10:15
The Lion King (G) Daily 1:30,3:30,5:30,7:30,9:30
Junior (PG-13) Daily 1:15,3:30,5:45,8:00,10:15
The Pagemaster (G) Daily 1:45,3:45,5:45
Interview With the Vampire (R) Daily 1:30,4:30,7:30,10.00
A Low Down Dirty Shame (R) Thur 1:00,3:15,5:15,7:45,
9:45; Fri-Wed 1:00,5:30,9:45
The Santa Clause (PG) Daily 1:30,3:30,5:45,8:00,10:00
«Far From Home (PG) Daily 1:00,3:00,5:00,7:45,9:45
«Ready to Wear (R) Daily 1:30,4:30,7:30,10:00
Válentino Super Discount Cinema
8524 SW 8th St; 266-2002
The Professional (R) Thur 7:00,9:00; Fri-Sun 6:00,8:00,
10:00 (Sat-Sun matinees 2:00,4:00); Mon-Wed 7:00,9:00
Disclosure (R) Thur 7:00,9:00; Fri-Sun 6:00,8:10,10:20
(Sat-Sun matinees 1:40,3:50); Mon-Wed 7:00,9:10
Houseguest (PG-13) Thur 2/16 only 7:00,9:00
*Locura de amor(U) Fri-Sun 6:00,8:00,10:00 (Sat-Sun
matinees 2:00,4:00); Mon-Wed 7:00,9:00
Hialeah-Miami Springs-Miami Lakes
Apollo Theatre
3800 W 12th Ave; 8266606
The Lion King (G) Thur-Fri 8:00,10:00; Sat-Sun 1:00,3:00,
5:00,8:00,10:30; Mon-Wed 8:00,10:00
The Santa Clause (PG) Thur-Fri 8:00,10:00; Sat-Sun 1:00,
3:00,5:00,8:00,10:30; Mon-Wed 8:00,10:00
Interview With the Vampire (R) Thur-Fri 800,10:00; Sat-
Sun 12:50,3:00,5:10,7:45,10:30; Mon-Wed 8:00,10:00
A Low Down Dirty Shame (R) Thur-Fri 8:00,10:00; Sat-Sun
1:00,3:00,5:00,8:00,10:30; Mon-Wed 8:00,10:00
Hialeah Cinema VIII
4650 W 17th Ct; 557-9888
Richie Rich (PG) Thur 2:30,5:20,7:45,9:50; Fri-Mon 1:00,
3:00; Tue-Wed 5:35
Houseguest (PG) Thur 2:35,5:30,8:00,10:10; Fri-Mon
1:00,3:40,7:50,10:15; Tue-Wéd 5:30,8:00,10:10
Higher Learning (R) Thur 2:20,5:00,7:30,10:00; Fri-Mon
1:30,4:45,7:50,10:30; Tue-Wed 7:30,10:00
Demon Knight (R)Thur 2:40,5:00,8:00,10:10; Fri-Mon
2:00,5:00,8:10,10:15; Tue-Wed 8:00,10:10 '
Bad Company (R) Thur 2/16 only 2:30,-5:00,7:40,10.05
Boys on Hie Side (R) Thur 2:30,5:00,7:40,10:05; Fri-Mon
5:20,7:55,10:25; TueWed 7:45,10:10
The Quick and the Dead (R) Thur 2:30,5:00,8:00,10:10;
Fri-Mon 2:00,5:00,8:00,10:20; TueWed 5:30,8:00,10:10
•Heavyweights (PG) Fri-Mon 1:30,4:00,7:40,10:00; Tue
Wed 5:40,7:30,9:45 '
•The Brady Bunch Movie (PG-13) Fri-Mon 1:15,5:00,8:00,
10:10; TueWed 5:45,7:50,10:00
•Strawbeny and Chocolate (R) Fri-Mon 2:00,5:30,8:00,
10:30; TueWed 7:30,10:00
Miami Lakes X
6711 Main St; 558-3810
Disclosure (R)Thur2/16 only 1:10,4:10,7:00,9:45
Dumb and Dumber (PG-13) Daily 1:30,4:30,7:30,10:00
(Fri-Sat late show 12:30a)
The Jungle Book (PG) Thur 2/16 only 1:30,4:20
Legends of the Fall (R) Daily 1:20 (Thur 1:00), 4:00,7:00,
9:45 (Fri-Sat late show 12:20a)
Murder in the first (R)Thur 2/16 only 7:10,9:50
Highlander - The final Dimension (PG-13) Thur 2/16 only
1:40,4:40,7:40,10:00
Boys on the Side (R) Daily 1:10,4:10,7:20,10:00 (Ihur
10:10) (Fri-Satlateshow 12:30a)
The Jerky Boys (R) Thur 1:10,3:00,4:50,730,9:40; Fri-
Wed 4:10,7:20
In the Mouth of Madness (R)Thur 1:20,4:20,7:30,9:50;
Fri-Wed 1:20,9:50
The Quick and Hie Dead (R) Daily 1:40,4:30,7:10,9:40 (Fri¬
Sat late show 12:00m)
Billy Madison (PG-13) Daily 1:30,4:20 (Thur 4:00), 7:40, 1
10:00 (Fri-Sat late show, 12:10a)
•Forrest Gump (PG-13) Daily 1:10,4:00,7:00,9:45 (Fri-Sat U
late show 12:30a)
•Just Cause (R) Daily 1:40,4:20,7:40,10:00 (FriSat late ]
show 12:30a)
•The Brady Bunch Movie (PG-13) Daily 1:00,3:00,5:00,
7:10,9:40 (Fri-Sat late show 12:00m)
•Heavyweights (PG) Daily 1:00,3:10,5:10,7:30,9:50 (Fri 1
Sat late show 12:00m)
Movies at Hialeah
780 W 49th St 826-7242
The Jungle Book (PG) Thur 1:50,4:25,7:05,9:40; Fri-Wed fl
1:50,4125
Drop Zone (R) Daily 1:25,3:30,5:30,7:35,9:35 (FriSat late ||
show 11:40)
Disclosure (R) Thur 1:45,4:30,7:10,9:45; Fri-Wed 1:45, |
4:25,700,9:25 (Fri-Sat late show 11:40)
Dumb and Dumber (PG-13) Daily 2:00,4:35,7:10,9:30 (Fri-
Satiate show 11:50)
StreeHighter (PG-13) Daily 1:15,3:25,5:35,7:45,10:00
(Fri-Sat late show 11:50)
Legends of the Fall (R) Thur 1:35,4:20,7:05,9:50; FriWed
705,9:50
Nobody's Fool (R) Thur 2/16 only 1:55,4:30,7:00,9:35
Pulp fiction (R) Daily 1:20,4:40,8:00
Murder in the first (R) Thur 2/16 only 1:55,4:35,7:15,
9:55
Highlander-The final Dimension (PG-13) Daily 1:30,3:40, II
5:45,7:50,9:55 (Fri-Satlate show 11:45)
The Jerky Boys (R) Daily 1:30,3:30,5:30,7:30,9:30 (Fri-
Sat late show 11:25)
In the Mouth of Madness (R) Daily 1:15,3:30,5:40,7:55,
10:05 (Fri-Sat late show 12:00m)
In the Mouth of Madness (R) (with Spanish subtitles) Daily n
1:20,3:25; 5:25,7:30,9:30 (Fri-Satlate show 11:30)
Billy Madison (PG-13) Daily 1:25,3:25 (Thur 3:30), 5:30, j
7:30 (Thur 7:35), 9:35 (Fri-Sat late show 11:35)
•Forrest Gump (PG-13) Daily 1:30,4:40,7:30 (Fri-Satlate 1
show 10:30)
•Forrest Gump (PG-13) (with Spanish subtitles) Daily
1:00,4:00,7:00,10:00
•Just Cause (R) Daily 1:05,3:10,5:20,7:30,9:40 (FriSat j
late show 11:40)
South Broward
Cinema IV
120 University Dr 4326225
Dumb and Dumber (PG-13) Daily 1:20,3:25,5:30,7:35 (Fri¬
Sat late show 9:40)
Higher Learning (R) Daily 4:45,7:3p (Fri-Sat late show
10:00)
The Shawshank Redemption (R) Daily 1:15,4:15,7:00 (Fri-
.Sat late show 9:50)
Highlander - The final Dimension (R) Daily 2:00
Before Sunrise (R) Daily 1:45,4:20,7:15 (Fri-Sat late show
9:45)
Florida IV
300 N Park Rd; 987-9350
Boys on the Side (R)Thur 2:00,4:20,7:10,9:30; Fri-Wed
2:00,4:20,7:00,920
Heavenly Creatures (R) Thur 2/16 only 2:15,4:35,7:20,
9:15
Immortal Beloved (R) Thur 2/16 only 1:50,4:15,6:50,9:15
Nobody's Fool (R) Thur 2:10,4:30,7:00,9:20; Fri-Wed 2:10,
430,7.05,9:15
•Forrest Gump (PG-13) Daily 2:00,5:00,8:00
•The Brady Bunch Movie (PG-13) Daily 1:30,3:30,5:30,
7:30,930
Hollywood Cinema
1710 Harrison St; 923-7000
Speechless (PG-13) Thur 5:45,8:00; Fri-Wed 5:45,8:00
(Sat-Sun matinees 1:30,3:30)
Movies at Pembroke Pines
11350 Pines Blvd; 4536700
Legends of the Fall (R) Thur 1:30,4:20,7:15,10:05; Fri-
Wed 1:30,4:20,7:10,10:00
UtUe Women (PG) Thur 1:40,4:20,7:05,9:40; Fri-Wed
1:50,4:30,7:15,9:55
The Jungle Book (PG) Thur 1:50,4:50,7:10,9:40; Fri-Wed
1:55,435
Richie Rich (PG) Thur 2:05,4:40,7:30,9:50; Fri-Wed 2:05,
4:45
Demon Knight (R) Thur 2:10,4:45,7:35,10:10; Fri-Wed
7:30,9:40
Pulp Fiction (R) Daily 1:40,4:45,8:00
Bad Company (R) Thur 1:55,4:30,7:20,10:00; Fri-Wed
7:20,10:05
Immortal Beloved (R) Daily 1:35,4:15,7:00,930 (Ihur
935)
Boys on the Side (R) Thur 2:00,4:35,7:25,9:55; Fri-Wed
1:45,4:25,7:05,935
•Heavyweights (PG) Daily 2:00,4:40,7:25,9:45
•The Brady Bunch Movie (PG-13) Daily 2:10,
Pago 60 New Times
February 16-22, 1995


ANTI-CELLULITE & ANTI-FAT
Bodywrap Treatments
THERE’S A SUMMER SIDE TO YOU
INCH LOSS NOT A
PERSPIRATION LOSS!
The bodywrap treatments
using super absorbent raw
volcanic ash clay, can produce
AN ACTUAL REDUCED AND
THINNER APPEARANCE ON
THE HUMAN BODY with its
powerful detoxification and
“pulling out" effect on toxins and
impurities from surface fatty
areas and cellulite, ESPECIALLY
THIGHS , BUTTOCKS, HIPS &
WAIST. A measurable difference
IN ONE-
HOUR,
or we don’t
charge you.
CALL
444-9727
NOW
for an
introductory
bodywrap
treatment for .
only $44.00
Ladies & Men
Now in our
4th year
444-9727
3191 Coral Way
#105
(Rear of Bldg.)
Houis:
Tues-Fri 9-9
Sat 9-5
Replenishing
f your Mind, 13
Jody & Spirit...
* February Events •
February 16th 7:30-9:00pm
/ stout wstiing
Explore with Patti Gordon and retrieve
information by interacting with vuwr guides
February 17th 7:30-9:30pm
' ‘f PSYCHIC MESSAGES /
journey into the gateway with Re»: Jody
Staley toretrieye your personalzed f
psychic messages f
February 18th 10:00am to 5:00pm
- DREAM INTStPRETATION j
Join Joan Mázza as featuft on WSVN
Chjnnel 7 &in theáíeral&as she iielps you
understand vourdieams
February 22nd 6:00 - 7:30pm
HATHA YOGA
with Michal Annassor
7:30 - 9:30pm
4:50,735,9:50
Oceanwalk Mall 10
Hollywood Boulevard at A1A; 9206330
Disclosure (R) Thur 1:35,5:00,7:35,10:15; Fri-Mon 1:35,
4:50,7:35,10:25; Tue-Wed 1:35,5:00,7:35,10:15 (Wed
early show 10:10a)
Higher Learning (R) Thur 2/16 only 1:30,4:30,7:10,9:45
Legends of the Fall (R) Thur 1:45,4:45,7:30,10:10; Fri-
Mon 1:45,4:40,7:30,10:20; Tue-Wed 1:45,4:45,7:30,
10:10 (Wed early show 10:25a)
Highlander - The Final Dimension (PG-13) Thur 2:00,5:45,
7:50,9:50; Fri-Mon 12:50,3:05,5:05,7:35,0:50 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:10a); Tue-Wed 2:00,5:45,7:50,9:50 (Wed
eaHy show 10:20a)
Boys on the Side (R) Thur 1:30,5:10,7:40,10:15; Fri-Mon
1:30,5:00,7:40,10:25 (Fri-Sat late show 12:40a); Tue-
Wed 1:30,5:10,7:40,10:15 (Wed early show 10:20a)
In the Mouth of Madness (R) Thur 2/16 only 1:40,5:35,
8:00,10:00
The Quick and the Dead (R)Thur 1:50,5:30,7:50,10:10;
Fri-Mon 12:55,3:10,5:25,8:00,10:30 (Fri-Sat late show
12:35a); Tue-Wed 1:50,5:40,8:05,10:20 (Wed early show
10:15a)
Billy Madison (PG-13) Thur 2:00,5:40,7:45,9:45; Fri-Mon
12:40,2:35,5:30,7:55,10:00 (Fri-Sat late show 12:05a);
Tue-Wed 2:00,5:50,7:55,9:50 (Wed early show 10:30a)
*The Brady Bunch Movie (PG-13) Fri-Mon 12:45,3:00,5:20^
7:50,9:55 (Fri-Sat late show 12:05a); Tue-Wed 1:55,5:55,
8:00,9:55 (Wed early show 10:00a)
*Just Cause (R) Fri-Mon 12:35,2:50,5:15,7:45,10:15 (Fri-
Sat.late show 12:30a); Tue-Wed 1:40,5:30,7:45,10:10
(Wed early show 10:10a)
«Heavyweights (PG) Fri-Mon 12:30,2:40,5:10,7:25,9:50
(Fri-Sat late show 12:15a); Tue-Wed 1:35,5:35,7:50,
10:00 (Wed early show 10;05a).
«Mr. Payback (PG-13) Daily 1:00,1:30,2:00,2:30,3:00,
3:30,4:00,4:30,5:00,5:30,6:00,6:30,7:00,7:30,8:00,8:30,
9:00,9:30,10:00,10:30 (Wed early show 10:00a; Fri-Sat
late shows 11:00,11:30,12:00m, 12:30a)
Pembroke Pines 8
12520 Pines Bivd; 437-7790
Dumb and Dumber (PG-13) Daily 1:10,3:30,5:50, 8:10,
10:30
Houseguest (PG) Thur 1:00,3:20,5:40,8:00,10:20; Fri-
Wed 1:00,7:30
Higher Learning (R)Thur 2/16 only 1:45,7:15
Nobody’s Fool (R) Daily 2:00,5:00,7:30,10:00
Highlander - The Final Dimension (PG-13) Thur 2/16 only
4:30,10:15
The Jerky Boys (R) Thur 1:30,3:30,5:30,7:45,9:45; Fri-
Wed 4:15,10:00
In the Mouth of Madness (R) Daily 1:15,3:30,5:45,8:00,
10:15
The Quick and the Dead (R) Thur 1:00,3:10,5:30,7:50,
10:20; Fri-Wed 1:00,3:20,5:40,8:10,10:20
Billy Madison (PG-13) Daily 1:15,3:15,5:15,7:30,10:10
•Forrest Gump (PG-13) Daily 1:00,4:00,7:00,10:00
•Just Cause (R) Daily 1:00,3:10,5:30,7:45,10:20
Sheridan Plaza 12
4999 Sheridan St; 987-4680
Dumb and Dumber (PG-13) Thur-Fri 1:45,5:00,7:15,9:30
(Fri late show 11:45); Sat-Mon 12:30,2:45,5:00,7:15,9:30
(Sat early show 10:15a; Sat late show 11:45); Tue-Wed
1:45,5:00,7:15,9:30
little Women (PG) Thur 2:00,5:30,8:00,.10:20; Fri-Wed
1:30,4:45,7:15,9:45 (Sat early show 11:00a)
Pulp Fiction (R) Daily 1:30,4:30,7:30,10:20 (Fri-Sat 10:30)
(Sat early show 10:30a)
Legends of the Fall (R) Daily 1:30,4:45,7:30,10:15 (Sat
early show 10:45a)
Highlander - The Final Dimension (PG-13) Thur 2:00,5:45,
8:00,10:10; Fri 2:00,5:45,8:00,10:15,12:20a; Sat-Mon
1:15,3:30,5:45,8:00,10:15 (Sat early show 11:00a; Sat
late show 12:20a); Tue-WSl 2:00,5:45,8:00,10:15
In the Mouth of Madness (R) Thur-Fri 2:00,5:45,8:00,
10:15; Sat-Mon 1:15,3:30,5:45,8:00,10:15 (Sat early
show 11:00a; Satiate show 12:20a);Tue-Wed 2:00,5:45,
8:00,10:15
Miami Rhapsody (PG-13) Thur-Fri 1:45,5:00,7:15,9:30
(Fri late show 11:45); Sat-Mon 12:30,2:45,5:00,7:15,9:30
(Sat early show 10:15a; Sat late show ll:45);Tue-Wed
1:45,5:00,7:15,9:30
Billy Madison (PG-13) Thur-Fri 1:45,5:30,7:45,9:55 (Fri
late show 12:00m); Sat-Mon 1:00,3:00,5:30,7:45,9:55
(Sat early show 11:00a; Sat late show 12:00m) ; Tue-Wed
1:45,5:30,7:45,9:55
The Quick and the Dead (R) Thur 2:00,5:00,7:30,9:45; Fri
2:00,5:45,8:00,10:15,12:20a; Sat-Mon 1:15,3:30,5:45,
8:00,10:15 (Sat early show 11:00a; Sat late show 12:20a);
Tue-Wed 2:00,5:45,8:00,10:15
Quiz Show (PG-13) Daily 1:30,4:45 (Thur 4:30), 7:30,10:15
(Fri-Sat 10:30)
Before Sunrise (R) Fri-Sat 12:15a only
•Just Cause (R) Fri 1:45,5:00,7:30,10:00,12:15a; Sat-
Mon 12:30,2:45,5:00,7:30,10:00 (Sat eariy show 10:15a;
Sat late show 12:15a); Tue-Wed 1:45,5:00,7:30,10:00
•Heavyweights (PG) Fri 2:00,5:30,7:45,9:55,12:00m; Sat-
Mon 1:00,3:15,5:30,7:45,9:55 (Sat early show 10:45a;
Sat late show 12:00m); Tue-Wed 2:00,5:30,7:45,9:55'
STARTS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17TH
Mltlll BIIK niiiii HWHUW Still iltiu IHl 111 RIB II
â– 1 BIBilliiUBlUiHli JHWK BUI 111
“■“iiii sum""" uuinicE fim i k up h mi iib tun inn .
-aiMiaMiiiifflijniiiairaiimin-iiiiiiiii! ,m>.
1pg-13|emb»ts sTwoMBurcALmoigD^l J*L SOUNDTRACK MAN AVAIAffli iM4C8pnSHT©Bí5BTPAaAiiM)i(íñCíBKS.
ON MUN CDs AND CASSETTES . ilMBBKI. YW
9MPIWI
MM
They're Back To
Save America
From The '90s.
'g-
bnerai Gnome's
INTRACOASTALTHE-
ATRE
Sunny ides ItvA
3701 Hi. 163rd SL
345-7416
BBKBBÃœBE
Muvko Theatres
CALIFORNIA aUB 6
850 Ives Wry Rood
652-8558 EX*
HK!BH
CobbTheakes
KENDALL 9
KendJ Ain
W. Of FI turnpike
598-5000
Gerard Gnemo's
ONEMA 10
Al Miracle Coder
3301 CardWby
442-2299
1:!=H Jl V.1,1
General Gnemo's
HIALEAH 8
Palmetto Expwy. t
H.W. 103rd. St.
557-9888
General Gnem's
RIVIERA aNEMA
1560 5. Dixie Hwy.
Cord Gabies
666-8513
MAYFAIR 10 CINEMAS
3390 May Si., Suite 380
Above Planet Holywood
447-9969
United Artists
MOVIES AT
THE FALLS
U.S. 1 & S.W. 136th St.
255-5200
AMC
MALL OF
THE AMERICAS
Pdmetto X-Way * 836
266-6646
AMC Theatres
SOUTH DADE S
ILS.ÍS
S.W. 185th St.
238-4424
Cobb Theatres
UNIVERSITY 7
S.W. 107th Ave.
0pp. HU
223-2700
AMC Theatres
OCEAN WALK 10
333 Harrison St
Holywood Booth
920-6330
AMC Theatres
OMN110
Omni International
358-2304
Cobb Theatres
MIAMI LAKES 10
AT Main t Lu Jam
558-3810
Womefto's
FLORIDA 4
Hollywood MJI
987-9350
United Artists
MOVIES AT PEMBROKE
3MÍ.W. Univ. Blvd.
On Pinos Bhrd.
435-3700
Also in Broward at; Coral Ridge, Fax Sunrise,
Fountains, Cobb Sawgrass, Weston, Swapshop,
Coral Springs, Mission Bay, Movies at
Towncenler, Pompano Cnema 4, Fax Festival;
Deerfield 8, Delray 10.
Visit the Brady’s on-lin*e at http://nick-at-nite.viacom.com
i
ago «I
February 16-22, 1995
New Times P


THROUGH FEB 26
BEATRICE ARTHUR
RENEÉ TAYLOR
$ JOSEPH BOLOGNA
Also starring Cliff Norton
Joseph Bologna
IN THE ENCORE ROOM
FEB 14-MARCH 19
HAROLD
GOULD
in a limited engagement
1
Written & Directed by
JOE CACACI
PerformancesTuesday through Sunday
Box Office
442-4000 358-5885
COCONUT GROVE
PLAYHOUSE
LIONEL
RESNICK
M.D., P.A., F.A.C.P., F.A.A.D.
Dermatology &
Cosmetic Laser Surgery
Board-Certified
• Collagen • Acne
• Facia] Peels • Allergies
• Leg Veins • Psoriasis
• Fat Implants • Nail Fungus
• Hair Transplants • Skin Cancer
• Medical Facials • Electrolysis
• Permanent Make-up • Skin Nutrition
• Anti-Aging Treatments
• Tattoo Removal
INTRODUCING
The new LASER for removal
of WRINKLES and SCARS.
EVENINGS / WEEKENDS
300 Arthur Godfrey • Ste 100
Miami Beach
532-3186 • 532-9510
CROSSROADS CRUZ
MIAMI:
10834 SW 104ST
279-6909
AND FITNESS CENTER
MIAMI AD SCHOOL
announces our
SIX MONTHS
COMPUTER
GRAPHICS
PROGRAM!
Intensive,
all-computer graphics,
no academics, no nonsense,
totally professional, night & day.
538 3193
Financial Aid available. Starts April 3
Engagement Extended thin Wed., Feb. 26
tk wildly enjoyable, delicious musical."
-Christine Dolen, Miami Herald
Ruthless!
Allkidsunder18,
1/2 price at the
Sunday Matinee
Group Salee I
576-1J73 or
New Schedule Beginning This Wednesday
Wed, Thur, Fri at 8PM • Sat 5 & 9PM • Sun. 3PM
Prices: $25 to $35
Colony Theater uncoin Road
DAM
358-5885
BROWARD
585-3509
cHarvcy ^fierstcin s ^{wartf~cWinning/
"Gay liberation has
rarely appeared
more liberated.
Funny, raunchy,
the writing
is sharp é
and clever."
—Clive Barnes
’’FIVE STARS!
LIGHTNING
BOLTS FROM
ON HIGH.
FABULOUS
THEATER
LIKE A
WHOLE
NIGHT OF
FIREWORKS.”
—Mandate
February 22 - 25 @ 8:00 PM
Feb 25 @ 2:00 PM & Feb 26 @ 3:00 PM
Produced by The UM Ring Theatre
At The Knight Center's Ashe Auditorium
400 SE 2nd Ave, Miami
The Ring will be performing at the Knight Center for 1995
During remodelling of its Coral Gables Campus facility.
Pane 62 New Times


Fire Escape
By Pamela Gordon
The Pope Theatre Company’s saucy production of
, Eric Overmyer’s Dark Rapture begins with a killer
scene that could turn the most hard-core devotee of
movies and TV toward the pleasures of live theater.
Two men collide at the edges of a cataclysmic fire in
Northern California. Amid the slides, lights, moving
stage props, and music that simulate the fire’s vora¬
cious appetite, they shout back and forth at each
other about chaos, loss, existence, and fighting in the
jungles of Cambodia. As fire ravages his house, one
of the men, Ray, questions why he feels so alive on
the threshold of a catastrophe, and remarks that
everyday life is not enough for human beings.
Instead, he says, we have a “deep-seated need to
manufacture our own inclement weather,” an omi¬
nous observation that stalks him throughout the rest
of the play as he runs from one life to the promise of
another.
This edge-of-the-seat opening serves as an overture
to more than a dozen scene changes in Dark Rap¬
ture, and each one, if not as pulse-thumping as the
first, is as clever and theatrical. The result of an
inspired collaboration between set designer Frank
Cornelius, lighting designer Suzanne M. Jones, and
sound designer Jon M. Loflin, the changing scenes
function as backdrop to Overmyer’s takeoff on two
distinctly American forms — detective novels and
film noir. Abetted by an excellent cast under the
direction of Louis Tyrrell,-it all comes together for a
topnotch production. Unfortunately, Overmyer’s
script, while witty and provocative in places, is never
as shrewd or inventive as the Manalapan-based Pope
Theatre’s staging of it. (Dark Rapture was commis¬
sioned by the Empty Space Theater in,Seattle and
first performed in 1993.)
• No one is who they say they are and nothing is as it
appears to be in the play’s skeletal whodunit, which
unfolds in a series of character introductions. Ray
(Earl Hagan) is a would-be screenwriter who may or
may not be dead as a result of the fire, and who may
or may not have made off with seven million dollars,
left in his now-destroyed house by his wife, Julia
(Rose Stockton), a would-be movie producer. While
the fire rages, Julia engages in a steamy téte-á-téte in
Mexico with her stuntman boyfriend, Danny
(Quint Von Canon). She returns to face the
wrath of her backers, the dubious Vegas (Gor-,
don McConnell) and Lexington (Richard Far¬
rell), who demand to know where their millions
have gone. Burned to cinders, Julia insists. The
investors have other ideas and, led by their hired
goon, Babcock (Jesse Doran), they hit the trail
in search of the missing husband.
Riddled with allusions to the genreslt paro¬
dies, from Raymond Chandler novels to
Humphrey Bogart movies, the play’s mystery
element attempts to fuel its narrative drive. But
Dark Rapture’s story is never as intricate or gripping
as a good detective novel or double-indemnity film
because the mystery is just a device Overmyer uses
for his real concerns: a celebration of this nation’s
sense of “place,” and a fascination with the American
myth of losing one’s history and starting over again.
Believe me, a challenging exploration of either of
those themes could supplant my interest in even the
tightest plotted mystery. After all, mysteries and
thrillers dominate the best-seller lists and cineplexes;
intelligent cultural observation is a much rarer com¬
modity. Maybe that’s why Overmyer’s treatment of
his own ideas is disappointing. After he reveals an
interest in sométhing more than the mere com¬
mercial, he betrays that interest by dealing with it
only on the surface. For example, descriptions of
American outposts such as Seattle, New Orleans,
and Key West are relegated to travétegué recitations -
of street names, native food and drink, and weather
conditions. As for the desire to remake oneself
repeatedly, Overmyer’s examination of this Ameri¬
can compulsion is limited to the shedding and
assuming of identities by changing names and
appearances. Perhaps this is a comment on the shal¬
lowness of American values. If so, it’s a shallow com¬
ment
At its best Overmyer’s language strikes me as a
combination of the yerbal wit and relentless mind
games of Tom Stoppard and the vernacular of Sam
Shepard, although he does not achieve the sharp¬
ness of the former or the passion of the latter. How¬
ever, he succeeds at amusingly re-creating several
American types, and Dark Rapture’s nimble cast
does justice to them. Of particular note are Richard
Farrell and Gordon McConnell, performing in con¬
cert as the mannered, stylized gangsters Lexington
and Vegas. The two also play, just as comically, a
completely different couple: Julia’s lawyers. Rose
Stockton as the ambitious Julia manages to remain in
control even as her character verges on a breakdown
when the money and success she counted on too
confidently appear to be slipping away. Karen
Stephens’s Key West drug dealer (Max) delivers a
sultry and riotous soliloquy on the absurdity of how
couples in movies have sex — against the wall. And
Jesse Doran is cunning and stealthy as the grinning,
ubiquitous Babcock; most ihemorable is his heart¬
breaking performance as a completely different char¬
acter, the immigrant used-car salesman Nazim, who
appears in only one scene,
Overmyer is best known in theater circles for his
often-produced 1985 comedy On the Verge. An enter¬
tainment Renaissance man, he has written for televi¬
sion (St. Elsewhere, The Days and Nights of Molly
Dodd) and currently works as a writer and producer
for The Cosby Mysteries. He also adapts and translates
classic texts, most recently Figaro/Figaro, which pre¬
viewed in December at the Yale Repertory Theater.
He has called Dark Rapture his midlife-crisis play,
evolving out of a the image of a man watching a fire
who was “about to leap through a window of opportu¬
nity and start his life over.” Thus the stunning first
scene. Would that he had sustained the power of that
image throughout the entire play.
At first glance, two plays could not be more dissim¬
ilar than the stylish, contemporary Dark Rapture and
Herb Gardner’s ethnic memory piece, Conversations
With My Father, which premiered on Broadway in 1992
and is currently at Hollywood Performing Arts in
Hollywood, In fact, had I not seen the two almost
back-to-back, I may not have recognized the obvious
thematic parallel. Both are about the impossibility of
turning one’s back on the past and refashioning life
without a history. As a character in Dark Rapture
notes, “History is a living wound.” No matter how far
they attempt to run from it, the characters in both
plays discover that their histories hunt them down
and haunt them. But where Dark Rapture is slick,
Conversations With My Father is raw; where Rapture
is purposefully enigmatic and illusive, Conversations
is in-your-face and angry. And where Rapture’s char¬
acters change identities by changing sunglasses, the
people in Conversations wrestle the daunting legacies
of Russian pogroms, Nazi extermination camps, and
unloving fathers in an attempt to free themselves. In
- neither- play isanyone easilyliberated. â–  *
Perhaps this is a comment
on the shallowness of
American values. If so,
it's a shallow comment.
â–² Skin diving:
Quint Von Canon
and Rose
Stockton remake
themselves in
Dark Rapture
Dark Rapture.
Written by Eric
Overatyer; directed
by Louis Tyrrell;
with Jesse Doran,
Earl Hagan, and
Rose Stockton.
Through February
19. for more
information, call
407-585-3404.
Conversations With
My Father.
Written by Herb
Gardner; directed
by David Taylor
London; with
Michael Goldsmith,
Tim Lewis, and
Walter Zukovski.
Through February
19. For more
information, call
926-0065.
Stage Notes
The theater world lost a luminary two weeks ago
when George Abbott died at his home on Sunset
Island. The Broadway producer, director, play¬
wright, and actor was 107 years old. Winner of 40
Tonys and a Pulitzer Prize, Abbott brought us
memorable shows such as The Pajama Game,
Damri Yankees, and Fiorello! He not only enjoyed
a productive and celebrated life in the theater but
also encouraged countless-others’ theater
careers. A visionary entertainer whose own
career spanned the centyry, Abbott once was
asked what he considered the greatest innovation
in the theater during his lifetime. He answered,
‘i‘Electriciiy??ED' ’<
Gardner’s drama tells the familiar story of a suc¬
cessful son trying, long into adulthood, to win the
admiration of a difficult father. He tells his, tale
through the contrived structure of adult Charlie (Tim
Lewis) looking back on scenes remembered from
life in his father’s lower Manhattan tavern, from 1936
through 1976. The play is infused with a cloying nos¬
talgia both for what was (Charlie’s mother’s Jewish
food, the protectiveness of older brother Joey, the
witticisms of long-dead tavern habitués) and for
what wasn’t (acknowledgement of Charlie by his
stubborn and embittered father), and Gardner
lards the dialogue with sentimental lines such as
“Love doesn’t make the world go round — looking
for it does.” But the undeniable foundation of the
play is the portrait of Eddie Ross (Michael Gold¬
smith), bom Itsel Goldberg, the father determined
to shake off the cloak of his painful heritage and
remake himself as a tough-talking, hard-drinking,
combative New World Jew. Goldsmith succeeds at
effecting Eddie’s transformation and, at the same
time, conveying the price his character must pay.
His performance is powerful and disturbing.
In addition to Goldsmith, particularly com¬
pelling is Walter Zukovski as Zaretsky, an
indomitable Yiddish theater actor who, with
Eddie, trades terrible memories of the Cossacks.
One of Zaretsky’s speeches marks the best writ¬
ing in the play, a painfully wry recollection of the
day after a terrible raid on the pair’s Russian
hometown, complete with the surreal imagery of
feathers blooming in the trees and Cossacks
wearing the suits and cloaks of dead Jews; it calls
to mind the tradition of Eastern European mas¬
ters such as Kafka and Kundera.
February’ 16-22, 1995
New Times Page 63


CtMIS
1661. MERIDIAN AT LINCOLN ROAD
OPEN 5:30 PM
5 3 8 - 0 9 9 7
The best
Shrimp Pasta
in town!
10201 HAMMOCKS BLVD. MIAML (305) 387-9705
12120 SW 8TH ST. (TAM I AM I TRAIL) MIAMI. (305) 223-2911
6272 SOUTH DIXIE HIGHWAY. SOUTH MIAMI. (305) 665-1288
7997 PINES BLVD. PEMBROKE PINES. (305) 987-3474
GREAT FOOD! GREAT PRICE!
HOMEMADE CLAM & CONCH CHOWDER • FRESH SHUCKED OYSTERS & CLAMS • SPECIAL KIDS'
MENU • SHRIMP & CHICKEN CAESAR • FRESH CHAR-GRILLED FISH • PASTA MARINARA WITH
SHRIMP OR CHICKEN • SURF & TURF • SUMPTUOUS DESSERTS • FISH FINGERS • SHRIMPS, PASTA
••• 4 7?. f. S
ill#?» MilfcftP * ..
I hSo RESTAURAMOS
. ^00 COLLINS AVENUE
[a^rst&Iuhsjc
mrnm,Ém
rMwmkwm*
> LUÍKH & WHNER^-M
^5¿31455Q4-*?
Page 64 New Times
February ±6—22, ±995
__ . _ „ <*4 *~ ***<"&# $ _ .


A Glean, Well-
lighted Plate
By Jen Karetnick
If the contents of a person’s refrigerator provide a
glimpse into his or her culinary mindset — and I
believe they do — then it’s also fair to say a restau¬
rant’s décor reveals a lot about its proprietor’s
predilections. Perhaps that’s why I felt reassured by
the mural painted near the kitchen of K.C. Cagney &
Co., a recently opened West Kendall establishment.
It’s a still life of condiments: Worcestershire sauce,
U-Bet chocolate syrup, Morton’s salt, crowded
together as if in the door of a fridge. A gigantic cross¬
word puzzle on another wall takes food as its subject,
and the floor tiles next to the specials board depict a
smashed Heinz ketchup bottle, oozing everywhere.
Vintage table appointments such as Coca-Cola nap¬
kin dispensers may make you think chef-owners
David and Ronnie Sigmond and their daughter
Stacey were looking to evoke the mood of a New Jer¬
sey diner circa 1950. But the emphasis here isn’t on
nostalgia, it’s on self-effacing humqr. And though
menu entries like “Eggplant Your Parmigiana on
Pasta” and “Dem Bones, Dem Bones, Dem Beef
Bones” might overshoot the mark, the irreverent
approach is refreshing, a much-needed poke at an
industry that takes itself far too seriously at times.
(Consider the use of a wooden skewer threaded
through a carrot slice and a radish as a garnish, an
unmistakable bit of editorializing on the dining com¬
munity’s current preoccupation with fussy, architec¬
turally inspired creations.) But make no mistake, this
self-billed “most unusual eatery” takes quality seri¬
ously, serving some of the freshest fare in Dade
County.
Even deep-fried foods were beautifully done. A
bowl of “curly curls” — carrots planed lengthwise,
then lightly battered and fried — retained their char¬
acteristic sweetness. Though it made the carrots a
bit too oily, a dressing of potent garlic butter and a
smattering of Parmesan cheese added spark. “Zuc¬
chini zips” were even more satisfying. Thin as dimes
but with the circumference of silver dollars, the
squash was crisp and greaseless, set off nicely by a
ranch dressing that was unexceptional but agree¬
able, smooth and creamy.
To round out our fried first course, we munched
Knowing how to handle a potato
is de rigueur for any diner,
and Cagney's succeeds
admirably with spuds.
from a “lotsa pasta” loaf, a huge heap of linguine
more tangled than Medusa’s hair. (Good thing we
ordered “just a big loaf’ rather than “a very big loaf.”)
Topped with an herby marinara sauce that smacked
pleasurably of oregano, the flat-edged pasta retained
just a hint of chewiness beneath the crunch.
We also tried a steaming cup of baked potato soup,
a delicious, lumpy mixture spiked with bacon and
chopped green onions. Those who monitor their
cholesterol levels can start with “a righteous bowl of
red,” the eatery’s signature chili.
Knowing how to handle a potato is de rigueur for
any diner worth its salt, and I’m pleased to report that
Cagney’s succeeds admirably with spuds. Fries were
crisp and well-done but were eclipsed by the mashed
February 16-22, 1995
potatoes — stiff peaks that held a lake of burgundy-
rich gravy in which fresh mushroom slices floated
like lily pads. You can’t possibly go wrong if you pair
these fiber tubers with “steak on the grass,” a savory
preparation of charbroiled Romanian skirt steak.
Served medium-rare on a bed of barely sautéed leaf
spinach, the steak is accompanied by sweet,
pan-fried onions and slices of exceptionally large
mushrooms.
Barbecue beef brisket, by contrast, was just
like mother used to make — dry and
stringy. Draped on a crusty French
roll, the portion was generous; too
bad it didn’t inspire us-to finish it.
But a Thai chicken sandwich pre- ¿
sented on the same bread was
truly a keeper. Incredibly meaty p
and tender, a boneless breast was Yj
layered with an Oriental vegetable
salad of cabbage, snow peas,
onions, and red peppers. Though
the chicken was purportedly glazed
with a spicy chili sauce, the evidence — an
abundance of honey—didn’t support that claim.
Rather than quibble, on a second visit we ordered
the Thai chicken as a main-course salad, which sub¬
stituted chilled greens and fried noodles for the
bread. The Asian influence carried through to the
specials, including a “rice bowl”—jasmine rice that
lined a casserole dish containing a fillet of either dol¬
phin or Chicken, topped with an extremely flavorful
sauce of black beans, grated ginger, and garlic, and
graced with a set of chopsticks.
Shrimp'salad made for another fine sandwich,
chunks of shrimp, celery, and not too much mayon¬
naise served on a poppy-seed kaiser roll with shred¬
ded lettuce and sliced tomato. “The Cajun,” similarly
showcased by the kaiser, featured a boneless
chicken breast basted with a mildly spiced, garlicky
Cajun sauce that was pleasant if not overly powerful.
This sandwich also can be prepared with a meat
patty or a garden burger (a combination of vege¬
tables, grains, and low-fat cheeses) , as can any of the
other 30 sandwich combinations that are offered.
Desserts, made on the premises by the owners
(and one of the waitresses), were a strong, diner-wor¬
thy finish. Given the recent cold snap, we regretfully
declined the pleasure of a classic ice cream sundae in
favor of old-time cream pies. A too-salty crust con¬
tributed the only flaw to an otherwise exceptional
banana cream, but a chocolate pudding pie
garnished with peanuts managed to handle the
assertive crumbs perfectly.
Open since October, this restau¬
rant is actually in its sixth incarna¬
tion. As Ronnie Sigmond tells it, back
in 1976 she and David bought an
eatery called K.C. Cagney on Ponce
de Leon Boulevard in the Gables.
They changed the menu and intend¬
ed to rename the place, too, but pop¬
ularity precluded that move. Three
more Cagneys — a second Ponce
location, as well as one in Hallandale
and a third in the Coconut Grove
Playhouse — soon followed. (The
Sigmonds also ran the Encore Room in the Play-
house'unti.l the theater was purchased by the state
and renóvated.) The other Cagneys dropped off the
map at the end of the decade, after which a fifth site
(in the Kendale Lakes Mall) came and went.
A stint at consulting was followed by the ill-fated
Inn at Coral Oaks near Parrot Jungle, which fell "vic¬
tim to Hurricane Andrew after only eighteen months
in operation. But when a Coral Oaks member invited
them to open a new venture in his Calusa Crossings
shopping plaza, they decided to give it another go.
And so far, at least, the going is swell. Offering an
honest, responsive brand of hospitality Miamians
have long forgotten, the staff seems very much at
home, dishing out one-liners as adeptly as they dish
out the fare. As they might say at Cagney, put a lock
on that combination.
Side Dish
I’m not a vegetarian, and I have no intention of
becoming one. I did try the concept while I was in
college, but for the wrong reason: I thought it
would help me lose weight. Was I wrong. After
three months of beans, starches, and a large quan¬
tity of junk food (the consequence of eliminating
half the variety in my diet), I was ten pounds heav¬
ier. Still, I love reading vegetarian cookbooks for
two reasons. One, I adore vegetables. And two, the
writing of hard-core vegans often makes me
snicker.
Take Bark & Grass (subtitled Revolution.Supper),
which was given to me by my unsuspecting cousin
Ben, a college freshman. A poorly edited desktop¬
publishing effort, it’s not without a certain charm.
The book opens with a disclaimer (“The info in
this cookbook is intended for entertainment pur¬
poses only...the recipes do not actually work, try¬
ing to live on a vegan diet is unhealthy and unreal¬
istic, and animals love pain”), an essay equating
feminism to animal rights (“It could very well be
easier for those who share the common bond of liv¬
ing outside the social/power structure to spot
oppression and empathize with others that are
being oppressed”), and a list of products to.avoid
and suitable substitutes (the making of distilled
vinegar involves animal charcoal; rice wine is sug¬
gested instead).
But it’s the recipes that are worth the read. Made
up, solicited from friends, and downright stolen
(albeit acknowledged as such) by the editor-cre¬
ator, who goes by the single name “Kim,” they fea¬
ture such exact measurements as “some cooked
rice, some beans, some sweet red pepper if it’s on
sale or maybe green pepper....” And instructions
usually include a personal comment or two from
the author, such as, “I have to make this when
Moon’s not around becaúse the girl cannot eat
beans.” You get the picture.
To order your own copy of Revolution Supper, write to P.0.
Box 477469, Chicago, IL 60647.
K.C. Cagney & Co.
11230 SW 137th
Ave; 386-1555.
Open Tuesday-
Thursdayfrom
11:00 a.m.to
9:00 p.m., Friday
and Saturday
from 11:00 a.m.
to 10:00 p.m.,
and Sunday from
5:00 to 9:00 p.m.
Curly curls
$3.75
Shrimp salad
sandwich
$5.50
Chinese chicken
salad
$6.95
Steak on the
grass
$9.95
New Times Page 65


——ü—-¿¡a
w |
ran
CKE
Marinated Broiled Chicken
• Low Flat
• Low Calorie
• Low Cholesterol
FREEDELIV1RY! *
1 Whole Chicken, includes 3 side
orders, 3 sauces and 2 pita breads
I (feeds 3 to 4)
for only *9.99 Exp3/16/95[
Not valid with combos, delivery
or others discounts. Must present coupon.
Special Beach Offer I
*4.99 Exp. 3/16/95 I
| ALL U CAN EAT ! SAT. ONLY |
I Not valid with combos, delivery â– 
or others discounts. Must present coupon.
Excluding boneless breast items
+ beverage, no sharing, in MB location only.
Miami Beach The Flails Area
474 41 st Street Colonial Palms Plaza
Arthur Godfrey Rd. 13623 S. Dixie Hwy.
(corner of 41 st & Royal Palm Ave.) # 144
(305)531-1888 (across from The Falls)
Fax:(305) 531 -2245 (305)255-991 1
Taste
the magic
of
Breakfast - Luncheon - Afternoon Tea
- Dinner and Sunday Brunch
Performing Fri & Sat Nights
Jeni,Joe&Jazz
8075 SW 67 Ave • Miami * 6694169
live Music Every Friday & Saturday Night
Visa & Mastercard
Tucked underneath the MctroRail
with Green & White Awnings.
Café Papillon
More Than a Cafe
Beer & Wine, Frozen Drinks, Fresh Sandwiches,
Soups, Salads and Fine Deserts
Mow 5erving Hot Pasta Dishes
530 Lincoln Road • 5outh Beach
(across from Lincoln Theatre) • 673-1139
“Welcome To A
Piece Of Japan”
Sushi Bar
Sushi - Sashimi,
Teriyaki & Tempura
Japanese Tatami Room
Children’s Menu
Monday-Thursday
ll:30-3pm 5-llpm
Friday & Saturday
ll:30-3pm 5-ll:30pm
Sunday
5pm- 10:30pm
7if4in#Re$t4«/r Open 7 Days
9533 South Dixie, Miami 668-9367
(In Dadeland Plaza, Next to Hooligans)
Rooftop Parking Available
SUSHI
All-l-CAN-EAT
6-11pm $12.95
Karaoke & Full Menu after 11 pm
TOKYO CLUB
3425 COLLINS AVE. MIAMI BEACH • 534-5358
Absolutely
Fabulous...
HERE COMES THE SUN
NATURAL FOOD
RESTAURANT
AND VITAMIN STORE
THE AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION'S PUBLISHED
DINING GUIDE HAS HERE COMES THE SUN LISTED
AS A HEALTH CONSCIOUS RESTAURANT SERVING
LOW.FAT, LOW SALT,LOW CHOLESTEROL DISHES.
BECAUSE WE CARE ABOUT YOUR HEALTH!
MONDAY-SATURDAY
TAKE OUT & DELIVERY
2188 NE 123 STREET
895-6793
CUISINE
WITH
JAPANESE
rmvoR
AhlSHIf
^ JAPA^SFIBESTAURANT,.
5830S. Dixie%\|y *665-6261
(at the old Depot location)
SUNNY ISLES PLAZA 3007 N.E. J^tOSTREET. N. MIAMI BEACH (305) 948-3687
MoltifcjyiyiN^aAM SAT & SUN: 5PM-3:30AM
Him’s Happy Hour-2 For 1*5- 7PIVI Mon - Fri
Tuesdays: I | r
presenting DoHtor Fabulus with mark West
UVEUOOL JAZZ- GREAT FOOD inOOpm - 3:30am
Weanesdays.
Music for all occasions with Bob Moffítton guitar
JAPANESE R^ST^URAJsfr & SUSHI BAR
February 16-22, 1995


• * » 4 •
Cafe
D
ining Guie
le
The following restaurants are recomménded by the
â–  New Times food critic. Please call in advance for
operating hours, reservations, and other specific
information.
Price Guide
(based on a complete meal for one, excluding tip and
alcoholic beverages)
Inexpensive, less than $15: $
Moderate, $15 to $30: $$
Expensive, more than $30: $$$
North Dade: Mainland and causeways, north of N
36th Street, excluding the areas covered under
West-Dade-Hialeah (see below).
North Beaches: All beachside communities north of
Dade Boulevard in Miami Beach.
South Beach: Miami Beach south of Dade
Boulevard.
Miami-Central Dade: Mainland east of SR 826, from N
36th Street south to Miller Road.
West DadeNialeah: Hialeah and adjacent municipali¬
ties (Hialeah Gardens, Opa-locka, Medley, Miami
Springs), as well as everything west of SR 826 from
Okeechobee Road south to Miller Road.
Coconut Grove-Key Biscayne: Key Biscayne proper
and everything in the City of Miami east of U.S. 1
and south of the Rickenbacker Causeway.
Coral Gables: Everything within the Coral Gables
city limits.
South MiamMfendall-South Dade: South Miami proper,
and everything south of Miller Road.
North Dade
Akash 11730 Biscayne Blvd; 8900557. Down-home
Indian dishes vie for appreciation with the friendly
staff. Nans, curries, and tandoori meat dishes are
authentic and satisfying. Gulab jamun (doughnutlike
fried “milk balls” served in warm syrup) and mango
ice cream are desserts for the most stalwart of sweet
tooths. Lunch and dinner. $
. Andre's Diner 14424 Biscayne Blvd; 919-9962. More
Northern Italian than your typical roadside eatery,
this likable little place serves pastas, chicken, veal,
and seafood dishes at diner-level prices. The hot
antipasto for two is a classic start, followed by a house
salad of arugula, shredded radicchio, and Belgian
endive. Fettuccine with salmon and cream sauce and
linguine pescastore have both a rich kick and a
reasonable price tag. Desserts such as proprietor
Andre Filosa’s plum tart bring a perfect bit of bistro
into the trattoria. Lunch and dinner. $
The Bar-B-Q-Bam 11705 NW 7th Ave; 681-2491-. An air-
conditioned, carpeted fern-bar rendition of a barbecue
shack. You got your spare ribs, your baby back ribs,
your sliced-to-order barbecue turkey, beef, and ham,
plus the lean and mean combination plates. Lunch
and dinner. $
Biscayne Wine Merchants & Bistro 738 NE 125th St;
899-1997. Owner/chef jan Sitko reopened his former
Biscayne locale just a few blocks away. Arugula salad
and homemade páté start any meal off right Of the
main courses, there’s shrimp with peppercorn sauce
and chicken crustaces, stuffed with leeks, dill, and
crab with dill sauce. The main deal here is the wine
policy—each bottle costs the same whether you take
it home or have it here. Daily specials range from fish
to chicken, usually excellent. Dinner, weekday
lunch. $
Bruza 3599 NE 207th St; 937-2400. Directly across
from the famous Unicom Village in the Shoppes at the
Waterways, this self-billed “contemporary trattoria” is
spacious and stylish, and features live jazz on
weekend nights, a lively bar, and great food. Salads,
gourmet pizzas, specials of the day, and a list of
innovative pasta dishes are the main attractions. Mix
and match a mussels marinara appetizer with aThai
chicken pizza or get carnivorous with a beef carpaccio
and crusted veal chops. Save room for dessert $$
The Burrito Place 2120123rd St; 895050L As the name,
implies, burritos are the specialty of the house, along
with pepitos (sandwiches) and quesadillas. Try the
roast pork loin with sauteed onions and peppers, or
the shredded chicken with beans and rice. If you have
an eyes-on-the-thighs philosophy, go for the fresh leaf
spinach and mushroom burrito, stir-fried with garlic
and folded in an oversize flour tortilla with black
beans, white rice, salsa, a sprinkle of cheese, and
guacamole, served with nonfat yogurt on the side.
Wash it down with a Dos Equis special lager—at
least it looks light Lunch, dinner, and delivery. $
Chef Allen's 19088 NE 29th Ave; 935-2900. Since '
February 16-22, '2995
F opening in 1986'tfrisuñiqué restaurant has dominated
the New World scene. These days innovative chef-
owner Allen Susser continues to cater to his
community’s fine-dining needs. Ajames Beard
Award-winning chef, he prepares the finest fish in
Miami, particularly whole yellowtail smothered in a
coconut-milk-and-curry sauce. Caribbean antipasto,
featuring tamarind-barbecue shrimp and jerk
calamari, is a fiesta of fire; swordfish, dotted with sun-
dried fruit confit is moist and meaty. Nightly soufflés,
prepared by Michele Kutas, range from lemon-
blackberry to chocolate-brownie and are an
exceptional end to an outstanding meal. $$$
Cool Beans Café 12573 Biscayne Blvd; 899-8815.
Bananas Foster. Spiced Jamaican rum. Cherries
jubile*. As flavors for coffee, these are cool beans,
indeed. Salads and sandwiches are also worth a look
at this cozy, arty coffee-and-wine bar, as are desserts.
Also try a cup of the house specialty, beanoccino —
made with chocolate and coconut flavors. Lunch and
dinner. $
Gourmet Diner 13951 Biscayne Blvd; 947-2255. Cheap
in price but not in quality, this North Miami Beach
institution serves some of the best French-roots
cuisine in Dade. Steamed artichoke served chilled
with a fabulous pink vinaigrette makes a simple but
satisfying appetizer; snails are succulent in butter,
garlic, and a powerful portion of white wine; and loin
of lamb encrusted with herbs is served rare and juicy.
House-made desserts are popular—you’d better
reserve a piece of that custard fruit tart before digging
in to your seafood au gratín. Lunch, dinner, and
weekend breakfast Cash only. $
Hiro Japanese Restaurant and Sushi & Yakitori Bar 3007
NE 163rd St 948-3687. Soothing jazz soundtracks and
late-night hours (till 3:00 a.m.) make Hiro appealing
for cocktail-hour snacks and after-movie munchies;
but grilled yakitori and fresh sushi rolls are appropri¬
ate for mealtimes, too. Don’t pass up the spider roll
(made with softshell crab) or the salmon, scallion, and
cream cheese roll, a creamy delicacy designed to
make you crave more. Lunch and dinner. $$
Langosta Beach Restaurant 1279 NE 79th St;
751-1200. The only “gourmet on the bay,” this
restaurant is distinguished not only by its boat-
docking capabilities, but by its kitchen capabilities.
Devour the fish, particularly the onion-encrusted
salmon or whole roasted yellowtail, served on a
stew of black beans. Imaginative designs such as the
martini of Maine lobster, are literally framed in
glass. $$$
Mark's Place 2286 NE 123rd St; 893-6888. Named one
of the fifty best restaurants in the nation and a
recipient of the Distinguished Restaurant Award from
Condé Nast Traveler, chef/owner Mark Militello’s
upscale establishment has placed Miami on the fancy
food map. A nominee at the James Beard Awards,
Militello has garnered top praise for his startlingly
inventive cuisine—pappardelle with grilled rabbit, for
example, or pan roasted pheasant with black truffles
and braised swiss chard. The menu changes daily, but
count on its being both exquisite and extensive. And
dessert, dessert, dessert! Lunch and dinner. $$$
Mike Gordon 1201 NE 79th St; 7514429. You can tell by
looking in the fish tanks: There’s no fresher seafood
in town. In this institution, black grouper—fried or
broiled—acquires legendary status. Lobster with
drawn butter has never tasted so sweet, and crab
dishes are also wonderful. If there’s room at the end,
The mountainous key lime pie is a treat Overlooks
beautiful Biscayne Bay. Lunch and dinner. $$
Neal's 2570 NE Miami Gardens Dr; 9368333.
Husband-and-wife team Neal Cooper and Mary Mass-
Cooper run this charming, 70-seat Aventura eatery.
Entrees — such as fillet of salmon served over
mashed potatoes, or the inches-thick pork chop with
spiced apples—are mouth-watering and reasonably
priced. Asian influences add a touch of reinvention to
duck and stuffed pasta dishes; Italian notes abound in
the grilled vegetable-goat cheese pizza and
homemade focaccia. Dusted with 24-karat gold dust,
Almond Roca chocolate surprise is a dessert worth its
weight in, well, gold. $$
Outback Steakhouse 3161 NE 163rd St; 9444329. For
information see listing under West Dade.
Tani Guchi's Place 2224 NE 123rd St; 8928744. What
this tiny husband-and-wife restaurant lacks in space, it
makes up for in taste. A dazzling array of Japanese
dishes is offered, both raw and cooked. Grilled tofo
with peanut miso sauce and steamed broccoli with
shiitake mushrooms and mustard sauce are pure
pleasure; yaki-soba and yaki-udon are more traditional
offerings. $
Tarks Seafoodery & Grill 13750 Biscayne Blvd; 9448275.
Here you’ll find almost as great a variety of sea life as
at the Seaquarium. You’ve got your raw, your fried, -
your sautéed, steamed, and charbroiled. And you’ve
got your chowders. Mouth-watering side dishes
include com on the cob, smoked ambeijack, and
conch salad. Cap off your meal with a hefty slice of ice-
cold watermelon. Lunch and dinner. $
Tivoli Restaurant 3439 NE 163rd St; 9467080. Not
much truly Danish cuisine here, despite the name
small in size
big on taste!
EUROPEAN
CUISINE IN ACASUAL
BISTRO ATMOSPHERE
CALL TODAY FOR
RESERVATIONS...
9707 SOUTH DIXIE HWY. MIAMI, 668-9395
the french have landed,
and theyre delicious.
south beach restaurant
SANDWICHES • SALADS • CREPES • WINE
1300 COLLINS AVENUE . SOUTH BEACH . 673-8803
New Times .Page, 67


:iW
WILL TAKE YOU THERE
WE OFFER A STYLE OF COOKING TO SUIT
BODY AND SPIRIT. THE BLENDING OF SPICES.
SPECIAL MARINADES, HAND BASTING AND
TURNING, SLOW COOKING, HARDWOOD FIRES.
WE SPECIALLY PREPARE CHICKEN, RIBS &
FISH TO MAKE YOU BODY FEEL GREAT.
COME TO THE
TIE ART OF TRADITIONAL COOIINB *'
THE DS OUT TODAY! LURCH 8 DINNER
2345 SW 37TH AVENUE MIAMI, 444-0334
2For1
Buy one entree & get second
of equal or lesser value FREE
! 325 Alcazar • Coral Gables !
446-1600
Not Valid Fri/Sat
i ' i
AUTHENTIC
JAPANESE RESTAURANT
ihSkpub/
Sun, Tue, Wed, Thur: 6pm-11pm
Fri & Sat: 6pm-lam
10855 Sunset Drive k Miami • 274-1148
¡¡MBaS
m
An Old World Tradition
; Step back wyapan t7J0P
Ned0t Experience
Big Big Sushi in
Meat Authentic
â– J.Atmosphere
m
m
NEW HOURS 6pm- Urn
Sun-Thur
Fri-Sat 6pm- 1am
1208 Washington Ave. Miami Beach
673-9368
m
Si
Page 6 8 JNew ,Ti mes
(derived from a famous Copenhagen landmark); but
classic continental dishes are well prepared and the
hopitality is first-rate. Standouts include a juicy and
flavorfiil duck with apple-and-chutney sauce, and a
sublime red snapper in pastry. Save room for dessert
—there are dozens to choose from. $$
Unicorn Village Restaurant 3595 NE 207th St; 933-8829.
Not only healthy but politically correct, too. Try the
dolphin-safe tongol tuna tossed with canola mayo or â– 
substitute soy cheese on that tempting Jamaican
pizza. Aside from the regular menu, fresh seafood
such as the coconut-crusted grouper is worth
investigation. Lunch and dinner. $
Wong's Shanghai 12420 Biscayne Blvd; 8914313.
Szechuan dishes are some of the high points of this
famous Chinese haven, still one of the best despite the
passage of time. Among appetizers, the best
unquestionably áre tender dumplings laden with
ginger and swimming in a light soy broth. Simple
things such as fried rice can surprise one by the high
quality of preparation. Reliable service of the speedy
kind. Lunch and dinner. $
North Beaches
Arnie and Richie's 525 41st St; 531-7691. As you walk in,
you know you’re in deli heaven: Fresh cuts of smoked
fish, ham, salami, roast beef, cheese, and other
favorites line the refrigerated display case.
Sandwiches are hard to beat here; there’s no better
pastrami on rye anywhere. Knishes also excel.
Breakfast, lunch, and early dinner. $
Café Avanti 732 41st St; 5384400. Pleasant Northern
Italian restaurant with a number of French nuances.
Start with soups as good as their pretty names
promise: minestrone Genovese, tortellini in brodo, or.
zuppa maitata. The shrrimp “fra diavolo” is spunky;
the veal dishes are exquisite and you won’t have to
take out a second mortgage to pay the check. Cuisine
is classical, but with a flair—and the chef has a
penchant for Pernod (notably with pears, as a grand
finale). $$
Café Gisela 1009 Kane Concourse; 861-8166. Don’t
waste your time on the all-American hot dog, or any of
the other American foods here. Check out the
cevapcici at this Eastern European café, or do your
worst to the bratwurst—don’t worry, it won’t bite
back. Homemade goulash is also good, but watch out
for the oven-fresh apple strudel—it sometimes runs
hot, but mostly it’s cold. $
Cafe Prima Pasta 414 71st St; 867-0106. The newest
pasta café in town. Eat here for fine handmade pasta
at fine-with-4verybody prices. Coarsely chopped fresh
tomato sauces are especially good. But be prepared to *
mill about on the sidewalk for a while — this 30-seat
establishment has its limitations. $$
Cafe Tango 7904 West Dr; 756-5885. The third point on
an almost geographically straight line, this from-
scratch pizzarand-pasta café joins distinguished trend
setters Qggi Café and Cafe Prima Pasta. But at Tango,
there’s no wait (at least not yet). Distinguishing
features, aside from the delicious cheese-and-herb
bread, fugazza pizza, and whole-wheat linguine,
include the Argentine-style free-range grilled items, of
which a half chicken marinated in lemon sauce is
particularly memorable. A list of Chilean and
Argentinean wines will complement your meal, a slice
of homemade tiramisii will cap it Lunch and dinner.$
Christine Lee’s Gaslight 18401 Collins Ave; 932-1145. An
instituion on Miami Beach, this restaurant located in
the Thunderbird Hotel offers a mix of Cantonese,
Hunan, Mandarin, and Szechuan specialties, not to
mention continental delights such as whole steamed
lobster, steaks, and veal dishes. Steamed dumplings
and roast pork tenderloin slices whet the appetite;
walnut chicken is a sublime main course, as is the
Hunan beef. As Chinese restaurants go, even desserts
are pleasing, particularly the pineapple melba. $$
Crystal Cafe 726 41st St; 673-8266. A dressed-up
Gourmet Diner. Lovingly prepared Continental
cuisine bears a touch of reinvention — chef-owner
Klime Kovaceski has lightened up traditionally heavy
recipes and eased up on prices. Osso buco is a
fantastic bargain, pink veal falling away in tender
hunks from the eye of bone. Served on herb-specked
and paprika-dusted plates, penne with plump shimp
bears testimony to the quality of ingredients; chicken
paprikash is a tangy version of an old favorite. Lunch
and dinner. $$
Dominique’s 5225 Collins Ave; 865-6500. The famous
lamb chops — marinated and cooked to poetic
perfection — raise the status of Dominique’s to near¬
legendary, which is unfair. If you’re adventurous, you
should try the alligator, rattlesnake, or buffalo dishes
that have become part of the lore. Desserts are
memorable, with soufflés from chocolate to pistachio.
Breakfast, lunch, and dinner. $$$
Kamon Japanese Restaurant 4441 Collins Ave;
538-0050. Tired of teriyaki? C’mon to Kamon. Sushi
and other authentic Japanese fare, such as somen
nóodjé,s on ice, $re a refreshing end to a Hot day. Or
try the filet mignon, grilled on a hot stone at your
table and served with three steak sauces—none of
them teriyaki. $$
La Famiglia 2445 Collins Ave; 534-7111. Located in the
refurbished Traymore Hotel, this ballroom-size
restaurant is a stunner in more waysjhan one. Try the
clam appetizer, with bivalves steamed in an
intoxicating broth of champagne, shallots,, green
peppers, and herbs, or the pasta e fagioli, which is
among the best in town. This continental menu leans
heavily toward Italian, and vitello Sinatra will light up
your ol’ eyes, no nlatter what color they are. Lunch
and dinner. $$
Oggi Café and Deli 1740 79th St Cswy; 866-1238. Tables
are at a premium at this 30-odd-seat restaurant and
deli in the White Star Center, but. then, so is the pasta
Fettuccine, agnolotti, penne, and spaghetti are all
handmade; the tortelloni bicolore, stuffed with sun-
dried tomatoes and ricotta, is the prince of the pile.
Homemade desserts deserve devouring. Lunch and
dinner. No credit cards. $
The Rascal House 17190 Collins Ave; 9474581. A
labyrinthine deli, but surely one of the best The menu
is a trip through all the glories of Jewish fare: chopped
liver with shmaltz; herring; smoked fish; Reuben,
corned beef, and pastrami sandwiches; huge potato
latkes with sour cream; brisket of beef; borscht.. .you
get the picture. Atmosphere is frantic but alive and
infectiously buoyant Breakfast lunch, and dinner. $
Tutto Matto 17000 Collins Ave; 945-0765. The sister
restaurant to South Beach’s i Papparazzi is no twin,
but there is a family resemblance. A wide-ranging
menu includes good pasta dishes, meats, fowl, and
fishes. Homemade bread and desserts are Sunny Isles
standouts. Lunch and dinner. $$
South Beach
A Fish Called Avalon 700 Ocean Dr, 532-1727. This sleek
South Beach eatery, located in the refurbished Avalon
Hotel, combines minimalist décor with top-notch
cuisine. The menu changes daily, but the choices
consistently reflect the essence of South Florida fare
— fresh local seafood shown off to its best advantage
with fresh local fruits and vegetables. Any catch of the
day served with fruit relish and citrus beurre blanc is
bound to be delicious; likewise the winning combo of
cucumber-tomato and avocado salsas. Closed
Monday. $$
Allioli 1300 Ocean Dr; 5384)553. It may be named after
a condiment, but it takes its influences from a
continent Serving Euro-Mediterranean cuisine, the
menu relies largely on traditional Spanish appetizers
and French and Italian entrees. Tapas like the bacalao
empanadillas are tasty starters; gazpacho is of the
Andalusian variety. The veal chop and boneless duck
are dependable main courses. Lunch and dinner. $$
Cafe Soleil 1233 Lincoln Rd; 672:3800. A respite from
1He bustle of South Beach. Inventive Asian-influenced
French fare yields appetizers as disparate as
vegetarian nori rolls and a country páté plate, both of
which are delicious. Fish entrées, such as swordfish
with black-olive pesto, are as expertly prepared as
rack of lamb, rolled in crushed mint and grainy
mustard. Lunch and dinner. $$
Dab Haus 852 Alton Rd; 534-9557. Deutschland is
definitely über alies in this Austró-German cubbyhole
on the Beach. Five varieties of chicken, pork, and veal
schnitzels are available, each deliquescently sautéed
and served. Among the appetizers, the curry and veal
wurst platter is fine, as is the vampire-frightening
garlic soup. Sauerbraten and beef roulades, two
notable German specialties, are also wonderfully
authentic. Desserts are few, but the warm, apricot-
filled crepes — otherwise known as palatschinten —
are delightful. $
Escopazzo 1311 Washington Ave; 674-9450. Service'
can be “a little crazy” in this minuscule 35-seat
establishment But the red snapper baked in a
balsamic bread shell is usually moist and flavorfiil,
and the came — free-range guinea breast and veal in
white wine and sage sauce, for example — could very '
well save your sanity. $$
Fellini Restaurant 860 Washington Ave; 532-8984. A
standout among Beach trattorias, this modest
storefront eatery is geared toward locals. Sautéed
grouper with fresh spinach is a wonder of a pan-
seared fillet flavored with roasted garlic; strozzapretti
is gnocchi dough formed into long twists and dressed
in cream with a rainbow of shredded arugula,
tomatoes, zucchini, and fresh com. For dessert, torta
di cioccolato is Italian for moist, oven-hot brownie*
topped with whipped cream and berries. Service is
friendly and effective. $$
Lulu's 1053 Washington Ave; 532-6147. Listen up,
trendoids, here’s a veritable Graceland-by- the-sea.
While the service is sketchy, the surroundings
themselves are a sketch. (Hint: picture every Elvis
souvenir extant) The menu is unabashedly southern
fried — chicken-fried steak, hush puppies, com-and-
okrafrittered The ..griddle; sizzles with Itrio steak, crab
February ±6—22, 199 5


cakes, burgers, pork chops, and even a fried peanut-
butter-and-banana sandwich. Lunch and dinner. $
Maiko Japanese Restaurant and Sushi Bar 1255
Washington Ave; 531-6369. Lines are out the door for
innovative sushi creations, such as the spider roD
combining soft-shell crab, asparagus, and avocado.
Noodle dishes are generous portions of sautéed
buckwheat noodles. Generous also are the dinners
such as ebi misoyaki, shrimp in miso sauce, served
wtih your choice of soup or green salad. The miso
honey salad dressing is such an attraction you
probably won’t age a week before a return visit Lunch
and dinner. $$
Mezzanotte 1200 Washington Ave; 673-4343. Yes, the
hustle and bustle inside can make Grand Central
seem meek, but that’s part of the paparazzo charm.
Terrific pastas are beautifully prepared. (There are no
better agnolotti in South Florida.) Better carpaccios
are hard to find, while veal dishes can vary from the
mundane to the spectacular. Second to none on the
Beach. $$
News Calé 800 Ocean Dr; 538-6397. Munch cold cuts
and any of a dozen cheeses and sip your choice of
three fine wines by the glass, or while away an entire
day with a bottle, listening to piped-in and piped-out
(to porch) jazz. Tahini salad with pita is tops, and the
gazpacho is great Look cool with a Euro mag from
the in-house newsstand (hence the name). Open 24
hours. $
Nick's Miami Beach 300 Alton Rd; 673-3444. At 1000
seats, this venture is touted as the largest new
restaurant in the U.S. And the self-hype has been
nearly as monstrous as the eatery. But you wouldn’t
know it from either the personalized service or the
excellent cuisine. Whether you attempt a five-pound
Maine lobster or a 22-ounce porterhouse steak, your
experience at Nick’s is bound to be prime. Lunch and
dinner. $$$
Osteria del Teatro 1443 Washington Ave; 538-7850.
Recipient of the 1993 Golden Spoon Award and
named one of the top 200 restaurants in the country
by Trend magazine, Osteria is one of Miami’s favorites
as well. National Chefs Award-winner Antonio
Tettamanzi has a delicate hand with fish, poaching
salmon to perfection and grilling tuna to a T. He also
creates such fabulous pasta dishes as pappardelle
sauteed with stone crab meat, sea scallops in the
shell, fresh tomatoes, and vodka cream sauce, and
linguine with mixed seafood baked in parchement
paper. Now you can enjoy these specialties from 6:00
to 7:30 p.m. at Twilight Pasta, the hippest early birder
on the beach. $$$
Pacific Time 915 Lincoln Rd; 534-5979. Chef and co¬
proprietor Jonathan Eismann stuns the New World
with his take on Pacific Rim cuisine. Florida Keys
grouper is enticing, served with sake, shallot, and
ginger and tempura-fried sweet potatoes. Freshwater
catfish, also in tempura batter, is stuffed with ginger
and served whole. Honey-roasted Chinese duck with
a fresh plum and plum wine sauce and supple Peking
pancakes are simply outstanding. Finally, pastry chef
Jennifer Warren’s chocolate bomb dessert is a baked-
to-order explosion that’s guaranteed to blow you
away. $$$
Puerto Sagua 700 Collins Ave; 673-1115. If you’re
allergic to Calle Ocho, then there’s this excellent
Cuban emporium. Most of the usual favorites are
here, the best of which is ropa vieja—not too saucy
and not dry. Specials are tasty as well, from sautéed
chicken livers to salt cod. When if s available, the -
shrimp in “enchilada” sauce is pleasing. Enormous
portions. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner. $
Raleigh Bar and Restaurant 1775 Collins Ave; 534-1775.
Forget the blues and follow the rising star of the
Raleigh Hotel’s stylish restaurant Head chef Marc
Lippman has some creative ways for you to start your
meal: lamb sausage and couscous with cumin and
mint and a creamless yellow-squash soup with spiced
croutons are just two. Follow that with an entree of
roasted grouper in a slow-roasted vegetable sauce or
grilled loin of lamb. Order the roasted garlic mashed
potatoes for Americana with a kick. Breakfast and
lunch daily; dinner Wednesday through Saturday
only. $$
Ruen Thai 947Washington Ave; 534-1504. In this
startlingly beautiful room, the teak tables are glass-
topped and intricately carved. The food is superb,
particularly mee krob, crunchy vermicelli in an
intriguing sweet-and-sour sauce garnished with bean
sprouts, tiny shrimp, and a butterfly sculpted from a
carrot Delicious house specialties include lobster
with chili paste, curried grouper, and a crispy,
amazingly lean, duck. Hot dishes are not as hot as
billed, so crank up your order accordingly. $
San Loco 23514th St; 538-3009. Located two doors
down from Tattoos by Lou, Sari Loco’s customers
feast on tacos—and show off tattoos — of every
shape and size. Choose beet chicken, or vegetarian,
wrap it in a flour or com tortilla, specify mild, medium,
or hot sauce, and you’ve built your own taco (or
burrito, enchilada, or quesadilla) to specifications.
Tbq chili is as hgt as a mid-July day, and jthe^chicken
$oup,. about as.comforting ás South Beach gets,' is ‘
February 16-22, 1995
stocked with breast meat onions, peppers, and
crushed jalapeños—while not exactly designed for
the sickbed, it’ll certainly clear your sinuses. Lunch,
dinner, and late night $
Shabeen Cookshack and Bar 1200 Collins Ave; 673-8373.
Dive into the Caribbean at the Marlin Hotel’s
Shabeen. C’mon in, the jerk chicken and oxtail and
beans are a tropical find. Vegetable dishes, such as
the stuffed cho-cho (chayóte squash) are light on the
pocketbook as well as the purse of your belly. And
service is fairly matched to the fare: stylish, warm¬
hearted, and genuine. Lunch and dinner. 6
Starfish 1427 West Ave; 673-1717. Once a week this
trendy eatery entertains with “Dragfish,” a cabaret-
themed evening of local entertainment But that’s not
the only kind offish thafs served up here. Get spicy
with Chef David Sloane’s Pemod-and-peppercom
salmon or chili-rubbed mahi-mahi. Those looking for
a heartier meal can order the signature meat loaf or
smoked beef tenderloin. Chocolate martinis are a
decadent nightcap. $$
The Strand 671 Washington Ave; 532-2340. The menu
at this Beach hot spot reflects a penchant for variety.
There are the appetizers, four spa-cuisine offerings,
low in fat and calories; the “classic comforts”
(including meat loaf with mashed potatoes and pan
gravy); salads, and pastas. Oh, and ask about the day’s
specials. $$
Sushi Rock Cafe 1351 Collins Ave; 532-2133. The proto¬
typical sushi bar where everyone claims to be a regular.
Don’t be intimidated if you’re not—service is pleasant
and efficient no matter who you are, and the sushi is
outstanding. Choose from 25 exotic makimono or from
a generous list of cooked vegetarian stir-fry dishes,
teriyaki dinners, and light, crisp tempuras. $6
Toni's New Tokyo Cuisine and Sushi Bar 1208 Washington
Ave; 673-9368. A blade runner of a Japanese dining
place. Apart from the wonderful sushi, cooked fish
can be served with a variety of sauces: tarragon
butter, ravigóte, house tomato, cream, or the more ■
common teriyaki. The atmosphere is — as much else
on the Beach—celeb-consdous, but no worse for
that Posey and enjoyable. Lunch and dinner. $$
Villa Deli 1608 Alton Rd; 5384552. You don’t have to
ask, “Where’s the beef?” at this chow-down emporium
—you don’t even have to ask, “Where’s the juice?”
The freshly sliced, juicy corned beef sandwich is
sublime, but there’s much more to the Villa than
corned beef. Let us now pay tribute to turkey and to
tongue, and give praise to pastrami. Breakfast, lunch,
and dinner. $
Miami-Central Dade
Aladdin 2841 Coral Way; 443-1426. Experience the
magic of authentic Lebanese cooking at this 58-seat
restaurant decorated with — you guessed it—brass
oil lamps on the wall. You won’t even notice the décor
once the fid medames appetizer (fava beans mixed
with hummus and served with pita bread) arrives.
Same goes for the mild and moist grape leaves and
the stewlike couscous topped with beef and chicken.
Syrupy baklava are crunchy, buttery sweets that make
for a fine finish. Lunch and dinner. $
Bahama's Fish Market & Restaurant 7200 SW 8th St;
264-1448. Not really a Caribbean restaurant, this
family-style operation is, however, a good spot for
fresh standard seafood dishes with Cuban nuances.
Don’t miss the escabeche, a chilled extravaganza of
lightly breaded and fried pickled kingfish smothered
with a tart onion-and-pepper studded marinade.
Nothing is frozen here and seasonal catches are
priced by the pound. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner. $
Big Fish 55 SW Miami Avenue Rd; 372-3725. Come
hear the tunes at this out-of-the-way fish place. You
might share a table with other yuppjes, but you won’t
complain after your first bite of that pita-bread fish
sandwich, stuffed with tomatoes and onions. The
“Portuguese Life-Giving Soup” changes from day to
day, but it’s the tastiest fish soup in Miami.
Atmosphere is everything here; service and desserts
vary in quality. Lunch. $
Brasserie Brickell Key 601 Brickell Key Dr; 577-0907.
An upscale neighborhood restaurant located on
Claughton Island, this place is ideal for before-sports
(or other downtown entertainment) dining. Pasta
dishes such as linguine with white clam sauce or
agnolotti allegria (stuffed with ricotta, layered with
cream) are key to fulfillment For a different starter try
the French onion soup with a hearty tomato base.
Giant bonbons—gourmet ice cream dipped and
rolled in tricolor chocolate — rival the mousse pie for
irresistible richness. Dinner and Sunday brunch. $$
The Brickell Club 1221 Brickell Ave; 536-9000. The view
from this penthouse restaurant is sky-high, as are the
prices. Furnishings are predictably snooty—leather
banquettes, oiled mahogany, fine china, engraved
silverware — but the cuisine is surprisingly
innovative. Try the mesquite onion soup, made with
sweet VIdalias and.bits of chorizo. Similarly delicious
are roast loin of lamb and chicken paillard in' lemdii
Smoothie
of the week
BERRY BURN
Raspberries, Blueberries, Strawberries,
Bananas, Protein, Amino Activator;
Energy Powder, Multi-Vitamin
V
2 off
SOtflllBEACtl
•exp 3/16/95
South Miami
1549 Sunset Drive
(3 doors east of Beverly Hills Cafe)
666-2Í53
Come and Discover the delicious taste
of multi ethnic vegetarian cuisine.
Including build your own Salad Bar,
Mixed Vegetable Medleys,
Varieties of Rice, And Much More.
Eat-In • Take Out • Free Delivery
Monday thru Saturday: 10:00am - 9:00pm
12260 SW 8th Street, Interplaza Shopping
Center. Call today for our daily specials
554-8989
(Mangos
House of the
Authentic Mexican Cuisine
Happy Hour from;
5:00 to 7:00pm
and
lOtfX) to Close
Everyday *Full liquor Bar
Now Delivering Lunch
in South Miami
Come Try our Newly
Opened Taco Stand!!!
Daily Specials
Open 7 Days Lunch, Dinner and
Sunday Brunch
5859 SW 73rd St. Miami, FL 33143
Located in the Heart of South Miami
Tel. 663-9333
PRIX FIXE
14.95
CG - • -
to choice of:
■¡ mimosa,
'f. bloody mary,
j|: screwdriver,
bellini,
large juice
I or smoothie
choice of :
croissant,
danish
or muffin
(blueberry
or apple bran)
choice of:
smoked salmon
benedict,
eggs florentine,
fruit pancakes.
Boulevard Slam,
eggs benedict,
or fruit,
granola and yogurt
choice of:
cappuccino,
cafe au lait,
cuban coffee,
or espresso
GUILT
buy'em
>vand Bar & Grill
brunch served every Saturday & Sunday till 4
740 Ocean Drive South Beach (305) 532-9069
Mi
New Times Page 69


%EST OF MIAMI WINNER!
St ‘Rcutcfo
tfauute
Mexican
Restaurant
♦‘Best Mexican Restaurant”
“Best Fajitas”
“Best Place.to Ruy Salsa Mexicana”
Üi •' -New Times Best of Miami
Lunch €r Dinner
1626 Pennsylvania Ave. Miami Beach
half block S. óf Lincoln Rd,673-0480
AUTHENTIC
MEXICAN FOOD
Another Satisfied Customer!
Specialty Cakes for Birthdays, Weddings & Parties.
Mouth Watering Key Lime Pies, Chocolate Cheese
Cakes. Hotel & Restamant Catering.
ANY OCCASION.. ANY TIME.
616 SOUTH MIAMI AVENUE, CALL : 374-7980
"Delicious... Distinctive... Intense... Lusty...
and Wonderful..." -Jen Karetnick, Mew nmes'95
French Caribbean Cuisine
TUESDAY A Romantic Caribbean Valentines Evening
THURSDAY Brazilian Might in the Courtyard
Music & Dancing 7:30 until...
SATURDAY Frideman & Ndble Duo
voted "Best Duo" - Mew Times’92
5erving Lunch and Dinner
Happy Hour Tues - Fri 5-7pm Closed Mondays
646 Lincoln Road (at Euclid) 532-2809
Free Parking in Back
A Catering^
Live Piano
(JjGafe "Barcelona
160 Giralda Avenue, Coral Gables
448-0912
Ruth’s Chris.
U.S. PRIME,
AGED BEEF.
Served sizzling.
Your Ruth’s Chris
No. 1 FOR BUSINESS.
No. 1 FQR STEAK.
Come in soon.
Home of Serious Steaks <
North Miami Beach
On the Intracoastal
305/949-0100
Open Nightly From 5:00 p.m.
Reservations Recommended
and cilantro, which is accompanied by guacamole,
pineapple salsa, plantain chips, and black bean
salad. $$$
Casa Juancho 2436 SW 8th St; 642-2452. This
cavernous Spanish emporium has become one of the
better-known attractions of Little Havana. A shame,
because the food can often be better than that
Besides tapas, there’s a large selection of Iberian fish
specialties, such as snapper in green sauce and baby
eels in garlic and olive oil. Ofthe desserts, none is
better than the crema catalana custard topped with
burnt caramel. Lunch and dinner. $$$
Covadonga 6480 SW 8th St; 261-2406. Cubans know
about seafood,, and this restaurant shows (is how
much and why. A plain snapper fillet sautéed in the
skillet can raise comparisons with José Marti’s verse.
One of the seasonal specialties is fish stuffed with
crab meat Desserts vary in quality. Lunch and
dinner. $$
East Coast Fisheries 360 W Flagler St; 373-5514. It’s
pricey, it’s always full, it’s noisy, but oh-so-good. The
WQnders of the sea come alive in this landmark fish
restaurant so full of character and homespun charm.
Conch fritters as appetizers are a must As for sauces,
where else can you find blackened fish served with a
red pepper sauce? Lunch and dinner. $$
El Bodegón de Castilla 2499 SW 8th St; 640-0863. A
popular restaurant offering standard Spanish seafood.
Decoration is stereotypically Iberian, but the food is
authentic. Snapper in green sauce brims with garlic
and parsley flavor. Grilled grouper and dolphin fillets
shine, and the imported Dover sole with lemon is
exceedingly delicate. The famed “cazuela de mariscos”
is a veritable who’s who of seafood. For dessert try the
crema catalana or the fried custard. Lunch and
dinner. $$
B Novillo 6830 Bird Rd; 284-8417. (Also in Hialeah and
Kendall.) One of the finest Nicaraguan restaurants to
appear in recent years. The décor suggests a
hacienda, not a stable. The appetizers offer
cornucopian variety, from fried cheese to
nacatamalitos to ceviche. But the churrasco is worth
saving room fon There is no more tender cut of meat
anywhere. And surprisingly, they prepare a fine
pepper steak in cream sauce. Dessert? The pto
quinto and queque cristal win hands down. Lunch and
dinner. $$
Fishbone Grille 650 S Miami Ave; 530-1915. This funky
spawn of Miami’s venerable Tobacco Road offers
eclectic décor, fresh seafood favorites, and a few
regional adaptions. Bait your hook with one of their
sensational soups — seafood gumbo or salmon and
dill chowder. But bring a book — service fluctuates
between speedy and slow. Lunch and dinner. $
Guayacan 1933 SW 8th St; 649-2015. A cozy spot in
Little Havana offers all the increasingly familiar
Nicaraguan dishes, from nacatamales to vigorón and
churrasco to tres leches and pío quinto — and it does
a bang-up pescado a la Tipitapa, a red snapper deep-
fried whole and drenched in a sauce of onions and
peppers, as well as a delectable beef tongue in tomato
sauce. But what sets Guayacan apart from the crowd
of Nica spots is the array of hearty, homemade sopas
— different ones for every day of the week. Lunch and
dinner. $$
Hy-Vong 3458 SW 8th St; 446-3674. Some of the best
Vietnamese food in town. People have been coming
back (with reason) for years. Fish in mango sauce is
delectable, as is the chicken liver mousse with
blueberry sauce. Pork dishes are similarly
multifaceted, with a gingery tang both authentic and
delicious. And a must: the Vietnamese-style coffee at
the end ófthe meal. $
Islas Canarias 285 NW 27th Ave; 649^)440. A tiny space
packed with hungiy; patrons who know what Cuban
. food is all about; It.may take three people tb finish the
bistec uruguayo, a bTéadéd palomilla steak filled with
Swiss cheese and ham. All die daily specials are
wonderful and.are gone quickly. Suggestions; half
chicken with mojo, pigs' feet “a la andaluza,” oxtail;
stew, and fried whole snapper. If theré?s room, try the
deceitfully delicate tocino dél cielo, a flan made with
egg yolks and cinnamon syrup—sublime. Lunch and
dinner. $
La Carreta 3632 SW 8th St; 444-7501. (Also in WeSt
Dade and KeifdalLJ A muncher’s mecca, with the
flashy wagon wheel out front. The food is not flashy,
but comprehensively Cuban and reliably good. Open
24 hours. $
Lombardi’s Bayside Marketplace at Bayside, 401
Biscayne Blvd; 391-9580. Go solar or lunar to this
sidewalk trattoria located in a shoppers’ paradise. Al.
fresco dining is a satisfaction in itself. Escape the whirl
of passersby and watch them watching you order the
risotto digiomo or á traditional thin-crust pizza. For a
lighter meal, the focaccia paired with the antipasto
misto is a generous refresher. The authentic gelato
proves the freshest ice in Miami (next to the Florida
Panthers). Lunch and dinner. $$
Los Ranchos at Bayside, 401 Biscayne Blvd; 375-0666.
For information see listing under West Dade.
Malaga 740 SW 8th St; 8584224. A Cuban restaurant
celebrating a Spanish heritage. The charming,
covelike décor adds warmth to the dining room, while
the cuisine is excellent You may have to wait for arroz
con polio or paella, but you'll be glad you did. Fried
snapper and grouper are specialties, as is chicken
with wine sauce. On the sweet side, Malaga offers
satisfyingboniatiüo (sweet potato pudding), and arroz
con leche. Lunch and dinner. $
Marlins Catch ofthe Day Raw Bar and Grill 1050 N Le
Jeune Rd; 448-7810.'Funky open-air seafood
restaurant in the unlikely vicinity of the State Road
836 overpass, in the midst of car lots, gas stations,
airport hotels, and traffic, lots of traffic. For starters,
dig into cooked-to-perfection conch fritters or other
finger foods and raw bar offerings. Seafaring entrées,
which include dolphin, shrimp, and yellowtail dishes,
among others, are fresh, simple, and tasty. Lunch,
dinner, and late night $
New Hickory BaHHlue 3170 Coral Way; 443-0842.
Rustic-style barbecue that aims to please Latins and
good ol’ boys alike. Cooked over wood chips, the
offerings include the standard barbecue items plus
ribs of beef, lamb, veal, and sometimes even chicken
livérs. For Latin-style barbecue lovers, lots of bistec
dishes are also featured, plus sides of rice and black
beans. Breakfast lunch, and dinner. $
The Pasta Factory 5725 SW 8th St; 261-3899. Lively
place where you can watch pasta being churned from
antiquated machines and filled by hand as you dine.
While chicken, veal, beef, sausage, and shrimp dishes
are available, the emphasis is, of course, on the
homemade pasta dishes and a wide variety of sauces.
No doggy bags and no sharing, but half-portions can
be ordered for children under twelve. Lunch and
dinner. $
S&S Diner 1757 NE 2nd Ave; 3734291. A Miami
institution made famous by Mel Kiser and Corky
Irick’s movie Last Night at the S&S Diner. Bring a
book while you wait ’cause wait you will in this
popular counter spot Try the chopped steak with
onions and gravy, the roast turkey, or the fried sole or
shrimp. And there are few better mashed potatoes
served in the area. Desserts are unexceptional, but
there’s a decent rice pudding. Breakfast lunch, and
dinner. $
Scala Grill 801S Bayshore Dr, 5774202. The specialty
here is rodizio — a steady rotation of grilled poultry
and meats, sliced and served at the table from sizzling
skewers. It’s authentic, it’s well prepared, and it’s
filling. Outstanding fish dishes flesh out the menu
for meat-free folks. And in direct contrast to the
round-robin tournament of meats, desserts are fruity
and light Challenge a date to dinner. Lunch and
dinner. $$
Sergio's Sandwich Shop 3252 Coral Way; 529-0047. A
combination of an American-style coffee shop-and a
Cuban cafeteria that works, especially when you
hanker for a BLT or tuna salad sandwich, but your
significant other is dreaming of the perfect
medianoche or pan con bistec. Tostones are served with
a gutsy garlic dip, and beers, including domestic and
many Latin American, are served in frosty mugs.
Breakfast lunch, dinner, and all night weekends. $
Unde Tom’s Barbecue 3988 SW 8th St 446-9528. Tom’s
has been around longer than most natives care to
remember. And best of all, it ain’t changed none. Ribs
aré none too sweet with a tang all their own. And
amid all the photos of goddesses such as Rita
Hayworth, Mae West and Liberace, you can count on
•barbecued chicken that’s moist tender, and tasty.
Lunch and dinner. $
Villa Habana Restaurant 3398 Coral Way; 446-7427. In
its second incarnation, this Cuban café delivers first-
rate traditional cuisine. From White bean and black
bean soups to white rice and black bean side dishes,
everything is homemade by the same team that runs
Villa Italia; Especially promising are the croquettes
and vaca frita, the favored flavor of shredded and fried
flank steak. Lunch and dinner. $
West Dade-Hialeah
Cami’s, The Seafood Place 869 SW 107th Ave; 227-2722,
(Also in Kendall and Pembroke Pines.) Specializes in
standard seafood offerings in Plain Jane surroundings.
The oysters, shrimp, clams, grouper, scallops, lobster
et cetera, are not gussied up — and neither are the
prices. Shellfish pasta is as uptown as it gets here, but
if s so good you might find yourself licking your plate.
You don’t need to put on your best bib and tucker—a
paper napkin and a big appetite will do. Lunch and
dinner. $
Canton 9796 SW 8th St; 226-8032. For information see
listing under Coral Gables.
El Inka 11049 Bird Rd; 5534074. The rustic setting is
humble, but the cuisine soars to Andean heights at
Miami’s oldest Peruvian restaurant Memorable
ceviches and spicy meat and seafood entrees abound.
Don’t miss the Inka Special ceviche, the best in town,
chock-full of fresh sea bass, squid, clams, scallops,
and octopus. For the simply ravenous: try seco de res, a
meat-and-potatoes dish that gives new meaning to the
February 16-22, 1995
Page 70 N»w Time*


word “stew” Lunch and dinner. $
El Novillo 1255 W 46th St; 556^888. For infonnation
see listing under Central Dade.)
El Segundo Viajante 2846 Palm Ave; 888-5465. For
information see listing under Miami Beach.
Kon Chau 8376 Bird Rd; 553-7799. AD you need here is
a big appetite and a little cash (no credit cards
accepted). Dozens of dim sum dishes offered daily,
from steamed shrimp dumplings to the truly exotic,
such as chicken feet or duck feet tid-bits. Full
selection of Chinese dishes offered on standard menu,
and house specialties such as a dish of shrimp, roast
pork, and chicken sautéed with vegetables. Lunch,
dinner, and special Saturday and Sunday additions to
dim sum menu. $
La Carreta 5350 W 16th Ave; 823-5200. (Also 8650 Bird
Rd; 553-8383.) For information see listing under
Central Dade.
Los Ranchos 125 SW 107th Ave; 221-9367. (Also in
Central Dade and Kendall.) Out in the wild, wild
West, this Nica steak house introduced many a left-
wing skeptic to right-wing delicacies. Beef has rarely
been so full of flavor. Pile on the chimichiirri and
gorge on galló pinto and fried plantains. As for the
famous tres leches, it, too, aims at re-creating the first
time — and nearly succeeds. Fine, food and service.
Lunch and dinner. $$
Outback Steakhouse 8255 W Flagler St; 262-9766! (Also
in North Miami Béach and Kendall.) Leave it to the.
Aussies to beat us at our own game: good ól’ thick,
juicy steaks. Except for a couple of pseudo-Australian
offerings, you’ll find the menu comparable to an
American house o’ beef — right down to offerings of
non-beef items such as chicken and fish — but
delicious steaks are what this restaurantis all about. $
Tropical Chinese Restaurant 7991 Bird Rd; 262 7576. An
intriguing menu ranges beyond China for spicy
masterpieces like black-bean chicken and Hong
Kong-style steak, succulent from a sake marinade.
Clay-pot cooking renders some of the best Asian'fare
in Miami; flaming pineapple boats certainly make it
the most dramatic. Lunch and dinner. $$
Coconut Grove-Key Biscayne
Banana's 3131 Commodore Plaza; 442-8788. The menu
ranges from the Mediterranean to Mexico. Spicy
chicken soup that’s more like chili is a terrific way to
awaken the palate. Pan-seáred tuná is also nicely
done; the grilled South Florida fish of the day is a
good rendition of snapper, grouper, or dolphin. Dry-
barbecued, smoky baby-back ribs fall off the bones as
if they’re in a huny to be eaten. Desserts, though, are
largely a disappointment Lunch and dinner. $
Bayside Hut 3501 Rickenbacker Cswy; 361-0808. They
don’t use big words like “convivial” here, but that’s the
word that best describes this local treasure, adjacent
to Miami Marine Stadium. Fresh seafood dishes are
rendered simply but deliciously and served in a
mellow, waterside setting. What more could you
want? A spot where Fido is welcome, too? Doggone if
it ain’t so.-Lunch and dinner. $
Brasserie Le Coze 2901 Florida Ave; 444-9697. This
classy addition to Grove dining from the folks that
brought Paris and New York the famous Le Bemardin
features hearty meat dishes and seafood entrees that
are more filling than fussy. The grouper in basil-
scented olive oil is sumptuous, as is the coq au vin, the
cassoulet, and veal stew. Fabulous desserts. $$$
Café Tu Tu Tango 3015 Grand Ave; 529-2222. This
perpetually crowded tapas bar in the CocoWalk
extravaplaza is much more than the sum of its artsy
parts. Styled after a European artist’s loft, the Café |
serves up a wide and wonderful variety of chips, dips,
frittatas, empanadas, kebabs, and assorted other
tidbits. Don’t miss the designer pizzas or the plantain
and boniato chips with chunky salsa Lunch and
dinner. $
The Chart House 51 Chart House Dr; 856-9741. The
prime ribof beef andfilet mignon are sinfully tender
and flavorful, but there’s also fresh fish every day.
Swordfish and dolphin, in particular, have rarely been
this good. Mammoth portions and a lovely setting at
Dinner Key Marina $$
Chiyo Japanese Restaurant at Mayfair, 3399 Virginia St;
445-0865. Sleek and sexy decor with splashes of
brilliant color. The wait staff is attentive and gracious,
and decked in authentic Japanese garb. Appetizers
from either the sushi bar or the teriyaki grill, plus two
soups, including a superb miso. Very fresh sushi and
sashimi, good tempura dishes (including a fried ice
cream-and-banana combo for dessert) and generous,
delicious teriyaki dinners. Lunch and dinner. $$
Grand Café at the Grand Bay Hotel 2669 S Bayshore Dr;
858-9600. The most extravagant Sunday brunch
imaginable. Opulent setting with mirrored ceiling, and
beautiful flowers and silver. Continental food with
seasonal, regional specials. Service is everything the
wealthy clientele would expect. Magnificent desserts.
Lunch, dinner, and Sunday brunch. $$$
Johnny Rockets 3036 Grand Ave; 444-1000. (Also in
February 16-22^1995
Kendall) Fifties-style diner serving only burgers and
sandwiches, but burgers and sandwiches so good
you’ll think you were back in the days when parents
wore “I like Ike” buttons and Elvis sightings were
actual. Burgers are cooked before your eyes, shakes
are almost too thick to drink, and the staff entertains
diners by grooving to jukebox tunes. Lunch and
dinner. $
Mandarin Garden 3268 Grand Ave; 446-9999. One of the
secret wonders of the Grove, this Chinese haven may
be small and unassuming, but it features the best
sesame chicken and Beijing duck in the area. The
food is spicy and Szechuan-inspired; Dumplings are
gingery, and the hot-and-sour soup is a sinus blaster.
Dishes are expertly prepared and served by a
pleásantly attentive, unaffected staff. Lunch and
dinner. $$
Monty's Stone Crab Seafood House & Raw Bar 2550 S
Bayshore Dr; 858-1431. This snazzy, Scenic spot is.
housed in a vertical shopping strip-on Dinner Key. Sit
. indoors, or diñe outside on a vast, bar-studded terrace
overlooking the bay. Coúnt ort beaucoup seafood
goodies, especially, in season, the stone-crab fixation
that made Months mighty moUusk reputation. A
phone call will net you the market price. Lunch and
dinner. $$
Señor Frog’s 3008 Grand Ave; 44¿0999. A quesadilla is;
a quesadilla, right? Wrong: Frog’s offers above- .
average Mexican fare. It may not be the real item, but
.with the strolling mariachi band and the fast-moving
decadence all around, who cares? Tostadas, bünitós,
and enchiladas show the ingredients to best .
advantage. And then there’s the amazing natifla
custard — absolutely the béstin the city. $$
Stefano's 24 Crandon Blvd; 361-7Ó07. Despite its
weekend transformation into a Latin hot spot,;the food
is variably outstanding. Calamari fritti and antipasto,
are the best of the nonfarinacequs appetizers;
amatriciana sauce on the pasta also exceeds
expectations. Veal dishes are the best of the main
courses, and the superior paiflard of veaLcompetes
with the best at any French restaurant. $$$
Sunrice 3195 Commodore Plaza; 445-1933. One of
Miami’s most innovative and attractive Japanese
restaurants. “Sunrice Chicken Tonight” and “Son of a
Beef’ take Cooked sushi rolls one step further, substi¬
tuting poultry and filet mignon (respectively) for fish.
‘Tropical twist,” a salad comprising cooked shrimp,
raw scallops, tomato, mango, papaya,.avocado,
and scallion is an ideal subtropical dish. Lunch and
dinner. $$
Taurus Steak House 3540 Main Hwy; 448-0633. Another
steak house with good seafood. The salads at
lunchtime — tuna, turkey, or otherwise — are
excellent The Reuben sandwich gets high marks, as
does the hamburger, one of the best. lively and busy,
and that makes the service perfunctory. But the
desserts are homemade, with the cheesecake, key
lime pie, and chocolate mousse being the best. Lunch
and dinner. $$
Tuscany Trattoria 3483 Main Hwy; 445-0022. The
Leaning Tower of Pisa is this trattoria’s logo, and
apropos. Pastas pile haphazardly on the plates amidst
the familial warmth of green-and-white-checked
tablecloths. Meats here are simply and deliciously
griUed, like the galleto al mattone, free range baby
chicken marinated and charbroiled. Sauces are wine -
and-herb-based, garnished with fresh mushrooms and
chopped tomatoes. The papardelle Giuseppe,
homemade noodles in a truffle sauce, is a house,
specialty. Lunch and dinner. $$
Coral Gables
Bangkok Bangkok 157 Giralda Ave; 444-2397. (Also in
Kendall) This “so nice they named it twice” place for
Thai has become something of an institution in just a
few years. The huge, tasty “little Big Man,” a fresh •
mackerel fried whole, might as weH be cafled “Holy
Mackerel,” and the “Roasted Duck Darling” is
delectable. Curries are exquisite, particularly the
shrimp. Traditional Thai treats such as Pad Thai, mee
krob, and satay are among the appetizers. Flawless
service. Lunch and dinner. $
Cafe Barcelona 160 Giralda Ave; 4484)912. Like the city
of Barcelona itself, this storefront restaurant dispalys
an unselfconscious elegance and timelessness.
Exceflent fish and méat dishes represent the best of
Spanish cooking. The sea bass in sea salt is
exceptionafly tender, as is the lamb and shrimp
brochette. Lunch and dinner. $$
Café Kolibri 6901 Red Rd; 665-2421. The. Bakery Centre
area finally has another bakery—and this one carries
gourmet, low-fat, and vegan items. It’s also a deli,
market, and restaurant Décor is as beautiful as the
cuisine, and both reflect the natural side of life. Don’t
miss the portabeDo mushrooms and anything roasted
in the Tuscan oven. A beer-and-wine bar features
some organic choices, but desserts —- mostly
chocolate-and-liqueur varieties — sport a higher proof
than the wines. Lunch and dinner. $$
“Ml PricelreÉérs”
PJPgí
YOURCHOKB
ASAK
^ Japanese Restaurant & Sushi Bar
20355 Biscayne Blvd, Aventura
(Promenade Sltops next to Winn Dixie}
Hands On Miami
Happy Hour
Tlnirsdifa1f^marr23rd, 1
5:30-8 pm Tobacco Road
$26 MiamiAvenue \ -;
($2 beer specials and tree chicken wings)
¡jeam more about thisbrganization dedicated
fo providing diversratid flexible volunteer!
Opportunities fortkisy/young profep.ig.nals
Your $5 donation will help
Hands On Miami keep up
the pod works!
FormoreMormation,
qai! Debbie at 5584745
Breakfast Served All Day. We Bake Fresh All Day
Bagels, Croissants, Fat -Free Muffins, Soup,
Sandwiches, Espresso, Cappuccino, Juice Bar & More!
Restaurant & Caterer
3915 Alton Road Rd., Miami Beach
Phone 538-0300.
91
¡GA1
TWO-NIGHT GETAWAYS!
R/T Air, Hotel A Transfers from MIAMI
$
269
.00*
Portside Villas
Rio Blanco
Jamiana
*299
.00*
Fantasy Resort
Gloucestershire Hotel
Foote Prints
Rock Cliff * Samsara
Summerset Village
COUPLES.
JAMAICA
Choose from over 200 Hotel/Air Packages
throughout JAMAICA!
VACATION HOTLINE 305-532-3399
VtLT JAMAICA SpedaSste. or 800-423-4095
*AII packages are per person, double occupancy and include lowest roundtrip airfare from
Miami, airport transfers, hotel accommodations and hotel tax/smice. Packages do not
include $32:95 departure and airport tax. Rates are valid through March 31,1995 and are
subject to change, availability and cancellation charges. Weekend surchages additional.
T1
tie Locals’ -«
Italian
Restaurant
for Lunch
(mill
.fDNTiJpCH
834 Ocean
Drive
Miami Beach
Try our out-of-this-
world Tapas &
Finger Foods
_ Featuring
Virtual Reality Games
that will blow your mind
1309 Washington Ave.South Beach • 532-0234
Where the art of
great food and
atmosphere are one«|
FIU J1 y A\
Japanese Restaurant
13750 SW 88st. 382-1700
(One block west of 137 Ave, next to Coconut’s Music Store)
Lunch Tue-Sat:Noon-2:30, Closed Sundays /
Dilyner Mon-Thur: 5:30-J 1:00 | Fri-Satr 5:30-11:30
-.Sun: 5:00^10:00 .
New Times Page 71


“Best Restaurant for
Late-Night Dining”
“Best Chocolate
Milkshake”
A New Times, Best of Miami'‘93
“Best 24 Hour
Restaurant
New Times, Best of Miami ‘94
iSNinmE
YOU CHECKED
FOR YOURSELF?
DINER
llth Street Diner
11th & Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, FL 534-6373
delicious
...naturally
Paradise exists in one magical
place... Unicom Village.
Whether you’re eating in the
all natural, award winning
waterfront restaurant,
or shopping in Florida’s largest
all natural supermarket,
it will be a heavenly experience.
UN
V
C©RN
LLAGE
RESTAURANTeHVIARKET
3565 NE 207 STREET. AVENTURA
RESTAURANT 305 933-8829
MARKET 305 933-1543
Cards
I Welcome
^age 72 New Times
YlH £***** ■»4 *
Caffé Abbracd 318 Aragon Ave; 441-0700. A verifiable
show place where Italian dishes of supreme
refinement reign: snails with polenta in a red-wine
sauce and mushrooms; gnocchi with porcinkomato
sauce; veal chop and grilled seafood dishes with virgin
olive oil and herbs. Desserts (Campari sorbet1) are
the finest Lunch and dinner. $$
Caffe Baci 2522 Ponce de Leon Blvd; 442-0600. Now
under its second owners, this veteran of Coral Gables
fine Italian dining once again shows its native colors.
Fare takes on a Mediterranean flair depending more
on light oils and spices than heavy, rich creams, and
menus are seasonal. Expect some excellent fish and
meats, baked in the Tuscan oven, and some lovely
cold salad and carpaccio plates. Don’t expect a quiet
little spot for two — this business rivals Mezzanotte’s
for elite appeal. Lunch and dinner. $$
Caffe CJ 65 Merrick Way; 445-1200. The namesake of
owner C J. Levenstein, hardly an Italian-sounding
appellation. Seats 200, hardly a caffe. Yet this quiet
restaurant excels in Italian cuisine, thanks to chef Jose
Cadavid, who grills lamb and veal chops to stunning
perfection, a culinaiy feat matched by his fragrant
pesto and buttery cream sauce. The menu tends
toward the fine-dining classics, though nightly
specials occasionally present more unusual, and
welcome, possibilities. House-made desserts include
liqueur-heavy tiramisu puddled in sabayon sauce.
Lunch arid dinner. $$
Canton 2614 Ponce de Leon Blvd; 448-3736. (Also in
South Miami, West Dade, and Pembroke Pines.)
Faves at these popular eateries are golden mountains
of honey garlic chicken and huge steaks—yes,
steaks. In addition to Cantonese, there’s Szechuan
and Mandarin cuisine. Sauces tend toward thick,
gravylike textures, but this is not a place for people
with tiny feet and similarly bound appetites. Lunch
and dinner. $$
Didier’s 2530 Ponce de Leon Blvd; 567-2444. This fine
French restaurant boasts more than double the
seating capacity in its new location, but it’s the same
family affair. The three brothers Collongette who
host, serve, and cook welcome guests with pungent
snails, herb-encrusted roasted rack of lamb, and a
fabulous inches-thick veal chop. Off-the-menu
specialties are also trustworthy. For dessert, tarte
tatin comes equipped with silky, cinnamon-scented
apples and a luscious layer of caramel. Lunch and
dinner. $$$
Islands 2345 SW 37th Ave; 444-0334. This popular
Caribbean-style roadhouse changed its name
(formerly Kountry Kottage) to better fit its simple but
simply great island cuisine. Known from here to
Trinidad for its wood-scented, tangy, barbecued ribs
and chicken, this spot also features sandwiches,
salads, breads, and muffins bursting with raisins, nuts,
and other goodies. Noisy, cross-generational, big-
family atmosphere tempered by the soft, musical
English of the wait staff. Lunch and dinner. $
JohnMartin’s 253 Miracle Mile; 445-3777. Who said
Irish food was all stew? This authentic Irish emporium
boasts a charming pub and an elegant dining room
serving the best poached salmon and hollandaise in
the area, sirloin steak with a whiskey sauce, lovely
homemade pátés, soups, and desserts. (Try the
Bailey’s ice cream!) Brunch on Sunday is a feast for
$17.50. Lunch and dinner. $$
Justa Pasta 139 Giralda Ave; 567-9555. It’s easy to
order exactly what you want to eat at this enchanting
restaurant, now in its second location. Feel like
seafood? Choose the black-and-white delight bicolore
fettuccine with scallops, shrimp, clams, and mussels
in cream sauce, from the “Entrees with Seafood”
category. Have a yen for veal and vegetables? Got
those categories, too, even one that reads “Entrees
with Cheese,” which offers everything from cheese
tortellini to bite-size raviolini. Choose from a dozen
different salads for lunch. Lunch and dinner. $$
Kaori Japanese Restaurant 5701 Sunset Dr; 662-8484.
Japanese tapas is the reason to visit this extensive
sushi bar and restaurant. Eighty-four appetizers entice
the diner into sampling several plates like the shrimp
dumplings with mustard sauce. And the license to
create your own roll with ingredients like salmon
tempura and Alaskan king crab leg is the reason to
come back. Lunch and dinner. $$
Las Puertas 148 Giralda Ave; 442-0708. A smashing
Mexican restaurant that puts Miami on the map in
terms of top-notch Mexican fare. The chef performs
miracles with fresh ingredients — Haas avocados
flown in from Mexico, for example. Don’t miss the
grilled duck fajitas, the sopa de tortilla, the enchiladas
with scallops, the flautas encasing spiced chicken, or
the warm apple pie. Lunch and dinner. $$
LB’s Eatery 5813 Ponce de Leon Blvd; 661-7091. An
institution that isn’t institutional, this intimate,
cafeteria-style spot next door to UM offers daily
specials that are truly special — epicurean delights fit
for a poor student’s budget. A changing array of the
aforementioned include such cooked-
to-order entrées as lobster, scampi, and chicken
Cordon Bleu. Beaucoup salads, sides (“Miami Fries”
— fried yuca with honey-mustard dip!), sandwiches,
ribs, steaks, beer, and wine. Lunch and dinner. $
Le Glacier 166 Giralda Ave; 447-9667. (Also in South
Miami.) Delightful, unpretentious French café with
friendly service and filling, affordable daily specials.
Or try onion soup, quiche, crab salad, or a sandwich
— on a croissant, of course. As the name indicates,
this pretty auberge-style restaurant—with greenery
galore and skylights — features wonderful ice cream
desserts. Lunch and dinner. $
Le Provencal 382 Miracle Mile; 448-8984. Leeks,
tomatoes, garlic, onions, olive oil.. .this is French
cuisine that beats the butter-and-cream rap. The
bouillabaisse gets all the honors—various fish fillets,
seafood, toasted rounds of French bread, and the
piquant red-pepper rouille. If the famed soup is too
ambitious, there’s an excellent dolphin in leek sauce.
Service is outstanding. Lunch and dinner. $$
Martin Seafood Grill 3841 Bird Rd; 443-3474. Seafood
and the startling color of Marlin blue are foregone
conclusions at this retro-look diner, a pretty patio and
monstrous televisions are the surprises. A good
inexpensive spot for lunch or happy hour, where the
fried calamari is tender and true. Caribbean grouper
chowder is a hearty snack. Lunch and dinner. $
Mozart Stube Restaurant 325 Alcazar Ave; 446-3364.
You may not find Mozart here, but you will find stube
— a place to relax. The wiener schnitzel comforts
even the pickiest schnitzel-seeker, and meats like
roast pork and smoked ham are top quality. For
dessert, traditional apfelstrudel is stocked with fruit,
but the egg-white soufflé eclipses both apples and
your appetite. Lunch and dinner. $
Peppy’s in the Gables 216 Palermo Ave; 448-1240. Don’t
be misled by the vaguely Spanish name — this place
is purely Italian. Peruse your take-home copy of the
menu while enjoying complimentary roasted and
mashed garlic spread on crusty bread. Pasta dishes
are masterful, especially those made with cream
sauces and seafood. The dante veal preparation is an
inferno of flavor. Amaretto cheesecake is an
exceptional dessert. Lunch and dinner. $$
Picnics at Allen's Drug Store 4000 Red Rd; 665-6964.
Diner ambiance and home cooking plunked down in a
drug store. Tasty staples such as fried chicken, liver
and onions, meaty chili, not to mention burgers,
sodas, deli sandwiches, “genuine” key lime pie, and
salads. Lots to survey as you munch: jukebox with
moldy-oldie tunes, wait staff that looks to have been
lifted out of an Archie comic, pics of James Dean and
other idols. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner. $
Ramiro's Restaurant 2700 Ponce de Leon Blvd;
■ 443-7605. Rub elbows with Miami’s glitterati and enjoy
classic Spanish cuisine fused with tropical inspiration.
Spinach flan with black-olive sauce and lamb-meat pie
in tamarind sauce replace the standard salads found at
more pedestrian places. Order the prix fixe dinner, or
choose á la carte from fresh seafood and game
offerings in a variety of fruit and wine sauces. Four-
seasons chocolate satisfies even the most discerning
chocoholic. Lunch and dinner. $$$
Restaurant St Michel 162 Alcazar Ave; 446-6572. This
lushly romantic spot in the ivy-covered landmark
Place St Michel Hotel is a culinary fairy tale come to
life. The menu, which changes monthly according to
the seasons and the prevailing dining trends, is always
varied, featuring meats and seafoods inventively
sparked with tropical and other nuances. Lunch,
dinner, and Sunday brunch. $$$
Rodeo Grill 2121 Ponce de Leon Blvd; 447-6336. An all-
you-can-eat carnivore’s paradise where sausages,
chicken, turkey, lamb, short ribs, top sirloin, ham,
pork loin, and surprises such as chicken hearts, are
skewered onto long swords, grilled over hot coals,
and theatrically whisked to your table. Seafood
kebabs also available and the salad bar is one of the
best in town. Fast before going and, afterward, do not
get on your scale. Lunch and dinner. $$
Two Sisters Restaurant Hyatt Regency Coral Gables, 50
Alhambra Plaza; 441-1234. Named for the royal
harem’s residence in the Moors’ Alhambra palace,
Two Sisters offers fabulous New World cuisine in an
Old World setting. The menu changes weekly,
keeping the experience as fresh as the local seafood.
Lamb is also done especially well. Finish the meal like
royalty with homemade desserts. The sultans never
had it so good. $$$
Vakhos 1915 Ponce de Leon Blvd; 444-8444.
Chef/owner Fotis Stavrinos serves up equal portions
of authentic Greek cuisine and hospitality. Winners
are the moussaka, made to order with potatoes,
eggplant, and ground beef, and the sfrida ala
spetchoita, meaty red snapper baked in white wine and
tomato sauce with herbs. Not to be left out is a
marvelous spanakopita, spinach, butter, and feta
cheese in a light phyllo dough. Dessert, too, is a treat,
with honey-drizzled baklava or galakto bourico. Lunch
and dinner. $$
Vatapá 2415 Ponce de Leon Blvd; 461-5669. Named
after a popular Brazilian dish, this eatery serves an
excellent version of the shrimp and fish stew in a
tropical rain-forest setting. Such delicacies as feijoada
(smoked meats and black beans) and the Bahian
favorite chicken in herb sauce vie for attention with
February 16—22, 1995


New York
& Sicilian Pizza
Edy’s Ice Cream (i6 Flavors)
Beer, Wine and Soda
Calzone
Stromboli
Pepperoni’s
On The Beach
Sun-Thur 11:00am -1:00am
Fri-Sat ll:30am - 2:00am
672-2333
2308 Collins Ave. • Miami Beach
mastering
the art of great
that cuisine, eveiyday.
Valentines Week Ladies receive
complimentary appetizer with
THIS THURSDAY
February 16m
SPANISH
TAPAS
&
ALMODOVAR MOVIES
(call for reservations)
Italian Style Sunday Brunch
448 Española Way
South Beach • 538-3230
j)
We Clawed
I Our Way
I to the Top
Voted Best Stone Crabs
-New Timesl992
BAYSIDE HUT
Seafood Restaurant and Hidden Cove Bar
3501 RickenbackerCwy., Key Biscayne 361-0808
(Enter at Marine Stadium and Take a Left)
All dogs welcome in our marina backyard
ALL
YOU
CAN
EAT
STONECRABS
Complete Dinner
$35.95 Every night
Twilight Menu 3:30-6:30
11 items $9.95
Complete Dinner
“JheAB a no J-asaJwa Seafood in town "
Overlooking Beautiful Biscayne Bay
1201 NE 79th St 751^4429
“GiCdoesit
Againf
This is a restaurant like no other.
They offer Italian American food at
it’s Homey Best. Cooked by the
owner himself. -New Times
Outside Bar
Exceptional Happy Hour
Fri-Sat-Sun 4:00-7:00pm
In the Ocean Front Hotel; 1230-38 Ocean Dr., South Beach Phone; 672-2579
BEEPER BLOWOUT
OUR LOWEST PRICES IN HISTORY
PANASONIC
SYNTHESIZER
FREE
ULTRA SMALL
CALCULATOR
WITH
PURCHASE
ANDAD
FREE RECONNECTION
WE WILL RECONNECT YOUR BEEPER
FOR FREE AND GIVE YOU AN ULTRA
SMALL LASER CALCULATOR
FOR FREE WITH THIS AD.
40 Memory
1 Clock
Alarm
Time Stamp
Reminder Beep
Date
Auto On/Off
Delete Numbers
Feature
Ultra Small
BRAVO
EXPRESS
$19.95
’ 8 Memory
â–  Clock
â– TlmeStamp
â– Auto On/Off
â– Alarm
â–  Choice of Colors
â–  Message Lock
All Beepers Feature: • Response Time About 8 Seconds
• Range: Key West to Vero Beach • High Frequency 931 MHZ
• Beeps and Vibrates • No Deposits, Last-Month or Security Required
•Walk in and out in 5 minutes with a working beeper
BRAVO PLUS
$4.95
â–  Time Stamp y
â–  Reminder Beep
â–  Date
â–  New Style Case
• Choice of Colors
•Trade ins welcome
• Free Delivery
ULTRA
COMMUNICATIONS
DADE - 238-0011
BROWARD - 926-3332
8 YEARS AT THE
SAME LOCATION
REQUIRES CONNECTION AND
SERVICE AGREEMENT
New Times Page 73
February 16-22, 1995


(V
0Ü1NIZE
ITALIAN AT
ITS BEST
LIVE MUSIC & DANCING
NIGHTLY
LAFAMTCtT IA
Located at the Traymore Hotel
2445 Collins Avenue
5347111
Free Valet Parking
Need a Telephone Number?
Have We Cot The Answef For You! ^OICE MAIL
Price includes a new -^¡■'computers wWh
answered 24 hours a day by yOUR voice.
• Confidential . credit Check
• Unlimited Messages Today!
. Business or Personal i, 95
800 Numbers Only $4.95
per month (+ usage).
Dade 442-8080
Broward 764-4544
We ve taken the best
of South Beach, and
made it better.
You love South Beach.
But you could live without the crowds.
You enjoy great food and drink, but you
could live without the outrageous prices.
Welcome to Casablanca. A wonderfully casual place
to eat, drink, and thoroughly enjoy yourself.
Delightful contemporary cuisine for breakfast, lunch
and dinner, prepared by our chef, Anthony Sindaco.
Amazing food.
Surprisingly modest prices.
Valet discount with easy access thru 7th Street.
A warm welcome and a cozy cafe table await you at
Casablanca. Join us for Happy Hour,
EACH
BBM
650 Ocean Drive Miami Beach 305-534-9463
5:30-7PM, Monday through Friday.
We’re open from 6:30AM to 2AM, 7 days a week!
â– 
947 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
534-1504
Mon-Fri 11:38 on- 3:00 pm
Wlkon opea at 5:30 -1£00 o'clock
Fri aid Sot opea at 5:30 - IKK) o'clock
*6*
MCHSPm
Mon. Ruen Thai Shrimp
Toes. Chicken Chili Sauce.
Wed. Chicken (uny.
lhun. Chicken Cashew Nut.
hi Shrimp Garik
Every Lunch Spedai
conies with
white rice, soup
and appetizers.
Only $6.95
market & Cafe
The Best Deal on the Beach Just
Got More Expensive!!
Complete Dinner For Two
With a Bottle of Wine
(Red or white)
Was'^t9á^Now$ 19.95
Includes Bread, Salad and Entree
(A Different Special Every Night)
Complimentary N.Y. Cannoli with this ad.
1430 Washington (at Española)
South Beach 674-1760
In Old World Tradition \
Hf Step back to Japón 179b
Neatest Experience
Big Big Sushi in
Heat Authentic
Atmosphere
YOUR HONDA or ACURA
WITH SO MUCH CARE!
OUR SERVICE WILL NOT VOID YOUR NEW CAR FACTORY WARRANTY!
WE USE GENUINE HONDA & ACURA PARTS. MUST PRESENT COUPONS AT TIME
IF SERVICE TAX & SHOP SUPPUES NOT INCLUDED • 6 MONTHS
MILE GUARANTEE • WE HONOR É) IS UCENSED
Hi*».. AND INSURED CAR REÑIA
$17Q.95
¡OIL-FILTER
SERVICE
*16*
MINOR
SERVICE
$69”
! ¡WEDNESDAY!
WASH
(0
Fuel Injection Slightly Higher
Offer Expires 3/1/95
Aetna, Legend & Vigor Slightly
Higher Offer Expires 3/1/95
Expires 3/1/95 JL
Includes:
Top Off fluids And Safety Check
Some Models Slightly Higher
Offer Expires 3/1/95
"MAINTAINING QUALITY SERVICE AT AFFORDABtE
â–  T-yuES-FRI 8AM-6PM/SAT 9AAA5PM
CALL FOR AN APPOINTMENT AND ASK FOR CARLOS
^£901 SW 72 AVENUE « 262-0002
MIDWAYBETWEEN CORAt WAY & BIRD RD ON SW 72ND
FREE CAR WASH
offer good on Wednesdays f|
only with major or minor service "jj
l
m&sE
194100176D ST-MV01402
^ 4k4#eWr'-Tl
February 16-22, 1995


the hanging hammocks and painted parrots. Start
with a cocktail made from cuchaga (sugar-cane rum)
and passion-fruit juice, and finish with a flourish of
cafezinho and Brazilian bread pudding. Lunch and
dinner. $$
South Miami-Kendall
South Dade
I Akashi Japanese Restaurant 583Ó S Dixie Hwy;
| 665-6261. Formerly the Depot, Akashi retains that
■ restaurant’s train-theme glass tables. The best sushi
I' boats in town, however, are no holdover — generous
m and artistic preparations of tuna, salmon, yellowtail,
E and shrimp. Cooked fare is also excellent, particularly
I the ton katsu (fried pork cutlet), and a distinctive char-
1 grilled chicken teriyaki. Amaretto cheesecake, dipped
E in a tempura batter and deep-fried, then served with
I drizzled chocolate and whipped cream, beats red bean
I ice cream any day. $$
Bangkok Bangkok 12584 N Kendall Dr; 595-5839. For
I information see listing under Coral Gables.
Bangkok Inn 12260 S Dixie Hwy; 253-3583. You’ll need
I some imagination to consider dishes named “Hello
I Ginger!” and “Kiss Me!”—but don’t worry, all is not
I lost. The Pad Thai noodles are excellent, as are the
I various fish and duck dishes flavored with red pepper
I flakes and peanuts. Service is first-rate, and the setting
I has charm. Lunch and dinner. $$
The Big Cheese 8080 SW 67th Ave; 662-6855. The
I setting ain’t much to look at, but you’ll be too busy
I stuffing your face to notice. This is carbo-loading
I made easy, with hedonistically huge portions of tasty
I pastas, pizzas, salads, specialty subs, and Italian
I entrees. Garlic rolls here are Miami’s chewy best,
[ brushed with olive oil and sprinkled with fresh garlic.
I Lunch and dinner. $
Café Bistro 10121 Sunset Dr; 595-3663. Charming, two-
| story Italian restaurant with a well-rounded selection
I of chicken, veal, seafood, and pasta dishes at ultra-
I reasonable prices. Lightly breaded and fried calamari
I ringlets, zucchini fingers, and mozzarella sticks make
i good starters; the horseradish dressing
E accompanying the zucchini is finger-licking fine. Don’t
I miss the dolphin prepared Greek-style with feta'
I cheese and a white wine sauce. Lunch and dinner. $
Cami’s, The Seafood Place 6272 S Dixie Hwy; 665-1288.
f For information see listing under West Dade.
Canton 6661S Dixie Hwy; 666-5511. (Also 14487 S
â–  Dixie Hwy, 233-6224.) For information see listing
l under Coral Gables.
Captain’s Tavern 9621S Dixie Hwy; 666-5979. A fixture
for nearly twenty years, this nautical-theme seafood
; house offers more local (and distant) fresh catches
than your local fishmonger. Among the South Florida
seafaring fare: lobster, yellowtail, snapper, pompano,
bay scallops, conch, dolphin, grouper, and stone
crabs. Steaks and other meat dishes are available, as
are some trendy seafood creations, but for the most
part, dishes are simply—and tastily—rendered.
Vast and varied wine list Lunch and dinner. $
Chita Chinese Restaurant 12590 N Kendall Dr; 271-3823.
Cozy place serving lots of Cantonese cuisine cooked
Peruvian style and a few Szechuan dishes. Known for
its many, cooked-upon-order hearty soups and stews
in lightly seasoned broths. Duck on the menu in many
different styles, and lots of deep-fried appetizers,
favorites of Peruvians. Chinese and Peruvian beers.
Lunch Tuesday through Sunday; dinner nightly. $
Chilango's Mexican Grill 5859 SW 73rd St;
663-9333. For well-prepared Mexican food served with
• a humorous flair, try this pretty remake of the old UM
hangout Coach’s. The chunkiest, richest guacamole
in town is a quick start, easing you into moist and
tender sopes and spicy tortilla soup. Follow up with an
enchilada platter smothered in a. salsa verde and wash
it down with Pacifico. Lunch and dinner. $
Doc Graham’s Taproom & Eatery 20537 Old Cutler Rd;
235-4373. Chicago and New Orleans influence this
handsome brick-lined pub, named for the baseball
player with the remarkably short major league career.
This segment of the rebuilt Old Cutler Towne Center
is destined for more extended fame, thanks to superb
charbroiled burgers, crisp and colossal onion rings,
and meaty chicken wings, not to mention simple and
well-prepared fresh seafood specialties. Twenty
international beers on draft don’t hurt, either. Lunch
and dinner. $
El Manara 5811 Sunset Dr; 665-3374. Middle Eastern
cuisine remains one of the oldest on earth, and when
you consider an ingredient such as tahini (ground
sesame seeds), it’s easy to see why. El Manara’s
menu is less Arabic than one would expect hummus,
baba ghanouj, stuffed vine leaves, lamb kebabs,
kibbeh, and such excellent side dishes as rice pilaf
and marinated stringbeans in tomato sauce are
equally magnificent Service can be spotty here, but
there’s no gainsaying the superb dividends the
kitchen offers. Tasty baked desserts, too, if you like
‘em very, very sweet. Lunch and dinner. $
February 16-22, 1995
El Toro Taco 1 Krome Ave, Homestead; 245-8182.
Andrew couldn’t blow away this Mexican
establishment, which dishes up authentic cuisine and
plenty of it Chicken burritos burst at the seams with
shredded white meat and taco shells spill over with
ground beef. Although you won’t torch your tastebuds
on this mostly mild fare, tasty selections such as mole
de polio—chicken glazed with a sleek sauce — and
steak, onion, and pepper-filled fajitas supply more than
enough flavor. A great stop to or from the Keys,
when you can’t honestly face another conch fritter.
Breakfast, lunch, and dinner. $
Finicky’s Little Diner 7310 Red Rd; 661-0535. A tiny,
charming, hole-'in-the-wall diner. You won’t find a
finer New England clam chowder anywhere
(available only on Friday and Saturday). Tasty
daily lunch specials: beef stroganoff and chicken
with yellow rice are especially good, but who can
resist the soup-and-sandwich servings, including
tender roast beef and meatball sandwiches? Good
cheesecake. Breakfast and lunch. $
Gil Capa's Bistro 10712 SW 113th PI; 273-1102. This
is a restaurant like no other, but it offers Italian-
American food at its homey best, cooked by the
owner himself (who likes to inspect his
customers). A delightful antipasto salad prepared
with Capa’s secret herb dressing starts things off.
The finest entrée is the sirloin with a superb sauce
made from green pepperoncini, black olives,
garlic, tomatoes, and capers. Good cannoli for
dessert. $$
Johnny Rockets, in Dadeland Mall, 7535 N Kendall
Dr; 663-8864. For information see listing under
Coconut-Grove-Key Biscayne.
Le Glacier 5950 S Dixie Hwy; 666-3120. For
information see listing under Coral Gables.
Los Ranchos 8430 Mills Dr; 596-5353. For
information see listing under West Dade.
Miami's Tropical Bar & Grill 8888 SW 136th St;
255-5050. If you’re thinking seafood and you’re
headed toward The Falls, the Key West-style Grill
features a spectacular and tasty spread — oysters,
clams, shrimp, conch, calamari, snapper fingers,
snapper, swordfish, and dolphin. Caribbean
touches abound as well: shrimp coated in coconut,
jerk chicken, sweet tater fries, and frosty brews.
Lunch and dinner. $
Hew Chinatown 5958 S Dixie Hwy; 662-5649. The
most celebrated' Chinese restaurant in-Miami isn’t
necessarily the greatest, but it inspires confidence.
Dishes from every culture — Cantonese,
Szechuan, Mandarin, and even transfigured
Chinese-American. Beef with spicy orange .sauce
and chicken with cashews are recommended. For
starters, the honey-garlic chicken wings are
heavenly. Service is quick and to the point*Lunch
and dinner. $$
Outback Steakhouse 13145 SW 89th PI; 254-4456.
(Also 11800 Sherri Ln; 596-6771.) For information
see listing under West Dade.
Punjab Palace 11780 N Kendall Dr; 274-1300.
Turbaned, bearded, and impressive, Punjabi Sikhs
run this immaculate Indian restaurant. Tandoori
chicken is a high point. Sarnosa pastries with
either vegetables or meat are crumbly and
satisfying. Of the main courses, rogan josh made
with cubed lamb is creamy and mild, and the
chicken curries are immensely fragrant and
delicious. Indian food at its finest and most
elegant. Lunch and dinner. $$
Romano’s Macaroni Grill 12100 N Kendall Dr;
270-0621. An Italian family restaurant with
excellent food and hospitality to match. Focaccia
is fabulous; a caesar salad costs less than a buck
when ordered with an entrée. Try the thin-crust
pizza with sun-dried tomatoes, mozzarella, basil,
and oregano, or the penne with scallops and
Italian peppers. $
Shibui 10141 Sunset Dr; 274-5578. Sushi is
magnificent — unagi, California roll, shrimp,
salmón, tuna — all beautifully prepared. Teriyaki,
katsu, stir fry, sukiyaki, and tempura dinners all
show excellence. Kiwi cheesecake and key lime
pie confound preconceived ideas about Japanese
desserts. Enchanting service, homey
atmosphere. $$
Shorty's Bar-B-Q 9200 S Dixie Hwy; 665-5732.
Another landmark barbecue joint, this one
features the ubiquitous ribs and chicken in
slightly sweeter and spicier renditions than
elsewhere. Hot off the wood, such specialties
continue to please after all these years. Lots of
character, lots of fun. Lunch and
dinner. $
Siam Lotus Room 6388 S Dixie Hwy; 666-8134.
Some of the best Thai food anywhere. The prize
item is the fried whole snapper with fiery chili
sauce. The same sauce lights up the “Volcano
Shrimp” entrée. Satay beef or pork sticks are
pungently sweet, especially with the peanut sauce.
Spring rolls, different from Chinese, also add spice
and variety. Clean surroundings and pleasant
ambiance. Lunch and dinner. $
"BEST BEACH PICNIC SPOT
DAY OR NIGHT"
TOMMY
OVPE&OELMES^r’
TO GO
SOUTH BEACH
EAT OUT «TAKE OUT
DELIVERY 674
FRESH SANDWICHES • THE FRIEZE ICE CREAM
GOURMET COFFEES • TROPICAL FRUITS • SALADS
FRESH-SQUEEZED FRUIT JUICE • DEU • BEER • WINE
ESPRESSO • SODA • MILK SHAKES • CAPPUCINO
dfiaiúCouse
Lunch Specials everyday
startiny at 11:30 AM. Dine inside
or outside on our streetside cafe.
1137 Washington AUe.
South Beach • 531-484 1
open 7 days 11:30am -2:00am
2250 ME 163rd St.
AJ. Miami Beach • 940-6075.
M-F 11:30am-10:30pm
Sat - Sun 5:00pm -10:30pm
STONE CRABS...
STONE CRABS...
STONE CRABS...
a fish called
AVALON
oJ
A CLASSIC SEAFOOD GRILLE
700 OCEAN DRIVE
MIAMI BEACH • 532-1727
(LIVE ENTERTAINMENT NIGHTLY)
NOW OWEN FOR LUNCH
7 DAYS
11:30am - 3:00pm!
Open for Dinner
Sun. - Thur.
5pm *til 12am
Fri. - Sat.
5pm ül lam
1351 Collins Ave • 532-2133
GULF,,
ySoniUniBKlttli
THE BIGGEST LITTLE CHAIN IN TOWN
CALIFORNIA
CHARDONNAY
‘92 Kendall Jackson Grand Reserve .. .19.50
‘91 Talbott 26.50
‘92 Calera-Mt. Harlan 26.50
‘93 St. Francis Reserve 17.50
‘92 Murphy-Goode Reserve 19.50
SAUVIGNON BLANC
‘93 Estancia 6.50
‘93 Caymus 10.99
‘92 R. Pepi 9.99
‘93 Mantazas Creek 12.99
‘92 Fetzer Barrel Select 6.99
CABERNET SAUVIGNON
‘92 Silverado .17.99
‘90 Jordan 19.99
‘90 Hess Collection 16.99
‘91 Groth ............15.99
‘91 Far Niente 29.99
RED ZINFANDEL
‘90 Kendwood Jack London 13.99
‘92 Topolos Russian River 8.99
‘91 Fife 11.99
‘92 Trentadue 9.99
'92 Eberle Sauret Vineyard .11.99
SPECIAL PURCHASE
I 1989
Kendall Jackson Cardinale
Reg 59.99 Sale 39.99
Limit 2 bottles
7 have so frequently praised Guigal, that little
can be added.”
-Robert M. Parker, The Wine Advocate
Tor Guigal it’s anything but lonely at the top.”
-James Suckling, The Wine Spectator
RHONE WINES
GUIGAL COTES DU RHONE
‘91 Red 750 ml 8.99
‘93 White 750 ml 8.99
91 Red 375 ml 4.99
90 Hermitage 375 ml 13.99
90 Chateanuef du Pape 375 ml 8.99
ITALIAN
Ruffino Libaio 6.99
Frascati 750 ml 4.99
Frascati 1.5 nil 8.99
Boila 750 ml your choice 5.99
2 bottles 11.00
Sangiovese 1 Merlot
Plnot Grigio • Bardollno • Valpolicelfa
South Africa
You Must toy this to Believe it’s quality.
K.W.V. Port
Tawny/Ruby
$499
($6.99 w/out coui
expires: 2/16-P
Mouton
Cadet
$^m Rod or
^99 White
â– f w/coupon
($5.99 w/out coupon)
expires: 2/16-2/23
Santa
Maraherita
Pinot Grigio
$12J&~*on
($13.99 w/out coupon)
expires: 2/16-2/23
Chile
Santa Carolina
1.5 ml Red or White
$£99
(2 Botties $11.00)
expires: 2/16-2/23
WE MEET ALL LOCAL
LIQUOR STORE COUPONS
& ADVERTISED PRICES,
PLEASE BRING AD
CIGARETTES.
KINGS, REG, 100’S, 120S
$14.99 cm
WEST MIAMI 888 SW 57th AVE 266-1626
SOUTH BEACH 1681 ALTON RD. 5315551
BRICKELL 1836 SW 3rd AVE 8544646
Mall-In Rebates Available
SALES ITEMS CASH & CARRY ONLY
PLAY LOTTO
Sale Good Feb. 16- Feb. 23 1995
New .Time-s. Page 7 5


“’’"Sake
9
J
iooos
¡TRADE for
njSKiy
ONLY
iproifii)priiiMfliiii(()iiiiiiiiiiifli|pinMii)i)iiij|]iiiiii|i
$5.00
^^^fe^coTOBwigiviBaiiSí^aSStfewtSas^^wtw^^iasw^
11415A S. DIXIE HWY. MIAMI • 378-1212
2902 N. STATE RD. 7, SE CORNER 441 & OAK PK. BLVD. LAUDERDALE LAKES • 733-6581
5975 N. FED. HWY. FORT LAUDERDALE, IMPERIAL SQUARE SHOPPING CENTER. • 771-3616
Open 10am - 10pm At All Locations
SPECIAL EVENTS
WEDNESDAY 15
Earth Girls are Easy
Ladies 2-4-1 Drinks 10pm till Midnight
EGE Potion for the Ladies all night
2-4-1 VIRTUAL REALITY 10pm till Midnight
D.J. Sugar Hosted by Richie Rich
THURSDAY 16
College Night
$3 Specialty Shooters/VIRTUAL REALITY
Daily Special Cocktail (Bacardi & Coke)
$1 Draft With College I.D.
VIRTUAL REALITY Boxing Competition for prizes-
Registration @ 11pm
FRIDAY 17
CyberSex on the Beach
CyberSex on the Beach Shooters to all
VIRTUAL REALITY Champions Served by Delicious
CyberSex Models Erotic Multimedia
$1 Off all Erotic Shooters
SATURDAY 18
Virtual Kombat Virtual Reality Triathlon
from 1 -5pm, An Exciting Four-week Cyberspace
Compitition! All ages welcome. Win Big Prizes!
Co-Sponsored by Computer Depot and Incredible Universe!
Registration only $15 includes all first round game plays. Register
on or before Feb. 18 in person or by calling 532-0234. Grand
Prize Winner Receives a Home Video Game System!
TUESDAY 21
Escape The Beach
For the Beach set only!
Bring proof that you live or work-on the beach and
receive a Virtual Vacation! Your Vacation will include:
2-4-1 well drinks, $1 Drafts, and 2-4-1 Virtual Reality
Games and pizza n’ pitcher special $11.95
The escape begins at 8:OOpm!
Don.t forget our Happy Hour
everyday from 5-8pm
2-4-1 well drinks, 2-4-1 drafts,
and 2-4-1 Virtual reality games!
CYBERMIND'S
C A . F É
South Florida's Only Virtual Reality Fantasy Playground
Mon-Fri 5pm - 3am Sat-Sun 12pm-4am
Happy Hour Everyday 2-4-1 Games,Drinks 5pm-7pm
Also Serving Specialty Drinks and Exotic Finger Foods
13ÜS Washington Ave., South Beach • 532-0234
¿SUNE&Y NITES
The weekend party
to emfall week¬
ends HTalf price
cover atjhe door
Every Sunday
say “New Times sent me”
for FREE entrance
and a FREE drink!
feUESt)» NITES:
- TWÍ FQR
' * TUESDAYS! j
Two J¡¡¡§llb price
:f|r- -of One coyer!.?,!
«Two for the price
|| of one drinks!
«WEDNESDAY NITES:
8PM-11PM OPEN BAR 1
Free Drinks, Beer, Wine
Where Everything is
Allowed ...
If you can handle it
OPENTUES-SUN
Sun, Tues, Wed, & Thijp
—8jan;2am
163 & Biscayne Blvd. NMB
What Shakin’Line 945-6869
Reservations:945-6799
P
OF AMERICA
155 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach • 672-2423
Page 76 New Times
February 16-22, 1995


gffppiippil
j Welcome Matt
Former Broken Spec
Matthew Sabatella
finds time for the spotlight
By Jim Murphy
Apart from the obvious tools of the trade —
cables, guitar picks, a really good head of hair
— musicians often require something more
likely associated with downtown business¬
men. An organizer, the kind that lets you
keep track of your schedule and store impor¬
tant notes, can be critical to the aspiring rock
star. Matthew Sabatella has a doozy: a leather-
bound DayRunner (the Entrepreneurial
Edition) complete with compartments for
business cards, addresses and phone num¬
bers, a detailed weekly calendar, and even a
nifty MEMO-RY section.
Even that may not be enough. Sabatella is
one of South Florida’s busiest musicians
these days, working double duty as bassist in
Diane Ward’s band while he gets his own
group off the ground. Add in the 35 hours per
wéek he puts in at the obligatoiy day job, and
Sabatella faces tough choices about how to
parcel out his time. “Pretty much every night
I’ll come home and either make a quick din¬
ner or grab a bite somewhere and then go to
rehearsal or a show or a meeting or go make
flyers or do something," he says. “But there’s
not enough time for everything, so I tend to
overlook sleep as the one thing that I don’t fit
in.”
On the surface, the back-breaking schedule
doesn’t make sense: The gig with Ward
would be enough for most musicians. Anyone
who’s heard Ward’s band knows she’s des¬
tined for greatness; Sabatella’s fluid bass play¬
ing and smooth vocal harmonies play an
important role in that
But Sabatella isn’t just any musician. Having
established his rep as co-founder, bassist, and
part-time frontman of Broken Spectacles (he
garnered a South Florida Rock Award as best
bassist), Sabatella has emerged as one of the
scene’s most promising talents — a skilled
musician (he also plays guitar and drums)
with a fistful of songs good enough to nab
him a spot in the recent ASCAP showcase in
Miami Beach. And besides, Sabatella’s latest
project isn’t just any band.
The story begins early last year, as Broken
Spectacles was on its last legs after a six-year
roller-coaster ride through the South Florida
music world. “When we started the band it
was funny,” recalls Sabatella. ‘We were 18,
19, thinking, yeah, we’re gonna be on MTV
by the time we’re 20,21.”
The Broken Spectacles were brilliant and
often challenging. And yet, even though the
Specs were highly acclaimed, they never
quite found their audience. “The big thing is,
there were three songwriters and three _j
singers,” states Sabatella, referring to fellow
bandmates Ed Hale and Dave Rubenstein,
both of whom played guitar and also handled
lead vocals on selected songs. “It was very
much like three solo projects going on. That
was the fundamental problem, I guess. We
spent all the years telling people, ‘Don’t
worry, you’ll catch on, you’ll like it,’ because
we liked it”
But local audiences never seemed to grasp
the concept of a band with three strong per¬
sonalities, and by the end of 1993 Sabatella
February 16-22, 1995
had begun performing solo acoustic shows. “I
loved the band,” he relates, “but it just
seemed a little bit easier to communicate
when I was doing my own material.”
Sabatella’s new group was formed piece¬
meal, almost haphazardly, and members only
recently settled on a name: Sabatella. We
spent some time talking about names, and
those were actually some very funny ses¬
sions,” says the band’s namesake. “It was
actually someone else who said, ‘How about
just Sabatella?’ And pretty much everyone
else instantly said, ‘Yeah, I could live with
thát’”
Matt Sabatella was first joined by key¬
boardist Lee Frank, known locally for having
collaborated with guitarist extraordinaire Joel
Schantz on the 1993 Bad Karma release My
Only Problem. Frank and Sabatella played as a
duo for several months and met up with
singer-songwriter Brian Franklin. Franklin, a
former member of the boogie-grunge band
Mr. Tasty and the Bread Healers who had
been cultivating a solo career, joined the band
as lead guitarist in May.
The three continued with acoustic perfor¬
mances; when an electric lineup was needed,
Sabatella switched to bass and Ari Schantz
(Joel’s brother) helped out on drums. The
lowing based on performances that leave lis¬
teners groping for adjectives to describe what
they’ve just heard. In terms of material, the
band is all over the musical map: Pensive
acoustic-centered ballads like “Memory
Coast” and “Butterfly” mix with grittier num¬
bers such as the bluesy “Rain on You,” which
is punctuated by a vicious, extended solo by
Franklin. “Capture” springs from the same
well as “Rain,” but takes on a slightly jazzier
feel thanks to Frank’s smooth organ work.
The anthemic “Uniform,” which has emerged
as a crowd favorite, is a straight-ahead rocker.
Which leads us back to the essential items
for musicians. While Sabatella (the musician)
may have a topnotch organizer, Sabatella (the
band) is sorely lacking in one key department
— the matter of a compartmentalizing its
unique sound. This is no trivial matter. These
days it seems the entire music industry —
from top label executives and radio program¬
mers to A&R scouts and lowly critics —
thrives on neatly pigeonholing acts, but
Sabatella defies easy classification.
Attempts have ranged from the sublime
(after a recent show, a first-time listener
walked up and suggested a cross between
Lenny Kravitz and R.E.M.) to the absurd (my
offering that there was some sort of stylistic
Matt's factor: Sabatella came together after the Spectacles were broken
final pieces of Sabatella fell into place last fall,
when Franklin recruited bassist David
ChaskeS, who brought along his long-time
friend, drummer Jordan Steele Lash.
“We came together to support Matt,” jokes
Chaskes. “It kind of happened by accident,”
adds Frank. Sabatella has come to realize that
the full-band backing enhances the power of
his songs. “When I started playing the solo
shows, I loved the freedom,” he says. “I was
so psyched to be up there without a band. It
just felt so good to be there by myself."
Then Sabatella saw a videotape of one of his
shows. “I’m watching it and I’m like, ‘Oh, is
that all it is? It’s just a guitar?’ Because I guess
I’m up there singing and playing, and I’m
hearing the whole band in my head, and so
I’m thinking that a whole lot more music is.
happening than actually is.”
Despite the band’s relative newness to the
scene, Sabatella has developed a strong fol¬
connection with mid-Severities Chicago,
although, in rhy defense, it should be noted I
was thinking specifically of the dozen or so
gems penned by Terry Kath, the band’s late,
tragically underrated guitarist).
The difficulty of pinning down Sabatella’s
sound stems from the diverse experiences
and talents of each band member. Sabatella
claims the Beatles as his earliest influence,
and he’s now spending a lot of time listening
to Tom Waits and classical music. Frank, well
steeped in blues, and jazz, attended the
University of Miami’s music school. (He
downplays the experience, saying, “People
think there’s a certain amount of cloning that
goes on. I’m not looking to be Bruce
Hornsby.”) By contrast Franklin is a self-
taught musician whose roots are firmly
planted in rock and roll. He cites the Allman
Brothers, Bruce Springsteen, and Eric
Clapton as his primary influences. “I think
I’m the least educated, least disciplined one
in the band,” he notes.
Lash, who studied at the Berklee College
of Music in Boston, leans heavily toward
roots music — he cites blues, country, and
jazz. Before joining Sabatella, Lash spent
eight months playing in a group headed by
Muddy Waters’s former (and Eric Clapton’s
current) harmonica sidekick, Jerry Portnoy.
Chaskes finds himself on bass after a mus-
ical journey that has included a stint as gui¬
tarist in a gospel band, extended travels in
Israel, and, most recently, playing sitar at an
Indian restaurant-club on South Beach. “I
would love to work the sitar into the group,”
he relays. “And not just for the sound, but
because we can really make songs around
it”
The members of Sabatella have managed
to harness the unwieldy patchwork of their
individual influences and talents, and fashion
them into a cohesive whole: Chaskes’s dron¬
ing, Eastern-influenced bass work meshes
perfectly with Lash’s powerful drumming;
texture is added by Frank’s blues-tinged
organ and jazzy piano; Franklin’s manic,
unorthodox guitar work provides grit and
power; Sabatella’s distinctive voice — a deep
instrument that can be raspy of crystal clear,
depending on the song — provides a spell¬
binding center.
During a recent rehearsal, as the members
goofed on new age and debated descriptions
(“I like ‘timeless’ better than ‘classic rock,”’
Sabatella interjects at one point. “Or maybe
toes dipped in the river of obscurity”),
Sabatella returned his full attention to the
DayPlanner, where he must juggle the
band’s rehearsal schedule with recording
work at Criteria Studios for Diane Ward’s
new project, which should be out within the
next month or two. Then she’ll want to solid¬
ify her band arid tour. “I don’t really know '*£?>
what’s going to happen on that,” Sabatella
says. “At this point, my own music is going to
have to take somewhat of a precedence for
me, just like hers is going to take a prece¬
dence for her. I love playing with Diane, and
I want to do it as long as I can, but things are
happening really fast for me right now and I
don’t want to fight that.”
Sabatella and Ward have discussed the
possibility of mounting a joint tour, which
would allow him to keep a foot in both bands.
That decision is at least a month away, and
Sabatella is clearly too busy enjoying the pre¬
sent to worry about the future. “The last year ¡feA
has just been amazing,” he says, “going from
where I was last year at this time. Just the
way, without the hassle of advertising for
musicians and auditioning and all that stuff,
everything’s falling into place and it’s just
kept growing, and this next year is looking
very good, too.”
Indeed it is: Sabatella’s become a hot prop¬
erty. He’s being courted by well-connected
managers who want to represent him, and a
couple of iawyers are separately shopping
the band’s demos among various labels in
New York. So for the time being, Sabatella’s
sleep will have to suffer. “But I like it like
that,” he reflects. “I would much rather be )
running around like I am than sitting home
watching Roseanne.”
Sabatella plays tomorrow (Friday) at Rose's Bar
and Music Lounge, 754 Washington Ave, Miami
Beach, and Sunday at the Stephen Talkhouse, 616
Collins Ave, Miami Beach. Anyone who wants to
keep up with Matt Sabatella's busy schedule can
call his information line at 949-1246.
New Times Page 77


Always Been True This Buds For You!
Wednesday
Fet> 22
THEATRE
paqtasiqa Productions
BRADFORD MARSALIS
a
Branford
Marsalis
Project
Music
m
Program Ni
otes
The future must look bright for local polka-
punkers I Don't Know, who use accordion
prominently in their songs, and occasion¬
ally toss in other instrumentation not nor¬
mally associated with high-energy rock.
First, this week the Rhino label will issue a
collection of music by accordion greats
(Flaco Jimenez, Clifton Chenier) and not-
so-greats (Lawrence Welk and Weird A1
Yankovic). Though Rhino tries to sneak in
a rock connection (mentioning that U2,
Talking Heads, John Mellencamp, and
They Might Be Giants all have used accor¬
dion), nobody — except maybe early
TMBG — relies on the accordion the way I
Don’t Know does. Too bad the band’s “Mr.
Malcolm’s Chronicles”
isn’t included in the $
Rhino set. Second, •
Know frontperson Fer- *
ny Coipel was invited a
on-stage to jam with -1
Ween the other night at
the Edge — playing
clarinet. You can catch
Know tomorrow (Fri¬
day) with the entertain¬
ing One Eyed Kings at
Squeeze.
Speaking of the fu¬
ture, I enjoyed an ad¬
vance tape of the soon-
out Load album, a mix
of live and studio tracks
by my favorite punk
band since the Ram¬
ones were fresh. Best
lyrics (of the words I
actually could discern):
“I’ve got my mojo on
my dick in my right
hand” and “I went to Churchill’s Hideaway
and I was fucking stoned.” It’s all as hell¬
raising as their earlier stuff, which was
hell-raising as hell. Called Load, the first
pressing will be available on see-through
gold vinyl. The band will be back on the
live circuit in early March.
These kids today. Come spring, wild¬
eyed college students, mostly from the
University of Miami, go crazy with what
they call Alternative Spring Break. In 1993,
for example, the little maniacs spent their
break time in the Midwest helping flood
victims. Tomorrow (Friday) Jennifer
Culture and Sketchbook perform at a bene¬
fit to help fund the students’ efforts. The
venue, Marsbar, promises a percentage of
the door to the kids. If you’re a Jennifer
freak — and after a recent show I saw, I’d
consider myself one — you also can catch
the band tonight (Thursday) at Ruins on
South Beach.
Other shows of note this week include
Gigi DeNisco tonight (Thursday) at
Tuna’s, tomorrow (Friday) at Club M, and
Saturday at Smith Brothers Lounge. Mr.
Tasty and the Bread Healers heat up the
Evolution Room in the Button South
tomorrow (Friday) and Saturday, then join
with another food-related band, Porridge,
for a show at the Chili Pepper on Sunday.
Mind Mural painfs the Button tonight
(Thursday). Tomorrow (Friday) the Holy
Terrors, Drive Choir, and Pohgoh join
forces at Churchill’s. Or you can opt for
Nuclear Valdez and Red Road tomorrow
(Friday) at the terminal Stephen
Talkhouse.
Look for a new Soul Asylum album in May.
Drummer Grant Young is out. No word yet
on his replacement.
Arlan Feiles plays solo every Sunday,
beginning this week, at Rose’s.
The popular, powerful, and somewhat
unstable Collapsing Lungs has undergone
another personnel change. Vocalist Brian
Tutunick is out. Or, from his perspective,
the other six members are out. He owns
the name Collapsing Lungs. The other
members will continue as L.U.N.G.S. (for
Life Under No Greedy Suckers) or just
“the Lungs.” The group is signed to
Atlantic, and is right now in an “option
period.” Keyboardist and sampler Chris
Nicholas explains it this way: “They
haven’t dropped us, and they haven’t
picked up the option yet either.’-’ As for the
group’s hard, crunchy sound, Nicholas
says, “When we started out, we were more
industrial. But each new member brought
a different style to the band, and we were
moving toward something Brian wasn’t
about.” You can catch L.U.N.G.S. on
Sunday at the Button South, with Tension
and Culture sharing the bill.
Veruca Salt Photo Contest: You have to
hand this much to Veruca Salt: Their exis¬
tence helped create yet another subgenre
— “waif rock.” Their album’s still weak
and the band still overrated, according to
respondents to last week’s contest in
which readers were asked to guess which
of the two V.S. publicity photos the group’s
label wants published. Geffen originally
mailed out the pic with the guitar in it,
then sent urgent orders to burn that one
and replace it with the other one. A couple
of reader comments: “My guess is it’s
gotta be the bottom one [without the gui¬
tar] because that’s the more glamour shot
one. But let’s be honest, both of those pic¬
tures are like totally vapid and vacant. Who
cares? Enough said.” Not quite, young
lady. Another reader says, “Yeah, I’m call¬
ing about that page 83, the pictures of
Veruca Salt. There are three pictures on
the page, two of Veruca Salt and one of
Wet Willie’s [actually an advertisement].
I’m not sure which one the label sent out. I
think I see the people from Veruca Salt in
the Wet Willie’s ad, and I would say that’s
the best photo on the page. I would also
say it doesn’t matter because Veruca Salt
is going to be off the airwaves and out of
the music scene quicker than you can
imagine, because like every other flavor of
the month their shit is weak and there’s no
substance to it and like all good trends will
come to an end not soon enough.”
- By Greg Baker
Accordion to I Don't Know (and Rhino), it's squeezebox time
Page 78 New Times
February ^6-22, 1995


meSIEPHEN
2/16
BROTHERS OF DIFFERENT MOTHERS,
WISDOM OF CROCODILES & GUESTS
ROCK 9PM
2/17
JORMA KAUKONEN
ACOUSTIC ROCK 8PM
NUCLEAR VALDEZ 12AM
2/18
JONATHAN EDWARDS FOLK 9PM
2/19
MANCHILD ROCK 12AM
BLACK JANET, SABATELLA &
GUESTS ROCK 9PM
2/21 RIDDLE PIE JAM 9PM
2/22 BABOONS, MY GIRLFRIEND AND
SOME LOUD LULLABY ROCK 9PM
Upcoming Shows
2/24.. ......LEO KOTTKE
3/12 JEFFERSON STARSHIP
3/19 RICHIE HAVENS
3/23 ..............KOKO TAYLOR
3/24..... LUCKY PETERSON
3/30 ..............^..CHARLIE MUSSLEWHITE
4/1 Í....GREG BROWN
4/7 SUBDUDES
4/13, 14 & 15 THE RADIATORS
616 COLLINS AVE 531-7557
Movie Sound Track • New Age • Ambient • Classical • Country • Fusion • Rap
Easy Listening • Soul • Latin • House • Acid Jazz • Trance • Alternative
Punk • Funk • Blues • Jazz • Reggae «Rock • International • R&B
513-515 Lincoln Rd Mia Beach • 534-2003
2
<
AMNESIA INTERNATIONAL
\ presents.
~r
and
Saturday Night
Wicked
The Parties Continue
concepts by Crazy Eddie and Jean Roch
doors open at l Opm
Early ReservationsTor Restaurant strongly recommended
136 Collins Ave. • South Beach • 531-5535
ACH
mW, 1
m
L2©i£3 DILINK FRcc 3 TILL !i
cod
.uy?rl?«c5i 3Amd
3509 N.E. 163rd Strélf, North Miami Beach, in the Intracoastal Mall (305)945-0196
kv
¡Si
February 16*22, 1995
New Times Page 79


IS®
Bm HMBHSH
BamaBiaHciga
in
EBjaaffl
tl® = i
fti
w-
Chubby ReturnstoThe
Road FromThe World
O'er.This Bund Pic
Recording Artist is One of
The Most Exciting Bands in
ZYDECO Today!
Drink Small â–  24 & 25
James Cotton - March 10
The Nighthawks - March 11
374-1198 • 626 South Miami Aye.
Don't’ risk your
next; occasion
on some stuffy,
stick-in-the-mud place.
We‘re the best
place to party
cause we party
all the time!
THEonnHni
We make music affordable.
North Miami Coral Gables Fort Lauderdale Lauderhill
13150 Biscayne Blvd. 1590 S. Dixie Highway 1012 North East 15th Avenue 4938 N. University Drive
892-1048 662-7100 761-7100 748-9929
Mon-Sat 10-10 • Sun 12-5 Gables Location Open Fri-Sat ‘til Midnite
W®
Musi
C
jjlgg
Concert
Calenc
ar
Gato Barbieri: Friday, February 17 and
Saturday, February 18, Club Tropigala, 4441
Collins Ave (Fontainebleau Hilton), Miami
Beach, 672-7469.
Chubby Carrior: Friday, February 17 and
Saturday, February 18, Tobacco Road, 626 S
Miami Ave, 374-1198; and Friday, March 3
and Saturday, March 4, Backroom, 16 E
Atlantic Ave, Delray Beach, 407-243-9110.
Jorma Kaukonen: Friday, February 17, Stephen
Talkhouse, 616 Collins Ave, Miami Beach,
531-7557, with Nuclear Valdez.
Roger McGuinn: Friday, February 17 and
Saturday, February 18, Musicians Exchange,
729 W Sunrise Blvd, 764.-1912, with Kathy
Fleischmann and the John the Cop.
Jane Oliver: Friday, February 17, Gusman
Center, 174 E Flagler St, 372-0925.
Stranger: Friday, February 17, Rosebuds, 2674
E Oakland Park Blvd, Ft Lauderdale,
564-7625.
Zhané: Friday, February 17, A. Chester'
Robinson Athletic Center (Florida Memorial
College), 15800 NW 42nd Ave, 6254141.
C & C Music Factory: Saturday, February 18,
Cameo Theatre, 1445 Washington Ave,
Miami Beach, 532-0922.
Jonathan Edwards: Saturday, February 18,
Stephen Talkhouse, 616 Collins Ave, Miami
Beach, 531-7557, with Manchild.
Celine Dion: Sunday, February 19, West Palm
Beach Auditorium, 1610 Palm Beach Lakes
Blvd, West Palm Beach, 407-683-6010.
Lords of the Underground: Sunday, February 19,
Pac Jam, 8400 NE 2nd Ave; and Paragon, 245
22nd St, Miami Beach, 534-1235.
Jeff Lorber: Monday, February 20, Musicians
Exchange, 729 W Sunrise Blvd, 764-1912.
Tony Bennett: Tuesday, February 21, Broward
Center for the Performing Arts, 201 SW 5th
Ave, Ft Lauderdale, 462-0222.
Buckshot Le Fonque featuring Branford Marsalis:
Tuesday, February 21, Carefree Theatre, 2000
S Dixie Hwy, West Palm Beach, 407-833-7305;
and Wednesday, February 22, Cameo
Theatre, 1445 Washington Ave, Miami Beach,
532-0922.
L.A. Guns: Wednesday, February 22, Button
South, 100 Ansin Blvd, Hallandale, 457-8800.
Drink Small: Friday, February 24 and Saturday,
February 25, Tobacco Road, 626 S Miami Ave,
374-1198.
Extreme: Friday, February 24, Button South,
100 Ansin Blvd, Hallandale, 457-8800, with
Flesh. '
Fishbone: Friday, February 24, the Edge, 200
W Broward Blvd, Ft Lauderdale, 525-9333,
with Weapons of Choice.
Leo Kottke: Friday, February 24, Stephen
Talkhouse, 616 Collins Ave, Miami Beach,
531-7557, with Texas West
Savoy Brown: Friday, February 24, Musicians
Exchange, 729 W Sunrise Blvd, 764-1912.
Dale Bozzio: Saturday, February 25, Rosebuds,
2674 E Oakland Park Blvd, Ft Lauderdale,
564-7625.
“Jazz at Lincoln Center Winter Tour": Saturday,
February 25, Gusman Center, 174 E Flagler
St, 372-0925, with Wynton Marsalis, Jon
Faddis, Clark Terry, Nicholas Payton.
Camilo Sesto: Saturday, February 25, Jackie
Gleason Theater of the Performing Arts, 1700 .
Washington Ave, Miami Beach, 673-7300.
Four Tops: Sunday, February 26, Swap Shop,
3501 W Sunrise Blvd, Ft Layderdale,
791-7927, with the Crystals.
Jawbox: Sunday, February 26, Cellblock, 1030
E Sample Rd, Pompano Beach, 7854545, with
Edsel, Gus.
Thursday
Jody McDonald's
URANUS
Ryan Laundry and Space Pussy
Friday i
FUR*
Is a Drag
Benefit for reta jj
DJ Waxman
Fashion Show at Midnight
Saturday
Gary James *
Quiet
Storm
DJ Boy George Acosta
Sunday
South Beach's first
and Only True
RAVE
18 +Over
Special Guest DJs
from Miami, Orlando & NY
Monday
Hood and Ernie7
FAT HACK
PUSSYCAT
Lord Michcml and Chris Pacielio
| Welcome You. 1
1203 Washington Ave. 53815582
Page 80 New Times
February 16-22, 1995


2 S. NEW RIVER DR.
IT. LAUDERDALE
¿r6 iN° «^FEBRUARY'S*
JAMES NIGHT-All BRINKS A DOUAR
^MjttZUALJAM NIGHT
i6thSB(ffiraSE/UHVEI«
l23rdBROTHERSwmiff MOM ME
ROCKERFELLAS
u„„„ ... NO COVER CHARGE
14075 W. DIXIE HWY., NORTH MIAMI
891-9024
A .
< ppontnnpc)
presents
7 Ways to
LCPVE
February!
Karaoke Mondays
You Name It-You Sing It!
Dance Tuesdays
Music by Mr. Robert
Wednesday-Saturday
The Max Montana Show
on Latin Guitar
Wednesday-Friday-Saturday
Broken Sound-Rough Reggae
Sunday Feb 19th 8pm’til?
Ms Ruby Baker-The Voice at SOBE
Saturday-Tuesday
Cleve Johns-Smooth Sounds all day «
Fridays starting Feb 24
Marcus Giavanni presents
TRI-LEVEL ENTERTAINMENT
S^cfaiasi' 2&o/e/b/
1060 Ocean Drive • 538-0007
EVERYTHURSDAY
9 PM TIL CLOSING
★ FREE DRAFT BEER, 9-10 PM
★ FREE COCKTAILS
(WELL BRANDS), 9-10 PM
9 til CLOSE: $6 PITCHERS
★ 25< WINGS ★ $1 SHOOTERS
★ TOP 40 & DISCO DANCING
★ MEN’S ‘BEST BUNS1 &
OYSTER EATING CONTESTS
$100G^W1^^EACH
Miami Lakes
15356 NW 79 Ct.
Just west of the Palmetto
on Miami Lakes Drive
829-2329
Dadeland
9555 S. Dixie Hwy.
in Dadeland Plaza
just south of Kendall Dr.
667-9673
2UNLMTED
ON SALE NOW *11.99 CD. *8.99 CS.
Listen to all of this or any other CD in the store at our Listening Center.
The power to hear it alt
Coconut Grove, Coral Springs (2 locations), Ft. Lauderdale (2 locations), Lauderhill, Miami (^locations),
N. Miami Beach, Pompano Beach, South Miami Now Open: Pembroke Pines Pines Blvd. & Hiatus Rd SunrlseSawgrass Mills
BLOCKBUSTER MUSIC and Design are Trademarira of Viacom, Inc., New Yd(k, N.Y. 10036. C1995. SALE ENOS 2/20/95 JoU *1805000341?
Get Ready .
RADIKAL
CAMEO THEATRE
1445 WASHINGTON AVE . SOBE
HOUSE
PARTY
• LOCO DANCERS
•BODY CONTEST
DOORS
OPEN
11pm
LADIES 18/MEN 21
INFO: 532-0922
• DRINK SPECIALS
February 16-22, 1995
New Times Page 81


do you say how
you cam about someone?
Say it with a gift from Spec’s,
it now we have a wide finge off great
accessories aft wal as itte hottest video on sale.
So hurry in and pick up something special
special someone.
; -V KJ&T 'te
rickmoronis
SSSfe,
ed o’nejii
PG O,
•
Little Giants “
Also available in Spanish
T it k \ k ilim i Four Weddings and a
Funeral
Penthouse Kama Sutra II
The Art of Making Love SSfík
Mask
Also avaliable in Spanish
Beavis and Butt-Head
Work Sucks! sown*
o
XK
>
O
1
5
X
I
â– 
0.
Playboy Celebrity rt«gg V
Centerfold ini
Path# Howie
Penthouse
Swimsuit Video
Distributed by
mvmm
Shaquille O’Neal
Larger Than Life
©1995 NBA Entertainment. Inc.
Aventura 20880 Biscayne Blvd. • Aventura Mall N. Miami Beach The Mall at 163rd St. • 12415 Biscayne Blvd. Miami Beach 1655 Washington Ave. Downtown Miami 361 E.
Flagler St. • 202 S.E. 1st St. Hialeah Westland Mall • 1001 W. 49th St. Central Miami Miami International Mall • Mall of the Americas • Miracle Center Coral Gables 1570
S. Dixie Hwy. South Dade Dadeland Mall • 11600 N. Kendall Dr. • 11921 S. Dixie Hwy. • 13801 S. Dixie Hwy. • Cutler Ridge Mall • 831 N. Homestead Blvd. at Selected Locations
it s AT
SPEC'S
age 82 New Times
February IS—22, 1995


GRAND OPENING
THE CROWN SUPPER CLUB
Every other Saturday Night we will
present the Best Live Entertainment
A Night of Sinatra with the
David Paladino Band Sat., Feb 18th
270 Catalonia Ave. Coral Gables
305-441-0204
Sooth Beach
Suifskle
And our Newest Store
BAYSIDE
MARKETPLACE
GENERAL NUTRITION CENTERS
Here’s To Your Health, America!"
24 Hour
Diet Plan.
Time to look
your best with
this 14 day
reduced caloric
diet plan.
Fortified with
vitamins and
minerals.
Cats daw Root in stock (Uña de Gato)
MET'UXSalc Price Box of 20 $57»*
90% off with GNC Gold Card
Bayside
401 Biscayne Blvd.
379-7181
South Beach Surfside
540 Lincoln ltd. 9448 Harding Ave
539-9513 865-8643
Open 'til 9pm Complete line
Tuesdays of © Vitamins
Rock & Roll
Blue Steel, 2895 Collins Ave, Miami Beach, 672-1227:
Marianne Flemming, Thursday; Bob Dylan Look and
Soun’ alike contest and open mike hosted by John
Soler, Friday; Black and Blue Steel, Saturday, Liquid
Lounge with Frosty, Sunday; open mike hosted by
Doc Wiley and Dennis Britt Monday.
Brickell Tavern, 760 SW 2nd Ave, 854-7989: Open jam,
Thursday; Twisted Ankle, Friday; the Mix, Saturday.
Button South, 100 Ansin Blvd, Hallandale, 457-8800:
Mind Mural plus R.I.P. plus Little Tramp, Thursday;
Mr. Tasty and the Bread Healers plus Little Tramp,
Friday and Saturday; Lungs plus Tension plus
Culture, Sunday; LA Guns plus the Kill, Wednesday.
Chili Pepper, 621 Washington Ave, Miami Beach,
531-9661: Holy Pepper Alternative Groove, Thursday;
DJ Rick Von Halle, Friday and Saturday; Mr. Tasty
and the Bread Healers plus Porridge, Sunday; pepper
University, Tuesday; locals night with DJ Bobby
Brandt Wednesday.
Churchill's Hideaway, 5501NE 2nd Ave, 757-1807:
Putney Swope, Thursday; Holy Terrors plus Pohgóh
plus Drive Choir, Friday; M.U. 330 plus Jive Step
Bunch plus Ed Matus Struggle, Saturday; Super Lack
and the Blackmoon crew plus From Creation Band
(reggae), Sunday; Milk Can bass player auditions plus
Laundry Room Squelchers, Monday; Temptation in
Purgatory featuring Branch Davidiáns, Tuesday; John
Gallo, Wednesday.
The Edge, 109 SW 2nd Ave, Ft Lauderdale, 525-9333:
Manifestation, Saturday.
Hooligan's Pub and Cabaret 13135 SW 89th PI, 252-9155:
Miami Blues Authority, Friday.
The Hub, 14670 W Dixie Hwy, North Miami Beach,
949-2288: Blues jam featuring Mr. Twister, Thursday;
Whig Party, Friday and Saturday; Torpedos, Sunday.
Joans Galley, 10442 SW 186th St 254-0108: Big White
Shoes, Friday and Saturday.
Lefly's Beach Grill, 1500 Bay Rd (Morton Towers),
Miami Beach, 532-6163: Manchild, Thursday; live
music, Friday; Clifford Hawkins, Wednesday.
Marsbar, 8505 Mills Dr (Kendall Town & Country
Centre), 271-6909: DJ, nightly except Monday;
Retrospect, Thursday; Alternative Spring Break
Benefit featuring Jennifer Culture plus Sketchbook,
Friday.
Mr. Lads, 2079 N University Dr, Sunrise, 748-7800; The
Zoo: Colour Junkies, Sunday.
Nocturnal Cafe, 110 SW 3rd Ave, Ft Lauderdale,
525-9656: Bern Sha Swing, Friday; Dog for a Day,
Saturday; SoBe Blue, Sunday; open mike, Tuesday.
Rosebuds, 2674 F Oakland Park Blvd, Ft Lauderdale,
566-6331: All Night Theatre plus My Girlfriend plus
Sacred Nation, Thursday; Stranger plus Company
Kane plus Lawton; Friday; One Red Walt Saturday;
Noodles, Sunday; Ho Chi Mihn plus Mood, Tuesday;
Noise Boxxx plus Skeletal Pups plus Sinamen Skunk,
Wednesday.
Rose's Bar and Music Lounge, 754 Washington Ave,
Miami Beach, 532-0228: The Hype, Thursday;
Sabatella plus Sixo, Friday; Le Coup, Saturday; Arlan
Feiles, Sunday; the Art of Jazz featuring Dante Luciani
plus John McMinn, Monday; Phat Tuesday with DJ
Snowhite; Manchild, Wednesday.
Scully's Tavern, 9809 Sunset Dr, 271-7404: Frank
Carmelitano-Marc Berner duo (jazz), Thursday;
Brooks Reid, Friday; Head First Saturday; the
Kickbacks, Wednesday.
Silver Dollar Lounge, 14075 W Dixie Hwy, North Miami,
891-9024: Suzy Creamcheese plus Native Tongue,
Thursday; Rockerfellas, Friday and Saturday; the
Kazuals, Wednesday.
Squeeze, 2 S New River Dr, Ft Lauderdale, 522-2151:
DJ Charles Arnold, Thursday, Saturday, and Tuesday;
1 Don’t Know plus One-Eyed Kings, Friday; Skull Park
Jones plus Unseelie Ct., Wednesday.
Stephen Talkhouse, 616 Collins Ave, Miami Beach,
531-7557: Brothers of Different Mothers plus Wisdom
of Crocodiles, Thursday; Jorma Kaukonen plus
Nuclear Valdez plus Red Road, Friday; Jonathan
Edwards plus Manchild, Saturday; Sabatella plus
Black Janet plus Britt Bus, Sunday; Riddle Re jam,
Tuesday; the Baboons plus My Girlfriend plus Some
Loud Lullaby, Wednesday.
Three R's, 13789 SW 152nd St, 238-5551: Velvet and
1
W/ SPECIAL GUEST
PORRIDGE
LOCALS NKHT
BOBBY BRANDT
SPINNING!
621 WASHINGTON AVE MIAMI BEACH • 531-9661
THE IV1 IVI O U \ A T O I R
Saturday, March 25 â–  8 PM
ON SALK FRIDAY • 10 AM
Mete available at the Snrise Boi Office and through Ticketmaster • Ta charge bj phone call
Dade: 358-5885 • Broward: 523-3309 • Palm Beach: 960-3300
A Cellar Door Concert Presentation
SUNDAY
FEBRUARY 19TH
THE HOLY PEPPER
ALTERNATIVE GROOVES
NO COVER
THE PEPPER RULES!
VON HALLE SPINS!
PEPPER UNIVERSITY
DJ NOY NADAR
New Tianes Page 83
February 16-22, 1995


DN UU NOW AT ALL AREA COCONUTS MUSIC AND MOVIES LOCATIONS
Miami, The Greenery Mall, At The Comer Of Southwest 77th Ave. and Kendall
Dr., 274-7045
Coral Gabies, University Shopping Center, 1240 So. Dixie Highway (Across
from the University Metro Rail Station), 284-9288
North Miami Beach, 269 N. E. 167th Street (formerly Vibrations), 653-44.10
Miami, Barnett Square, 13736 N. Kendall Drive (Across from Kendall
Lakes Mall), 388-2629
North Miami Beach, 14700 Biscayne Boulevard, 944-6952
Pembroke Pines, Pembroke Commons, 302 N. University Drive (Adjacent to
University Mall) 437-2925
HURRY, SALE ENDS 2/21/95!
Call about our HASSLE-FREE Loan
No Asset Verifications
No Income Verification
No Employment Verification
No Questions about Cash
NO KIDDING!
^*S0JC
I will I
mils
mmm
mam:
MM
Dow Guarantee Mortgage
(Licensed Mortgage Lender)
9700 NE 2 Avenue~ Miami, FL
Phone (305) 751-32321-800-762-2535
WEEKEND & EVENINGS 540-L0AN (PAGER)
<$>
j©L BEACH AMOCO
/áÜKVSÜík-. AUTO DETAILING
AMOCO I7Q0 Airón RH
1790 Alton Rd
Miami Beach 532-9655
Trade in your old
car for a new one
Machine Wash* Wax
Clean Wheels/Armor all
Clean Door Jams, Hood &. Trunk
Gutters • Shampoo Rugs &
Upholstery • Clean &. Detail Dash
M * Compounding & polishing paint available by estimate.
1 â„¢
IAI
y
i]
jo
n
i mm
N
11
r
Humor. I
WIN00W FILM |
59
$
99
70%
Heat
Reduction
ALL. CARS any legal shade,
=1 with scratch resistant film.
I Vans & Wagons slightly higher.
I Cash Only
NEW TITANIUM FILM
Special* All Cars /qÁÍh
Lifetime Guarantee L only
238-1253
TINTMASTER Established 1981
8825 SW 129 Terr, in Kendall Since 1981
t^) Smooth Groves:
A Sensual Collection
Volumes 1-4 Various Artists
Bermuda
Tuesday February 21st 1995
from 9pm -11pm
for a Rhino
Deep in The Groove"
listening & dance party.
Giveaways of Rhino T-Shirts,
CD Samplers and win a trip
for 2 on a Sea Escape
Also Available from Rhino
Aretha Franklin -
Very Best Of 2
Otis Redding -
Very Best Of
Betty Wright -
Best Of
Average White Band -
Cut the Cake
Available at:
Syds,
Cali Music
& Sooperstore
Page 84 New Times
February 16—2.2, 1995


BRANCH DAVIDIANS
Wednesday
JOHN GALLO
(SIptrdFiU’B
5501 NE2ndAveMiami • 757-1807
0ver21.1.D. required
Friday 6pm Pan Am Dave Barbeque *
Saturday 18th 10am English Premier Division
Soccer Sheffield Wed. vs. Aston Villa
Coming Soon
átftheUach...
any appointment made
before Grand Opening
¡ Fuif Legs" *25 "¡
With Coupon
I Ladies Only-Valid Grand
I Opening Month |
Call Now For Appointment J
Painless Waxing in
lust 15 minutes?
You may not believe it either until
you try it. Our European Wax
System is unique in the U.S. But
once you’ve tried it, you’ll be
glad you did.-. In just a few
minutes, -^tli^Btew system
painlessly ^amoves hat from the
face, chest, legs or bikini area.
And at a fraction Of the cost of
electrolysis oi^honey ifec. We use
different types of waxes for
various skirt types and for
different are>os of the body.
W© te Qsü^gRím .
téstese
isatis®© te» iMm ■
Wniwax OPENING
MARCH 1st
m.
1370 Washington Ave.
vr Suite 302, Miami Beach
European System 531-9946
Naijs^W’ednesday.
Toucans, 1350 S Dbde Hwy (Holiday fnn), ¿oral
Gables, 667-5611: Velvet and Nails, Friday.
Jazz ft Blues
Cool Beans Cats, 12573 Biscayne Blvd, North Miami,
899-8815: Steve McAckley, Thursday; live blues and
swing, Friday; Johnny Brown Blues Band, Saturday;
Blue Monday; open mike, Tuesday; Jet Nero and His
Real Cool Human Beans Band, Wednesday.
Greenstreets, 2051 Le Jeune Rd (Holiday Inn), 445-
2131: Tony Castellano, Wednesday through Friday,
Monday and Tuesday; Yvonne Brown and the
Wonderful World Band, Sunday..
Les Deux Fontaines, 1230 Ocean Or, Miami Beach,
672-7878; John Chapman Quartet, Thursday; Rhythm
Pygmies, Friday and Sunday; John Chapman Quartet,
Tuesday.
MoJazz Cafe, 928 71st St (facing Normandy Fountain),
Miami Beach, 865-2636; Miguel Cruz and Tropical
Dreams featuring Dayami, Thursday; Randy Johnston
plus Bob Mover plus MoJazz Band, Friday and
Saturday; Billy Marcus, Sunday; jazz jam with Howie
Schneider plus Lew Berryman & Co., Tuesday;
singers’ showcase with Dolph Castellano plus Lew
Berryman & Co., Wednesday.
Musicians Exchange Cafe, 729 W Sunrise Blvd, Ft
Lauderdale, 944-2627: Kim Hoyer Quintet, Thursday;
Roger McGuirin plus Kathy Fleischmann and John
the Cop, Friday and Saturday; Jeff Lorber, Monday;
Catawompus, Wednesday.
Norma’s on the Beach, 646 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach,
532-2809; Brazilian Explosion with Brazil Zum ^um
Zum Review, Thursday; Rob Friedman-Lynne Noble
Duo, Saturday.
News Cafe, 804 Ocean Dr, Miami Beach, 538-6397: Jim
Belt Trio, Thursday through Saturday; Howie
Schneider plus Walter Rodriguez, Sunday; Ben
Stivers Duo, Monday and Tuesday; John McMinn
Duo, Wednesday.
O’Hara’s Pub, 722 E Las Olas Blvd, Ft Lauderdale,
524-1764: Dr. Lonnie Smith and the O’Hara’s All-Star
Band with Danny Burger plus Dave Hubbard plus
Dave Wertman plus Juanita Dixon, Thursday; Dr.
Lonnie Smith and the O’Hara’s All-Star Band with
Danny Burger plus Jesse Jones plus Don Coffman
plus Juanita Dixon, Friday; Dr. Lonnie Smith and the
O’Hara’s All-Star Band with Danny Burger plus Dave
Hubbard plus Don Coffman plus Juanita Dixon,
Saturday; Melton Mustafa Big Band, Sunday
afternoon; Skip Lane plus Dave Wertman, Sunday;
Sha-Shaty, Monday; Dana Paul and the Nantucket
Sound, Tuesday; Dr. Lonnie Smith and the O’Hara’s
All-Star Band with Danny Burger plus Joey Gilmore
plus Johnny Hodge, Wednesday.
Taurus, 3540 Main Hwy, Coconut Grove, 448-0633:
Willie and Dave, Thursday; live music, Friday and
Saturday; Joe Donato plus guests, Tuesday; Rob
Friedman-Lynne Noble duo, Wednesday.
Tobacco Road, 626 S'Miami Ave, 374-1198; Louis
Archambeau, Thursday; Chubby Carrier and the
Bayou Swamp Band, Friday and Saturday; Nick
Macina, Sunday; Monday-night blues jam with Iko-
Iko; Rano Bob and the Snowman, Tuesday;
MarKrumich jazz jam, Wednesday.
Tuna's Waterfront, 17201 Biscayne Blvd, North Miami,
945-2567: Gigi DeNisco, Thursday; August Campbell,
Friday; Marianne Flemming, Saturday.
Van Dyke, 1641 Jefferson Ave, Miami Beach, 534r3600:
Ben Stivers plus Bob “BeBob” Grabowski, Thursday;
Toni Bishop, Friday and Saturday; Rita Quintero,
Sunday; Eddie Higgins plus guest bassist, Monday
and Tuesday; Ben Stivers plus guest bassist,
Wednesday.
Country
Desperado, 2520 S Miami Rd, Ft Lauderdale, 463-2855:
Brickey’s Pass, Thursday through Sunday; Mud
Puppies Band, Wednesday.
Smokin' Joe's Country Saloon, 5360 N Federal Hwy,
Lighthouse Point, 428-1404: Chopper and the Lone
Star Band, Thursday through Sunday and
Wednesday; Jesse Butler, Monday.
Latin
Añoranza, 10855 SW 72nd St, 271-1211; Tony Tony
(guitar), Thursday through Sunday; Tequendama: DJ,
Friday and Saturday.
Caché, 7369 SW 8th St, 2654800; Israel Kantory su
Orquesta, Friday through Sunday.
Centro Vasco, 2235 SW 8th St, 643-9606; Latin jazz jam
session, Thursday; Albita Rodriguez, Friday through
Sunday.
town & country center 8505 mills drive 274-4948
FREE YOTTR INHIBITIONS • 8FM TIL SAM TUESDAY THRU SUNDAY
Town & Country Centre Turnpike & Kendall Dr. JS71-6909
THURSDAY
RETROSPECT
ACIEENMIVE CLASSICS
FRDM1HE1980S
FRIDAY
JUSTADDSAIURDAYNIEE
$2.00 BACARDIALL NIGHT
0QMINGEEB.24TH:QUIT
FEBRUARY 17TH
fffilERNATIVE SFRJDNGBREAK
BENEFIT CONCERT
JENNIFER CUETURE
SKETCHBOOK
9PM
SATURDAY
February 16-22, 1995
New Times Page 85


Thursday, February 16,1995
10pm Featuring live Percussions,
Salsa and Dance music
in the heat of the night...
s
655 Washington Ave.
13
South Beach
538-2274
Club Mystique, 5101 Blue Lagoon Dr (Miami Airport
Hilton), 265-3900: Juan Rosario plus DJ Hector San
Roman, Thursday through Sunday and Wednesday;
Giro, Saturday.
Club Tropigala, 4441 Collins Ave (Fontainebleau
Hilton), Miami Beach, 672-7469: Zun Zun Dambae
show plus Orquesta Tropigala featuring Gaby Gabriel
Thursday through Saturday; Gato Barbieri, Friday
and Saturday.
Costa Vasca, 5779 SW 8th St, 261-2394: La Taberna:
Flamenco show with Cacharrito de Malaga, Friday
and Saturday.
Desirée, 9674 SW 24th St, 559-0969: Live music, Friday
and Saturday.
Gaucho's, 2901 SW 8th St, 649-9494: Daniel Olivera
plus Karin Meene plus Sergio Torres, Thursday
through Saturday.
Illusions, 4343 Collins Ave (Quality Shawnee Beach
Resort), Miami Beach, 532-3311: Fusion show
(flamenco, Afro-Cuban) plus DJ Fidelito, Friday and
Saturday.
La Covacha, 10730 NW 25th St, 594-3717: DJ Ray Perez,
Friday and Saturday.
la Fuerza, 1115 NW 22nd Ave, 642-3566: DJ Wow,
Friday through Monday.
La Paloma, 10999 Biscayne Blvd, North Miami,
891-0505: Robert Lozano, Thursday through Sunday.
Les Violins Supper Club, 1751 Biscayne Blvd,' 371-8668:
Frankie Kein Show, Friday and Saturday; Elixandra,
Saturday.
Málaga, 740 SW 8th St, 854-9101: Flamenco show,
Thursday through Sunday.
Mango's Tropical Cafe, 900 Ocean Dr, Miami Beach,
673-4422: D’votion (reggae), Thursday; Miguel Cruz
and Tropical Dreams featuring Dayami, Friday;
D’votion (reggae) plus Miguel Cruz and Tropical
Dreams featuring Dayami, Saturday and Sunday;
Erica and the Brazilian Explosion, Monday and
Tuesday; Leo Casino and the Florida Players (jazz),
Wednesday.
Miami's Concorde, 2301 SW 32nd Ave, 441-6974:
Miami’s Concorde Band, Friday and Saturday; Los
Fonomemécos (comedy), Friday and Sunday.
Penthouse Cafe, 2100 W 76th St, Hialeah, 362-2100:
Luis Garcia, Thursday through Saturday; Paquita
Hechavarria, Tuesday and Wednesday.
Stefano's, 24 Crandon Blvd, Key Biscayne, 361-7007:
DJ Carlos Sarli, Thursday through Saturday and
Wednesday; Latin night, Thursday, ladies night,
Friday; Brazilian Tanga Follies, Wednesday.
Studio 23,247 23rd St, Miami Beach, 538-1196: DJ
Juan Diego Alvarez (salsa, cumbia, merengue),
Thursday through Sunday and Wednesday.
821 Lincoln, 821 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach, 534-0887:
Mary D.’s cabaret night, Thursday; Overdrive with DJ
Tony (alternative), Friday; Mary D.’s Steaming
Saturday; Martini Monday; Boy Bar Lounge, Tuesday,
Hood on 45, Wednesday.
Amnesia, 136 Ocean Dr, Miami Beach, 531-5535: Tutti
Frutü hosted by Gary James, Thursday; DJ, Friday
and Saturday, tea dance, Sunday.
Bqja Beach Club, 3015 Grand Ave (CocoWalk), Coconut
Grove, 4454)278: DJ, nightly except Monday; ladies
night, Wednesday.
Baja Beach Club, 3200 N Federal Hwy, Ft Lauderdale,
5614257: DJ, nightly; ladies night, Wednesday.
Bash, 655 Washington Ave, Miami Beach, 538-2274:
DJ, Thursday through Sunday and Wednesday; DJ
Mark Sacheli, Friday through Sunday.
Bermuda Bar, 3509 NE 163rd St, North Miami Beach,
945-0196: DJ, nightly; Sex on the Beach featuring live
1 music (reggae), Sunday.’
Cafe Iguana, 8505 Mills Dr (Kendall Town & Country
Centre), 2744948: DJ AJ Falcon plus DJ Angel plus
DJ Greg Hunt, nightly; ladies night, Thursday and
Tuesday.
Cameo Theatre, 1445 Washington Ave, Miami Beach,
532-0922: Power 96 live broadcast with DJ Eddie Mix,
Friday; C & C Music Factory, Saturday; DJ George
Jett plus DJ Jack DeMatas (oldies disco), Sunday;
Buckshot Le Fonque featuring Branford Marsalis,
Wednesday.
Cheers, 2490 SW 17th Ave, 857-0041: Erotica with DJ
George Vidal, Friday DJ George Vidal (Latin),
Saturday; tea dance and BBQ with DJ George Vidal,
Sunday; DJ George Valdez (Latin), Wednesday.
Coco Bongo, 1045 5th St, Miami Beach, 5344999:
College night hosted by Power 96, Thursday; DJ
George Jett, Friday Latin night, Saturday; reggae
night, Wednesday.
Coco Loco, 495 Brickell Ave (Sheraton.Brickell Point),
373-6000: DJ Carlos Marban plus DJ Willie E., Friday
DJ Carlos Marban, Saturday.
Dan Marino's, 3015 Grand Ave, 567-0013: DJ, nightly
DJ Ben Richards, Thursday DJ Greg Hoover, Friday
and Saturday karaoke ladies night, Tuesday.
Dune, 1439 Washington Ave, Miami Beach, 672-7111:
UNDER NEW OWNERSHIP
FEB.16th-22nd
(3TÍ' '"XIX ? > 3
THURSDAY
Draft Nite- $8.00 ALL U CAN
Drink Drafts 10:00p.m.-1:00a.m.
Mr. Twister Blues Jam
B’X-IW'Í’’ X -5 '
FRIDAY & SATURDAY
music by WIG
Party/Drink Specials
SUNDAY
Wet-T-Shirt Contest
FREE BBQ music by torpedos
MONDAY
Ladies Nite
2 for 1 drinks well & call
7pm - 3am
TUESDAY
$ 1 Shooters, $ 1.50 Domestic
siteE? aBnE*s33i
WEDNESDAY
Ladies Nite 7pm-3am 50C drinks
l XJTTOft 2SHXI3
Chef Daves Raw Bar
Oysters, Clams, Peel & Eat Shrimp
Full Menu - Open for
lunch & dinner
Sunday Mornings Brkfst Buffet
8:30 - 11:00 All-U-Can Eat $4.00
Parking never a problem
HRS 11a.m.-3a.m.
14670 West Dixie Hywy
N. Miami Beach - 949-2288
£» dm & i &av§s S
EVERY WEDNESDAY
MANCHILD
Hi., Feb 17
MATTHEW
SABATELLA
Sat., Feb 18
LeCOUP
ACOUSTIC SUNDAYS
WORLD BEAT
MUSIC WITH
ARLAN
FE1LES
Mon., Feb 20
THE ART OF JAZZ
WITH
DANTE
I m LUCIANI
PHATTUESDAYS
Live Hip Hop Jam • DJ Snowhite spinning
Acid Jazz, Hip Hop, Reggae and R & B
SHOWTIMES 11PM • NO COVER
754 Washington Ave.,
South Beach 532- 0228
Dance Music & DJs
Page 86 New Times
February 16-22, 1995


Beatles
C apitol/EM I/Apple
Frank Sinatra
Capitol
Garth Brooks
Liberty
Jerky. Boys Soundtrack
Atlántic/Select
with music sale
How do you say how
much you care about someone?
Say ü with a gift of music—from Spec’s.
Right now we have a wide range of great selections as
well as accessories on sale. So hyny in and pick iq>
something special for that special someone.
Madonna
Maverick/Sire
Tflli'f BENNETT
Tony Bennett
Columbia
Tom Petty
Warner Bros.
Van Halen
Warner Bros."
Weezer
DGC
MUSIC
We’re Back in Homestead • 831 N. Homestead Blvd. • Next To Publix
Aventura 2088G Biscayne Blvd. • Aventura Mall N. Miami Beach The Mall at 163rd St. • 12415 Biscayne Blvd; Miami Beach 1655 Washington Ave. Downtown Miami 361 E.
Flagler St. • 202 S.E. 1st St. Hialeah Westland Mall • 1001 W. 49th St. Central Miami Miami International Mall • Mall of the Americas • Miracle Center Coral Gables
1570 S. Dixie Hwy. South Dade Dadeland Mall • 1160ÓN. Kendall Dr. • 11921 S. Dixie Hwy. • 13801 S. Dixie Hwy. • Cutler Ridge Mall « 831 N. Homestead Blvd. At Selected Locations
February 16-22/ 1995
IT'S AT
SPEC’S
New Times Page 87


Express yourself with music sale.
How do you say how much you care about someone? Say it with a gift from Spec’s.
Right now we have a wide range of great accessories as well as the hottest music on sale.
So hurry in and pick up something special for that special someone.
Case Logic Cassette Case
CP-30 Holds 30 tapes
$9.99
Case Logic CD Organizer
CDW-100 Holds 100 CDs
$29.99
TDKSA100 3 Pack
$7.99
TDKD905+1
$4.99
Case Logic CDTVaveter
DM-24 Holds 24 CDs
$19.99
Case Logic CD Case
CD-30 Holds 30 CDs
$12.99
TDK SA90 4+1
$7.99
TDKSA605+1
$7.99
More music. Less moncyi
Aventura 20880 Biscayne Blvd. N. Miami Beach The Mall at 163rd St. North Miami 12415 Biscayne Blvd. Miami Beach 1665 Washington Ave. Downtown Miami
361 E. Flagler St. • 202 S.E. 1st St. Hialeah Westland Mall • 1001 West 49 St. Central Miami Mall of the Americas • Miracle Center Coral Gables 1570 S.
Dixie Hwy. South Dade Dadeland Mall • 11600 N. Kendall Dr. «11921 S. Dixie Hwy. «Cutler Ridge Mall t*pAt Selected Locations
IT'S AT
SPEC'S
Page 88 New Times
- Ütivj Gt$ Wm''•-t*#’ B^lrl
February 16^22, 199


U'f CMiWWIkMMiMhBiMiWPWWJ' 1 iryb* w*****1k
The soft sell of the
glitz parade, pointed
parties and random
encounters: (clockwise
from top) Danny Aiello
and Melanie Griffith
and at the Two Much
production on Lincoln
Road; Guillermo
Cabrera Infante
mingling with the
literati at Books &
Books; saxman
Paquito D'Rivera and
wife Brenda, and
actors Gabino Diego
and Ariadna Gil at the
Miami Film Festival
closing^iight party
lovelies: Let’s tighten up, girls, regain a little
perspective on things. Winding down at
Niva, Gary James taking a partnership posi¬
tion and hosting a nice little opening party.
A drink or two with a table of models — the
sort of sweet, sprightly, ahd well-bred six-
footers who give credit to the industry —
and an intelligent nightlife veteran of the
professional classes, good-naturedly ques¬
tioning our party about credentials and taste
for riveting disgust and trash decadence,
lingering at the bar, our favorite nightlife cult.
figure — Effraim — accompanied by his^
newest real man discovery: Roar, an excep¬
tionally hearty boxer, a brooding presence
from Eastern Europe. Effraim, a pioneer of
the go-out-every-single-night school, claiming
to be heading for Poland, of all places, really
and truly over it this time around:
“South Beach used to be a nice little town,
where everybody knew each other and noth¬
ing much happened. Now there’s all this
ridiculous hype — darling, you’ve got to do
something about stopping all the silliness,
this celebrity nonsense. The whole city keeps
waving its ass in the air like a whore, trying to
get fucked by all the money and celebrity.
When I see somebody famous in a club, I just
run away; the scene has really gotten intolera¬
ble. But then, where else can you make a very
decent living simply by going to one another’s
parties?”
meals late at.night....
Now that I’m a star, I
know this rotten busi¬
ness inside and out.... I
feel so cheap and dirty —
how did this ever hap¬
pen?”
Real life redux, taking
in South Beach on a stray
Friday evening, gearing
up with the lowest form
of social interaction
known to mankind, a
restaurant opening, tour¬
ing the attractive Cafe
Impala in one minute flat.
On to dinner at the
Strand with Josh Levine of
Forbes, down from New
York to research a cover story about the
insanely profitable modeling industry,
luminaries like Cindy Crawford Inc.
approaching the seismographic charge of
movie stars. The restaurant a battleground
of tumescent headiness and insanity, din¬
ing in state like the countess in Daughter of
the Regiment and taking in the pussy
parade: real models, decorative escorts,
and perky strippers, invariably denounced
by women who shouldn’t be throwing any
stones in the floating cathouse. On to
other establishments, treading through
the sloppy gauntlet of teen-wásteland
clubs, not all that inspiring to Levine, a
diehard Manhattanite who hadn’t been in
Florida since 1977: “This is what every¬
body has been talking about in New York?”
First stop, Bar None, totally losing our
grip and going nutso-schizo on a massive
bouncer —■ a very uncool move — the
place brimming with tales of Hollywood.
Joan Cusack, Melanie Griffith, Danny Aiello, and
Rosie Perez in town for the Two Much pro¬
duction, currently shooting on Lincoln
Road; John Cusack and Don Johnson around,
as well. Robin Williams set to come down in
April for another movie. Mogul Joel Silver all
over town, producing Fair Game and work¬
ing the big picture, the interplanetary
tycoon always accompanied by two assis¬
tants bearing portable phones. The club one
vast percolating lab culture of flesh, flash,
and hustle, Bob Vila, the low-bore home
handyman huckster of television, actually
granted the status of anchoring a booth of
welter
Unfortunately, a free and vigorous
press requires a touch of scandal-
mongering on the side, something
of an unseemly decline from the
noble ideals of Thomas Jefferson, a rich,
famous, and powerful statesman (think
Dallas set on a plantation) whose randy
appetite for interracial dating might have
made him the perfect tabloid star, sort of a
thinking man’s OJ. Simpson. The press, in
fact, may be a little too free, easy, and sex¬
ually obsessed lately. Topless photos of
Marcia Clark in her Brigitte Bardot period,
sold by her then-companion’s mother.
American Journal staking out Cindy
Crawford’s Miami Beach house for more
nude sunbathing vignettes, and worse yet,
stealing items from our column. Sleazy
stuff, although, to be fair, everyone has a
stoiy, no one can stop talking, and journal¬
ism may be akin to the proverbial tree
falling in the forest. If an incident doesn’t
make the papers, preferably in boldface,
can it be said, at least in an existential
sense, really to exist?
On the rounds, trolling through carnality
and motley behaviors, unhinged and yet
curiously disengaged. Limping along the
banal seashore for a constitutional, some
photo crew shooting a lingerie layout and
backing up pedestrian traffic. Dinner with
an arresting Italian woman, one of those
exquisite European thoroughbreds who
have a knack for making you feel like a
skanky-ass American rube,, all Cheez
Doodles and F Troop reruns. Our romantic
crush, alas, marred by her forthright
embrace of the plug aesthetic (“Do I kiss
you or strip?”) and heedless disregard of
the bill. Yet another dinner in chicville, a
gentleman reminiscing about the old days
of Havana, when Superman — the mas¬
sively endowed nightclub performer
immortalized in The Godfather, Part II —
unveiled his masterful weapon for giggling
tourists every night, challenging gals from
the audience to take him on. Lots of plants
in the audience, of course, although some
nonprofessional woman invariably would
rise to the challenge, an odd strain of femi¬
nine dysfunction. Most
men, if invited to, say,
thrust their dick in a radia¬
tor fan, might be slightly
more protective of vital
equipment.
Lincoln Road, a local
club veteran turned busi¬
nessman opening a joyboy
palace in Havana this
spring (“South Beach is
okay, but Cuba will be the
new gay paradise”), the
figurehead of fun joining forces with
another civic leader for a renowned gay
bash, this year’s pageant of lust sét to take
place on a Havana rooftop. The mono¬
graphic Omar Martinez — formerly of Café
Mañana — turning up, Martinez now living
in Mexico City, making forays into Cuba
for television documentaries and forever
running into local luminaries, people such
as Ken Zarrilli of the Raleigh. Long ago,
when Martinez had tried to bring us along
on a muy controversial tour of Cuba, all the
talk had been of underground clubs and
women who looked like “monuments.” An
interesting offer, but ultimately passing
twice on the Cuba watch, our life already
too full of monuments and sexual degrada¬
tion. Martinez dispiritedly detailing the
bloodbath era — cheap drugs, cheap boys,
cheap thrills — tourists spreading the
plague like horny rats. Fathers selling
their nine-year-old sons, adorned with lip¬
stick, to German tourists. A positive
Mexican banking heir bringing back a
teenager from Cuba, promptly tainting the
boy and then abandoning him. Tales of
horror, straight out of medieval times:
“Here everyone does it for free; there, it’s
about a scrap of bread, survival. These old
men who go there and infect these desper¬
ate kids with AIDS should be shot”
Fleeing to the bosom of culture, neat
packages of uplifting nonsense, where
everything eventually works out and all’s
well, more or less, in the end. An interlude
of dance, pure and blissfully nonverbal,
with Hubbard Street Dance Chicago, the
company whizzing through kinetic
rhythms. Fitful stabs at the dimming allure
of the Miami Film Festival, commencing
with a screening of Exotica, an indescrib¬
able mood fugue revolving around a truly
splendid strip club, one befuddled viewer
buttonholing an usher: “Can you tell me
what the hell that was all about?” A civi¬
lized reception at the Foundlings Club, the
guest list featuring Guillermo Cabrera
Infante — also making an appearance
downstairs at Books & Books — and the
international intellectual set, people such
as Gérard Gorbiau of Farinelli fame. Search
and Destroy, the closing-night selection of
the film festival, Spanish actors Gabino
Diego and Ariadna Gil turning up at the aprés
party. Home to bed early on Saturday
evening, missing a South Beach salute to
former White House press office
spokesperson Dee Dee Myers;— hating both
the press and the unhooked-up life — and
a major lineup at a screening of An Awfully
Big Adventure. Billy Baldwin and Chynna
Phillips, songwriter Desmond Child, film
technologies expert Allee Willis, and theatri¬
cal producer Cameron Mackintosh and his
associate Richard Jay-Alexander — who will
be hosting an upcoming AIDS walk benefit
with Rosie O'Donnell — occupying the front
row. Stay home one night and the world
passes you by.
The world of gotta-dance fandom gearing
up for the pop legend of Sam Harris, star¬
ring in Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor
Dreamcoat this wéek, Harris scrambling
up the career ladder after a rousing rendi¬
tion of “Somewhere Over the Rainbow” on
‘These old men who go there
and Infect these desperate
kids with AIDS should be shot.”
Star Search. The technicolor dreamboat
lending luster to drag night at Mulberry
Street Cafe and other soirees, yet another
celeb du jour story for Miami. The verities
of the star-is-born life coming up again
with the ongoing production of Joel Paley’s
Ruthless at the Colony Theater. A gleeful
lampoon of the Broadway mystique, three
generations of ambitious bitches duking it
out on the Great White Way, with stellar
performances by Hugh Murphy as Sylvia St.
Croix and eight-year-old Meghan Garson as
Tina Denmark, the “devil’s .spawn” of
Shirley Temple and all the satanic
ingénues of Hollywood. All the camp and ‘
cutting remarks striking home, coming off
as nuggets of wisdom: “In show biz you’re
doomed to a life of booze, pills, and heavy
By Tom Austin
February 16-22, 1995
New Times Page 89


Advantage
Comprehensive review
af Test-taking strategies
af Practice tests
af Small classes
Expert instructors
af Competitively priced
Call
529-3999
for a brochure
SCHOOL OF CONTINUING STUDIES
Beeper Sale
16 memory • Vibrator • Time Stamp
Standard Bravo Pager
6 mem • vibrator
6 memory • Vibrator
Monthly Rates As Low As *595
>. voice mail Available
We sell Express and Encore
Will beat any advertised price
NEW AGE COMMUNICATION
595-BEEP or 59S0707
10240 SW 56th STREET, SUITE 105
Srisfj House j:
Í Grilled burgers & steaks till 1am !;
I; A Frosted mugs of beer • ale • stout £
Í A Pool Tables • Darts • Foosball !■
• A Neighborhood Pub
• Since 1938
• 1430 Alton Rd., Miami Beach «J
| 534-5667 f
Open
Mic
Night
With
John
Soler
Every Friday at Blue Steel
2895 Collins Ave.
672-1227
=Corfoetfs=
SPORTS BAR & GRILL
LfilENKHT
DRINK SPECIALS
2AM4AM
MON $2 SCHNAPPS
$5 PITCHERS
TUES $2 TEQUILA
WED $2 VODKA
THURS 1.50 BOTTLE
BEER
FRI$2RUM
SAT $2 GOLDSCHLAGER
SUN $2 IMPORT BOTTLED
BEER
12721S. Dixit' Hwy
South Park Centre, Miami
2390823
DJ, Thursday through Sunday and Wednesday.
Glam Slam, 1235 Washington Ave, Miami Beach,
6724858: DJ, Friday through Sunday; Icon, Friday; DJ
Sugar, Saturday; CarWash, Wednesday.
Groove Jet 323 23rd St 532-2002; Groove Girl night
with DJ Luis Diaz plus DJ Glenn Richards, Thursday;
DJ Carlos Menendez plus DJ Luis Diaz, Friday and
Saturday; the Church with DJ Carlos Menendez,
Sunday; Rock and Roll Satisfaction, Wednesday.
Hooligan's Pub and Oyster Bar, 15356 NW 79th Ct
Miami Lakes, 829-2329: DJ Jumpin’ Charlie D. plus DJ
Wildman Bobby V., Thursday and Friday; karaoke
plus DJ Wildman Bobby V., Saturday; DJ Crazy Eddy,
Monday and Tuesday; ladies night with DJ George
Jett plus DJ Jumpin’ Charlie D., Wednesday.
Jessie's, 615 Washington Ave, Miami Beach, 5386688:
DJ, nightly; DJ Noah Sher, Thursday, Earwax with DJ
Krypto plus DJ Jeremy Henderson plus DJ Metaphor
(hip-hop, acid, rap), Tuesday; Island Girl with DJ Mr.
Jackson plus DJ Garth (reggae), Wednesday.
Kremlin, 727 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach, 673-3150: DJ
David Knapp, Thursday; Hot Tropical Salsa Friday
with DJ Lazaro Leon; DJ Lazaro Leon, Saturday; DJ
JoJo Odyssey, Tuesday.
Les Bains, 753 Washington Ave, Miami Beach,
532-8768: DJ, Friday, Saturday, Tuesday, and
Wednesday; Michael Capponi party, Friday; Back
Door, Wednesday.
Lua, 409 Española Way, Miami Beach, 534-0061:
Brazilian night with DJ Marcos de Olivera, Thursday;
DJ, Friday and Saturday, Hercules with DJ Sista
Leventhal, Sunday; DJ Chilly, Monday; DJ Gigi,
Wednesday.
Metro Underground, 925 Washington Ave, Miami
Beach, 538-7883; DJ, Thursday through Saturday; DJ,
Thursday; Fetish and Levi Leather alley entrance
party, Friday; Butt Bar grand opening, Saturday; DJ,
Sunday.
Pacha, 155 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach, 672-2423: DJ
Pierre Zon-Zon, Thursday through Sunday and
Wednesday; ladies night, Thursday.
Paragon, 245 22nd St, Miami Beach, 534-1235: Go!
after-hours party with DJ Eric Joseph, Friday,
Saturday and Wedneday; Punch at Go! after-hours
party with DJ Michael Mangiaforte, Sunday; Queen
Adora’s Valentine’s Day Ball, Tuesday.
Phoenix, 1121 Washington Ave, 6724788: DJ, Friday
through Sunday; Boys Will Be Boys, Thursday; Out of
the Fire, Monday.
Risk, 1203 Washington Ave, Miami Beach, 538-5587;
DJ, Thursday and Friday; Butter N’Jam with Geoff,
Thursday; Fur with DJ Dave Waxman, Friday; Fat
Black Pussycat, hosted by John Hood, Monday;
Loverboy, hosted by Ernie Levy with DJ, Tuesday.
Ruins, 601 Washington Ave, Miami Beach, 5324292:
DJ, Thursday through Saturday; Jennifer Culture,
Thursday.
Steel, 841 Washington Ave, Miami Beach, 674-0408:
DJ, Thursday and Friday; High Energy, Friday; DJ
Neal Rivera, Saturday; Drive Shaft, Monday; Under
the Steel Moon, Tuesday.
Twist 1057 Washington Ave, Miami Beach, 538-9478:
DJ, nightly; DJ JoJo Odyssey, Friday; DJ Charlie
Mercado, Saturday; DJ Brent Sunday; DJ Eric
Cabrera, Monday.
Warsaw Ballroom, 1450 Collins Ave, Miami Beach,
5314555: Level II, Thursday; DJ David Padilla, Friday
and Saturday; DJ Scotty J., Sunday; Amateur Strip
Contest with DJ David Padilla, Wednesday.'
Folk & Ethnic
Aruba Beach Gafe, 1 Commercial Blvd, Ft Lauderdale,
776-0001: Sweet Justice (reggae), Saturday; Juanita
Dixon plus Bob Vandivort plus Dr. Lonnie Smith,
Sunday.
JohnMartin's, 253 Miracle Mile, Coral Gables,
445-3777: Watch Fire f60s and 70s), Saturday; Cathall
Dunne, Sunday; Claddagh, Tuesday.
Lime Key, 10625 Kendall Dr, 279-6511: Top Vice,
Thursday; DJ, Friday; Waggy Tee, Saturday; Paradise
Wednesday with DJ Pete Moreno.
Mombasa Bay, 3051NF 32nd Ave, Ft Lauderdale,
565-7441: Broken Sound, Thursday; RPI, Friday and
Saturday; Don Fedele, Sunday afternoon; Broken
Sound, Monday; Motel Mel and the Innkeepers,
Tuesday and Wednesday.
Stinger Lounge, 6029 Miramar Pkwy, Miramar,
981-0202: DJ (oldies), Thursday; after-work jam with
DJ Yo-Yo, Friday; Caribbean night with DJ Yo-Yo,
Saturday; singles’ party, Sunday.
World Music Cafe, 3430 F Atlantic Blvd, Pompano
Beach, 941-2751: Vanessa Falabella (Latin jazz),
Thursday through Saturday.
World Resources, 719 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach,
534-9095: Sunflower Blues Band, Thursday; Asian
fusion with Stephan Mikés, Friday; Joe Zeytoonian
(Middle Eastern), Saturday, Cedric “Im” Brooks,
Sunday; New World Symphony members, Monday
and Tuesday.
WEDNESDAY
Open
Bar
til 12
Live Music Outback
FRIDAY
MISSION
TIL lO PM
$2 Bottled Import Beers
ell nite lone
SATURDAY
$1 Domestic Beer and
$2.” Bottled Imports
ALL NITE LONG!!
LIVE
REGGAE
OUTBACK
coming soon...
Friday Feb. 24
Funk • Alternative • rock
FISHBONE
Weapons of Choice
da 7pm, afi ayei, $13 adv, $15 dot
toesday Feb. 28
THEY MIGHT
BE GIANTS
da 8pm, all ayei, $15adv, $T7des
thunday march 2
ska • punk
THE MIGHTY
MIGHTY BOSSTONES
Face to Face
da 8pm, /aÑ a*es, $10
Saturday march 4
THE RAMONES
ADVANCE TICKETS
AVAILABLE THRU
TICKETALASTEE
THE EDGE
200 w broward blvd.
downtown ft. lauderdale
Page 90 New Times
February .16-22, 1995


Information
Services
GIVE US THE
FAX
579-1561
NEW TIMES
CLASSIFIED
READER NOTICE â– 
These classifications may
contain ads for conversation
or recorded messages
through the use of tele¬
phones. Calls to such num¬
bers result in a charge to
the calling phone number.
Call blocking is available
from Southern Bell for most
single-line residences in r
Southern Florida. Call 780-
2355 for residential call¬
blocking service. Not all 900
numbers allow a grace pe¬
riod or warning before the
call is charged to your
phone bill As telecommu¬
nications, these services are
regulated by the Federal
Communications Commis¬
sion & the Florida Public .
Service Commission. Com¬
plaints my be directed to the
Florida Public Service Com¬
mission at 101 E Gaines St,
Fletcher Bldg, Tallahassee,
FL 32399-0850.904-488-
1234. The FCC may be
reached at 1919 M St NW,
Washington, DC 20554
' Entertainment
PHONE
SEX
Live 1 on 1
Only $3.99/min
1-800-940-2625
1-900-745-2620
Hot British
Babes
Waiting to
Turn You
On!!!
1 -800-669-6705
18+, LD may apply
ALL NEW!!
3-IN-ONE DATE LINE
English/Spanish/alternative
LISTEN TO PERSONAL ADS
OF LOCAL PEOPLE!!
1-900-288-4441
Ext 462
$2/min, 18+, touch tone req
(305)525-0800
LIVE 1-ON-1
ALL LIFESTYLES
1-800-500-5243
1-900-446-2925
1-800-GAY-1-ON-1
1-900-FUN-4-FUN
$1.99-$3.99/min, 18+
HOME ALONE TOO?
DATELINE
4-U ALL NOW!!
1-900-825-6000
EXT 9603-18+ Only
$2.99 min. Procall Co
602-954-7420
LONELY?
NEED SOMEONE TO
TALK TO?
ONE-ON-ONE
1-900-725-6000
Ext 8733
$3.99/min, 18+
Procall Co (602) 954-7420
NEW!
Burning Live One-On-One
10509-1 -604-821 -4201
Free! Live Lesbians
011-239-129-3747
Dominatrix
011-239-129-4169
Nasty Back Door Babes
10509-1-604-821-4250
Int'l tolls apply, 18+
CS: 514-879-3406
WHY WAIT? GET A DATE!
FREE
TO CALL & LISTEN TO
1000’S OF PERSONAL
ADS OF LOCAL PEOPLE
-Long term/casual dating
-Exotic/fantasy
-Live 1 on 1
TELECOMPANIONS
933-6868
Broward 433-7587
FREE
FOR WOMEN
Not a 900/976 service
LIVE TALK
HOT * WILD * SEXY
1 ON 1
The Best for Less
212-741-1202
$.99/min
c/s 212-741-9144
HOTTEST
Swingers
Dateline
Network
Singles - Couples
Straight - Bl-Curlous
900-486-6644
ext 16
$2.95/min, 18+.
GUARANTEED
RECORDED ADS IN
EVERY AREA CODE!
To talk LIVE to Guys & Gals,
CALL OUR CHATLINE: .
900-255-7555
$3.95/min, 18+.
WANNA
BE BAD ?
LIVE, ONE-ON-ONE
HARDCORE
PHONE SEX
Dial
10718
1-604-821-BAD1
2231
18+/tolls apply
FUN
SEX/DATES
Miami area
names & numbers
For instant hot contacts!!
1-900-446-5005 x77
24 hrs, 18+, $1.95/min
Ofc: 213-465-1000
HOT SINGLES
Seeking Love & Romance
Nationwide Singles Dateline
CALL NOW!
1-900-420-3099
Ext 181
$2/min 18+24 HRS
T-Tone req’d
Avalon Comm 525-0800
FREE TO CALL
GAYS & LESBIANS
Relationships,
fantasies/tricks, etc.
Listen FREE to 1000’s
of phone personals.
Leave messages for
as little as .25
Yes...CENTS A MIN
933-6888 Dade
433-5121 Broward
EROTIC
LIVE TALK
1-800-677-3444 WMC
1-900-776-2288
$1.98 Min 18+
1-800-
RENT-
HOT..?
$2.98/min VISA/MC
213-656-1297
HOT
LIVE ACTION
UNCENSORED
1 -on-1 TALK
1-900-745-2084
1-900-745-0202
(EN ESPAÑOL)
1-900-745-1216
GROUP ACTION
1 -900-745-1947
1-900-745-1810
• $2-3.99/MIN 18+
HOT
GAY ACTION
UNCENSORED
1-on-1 TALK
1-900-745-2063
1-900-745-0303
GROUP ACTION
1-900-745-1843
1-900-745-1581
$2-3.99/MIN 18+
Anything Goes!
The Hottest Live Girls
800-295-7966
$3.99/min
or 809-474-5615
Int’l rates apply, 18+
THE BEST
LIVE TALK!
Partyline/Dateline
LIVE 1-ON-1
809-563-0022
Low as .80/min. Int’l toll
only! 18+ Why pay more?
SIZZLING
HOT LIVE
PHONE TALK
Only $1.69 per min
No Minimum
1-800-238-LIVE
Over 21
EAVESDROP
LINE
Secretly listen in on hot,
steamy phone calls
212-691-2444
$.99 Min/Min 21+
cust svs 212-741-9144
FREE
PHONE FUN
SINGLES*COUPLES
FITNESS PARTNERS
DATELINE 371-DATE
2 GIRLS LIVE
1-800-235-7465 LIVE
1 -900-745-0171
$2.50-$4.99/min, 18+
1-800-892-5575 mc/v
CBK 305-345-0292
GIRLS
GIRLS
GIRLS
Anything Goes!
Live Group Action
Something for
Everyone!!
1-809-474-2247
18+int’l LD Applies
CHEAP
SEX TALK
LIVE 1 ON 1
212-741-1202
$.99/MIN
No minimum/21 +
cúst svs 212-741-9144
HOT GAY MEN
1-800968-2625 WMC
1-900-825-7733 $2.98 min
HOTTEST BOYS EVER
1-809-474-2420
011-852-1721-1960
LD Chgs 18+
uncensored
NEW
ALL LIVE
DIAL 101-720
Adults 18+ only
Extra charges may apply
DIRTY
SEXY
SAMPLES
No Call Backs!
1-800-814-4637
Adults over 18 only
QUICK
RELEASE
1-800-285-9047
No major
credit card needed
Adults over 18 only
REAL SEXY
SAMPLES
1-800-723-5018
. Adults over 18 only
ORAL
FANTASIES
Complete
Sex Phone
1-800-587-9060
Adults over 18 only
HORNY
WOMEN WILL
TURN YOU ON
1-800-587-9063
Adults over 18 only
LIVE
EXPLICIT
PHONE
SEX!
One-on-One
Hardcore
* No 900 Charges
* No Credit Card
Dial
10718-
1-604-821-2221
18+Aolls apply
FREE-LIVE, EXPLICIT
1-0N-1
PHONE SEX
10509-1 -604-
643-3997
Dial All #’s For
Full Satisfaction
C/S 206-286-5299
18+ Int'l LD Rates Apply
THE HOTTEST
Line In Town
Live Party Line
*No 900# charges*
1-717-445-1010
regular L.D. charges apply
UNCENSORED
UNTAMED
UNQUENCHABLE
UNDERSTAND?????
1-900-745-0147
$3.99/min, 18+
305-932-5258
Free!
“LIVE**
PARTY LINE
DATE LINE
1-217-792-2222
regular L.D. charges apply
FETISH HOTELINE
Voluptuous Mistress Will
Allow YOU to Experience the
Ultimate Pleasure
LIVE 99 cents min
212-741-1202 21 +
c/s 212-741-9144
1-800
CHAT
FREE
1-800-242-8373 18+
. For free info
HFREEn
EXPLICIT
HOT
UNCENSORED
PHONE1
TALK
LIVE 1 ON 1
ALWAYS
HOT »
800-933-4032
18+, All Credit Cards
$2.49/min, First 5 min FREE
900 #S
BLOCKED?
Call from Home or Office
10718-1604-
821 - 3735
3.99/min, be 18+,
PPI, Pgh, PA
BOYS!
BOYSilflp
BOYS!
All Live!!
All Gay!!
1-809-563-9414
18+ Int’l LD Chgs Apply
A TOY in the
Attic
DOMINATION
FANTASIES
Call NOW!!!
651-6937
Now Hiring
EXTREMÉ
PHONE SEX
LIVE LOCAL
GIRLS
1-800-375-7785
Toll-Free-24 Hrs
Chks by phone/billiing opt
February 199 5
New Times Page 91


HOURS
Monday - Tuesday 8am-6pm.
Wednesday 10am-6pm
Thursday - Friday 8am-6pm
DEADUNES
Romance Ads: Tuesday 12pm
Classified Line Ads; Tuesday 6pm
Display Alto: Tuesday 12pm
Dade 372-9393. Broward 763*422.
FAX: 305- 579-1561
Winter Special
WATERFRONT
Two Bdrm/2 Bath
starting $7 00
Hours Mon-Sat 9-6 Sun 1-5
NEW TIMES
CLASSIFIED
P.0. Box 011591
Miami, FL 33101-1591
FAX: 579-1561
330 Biscayne Blvd.
10th Floor, Bayside
Plaza Bldg.
DEADLINES
Romance: Tuesday
12pm
Line Ads: Tuesday 6pm
Display Ads: Tuesday
12noon
RATES
Buy-Sell-Trade
5 lines, 2 weeks $10
Buy-Sell-Trade Deal
For items $50 or less
5 lines, 2 weeks $5
Private parties only. Flat
rate.
Repaid. Must publish
pnce.
Motor Guarantee
5 lines, 2 weeks $10
Flat rate. Free renewal until
auto sells. Private party
only.
Legal Notices
5 lines, 1 week $25
Garage Sales
10 lines, 1 week $15
Music: Instruments for
Sale, Musicians
Available/Wanted
5 lines, 2 weeks $10. Flat
rate.
Private party only
Roommates
5 lines, 1 week $22.
5 lines, 2 weeks $30.
Romance: See this
week’s Romance section.
Line Rates
5 line minimum. Some
restrictions apply.
Open rate: $4.80 per line.
2wk rate: $3.65 per line.
4wk rate: $3.40 per line.
8wk rate: $3.15 per line.
13wk rate: $2.90 per line.
26wk rate: $2.60 per line.
52wk rate: $2.30 per line.
Custom Classified Ads
Custom Classifieds offer
thick cutrules, unlimited
bold type, stars, bullets,
white space and larger
type sizes at no extra
charge. One inch
minimum (10 agate lines)
required. Rates are the
same as Line rates above.
Display
Contact a Classified
Advertising Representative
for more information.
Back Page
Point sizes.: 7,9,12,1416
Open Rate: $2.70/point
2 Wk Rate: $2.30/point
4 Wk Rate: $1.95/point
8 Wk Rate: $1.70/point
12 Wk Rate: $1.50/point
Inside Back Page
Open Rate: $2.00/point
2 Wk Rate: $1.80/point
4 Wk Rate: $T.66/point
General Information
MC, Visa, Amex accepted.
New Times reserves the
right to correctly classify
and edit all copy, or to
reject or cancel any ad at
any time. Only standard
abbreviations accepted.
Deadlines for cancellation
are identical to placement
deadlines. Rates subject to
change.
Adjustments
Please check your ad the
first day it appears. We
can oniy offer in-house
credit for one issue. No
refunds. New Times
assumes no financial
responsibility for errors
nor for copy omission.
Direct classified billing
inquires to 372-0004.
TALS
Apartments/
Condos / TH
for font
FAIR HOUSING
NOTICE
All real estate advertised is
subject to the Federal Fair
Housing Act, which makes it
illegal to advertise “any pref¬
erence, limitation or dis¬
crimination because of race,
color, religion, sex, handi¬
cap, familial status, or na¬
tional origin, or intention to
make any such preference,
limitation or discrimination.”'
NEW TIMES will not know¬
ingly accept any advertising
for real estate which is in vi¬
olation of the law. All per¬
sons are hereby informed
that all dwellings advertised
are available on an equal op-
gortunitjMjasis^^^^^^
ALL AREAS
RENTER’S WORLD
* Large Studios from $425
* 1 Bedrooms from $500
* 2 Bedrooms from $700
No Fee - All Areas
• 867-9800 •
ALLENDALE APTS
ALL MIAMI BEACH
24 St huge ocean front 1/2,
-1,125 sqft$900/mo
8 St 1 BR $550 and
- effic $475/mo
7St2/1’s$795/mo
28 St Effic $475/mo
3/2 convertible $750/mo
672-5766 or Bp 737-5925
ART DECO
SOUTH BEACH
New Bldg, 1 br, central air
cond, parking, washer/dry¬
er, cable ready, $600/
month. 1409 Euclid Ave.
Call 538-3367
ART DECO RENTALS
S BEACH/N BEACH
*Lg eff $425-$550/mo
*1 bdr$450-$1250/mo
*2 bdr$750-$1350/mo
’Single family homes
$1350/mo & up!
Long/Short term.
MANY more/No Fee
INCOME R.E.
534-RENT (7368)
ART DECO/SOUTH BEACH
Unique New Orleans style
bldg on Mich at 7th St. Effic
from $385. No dogs, yearly.
354-4544,770-8984 bpr.
ATTENTION LANDLORDS
AND MANAGERS:
Know who you are renting
to! We can qualify your ten-
nant applicants for credit,
criminal and landlord/ten-
nant disputes. Avoid dis¬
crimination charges. No
cost to you! All property
management services. Call:
531-0372
BAL HARBOUR/SURF SIDE
INCREDIBLE VALUE
Enormous ocean front pent
house, 3 br, 3 bath. Spec¬
tacular view. $2400/mo
9225 Collins Ave Royal
Palm Realty 674-0495.
BAY HARBOR ISLAND
Sublease, 2 bedroom/2 and
one half bath, full washer/
dryer, 2,000 square feet
$1000/mo. Call: 867-0427
CLASSIC VILLA/BAYVIEW
5 min from downtown. 2/1
with wood floors, french
doors, secure pkg, alarm,
cable. $775 mo. 573-5505.
BELLE MEADE
Waterfront, Studio, $500.
1/1 $700. A/C include, sec,
parking, pool, tennis. Call
751-4939.
BELLE MEADE
Young, gay couple seek
non-smoker to rent quaint
studio. W/D, utils incl $350/
mo, 1 st/last req, avail 3/7.
751-2170
BRICKELLAREA
Efficiency $485. One bed¬
room $545. For single rent¬
er. 1257 SW 15 Street. Call
666-5695.
BRICKELL KEY
Island Club sublet, 1/1,
gym, pool, tennis, pets,
cable. $1045mo, option to
renew. 447-3183 379-3809
BRICKELL TWNHSE
2/2.5 with Mexican tile, ail
appliances, 2 parkings, se¬
curity gate, pool, $1200/mo.
854-3203 or 656-6615 bpr
C GROVE-2 BEDROOM APT
Excellent location, 1 block to
Mayfair, security, 2 pools,
spa, gardens. $825/mo.
Call 448-4095
C GROVE/C GABLES/S BCH
1,2,344 BR’s. We will find
you the perfect rental for
FREE! FAST! Call Rachel:
567-6064 leave message
CMG: 856-1995
Coconut Grove’s .
premier rental source.
South Grove 2/1 duplex on
quiet, tree lined street,
walk to Cocowalk & village,
great yard, deck, pkng $850
Short term rentals $1200 +
COCONUT GROVE
1/1, hd wd floors, a/c, great
location, $500/mo incl util¬
ities. 2939 SW 30th Ct.
339-4488 bp.
COCONUT GROVE
2nd floor studio apt on quiet
street in N. Grove, off of Ti¬
er Tail. $450/mo, incl util,
all 444-6744.
COCONUT GROVE
Waterfront direct bay access
S. Grove 1 rm efficiency.
Very prvt paradise. $550
neg. Call 665-9898.
COCONUT GROVE
Fabulous Buillding. 2 bed¬
room/1 bath apt $850.
Clean, quiet, secure, pool,
no pets. 444-4263
COCONUT GROVE NORTH
Nice area. 1 br. Parking,
tiled floors. Fenced patio.
Ceiling fans. $700/mo. 2587
Trapp Ave. 443-2716
COCONUT GROVE NORTH
Charming 2 bdr, gated park¬
ing, secure, bamboo gar¬
den, tree lined culdesac.
$850/mo. 444-7147
COCONUT GROVE NORTH
Very large 1 bdr cottage,
gated parking, secure, gar¬
den setting, quiet, shaded
street. $750/mo. 444-7147
COCONUT GROVE
1 Bedroom. 1 block Planet
Hollywood & Cocowalk,
2830 Tigertail. Pets ok.
$550.854-7561,856-2850
COCONUT GROVE
- ON THE BAY -
Quiet 1/1
TROPICAL SETTING
-Pool, Enel Parking, D/W,
New Carpet/Tile. $810 mo
856-5561
SOUTH GROVE
Charming 1 bedroom, hard¬
wood floors, friendly neigh¬
borhood, sorry no pets
445-3257, $625 plus util.
GROVE AREA
2nd floor, 2/1 apt, hard
wood floors, A/C, 1 block to
Metro Rail $600/mo. Call:
854-6984
Â¥
CORAL GABLES
121 Zamora
1 or 2 Bedrooms, 1 Bath,
Hardwood floors. Excellent
location, 1/2 block to Ponce
de Leon. $520 & UP
2 mos. security
444-8668
854-5206
374-2705
CORAL GABLES - UM
Charming, landscaped, 2/1
duplex, modern new win¬
dows & kitchen, fans, Italian
tile firs, central A/C, dining
room & small Florida room
$800/mo + utils. 441-9117
CORAL GABLES
444 Ponce, Studio with
wood floor, $450. Quiet,
clean bldg. Sue Katz Re/Max
Advance Realty. 251-2127.
DECOPLAGE
Beautiful studio with terrace,
ocean view, pool, gym $950
per month. Call: 534-5972
or 674-9966. Lv msg
DOWNTOWN
VIEWS
FOR RENT!
From $975
Premiere 2/2’s with
spectacular Downtown &
Bay views now available!
Luxury high rise, 24 hr
sec, valet, 7 tennis Courts
with pro, indoor Jacuzzi,
sauna/steam, gym, lobby
bar & convenient store.
ONE MONTH FREE!!!!
On select units.
759-0700
Mon - Fri, 9:30-5:30
Appointments only!
★ ★ ★
SOUTH BEACH 1/1
on 9th and Michigan Ave.
Parking, central a/c, totally
renovated, tile floors, HUGE
closets, $600/mo, 6 mos
lease available. Call NOW!!
534-8683
★ ★ ★
KENDALL/KINGS CREEK S.
1/1.5 excellent location and
condition all amenities, no
pets $580 month. Evenings
383-5728
• S. BCH. •
2 Br, 2 Bath 1300 s.f.
4 Blocks to Beach! Hard¬
wood Floors, Ceilings
Fans, Small Quiet Bldg,
Near S. Pointe Elementary
$815 mo. 754-8258
LINCOLN ROAD
1/1.5 pkg, tiles, new appl,
1617 Jefferson Ave. One
year lease, 1st, last, sec.
$625 mo. 672-7919
*
SO. BCH.-LARGEEFFIC
Steps to beach, wood
floors, full kit, dining, laun¬
dry, renovated, sec bldg, yr
lease. From $450.532-4697
*
S BCH SHORTTERM
960 Collins. Steps to beach.
Furn effic, wood floors, pri¬
vate phone, cable TV. $325
per week. 534-9678
S BCH STUDIOS $400
BEACH SPECIAL. 6 mo, 1 yr
lease. Totally renovated, well
kept, parking, sec entry.
672-2771 & 538-1117
M BCH 41 ST AREA
Huge cottage Efficiency
$475mo, incl all util, private
parking and near trans and
shops, call 673-2818
M BCH-LEASE/RENT
Finest hotel at Collins Ave &
50 St. Ocean view. Steps to
bch. Monthly, incl all amen
& valet parking. 759-8984
M BEACH 36 & COLLINS
Ocean front, beautiful, fur¬
nished studio, A/C $500 per
month plus security. Call:
551-1343
M BEACH/BEST LOCATION
1 & 2 bedroom apartments,
olf course, rent $575 &
650, one month security,
672-2650
MIA BCH-LARGE 1/1
Dining. Garden apt, W/D,
close to Surf side & beach,
fresh paint. Section 8 ok.
$500 mo. 534-0159.
MIA BCH 2/2 + 7 CLOSETS
80 St. Unfurn, spacious, hi
ceilings, decorative arches,
wood firs or carpet, bale,
$700. No dogs. 866-6599
MIA BCH NORTH
Spacious 2/2, Ig closets,
w/d on premises, 1 yr lease.
$650. Choose 1st or 2nd
flood No pets. 235-2420
MIA BCH PARKING
2 br/2 ba, new carpet &
paint, $625 month, 1st, last
& security. Local references.
Normandy Isle. 861-8544
MIA BCH-OCEANFRONT
Safe, secure, warm, friendly
shops, AC, maid, TV/HBO,
with utils, phone. $475 mo
with lease. $125 wk. Effic
short term from $33 day.
6979 Collins. 866-2000
MIA BCH/1677 WEST AVE
1/2 blk to Lincoln Rd.
LARGE garden studio for
quiet person. Complete
kitchen in separate room.
Fireplace, 50 sq ft dressing
room, lush landscaping. Im¬
maculately CLEAN. $575/
mo incl util. Refs & good
credit. No pets. 854-7314
MIA BCH/NEAR LINCOLN
Small garden studio, $450
per month inc. util for quiet
person at 1677 West Ave.
References & good credit.
No pets. 854-7314.
MIA BCH/WATERFRONT
2/1.5, central A/C, large ter¬
race, boat dock, $725/mo,
pet ok. 8401 Crespi Blvd.
674-9937.
MIAMI
Single rooms $150, Effi¬
ciency $160, Double apts.
$170. All have A/C, cable.
759-5568.
MIAMI
Great View on Bay!
1/1.5, central A/C, pool,
parking, $550.751-8912.
MIAMI AREA
Lg 1 BR, wood firs $485/mo
includes utils. Small 1 BR, Ig
enclosed garden $440/mo
includes utils. 444 NE 39 St,
Rear. 1 st/last/sec. 271-3460
MIAMI BEACH
Lg 1/1.5 apt, water view,
West Ave, newly renov, sec,
gym, assigned pkng, avail
NOW! $795/mo. 935-1678
MIAMI BEACH
MANHATTAN TOWERS
MAGNIFICENT
OCEAN & BAY VIEWS
Extra Large 1/1,1/2 & 2/2.
FREE A/C, Gym & Large
Pool. Deck & Marina
Season & Corp Avail
Please Call Lisa
868-6770
MIAMI BEACH STUDIO
Historic, art deco, Italian
tiles, murphy wall unit, walk
in closet, new kitchen and
bathroom, no pets. Meridian
Ave. $525. Call 437-0939.
MIAMI BEACH
Remodeled, furnished stu¬
dio for rent. 4000 Collins
Ave. $250 weekly, $650/mo.
Call: 854-3107
MIAMI BEACH
Decoplage, Ig studio, ocean
view, 11th fI, yrly contract,
$850 mo + 1st, Last, sec
534-4393 or 904-626-5539
MIAMI BEACH
Studio apt hardwood floors,
telephone security, laundry
room, great location, $525
mo. 673-6876.
MIAMI BEACH
Studios, large 1 & 2 bed¬
room apts, unfurnished,
pets welcome, near con¬
vention center. 673-8759
MIAMI BEACH
1 BEDROOMS
From $450/month & up.
Lots of choices. Normandy
Realty 866-6691
MIAMI BEACH
Luxury studio on the ocean,
fully furnished, $900/mo in¬
cludes utilities, cable, kitch¬
enette, parking. 254-1773
MIAMI BEACH OCEAN DR
Ocean front bldg 1/1, furn/
unfum, tile floors, bale, cent
a/c, covered and sec. pkg,
pool, No pets. Yrly lease.
$690 mo. Call 674-1955
# # #
MIAMI BEACH
Fabulous new beach front 2/
2 condo includes: pool, se¬
cured parking, 2 balconies,
1200 sq ft, new everything!
$1100/mo. Call 223-2696.
MIAMI BEACH
Effic $395 & $420/mo.
Docking available, near
beach & 82 St. Call Allen:
933-0630
BANYAN BAY
757-4529
Managed by Great Atlantic
STUDIOS STARTING AT $500
1 BDRM STARTING AT $550
2 BEDROOM & PENTHOUSES
ALSO AVAILABLE
• Panoramic Views •
•Dry Dock*
• Lighted Tennis Courts *
• Cafe & Convenience Shop •
• Valet & Dry Cleaners on premises *
• Hair Salon for Men & Women •
• Two Unique Pools *
• Laundry Rooms in Every Building *
* Exercise Room • „
• Outdoor Barbecues •
• Jacuzzi &Sauna *
• Tropical Landscaping •
• Ceramic Tile Floors *
• Marble Bathrooms with Brass *
• Fixtures in Select Units *
MODELS OPEN DAILY!
Professionally Managed by:
GREAT ATLANTIC
For Rental Information Call 757-4529
Biscayne Blvd. & NE 63rd St. ^
East to the Ba v L5J
BANYAN RAY
APARTMENTS
Page 92 New Times
February 16?22, 1995


MIAMI BEACH
74 & Byron, lovely, small 1
BR apt with seperate kitch¬
en, 2nd floor $385/mo. Call:
864-8557 leave message
MIAMI BEACH
Beautiful 1/1.5 apt, w/d
hookup, covered parking,
central air, $600. 1st, last,
sec. Call Terry at 787-7170.
MIAMI BEACH HI-RISE
Penthouse 3/2.5 split level
on 15th & 16th floors w/
spectacular views. Central a/
c, roof top pool and parking
available. Also 1/1 s. Sun¬
shine Towers 1830 Meridian
Ave. 672-5600
MIAMI BEACH
South Bay Club.-Bay view,
pent house studio, renovat¬
ed, pool, parking. $775 mo.
432-3928.
MIAMI BEACH
Efficiency for one, private,
full kitchen, A/C, parking,
near Arthur Godfrey $435/
mo with utilities. 534-5675
MIAMI BEACH
SECTION 8 PROGRAM OKI!
780-82 St, large 2/2, newly
renov, small bldg, W/D.
Close to parks, schools &
beach. $590 mo. 531-7541
MIAMI BEACH
1 & 2 bdrs from $500/mo.
Best locations on the Beaeh!
Call Carmen M for more in¬
formation. 754-0673
MIAMI BEACH
Waterfront 1/1. Spacious
bdr. Security gate, Terraza
fir, parking, small pets ok.
$475/mo. Call 669-3000.
MIAMI BEACH-ART DECO
Top area, 17 St, 1 block
to Beach! large Efficiency,
$475 month. Furnished &
renovated. 531-8534.
MIAMI BEACH
NORTH BAY VILLAGE
* Large waterfront 1/1,
magnificent bay views $650
. Available immediately.
New Age Realty.
444-3142
Sandra 399-9925
MIAMI BEACH/86TH ST
2/2 idyllic, quiet setting, bay
views, wood floors, balcony,
parking, pool, only 2 blocks
to beach. $750/mo, 1 st/last/
. sec. Call/Llame 864-9403.
MIAMI BEACH
Sales or Rentals!!! Call the
Beach Specialist -
Marilyn Morales
882-6932 or 673-4668
MIAMI BEACH/NMB
M Beach PH, 2/2, ocean
view, immaculate $1300/
mo. Millionare's Row, turn
studio $750/mo. 567-7100 -
MIAMI BEACH
Lge 1/1, newly paiRted at
2006 Calais Dr. . Private
parking and entrance. $475/
mo, 1st & last. 866-3296.
MIAMI LAKES
2/2, two story, corner unit
townhome, all appliances, 1
year lease, asking $875/mo.
557-1739
MIAMI on the BAY
2/2 on the Bay. Furnished/
unfurnished, balcony, ten-'
nis, pool, security. $825/mo
Call 751-1899
MIAMI S. - 2/1 DUPLEX
Unfurn, A/C & heat, carpet¬
ed, fenced, laundry room,
no pets. Nonsmokers. S.W.
70 Ave & 22 St. 444-2934
MIAMI/EDGEWATER BAY
1 month free rent! East of
Biscayne on the bay. 1 & 2
br garden apts from $460.
Free gas & water. 787-5100,
10am-6pm, Mon-Sat.
N. MIAMI BEACH
1 bedroom unfurn apts.
Pool, elevator,, laundry.
Close to shopping &
schools. No pets. Call Mario
947-6798,9am-6pm
»Q* "
*
MIAMI BEACH
Gorgeous! Renovated, 1
bed rm, new kitchen, a/c,
hardwood floor, verticals.
$650/mo. 661-1299
N BAY VILLAGE SUBLET
Furn, Ig, corner 1/1 apt. Wa¬
terfront, panoramic view, ac,
3 pools, free pkng, sec,
laundry. Sublet $800/mo.
864-5199
N. MIAMI BEACH 125 ST
1 bedroom, new carpet, new
appliances, $450 mo + sec.
895-2227.
N.BAY VILLAGE STUDIO
overlooking the bay. Tennis
cts, pool, sec, newly renov.
Great area with gorgeous
view. $475/mo 556-0606
NE KEYSTONE PT.
1 br 1.5 ba, bale, exc pano¬
ramic and water views. Sec.
& pool. $625 mo. Please call
899-0160 or 775-6498.
NEED
5 original artists and/or
groups for unique CD pro¬
ject. June *95 release. Con¬
tact Jeff: 378-4417
NEW TIMES
CLASSIFIED
DEADLINE
TUESDAYS 6PM
NEW YORK STYLE LOFT
On Miami River 3000sq ft
wood firs, used in many
fashion & film shoots, long
term lease Harold 672-5502
NMB/EASTERN SHORES
2/2, waterfront condo,
peaceful area, security, pool,
parking, dock space, no
pets. $735/mo. 573-0298.
NORMANDY ISLE
1135 Marceiles Dr, very
LARGE 1 and 2bdr apts,
walk-in" closet, on canal,
$500/mo. 861-4626
NORMANDY ISLE-BAY DR
Large 2/2, bright, 2nd floor.
Stunning view of canal!
$750 month. Call 672-1234 .
Global Realty Mgmt.
NORMANDY ISLE
Spacioüs Art Deco one bed¬
room. Boat deck on water.
Close to golf & tennis.
Call 854-9810
NORTH BAY VILLAGE
Gorgeous 2 br apt available.
Private, quiet, discreet, safe,
on the water. Central a/c, d/
w, walk-in closets. A must
see. Please call for appt:
758-5553
NORTH BAY VILLAGE
Ig 1/2,, 2 18’ balconies/bay-
view, all appl, covered pkg,
pool, safe area, min from
downtown $725 mo 305-
852-7170/305-745-9079
NORTH BEACH GEM
Remodeled studio, charm¬
ing deco bldg, Harding &
76th, $400 incl util. No pets.
868-8703. Bp 729-0803
OMNI AREA
Spacious furn studios Close
to dwntwn/transportation.
Historic bldg, comp, renov.,
reasonable rate 539-9327
PLAZA OF THE AMERICAS
1 or 2 bedroom condos
available, short/long term
leases, walk to beach,
amenities 24 hr sec., prices
from $600/month. Plaza of
the Americas Realty 949-
7923, Evenings 932-4656.
RENOVATED/NICE ROOMS
Clean rooms on SoBe. A/C,
some w/ kitch, Phone/Maid
service, from $395-$495/
SBch
LINCOLN RD
One bedim with parking.
Top Floor. Bay View.
Annually $850 mo. First
and 2 months security.
Chris Helmstetter
532-7368
Streamline Properties
SBCH
RENOVATED 2/2 APT
Wood floors, central a/c,
new laundry facilities.
From $850-$1000/mo. NO
FEE! Broker. 538-7368
S BCH -1 BEDROOM
Beautiful, very large, ce¬
ramic tile floors, A/C, ceiling
fans, lots of closets, verti¬
cals. Beeper 838-9723.
S BCH 4 BLOCKS BEACH
Near park. 1 br & effic, full
kit/ba, 2 fir, A/C, very clean
cable, laundry, no dogs.
$650 & $475.233-9898.
S. BCH. ART DECO
MUSEUM WALK
Immediate Occupancy
-Newly Renovated
- New Carpet
- Parking
- Walk to Beach
- Pool & Patio
- 6 Mo or1 Yr Lease
Studios from $475
1 Bedrms from $500
531-6795
Best
S BCH/1050 MICHIGAN
Deco style large studios & 1
bedrooms starting at $425.
Renting now. Please call
531-2113.
S BCH FULL RENOVATION
Studio, 1 & 2 BRs. Oak firs,
alarm, cent A/C, pking, frplc,
balcony. Great Locations!
$399-$950. 534-0102.
SBEACH
2/2 Townhouse. Completely
renovated, parking, alarm,
central air, d/w, hardwood
floors, etc. Seasonal or
yearly. 532-1600
SBEACH
Corner unit facing park*
large 1/1, 700 sq ft,, big din¬
ing room, hard wood floors,
firepl, $675/mo. 534-2652.
~lfT
S BEACH-ADJACENT
“Ventia Condominum” 1/1.5,
12 floor, bay view, pool, ten¬
nis, gym, parking, million $
renovation. $1075/mo. Call
662-7757 or 350-7042.
S BEACH GARDEN APT
With pkng & laundry, newly
renovated, clean & quiet.
$600/mo + elec (first, last &
1 mo sec). Call:, 673-0731
S BEACH ON THE OCEAN
1/1, ocean view,, art deco,
batch, furn, all util, $900
mo. Yr lease. 2 mo sec + 1
mo rent. 534-3131
S BEACH-1250 WEST AVE
1/1 apt, bay view, hi rise,
pking, pool, sec, $650/mo,
water & a/c free. Sale $79k.
All Trust RE 531-2669.
S BEACH-1524 LENOX AVE
Efficiency, corner. Centrally
located, quiet, clean build¬
ing, security gates, $450
mo. Jose 673-1157.
S BEACH-PENNSYLVANIA
Deco style studios, close to
Lincoln Rd, wood floors,
fireplace $475. Call 672-
1234. Global Realty Mgmt
February ±6-22, ±995
S BEACH/VENETIAN CSWY
Furnished 1 bedroom at the
Sandpiper on Venetian
Causeway, responsible, sin¬
gle $650/mo. 372-7157
S. BCH ART DECO
9th St: magic. Renov. jumbo
studios, wood floors, Fpl
from $425 incl. util. yrly. 1
hour application process.
866-2975 am or 674-3233.
S. BCH ART DECO
2/2, hardwood floors,
vaulted ceiling,
security bldg.
-ALSO-
Studios, wood floors.
From $425. Pets ok.
Walk to Beach.
-531-5867-
S. BCH-ART DECO
Discounts. 1 bd $475-$675.
Effic $375-$475. Pied-a-tere
studios, no kitchen $345.
Fashion Apts. 672-0714
S. BCH.
Studio from $325
Efficiency from $475
1 Bedrooms $595
Hardwood Floors!!
Walk to Beach!!
Some with Parking!!
Call Liliana 532-1975
S. BCH. ART DECO
Renovated Bldg, 1/1
fully furnished Italian
designer, 3/6 mos.
Catherine Gazats
Beeper 737-5183
Real Estate Transactions
Realtors 672-0304
S. BCH. COLLINS & 16
Large 2/2, 2nd floor terrace
with oceanview, parking,
gym, pool access to beach.
$1100 mo. 1st/last/dep
531-3761 or bpr 399-8570.
S. BCH. SHORT TERM TOO
Classic Deco large studios
$450, 1 Bedroom $550
Near Flamingo Park, renov,
AC, security entry phone.
841-4137 or 672-2812.
S. BCH. THE DECOPLAGE
Oceanfront fr $750. Andrea
Silverthorne 322-4055 or
Marco Giancola 996-2755.
Agents, Jeanne Baker, Inc.
S. BEACH
COLLINS AVE - Bright, airy
2/2 comer unit, wood
floors, parking, balcony.
Owner/agent
Call Ilona, agent
531-7262
Weiss R.E.Services Inc
S. BEACH 538-3583
Effic, 1 & 2 bedrm apt,
house, parking, tile, clean,
safe, laundry, ample cíoséts.
Some pools, others jacuzzis.
Oceanfront
South Beach
, Decoplage
Studios from $1000
1 Bedrooms from $1500
2 Bedrooms from $2000
A/C, Utilities & Cable TV incl.
Full Kitchens, Terrace, Pool
Fitness Center, 24 Hour Sec.
Furnished Visa/MC/AMEX
Monday-Thursday 9-6
Friday 9-4
Saturday Closed
531-6886
Ext 3027
CLhbsiif Motel: JJte ¿.legará JtitfeAfyle
Art Deco District
Hotel rooms Si efficiencies With full kitchen,
cable, maid service, continental breakfast,
2 b hour security. Receive 2 b hour incominy
calls. Wake up calls available
Between Washington and Collins on 21st Street
Call 531-0031 ask for Jason
FEBRUARY SPECIAL
ONE MONTH FREE RENT
Spacious litad 2 Bedroom
Styied Apartments Pool
Located Nesfr University of Miami
| and Coral Gabte^
Alarm Service Avafiitjle
Washer & Dryer C^n||§¡iÍG¡|# ; -
“EXCLUSIVE” GATED COMMUNÍTY
(305) 661 -7911
HOLLYWOOD BEACH
RENTALS
Why Buy When You Can Live On The Ocean
In A Luxurious 1031 sq. ft 1 Bd. 11/2 Ba
Apartment On Hollywood Beach Starting
At Just
$740 “Vmo.
(Yearly Basis)
OCEANFRONT ' RENTAL APARTMENTS
3725 S.OCEAN DR., HOLLYWOOO-BY-THE SEA, FL 33019
TEL 457-7514 (MIAMI 94S5471)
P
NewTimes
If you want the truth before
you waste your time.
FILM CAPSULES
2618 Collins Ave. Miami Beach, FL 33M0
Under New Management
IBIlhi $40/day $175/week
$600/month util. incl.
oh
These items are FREE OF CHARGE
♦Telephone
MiplÉice
: ♦ Air Conditioning
♦ Parking
♦ Color TV
♦Poo!
♦Maid Service
• Full Bathroom
with Tub
i Night Security 1
• New Fridges
i| New Stoves
• New Carpets
I Separate Kitchen
: â–  â– â– â– â–  - 1
you can have it all
hedugive New Waterfront Rentals along
the;Intercostal Just a short walk to
rolling blue waters of the Atlantic. One;
J^/o and Three bedroom apartment
pgnes\tarting at *875 per month.
*Secu¥e Environment
Sítate qtihe art
fitness Center
•Lighied;'ify?inis Courts
«1
New Times Page 93


NEED A NEW OFFICE SUITE
IN DOWNTOWN MIAMI?
* From $16.00 a sq. ft.
* Beautiful view of the city or
the river bay
* Janitorial service included
* Central A/C
* Electricity included
STOP BY FOR A SITE INSPECTION
DUPONT PLAZA CENTER
300 BISCAYNE BLVD. WAY
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33131
OR CALL
ODALYS DIPP
(305) 358-2541
SOUTH I3CRCH
17 acres of private Tropical
Paradise on the edge o the
Bay...a short stroll to Lincoln
minutes to Downtown Miami!
Oversized Deluxe Apartments
Salt & Fresh Water Pools
Fully Equipped Fitness Center
Restaurant Cleaners Market
Boat Docks Tot Lot Fishing Pier
Walled/Guard Gated Community
Eff/Studios/1/2/3 Bedrooms
Starting at $545
Chilled Water for AC Included
WEEKLY SPECIALS
CALL FOR PRICES!
Merton Ttwers
Leasing Cffice
1500 Bay Road Miami Beach
Alton Road to 15th St.
672-4461
urn West
Mon/Fri 10-7 Sat/Sun 10-6
SOUTH BEACH
The
Palm & Pine
Villas
1559 Michigan Ave
*
1 Bedroom Apts
$475 -Up
Convenient Shops
5 Blocks to Beach
-531-1929-
- 642-7080 -
PARKING
SECURITY
SOUTH BEACH
Studios & 1 Bedroom Apts
from $495 per month.
Please call office 899-8740.
Or digital beeper 658-0374
S. BCH. 5 ST 1 BEDROOM
A/C, pets ok, cable, near bus
& Meridian, wood floors,
new appliances, fenced.
$500 mo. 53.1-9899.
SILVER IMAGE
Factory direct
silver/marcasite jewelry at
below wholesale prices!! I
Many styles to choose from.
Wholesale and retail.
Silver Image, 1 NE1 St
#B-16, Miami, FL 33132.
374-6621 or
Bp 286-3192
SO BCH SHOWPLACE
3/3, 2400’, 2 tény bay/city/
ocean view. Owners unit
(many extras). See Morton
Towers ad in this section.
672-4461,10-7.
SO BE
1/1, renov, great bldg/loca¬
tion, new appliances, 2nd
floor, new a/c, ceiling fans,
w/d, near shopping, $650.
680-6199, pager 682-5222
SO BEACH/MIAMI BEACH
1 br $595, -2 br $800, Ig
studio $450. Move in spe¬
cial, pets okay. Renter’s Par¬
adise 865-0200
SO. BEACH/SOUTH POINTE
Gorgeous, 2/2, over pool,
bay view, wrap around ter¬
race, reserved covered prkg
$2000/mo 365-9601
SOBE
TOWNHOUSE
One of a kind, 2/1.5
townhouse directly on
beach with ocean view!
Located in fabulous
Shelboume Hotel.
Apartment living with hotel
amenities. Must see!!
CALL:
759-0700
or
Pager: 239-0790
SOBE 2 LG 1 BEDROOMS
7th & Meridian, 9th & Jef¬
ferson, totally renovated,
wood firs or carpet $650/
mo. (days) 331-3418
(evenings) 864-5757
SOBE RENTAL
Sublease a studio in the
heart of SoBe. 6 months at
$465/mo. Wood floors &
security at 10th & Euclid
Ave. For more info, call
Andy at 538-8385.
SOBE-2/2 8th St. Area
1000 sq ft, $775/mo, no
pets, unTurnished, new car^
pet & paint, eat-in kit, w/d,
.Call 865-2534 (10am-9pm),. „
SOBE-DECO DISTRICT
On Meridian. Quiet 1 br,
newly renovated, brand new
bathroom, hardwood firs,
$525. 2 room studio, $450.
Both have laundry room.
674-7995
SOBE/1900 & COLLINS
Furn rooms, near ocean,
some with kitchens, a/c, TV,
maid service. From $450-
$495/mo. Call 531-7611.
SO BE/233 27TH STREET
Large STUDIOS & 1/1. All
have A/C, wood floors, ceil¬
ing fans, blinds. $400-$500/
mo, util incl. Cali 866-9494.
SOUTH BCH-HOT!!!!!!!
Newly reñov Deco bldg, 1 br
penthouse $600. Wood firs,
a/c, laundry, intercom, gat¬
ed bldg. Pets ok. 538-4346
SOUTH BEACH
Art Deco Studios
1 & 2 Bedrooms
Fully Renovated
Central A/C
Security Intercom
Walk-in Closets
New Kitchens
531-7889
SOUTH BEACH/OCEAN DR
The Gallery Hotel Apt. Best
location, 436 Ocean Dr. Best
choices, Monthly/Weekly/
Daily Rates. Best Prices. Call
532-7093.
SOUTH BEACH
619 Euclid Ave, large effic,
central A/C, private parking.
$475. Call 673-5590.
SOUTH BEACH
751 Collins Ave. Large effi¬
ciency, clean, no pets, $450/
mo. Please call 534-5259.
SOUTH BEACH
1555 Penn, Ave. 1 bedrm,
$500 mo. Gas & water incl,
carpet, central A/C, Richard
532-7682,1 yr lease
SOUTH BEACH/BEST DEAL
Art Deco, Renovated furn
rooms, w/ bath, central a/c,
tel, cable & maid service,
call 538-0398.
SOUTH BEACH
Beautiful, art deco, Ig studio,
with wood floors, all new
appl, alarm, gated, washer/
dryer in bldg. 635-6031
SOUTH BEACH/DECOPLAGE
Furnished studio, parking,
balcony, ocean view, gym,
pool, $900/mo. Si parla
Italiano! (305)761-1806
SOUTH BEACH
ART DECO
STUDIO’S - $505
1/1’S FROM $625
FULLY RENOVATED
2 BLOCKS FROM BEACH
WOOD FLOORS
COURT¬
YARD
Call 534-9415
SOUTH BEACH EFFICIENCY
4th and Ocean Drive-re¬
modeled, unfurnished, park¬
ing. Yearly lease min. $500
and up. Call 531-3143.
SOUTH BEACH EFFICIENCY
APTS.
21st and Washington, fur¬
nished, utilities included,
$550 and up. Call 531-
3143.
SOUTH BEACH
Art deco, bright, breezy,
renovated, 1/1, wood floors,
ceiling fans. Sorry No dogs.
$600 mo. 672-2446.
SOUTH BEACH
1/1, beach front, pool, se¬
curity, walk to restaurants, 1
yr lease, no pets, $745/mo.
Call 430-1838 or 952-8513
SOUTH BEACH/1 BR
Renovated bldg, hard wd
firs, very large & charming,
$600mo. 2nd fir, 836 Lenox
Ave. Pkng avail. 439-0563
SOUTH BEACH 2/1
Newly renovated, new kit &
hd wd firs, cent ac, balcony,
ct yard bldg w/ sec. 1536
Jeff. Ave. $925.439-0563
SOUTH BEACH-13 & PENN
Newly renovated 2/1, in
beautiful building, w/d, cent
a/c, EVERYTHING NEW.
$10Q0/moryr Ise-531^9168 -
SOUTH BEACH
Private island home, separ¬
ate efficiency, a/c, pool,
cable, electric incl, non-
smoker. $650/mo or trade
for house keeping services.
371-6767
SOUTH BEACH
Small but cozy, 2/1, 22nd
and Collins, walk-up apt,
$625/mo. 672-5600. Amer¬
ican Interstate Corp.
SOUTH BEACH
studios for 7th and Wash¬
ington, newly renovated,
furnished/unfurnished, from
$650.538-8702 Iv message
SOUTH BEACH
Penthouse 1/1, new, gor¬
geous, secure, pool, roof
deck, private parking,
(completely or partially)
furnished, negotiable lease
and rent. Avail March 1st.
All util included, 668-0457
or 219-244-7877
SOUTH BEACH DECO
LARGE STUDIOS
NEWLY REMODELED
1757 James. Near Lincoln
Rd & Convention Center.
Own Parking - Wood Floors
- New Appliances. From
$475. Apply Richmond Ho¬
tel. 18 & Collins. 538-2331
SOUTH BEACH
MUSEUM DISTRICT
2 bedrooms. Mediterranean
Villas, balconies, beam
ceilings, fire places, wood
floors. 841-1337.
SOUTH BEACH STUDIO
New furn apt incl pool, sec,
and util. One blk to beach
Week/mo avail Call 996-
1889 bpr/593-2222ext119
SOUTH BEACH/WEST AVE
Lg, 2/2, 2nd fir, white tile,
covered pkg, sec intercom,
modem kit, central A/C, walk
in closet, laundry, 2 blks to
Lincoln Rd, small pet ok.
$825 mo Call: 268-6003 bpr
SOUTH BEACH
208 Meridian Ave. 1/1, cen¬
tral a/c, parking, tile floor,
patio, first floor apt. Ralph
553-4860 between 5-7pm.
SOUTH BEACH
Euclid, Penn & Lenox 1 BR’s
& studios with hardwood
floors, central A/C, totally
rnovated, vertical bHfHjs, se¬
curity system, ho . pets
$450-$600/mo. Call Dana:
445-2791 or Bp 339-6264
SOUTH BEACH
Jr 1 BR apt. Pvt entrance.
Quiet location. Util & park¬
ing incl. No pets. $600/mo.
Call Peter 305-302-4153.
SOUTH BEACH
1535 Drexel #5. Cozy 1 bdr
apt. $400/mo. 1st mo dep.
Mgr apt #10.' 442-9419 or
809-727-1508.
SOUTH BEACH
Euclid, Penn & Lenox 1 BR’s
& studios with hardwood
floors, central A/C, totally
rnovated, vertical blinds, se¬
curity system, no pets
$450-$600/mo. Call Dana:
445-2791 or Bp 339-6264
SOUTH BEACH
Very large 1/1 parking,
beautiful apartment with
white tile and balcony. $700
mo. 1st last sec. 538-5244
No Brokers.
SOUTH BEACH
BRAND NEW!!
Large, bright lux studios.
Charming 2 story bldg. Cen¬
tral station alarm, designer
flooring, kitchen & lighting,
cable ready. New windows,
appl & dishwasher. Park-like
setting, next to Lincoln Rd.
Long/short term. Some with
upscale furn. Private condo
quality at rental prices!!
531-3003
or Bp 800-998-6058
ATTENTION LANDLORDS
AND MANAGERS:
Know who you are renting
to! We can qualify your ten-
nant applicants for credit,
criminal and landlord/ten-
nant disputes. Avoid dis¬
crimination charges. No
cost to you! All property
management services, Call:
531-0372 -
SOUTH BEACH
1610 Euclid Ave, newly ren¬
ovated studios. Also avail, 1
bedrooms. Half a block
from Lincoln Rd! 673-4981
S. BCH
2 LARGE STUDIOS
719 Euclid Ave
820 3rd St
$1900 Down. $450 mo.
Owner Finance
Call 899-9934
SOUTH BEACH 2/2
Half block off Lincoln Road.
5th Floor, carpet, parking.
$950 mo. One year lease.
534-7411, leave message.
SOUTH BEACH
1/1.5. West Ave. Bay view,
pool, security, balcony, 1 for
$750/mo and 1 for $650/
mo. Ligia. 538-1561
SOUTH BEACH/DECO AREA
Huge sunny spotless corner
effic. $525. Cntrl A/C, White
Italian tile firs, modern kit &
bath, walk-in closet. Yrly
lease. Avail immed. Apply
245—9th St.
866-8980/674-1468.
SOUTH BEACH SPECIAL!
$500-$700/mo. Completely
furnished. A/C. Utilities in¬
cluded. 24HR security. 1/2
block to beach/shopping.
1720 Collins Ave. 531-5759
SOUTH BEACH/ART DECO
Renovated bldg, charming
Ig 1 br, quiet street cent a/c
-lots of closets, wood floors,
$650 mo. Call 538-5116
SOUTH BEACH
12th & Penn, Ig studios,
newly renovated, terrace,
furn or unfurn, wd fir, a/c,
from $500/mo, 672-4004.
★ ★ ★
SOUTH BEACH
Washington/Uncoln
luxury landmark 600 sq ft
ocean view studio, parking,
gym, pool, 24 hr security,
$750/mo. Call 535-6511.
FORTE TOWERS
South Beach on the bay has
studios, 1 &.2 bedrooms for
rent at 1000 West Ave.
Monday - Friday 10 to 6 and
Saturday 11 to 4. Call us to¬
day at 672-7815
S. BEACH
Studios from $395. 1 Bed¬
rooms from $550. Hard¬
wood floors, new kitchens,
Keystone 532-7878.
GREAT ART DECO
Beautiful courtyard & lobby,
studios from $465. 1 bed¬
rooms from $550. Call
Keystone 532-7878.
★ ★ ★
SOUTH BEACH ART DECO
Renovated, wood floors, Ig
layout. Studios $440, 1/1’s.
6/mo avail! Vintage Proper¬
ties 538-1118
HEART OF SOUTH BEACH
Charming, secure, renov,
furn/unfurn, 1 bdr $550 UP,
call Dwayne at 532-4884/
839-3394 bpr
S BCH
ART DECO RENTALS
Studios from $475
1 bedrooms $500-$695
2 bedrooms $850-$1000
Hardwood Floors!!
Walk to Beach!!
Some with parking!!
No fee! Renter’s
Connection 538-7368
V
OF SOUTH BEACH
750 Collins. Near Armani,
New 1 & 2 beds, central A/C,
new appliances & carpet.
From $595. Office/Apt #1
Mqn-Fri,-10-3,534-5788 -
THE ALEXANDER HOTEL
Ocean front building 5225
Collins Ave. View to the
ocean and bay, marble floor,
remodeled kitchen; fully fur¬
nished. 960 sq. feet. $1900
mo. 667-7656
VENETiA
Luxury 1/1. Best view! High
floor. $1300/mo. European
American. Harry 538-7957
or 268-5757 bpr.
★ ★ ★
GRAND AT VENETIAN
Fabulous 1 br. 1/1.5 bath
condo, spectacular view
28th floor overlooking bay
and ocean. Maitle floors.
Swimming pool, jacuzzi,
health club, 24 hr sec, va¬
let parking. Available 3/1/
95, w/or without furniture,
looking for 1 year lease.
Great deal!! $1300 per
mo. Call for appt
841-4408.
¥;¥ ¥ f f
MIAMI BEACH
CASA MARINA
SAIL INTO FUN...
YOU’LL LOVE
OUR LIFESTYLE
Breeze into a bayfront
1 bedroom
Catch our version of
resort recreation
Pull into port at a rate
you can afford!
Great location
Boat slips available
HALF OFF DEPOSIT
while avail, lasts
757-8474
yy ? yy
Houses For Rent
BEACH HOME-SURFSIDE
Big, beautiful 2 story home,
lushly landscaped. Exec,
home, renov, 2 blocks to
ocean, alarm. Must see!
$1675 mo. Eric 531-7433
BRICKELL/2 STORY
2/2.5, pool, cent A/C, fenced
yard + cottage, $2250/mo,
incl maint. Also rent separ¬
ately. 854-1659/965-0958.
COCONUT GROVE
2/1 DUPLEX
Eat in kitchen, Large Yard,
Pets Okay. 1 Block Main
Hwy. Walk to Cocowalk.
Remote control electronic
gate entry. 3337 Franklin
$690 mo. 2 mos. sec.
854-5206 - 374-2705
COCONUT GROVE
ARTIST COTTAGE
3167 Ohio St. 2/1 w/ wd
firs, wd burning fp, garden¬
ers paradise, cent ac, sec
lamps. $750/mo. Owner/
Broker 668-0959 Larry.
COCONUT GROVE AREA
2 bedroom cottage, newly
renovated, unfurnished
$1000 per month. Call:
(305)856-6373
CORAL GABLES
Avail, classic old Spanish
house + garden, 4 rooms
plus kitchen and bath. Call
for details: (305)447-1106
HIBISCUS ISLAND
2/2, corner lot house in
beautiful area. $1850/mo.
Call 556-7613, leave mes¬
sage.
HIGH PINES/C. GABLES
Avail. 3/8, prime location, 21
3, a/c, fans, garage, near
UM, hospitals, schools, me¬
tro. $1400 mo 665-4002.
■¥
VALENTINE RENTERS
2/1 Cozy house, yard, fence,
near 67th Ave, expressway,
and shops. First, last, and
security. Call now and save
$$$. Adams 300 Real Estate
661-1288.
MIA. BCH. SURFSIDE
Corner lot, 2 bedroom, 2.5
bath, large den, large gar¬
age, central a/c, fruit trees,
$1175 mo. Eric 531-7433
MIAMI HOUSE
Waterfront, walled estate. 3
bedrooms, garden, boat
dock, pool, sunk in tub, ja¬
cuzzi, sauna. $1490/mo.
Please call 573-5101 or
beeper 337-8760
MIAMI SPRINGS
2 bdrm 1 bath, garage, large
yard, carpeted, fireplace,
very clean. References re¬
quired. Call 534-1128.
*
MORNINGSIDE HISTORIC
Spanish Villa 5600 NE 6
Ave. Elegant 2 Story Execu¬
tive home. 4 bedrm, 3.5
baths. Pool, A/C. Luxurious
Landscaping. Ail Amenities.
References. $3500 mo. No-
rah Schaefer, Inc. 757-2967
PALM BAY
Next to Belie Meade. 2/1
home. Newly remodeled.
Wood firs, fireplace, fenced
yard. Excellent, friendly
neighborhood. No Ig dogs.
Close to M Beach & Down¬
town. Avail 3/15.758-0704
RENTERS
2/2, 3/2, and 4/2 in South
Miami, Coral Gables, Coco¬
nut Grove. You relax, we’ll
find it. 661-1288.
ADAMS 3000
REAL ESTATE.
SOBE/VENETIAN CSWY
4/4, garage, Mediterranean,
reat sunsets & sunrises
2900/mo. Water front,
pure Art Deco, golf course
view, 5/3.5, huge garden
$2900/mo. 337-1839
SOUTH BEACH HOUSE
2 blocks South of Lincoln
:Rd, next to Flamingo Park,
3BR/2BA, With rear cottage,
A/C, call 948-3227.
Surfside
Homes
3 OR 4 bdrs with
fireplace, central a/c,
quiet streets, walk to
ocean. Starting at
$1375/mo! M Kotler
Realty. 866-2423
THE ROADS/BRICKELL
AREA
Beautiful 40s home: 2/1; Fla
room; w/d; new hardwood
floors; fireplace; cent a/c;
large yard; nice street &
neighborhood. Close to
everything-S. Beach, Down¬
town, Grove, Gables & air¬
port. $1100/month. 579-
1537 & Iv msg, or beep
368-0005.
Rooms For Root
AVENTURA/N.M.B. AREA
Furnished room in beautiful
3 bedroom home. Kitchen
privileges, TV, phone, cable,
24 hour security. 935-3742.
CLOSE TO BRICKELL
And Key Biscayne. Room for
rent with bathroom and tele¬
phone, $250/mo. 854-9810
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
S.BEACH
- Furnished Rooms
- Private Bath
- Refrigerator
- Air Conditioning
- Walk to Beach
- Utilities Included
From $350 mo.
Office 899-8740
Dig. Beeper 658-0374
KENDALL
Room for rent w/wonderful
Italian family for female stu¬
dent only. Great arqenitjes
$260 mo. Cali274-5841. --
page 94 New Times
FetnuAry,


KENDALL/SOUTH MIAMI
Decorated & turn bedroom
in nice home for a single
person, kitchen privileges.
Great area. Call 268-0048.
S BCH $10/DAY & UP
Bath in hall, European style.
A/C, TV, fridge avail. Com¬
munity kitchen/parking,
Open 24 Hours! 538-9158
SOUTH BEACH
- Furn Renov Studio
- Utilities, Phone
- Walk to Beach
- 24 Hr Security
From $89 Day
From $149 Week
531-3464
THE FALLS AREA
Rooms for rent in a town-
house. $300 and $350.
253-7471
Roommates
ALL AREAS
Roommate Referrals. Flori¬
da’s Oldest/Largest Co. All
Screened. Dade: 667-7777,
Brwd: 797-7779,9-6 pm
AVENTURA/MYSTIC POINT
Share 2/2, PH on pvt island,
bay/city views, all amen, no
smoke/drugs $650 + 1/2 util
933-9991
AVENTURA/WATERWAYS
SWF, prof, looking for M/F
to share 2/2, $500 + 1/2 util,
28-35, stable, n/s, parking;
on bay, gym. Liz 936-1161
BAL HARBOUR AREA
Share beautiful 2 br town-
house with GM couple & 2
dogs. Private bath. $400 +
1/3 utils. 895-4598
BEACH/COLLINS AVE.
M. Prof, 35, 2 cats. Share
HUGE lux., 2/2 condo on
water. Pool, amenities, se¬
cure, peaceful, neat. Call
573-7370 work, LV MSG.
BRICKELLAVE
N/S, very neat' & clean rmmt
lux 3/2. $550 incl elec, cine-
max, pkng, w/d, 1st, last,
sec. Marl. Kelly860-1249
CALIFORNIA CLUB AREA
Male or Female to share 2
br, 2ba condo with male.
24hr sec, heatfed pool,
$350/mo. Call 653-3767
COCONUT GROVE
Share 2/1 duplex, sec pking,
big yard, 2 blocks to Co¬
cowalk. $345/mo +1/2 utils.
1st & sec req. 567-2556
CUTLER RIDGE 2/2
Share Condo washer/dryer,
Ctrl ac, 24hr sec. $250 de¬
posit, $250/mo + 1/2 util.
Call 255-0476
IN THE GROVE
23 year old female looking
for reliable female room¬
mate to share apartment in
the Grove. 649-0364
KENDALL
Rmmt needed to share
2/2.5 twnhse w/ Gay prof,
male. Non-smoker $315/mo
+1/2 elec. 380-6650.
KENDALL
Gay, professional male to
share nice, furnished, 3/2
house, yard, quiet/private
area, no drugs/pets. $325/
mo plus 1/3 utilities. Call:
274-4230 leave message
KENDALL/SOUTHWEST
GWM to share new 2/2 con¬
do, non smoker, $350 a
month plus 1/2 utilities. Call
252-2729 leave message.
MIA-FONTAINBLEAU BLVD
Female to share 2 bedroom
condo with lake view, $345
includes utilities. 6 mo.
lease. Call 223-8954.
MIAMI
Seeking lady to share 1 br
duplex, washer, fenced
yard, alarm, 10 mins from
Civic Center, 15 mins from
Airport. $300 + 1/2 util. Call
325-0729. Iv message.
MIAMI BCH 71 ST
Female roommate wanted
for 2/2 apt with dock space,
must like dogs. $350 + util.
864-7642 nprniijg?....
MIAMI BEACH/54TH
female share studio in lux
oceanside bldg. Waterview,
pool, jacuzzi. Nsmkr/Ndrnkr
$300/mo incl 669-8954.
NE MIAMI
Furn BR for 1, kitchen &
dinette, cable, A/C, pool,
Bay, boat. $220/mo + util &
sec. Call 573-1853.
NEED A ROOMMATE?
LOW COST roommate re¬
ferrals made easy! Call
Roommate Connections
TODAY! 538-7368
NORMANDY ISLES
Straight or gay Female to
share apartment half rent &
utilities, on Miami Beach.
657-6032 ext 27 after 6 pm
NORTH MIAMI
One quality roommate need¬
ed to share waterfront
home. $575 mo plus half
utilities. 892-2208
NORTH MIAMI-$80/WEEK
Cable in bedroom, all house
privileges, w/d, non-smoker,
prefer straight decent male
day worker. 945-7716
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
Private room, furnished,
near 163 St Mall, all utilities
and kitchen, $300/mo. 437-
4367 or 874-8240 beeper.
S BCH
ATTN LANDLORDS
Too busy?
Let us work for you.
* Negotiable comm.
* Qualified tenants
* Credit checks & leases
Renter’s Connection
538-RENT (7368)
S. BCH. 9 & MERIDIAN
Responsible person to
share large furnished stu¬
dio, full kitchen & bath.
$260 + deposits.. Bpr OSO-
OSOS after 8 PM
SOUTH BEACH MELROSE
2/1, artistic apt to share,
hardwood floors, into ani¬
mals & cleanliness. Refs
req. Avail 3/1 $450/mo +
utils. 534-6933
SOUTH BEACH-WEST AVE
Overlooking the bay, pool,
sec & parking. Seek straight
professional. $440 + 1/2
utils. 532-0182 Iv msg.
SOUTH BEACH
2/2 gym and pool, all util¬
ities included, available im¬
mediately $470 per month.
Call: 534-3828
SOUTH BEACH
24 year old GWPM, seeking
responsible and considérate
roommate to live in a 2/2
apt. on South Beach. Call
eves. 532-1557 leave mess.
SW OF MIAMI LAKES
Share new 3 BR house. Fully
furn. Female pref. $195/mo.
Erika, Mon-Fri before 6pm
352-1996, bpr, code 22.
Stores/Officss/
Warehouses
ALTON RD. OFFICE
Cheap office space. Sublet
room. Can use equipment.
$230/mo. Call 532-2277
AN OFFICE DREAM
M Beach. An open 25Q0 SQ
FT Loft. Surrounding day¬
light, Bath, Kit, 2nd fir,
$2000. Must see! 534-6233
ARTIST STUDIOS
ONLY 1 LEFT!!
Safe & secure, sink $150.
Call Phil: 576-3570 or Bp
736-9272
BEST
SHOWROOM
IN MIAMI TO
SHARE
Newly decorated in the mi-
ami D & D, great for general
merchandise and gift ware,
also ideal for office space,
conference room, reception
area, small and large offices.
Competitively priced. Cali
Tenant 573-6990.
DOWNTOWN
Studio or storage space
near I-395 & Biscayne Bay.
Minutes to South Beach,
MDCC, and New World
School. 400 sq ft & up.
From $150/mo. 892-9445/
277-5019 bpr.
NE NORTH MIAMI
Furn and unfurn offices,
starting at $175/mo. Incl
use of conference room and
kitchen. 891-1543 Mon-Fri
OFFICES NOW AVAILABLE
In beautifully renovated Art
Deco building in the heart of
South Beach. A/C & cable
TV, $500/mo. 538-0398
S. BEACH
600 Square Feet
Artists Studio or Storage
Space on Washington Ave.
$295 per mo. 899-8740
FAIR HOUSING
NOTICE
All real estate advertised is
subject to the Federal Fair
Housing Act, which makes it
illegal to advertise “any pref¬
erence, limitation or dis¬
crimination because of race,
color, religion, sex, handi¬
cap, familial status, or na¬
tional origin, or intention to
make any such preference,
limitation or discrimination."
NEW TIMES will not know¬
ingly accept any advertising
for real estate which is in vi¬
olation of the law. All per¬
sons are hereby informed
that all dwellings advertised
are available on an equal op¬
portunity basis.
Apartments/
Condos / TH
for Sale
“Your Island City Realtors”
BELLE PLAZA
Venetian Isle Studio
600 sq ft. Direct Bayfront
A knock out. Andy Casas
FAIRVIEW
Lincoln Rd. area, See, pkg.
1 br conv from $75k.
Call Terry Dewis
HARDING HALL
Fab ocean view, designer
finishes, totally updated.
Call Terry Dewis.
BAL HARBOUR CO-OP
1/1, beautiful, updated, 800
sf, furn, no pets; walk to
beach & Bal Harbour Mall.
Asking $65k
Call Blanca Gomez
Landmark Properties
LTD Inc.
531-6899
ALL AREAS
Buy with only $3,000
downl! Condos, twnhmes,
houses. No fee! Call Jason
Remer: 567-7100 realtor
Art Deco So Beach
The Esplanade Beach
OPEN SUNDAY 12-3
Comer Jefferson & 16 St
Great bldg! Great location!
Great prices!
Marco Giancola
996-2755
Andrea Silverthome
322-4055
Agents Jeanne Baker, Inc.
BAY HARBOR ISLAND
2/2 condo with a view. Wa¬
terfront. Newly remodeled.
Must see. For sale by owner
$90,000.868-8332
COCONUT GROVE-NEW!!!
“Melrose Place in the Grove”
1 & 2 br twnhs, pool, jacuz¬
zi, sec, parking. From $79K
Chabli Realty 443-1801
COCONUT GROVE
Gorgeous 1/1, great loca¬
tion, S Bayshore, all amen¬
ities, across from bay, sec,
pkng $79,000. .567-7}0ph
SBch
THE CHELSEA
530-55015th Street
Developer Says
SELL!!!
Fully Renovated,
Art Deco, 1/1, Hardwood
floors, Central A/C,
Washer & Dryer hook-up,
New kitchens & baths.
Priced from $59,000.00
Andy Gelb
Dacra Realty
531-8700 Ext 324
DEVONAIRE TH-MDCC-S
3/2 split, jacuzzi,’"FAB" decor,
great rental investment, 1
min to turnpike & MDCC-S.
Chris 598-5594
ESTATE SALES
Across from Bay Harbor. 5
min to bch. 2/2 huge cor¬
ner, view, pool, prkg, re¬
duces to $68.5K,~for imme¬
diate sale. Also 1/1.5,
$45.5K. Anxious owners.
Bob Jassen, Rickenback As¬
soc. 899-9529.
★ ★ ★
Art Deco District
Large Classic
DECO STUDIOS
15 & Meridian. Wd firs,
firepjaces, walk-in closets,
new appliances $46,900
ONLY $2500 DOWN!
MITCH 331-3418
(1-7pm)
864-5757 (eve)
JADE WINDS PENTHOUSE
Incredible 1 BR with conv
den, new kit, 1.5 new baths,
view of lake & pool. Over
1100 sq ft of sheer joy. A
dream come true at $49.5K.
Rickenback Assoc.
Bob Jassen 899-9529.
M BEACH/BY OWNER
Apt for sale/rent, 1/1, tile fir,
So ocean view, high fir, Port
Real Bldg 6969 Collins sale/
$95K rent/$800 mo. Tele
868-5094
M.B. CRYSTAL HOUSE
Lux, 2/3, reduced, $175k,
50st-0cean, Watch sunset.
For sale by owner. Call
868-2287
MB-OCEAN!! OCEAN!!
50’S & COLLINS
Best Buys - Must Sell
-1/1.5, Great View, $129K
- Hi-flr, 1/2 + den, $169K
- 2/2, Bayview, $189K
Call Dominique 880-7667.
Rotbart & Associates
MB 921 Jefferson Ave
Lg 1/1, everything new,
private parking! $69,900
Only $2900 down!!
(Day) 331-3418
(Eve) 864-5757
Rent $650/mo
MB/COLLINS & 54 ST
Castle Beach, Irg studio.
Tjled/mirrored. Low maint.
Incl all. A steal at $65K.
Victor Rivera Rlty 866-7777
MB/SOUTH BAY CLUB
1/1. Bay view. 4th floor.
Pool, jacuzzi, parking.
$119K. Furn/unfurn.
Express FL RE 534-5544
MIA BCH WATERFRONT
2/2, pvt bayfront patio, tile,
pool, low maint, $67K.
- Studio, wide bay, tile, terr,
pvt tennis, pool, sec. Re¬
duced $39.9K! Buy Beach
Realty 531-6929.
MIA. BCH. 3 EXPOSURES
Great view, waterfront,
security, pool. Adult com¬
munity. Only $65,000.
Barbarov Brpker 534-0159 .
MIA. BCH. 2 BLOCK OCEAN
Large 2/2, tile, W/D in,
large kitchen, large balcony,
pool, low maint. $95,000.
Barbarov Broker 534-0159
FREE
CONSULTATION
Real estate closing
From $250 plus costs
CONDOS,
RESIDENTIAL,
COMMERCIAL
TITLE INSURANCE
SERVICES
Call: Lenora Bach, Esq.
Buy it.
Sell it.
Trade it!
GEM MORTGAGE
• Home Equity Loans
Cash For Any Worthwhile Purpose
• Foreclosures
“No Problems” Save Your Home and
Refinance
• First Time Home Buyer Program
Sandy Payne
Call (305) 447-1778 or
Bpr. 288-5013
• Free Loan Qualifications
Regardless of Past Credit
The Great
(AIM >
South Beach Condos
1351 Meridian Avenue
10 Units - Studios & 1 BR's
Landscaped, gated grounds
Authentic Deco Charm
Ziggurat Arches
Hardwood Floors
f1=} From $49,900
Call Chris (305) 532-7368
Streamline Properties
* New Times Gassified
BUY/SELL/TRADE section.
Weve got a deal for you.
Call 372-9393 in Dade
or 763-2422 in Broward.
SOUTH BUCK CONDO BARGAINS
§HÍ HABANA
||N 1308 Drexel At/e I
Studios from $35,9001
ÍBR from $65,000
2&R from $59,000
Central A/C, security,
three Mocks to thebeach.
Located in the heart of
the Art Deco District.
All twits priced Well
below market.
Must be soldi
Get a great deal before
they are gone ft
Caff owner/agent : GCS
(305) 532-9890 151
THE 4 P’S OF SOUTH BEACH
• Pool
• Parking
• Panoramic Views
©
Pre Construction
Prices
(=)
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
Downtown Miami Skyline & Ocean Views
I & 2 Bedroom Units
Priced from $95,000 to $175,000
Sales Center at Corner of 14th Terr. & West Ave.
Miami Beach • tel. 305.53 1.5330
A
Febriláry Í6-¿22, 1.99 5 -
New Times Page 95


WEEK \
iXl ESPICHOLA INKY...
I br, comer ot EucUd Ave
renov, only $59,900
- 635 8\h ST. Studio, walk
to beech, only 339,300
ALTON RD
- 1250 Alton, T br, $71,000
BYRON AME
- 8550 Byron T br, 356,500
.ov)0 sc\ It, t/A.5,
-«umcerM ocean Iront, Vow
rJSVS’ nx.?iea^ ammemtles,
motivated'.
353-2023 or 457-7410
OtAOH-yj ATTRSIDt
\ beoroom, V5ba, 355,000
\ bedroom/1.5ba, 377,000
Z bedroom/2 batb, 335,000
o» barking, spotless'.
So Be Eblclency - $47,000
Normandy Rlty 354-5564
COLLINS AME
-1801 Collins, 349,00Q\
- 2457 Collins, .1 br, 3159K
- 2899 Collins, 364,000
- 5225 Collins, 2 br, 321 OK
- 5313 Collins, 1 br, $139K
- 5401 Collins, 1 br, 3155K
- 5445 Collins, THS, 3214K
- 5445 Collins, 365,000
DREXEL AME
- 1342 Drexet, 2 br, 398K
EUCLID AME
- 1150 Euc, 1 br, 360K
-1545 Euc, 1 br, $72K
ISLAND AME
- 5 Island, 1 br, 3118K
- 20 Island, 1 br, 398,500
JEFFERSON AME
- 711 Jeff, 2 br, 399,500
LENOX AME
- 736 Lenox, 1 br, 385,000
- 1033 Lenox, 1 br, 371K
. . . MIAMI BEACH
2 bedroom 2 batb, high rise,
valet, security, pool, walk to
tbe beach. Beautiful
view $82.000. Call
854-8293.
$85,000,531-9529*
rnSiSPV 3TO010
yONDO. Tile, security, cell-
ilr\g tans, 101 Collins Ave
Near joe’s. 531-0002
8.8CH.
CONDO DEALS \
Palm Garden Studios (21
Enchanting, renovated,
central A/C. Investor wants
Quick sale. 520 st. Asking
S59K each. Bring all offers.
305-436-0524.
30BE
1 Studios for sale'. 7th and
Washington, newly reno¬
vated, full kitchen, $68k.
Call 538-8702 \v message.
¿ nedrm, 2 hath from \
$135KAh0 2 8 8hedTm'
duplex’s + deck, totally
renov, from $215K. Judith
Rosen, 8kr. 532-7688
er/agent. Call
312-8864 hpr.
IVWIVVi vt
865-2287,
»«»«> v« juui mmamcu
stuff \n Classifieds.
Twv ygvil a
SOBE TOtNNHOUGE
Mstorlc renovation,
prime view, all amenities,
1218 Orexel Ave $125,000
no brokers. Call-. 674-4405
Houses tor ^e\e
BISCKYHE GARDENS
14/2 w/ vaulted ceilings, ce-'
ramie tile, cent ac, automatic
I 2 car oarage. $125K. Call
â–  880-5191 bp orillMH
MIA BCR 4 UNIT 8106
Updated. Good return. Close
to beach. Good tenants.
New roof, ho agents please.
$185,000.534-0159.
Iniovmatian
«eeW hppty avm»
bp or 892-8282.
bay
owner
MIAMI BEACH
Large corner apt, water¬
front, 2 balconies overlook¬
ing bay and pool, sec, tile
floors 3110k. 882-5950 bpr
MIAMI BEACH
Helen-Mar condo, studio,
12 ft ceilings, great view and
condition. Please call 538-
5565, beginning 2/18.
845 Jefferson Avenue
Architecturally distinct
great charm, 2/2, wood
floors, renovated kitchen &
bath. Asking only $125,000
South Bay Club
Extra large 925 st, 1 br. 1
1.5 bath. Hi floor, great view
over district to ocean. Seller
motivated. Asking $99,900
Jim INeingarten
531-9644
532-7368 - Ext 112
Streamline Pmn
SOUTH BEACH
for sale 2br 2bth, 2 blocks
from beach totally renovat¬
ed $87,500. Owner/Agent
Susana 372-5267
SOUTH BEACH
1/1 on Michigan Avenue
with white tile throughout.
Walk to hoach. Parking.
672-2822
BUEHAMISTA EIEGAKT
Historic home, master bed¬
room suite, fireplace, huge
rooms, adjacent rentals
(income $1250). 573-1145
MIA-UPPER EASTSIDE
MED. REVIVAL
Vaulted ceilings, wood firs
frpic, gar, cent JVC. ’
Asking $97,500
DECO DELIGHT!
Vauited ceilings, frpic, totally
renovated. Asking $85,000
Real tslate
Services
Viooo weekly
Stuffing envelopes at home.
Free details. Send SA.S.t.
to: P.0. Box 50Q-MÜ, Lima,
PA 19037
tKlEKINHMEMI
Cheerleader type models are
needed. Must have car. Bi-
ilhguai helpful. Good pay.
immediate work Cali 531-
8344, Beeper 286-3157
LINCOLN RD
- 1400 Line, 1 br, $73K
- 1450 Line, 1 br, $79K
LINCOLN CT
- 1662 Line, 1 br, $59K
MERIDIAN AME
- 528 Merid, 1 br, $58,000
- 900 Merid, 1 br, $68,900
- 1020 Merid, 1 br $79,000
- 1051 Merid, 1 br, $69K
- 1900 Merid, 2 br, $99K
OCEAN DR
- 345 Ocean, 1 br, 3139K
- 345 Ocean, 1 br, $165K
- 401 Ocean, 1 br, $149K
- 401 Ocean, 1 br, $175K
PENN AME
- 730 Penn, 1 br, $79,000
- 1420 Penn, 1 br, $65K
VENETIAN WAY
- 1130 Venetian, 1 bd $55K
WASHINGTON AVE
- 65 Wash, 1 br, $69,000
- 524 Wash, 1 br, $47,000
WEST AVE
- 1228 West, 1 br, $1Q5K
- 1250 West, 1 br, $80,000
NUMBER STREETS
- 635 8th, studios, $39,900
- 915 8th, 2 br, $89K
- 742 10th, 1 br, $68,000
DECOPLAGE
100 Lincoln, Oceanfront
- 1/1, ocean vu, $85K
- 2/2, ocean vu/balc $275K
- Studio, ocean view, $79K
HELEN MAR
2421 Lake Pancoast lakefrt
• - Studio, reduced! $82K
- Annex, Studio, $49,000
MANTELL
255 W. 24th St
- Studio, bargain, $36,000
- Studio, ocean vu $48,000
SOUTH BAY CLUB
800 West Ave, Bayfront
- 2 br, dir bay view, $199K
- 1 br, bargain, $75,000
MANY MORE...
BRET TAYLOR
The Miami Beach
Condo Specialist â„¢
531-BRET
531-2738
MIAMI BEACH
One Bedrooms
345 Ocean Dr 3129K
801 Meridian Ave .$75K
821 Jefferson Ave $69,5K
6900 Bay Dr .$71,5K
1140 71 St $33,9
Two Bedroom
3 Island-Ave 3108K
George Sanders 858-3166
Ascott Realty
MIAMI BEACH
Sales or Rentals'11 Call the
Beach Specialist -
Marilyn Morales
882-6932 or 673-4668
MIAMI BEACH
Beautiful, ocean front, ocean
i view studios! Luxury living!!
3 avail from $68,500. 1 with
owner financing. 567-7100
S.BCH.
SOBE 401 OCEAN
1 hr, 11 fir. MAGNIFICENT
City View. $125,000
Norma Wilson 854-8113
VENETIAN CSINAY
080’ Effic, furn, move
cond. Cash only $39,900
Brian Jones 840-0233
m
SOUTH BEACH
$34,500 Effic - 1 block
ocean. Remodeled, wood
floors, 800 block Collins
Brian Jones 840-0233
MIAMI/ON THE BAY
10 min to SoBe. Lux 1700
SQ FT waterfront 2/2, spec¬
tacular bay view, glass,
huge wrap around balcony,
24HR guard, doormen,
health club, tennis, heated
pool, marina, covered park¬
ing. Beautifully furn, pets ok.
$119K. 754-0669
N. BAY VILLAGE
WATERFRONT
1/1, Spectacular View,
Balcony, Walk in Closet,
Newly Renovated Building,
Great Location! Cats Okay
$63,000
Call Lorraine - 654-2639
Coldwell Banker
NMB/EASTERN SHORES
DOCK AVAILABLE/PETS OK
2/1, completely renovated,
everything brand new, pick
your own carpet. Anita Kan-
dell. Lie. RE Brkr. 945-3307
OMNI BAY VIEW
Four unit 1/1 bldg., $175k.
1/1 Flamingo Park, So Bch,
renovated by European dec¬
orator $85,000. 672-2603.
PALM BAY YACHT CLUB
1/2 condo, 828 square feet,
spacious balcony, all new
tile, 18th floor, bay view,
furnished, sale priced at
$78,000!! Palm Bay Yacht
Club, Franco: 556-5554
S BCH - BEST AREA
Secure 1/1, corner, terr,
covered pking, new kit, su¬
per low taxes & maint, $78K
buy Beach Realty 531-6929
MIA BCH
OCEANFRONT
Large Studio, hi floor,
luxury bldg, tennis court,
2nd Home or Rental
Excellent income!
$59,900 firm
866-1901
S BCH THE DECOPLAGE
Oceanfrt from $83K. Andrea
Silverthorne 322-4055.
Marco Giancola 996-2755.
agents Jeanne Baker, Inc
S BEACH - 401 OCEAN DR
Ocean front, SE corner, 5th
floor, 1 BR/1 BA, parking.
The best location in South
Beach $190,000. 674-0277
OCEAN DRIVE
New Listing! Roya! Atlantic
condo facing park/ocean
Fabulously remod. New kit/
tile/cov pking. $147,500
Brian Jones 840-0233
DECOPLAGE
STEAL! 4 from ocean. $75K
Brian Jones 840-0233
6900 BAY DRIVE
800’ corner 1/1.5. Fab
Water/city views $65,000
Brian Jones 840-0233
Studios, 1,2 & 3 Bedroom
Units Available.
For Best selection of
Miami Beach Condos call
Susan McBride 865-9667
SOUTH BEACH
1/1.5 with parking. Apollo
Condo, 1130-11th Street.
Low maint. 792 st. Mitchell
& Berger Assoc. 936-9000
SOUTH BEACH
Effic with pkg, $50,000.
1bdr with pkg, $65,000.
Please call tor more infor¬
mation. 754-0673
SOUTH BEACH
Studio & 1 br condo, start¬
ing at $54k. Hard wd firs,
renovated. Jeanne Baker
Realty. K. Morris 443-9001
Dave, Agent
Beeper 880-6581
Noran Schaefer Realty
South Beach
Euclid Ave. Spacious
comer studio in charming
deco bldg. Completely
Renov. Low $50’s.
Extremely Lg Split 2/2.
Greay Buy for $92,900!
All new 2/2 TownHouse in
Charming deco bldg. Terra
cotta floors-Must See!
Large Inventory of
Deco Condos
MIAMI SHORES 2/1
Hd wd firs, tpl, a/c, lg FI rm
huge fenced yd w/ fruit |
trees, corner house, quiet
block $90k 506-833-1087
MIAMI SHORES
Beautifully updated 3/1 in
NE area. Hard wood floors
fireplace, lg lot. new kitchen
$115,500.758-1586
MIAMI SPRINGS
Modernized 2/1, solar, se¬
curity, sprinkler system,
i paneling, mirrors, work¬
shop, huge rear carport per¬
fect for boat or motor
home. $151,000, owner
may finance. 887-3121
MOVING TO
FT LAUDERDALE?
* Victoria Park
* Las Olas Isles
* Wilton Manors
* NEW Ft Laud Beach
* Intracoastal/Beach
Homes/Duplexes/Condos
to fit your RE needs!
Jon Dasher,
Atlantic Properties: 800-
927-8232 or 305-564-8182
ATTENTION*.
RE BROKERS!
6%
COMMISSION
30 DAY CLOSINGS
We’ll do all the work!
-FINANCING
-CLOSING
- REMODELING
Just bring you’re qualified
prospects, we’ll do the rest!
For more information,
call Mr Metzger:
673-1700
AIRLINES HIRING FUGH1
ATTENDANTS
Take oft with an exciting
new career. World Travel,
Great Benefits. Complete
package to get started
$18.95. mail to Into Servic¬
es 1010 SE 15th Street Ste.
212, Ft. Lauderdale, Ft
33318.
FREELANCEFLORAL
Designers. Also party pro¬
duction workers. Needed
immed. F/T, P/T. 458-4000
x186. Leave name &te\#
MODEL TTFES
Attractive personnel needed
tor private entertainment tor
men on out an call basis. No
experience necessary. Cali
beeper: 485-3360
Miscellaneous
Real Estate
CRUISE SHIPS HIRING
Earn up to $2000+/mo
working on cruise ships or
land-tour companies. No
exp necessary. For info: 1-
206-634-0468 ext 073542
EARN UP TO $1000/WEEK
Stuffing envelopes at home
work own hours tor tree de¬
tails send SASE to 5941 SW
62 PL Mia, R. 33143
FEDERAL/POSTAL JOBS
$23 per hour, benefits, now
hiring, no experience nec¬
essary, will train. To apply .
1-800-582-2980 24 hrs
MODELS/DANCERS
Attractive and fit. Private
lingerie modeling. No exp.
Paid Daily. $1500 per week.
F/T P/T, Call 944-3837.
MODELS/DANCERS
Needed reiiabie, attractive
outcatt dancers - model
type, honest, drug tree, top
pay, serious only. 374-0601
or 372-9390.24 hr work.
General
JEANNE BAKER,
672-5800
INC.
S. BCH.
- BUY OR RENT -
Studios, 1 & 2 Bedrooms
12th & PENN
1 Bedrm Condos, 700 sf.
With Private Parking
Great Closet Space
Gorgeous Wood Floors
From $64,300
12th & MERIDIAN
Seller Financing
Overlooking Flamingo Park
Parking, Studios & 1 Bedrm
Condos from $52,900
1446 LENOX
2/1 From $93,900. Oak
Floors, Fireplace, Charming.
1500 sf, 2/2, Private Yard,
Secure Parking
673-2201 Scott
S. BCH. 800 WEST AVE
South Bay Club, PH studio,
extra hi ceiling, balcony,
parking. $59,000. Owner/
agent, 534-2387 call Barry
S. BCH. COLLINS & 16
Large 2/2, 2nd floor terrace
with oceanview, parking,
gym, pool access to beach.
$145,000. 531-3761 or bpr
399-8570.
S. BCH. COVERED PKING
Converted to 2 brs. 1.5, tile,
new kitchen-bath-A/C, large
bale, pool, low maint. $89K
Barbarov Broker 534-0159
S. BCH. S POINTE TOWER
1 br conv, 2 bath, tile floor.
Great city view! 16th floor,
balcony, huge closets.
$250,000. 538-6342
SO BEACH-OCEAN & 5TH
1/1, remodeled bath, ocean-
front building. $129.9k. ERA
Leibert Assoc 252-0011,
Margaret Yoder 666-5456
Re/Max
Beach Properties
Kimberly Cecilia
535-3552
SOUTH BEACH OCEAN
FRONT
1/1 1.5 with underground
parking, ocean view, balco¬
ny, pool, sec,. 1621 Collins
Ave, 64. $159K. Call Tom
577-2953.
SOUTH BEACH
1/1, pool, parking, terrace,
low sixties. Contact George
Reyes, lie. R/E Broker 266-
2130/882-6950 bpr.
SOUTH BEACH
.1/1, 8th fl., 5th and Ocean,
parking, balcony, security,
pool. Owner motivated.
$165K. Call 431-6142
SOUTH BEACH
Lincoln Road area. 1/1,
tiled, new a/c, bay view.
$68,000. Call Nelly Koch.
The Keyes Co. 538-9138 or
531-5803.
South Beach
BEAUTY AND
THE BEACH
2/1.5 convertible, covered
pkng. Totally renov, tile firs,
DOME ceilings, new kit, cent
a/c, balcony overlooking
pool. 1455 West ave. #204;
open house sun 1-4pm.
$89k. David 931-1222
SOUTH BEACH
1020 Euclid Ave Studios
from $46,000. 1 Bedrooms
from $59,500. Art Deco
Conversion. Keystone Lie.
R/E Bkr. 532-7878
SOBE/VENETIAN CSWY
Commercial property,
13,500 sq ft, zoned for
townhomes. water front,
Convention Center, golf
course view $550K. Also, 4/
4 home, golf course views,
etc S350K 337-1839
SOUTH BEACH
Unique co-op in Deco bldg.
Can be used, as 5 rooms,
2.5 baths OR separated for
income. Low maintenance.
$175,000. Call owner, iv
msg 672-4949
SOUTH BEACH
CONDOS ARE HOT!!
•STUDIOS lg-$44,900
•RENOV 1/1, gorg-$59,000
•RENOV 2 bdr-S/9,900
*Twnhm 2/2.5, new-$162K
•Twnhm 3/2.5-red S189.9K
Many more with Owner Fin
INCOME RE 673-9999
TAMPA
WATERFRONT
Beautiful lakefront 4/3
home, 2700 air conditioned
square feet, split bedroom
plan, located in peaceful
north Hillsborough County,
5 minutes from Veterans
Expressway, $189.9k.
Call 305-255-3875
income Property
Far Sale
BEACH BLDGS
ARE HOT!
*4un, waterfront, good
assum mtg
•8un, walk to ocean, 239K
•12un, 81/1 s,4 eff=390K
*16un, SoBe, fin=495K
*24un, NB 550K, SB 795K
MANY more motivated
sellers!
INVESTMENT SPECIALIST
INCOME R.E. 673-9999
$32 MILLION
SPORTS COMPLEX
under const, summer '95.
15 ACRES
BARSTOW, CALIFORNIA
2 acres fenced. Between
Vegas & L.A. 1/4 mile to
largest mill outlet west of
the Mississippi on Route 15.
Sweet Artesian well water,
, electricity. Call
Hollywood 925-2388 or call
owner 619-253-7788
SOUTH MIAMI
Prime real estate over
27,200 sq ft. On the S. East
corner of Red Rd. and Davis
Rd. Build home(s) for info
Call Nevada 444-2666
FINANCIAL FREEDOM
Guaranteed. Earn easy
1,000s at home. Send SASE
to: Zippy, 2301 Collins Ave,
»1616-A,M.B.,F! 33139
INT’L EMPLOYMENT
Make up to $2,000-
$4,000+mo teaching basic
conversational English in
Japan, Taiwan, or S. Korea.
No teaching background or
Asian languages req. For
into call 1-206-632-1146
extJ73541
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT
Fishing Industry. Earn up to
$3000-$6000+/mo. No exp
necessary. M/F. Age 18-70.
(206) 545-4155 ext A73544
ATTENTION
Major manufacturer ex¬
panding needs 20/30 rep¬
resentatives. Big Bucks. Bi¬
lingual. 274-8783
CERTIFIED TRAINER
Aerobic instructor, sett
starter, to manage small
. gym in Miami Beach. Salary/
profit sharing. 535*2049
PERSONS WANTED
Earn easy StOOO’s at home.
Send SASE to C.A. Mena
Freedom, 10855 NW 7 Ave,
Ste 161, Mia, FL 33168.
Computer
DIGITAL IMAGING
We need computer literate
supervisors and workers to
staff new digital imaging/
scanning business. FT & PT
positions avail. Fax resume
to Mr. Ram 539-8171.
GRAPHIC DESIGNER
with extensive knowledge of
computer graphics/PC
based pagemaker 5.0, Corel
Draw & photo styler. Excel¬
lent salary - good benefits.
Fax Resume 305-477-5486
DECKHAND/MATE WANTED
For sight-seeing/charter
boat. 534-7000
DRIVER
For pickups and deliveries.
FT. Must have clean Fla li¬
cense & know Dade County.
593-9600, Rusty or Mike.
Domestic
Career Training/
Schools
THERAPEUTIC
MASSAGE
Put Your Destiny in
Your Own Hands
Train to Become a Licensed
Massage Therapist in as lit¬
tle as 6 Months. You can be
a Professional in a person¬
ally Rewarding Field that of¬
fers Financial Independence
& a Flexible Schedule
For More Info Call
Educating Hands
School of Massage
- 285-6991 -
EMPLOYMENT NOTICE
NEW TIMES is committed to
equal employment oppor¬
tunity and does not accept
employment advertising
which seems to indicate a
preference based on age,
sex, creed, color or ethnic
background.
LIVE-IN
Need help with decorating
business. Call Mon-Fri 8a-
4p. S200/wk approx. Female
pref. Erika 352-1996, bpr,
code 33.
NEED HELP 3 DAYS/WEEK
Noon (flex) to 7pm. House¬
keeping; help 8 & 11 yr olds
with homework; light cook¬
ing. Must have car & excel¬
lent references. Shari at
579-1545, salary nego¬
tiable.
Entertainment
CHEERLEADER TYPES
LINGERIE/FIGURE
MODEL TYPES
Attractive, fit for private ex¬
otic entertainment. No Ex¬
perience. Amateurs Only.
$100 + hr/PT, up to S1K
week. No club dancers. No
tattoos. No combative, tem¬
peramental, unfriendly
types. 940-0511, Ext 3637
DANCERS
“NEW CLUB”
Top Dollar
for Top Dancers
Apply: 766 E. 25 St
Hialeah
Or Call 691-8980
EXPERIENCE THE
BOAT SHOW AND
YOUR OTHER
FAVORITE EVENTS!
We need:
* Bar Stall
* Cashiers
4 Counter Persons &
Concession Workers
* Bussers
* Housekeepers
* Line Cooks
* General Laborers
Work with
STAFFIX
#1 Service In
Hopitality Staffing!
254 NE 3rd ST
Downtown, Accross from
Bayside
577-3705
MAID SERVICE
Easy, low cost start up! We
will train you. Total support.
Please call Bob at 665-0605
MAINTENANCE
PERSONNEL
PT for parking garages &
lots. Day & evening shifts
available. 372-5151
MASSAGE THERAPIST
licensed therapists needed.
Contact 532-6334.
NOW HIRING
Large busy production
company seeking experi¬
enced, motivated, creative
people. Build sets, install
special events. Lots of
hours. Some weekends.
Carpentry skills and COL li¬
cense a major plus.
Contact Mr. Hoff at
305-458-4000
Ext 150.


IF
IF you are facing a career transition.
IF you are caught up in Corporate down sizing.
Opee in a Lifetime
Opportunity
A drainalk* breakthrough in
HI research has created an extraordinary - i¡|¡|||¡¡|
IF Total Control, a six figure income, and
¡¡§§¡¡¡1 business opportmnfywherc
IF International positioning are of interest to you.
|¡|¡¡¡|¡¡|¡| substantial income ran be tfrawrt
Then call my 2 minute message / 24 hours.
without capital investment.
1-800-994-3369
Serious inquiries only! 305 - 538 * 3312
Boost Your Income!
ElderCare^
WANTED
ELDERCARE
CONSULTANTS!
Unlimited income, low
start-up, dynamic home based
NEW CONCEPT IN REAL ESTATE
FIELD. GREAT POTENTIAL.
M
"PART TIME OR FULL TIME.
Consulting b^^S'2000
Call Dee or Ron For Details
551-6727
Free info: Perspectives Institute
Box 163F, 742S E. Biff Ave Denver, GO 80231
303-7S0-8324 24hours
APOGEE
COMPLETE PERSONNEL SERVICES
SECRETARY
Work in phiah private setting. WHh rich
and famous. Must type 40, wordperfecL
Great opportunity. 20 R
Work for prestigious hotel. WordPerfect,
Dictaphone. Excellent typing skills $ 11
in»
¡thiifcjmL
TIVE ASSIST.
Work for partner of interior design Ann.
Must be outgoing professional.
Microsoft wond/ExceL
Apogee; (305) 595-6640.
\/gd& TELEMARKEHNG$~!
IfHF A dear speaking voice can earn you: |
I *$6-1 ahr Salary Guar. « Medical & Dental Insurance I
I "Daily Cash Bonuses • Weekly & Monthly Bonuses I
■ *14 yrs in business • Great Work Atmosphere 1
^ "Easy Phone Sale • No Experience Necessary I
[_WETRAIN! Call for an interview: 891-1687_J
THE BRICKELL CLUB IS NOW HIRING!!!
Maitre D’
Captains
Servers
Bartenders
Catering Secty.
Apply IN PERSON ONLY
10am - 2pm M-F
Interviews 1221 Brickell Ave. Suite #1470
Banquet Staff
F.T. and On-Call
Secty/Bookkeeper
Kitchen Staff
NORMAN VAN AKEN'S
New Restaurant seeks:
Sous Chef, Line Chefs, Bartenders,
Waitstaff, Bookkeeper
Send Resumes to: “Norman’s”
21 Almería Ave. Coral Gables, FL.33134
Fax: 446-7909
DOCUMENTED SUCCESS
If your job has you trading hours you work
for dollars you earn, but you're money
motivated to earn much more?
You are the type of person I'm looking to
train personally to match my $22,000 ■“
monthly paycheck.
I will not ask you to sell, invest in inventory,
or make monthly purchase requirements.
933-6131
mSLEGAL
FOR ALL YOUR COPYING NEEDS
Legal Impressions is now
hiring for our locations in
Miami and Coral Gables,
full time, day & night shifts.
• Receptionist
• Office Services
• Copy Operators
• Technician
Call
374-0712
Czech & Slovak
speaking guides
needed
for in-bound groups to the
Miami Beach area. Some
experience preferred, but
not necessary. Please
call CLASSIC AMERICAN
TRAVEL at 1-800-783-5736,
before 3/16
I Copy Editor
. Experienced, literate copy -
- editor needed to fill full-time
/ ^psition. Applicant must work
”\well under deadline pressure,
demonstrate a facility w ith
style and usage, and have .
/ knowledge of Macintosh
IBM computers, Bilingual
sense of humor a plus.
- Competitive salary//;
and benefits.
Send resume and coyer letter to:
HB po box 531103 mmm
Miami Shores, EL 35153 |
Deli Lañé now has openings for
Servers
Please apply in person:
1401 Brickell Avenue.
NOW HIRING
Local agency looking
for Models and Dancers.
Must be 18 or older
and available to
work evenings.
FUN-SAFE-LEGAL .
J 800 • 637 • 0811
m A American
Entertainment Corp.
NOW HIRING
FOR THE FOLLOWING
POSITIONS:
Servers,
Buspersons
Hi Volume-TOP $$
Apply in Person:
2550 S. Bayshore Dr. Coconut Grove, FL
EXECUTIVE
ASSISTANT TO CEO
j CASABLANCA
.|J^órtn*srly Charcoals of Miami
Seeking a bright, eloquent,
energetic and polished individual
to assist a busy senior executive
with multi-national contacts
working out of his home/office
near Aventura Mall.
Business degree with experience
in investment banking a plus. Must
be graceful under pressure, highly
organized, have strong communi¬
cation skills and be willing to work
flexible hours. Excellent computer
skills are essential: MS Word for
Windows and Lotus 1-2-3
are required.
IgfflMg - ‘ v "* _ - z Wfm
gvjW^tfil'i/the ground-breaking icam rf '
///|||^'Ftl08t exciting club soon tcL^nine ?
to S. Florida.
Hosts/ Hostesses
¡^jfejjMipCoektail Servers
^^'SBatbroom Attendwi»!^^1
^^^%able Servers
Flamenco Ciuitarist"
Shoe Shine Person ItóSlJplS
|¡S| . ■ . . 'Wm
/ Table service or
^.experience preferred. dgSEBjSftg
l|ll§: : • fiWm
i ; Apply in person; $
, Tliurs-Tues, 2-7pm
Please fax resume to
305-931-8777 E.O.E
See Carol at
15532 NW 77 Miami Lakes-
February 16-22, 1995 New Times Page 97
i? K ¿4 t *9 f*. til N H ^UrWWT- H’W q


NOW HIRING
CARPENTER
Large busy production
company needs profes¬
sional carpenter to build
theatre sets and props. Per¬
fect finished work. Build
from designer’s spec. Run
and maintain department.
Professional attitude and
> experience a MUST!
(305) 458-4000. Ext
150. Mr. Hoff.
PROMOTIONS
We need people with a
great personality and a
first class image
*$3-5k/mo
¿Part/full time positions
•Training provided
•Travel opportunity
No phone interviews. Call
595-7002
NewTones
ROUTE DRIVERS
NEEDED
To deliver NEW TIMES eve¬
ry Wednesday. Truck or van
required. Call Clarence at
579-1510.
VALET RUNNERS
FT/PT needed. Valid license
ú good driving record a
must. Good hourly wages,
tips & benefits. 372-5151
WAREHOUSE HELP
Heavy lifting, computer
knowledge a plus, handy-
person, driver’s license a
must, FT. Shawn 573-8903
Management/
Professional
ArchiPRO Staff Agency
Needs Experienced:
Architects: CAD 2 years
Architects: Government
Projects
Architects: Hotel & Retail,
CAD
532-5722 fax 532-5075
ASST ART DIRECTOR
5+ years advanced practical
exp with MAC/QuarkXpress-
design of packaging, cata¬
logs, marketing collateral
and advertising; Adobe Il¬
lustrator & Photo shop a
plus; W Kendall electronics
maní for 17 yrs with 90 em¬
ployees- salary & benefits;
Fax resume to 305-378-
4094 EOE-Drug Fee WP.
FASHION DESIGNERS
Stop hiding.. Exhibit your
styles in Fashion/Trade
Show. Exiting profitable
oppty. Lv msg. 456-5462.
MAC ARTIST NEEDED
Quark, Pagemaker, free
hand, experienced, in news¬
paper layout. Call Andrew
538-9700
PROFESSIONAL
PHONE VOICE NEEDED
Executive search company
is looking for a very profes¬
sional phone voice to do ca¬
reer profiles by phone. If
you like talking to profes¬
sional people and can gain
someone’s confidence
quickly you will do well.
Must be able to work at
home during business
hours for 3-4 hours each
day. Can earn $20 per hour
plus a nice bonus on hired
candidates. Call 371-0054
to discuss your qualifica¬
tions.
WILLIAM’S ISLAND
EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT
TO CEO
Seeking a bright, eloquent,
energetic and polished in¬
dividual to assist a busy
senior executive with multi
national contacts working
out of his home/office near
Aventura Mall. Business de¬
gree with experience in in¬
vestment banking a plus.
Must be graceful under
pressure, highly organized,
have strong communication
skills and be willing to work
flexible hours. Excellent
computer skills are essen¬
tial. MS Word for Windows
and Lotus 1-2-3 are re¬
quired. Please fax resume to
305-931-8777. SEE OUR
DISPLAY AD IN CAREER
OPPORTUNITIES
Office/Clerical
APPOINTMENT SETTERS
AM/PM shifts. North Miami
Beach area. No sales. No ex¬
perience necessary. Call
682-8324
BOOKKEEPER/DATA ENTRY
Active sports apparel co. is
looking for a team player
who has knowledge of A/P,
A/R, data entry, shipping
rec. Great opportunity for
the right candidate. Please
call. Liz 379-5550
CLERK/GEN. OFFICE
Good handwriting and fig¬
ure aptitude required, typing
& computer literacy helpful,
531-2744.
GAL/GUY FRIDAY
Receptionist for model &
talent agency. Well groomed
& excellent phone voice. PT,
Miami Beach, 531-3910.
OFFICE ASSISTANT
Full time. Bilingual, com¬
puter for auto parts export
business. Apply: 5531 N.W.
74 Ave, 9-5 PM, Mon-Fri
OFFICE COORDINATOR
The Lesbian, Gay, Bi-Sexual
Community Center is look¬
ing for a self motivated Mi¬
ami Beach resident. P/T
clerical. Resumes to LGBCC,
PO Box 19-1679 Miami
Beach, FI 33119-1679
NewTimes
New Times Is
currently seeking
qualified graphic
designers. Quark
XPress, Photoshop
; experience required.
Printing knowledge
helpful.
Please send resumé to:
Carla Peters
Production Manager
4 P.O. Box 011591
Miami, FL 3310M591
or FAX to 579-1590
No phone calls please
MARKETING REPRESENTATIVE
- Part Time Minimum of 20hrs.
- Must have reliable transportation
- $100 draw. $20,000 annual salary
potential
(305) 655-1559
OVER
ARE YOU?
A Freelance Artist capable
of working with mixe
media for a unique SoBe
furniture store. 725-731 5th St.
Be creative call Miami Beach 33139
for an appointment. (305)532-4276
Field Interviewers
tiniversity-based research
center needs persons to
conduct home interviews
with teenagers/parents
in Little Havana late
April through August.
Most positions
Spanish/English bi-lingual.
Flexibility to work evenings &
weekends, 25-30 hours/week
CaF & telephone req. Six days
paid training in Chicago.
$9/hr + mileage. EOE
1*800 •276*7508^
SKILLED TYPIST
for South Beach Office.
Skilled in WordPerfect fdr
Windows or 5.1. Part-time/
Flexible Hours. 531-7558.
RECEPTIONIST
Good phone manner, WP
skills, professional attitude.
Call (305) 458-4000.
SCUBA EXPO FT
Until June or PT/weekends.
Must know IBM - Q & A:
data entry. Exp, organizer,
fluent English, phone skills,
etc. N Miami. 891-6095
SECRETARY ASSISTANT
HIV-AIDS advocacy work.
Letter and report writing;
and filing. Computer literate.
MS Works/Excel. Send re¬
sume or application to:
PWAC-DADE, 3890 Bi-
scayne Blvd, Miami, FL
33137. -
Restaurant/
Hotel/Clubs/
Cruises
Art Deco Hotels
is currently seeking the
Following Positions
-FRONT DESK CLERKS
-NIGHT AUDITOR
- EXECUTIVE CHEF
- ASST F & B MGR
-WAIT STAFF
-BUSSERS
- HOST/HOSTESS
- DISHWASHERS
- HOUSEKEEPERS
- HOUSEMAN/WOMAN
-LAUNDRY ATTENDANT
- LAUNDRY SUPERVISER
With Experience
- NIGHT CLEANERS
- RESERVATIONS
Please call 672-5254
Ext 4110-or-Fax
resume to 672-6288
or come in person
Mon-Fri, 10-5, Cavalier
Hotel 1320 Ocean Dr
BARCLAY PLAZA
Front desk clerk needed
11pm-7am, 3-5 nights, sen¬
iors and retired welcome!
Call: 531-5577
BARSTAFF
COCKTAIL SERVERS
For new South Beach club.
Apply noon-6pm at 100-21
Street, Miami Beach
CAFE BY THE BAY
Kitchen help needed. Mon-
day-Friday, daytime hours.
Benefits. Call Rich or Eric:
539-6365 or’539-6659.
CHEF
Working Chef, small res¬
taurant, Continental cuisine.
Call for appt - 756-3922
COOK FT -AM & PM SHIFT
Wait Staff & Dishwasher.
Apply in person at the
Coconut Restaurant, 9449
Collins Ave, Holiday inn
COUNTER PERSON
High volume South Beach
sandwich shop, La Sand-
wicherie, is in need of a re¬
sponsible and honest indi¬
vidual for Full-time work. $6
plus tips. Experience pre¬
ferred. Call 532-8934 for an
immediate interview!
DANCERS
$500 CASH BONUS
All Types of Dancers!
No exp. nec. Will Train
Clean, Comfortable
atmosphere. Full & Part
Time,- Day-Night
227-0310
FOOD SERVERS/
BUSSERS/COOKS
Accepting applications for
experienced food servers/
bussers/cooks at Kendall’s,
newest Italian. restaurant.
We offer excellent pay &
benefits. Please apply in
person, M-F, 2-4pm. 11625
N. Kendall Drive. No phone
calls.
FRONT DESK
CLERKS
Computer exp. helpful
Multilingual preferred.
HOUSEKEEPERS
Experience a MUST.
Full time positions. Apply
within.
BEACON HOTEL
720 Ocean Dr
Miami Beach
★ ★ ★
BUSSERS
& WAIT STAFF
Kaleidascope Restaurant
3112 Commodore Plaza
Coconut Grove
446-5010 ask for Mgr
INTERNATIONAL
YOUTH HOSTEL
Is looking for a
part-time housekeeper.
Please apply in person.
236 9th Street, Mia Bch.
LYON FRERES
- Now Hiring
Our New Location
at Miami Beach Marina
- ESPRESSO BAR
- CASHIER
-DELI
- MEAT/SEAFOOD
- PRODUCE
- PORTER
- BAKERY
Experienced Only
Apply in person, mornings
300 Alton Rd, Suite 100
MANGO’S
IS NOW HIRING!
* WAIT STAFF
* BARTENDERS
* BUSSERS
Must be exp in food & alcoh
bev. Must have local refs, be
dynamic, & well groomed.
Apply Mon-Fri, 2-3PM at
900 Ocean Drive
MARCO’S CLUB TAJ
Needs COCKTAIL SERVERS
to start now! Experience
preferred. Call: 444-5333
8am-4:30pm
PIZZA MAKER
F/T in Miami Beach. Experi¬
enced only. Good work at¬
mosphere. Leave message
for Mike 531-3908
RESTAURANT BURNOUT?
Seeking motivated individ¬
uals with strong personal¬
ities and excellent people
skills for health marketing.
FT/PT. Full training & travel
opportunites. $2-5k/mo po¬
tential. 305-568-9366.
THE BAGEL FACTORY
Needs counter and kitchen
help (SoBe) and someone
to operate a bagel vending
cart (Downtown). Call
Bruce: 674-1577
TOP HAT CAFE
Waitstaff wanted. Down¬
town. Monday - Friday, days
only, no weekends. Please
call 381-6337.
TOP PAY FOR EXPERIENCE
Pizia pie maker needed for
well established business.
Also avail sandwich maker.
267-0745/662-4025.
WAITSTAFF NEEDED
for Thai restaurant. Knowl¬
edge of Thai cuisine a plus.
Call or stop by Siam River
3455 NE 163 St, 945-8079
Retail
NOW HIRING
Bealls Outlet is opening new
store in Miami Bch, many
positions available Apply in
person Mon:Fri 10am-5pm
18260 Collins Ave, 1723 E
Hallandale Bch Blvd.
P/T SALES
Furniture, accessories
and gifts. Retail sales expe¬
rience helpful. 535-3003
RETAIL SALES
Have sales exp, be agressive
and enjoy being with people.
South Beach shop, FT or
PT. 532-0068 or 456-7440
SPORTS SHOP
Looking for part-time eve¬
ning & weekend help. Dept
store experience & sports
enthusiasm both a plus. Call
674-8191
STORE MANAGER
Wanted experienced
Retail Manager and
Sales Assistants for busy
Lincoln Road retail outlet,
computer literate essential.
Send resume to:
P.O. Box 398294
Miami Beach, FL 33239.
WEEKEND RETAIL SALES
Leather Plus needs help in
Design District, aggressive
closer, pay is 5% of sales,
Retail exp req call 573-4169
Sales
SMILES
Immediate opening for a
few individuals with great
smiles who enjoy working
with people, love travel and
earn top $$$• 471 -9987
ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES
The Miami Beach Chamber
of Commerce has full and
part time positions in Mem¬
bership Sales. Will train
qualified applicants. Call
Gertraud at 672-1270, ext
29
NewTimes
ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE
Miami New Times seeks a
highly motivated, tenacious
self-starter to sell retail
advertising. Strong verbal
and written skills necessary,
prior sales experience help¬
ful, familiarity with New
Times ana other media im¬
portant, and an under¬
standing of advertising and
marketing principles is es¬
sential.
First year salary includes
base, commission and bo¬
nuses. Unlimited earning
potential, full benefits, and
an opportunity to work for a
fast-growing newspaper
and publishing company.
Fax resume and cover letter
to P.F. 372-5229, or mail to:
Advertising Director
P.O Box 011591
Miami, FL 33101
AIRLINE ATTITUDE
If you enjoy people, love
travel, and earning TOP $$$,
LETS GO! 597-0131
AVON REPS NEEDED
Full/Part-time, several ways
to sell. Unlimited earnings,
no exp nec. Independent
Rep. Call 1-800-239-2866.
ENVIRONMENTAL/HEALTH
minded people needed for
rapid expansion of our Mar¬
keting Company. Reps and
Management. Please call
305-568-9221.
EXPANDING NATIONAL CO.
Needs 20 distributors in S.
FI—P/T & F/T Call Ron for
appt. Dade 258-3961, non-
Dade 1-800-436-6328
EXPERIENCED JEWELRY
SALESPERSON
Good pay & benefits. Jewels
by Us 651-5626 ^
FED UP? PISSED OFF!
Tired of the system keeping
you broke? Beat the system
at it’s own game! There’s no
revenge like massive suc¬
cess. Call Dan 594-0001
FITNESS MINDED
Health company seeks mo¬
tivated individuals with
strong personalities and
good people skills. FT/PT.
Full training & travel oppor¬
tunites. $2-5k/mo potential.
305-568-9366.
FUN AND TRAVEL
High energy, ambitious
people needed immediately
for new offices. 18 and
older. Full training. $2000+/
mo potential. 477-8917.
HEALTH CLUB &
SPA SALES
The SPA at the Fontaine¬
bleau Hilton Resort, is
looking for a Membership
Salesperson with at least 2
yrs min. HEALTH CLUB
SALES EXP. Outstanding
opportunity. Energetic,
enthusiastic, outgoing
attitude a must. Immediate
opening. Call Rebecca
between 2-4,538-7600,
FAX resume to 534-7590
MARKETING POSITION
Mktg job, fun place, some
college, computer skills.
Flexible hours. Fax resume
(305) 592-0927 Good pay
MODEL TYPES
WANTED
In search of fashion, fun, &
adventure. Demonstrate &
promote for our nutrition/
health company. Lucrative
positions available. Full/part
time, will train.
305-568-9366
NASTY
BOSS!
I am looking for 8-10 peo¬
ple that I can work half to
death for a better than
above average salary in
the Advertising/Enterta i n-
ment industry. If you like to
be kicked around, are a
self-starter, & enjoy travel,
call Jake 859-2892
OPTIONS
An alternative dating service
for Gays & Lesbians, is
seeking reps/telemarketers
for its MB location. Exciting
opp to join this rapidly ex¬
panding nat’l company. Call
531-9990 to explore your
OPTIONS. CAR Neccessary!
P/T PHONE SECRETARY
No selling, good phone
voice a must. Call Business
Owners, Guarantee plus bo¬
nus. 865-0103 after 11am
SALES
Bilingual sales person for
boutique, Fontainebleau
Hilton. Experience a plus,
Full time/part time. Good
salary, commission, bonus
Call 358-4336
Fax Resume
358-4805
SALES PERSON
SPECIAL EVENTS CO
Must be dynamic, energetic,
self motivated & able to
write creative proposals.
Willing to train. Resume to:
20285 NE 15th Ct, NMB,
33179 or fax 651-2103.
SALES REP - PHONE
Work at home, exp only, FT
(days), flex, commission
only. SCUBA expo, start
now! N Miami. 891-6095
SALES REP NEEDED
High energy, ambitious peo¬
ple to sell advertising prod¬
ucts. Commission only. Fax
resume at 305-532-2740 or
call between 9 to 5 at
532-2633
Salons
BE YOUR OWN BOSS
Hair stylist & manicurist rent
chair in this upscale salon.
San Souci area. 2 weeks
free rent. Friendly atmos¬
phere. 893-1721.
HAIRSTYLIST
If you’re ambitious and want
to work in an established
hair salon, call Pam at
532-7337
SOME LIKE IT HOT
Is expanding and is now
accepting applications for
the following positions:
- Receptionist
- Manicurist
- Aesthetician
- Assistant
- Massage Therapist
No phone calls.
Please come in & fill
out an application at:
630 Lincoln Rd, Mia Bch,
btwn 10a-6p, everyday.


Automobiles
ACURA INTEGRA GS1991
Blk/tan, auto, 48K, A/C, ABS,
moon roof, spoiler, new
tires, mint condition, asking
$10995/OBO. Call 256-8067
Iv mess.
ACURA INTEGRA GS
1990 White with charcoal
int; tints; 5-spd; a/c; moon-
roof; stereo. $8500. 858-
2405.
ACURA INTEGRA ’91
5 speed, a/c, low mileage,
am/fm/cass, blue, clean.
$8700 cash. 598-1519 or
361-4129.
ALFA ROMEO SPIDER 77
Black, needs some body
work, new top, eng recently
overhauled $1500. Includes
extra parts.576-9962
AMC-SPIRIT OL
1980, auto, PS, 4 cyl, 72K,
new brakes + muffler, runs
great & reliable, $850 OBO.
866-9225.
AMC CONCORD
1982 2-dr. Cold a/c; auto;
stereo; runs great. Looks
good. Call 893-8372/bp
859-5945.
AMC CONCORDE 79
Runs, great, excellent inte¬
rior, A/C, automatic, new
tires. $1100 obo. Please call
576-2624.
AUDI 5000CS TURBO 86
4-door, auto, A/C, leather in¬
terior, all power, Sony CO,
sunroof, $3800 obo, call
363-0085.
BMW 1987
50k original miles. Excellent
running cond. Dark blue,
sunroof, a/c, stereo, anti-
theft. $8000 obo. 663-1007
BMW 3181 84
Burgundy ext, blk int, silver
fender moldings, Momo
rims & steering wheel, sun¬
roof, cold a/c, looks & runs
great. $3500 obo. 595-8168
BMW 320i
’83 in outstanding condi¬
tion. Many extras; gotta see
it! $3500 obo. Call 595-
9807 and leave message.
BMW 320i ’81
Runs great, new tires, good
engine. $1200 OBO. Call
944-2956 leave message.
BMW 325E1986
Nice and clean, fully loaded,
5 speed manual, 80,000
miles. Must sell $6800 obo.
Call 573-0125
BMW 325i
’88 convertible. White with
blue top & blue leather in¬
terior. $12K. Call Roger @
374-0999/945-0256(eves).
BMW 325i
1990 convertible. 5-spd, exc
cond, 1 owner, alarm, black/
tan. 48K, warranty. $17,500
must sell. 935-0360.
BMW 325i ’89
Convertible, excellent con¬
dition, white with blue top &
interior, under 50,000 miles.
$15,000 OBO. Also ’87
BMW red convertible. 837-
2664 bpr/267-1566.
BMW 32511988
Convertible, beige/tan int.,
new tires, one owner, alarm.
$11,000 obo. Must sell. Call
867-9203.
BMW 325IS ’90
2 door, black with beige in-
térior, sunroof, perfect con¬
dition. $13K 0B0. Call for
details 352-1895,
BMW 528e 1984
Metallic blue, automatic,
sunroof, p/I, p/w, new paint,
excellent condition. $4295.
Please call 856-1543
BMW 528E 88
Excellent condition, 66K
original miles, all maint
records, fully loaded, leather
seats, new tires, MUST
SELL! $8900 obo. 573-
0125
*
BMW 735187
Great Condition!/ New Paint -
Burgandy Exterior. This is the
ultimate style-mobile/ Runs
Great! New breaks/ New
Mats/ Leather Interior/ FULLY
Loaded, even has a sun roof!
Please Call 14K Nego.
Bp:880-3460
BUICK CENTURY LTD 86
NEW AD. Only 57,000 miles,
all power, loaded, new air/
tires/struts, super clean. Sil-
ver/gray. Luxury for less.
$4000 invested, asking
$3000 OBO. 866-3243.
BUICK CENTURY ‘87
Station wagon, power wid¬
ows/locks/steering, cold A/
C. V6, cruise, runs great!
$2200.931-3082
BUICK LASABRE 88
Very clean, 2 door, ice cold
A/C, 90K miles, 29 miles per
gallon. $3900. Beeper 366-
1089/305-370-6273.
CADDILAC OE VILLE 70
Green, leather interior, wire
rims, runs well, AM/FM
cass, power everything
$700 obo. 931-6210
CADILLAC 1977
Coupe De Ville, good run¬
ning car for work or towing.
Asking $495.00 Call 751-
9813.
CADILLAC EL DORADO 82
Black, new deisel plugs, new
tranny, only $71K miles,
needs minor work. Call 444-
1420, $1000 OBO
CADILLAC SEDAN DeVILLE.
’81 4-dr, w/sunroof. Runs
great. Good cond in/out,
needs cosmetic work. $1K
obo. 532-1081/534-6562.
CADILLAC SEVILLE 1991
4 door/ 20,000 miles. One
driver owner. 865-3946 or
leave telephone number.
$14,000 obo.
CADILLAC SEDAN
DEVILLE ’85
Clean, fully equipped, pri¬
vate owner, 108k mi,
$2975, Call 305-537-3468
CADILLAC SEDAN ’84
White, dependable, new
tires, transmis & brakes,
cold a/c. Hate to sell. $2500.
673-2160,673-0111
CADILLAC SEVILLE 1980
Good Condition $1200.
357-4803
CAVALIER 86
4 door, automatic, PS, PB,
white. Great transportation.
$950. 358-9032 (9a-6p).
417-0062 beeper.
CHEVY ’88
Caprice classic wagon, blue,
runs great, power every¬
thing, 18 MPG, new tires,
$4250.985-7378
CHEVY BERRETA GT 88
Black, tinted windows, pow¬
er everything, cruise con¬
trol, auto, am/fm cass, digi¬
tal dash. 69K miles. $5000
OBO. 800-973-8013 bpr.
CHEVY CAMARO ‘91
RS Sport, white on black, 5
speed/5 litre engine, very
clean, must sell, retail
$9200, sacrifice for $7900.
242-1133 or 258-7827
CHEVY CAMARO Z28 ’93
5.7 L V-8, purple pearl me¬
tallic, fully loaded, dual air¬
bag, CD, beautiful, fast car.
$15,900. Call 672-4887.
CHEVY CORVETTE '90
CD player, glass top, red,
cruise control, leather seats,
new tires, low miles.
$21,000 obo. 672-7038
CHEVY IMPALA
1969, 4 door, sports, im¬
maculate condition, 61,000
original miles, call 757-8871
CHEVY NOVA ‘69
Mechanic’s special! 2 dr,
fair condition, great stero
system! $500. 285-5554 Bp
465-6665
CHEVY SPRINT
'88 LX. 5spd; stereo; 60
mpg; sunroof. Orig owner,
excellent condition. Sacri¬
fice, negot. 554-7047(bpr).
CHRYSLER 1989LEBARON
Conv, all options incl air¬
bags, auto, champagne met,
tan interior. $5000 OBO.
Please call 672-7050.
CHRYSLER 1982 LEBARON
Runs excellent, cold A/C,
good transportation, must
sell, relocating, 92K miles,
$995 OBO, 305-494-8206.
CHRYSLER 5TH AVE 86
RUNS GREAT! Power win¬
dows & brakes, cruise. Cold
a/c, Great 2nd car! passed
inspec. $1500.964-1989
CHRYSLER LE BARON 90
Conv, navy, V-6 engine, all
power, $7500 OBO, Call
865-1057, leave message.
CHRYSLER NEW YORKER
SALON ’93
Fully loaded, must sell. 34K
miles, factory warranty.
$6995 OBO. 800-923-1530
CONV FORD MUSTANG 72
Mint condition, 2nd owner,
original mi. 76K, fully re¬
stored. Price neg. Call 859-
9215 after 5.
CORVETTE LOVERS
MUST SEE
81. Mint cond; 2-tone gray;
loaded. Great sound
system. $10K obo. Call 347-
6527 (wk) or 385-2500
(hm).
CORVETTE STINGRAY 75
P/S, P/B, P/W, air, auto, t-
tops, 62k original miles,
with service records.
$10,200 obo. 315-0869 bp
CORVETTE 75
Black Stingray, 350, auto¬
matic, A/C, AM/FM cassette
plus many extras, family
owned $6K obo. 949-7799
DATSUN 260Z 74
4 speed, a/c, 2 seater, Holly
4 barrel!. Call 352-5916,
825-1967 or 558-1993.
Excellent condition.
DATSUN B210 ’82
Automatic, a/c, 2 dr lift back,
77,000 miles, Kenwood
pullout, good transportation
asking $575 441-3594 bpr.
DODGE 600 CONV. ’86
Red with automatic top,
good condition, am/fm ster¬
eo, air conditioning. $2500.
944-6988.
DODGE ARIES ’81
New rebuilt transmission
and motor. Many other new
parts. Great condition. 861-
0746
DODGE ASPEN 80
Volaré (S. Wagon), auto, 6
cylinder, runs good, $450.
Beeper 729-1628 or leave
msg 534-6115 daytime
DODGE CONVERTIBLE 85
600 Series. New tires, top in
great cond, runs great. Feel
the wind in your face! $595.
672-3602. Must sell!
DODGE, OMNI ’88
Excellent condition, 56k
miles, 5 speed, white,
$1800. Must sell this car.
Call 534-8404
EAGLE TALON 90’
TSI Turbo, y5 speed, A/C,
leather seats, all power, cd
player, factory alarm, 65K
miles. $7,900.443-8082.
FIAT CONV. 1979
Runs and looks good, new
top, fun car for all ages,
won’t last. $2000 obo.
598-2830.
FIAT SPIDER ’81
2000 fuel injected, fully re¬
stored, British racing green,
tan top, new interior. Immi-
rating. Cost $7000 sell
3900 obo. Call 448-2330
or 276-8524
FIAT SPYDER ‘77
Red/blk int, manual, exc
cond, new paint, mechani¬
cally A-1, runs/looks great,
must sell $3900.672-6822
HANDYMAN SPECIAL
’88.5 Ford Escort GT, 2 dr, 5
spd, cracked windshield,
PS, PB, runs well, $3333
OBO. Lv mess 256-1448.
FORD 1986 MUSTANG GT
Conv, all options, new red
paint and black top. Great
cond, asking $4750. Please
call 672-7050.
FORD BRONCO II
’89, red/white, 5 speed, 82K
miles, new A/C, AM/FM cas¬
sette, excellent condition,
runs great. $5700 OBO. Call
444-7406.
FORD CROWNEVIC ’86
Wagon, fully loaded, 75,000
miles, looks & runs primo.
$2750. Please call 534-
2130.
FORD ESCORT GTE 89
Excellent condition, meticu¬
lously maintained, all
records. Priced to sell
$2000! Serious inquiries
only. 858-0370
FORD ESCORT L ‘86
Blue with blue int, 4 dr, 4cyl,
auto, A/C, AM/FM, 66K
miles, all original, runs great
$1800.251-1661
FORD ESCORT GT 93'
Like new A/C, 5 speed,
17,000 mis., factory war¬
ranty, one owner, white/grey
int., $6,400.956-9549
FORD ESCORT GT 93’
Like new A/C, 5 speed,
17,000 mis., factory war¬
ranty, one owner, white/grey
int., $6,400.956-9549
FORD MUSTANG 79
Hatchback; 6 cylinder, auto,
rebuilt transmission, runs
but needs work. $200 obo.
893-5703
FORD MUSTANG LX ’89
Convertible, 73k miles, black
in excellent condition, am/
fm cass, a/c, $6500 obo.
667-9296 wk 661-5698 hm
FORD MUSTANG 1970
All MACH I features, 351 W,
4 spd, 390 gears, new parts,
new int, recently reb eng.
$4500 OBO (305) 792-5760
FORD MUSTANG '66
Baby blue, 6 cylinder,
3 speed, runs great needs
body work. $1900. Call
Monica 667-0378
FORD MUSTANG LX ’84
Conv, rebuilt trans, V6 en¬
gine, auto top & windows,
AM/FM cassette, A/C, body
needs minor work, runs
great, $1800 OBO.
534-1028
FORD MUSTANG ‘89
Convertible, white with
brand new white top, new
everything!. 72,000 miles
$6,200 obo. Call; 354-7335
ask for Marion
FORD MUSTANG LX 1993
Auto, low miles, air bag,
cruise Ctrl, sunroof, alarm,
tinted windows, am/fm/
cass, $8000 obo, 866-7048
FORD PftOBE GT 90’
Sharp car, red with grey int.,
all power. & options, sun¬
roof, maintained, 43,000
mis, $5,900.956-9549.
FORD PROBE GT 90’
Sharp car, red with grey int.,
all power & options, sun¬
roof, maintained, 43,000
mis, $5,900.956-9549.
FORD T-BIRD
1985; 8 cyl; auto; am/fm
cass; all power options.
Very low miles/good cond.
$2500 obo. Call 861-3977.
FORD T-BIRD ’84
A/C, runs great, $1300 obo.
Call 881-0485 beeper.
FORD TAURUS GL
’89 wgn. 86K; V6; auto; a/c;
pw; tilt; orig pnt; new tires.
Exc fam car. $3900 obo.
754-2126/363-6026(bpr).
FORD TAURUS ’86
30K actual miles, super
clean, ice cold A/C, asking
$3500, Call for details 828-
4383 or 312-3540 bpr.
FORD TAURUS GL ‘88
Station wagon, auto, cruise,
power brakes/steering, exc
family car $3900. 672-5591
or 865-9313 (eves Rosa)
FORD THUNDERBIRD1984
Leather, power everything,
very reliable, many new
parts, 302 engine. $1400
OBO. Call 673-2136.
FORD, MUSTANG ’66
6 cyl, coupe, automatic,
$2500 or best offer. Cali for
more information 567-0300
btwn 9am and 5pm.
GEO METRO LSI CONV ’92
White with black top, 2
door, a/c, stereo, 24,000
miles, great gas mileage,
$8500.534-9253
GMC SUBURBAN’93
1500 SLE, fully loaded, low
miles, celebrity pre-owned,
like new, must see. For appt
643-6851/881-5642 bpr.
HONDA ACCORD LX
’91 4-dr. Taupe w/ivory.
Am/Fm cass; auto; pwr;
67K. Getting company car.
Call Marisela 825-5356.
HONDA ACCORD 88’
LXI Coupe, white, one own¬
er, auto, PW, PS, A/C, amfm
cassette. $6000 obo. Call
859-8268.
HONDA ACCORD LXi 1989
Excellent condition, black
with beige interior, sunroof,
good tires & brakes, $5500.
538-7368
HONDA ACCORD LXi 86
2 dr, automatic, a/c, power
windows, am/fm, excellent
condition* $3,300 OBO.
Please call 446-1462
HONDA ACCORD ’82
Blue hatchback, 5 speed, a/
c, tinted windows, runs
good, 90k+ miles. 254-9673
Iv msg or 334-7098 bpr.
HONDA CIVIC ’83
Has body damage. 5 speed,
cold A/C, amfm. $800. Call
539:1045,. .
SOUTH FLORIDA’S
ANSWER FOR NEW & LATE
MODEL AUTOMOBILES
Tried Elsewhere? Turned Down?
CALL THE CREDIT ANALYZER
TOM ROCHÉ
§
Call Today/Drive Today!
All Credit Applications Accepted!
★ All Makes ★ All Models
Buy The Late Model Car You Wanted Now!
1990 to 1995’s
Bankruptcy • Bad Credit • Repossessions • No Credit • Foreclosures
Bankruptcy * Charge-Offs .
NEW CARS USED CARS FINANCING AVAILABLE
Based on qualifications. Terms as low as 60 months.
HONDA CIVIC LX’93
White, 4 door, automatic,
power sunroof, FM, tinted
windows, 20K miles, excel¬
lent condition. Asking
$12,900. Call 271-1780
leave message.
HONDA CIVIC VX1992
5 spd, V-TEC engine, pas¬
sive alarm, Sony CD/STER¬
EO, cold A/C, white/blue,
37K miles, great cond, need
to sell! OBO. 854-3259
HONDA CRX1988
5 speed, silverAan, tinted
windows, mag wheels, ad¬
vanced alarm system, am/
fm cass, low pro tires,
looks and runs very well,
$3700.
532-8502
HYUNDAI EXCEL GL ‘88
Dark grey, 4 dr hatchback,
A/C, AM/FM cass, 74K orig
miles, 5 speed, runs new
$2000.251-1661
HYUNDAI EXCEL ’88
Hatchback, A/C, Pioneer
AM/FM cassette, 4 speed,
82K miles. Asking $1499.
Gall 270-8704.
HYUNDAI GLS ‘86
4 door, automatic, A/C, red
with tan int, 50K miles, all
original, runs great $1800.
251-1661
ISUZU PICKUP/REDUCED
’89 Beige, rebuilt eng, looks
good, needs a little fender
work, 5 spd, $2,900 obo.
756-6249.
JAGUAR XJSC V121986
Cabriolet, 48 K miles, char¬
coal gray exterior, matching
gray leather, very sleek and
sexy car, California car,
$14900 OBO. Call:
(305)672-7050.
JAGUAR ’88 XJS
Mint condition, 56K mi, 2
dr, 12 cyclinder, champagne
color. $10,500 firm. Please
call 983-6679.
JAGUAR XJ6 ’84
Vanden Plas, black/cream,
auto, full power, chrome
rims, CD player, 54k miles.
Best offer. 591-3991
JAGUAR XJ6
1985; 87.5K; Immaculately
maint. Cobalt/blue Ithr; Ided;
snroof. Sacrifice for $6000.
670-2482/577-0370.
JAGUAR XJS 1982
Green/beige int., new tires,
full service, genuine 36,000
miles. Owner returning to
UK. $6,500.919-9483.
JEEP 1992
Red, great condition, please
call for information 538-
5566, beginning 2/18.
JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE
1993. 21,000 miles, take
over payments or $17,000.
Excellent condition, call
532-5911 or 757-6422.
JEEP SAHARA’89
Low mi, 4.2 liter, 6 cyl, w/
soft top, bikini, windjammer,
dust cover. Det face stereo
asking $8k (305) 375-0502/
973-6121 after 8 pm
JEEP SCRAMBLER 1983
Model 87. 6 cylinder, black,
good condition, big tires,
new engine. Please call 353-
8767 bpr
JEEP WRANGLER '87
49,000 miles, A/C, stereo,
hard top, runs well, serviced
regularly, original owner
$8000.538-3876
JEEP WRANGLER ’92
Green, 4 WD, new tires, soft
top, radio/tape player, $9K
OBO. Please call 538-6209
LAMBORGHINI
Replica (white), 0-60 in
3.9sec, .1/4 mi in 10, 11’s
FAST, $16,000 it’s a beauti-
ful car. Call 538-9331.
LINCOLN C0NT ’88
Signature series, garage
kept, non-smokers, low mil¬
age, $5950, it will go fast,
call 757-8705.
1990 MAZDA MIATA
Convertible, 30K miles, all
opt, exc cond, red w/blk int,
asking $9000. Call JC 596-
8240 days/860-9977teves.
MAZDA MIATA ’91
New radials, 35,000 miles,
racing green/blaek interior,
am/fm. $11,000.534-6021
MAZDA MIATA 1991
5 spd, 50K miles, silver,runs
like new, new perrelli tires.
Sell $10,000 OBO. 532-
9189 or 736-5519 bpr
MAZDA jVIIATA’91
Package A white; black in¬
terior, 5 speed, 40k miles,
stereo, $10,000 obo.
Call 305-966-3419
MAZDA MIATA 1993
Must Sell! AM/FM CD
player, red with black inte¬
rior, airbag, A/C, $16,000.
Great condition, low milage.
Leave message 672-4567.
MAZDA MIATA ’91
Convertible, 51k mi, silver,
a/c, p/s, am/fm cass. airbag,
rims, cover, 1 owner, $9500
obo 534-3375.
MAZDA MIATA ’90
Red with black top, low
mileage, nice stereo. Fun
car! $8800 obo. Sharon
857-9754 or 881-1908 bpr.
MAZDA MX-6 ’91
Silver 5 speed, a/c, runs
great, 48,000 miles, original
owner. $5995. Please call
682-9112
MAZDA MX-6 LX ’91
Relocating, must sell, 5
speed, white, loaded, 4 new
Pirelli tires. Best offer buys.
Call 554-6992.
MAZDA RX7
1988 convertible. Beautiful
and in excellent condition,
only $7400. Hurry up and
call 798-1359.
MAZDA RX71989
Mint condition, 60K miles,
a/c, am/fm, cassette, electric
sunroof, 28mpg, must sell!
$7900.460-2788
MAZDA RX71984
Good condition, silver/black,
reat stereo system, A/C.
2000.864-9902.
MERC GRAN MARQUIS ’87
Super smooth lux car. Blk
115k miles, $2800 obo.-
REKI MASTER-FRANK
866-1921 or 536-4423
MERCEDES ’94
SL600, black with cream in¬
terior. 6900 miles, Show¬
room mint cond. Both tops.
Must sell. 895-5883.
MERCEDES ’80
450 SLC, last in the series,
priced right at $6200 OBO.
Needs some work. Call 255-
5644.
MERCEDES 1979 450 SL
Roadster, white w/tan inte¬
rior, all options, 82K miles.
Mint cond, asking only
$10,500. Call 672-7050.
MERCEDES 280 CE
1978 coupe/sunroof. Dark
brown/brown; a/c, auto;
Low milage am/fm cass.
Asking $3995 Please call
945-4986.
MERCEDES 2301974
Light blue, 4 dr, A/C, am/fm,
dependable - great car,
mechanically sound. $2500.
Please call 538-2672.
MERCEDES BENZ 450 SL y
79, conv, sky blue metallic,
beige leather. Immaculate *
condition. $16,500. 672-
7050/449-0866 bpr.
MERCURY CAPRI ’92
Convertible, 5 speed, blue,
cassette, like new, 1 owner,
airbag, A/C, $9500 OBO.
Please call 576-3634.
MERCURY COUGAR LS ’89 *r
Loaded, sunroof, 2 doors,
brand new tires. Runs
Great! $7000. 770-9311
MERCURY WAGON
’84 Colony Park, 31,000
original miles, runs great,
save $20,000 on new wag¬
on. $3950 OBO. 956-5523.
MG 78-RED
The best one in Florida. New,¿
engine & paint. Alloy
wheels. Spent $8000, will
sell for $3700 OBO. 532-
9487.
MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE 1992
14 K miles, black, 5 speed,
am/fm cassette, excellent
condition, reduced must sell
$9850.532-8241
MITSUBISHI CONQUEST 87
TSI turbo. 5 speed, leather,
power everything, immacu¬
late car owned by Mits
dealter. $4990.526-9795
MITSUBISHI PICK-UP '91
75,000 miles, just tuned -
up, new belts. $2800.
Please call 460-3322
MUSTANG ’93
Sunroof, sport tires, AM/
FM, cruise, air bag. 12K.
885-8824.
MUSTANG LX50
1988 convertible. Hi-pwr
upgrades; a/c; all options.
Fast & reliable. $6900 obo.
685-3280.
MUSTANG SVO’86
Black, 5 speed, A/C, AM/FM
cassette, power windows &
locks. $4000 OBO.
Call 866-2546.
NISSAN 240SX1990
Hatchback. 5 speed, A/C,
Stereo cassette. Original
owner. Mint condition.
MUST SEE! No reasonable
offer refused! 887-2401 or
317-9484 bpr
NISSAN 300 ZX ’86
Black leather, electronic
dash, automatic, T-tops.
107,000 miles. $3500. Call l
667-6765
NISSAN 300ZX 2+2 ’87
Burgundy, automatic, A/C,
all power, low miles, tan
cloth interior, $4995. Please
call 861-5742
NISSAN 300 ZX ’91
Twin turbo, automatic, t-
top, lojack, low, low miles,
mint condition,. AM/FM
cass, A/C, $21.5K OBO.
305-927-3951 Iv msg.
NISSAN 300ZX ’90
T-tops, white/burgundy, 5
speed, 44K miles, excellent
condition, $13,900 OBO.
Call 386-3966.
NISSAN 300ZX TURBO, '87
gray with gray leather, 57k A
miles, t-tops, a/c, cruise, full ^
power, must sell, $3,800
obo. Call 628-2592
MERCEDES 380 SL 1982
Both tops, CD player, silver/
blue leather int, all records,
$11,000 worth of work,
double chain, $12,500 obo
Must sell. May trade for MB
190 R300E. (305)561-0307
MERCEDES 300D 75
Classic sedan, built to last,
original owner, needs some
body and engine work, low
milage $800.665-8785
MERCEDES 5O0SL
1985 German beauty. Gar¬
age kept, 17K orig miles. 1
owner, 2 tops. $26K. Call
828-4383/312-3540(bp).
MERCEDES 450 SEL 6.9
79, baby blue metallic, cloth
interior, all options included,
sunroof, power everything.
The world’s fastest sedan
over built. It’s rare and only
$7500. Call 672-7050.
MERCEDES BZ 560 SL ’88
Gray with blue interior,
29,000 original mis, only
serviced by LP Evans,
$33.9K. 866-9313/538-
1242
NISSAN MAXIMA
1985, fully loaded! Has
original paint, plus all new
tires. Must see. Will take
best offer. Call 238-7467.
NISSAN MAXIMA ’87
Fully loaded, original owner,
$4600 OBO. Moving - must
sell!. Please call 535-6511.
NISSAN SENTRA 87
2dr hatchback, royal blue,
85K miles, drives like new,
a/c & heater, am/fm, $1800
OBO. 535-9686
NISSAN SENTRA ’84
5 speed, new tires, runs ji
great. Reliable transporta-^
tion, only $1000.
Call 672-2689.
NISSAN SENTRA 1989
Black, stick shift, 126k
miles. Runs great. Perfect
transportation. $1400 obo.
Must sell fast! 273-0751
NISSAN STANZA XE ’91
Sedan, 5 speed, cold air, CD
player, 45,000 miles, origi-
nal owner, $6000. 682- r
9112
FeD^u^iV 16-22, 1995
New* VhtiWi' w


24-hour tou
dealer invol
really paid I
Information
First minute
Average cc
Neu/Ttmes classified
ch tone hot-line provides
ice cost (what the dealer
for the car), secret rebate ,
I and negotiation strageties
1900-772-3477
free. $7.95 ea. add. min.
ill 5 minutes.
OLDS CUTLASS 72
$320 or best offer. Trans¬
portation special,
does not need inspection.
Call 531-3971.
OLDS DELTA 88 ROYALE
’87, loaded, 4 door, great
condition, new trans with
warranty, $3000. Call 756-
SI 48, leave message.
OLDS DYNAMIC 88,1963
8 cvl, a/c, 48,000 orig mi,
perfect inside and out.
$4500 obo 620-6368 or
beeper 397-9829
OLDS FIRENZA 84
Blue 4 door, Power steering/
brakes, tilt, int exc, some
rust, new hitch, 130K miles
$950 neg. 531-2540
PEUGEOUT 5051987
Auto, sunroof, silver met,
ray int, spotless and only
3400. v Please call 672-
7050.
PLYMOUTH FURY 3 65 -
Runs perfect, needs paint,
Jetson-mobile, low miles,
one owner $1480. Call Kyle:
531-1859
PONTIAC 1989
Bonneville SE. New brakes
and tires. PS, PW, PB, A/C.
Runs 33 miles/gallon.
$3950. 534-2988 ext 308.
PONTIAC FIERO 86
78,000 miles, working a/c,
cassette/radio, sunroof,
mint, gray with gray interior.
$2500 obo. 944-3509
PONTIAC FIREBIRD, 78
Red, auto, rebuilt engine,
350 V8, 58K mi, mags,
needs rear windshield $800
obo as is. 673-8222
PONTIAC GRAND PRIX 89
Automatic, mint condition
inside & out, drives like new,
ice cold air, high mileage,
$4900. 270-8722
PONTIAC GRAND PRIX 79
PS, pb; pw, a/c. Good con¬
dition, runs well. 1 year on
new paint. $1400 obo. 315-
0869, leave message.
PONTIAC GRAND AM 86
4 door, cold a/c, automatic,
power windows, looks
good, runs great. $2200
obo. Call 756-5347
PONTIAC LE MANS 1988
Mint condition, must see,
high mileage but runs great.
$1950. Call Anette 531-
0492.
PONTIAC SUNBIRD 87
Very clean, ice cold A/C,
stereo cassette, 2 door, 90K
miles, auto. $2400. Beeper
366-1089/305-370-6273
PORCHE 9241980
Automatic, Pioneer am/fm
cass radio, excellent trans¬
portation, asking $2000
obo. Must sell 867-9203
PORCHE 928 79
Like new in and out, Guards
Red with black leather, cus¬
tom stereo, asking $6900*
361-7094
PORCHE 944 1985
Excellent cond. $6700.
Black with tan leather int.,
am/fm Cassette, sunroof.
754-1835. Low Milage.
PORCHE CABRIOLET 89
930 turbo, loaded, low
miles, one of 400 built
$62,000. 258-7827
PORSCHE 911SC 82
Only 43K miles, champagne
over burgundy leather, 2
targa tops, air, P/W, incred¬
ible cond. $22,000. 672-
7050/449-0866 bpr.
PORSCHE 944 87
Black with tan leather, 5
speed, a/c, all power, radar,
alarm, Alpine CD, mint con¬
dition, all Porsche parts.
$8500 obo. 461-3040
RAMBLER CONV. 61
6 cyl, 3 speed, new top, new
interior, runs perfect.
$3200, 822-2495/821-3938
SAAB 900 87
3 door. Engine excellent
condition, original owner,
low mileage, $3800. Call
535-9919.
SAAB 9001986
56K original miles, in great
shape, runs great, needs
new front hood ONLY! Au¬
tomatic & very clean.
$1300. 538-7796
SAAB 900S 88
2 door coupe, auto, all pow¬
er, am/fm/cass, 87k miles,
teal/tan. Excellent condition.
666-2505.
SATURN SL2
’93 4-dr. Auto; am/fm cass,
low miles. Gold w/leather;
ABS; airbag. Under warran-
ty, $11,500 obo. 884-1025.
SUBARU JUSTY 89
White, automatic, 3 cylinder,
runs good, 79,400 miles.
$2500. Call 532-5504,
please leave message.
SUBARU SEDAN 84
2 dr $1500 or best offer.
Will trade for truck, van, bus
or trip to Florence, South
Carolina. 221-5127
SUBARU SW1986
Burgundy, auto, power win¬
dows/locks/meter, am/fm,
Mint condition. Great on
gas! $2795 0B0 759-7733
SUZUKI SAMURAI 93
Black, A/C, pull-out stereo,
alarm, 4 wheel drive, 15,000
miles. $7500 obo. Call
538-1535.
SUZUKI SWIFT GT1993
Black, 11,000 miles, $6000
down and take over very
small payments. Call 534-
6645 after 8:00 pm
TOYOTA 4 RUNNER 88
New paint, exhaust, clutch,
and brakes. 160K miles.
Second owner, a/c. $6400
OBO. 534-7572
TOYOTA CAMRY ‘84
4 dr, auto, 4 cyl, sunroof,
AM/FM cass, power win¬
dows, new valve job, runs
great $2200.251-1661
TOYOTA CAMRY
89 5-spd. Silver; a/c; am/fm
cass; ps; pw; pi; pb; p sun¬
roof; tilt; cruise. 75K, mint
$6500 obo. 532-0885.
TOYOTA CELICA GT 83
New silver paint & loaded:
cc, pw, ps, pi, tilt, auto, elec
sunrf, Iftbk, good shp, 87k.
$2200. 598-3611/274-0908
TOYOTA CELICA 86
A/C, stereo, drives perfect.
Good condition. $2600. Call
445-7942.
TOYOTA CELICA GT 89
Conv, blk with blk top, 5
spd, A/C, power windows/
top, new tires, 74K miles
$7499 obo. 452-6506
TOYOTA CONV 1989
Célica, auto, A/C, ps, pb, pw,
pdl, am/fm cass, sec
system. Enkei wheels, tinted
windows. Mint. 53K miles.
$8300 OBO. Bpr 841-1876
TOYOTA COROLLA 89
Red, auto, a/c, am/fm cass,
4dr, Tinted windows. Runs
great! $5500 OBO Call
beeper 544-2828
TOYOTA COROLLA
1983 wagon. Blue; good
tires; runs great; cold a/c;
exc transportation. $1100
obo. Call Axel 391-7031.
TOYOTA CRESSIDA 87
$6000. White, excellent
paint, pdl, pw, luggage rack,
new Pirelli tires, no dents,
excellent running cond.
361-3354 days, 361-8401
eves & weekends.
TOYOTA P/U 1985
Customized walk thru con¬
version with top, Blaupunkt,
ice cold air, 4 speed, new
50’s series tires, $2600. A
MUST SEE! 531-9348
TOYOTA TERCEL 91
2 door, A/C, automatic,
good condition, 67,000
miles. $6300. Please call
535-3762.
VOLKSWAGEN BEETLE 74
Convertible, green, excellent
running condition, clean
white interior. $2000 obo.
673-6692.
VOLVO 240 91
4-dr, A/C, new tires, am/fm
cass, pwr w/l, d/s airbag, ex¬
tra clean, maint records,
54k, $10,900 obo 927-2644
VOLVO 240GL
1982 4-dr. Reliable, runs
great. Good a/c, new front
brake pads & fuel pump.
$2000 obo. 663-4709,
Find a car fast in New Times
Classified's Motor section! All
cars are listed alphabetically,
so it's easy to find the wheels
you've been wishing for. You’ll
also find a variety of boats,
motorcycles, trucks and vans,
and even Motor services like
car repair, window tinting and
more. So take a ride through
Classified’s revved up Motor
section. To sell your car, call
an Advertising Representative
today at 372-9393. Cost is
only $10 for 2 weeks, plus free
renewal until your auto sells!
Automotive
Experts
Non-Profit Consumer Information Service
Recommended by
Motor Trend Magazine.
VOLVO DL 85
4 dr, A/C, 5 spd, cruise, AM/
FM with EQ, very good
condition $2850 obo. Call:
861-8470
VOLVO GL
’90 4-dr. White w/leather.
Auto; am/fm cass; a/c. 60K.
Exc cond. $11,250 obo.
452-0856/436-3813.
VOLVO,850 GLT93
New California aero design,
4 door sedan with touring
package, all safety features,
FWD bright red with dark
grey leather interior. Under
warranty 21,000 miles ask-
ing $23,000. 945-2151
VW BEETLE 77
4 speed, runs great, good
condition, racing engine,
new paint, perfect interior,
extra gauges, beautiful rims
and new tires. $6000, obo,
279-5350
VW FOX GL ‘89
Red, grey interior, 45K mi,
excellent mechanical condi¬
tion, A/C, sunroof, $2495.
868-6823
VWJETTA84
4 door, 5 speed, gray, sun¬
roof, am/fm/cassette stereo,
new starter & alternator,
$1750 obo 663-0437 tvmsg
VW PASSAT GLX 93
Relocating, must sell, 5
speed, red, loaded, under
warranty. Best offer buys.
Call 554-6992.
VW PASSAT 92
Dark marroon, all extras,
alarm, all power, excellent
condtion. 21,000 miles.
$11,600.756-1445
Antiques/
Classics
BUICK GS CONV
1972; 4-spd; a/c; ps; pw;
pb. Orig owner $9700 ap¬
praisal. Sacrifice at $8000
or trade for 1989 or newer.
531-1689.
CADDY COUPE DV 67
Convertible, Mint condition,
all original, original owner
manuals, baby blue/white.
944-7460 or 868-9423
CADDY TALISMAN
76 beauty. 67K; black w/
black velour int & tan top.
Awesome. Great for movie
prod. $5500 obo. 271 -
9775.
CADILLAC CONV
1967; maroon w/white int &
top. All electric; excellent
condition: $7500. Call 751-
1400.
CADILLAC COUPE DE VILLE
1971, all power, everything
works, cool A/C, very clean.
$1100. Please call
893-4456/842-1311 bpr
CHEVY 2101955
2 Door, 6 cyl. 3 speed.
Runs good, needs major
body restoration. $1850.00
obo. Call 751-9813.
CHEVY CHEYENNE 1971
Restored truck. LWB, auto,
350, p/s, p/b, A/C, am/fm/
cass, tool box, side bed
rails, front bumper guards,
dual exhaust pipes, tinted
windows, sculptured inte¬
rior, seat covers and towing
package. $5000.861-3718
CORVETTE 1971
Coupe, t-tops, 350/270
auto. Numbers match. New
red paint & new black inte¬
rior. All gauges & fiber op¬
tics work. PS, PB, chrome
lugg. rack, shoulder har¬
nesses, Alpine stereo, cold
A/C. LOJACK & alarm. Fe¬
male owned. Over $25k in¬
vested. Beautiful car.
$16,900 nego.
(305)596-5638
DODGE CHARGER '67
Rare 2 door hard top, fast
back, preserved, straight
Georgia body. Nice interior.
Runs great. A real head
turner! Drive anywhere.
$3000 obo. 667-4558
FIREBIRD
CONVERTIBLE '68
Late model 400 with turbo,
400 trans, white with black
top. $4200. Call 532-9387
FORD THUNDERBIRD
1962. Red w/white top. Exc
shape, all pwr, runs great.
'Beautiful car, make offer.
Call 532-5911/538-7796.
I MSA STREET TURBO
'84-'90. 4-700+ HP Efig.
Top show-awards 43.5mi
Like 935 Porsche Turbo
Incr int $16K 764-6974.
JAGUAR XKE ROADSTER
74, ground up restoration,
silver with russet interior, 4
speed manual, wire wheels,
A/C, low miles, a GEM! Must
sell, best offer! 377-8419
MERCEDES 1972
Collectors item. 4 dr, newly
painted, rare car, 65k mi,
$9,000 - a real steal. Seri¬
ous buyers call 754-6816.
MERCEDES 280 SE
’69 classic. Leather seats;
6cyl fuel inj; auto; pw. Wa¬
ter-proof bottom, 29K
miles. Call 932-1690.
MERCEDES 250S1967
4 door, auto, air/cond, am/
fm, 6 cyl, gray w/ red inte¬
rior, p/w, p/s, p/b. Needs
work. $1250.00.751-9813
MERCEDES 280SL
70 conv. Exc cond w/2
tops. Auto; a/c; silver w/
burg Ithr. $23K. Orig re-
store. 596-6200/669-1050.
MUSTANG CONVERTIBLE
1972 New paint job; new
roof, runs great, A/C, AM/
FM cassette $6100 obo. Call
Isaac 861-6575
OLDS 4421966
Original owner, automatic,
posi-traction, ps, pb, pw.
$1200 obo. Awesome! Call
769-0827.
PLYMOUTH VALIANT
1960 Deco delight. Re¬
stored; blk/white; spare on
trunk; fins. Very rare, runs
great, $2600.949-3396.
PLYMOUTH VALIANT 1964
Rare convertible, push but¬
ton trans, over $4000 in¬
vested, runs great, $2300
0B0. Call 337-8332 bpr.
STUDEBAKER 62
Lark Daytona, 2 dr hard top,
auto, p/s, runs well, new in¬
terior, many new mechani¬
cals, $6000 obo. 662-2266.
T-BIRD 57
2 tops, gorgeous. 57 Fair-
lane 4 dr, trade cash or real
estate or fine jewelry. Both
garaged 864-5496.
ULTIMATE
DIVA-MOBILE!
1962 Trabant, mint condi¬
tion, red/white ext, red fur
interior. New tires. Fabu¬
lous, cartoon-like car. Defi¬
nitely something Felix the
Cat would drive! A Must-See
Classic. $4500. Call 673-
1688 or 532-4228. Leave
message.
VW BEETLE 72
Blue with white interior, very
good condition, $1300.
448-4835 or 666-6365
VW BUG 69
Totally restored. New: inte¬
rior, engine & body. Prime
condition. Must see and
drive! $2500.672-7097
CLASSIC 68 VW BUS
New engine. Everything
mech replaced. New brakes,
generator, starter. Only
needs a paint job. I have all
receipts of purchases.
$2500. Call Erik, eves 666-
8372.
Recreational
Vehicles
CHAMP MOTOR HOME
Sleeps 10-12 with parking
utils & gen. Sell/trade, share
with responsible person
$5K obo. 221-5127
GO-CART
5 horse power, good con¬
dition, $270 O.B.O. Please
call for more information:
866-0993
HANDYMAN SPECIAL 1970
Starcraft Stare miser, 19’
streamlined fiberglass body
with dual rear wheels, $500.
Dan 305-491-3331
SP0RTSC0ACH ’86
36.5 ft x-country, 2 new A/C
& tires, 27K miles, too many
options to list, ready to go
anywhere, $27.9 0B0. 255-
5644.
Trucks 8 Vans
CADILLAC PICKUP ‘85
Front wheel drive, show car,
teak bed, impeccable work¬
manship, one of a kind!
$15,000. (305)255-3981
CHEVY CARGO VAN ‘83
Beige, in good running
shape, recent servicing,
some new parts. $1500
obo. 538-0207 or 532-4505
CHEVY CUST0MVAN 83
Low miles 65k, fully loaded,
great'condition, $3500 or
best offer, call Jason at
531-9373.
DODGE RADER 4X4
Blue/silver, chrome wheels.
One previous owner. Runs
and looks like new! $5400
obo. 595-5556
FORD CLUB WAGON 79
Custom, excellent working
condition. Automatic, A/C,
P/B, P/S. Must sell $1600.
371-8515.
FORD F-150 XL 93
$10,500. Burgundy, long
bed, bed liner, construction
topper, auto, 34,000 high-
way miles. Cesar 441-2230.
FORD F-350 CREW CAB ’87
Low miles, 2-tone metallic,
all power options incl P/W,
P-locks, air, etc. New tires.
$8750 0B0.672-7050.
FORD FLATBED 1966
Oldie goldie work truck with
removable stake sides: good
running condition. $1500.
Call 667-6350.
FORD VAN E150 84 ,
Runs perfect. Like new, ps,
pb, automatic. Looks great.
$1400 0B0. Call Lou 358-
9032 or 417-0060 bpr.
GMC SUBURBAN 93
1500 SLE, fully loaded, low
miles, tans-con conversion
pkg, like new, must see. Call
643-6851/881-5642 bpr
VW VAN 1975
Driven daily, brand new
tires, new brakes, new paint,
4 speed, many extras.
$1200. Call 442-9725
Motorcycles
BMW R651986
8,000 miles, black, excellent
condition, rack, service
records. $2400. Last year of
model/Classic. 865-7154.
CUSHMAN SCOOTER 76
3 wheel scooter. Used to
put a hot dog cart on. Needs
some work. $500 as is. JP
935-9243,10am-3pm
HARLEY DAVIDSON 74
1200 shover head, black,
very good condition.
$12,500 0B0.673-9512.
HARLEY LOW RIDER 79
Lots of chrome, rebuilt,
runs great!! $6,500 or best
offer. Call: Bp 544-2387 or
892-6494 Iv msg
CUSHMAN TRUCKSTER 81
3 wheel scooter. Used to
put a hot dog cart on. Runs,
nave extra parts. $500 as is.
JP 935-9243,10am-3pm
GABLES HONDA
USED BIKE SALE
’90CBR600 $3698
’93 CH80 Sctr $1198
’89 VTR250 $2098
’94 Secca II $3698
’95 Shadow 1100 ....'....$6998
New’90 CBR1000 $4995
New ’91 ST 1100 $7498
New ’93 VFR 750 $6298
New ’92 CB 750 $3698
7300 BIRD ROAD
266-8300
HONDA CB 650
1980 Full dressed; black;
44K original miles; strong &
dependable. $1000. Call
985-7378.
HONDA GOLDWING SE 91
“Anniversary edition”. Gold
paint, 6 cyl, reverse, loaded,
2 helmets, full cover. Only
19,000 orig miles. Garaged.
$9,900. 407-392-7182.
HONDA SHADOW ’86
Excellent condition, 500cc,
20,000 miles, perfect first
bike, $1375. 672-8260
evenings.
HONDA V65 MAGNA 1984
1100 cc, needs work. $600
obo. Call Amber/Gary: 532-
7963 after 4:00pm or leave
message
KAWASAKI 1000CC 89
Police special, runs perfect,
all the goodies, first $1895!
443-7485
KAWASAKI 1000CC ’89
Police special, runs perfect,
all the goodies, first $1895!
443-7485
KAWASAKI VULCAN 500
‘91, lots of chrome, 5500
miles, no rust, very clean!
Asking $2500. Call:
(305)538-0622
SUZUKI GS425
Excellent condition, runs
great, helmet included, low
miles, good deal $1200.
672-7511
SUZUKI GS1100 1983
Alarm, Yoshimura pipe, hel¬
mets, cover, kryptonite
chain, o ring, exellent con¬
dition. $2000 firm. 531-
6711 ext 217, leave msg
YAMAHA ’88
Very well maintained, black,
runs good, ready to hear a
good offer. Please call
672-8137.
YAMAHA 180 XWAY LEGAL
70 mph, truck, Dole light, all
digital. No wreck or drop.
Everything A-1. $1100. Call
856-3622
YAMAHA FZ600 1989
Midnight blue, great condi¬
tion, 12,000 miles. Must
see! $2500 obo. 256-7950,
call evenings or leave msg.
YAMAHA SECA II ’92
All blk w/ dusted chrome
engine. Mint condition; very
quick 600cc. Helmets, bike
lock incl, only 4,800 miles.
372-7046 or 672-5702 eve..
Boats
121/2 FT ZODIAC
With wheels, $600. 4 HP
Mercury, $300. 6 HP long
shaft Evinrude, $600. Please
call 985-7378.
24’ RACING SLOOP
6 hrspwr long shaft Evin¬
rude, 3 ft draft, very fast,
new canvas, pocket cruiser.
$4000. Call 985-7378.
26 FT PEARSON SAILBOAT
1975, clean, all fiberglass.
$2900 0B0, will take trade
outboard engine + cash. Call
Ashton beeper 290-7095.
27FT CATALINA SAILBOAT
1975. Just re-done engine,
wiring, rigging, head, bot¬
tom, sails. Great boat. Steal
at $8700 or trade for power
boat. 861-8988
38 FT. TRIMARAN
17 ft beam, 3 sails, 1 spin,
extras! $10,000 neg. 576-
2624.
44’ CUTTER
3’6” draft, rebuilt, Perkins
4108, sailing dinghy, pro¬
pane stove, 4 sails, a/c,
$16,000.757-5971
BUFFALO MINI-BOAT
Never been used. 1-2 riders.
Motor and trailer hitch in¬
cluded: Call 305-746-8587
after 6pm for more details.
CATAMARAN SAIL BOAT
14 foot Aqua Cat with trailer.
New tramp. $900 OBO. Call
886-8382 leave your name
and phone number.
GABLES MARINE
USED BOAT SALE
Reflex 94 $6698
Chriscraft 86 $12,298
’94 Bayliner 17’ I/O $8998
Arriva 89 $5998
2550 Bayliner 87 $11,998
7300 SW 41st St
267-2628
HURRICANE SAILBOAT
MOORINGS
At full service marina. Firm
$105/mo. Dingy dock. Vir¬
ginia key 361-1900.


Full Text
February IG-2Z. 1995 FREE
Metro: Conservative
lawmakers have nudists
fighting to save their skins
Volume 9 . Number 44
Theater: Fast games, hard dames, and crying shames
Sink your teeth
into “Taste”:
Pull-out menu
guide inside!

Contents
is Issue
Letters
Reel racism
News of the Weird
Faux poo
12
Program Notes
Live cultures
Swelter
Cogs in a wheel
On the cover:
photo by
«I.K. Yearick
Metro: Exposed facto 7
Proposed anti-nudity legislation has local naturists
hollering, ‘Take it all off!”
By Art Levine
Learning to Scrawl .....15
Handwriting is never merely handwriting. Ask
Miami Beach graphologist Charlotte Leibel.
By Art Levine
Black in the Red 24
Three years after opening, Miami’s only black-owned
department store is in Chapter 11, and owner Charles
Howze is trying his best to sink positively.
By Kirk Semple
Making Whoopi 55
Schmaltz filmmaker Herbert Ross casts Goldberg as a
lesbian lounge singer stuck on straight women. Get us
rewrite!
By Todd Anthony
Volume 9
Number 44
February
16-22, 1995
Metro
Page 7
Troubletown
Page 12
Calendar
Page 38
Life in Hell
Page 40
Ernie Pook
Page 42
Film
Page 55
Shnwtimes
Page 59
Cafe
Page G5
Staff
Editor Jim Mullin
Managing Editor Tom Finkel
Associate Editor Michael Yockel
Assistant Editor Art Levine
Music Editor Greg Baker
Staff Writers Elise Ackerman,
Steven Almond, Todd Anthony,
Tom Austin, Judy Cantor, Jim DeFede,
Kathy Glasgow, Donald W. Pine, Kirk Semple
Copy Editors Ann Clark Espuelas,
Bob Weinberg
Calendar Editor Georgina Cárdenas
listings Specialist Elizabeth Martinez
Proofreader Christine Tague
Contributors Jen Karetnick,
Pamela Gordon
Editorial Department Administrator
Estela Cabrero
Art Director Brian M. Stauffer
Production Manager Carla Peters
Assistant Production Manager
Charles Masella
Editorial Layout Ray Villarosa
Production Sara Kubik, Marcy Mock,
Denise Serrano
Production Intern Brandi Montgomery
Circulation Manager Clarence Jones
Advertising Director Patrick Rood
Senior Account Executives Carolina Falla,
Shari Gherman-Rance
Account Executives Alina Blanco,
Beth Brandes, Luis de Cardenas, Doug Fenimore,
Kara Harris, Steen Lawson, Jacqueline Lim,
Kyle Martell, Jenni Price, Richard Santelises,
Frank Tomasino, Claudia Valencia
Account Managers Hillary Crane,
Andrew Polsky
House Account Manager Jennifer Granat
Sales Assistant Shifra Abramson
Sales Administrator Diane Maxwell
Sales Secretary Julie Ahern
Ad Designer J.P. Robinson
Contributing Ad Designer
Vivian Galainena
Classified Advertising Director
Maureen Bohannon-Olson
Classified Department Administrator
Juan Saborido
Senior Classified Account Representative
Joanne Morrow
Classified Advertising Representatives
Carl Brunswick, Alex Budyszewick,
Tracey Burger, Emilio Cernuda,
Kevin Montgomery, Henry Pinto, Edward Reid,
Jeff Saylor
Romance Director Gaby Rios
Romance Administrators
Jennifer Velazquez, Cory Ramirez
Business Manager Maria Cabrera
Accounting Supervisor Michelle Fabelo
Classified Accountant Moses A. Betancourt
Accounting Clerks Beatriz Avellan,
Orlando Hislop
Computer Systems Specialist
Kevin Mitchell
Front Desk Administrator
Barbara C. Garcia
General Manager Irene T. Bustamante
Publisher Greg Stier
New Times mailing address:
P.0. Box 011591, Miami, FL 33101-1591
Street address:
330 Biscayne Blvd, 10th Floor
Miami, FL 33132-2220
For general information call:
372-0004 or 763-2422 (Broward)
For advertising call: 372-3380
For classified advertising call: 372-9393
For romance information call: 579-1550
Page 2 New Times
February 16-22, 1995

Your Film Festival Hosts: Uncle
Tom and Stepin Fetchit
From time to time, one is rudely reminded in
this city that Florida was indeed a member of
the Confederacy and that the hideous beast of
systematic racism assumes many shapes and
forms. One of those manifestations was
revealed in the programming thrust of the
twelfth Miami Film Festival (“Foreign
Intrigues,” February 9).
While festival organizers espouse the pre¬
sentation of cinematic works from throughout
the world, one could not help but ask: In what
world do these people live? The schedule of
official events is reminiscent of the “unrecon¬
structed” American South, where lavish
expenditures are allocated to appease and
promote Anglo-American-based values and
aesthetic tastes while the needs of the African
diaspora are woefully underfunded and mar¬
ginalized.
The activities devoted to the African diaspo¬
ra cinema, “Cinema and Culture: Black World
Cinema in the Americas,” appears decidedly
malnourished when juxtaposed against the
world cinema. And by the way, where were
the African filmmakers? Where were the
black British filmmakers? Where is Man on
the Shore by Haitian filmmaker Raoul Peck?
One gets the nauseous feeling that the world
of the Miami Film Festival organizers is one
in which the Confederate Stars and Bars-
waves proudly atop a United Nations building
where delegates who have too much melanin
are forced to sit in the back of the general
assembly, the kind of global community in
which Russian racist Vladimir Zhirinovsky
would win the Nobel Peace Prize for his abili¬
ty to bring people together, and the authors of
The Bell Curte would be heralded for their
exemplary work in the field of social research.
Consigning the works of African diaspora
filmmakers to the cinematic equivalent of the
outhouse not only demeans the accomplish¬
ments of these artists (both past and present),
it also arrests the progress of the world cine¬
matic community.
The “Dixie Internationalism” that the
Miami Film Festival has chosen to exhibit is
contemptuous of the cultures ‘created by
members of the African diaspora. In fact, the
undertone of the Old South was so strong that
upon his arrival at the opening-night gala,
someone asked the distinguished and influen¬
tial film critic Clyde Taylor if he was a chauf¬
feur. Maybe the always diplomatic Taylor can
forgive the woman for being so completely
stupid in her yearnings for black servitude.
' But no one should forgive the Miami Film
Festival.
Adrian Anderson,
Miami
Redundancy of the Week:
Dysfunctional Idiotic Racist Nazi
Trash
It’s sad to see how ignorant, jealous, and envi¬
ous is this group of readers writing about
Cubans. The fact is they are wrong. They
should try to read about Cubans and their
struggle to free Cuba before writing stupid let¬
ters with racist overtones. Cubans cannot
leave U.S. soil to fight Castro; they will go to
jail as they have in the past
Stop spreading blame around for your own
dysfünctional lives. I work very hard to live in
a good, clean environment, away from idiotic
Nazi trash. People like Susan Williams and
Mark Scott need to get a life — or get out of it
They will do the nation a favor. Who needs
racists anyway?
Sergio Gonzalez
Miami
Talking About No Revolution
In response to Mark Scott and Eva Louise L
regarding we Cubans being to blame for Cas¬
tro’s takeover, I grant you that as a society we
bear some responsibility for his takeover.
However, history tells a different story. After
the Spanish-American War, the U.S. placed
the Platt Amendment in Cuba’s constitution
(it was repealed subsequently). Said amend¬
ment granted the U.S. the right to intervene
in Cuban affairs. As such, throughout the
years (and two U.S. interventions), we
Cubans grew to rely on the U.S. for support
When people like [the late-television talk-
show host] Jack Paar and other highly placed
Americans and politicians said Castro was
great what were we to think? And when Cas¬
tro took over, who were we to look to for
help?
With respect to the reason for Castro’s
takeover being the “huge” gap between rich'
and poor, think again. The U.N. report on
Cuba for 1959 shows that Cuba had one of the
largest middle classes in Latin America, one
of the lowest infant mortality rates, and one of
the highest literacy rates.
The fact is that no communist revolution
occurred the way Marx predicted. Marx
Continued on page 4
Distribution; New Times is available free of
charge, limited to one copy per reader. Additional
copies of the current issue of New Times may be
. purchased for $1.00, payable at the New Tunes
office in advance. New Times may be distributed
only by New Times’s authorized distributors. No.
person may, without prior written permission of
New Times, take more than one copy of each
New Times weekly issue.
Subscriptions: Domestic subscriptions may be pur¬
chased for $50 yearly or $30 for six months. Mail
to: Subscriptions/New Times, P.O. Box 011591,
Miami, Florida 33101. Delivery may take one
week.
New Times: (ISSN 10723331) (USPS 010669) is
published by New Times, Inc., 330 Biscayne
Boulevard, Miami, FL 33132, weekly, 52 times per
year. Second-class postage rate is paid at Miami,
Florida 33152.
Postmaster: Send address changes to New Times,
Post Office Box 011591, Miami, Florida 33101-
1591. | '•
Copyright The entire contents of New Times are
Copyright 1995 by New Times, Inc. No portion
February ±6—22, 1995
may be reproduced in whole or part by any
means including electronic retrieval systems
without the express written permission of the
Publisher, New Times, 330 Biscayne Blvd., Tenth
Floor, Miami, FL 33132. Please call the New
Times office for back issue information.
I ?J VERIFIED
A m AUDIT CIRCULATION
New Times, Inc.
Executive Editor Michael Lacey,
Design Director Kim Klein, Executive Managing
Editors Christine Fleming, Deborah Laake,
Corporate Editorial Assistant Alex McCall,
Operations Director Marjorie Rothrock,
Computer Systems Dave Ritter,
Corporate Administrator Kathy Ziegler, Director
of Human Resources Yolanda Celis, Financial
Coordinator Michelle Anderson, Sales Director
Michele Laven, Chief Financial Officer Jed Rrunst,
Executive Vice President Scott Spear, President
and Chief Operating Officer Hal Smith,
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Jim Larkin
Treasures of Pompeii...
Classic reproductions, custom upholstery
and finishes, accessories. Complete
Interior services.Centrally Located at
12413 Biscayne Blvd. North Miami.
Call today for our new arrivals, 895-1207

'ALE
5É¡ H°m5. Il§f Lincoln Road Miami Beach • 531-1321
the Beach 1149 Washington Ave Miami Beach • 672-0171
DETAILS
Goodbye. So Long. AuRevoir. Adiós.
Farewell. Afaha. Arrivederd, Adieu.
Sayonara. Auf Wiedersehen,
Cheerio. See Ya Later Alligator.
Bon. Voyage. Bye Bye.
50% Off
Every Wonderful
Thing In Our Store
You’ve got a few weeks to get fabulous deals on the
best vintage clothing and collectibles you’ll ever
encounter...anywhere! Together with an eclectic mix of
mannequins, antique fixtures and props we wouldn’t
have dreamed of parting with before. All because after
8 years of selling the best of 8 decades...we’re closing
the store to do some shopping of our own. Look for us
this spring and summer at major shows throughout
the country or call us for a private appointment. And
watch for our opening ads at our new location this fall.
LAST TANGO
1214"Washington Ave., Miami Beach, (305)532-4228
All Major Credit Cards Accepted
Page 4 New Times
Letters
Continued from page 3
wrote during the Industrial Revolution; an
ideal setting for a Marxist revolution would
have been either Germany or England (a
look at Dickens would tell you why). Howev¬
er, what Marx failed to recognize was that
capitalism would evolve, that history is an
ever-changing and dynamic process. His
dialectical theory was incorrect in that there
is no finality to history (it certainly does not
end in a dictatorship of the proletariat). He
did not see that legislatures, pressured by
electorates, would enact reforms such as
wage-and-bour regulations, child-labor laws,
and so on Does anyone really think the
Cuban revolution was really a “proletarian”
revolution?
José L Lopez-Tariche
Miami
Ah, Those Delicious Trembling
Meatballs
In reference to the recent letter from Sergio
Acosta, who was offended by an opinion from
another of your readers: There is a big differ¬
ence between a soldier of fortune and a plain
soldier. The first is a paid individual, a subject
usually of very bad character, a paranoiac, a
killer, a man without a clear personality. He
does anything for money — even killing the
innocent. The second soldier is a common
individual, too. But he is chosen by an estab¬
lished military system to perform duties with
honor.
The Bay of Pigs was not a clean war, not a
clean invasion. It was an invasion mounted
illegally, in which a bunch of paid soldiers,
usually called mercenaries, were used. Their
good salary was the price. The killings they
could commit were their trophies. Ill bet Ser¬
gio Acosta was there — paranoiac, insensi¬
tive to any good cause. But very well paid, of
course! And with his meatballs hanging but
trembling.
Now he is living in America and ignoring
the very basis of democracy.
Thomas Medigar
Miami Shores
Isolationists R Us
While American citizens are not eating prop¬
erly, going to bed hungry, unable to afford
decent shelter, and can’t find decent-paying
jobs, the government has given away our tax
dollars to help “defend” and “support” those
who won’t do for themselves in foreign lands.
Refugees, both political and economic,
enter our country at will, yet our government
does little or nothing. Then, to add insult to
injury, these same people who did nothing in
their country demand that America do for
them — that we send our loved ones to fight
and die for their country while they sit safely
here in our country, collecting from us tax¬
payers, or displacing our own citizens from
jobs.
Haven’t we, the citizens of this country,
heard enough and done enough for the rest
of the world? Isn’t it time for the people in
places like Haiti, Cuba, et cetera to do for
themselves? If they’re not willing to fight and
die for their own country, why should we?
Why should our loved ones have to sacrifice,
or be sacrificed, to do for them? It’s time for
these people to stay home and do for them¬
selves!
Richard Beattie, state secretary
Populist Party of Florida
Dania
Erratum
In the chart accompanying last week’s article
“Hired Gums,” the Simpson-trial commenta¬
tor information for Channel 10 and Channel
23 was switched inadvertently. New Times
regrets the error.
Conservative.
What
Do
You Think?
February 16-22, 1995

Buries Reports is now
a 1 hour TV fashion
show with a special
appearance bif Lauren
Hutton! See the latest
fashion trends, designer
interviews, stvli
suggestions
makeup tips and much
pore. Plus, you can
order the fashions you
love, as vou watch! Not
going tone home? Be
ire to set vour VCR...
Is an event you don’t
want to miss!

Thinking about buying a fabulous
South Beach Art Deco Condo?
But you're worried about
• Parking • Interest Rates
• Maintaining Older Condos
Vintage Properties wants you to stop
worrying and just enjoy the
South Beach Lifestyle.
That's why our Condos come with:
* Below market 7 3/4% Financing - Fixed Rate forv5 years
(for qualified buyers)
* One year Buyer's Warranty Program covering all
appliances, plumbing, electrical.
* Free one-year residential parking permit usable,
anywhere in the Art Deco District Zone 2
Any more questions?!!
Call Eddy (305) 538-1118
VINTAGE
REALTY
CROUP. INC.
1601 Jefferson Ave. • Miami Beach, FL 33139
Your Authorized COLOR NET Member Broker
To receive above benefits: purchase contract must be signed by 3-15-95
&
like a designer.
Athina Design A.Rtera Made in Spain
180 NE 39 STREET #112. MIAMI. FLORIDA 33137
MIAMI DESIGN DISTRICT
TELEPHONE (305) 573-7711. FAX (305) 576-5229
OPEN SATURDAYS

"I find it offensive that anyone can just
throw down their totoel beside me and
my family and get buck-naked.”
State Rep. Mark Flanagan.
No Butts?
With state lawmakers renewing their threats to ban au naturel
sunbathing, local nudists are undressing for battle
By Art Levine
Nudists of the world unite!
That, in fact, is exactly what hap¬
pened when Miami Shores resident
Richard Mason, president of South
Florida Free Beaches, sounded the alarm
over a bill to restrict public nudity that’s
being considered by the House Criminal
Justice Commjttee in Tallahassee. “This is
more than a nudist issue — it’s a tourist
issue,” says Mason. “When you’re saying to
European tourists, Tour sunbathing customs
are criminal,’ this will literally drive people to
Cuban beaches. This will be the Cuban Relief
Act of’95!”
Using this passionate rhetoric, Mason,
along with lobbyist and fellow nudist Ramon
Maury, launched a grassroots campaign that
has deluged the committee with hundreds of
messages and letters from outraged naturists
in Florida and abroad.
The committee flinched. Slightly. Although
a watered-down bill that restricted nudity in
state parks passed in a close vote, the
proposed measure — which has not yet
been considered by the full House or
Senate — would not affect the most pop¬
ular clothing-optional beaches in South
Florida, Haulover Beach and South
Beach. Even so, Mason and Maury
remain vigilant. “Once this bill goes to
the floor, it’s fair game for anyone who
wants to amend it,” Maury warns. “The
mood of the new legislature is to take
away this freedom from families and con¬
senting adults.”
If the wrangling in committee is any
guide, a citizen’s right to sunbathe in the
altogether won’t be stripped away with¬
out a fight In the state capital, the legisla¬
tive equivalent of mud-wrestling over
nudity is becoming an annual tradition.
This latest bill, as proposed by State
Rep. Buddy Johnson (R-Plant City), Origi¬
nally aimed to prohibit anyone from
being “naked or in a nude state in public
except in any place provided or set apart
for that purpose,” making that offense a
first-degree misdemeanor punishable by
up to one year in jail. It was amended in
committee to cover only state parks. The
measure seeks to remedy what advo¬
cates see as a loophole in the state’s inde¬
cent-exposure statute; state and federal
courts have ruled that the section of that
statute dealing with “exposure of sexual
organs” does not bar nudity unless
accompanied by “vulgar and indecent”
behavior. In 1993, for instance, a federal
magistrate overturned the arrests of
eight nude sunbathers at Canaveral
National Seashore (f/.S. v. A Naked
Person Issued Notice of Violation No.
P41940), prompting state and national park
officials, along with the religious right, to
push for new legislation to sharply limit pub¬
lic nudity. That set off a fusillade of lobbying
in the last legislative session, with the conser¬
vative American Family Association of
Florida summoning its troops and allies to do
battle with a variety of nudist organizations.
The anti-nudists’ main argument is this:
Anyone can walk naked anywhere without
getting arrested. Baloney, say nude-niks, who
point out that the state’s disorderly conduct
statute permits such arrests. Though a
Senate committee approved an anti-nudity
bill, no new law resulted. “That [nudity issue]
assault grabbed everyone’s attention, and we
had no time to attend to other issues,” com¬
plains one legislative staffer rubbed raw by
the politicking.
This year Criminal Justice Committee
chairman Elvin Martinez (D-Tampa) said he
wanted to avoid any distractions by bringing
up the matter early in January. (The bill was
quietly introduced by the chairman himself,
in part because Johnson, its chief supporter,
doesn’t sit on the committee.) Richard
Mason hints at a darker motivation: ‘The
leadership engendered the bill quickly before
we could know about it because they didn’t
want to put up with our lobbying.” Indeed,
the “nonclothing community” didn’t learn
ist clubs that have a combined membership
of 45,000. Those leaders contacted their
members and began bombarding members
of the committee with letters and faxes. Dade
tourist industry officials were also notified,
leading some, including Don Meginley of the
Ocean Drive Association, to pen blistering
missives. “Does everyone in Talláhassee
insist on being offensive to our European visi¬
tors to South Beach, or is everyone in
Tallahassee just stu¬
pid?” Meginley wrote.
“Either way, the Flori¬
da legislature should
be working on getting
people to come to Flor-
ida, not create bills
which chase them
away.”
At the same time,
Mason prepared 4500
copies of an inflamma¬
tory leaflet and distrib¬
uted it at local beaches. /
“LEGISLATIVE ALERT!” it virtually scream¬
ed. “If you are reading this on Miami Beach
or Haulover Beach and you are. nude or top-
free, you will be a criminal on October 1,
1995,” referring to the date on which a new
law, if passed, would take effect The back of
each leaflet listed committee members to
contact Mason also arranged to post similar
and derided the bill as unnecessary ánd
costly. “We do not want our tax dollars
wasted on such a preposterous boondoggle!”
wrote Bruce Frendahl, a former president of
South Florida Free Beaches.
To Cobb, the nudists’ apprehension is
unwarranted. “The bill wouldn’t stop nudity,
or stop tourists from taking off their clothes
in appropriate places,” she asserts. (Nudism
advocates say that without a formal local gov¬
“Saying to European tourists
‘Your sunbathing customs are
criminal' will literally drive
people to Cuban beaches.”
Naked came the lobbyists: Richard Mason (right) is fighting the state's proposed anti-nudity legislation along
with unclothed allies Larry Fleischman and "Silva"
about the bill and the committee’s plans for a
January 24 hearing until the second week of
January — but then they quickly swung into
action.
Hell, it seems, hath no fury like a nudist
scorned. Beginning on the weekend of
January 13, Mason and Maury, among oth¬
ers, contacted members of the “Non-Groiip,”
a coalition representing about 40 Florida nud¬
information on the Internet and America
On-Line.
“The lobbying was very heavy, from all
over the world,” confirms Lynn Cobb, staff
director of thé Criminal Justice Committee.
“My chairman used up an entire ream of fax
paper [receiving messages].” Arriving from
as far away as Australia, the protests warned
that foreign visitors wouldn’t come to Florida
ernment vote permitting nudity in certain
places — a political impossibility — the prac¬
tice might indeed be banned.)
The committee room was packed on
January 24, when proponents and supporters
lined up to testify. Legislators spoke up, too.
Rep. Mark Flanagan (R-Bradenton) fumed, “I
find it offensive that anyone can just throw
down their towel beside me and my
family and get buck-naked.” Chairman
Elvin Martinez, apparently swayed by
the religious right’s propaganda,
intoned, “My understanding of the cur¬
rent status of the law is there’s nothing
illegal, about anyone in this audience
standing up and taking off all their
clothes and sitting here naked.” (In fact,
nobody did so, but anyone who had
would have risked arrest for disor¬
derly conduct; court rulings upheld
such arrests in 1976 and 1986.) On the
other hand, Rep. Sally Heyman (D-
North Miami Beach) argued, “We
don’t have enough money for prisons,
but what do we do? Pass legislation
that makes skinny-dippers sex offend¬
ers. We don’t need to create new crim¬
inals, we need to deal with the crimi¬
nals we have.”
Buddy Johnson and his supporters
sought to downplay the scary eco¬
nomic side effects cited by critics.
“This bill would not put South Beach
out of business,” he said before the bill
was amended to covef only state
parks, adding that the measure is
needed because Florida is a “family-
friendly” state. David Catón, executive
director of the American Family
Association of Florida and a self-
described “former pom addict,” built on
those themes. “Family tourism is the
largest industry in our state,” Catón
declared. ‘We can see that nudists are
very organized, .they’re encroaching on
the beaches, and they’re demanding
more places to show their.. .wares.”
Master strategist Ramon Maury
knows that the fight for preserving truth, jus¬
tice, and the American T & A is a never-end¬
ing one. The bill may reach the floor when the
legislature returns next month, but Maury is
hoping to sidetrack it to other committees
and then work to kill it. “The battle has just
begun,” he promises. We have a long way to
go, and we hope the people of Florida wake
up and tajre action.” |JJ
February lQ-^2, 1995.
New Times Page 7

Competitive Poces
• Dive Classes
• All Major Bran
• Wet Suits • Mas’
• Snorkels • BC’s & Regulators
• Tanks • Instruments
| Let the trained staff at Bubbles help
you put your dive package together.
ubbles
Dive Center
2671 S.W. 27th Ave
Coconut Grove
8564)565
From an array of living
crafts at their most vital
and delightful we bring
you from Indonesia and
India a collection of
objects made for
everyday use.
Seats woven in rattan,
painted cupboards,
latticed windows,
architectural details and
ornamented trunks
are part of our latest
arrivals.
MASALA
3021 SW 28th Lane • 567-1510 • open Monday thru Saturday 11am-6pm
GO AWAY
and take us with you!
A
Sul
Xces .
DAY-OFF
Seachu/eaz
a**:*
1BÉ ; $
Going away this holiday weekend ?
See Alices Day-Off first,
for the best swimwear & coverups anywhere
We make baying swimwear easy.
mm US n
SOUTH MIAMI MIAMI INT'L MALL CORAL SQUARE MALL PEMBROKE LAKES MALL
5900 Sunset Drive 1455 NW 107 Ave. 9149 W Atlantic Blvd. 11401 Pines Blvd.
(corner of U.S. 1 & Sunset) (Near Burdines) Coral Springs Pembroke Pines
10am-ópm Open 10am-9pm Open 10am-9pm Open 10am-9pm
2840301 4770393 345-8141 437-5428
February 16-22, 1995

In the Paint
The Heat didn't hook up with Greg “Bald Eagle" Jackson so
they could sit him on the bench. He’s their first-string
billboard model.
The Miami Heat's newest star, Greg “Bald Eagle" Jackson
By Steven Almond
nn San Antonio seven-foot Spurs cen¬
ter David Robinson glowers from an
assortment of billboards. The image
that towers over Seattle’s highways
is that of fierce all-star forward Shawn
Kemp. The Houston Rockets decorate
their boards with a battery of NBA champi¬
ons — Hakeem Olajuwon, Vernon
Maxwell, Otis Thorpe.
Here in Miami, the player who domi¬
nates the skyline is Greg Jackson.
Jackson’s bald head and muscular upper
body are the star attraction in a trio of
promo billboards sponsored by WBFS-TV
(Channel 33) and WINZ-AM (940), the sta¬
tions that broadcast Heat games. Jackson
is the figure in the Heat uniform who
bursts rocketlike through the word
Smmmoookiri.
Given all the trades the
franchise has made this
season, it’s probably
worth supplying a little
background on the team’s
newest and most visible
star. Jackson is a South
Florida native who
starred as a point guard at
Boca Raton High, and
later logged time at Palm
Beach Junior College
before moving on to
Florida State. At six feet
and 185 pounds, he’s a strong outside
shooter and has excellent ball-handling
skills. His nickname is “Bald Eagle.”
One other thing about Jackson — he
doesn’t actually play for the Heat. He
works for Motorola, in the purchasing
department.
“I buy materials,” explains the 35-year-
old Jackson. “Like for pagers and stuff.”
Confused?
So were we.
So we called Channel 33 to find out what
the deal was. The deal, according to art
director Stacey Panson, is this: “With all
the trades they’ve made, our management
and the Heat were worried about putting a
specific player on the billboard. So we
decided to go with a generic-type player.
He’s a very nice guy,” Panson stresses.
“He just doesn’t happen to be a Heat
player.”
Brian Fein is the award-winning Broward
illustrator who created the billboard — and
discovered Jackson. “He works out at the
same gym as me,” Fein says. “I paid him 50
bucks.”
Jackson is thrilled with the arrangement.
"I haven’t actually seen the billboards
because I live in Plantation, but Brian did
give me some of the pocket-size TV sched¬
ules, and a lot of my friends have called to
tell me they’ve seen my billboard.” (Two
billboards are located along 1-95, one near
the Griffin Road exit in Broward, a second
at 79th Street. A third resides on Biscayne
Boulevard, at the MacArthur Causeway
exit just north of downtown. A fourth is in
the heart of Downtown, off Second
Avenue.)
For those who don’t know Jackson, how¬
ever, the billboard has caused confusion,
according to an informal survey conducted
by New Times this past week at the inter¬
section facing the Biscayne Boulevard bill¬
board. The question: Do you recognize the
man on that billboard?
Respondent 1: “It’s the bald guy —
Harold Miner, right?”
Respondent 2: “That’s Derek Strong,
from the Milwaukee Bucks. Did the Heat
trade for him?”
Respondent 3: “Glen Rice.”
Respondent 4: "Miner.”
Respondent 5: “Get away from my car.”
Jackson himself, who still plays pickup
ball, says he used to be called “Jordan” in
college. ‘These days people say I remind
them of Montel Williams. You know, the
guy on the talk show.”
The confusion is not likely to diminish
come next season. According to Mark
Pray, the Heat’s director of public rela¬
tions, the team will continue to discourage
the use of players’ images on promotional
material. But Pray insists the reason has.
less to do with trades than with “the impor¬
tance of emphasizing the team concept.”
The Heat’s preseason billboard, which
lined 1-95 for weeks, featured another
generic player. “Basically the board was
based on a photo of [guard] Steve Smith,
but the number was airbrushed out,” Pray
says. Smith was subsequently traded to the
Atlanta Hawks.
The Heat, as it turns out, are at the fore¬
front of a movement away from using
actual players to promote. Orlando and
Charlotte also refuse to use players on
their billboards; spokesmen for both clubs
cite the same reason as Pray —' team unity.
But NBA officials are more forthright.
“With trades becoming so prevalent, it’s
foolhardy to sell your product based on an
attraction that may be gone tomorrow,” says
Peter Land, a staffer at NBA headquarters in
New York.
The peril of staking a promotional campaign
on real players in this era of transience was
perfectly demonstrated by the Miami Herald
earlier this year. In their annual special sec¬
tion about the Heat, they ran a full-page photo
of three players: Steve Smith, forward Glen
Rice, and center Rony Seikaly.
Smith, as mentioned, later moved on to
the Hawks. And on the very morning the
special section hit the streets, Seikaly was
traded to the Golden State Warriors. [Q
“He's a very nice guy” stresses
art director Stacey Panson.
“He just doesn't happen to
be a Heat player.”
ROBERT’S
f 0[ ñ
WESTERN WERE
Is Jifl LJ l
The Largest
Jf Accessory éjevíeírij Salon.
Lucchese Dealer
./Y 'mm
in the Southeast
Justin
M[ Durango
Code West
Pnce
&*le
Boots • Jeans
Shirts • Hats
1 â–  *â–  V
5854 South Dixie Hwy
Martines
Valero
South Miami
666:664y
710 WashingtonJtveJAiaroi $010(1 552—2295
February 16-22, 1995
New Times Page 9

INe Day Only
W4
m&t
Our
50W0
O/
/o
¿g$fei$Fetfruary 18th
MM 0AM to 5PM
Í-. !!/'•: •*!Í-í^¿:**",X'¡^l
Furniture Lighting Accessories
Warehouse Address:
2144 SW 38 ST.
FT. LAUDERDALE
a«i.í
N
E
£2
MAKE YOUR
FAVORITE
PHOTO THE
PERFECT GIFT
JUST BRING US YOUR ;
J* PHOTO OR ARTWORK AND
WE'LL CREATE A FULL COLOR
TRANSFER ON A T-SHIRT,
HAT, SWEATSHIRT, ETC
THE PERFECT GIFT THIS
HOUDAY SEASON.
craft.
/ w ^H*d
INC.
Kendall Drive at SW 107th Ave. Miami. 279-2424
Open 7 Days\ â– 
ANNUAL SKI
m
Si-
tCLEARANCE!
the
W¡
m
JUST
PROPpgp
Universal.
Outlet
8789 S. W. 132nd Street (Near the Falls in
South Kendall) 255-1166 UmHod to stock on
hand. Interim markdowns may have been taken.
Dor
Color
ytás
91
NOW
pof
50%
¿tí%
40%
pa%
30%
©
V”
/Kf%r
%mm
20%
It’s
Simple
Leather Boots
NOW
$19.99
your choice
Gregory’s
Discount Designer Shoes
333 Miracle Mile,Coral Gables
461-5195
MIAMI AIR TOUR
Your adventure begins with the unique excitement
of a water take-off. Like a fun park ride the seaplane,
skips across the wave tops, salt spray splashing
your window as you gain speed until the boat
leaves the water and transforms into a plane to
offer you an awesome view of the watery world
below. This 25 minute flight will allow you a whole
new perspective of the coastal city.
BIMINI, BAHAMAS PACKAGES
Nestled amidst balmy tropical breezes, set against
the backdrop of a stunning turquoise sea, Bimini is
a casual barefoot hideaway. Famous for world class
deep sea fishing, these trophy size fish don't need
a‘good story about the one that got away. Lots of
brilliantly colored tropical fish make scuba diving
and snorkeling great, Bimini is only a 25 minute
flight, but it feels like a world away.
A SPLASHDOWN CERTIFICATE
This full color photo is personalized with your name
as a momento of your adventure. It is matted and
framed, and ready to hang. (Other gift items are
also available; call for a brochure.)
GIFT CERTIFICATES ARE
AVAILABLE NOW!
MIAMI: 305-371-8628
FT. LAUDERDAUh 305-359-7980
CHAUCr
J¡g|n¡S canMly h^causfe’they
takefthemselves so 1 i gh1Tv
MCMXCV
RED ROAD
KIDS
Celebrating Childrliff
Past •Pmsfcdát • Future
kdjtoocfe
p
Miami • >6613163 • Mon Sat 10-6
Page lO New Times
February 16^-22, 1995

etro
20,000 Geezers Under
the SeaP
A promoter’s tale of top-secret Euthanasia
cruises" doesn’t hold water
By Dewey Wtebb
hen it comes to bedside manner,
“suicide doctor” Jack Kevorkian
really missed the boat.
At least that’s the opinion of a rival
ji assisted-suicide advocate who claims to
- operate secret “euthanasia cruises” — sui-
'â–  cide voyages for which terminally ill passen-
e gérs from around the nation pay $500 for
[ the privilege of being, wined, dined,
i sedated, and tossed overboard. Harrison T.
f Rogers, the man who purports to have
dreamed up the death cruises, likens
| Kevorkian’s methodology to something
! out of a 1940s horror movie.
“He’s sort of like Dr. Cyclops with all
; his tubes, his syringes, and his
machine,” says cruise director Rogers,
¿ who identifies himself only as a psychol-
I ogist in an uniiamed Midwestern city.
“What he’s doing is a little grisly.”
Many people would undoubtedly say
i the same thing about Rogers’s bizarre
boat rides, which, according to his
claims, set sail from a Fort Lauderdale
marina once a month with up to 25 ter¬
minal patients and their loved ones
aboard. Rogers claims that since 1993,
when he and a handful of like-minded
“trained medical professionals” first
began offering the nonprofit cruises,
he’s helped usher more than 100 grate¬
ful passengers to watery graves.
“The way we set this program up, it’s an
adventure,” insists Rogers. “It’s kind of like
going to the theater and having the last sup¬
per and just going out partying. Then sud¬
denly you go down into Davy Jones’s locker
and it’s all over. And it’s great, because you
planned it that way.”
Noting the wide array of luxuries —
optional amenities include the' round-the-
clock services of licensed sex surrogates of
both genders — Rogers says, “We’re
delighted to offer an innovative and humani¬
tarian plan that circumvents the archaic
laws of the land.”
According to Rogers, practically all of his
passengers have been elderly and suffering
from debilitating, life-threatening disease;
he says most have been recruited through
lectures directed to underground senior-cit¬
izen organizations and euthanasia groups
across the U.S.
To book passage, a would-be client calls a
toll-free number and leaves his own phone
number on a message machine. (New
Times learned of the 800 number, which is
believed to be based in a private home in
Hoboken, New Jersey, through a press
release that arrived in the mail earlier this
month.)
After arrangements are made and legal
paperwork completed (owing to the illegal
nature of his operation, Rogers naturally
H can’t elaborate on details), clients and their
guests rendezvous in Fort Lauderdale,
where they participate in a daylong orienta¬
tion session. On Saturday passengers board
a yacht for a four-hour
cruise into international
waters off the coast. At
noon on Sunday, the
terminally ill voyagers
enjoy a gourmet
brunch spiked with
euphoric drugs before
being dropped into the
ocean with weights
strapped to their
ankles. Celestial organ music drones in the
background. Says Rogers, “People aré
really interested and excited about the pos¬
sibility of terminating this way.”
Well, not everyone. Those in the know
seem to agreé that as a viable euthanasia
technique, Rogers’s lethal Love Boat is just
a bunch of bilge. Members of the Hemlock
Society, a national organization that sup¬
ports voluntary euthanasia through nonvio¬
lent assisted suicide, could scarcely control
their laughter upon hearing of Rogers’s
cruises. “We’ve certainly never heard of this
outfit,” says Carlos Hudson, co-director of
the Hemlock Society’s Fort Lauderdale
chapter. “A lot of people will probably get a
chuckle out of-this,” he adds, suspecting a
college prank in the making, “but it doesn’t
have anything to do with reality.
Somebody’s pulling your leg.”
Asked why the biggest euthanasia organi¬
zation in the world has absolutely no knowl¬
edge of his activities, Rogers (who, to judge
from his telephone voice, is
middle-age) counters that the Hemlock
Society is well aware of what he’s up to;
.‘They’ll never admit it, though, because
we’re kind of competition for them,” main¬
tains the self-styled suicide czar. “They kind
of frown on the fact that we’re making such
a joyous occasion out of this.”
But Rogers is far less successful in
explaining away a glaring flaw in his luxury-
suicide scenario: After one of his passen¬
gers has taken the plunge, how will sur¬
vivors ever hope to settle the estate or
deal with life insurance companies with¬
out benefit of a body, a death certificate,
or even documentation that an accident
at sea actually occurred?
In the eighteen months he’s been feed¬
ing customérs to the fishes, Rogers
insists, no insurance company has ever
rejected a claim resulting from one of his
cruises. “From what I understand, there
have been no challenge3"because the
deceased was lost at sea,” he says. “Keep
in mind that in almost every instance
where there has been insurance
\ involved, the people have been in their
! seventies or eighties, so they are at an
» age when it’s not questionable that they
! would terminate.”
Explaining that he’s late for a top-
secret appointment with Oprah
Winfrey’s people (so secret, in fact, that,
just as Rogers predicts, no one in Winfrey’s
production office will admit to knowing any¬
thing about it), the suicide skipper prepares
to sign off.
But not before first promising to alert the
media: the minute he hammers out a deal to
broadcast one of his seagoing terminations
on national television. CD
“People are really Interested and
excited about the possibility of
terminating this way.”

I
ews
ÍSÍif&SSJv? 'v‘®®W@(!J3'P©W[ai
By uoyt>
DANSlF
TRou8ifroww Finally starts to see
SKins of pecoveny/ a Few New
Bvsinfssfs start and hundríos
of croes arc crFatfd/
Pfopif Start
gVYING ISvm Rocíos
ano Putt in 6
FRIVOLOUS THINGS
OH CkeOlT CARPS/
ALAN GiRfFNSPAN
WAkCS VP WITH GAS
PAINS— WHICH CAN
only tufan one
THING'/
pepueuCAN HA FAT
OfRFGvLATION
EXC/TfS gvSiNfSS-
WHflf CoNiumfR
FPARS THOVNT.'
pRFS IJ)CnT CLINTON
BAIL S-OUT IHexiCAu
6ANKFAS, HI A KING
bankprs bvfrv-
WHf»f pfLlRlOUS!
CRfoiTcards
Cost Nil/CH NlORF
To PAY OFF,
Causing BvRAFR.
Sal(s To t>fciiNe/
THF INFLUX OF
Cash froiyi Bahaa
Strfisand to Bin
Clinton’s 3 lfgal
OFFFNSf TPAHi j
CAVSfS A SHORTARF
IN THF HAONFYa
SutPiY:
TAlr, of Raising
THf nuNiHtinv
wag F cavscsthf
WFAK BlRGFR To
Fall AGainst THF
SPIRALING TACO.'
¿¡¡¡pfel
SHORT ORbtR COOKS
And FRYCHFFS HIT
THF StR(FTS.
TSuzu DFAlFRS
0RACF FOR weL-
fARepe FoRmi
GRCCNSPAN sees
AN APPARITION IN
A FISH tank at a
CkINtse ReSTAURAHT'i
/Jfi
guSiNfSSFS START
TO HAAH6 lonG-
VffDfo CAPITAL
impAove ho fntS
A monitor Litard
SPFAKS TO ALAN
GRcenspani" a
one Am/
FANiILIFS WITH
adji/stabif
IVORTGAGfS COOK
For orphanagfs
For THFIR KIOS/
Lead Story
• In December a jury in Ellsworth, Wisconsin,
deliberated for three hours before ruling
against Stewart Blair in his lawsuit against his
friend, Maurice Poulin, for injuries incurred
when Blair tripped over a snowplow blade.
Blair claimed that Poulin caused the fall when
he startled Blair by accidentally passing gas in
his face. And in a postscript to the trial, as the
jurors ceremoniously exited the courtroom,
the foreman accidentally and audibly passed
gas as he walked by the judge.
The Entrepreneurial Spirit
•In August police in Sao Paulo, Brazil,
arrested master thief Robson Augusto Araujo
and confiscated a stash of his business cards
with the firm name (in Portuguese) “Thefts
and Robberies, Ltd.” and his job title “Thief.”
Though the card’s address was fake, the cel¬
lular phone number was real, along with the
legend “325 iS,” which is the model of BMW
he specializes in stealing.
•And in August police in Chandler, Arizona,
confiscated a videotape allegedly made by
four teenage boys known as the Insane Skate
Posse and containing inspirational promo¬
tional messages of mayhem and destruction
designed to recruit new members for their
gang. They are shown having fun by smoking
marijuana, drinking beer, destroying a parked
car, and making harassing phone calls.
•In October the New York Times reported
that Kimberly-Clark Corp. had received a
patent for chemically realistic, synthetic feces
that it regards as crucial for testing diapers
and incontinence garments.
Technicians had concluded that
makeshift substances, such as
mashed potatoes, peanut butter and
canned pumpkin-pie mix were inade¬
quate because they separated into liquids and
solids more quickly than feces do.
• In December Dr. Henry Abrams of
Loveladies, New Jersey, who was Albert
Einstein’s ophthalmologist and who removed
Einstein’s eyes during his autopsy in 1955
(storing them in a safe-deposit box ever
since), announced the eyes were for sale and
said he expected they could bring five million
dollars.
Overreactions
•Recent Sensitive People: Brenda L Hunter,
age 31, Zion, Illinois, allegedly shot her
brother because she did not like the kind of
cheese he was putting on their chili dinner;
Michael R. Waggoner, age 37, Knoxville,
Tennessee, allegedly shot a man five times in
a bar because he thought the man had asked
“Have you got a light, baby?” when the man
actually ended the question with “buddy”;
Anthony'Foti, age 35, Missasauga, Ontario,
was charged with severely punching and
kicking an elementary school principal
because one of his kid’s teachers was wearing
a skirt that was too short
•The Charlotte Observer reported in June that
a Sanford, North Carolina, man drove to City
Hall wearing only a towel to complain that his
water had been shut off in the middle of his
shower. After the city pointed out that his
account was overdue and that two warnings
had been mailed, the man stood in line, paid
his bill, and drove home to finish his shower.
• In June in Liberty, Ohio, police officer
Bradley L Sebastian, tired of waiting for his
food order at Denny’s, stormed into the
kitchen, held his service revolver to the
cook’s head, and told her he would kill her if
she didn’t hurry up.
•Christian-oriented radio station WKID in
Vevay, Indiana, was burglarized and set afire
in September, probably by the man who
became angry earlier in the day when a DJ
refused to play his request. (The song was
“Don’t Take the Girl” by Tim McGraw. DJs
seeking to avoid trouble are advised to honor
all requests to play that song.)
- By Chuck Shepherd
It's National ¥ Month
The American Heart Association has designated February as "NATIONAL
HEART MONTH". The SPA would like to invite you to participate in Seriously
Affordable Fitness.
Join during the month of February and we'll give you:
1. 50% Off on your Enrollment Fee to get your heart beating.
2. Receive your choice of either One FREE Massage, One FREE Tennis Lesson
or a FREE SPA-Boutique Gift.
3. FREE Computerized Fitness Evaluation.
4. 3 FREE One-On-One Personal Training Sessions.
5. FREE Nutritional Evaluation.
6. FREE Cholesterol screening by Miami Heart Institute.
At the Fontainebleau Hilton Resort
4441 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach
1007 Lincoln Road, South Beach 535-3003
SO ARE
WE!
9P fyffinbfonj
page 12 New Times
February 16—22, 1995

ADVANCING THE ART OF
HOME ACCESSORIES
AVENTURA SOUTH MIAMI KENDALL FT. LAUDERDALE
18721 Biscayne Blvd. 11301 S. Dixie Hwy.'”^ 8514 Mills Drive - 2000 N. Federal Hwy.
(Loehman's Fashion Island) (Suniland Shopping Center) (Town & Country Center). (Capital-Bank Plaza)
937-2638 238-8085 274-7268 566-1969
BOCA RATON
9882 Glades Road
(Westwinds of Boca)
451-1128
Appoint yourself to
The Sup
reme
Courts
Supremely situated.
Tke Courts at S.outk Beack is in tke
keart of Soutk Béack, across from tke
Miami Beack Marina, only steps away
from tke finest skopping and dining
in tke world, two klocks to tke wkite
sandy keack, and a few minutes stroll
from tke kottest nigkt spots, first-rate
tkeater, art galleries and museums.
Supremely spacious.
Resident^ can ckoose from, a wide
selection of tke most luxurious,
inteüigently designed and spacious
floorplans, featuring expansive
private terraces, kalconies and ample
storage room.
The Courts
AT SOUTHBEACH
Exquisitely designed 1 to 4 bedroom condominium townhomes and apartments.
Priced from $159,000 to over $600,000.
Supremely original.
Tkis casually elegant, self-contained
residential community is designed
around tropical gardens and intimate
Courtyards reminiscent of tke
Mediterranean. Everything wraps
around a magnificent 3 1/2 acre
piazza. It even features an on-site
likrary and convenient retail stores.
Supremely appointed.
Tke kigk-teck security, fitness
center, lap and recreational pools,
and indoor racquetkall courts exceed
tke most demanding expectations.
And at Tke Courts, all parking is
Secured and under covér.
Visit us today at First Street and Alton Road or call (305) 53,2-1700. Sales Office open 7 days, 10:00 am to 6:00 pm
Under construction, occupancy Summer of 1995.
. EQUAL HOUSING
Broker Participation Invited. Another development by a subsidiary of the PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL EQUITIES. INC., Group of Companies and an affiliate of COBB PARTNERS. INC. Your assurance of quality from Miami Beach's largest developer, opportunity
Februa r y~ i-0^2 2-j
New" TimSs*Page i3

The World of
FMonnKijw
isrufes n¡v»í
m
nusounn
â– iitrhwav
Florida’s Lowest Prices on
Lexington, American Drew,
Bassett, Singer, Riverside,
Vaughn Basset & Many More
ISKSS!fHB5i3B«l
Mon-Sat 10:(K)-7:(H)
Sunday 12HX) - 5:00
Closed Wednesday
Tenemos
assistentes que
hablan el Español
los fines de la semans
m
No Lie...
Big, Big, Big, Savings
Blaclcwelclers
â– â– â– â– â– hf u r I t u r e
12475 S. Dixie Hwy • Miami • 238-5379
Hours: Mon-Thurs 10-6 • Fri 10-8 • Sat 10-5 • Sun 12-5
The Original Solid Wood Furniture Store.
67 N.W. 167TH STREET • NORTH MIAMI BEACH 33169
651-4999 • FAX 651-3547
Page. 14 New Times
February 16-22, 199 5

Leibel claims to detect your innermost personality traits when examining yoiir handwriting
w r / T £
Inside a cramped studio apartment on South Beach, a
tiny 95-year-old woman in white polyester pants and a
white jacket is watching some of the preliminary skir¬
mishings in the O J. Simpson trial on TV. Hunched
over in her rocking chair, peering intently at the
screen, Charlotte Leibel, like millions of other
Americans, holds strong opinions about the case. As
deputy district attorney Marcia Clark talks on-screen,
Leibel suddenly bursts out, “He’s guilty as hell!” But
unlike most observers of the trial, this particular
viewer has unique insights into O.J.’s personality,
perceptions so special that the tabloid TV show Hard
Copy featured her in December as an expert com¬
mentator on...O.J. Simpson’s handwriting. And this
past Tuesday, she appeared on The Tonight Show
with Jay Leno, right alongside Tom Arnold.
Leibel, it turns out, has about 50 years’ experience
analyzing the handwriting of thousands of people for
clues to the human personality. Her Simpson find¬
ings were ballyhooed at the top of the Hard Copy
show as OJ.’s “Secret Message” contained in the
“suicide note” he wrote on the day he fled in A1
Cowlings’s notorious white Bronco. The note, first
read aloud by his friend Robert Kardashian at a news
conference last June, proclaimed OJ.’s innocence
and love for his ex-wife, Nicole, but Charlotte Leibel
didn’t care about any of that — she just looked at
the individual letters and the style of Simpson’s
penmanship. •
She based her analysis on a careful examination of
BY ART LEVINE
what she and other handwriting analysts say are tell¬
tale signs, such as the slant and size of letters and'
the way loops and strokes are formed. During
Leibel’s segment on Hard Copy, the TV announcer
breathlessly intoned, “Now one of America’s leading
handwriting experts has just finished examining the
note, and what she has to say may shock some of O J.
Simpson’s supporters.” From her couch in her apart¬
d 5 5 e
ment in a public housing project on Alton Road,
Leibel told the TV interviewer, “When I saw his writ¬
ing, I was pretty well convinced that he was capable
of violence.”
Her views on O.J. are discussed in more detail in a
book one of her acolytes arranged to publish this
month, Change Your Handwriting...Change Your
Life. It is a revised version of a 1972 book that.illus-
trates not only how to analyze handwriting but how to
change your personality by altering your handwriting.
This supposedly is accomplished through
“graphotherapy,” an obscure self-help technique.
(Personal problems can be solved, Leibel contends,
by spending 30 minutes a day for several months
practicing new handwriting styles. “It’s the only way
they [people] can really help themselves,” she says in
a forceful manner. “Handwriting is brainwriting. By
changing it, you’re changing the brain.”)
As for O.J., Leibel never had the opportunity to
work directly with him to change his handwriting, so
Continued on page 16
Charlotte Leibel knows all about the handwriting on the
WALL, AND SHE USES IT TO UNLOCK THE SECRETS OF PERSONALITY
Fébrirary^íe-^i'/iléSS New TÍñies Page 15

Writes
Continued from page 15
he remains stuck with the unique stylistic
quirks that mark him, in Leibel’s view, as a
dangerous man. “I’ve never seen such vio¬
lence,” asserts Leibel, who’s also studied
Charles Manson and other sociopaths, as well
as nobler celebrities. “OJ.’s jealousy is seen in
the wavering of pressure as he writes,” she
notes. “His printing is disconnected” —
which, she explains, indicates his indepen¬
dence, stubbornness, and strong feelings that
could lead to violence. Our grade school
teachers were right: Penmanship, it seems,
does count
Over time, Leibel claims, she has discov¬
ered traits in celebrities that were not widely
known at the time she did her analysis. For
instance, in the 1960s, Leibel studied Eleanor
Roosevelt’s signature closely and discovered
that she had homosexual tendencies. The
giveaway, to Leibel, was the distorted way the
former first lady made her lower loops in let¬
ters, such as f which supposedly reflect sex¬
ual impulses; hers had a squarelike appear¬
ance. In recent years, historians have
discussed the possibility of a homosexual
friendship between Roosevelt and journalist
Lorena Hickok. Whatever she discovers,
Leibel holds no doubts about the general
accuracy of her methods.
“It’s the most valuable science in detecting
personality that there is,” she says. (Although
enthusiastic clients and handwriting experts
back up her view, critics point out that few
well-designed studies exist .to confirm
the validity of “graphology,” or handwriting
analysis.)
As in the case of Eleanor Roosevelt, Leibel’s
purported ability to probe the innermost
depths of the human spirit often leads her to
discover hidden truths about people’s sex
lives. When John F. Kennedy was still in
office, Leibel took one look at the enormous y
stem in his signature and concluded, “He had
the most outstanding sexual appetite I ever
saw.” (Only after his death did the country
learn that he was what today would be called
a “sex addict.”)’
Indeed, Leibel doesn’t pull her punches
when making any of her pronouncements,
whether you’re one of the common folk or a
candidate for higher office. For example,
Leibel recalls speaking to a local women’s
Republican club in 1968 when one of the
members handed her a handwriting sample
of a politician about whom she claims she
knew virtually nothing: Richard Nixon. After
glancing at the paper, Leibel told the stunned
audience, “What an opportunist!” Nixon was
elected president, but after he resigned in the
wake of the Watergate scandal, she remem¬
bers, one of the club officials told her, “By
golly, you were right!”
Leibel doesn’t claim to be foolproof, but she
ends most of these tales of her powers by not¬
ing, “I was 100 percent right” It’s no accident
that she makes sure to cross her fs near the
top of the stem: It’s a sign, she says, of high
self-esteem.
There are plenty of people who hold Leibel in
the same high regard. In fact she still has a
handful of clients and friends who see her for
handwriting analysis, counseling, and
graphotherapy. On a recent weekday morn¬
ing, she is working with a woman we’ll call
Louise, a rather tense middle-age recovering
alcoholic. Leibel first analyzed Louise’s hand¬
writing last spring, when the woman was hav¬
ing drinking problems, then began “treating”
her after she left an addiction treatment cen¬
ter last summer. (Leibel usually charges a $35
fee for a 90-minute session.) Louise has
sobered up, joined Alcoholics Anonymous
(AA), and for this session has brought along a
sample of her handwriting from December.
Despite the presence of onlookers, Leibel
mercilessly dissects Louise’s writing — and
personality.
Leibel also remembers clearly the way
Louise’s handwriting once looked. She has,
amazingly enough, the
same vivid memory for
a person’s handwriting
that some people have
for faces. “Her original
writing was entangled
in the lines below,”
Leibel explains. “She
was very confused.”
She turns to
Louise:“You needed
graphotherapy very
badly. I showed you
how to abandon [writ¬
ing] entanglements.
You began to untangle
yourself and think
clearly.”
Louise bristles a bit at
this.-T also stopped the intake of alcohol,” she
points out
Leibel then takes the pages of Louise’s
recent writing and brings them close to her
face, staring at each little detail of the writing
with a circular magnifying glass that she
keeps hung around her neck with a string.
‘Tour writing now shows you are thinking
pretty clearly,” she says. “You’ve shortened
your loops and you’ve begun to regain con¬
trol.” Then she adds, “You still have compul¬
sions and obsessions. That would require a
little psychotherapy.” Louise murmurs in
assent.
Leibel offers Louise more bad news gleaned
from the writing. ‘Tour feelings of inferiority
are no good, either,” she says. “Instead of haw
ing a small I, you should lift it up.” As the ses¬
sion continues, Leibel asks Louise to write a
few more lines on the spot. Using both
samples, she finds that Louise is resentful,
guarded, and repressed — all of which
prompts Louise’s agreement
Suddenly Leibel squints her eyes at the writ¬
ing, looks up, and announces, “Your sex life is
stunted.” Louise is briefly taken aback, then
regains her composure and says, ‘Tes, I live a
celibate lifestyle.”
Leibel blithely moves on, scanning the lines
with her magnifier and continuing to list
Louise’s strengths and weaknesses. Near the
end, Leibel concludes, “You still need treat¬
ment. I can help you accelerate your psy¬
chotherapy. Their costs at $110 an hour are
quite expensive, but if you work with me, I
can help you in a couple of months.”
Leibel advises Louise to spend 30 minutes a
day writing about her problems and hopes,
along with copying an “affirmation” that
Louise selects herself: the “serenity prayer”
widely used in AA.
When it’s all over, Louise is rather noncha¬
lant about the apparent
accuracy and value of
Leibel’s analysis. “None of
it struck me as surpris¬
ing,” she shrugs. “I totally
believe in what she’s
doing. Everything she
said is true.”
“What’s my bat¬
ting average with you?”
Leibel asks.
“As far as your
being right-on? I’d say 100
percent”
“Isn’t that some¬
thing?” Leibel beams,
preening a bit at her
kitchen table.
And Louise
credits her handwriting work with Leibel as
helping her to think more clearly.
Whatever its value, Leibel’s odd therapeutic
approach — as improbable and unaccepted as
it is — actually has won plaudits from a sur¬
prisingly respectable variety of adherents.
“It’s, not hocus-pocus,” says 25-year-old Reed
Martin, currently studying for his master’s in
business administration at Columbia
University in New York City. Martin began
Continued on next page
iedl
* He
k
15 5 ee*\ lrK
or
fre„«re a*
wrf/'¿5* / \ i5
prin/ir^ i 5
a I 5 c- oi~C a*
Secrets of
the Stars
Revealed!
Celebs mind their p's and q’s
What’s pop star Jon Secada really like? One
person who says she knows the answer to
that burning question is graphologist
Charlotte Leibel, who was asked by New
Times to analyze anonymous handwriting
samples from Secada, singer Albita
Rodríguez, and other lesser-knowns, includ¬
ing one of the world’s leading skeptics of
handwriting analysis. What she discovered
about them might amaze and shock you —
or maybe not, depending on your views of
the “science” she practices.
Leibel was handed the unsigned writing
samples by her publisher and promoter, Jeff
Starkffian, who in turn recorded her com¬
ments. She looked at the writing of the
famous (and not-so-famous) closely, examin¬
ing the script with her trusty magnifying
glass. In doing so, she seemingly penetrated
into the hidden recesses of the psyches of
her subjects. Here’s what she found:
Hunky Jon Secada seems to crave what
Freud said all male artists really want: fame,
money, and the love of beautiful women. He
likes “variety, money, and sex...admiration
and attention,” and, to further those goals,
he’s “constantly on the go.” As befits a skilled
song stylist, he’s'“highly imaginative” and
“probably has some technical aptitude.” But
Leibel points out he’s also “quite restless,”
“doesn’t always complete his jobs,” and
“finds it difficult to concentrate.” His emo¬
tional reactions create a “constant need of
expressing himself in words', actions, and
projects.” Lourdes Lopez, a spokesman for
Estefan Enterprises, which manages Secada,
says of these conclusions: “It’s fine, no
problem,”
The charismatic Cuban singer
Albita Rodriguez gives her
blessing — with one excep¬
tion — to Leibefs report ón J
her. A fiery vocalist who fled 1
Cuba for freedom here, it’s!
not surprising that Leibell
concluded that she “wants to]
be independent and individ- ,
ualistic, insists on her opin-i
ions and opposes those that!
don’t agree with her.” As a!
creative entertainer, “many
ideas come surging in her mind
which she likes to execu
quickly.” Still, all is not well: She
has “some disturbance in emotions and __
sex life,” and although she “puts on a little
charm,” she can become “easily withdrawn.”
And she’s a “bluffer.” Albita concurred with
Leibel, although she pointed out, through a
spokesperson, Tm not a bluffer.” (After see¬
ing the results» another staffer, Becky
Fajardo, Gloria Estefan’s sister, was
so impressed that she was
eager to have her handwrit¬
ing analyzed, too.)
Leibel also gave a fairly
precise reading on our
own hawk-eyed managing
editor, Tom Finkel.
Without knowing anything
. about him or where he
worked, she found him to
have such traits as “good
in detail, efficient, good
memory, good level of intelli¬
gence... rather frank and can¬
did.” As those who work with him
W know, he also can be “highly crit¬
ical...obstinate.” The reading contra¬
dicted itself, though, because it said he pro¬
crastinated and was “efficient — gets down
to brass tacks.” What we didn’t know about
him was that he “likes to cuddle.” “She cast a
wide net,” Finkel said, “but yes, I do like to
Continued on next page
Page 16 New Times
February 16-22, 1995

Secrets
Continued from previous page
cuddle.”
She wasn’t so accurate when analyz¬
ing the writing of Barry Beyerstein, a
psychology professor at Simon Fraser
University in British Columbia who co¬
authored a skeptical book on graphol¬
ogy. But then her assessment was
muddied by his obnoxious insistence
on deliberately tilting the paper so his
lines slanted downward — as a result,
Leibel concluded that Beyerstein was
“depressed” when he wasn’t. Other¬
wise, the sneaky professor insisted, he
didn’t change his handwriting. Leibel
said that his effort to fool her “doesn’t
disrupt” her ability to read his personal¬
ity. She found him to have only an
“average education and culture,” and
was a “slow thinker” who needs to
gather data before drawing conclu¬
sions, as well as “possibly [being] a
slow readjer.” She also labeled him as a
“somewhat secretive” man who
“doesn’t express his feelings” and
“doesn’t like the example of his father.”
On almost all counts, Leibel missed
the mark, the wily Beyerstein main¬
tained. “It’s pseudoscientific twaddle,”
he contended. “It’s the kind of stuff you
get from palm readers, full of weasel
Leibel concludes
Albita “insists on
her opinions and
opposes those that
don’t agree with her.”
words.” He pointed to her use of words
such as somewhat and possibly:
“Everyone is somewhat secretive
sometimes.” As for keeping his feelings
bottled up, he’s appeared' on Oprah
challenging psychics: “I’m more open
than the average person.” He was par¬
ticularly appalled by her mediocre
rankings for his intelligence and cul¬
tural background: “I was trained as a
concert pianist.... I have a Ph.D. from
the . University of California at
Berkeley.... I read six to eight books a
week.... I regularly attend the opera,
symphony, and art galleries.” And he
claims to have scored high on reading
and I.Q. tests.
He also admired and loved his late
father, a former member of the
Canadian Parliament and delegate to
the United Nations. Beyerstein’s book
on graphology is dedicated to his
father, although, the professor admits,
he was troubled by his father’s unwill¬
ingness to seek more lucrative work.
Leibel’s analysis, he laughs, “is a hoot.”
Leibel is equally dismissive of
Beyerstein. After learning that he was a
prominent skeptic who derides her
life’s work, graphology, she added
more bite to her original reading. “He’s
got no insight,” she sneered as she
examined his handwriting sample a bit
more. “He’s got a low I.Q. He doesn’t
know what he’s talking about!”
—Art Levine
February 16-22, 1995
Writes
Continued from previous page
visiting Leibel for handwriting counseling
when he was a Miami teenager troubled by
mediocre grades, mercurial moods, and a cer¬
tain aimlessness in life. Today, he notes, “I
cross my fs at the top and now look at me” —
a successful Georgetown University and
Columbia Journalism School graduate seek¬
ing his MBA He compares the new discipline
that has emerged in his life to the benefits
that come from any regimen, even organizing
the socks in your drawer. And he credits
Leibel’s wisdom about life with helping him,
too: “She’s a Yoda-like character in my child¬
hood, teaching me self-discipline and goal ori¬
entation.”
In addition to having his own script ana¬
lyzed, Martin began showing Leibel the hand¬
writing of different women he had dated over
the years. “At first I dismissed what she said,
but she was always dead-on,” he contends. In
one case, he was surprised to learn that a
woman he dated briefly was viewed by Leibel
as having homosexual tendencies; that same
woman later became an active bisexual on the
campus of the college they attended.
“It all sounds ridiculous and fanciful,”
Martin admits, “but handwriting does relate to
certain things in your life.”
Weston Agor, now a professor of public
administration at the University of Texas in El
Paso, is equally fervent in his belief in Leibel’s
abilities. When he first consulted her in 1980,
he was researching how intuition could be
applied in executive decision-making, but he
didn’t have the courage to follow his own intu¬
ition. Leibel told him he ought to break up
some of the connecting script within some of
his words, because that would somehow
work to strengthen his intuition. He followed
her suggestions, then summoned the deter¬
mination to write three books, and in 1990
won a $462,000 research grant for his work.
Did Leibel’s graphotherapy contribute to his
success? “Definitely,” he says.
Despite such testimonials, the use of hand¬
writing analysis and handwriting therapy is
usually ridiculed or, at the very least, con¬
ducted in sécret. “After looking at over 170
well-done studies on graphology, there is no
evidence whatsoever that it can detect the
human traits they [advocates] say is encoded
in handwriting,” says Barry Beyerstein, co-
editor of a book on the topic, The Write Stuff,
and an associate professor of psychology at
Simon Fraser University in British Columbia.
Whether it involves comparing handwriting
analysis with such accepted personality evalu¬
ation techniques as the Myers-Briggs Type
Indicator or matching their findings with the
known attributes of employees, “Grapholo¬
gists can’t perform better than chance,”
asserts Beyerstein. Last fall a report commis¬
sioned by the British Psychological Society
concluded that graphology was a waste of
money and had “zero predictive effective¬
ness.” (In contrast, Robert Backman, curator
pf the Handwriting Analysis Research
Library, in Greenfield, Massachusetts, con¬
tends that there have been 4000 studies over
the last century validating elements of the
method, although they apparently haven’t
been well designed enough to mollify critics.)
Graphology is most widely used in Europe,
particularly in France, where many compa¬
nies employ it to analyze job applicants’per¬
sonalities. Handwriting expert Ron Rice of
New England Legal Investigations, a private
investigation and document-examination firm,
says some American companies—reportedly
including Ford Motors — use the method for
that purpose, as do the FBI and some police
departments around the country; none of
these organizations, though, will confirm that
they’ve used graphology in that fashion. Rice
has handled about 50 business clients that
Continued on page 18
MY VIEW PLAZA CONDOMINIUM
Overlooking Biscayne Bay and Downtown Miami
UNDER CONSTRUCTION
SALE
MMIS
111 â–  i lili:
1 mm it H 8 g.
: • *; *5«i S- m '
mkm. m m m B-.flSj *> "••¡IP1
m si wmüálm . m mH*
• Free Assigned Covered Parking
1 Swimming Pool & Sauna
’ Gym and Outdoor Jacuzzi
1 Meeting Room & Billiards
1 Completely Fenced with
Electric Gate
‘Maintenance from $104
2BR/
2 BA fromi
3 BR fromi
$99,000
116,000
169,000
16 models to choose from
Full amenities, FREE assigned parking, Art Deco area
1621 Bay Road (South of Lincoln.Road) South Miami Beach
538-7488
New times Page 17

Writer's
Cramp
My penmanship, my life
I didn’t know quite what to expect from 95-
year-old Charlotte Leibel, master grapholo¬
gist, when I visited her at her Rebecca
Towers efficiency apartment on South
Beach. Frail-looking, soft-spoken, and wear¬
ing a magnifying glass around her neck, she
didn’t appear to be someone who could pen¬
etrate to the depths of my soul merely by
looking at a few lines of
my notoriously sloppy
handwriting. Indeed, !
was worried that my
handwriting was so poor
that she might mistake
me for, say, a mass mur¬
derer who dabbled in
Satanism.
As a youngster, after
all, I regularly was be¬
rated by menacing nuns
who whacked me with a
ruler for my poor pen¬
manship. (Actually I’m a Jew who went to
public school, but I was so humiliated over
my handwriting it felt like I was being tor¬
mented by nuns.) Now I faced the dreaded
prospect of having my handwriting critiqued
for its appearance and for what it said about
the guilty secrets of my subconscious. I
wasn’t sure I could take the bad news she
might deliver.
Even before I met Leibel in person, her
promoter-cum-publisher Jeff Starkman fast-
talked me into giving him a handwriting
sample he said he’d analyze in conjunction
with her, By the next day, he faxed back to
me a laundry list of my various purported
weaknesses, salted with a few complimen¬
tary phrases; the few positive descriptions
were, I assumed, designed to reassure me
that my life was still worth living.
Nevertheless, as a paragon of strength and
stability, a man for whom the phrase “hap¬
pily well-adjusted” might have been
invented, I was shocked — yes, shocked —
to discover that I was being caricatured as a
demented neurotic. The list of descriptive
phrases he sent me bore an uncanny resem¬
blance, no doubt, to the FBI psychiatric
profile of Sirhan Sirhan, minus the violent
tendencies.
One phrase was listed underneath another
ad nauseam, in a cascade of largely dispirit¬
ing adjectives. Among other things, I was
labeled “secretive,” “obses¬
sive-compulsive neurotic,”
“easily irritated,” and “inde¬
cisive” — and that wasn’t
the worst of it (I’d tell you
more, but I’d like to hold on
to the few shreds of dignify
I have left. If you want to
see the full list please send
$150 to the Art Levine
Psychiatric Fund c/o New
Times, P.O. Box 011591,
Miami, FL 33101.) On the
plus side, I was told I “see
things clearly,” was “versa¬
tile,” and have “good self¬
esteem” (before I read
their graphoanalysis, of
course). After reading the
list I was tom about what I
should do next: commit
myself to a psychiatric hos¬
pital or just go ahead and
make plans to stalk elected
officials with a high-pow¬
ered rifle? I decided it
would be best to get her
judgments on me in
person.‘
As Leibel sat on a couch looking closely at
a few sentences I had scribbled for her, she
glanced up at me and asked, “Are you
fatigued?" As I looked pale and rather
exhausted, it didn’t take a handwriting
expert to see that I was tired. Then she said,
“You may have borderline anemia,” a per¬
ception gleaned from the light pressure of
my handwriting. (Later, when I had a thor¬
ough blood workup done, which I was plan¬
ning to do anyway, I swear, I learned that
while I had a normal blood count, it was on
the low side.) I may have been on the verge
of physical collapse, Leibel indicated, but, to
look on the bright side, at least my different
lines of script weren’t entangled with each
other — these separated lines meant I
Continued on next page
“All these have to change,”
she told me, before
helpfully adding, “You need
psychological assistance.”
Writes
Continued from page 17
have hired his company to analyze the writing
of employee's or applicants. “You can laugh,
but the phone rings and the checks keep
coming in,” he says. ‘They keep us busy.”
(Assessing Leibel, he adds, “She’s a great ana¬
lyst and a great teacher.”)
American businesses, while generally keep¬
ing quiet about their activities in this field,
occasionally have made discreet inquiries to
Leibel about hiring her, she notes. About six
years ago, Leibel says, a Washington person¬
nel firm — she forgets the name — made
overtures to bring her onboard to supplement
their own handwriting analysis staff. And
about twenty years ago, a representative from
Bethlehem Steel made similar inquiries. “I
could have had many positions,” she says, but
she didn’t want to move from the sunny cli¬
mate of Florida.
It’s no surprise that Leibel has been sought
after: Her level of skill is relatively rare. As
she surveys the state of graphology today,
she’s.-dismayed by what she terms the “super¬
ficial” and “shallow” types who have degraded
the technique in recent times. “They used to
do their acts in nightclubs,” she observes with
biting disdain. “They ruined it—and the best
[practitioners] have left.” She’s now one of
just a few widely respected graphologists in
the country, and that bothers her: “It makes
me feel bad. It’s a great science, but I don’t
see it growing.”
When Charlotte Leibel took up graphology in
the 1940s, she’d already had enough careers
and pursuits for a half-dozen lives. Bom to the
prosperous Pollack family in 1899 in Boston
(her father was an importer-exporter of feath¬
ers), she graduated from the New England
School of Law in 1922, joined the state bar,
and became one of the few women lawyers in
the region—just two years after women were
granted the vote. “I couldn’t get a job,” she
recalls. “Nobody wanted to hire a woman.”
She handled only a few cases, and then
decided to audit courses in everything from
psychology to anthropology at Harvard
University, which generally didn’t admit
women at the time. Her professors and fellow
students viewed her as an oddity. “I was such
a rare bird,” she says now.
Indeed, she became a proto-new ager
before the concept
even existed. While at
law school, Leibel took
up the study of mysti¬
cism and became an
adherent of theosophy,
with its teachings
about karma and inner
guidance and supernat¬
ural dimensions. “It
showed me that within
you was every possibil¬
ity you could ever
know,” she explains.
“It was very inspiring.”
Her eclectic pursuits
continued when she became a caseworker
with juvenile delinquents at a Boston social
services agency. After she married a pharma¬
cist in 1931, she became a pharmacist, too.
However, her work allowed her to see first¬
hand the dangers of drugs, and as a result she
turned to alternative therapies. (The switch
has paid off: Although she moves especially
slowly since being injured in an accident last
July, Leibel is in strik¬
ingly good health and
remarkably lucid.)
Back in the. early
1940s, she was, there¬
fore, just the sort of
open-minded person
who would' respond
to a book entitled
Handwriting: The Key
to Personality, which
she found in the Boston
public library. “I took
the book and tried it out
— and found things
about people nobody
knew,” she remembers. In her typical quest¬
ing spirit, she soon tracked down one of the
country’s leading teachers on the subject,
Continued on next page
a YoJa-Ííke
oklrZofcr fry V*-\ ^
o l\ I I J í\ 0 0 J, C cl o (\ I
y+yC Jitciol ¡r\C
clr\J ‘j 0 cl j
or I C0 r\*u
MIAMI BEACH CONDOS
•SOUTH BEACH
•MID-BEACH
•NORTH BEACH
BRET TAYLOR, PRESIDENT, UC. REAL ESTATE BROKER
"THE MIAMI BEACH CONDO SPECIALIST"â„¢
BRET TAYLOR
REAL ESTATE INC.
420 LINCOLN RD • SUITE 2 60 •
531-BRET
5 3 1-2 73 8
MIAMI BEACH • 33139
change your style
IT Foliage frenz^i
Thai-Stule Cushions
at Cornell's
d y * Interior Plants to 8' (j (J
VStfvl • Exterior Flowers & Plants
• Topiary's
I « J ) • Roses on Fortuniana root
Uh • Herbs & Vegetables \u \J]
¿/\) Family Run Since 1959 n
1 Cornell's Nursery M
{imported directly fromThailand
Reasonably Priced.
5 Different Colors!®
rTVl 17091 Biscayne Blvd \\(\
l ' y North Miami Beach \ \
\y 947-4454 SL
C**~~-*T Open 7 days
. 945-8079 - 10am-ltpm Wk
V â– . 3455 NE 163id Street NMB
Page 18 New Times
Fe.l^rupry. 16—22,199 5

C r a m p
Continued from previous page
exhibited clear thinking.
That was just a temporary respite of
good news, however. “Do you waste
time before you get down to essentials?”
she asked suddenly. I always thought
my regimen would be considered the
time-consuming but vital mental prepa¬
ration needed for good writing: a thor¬
ough reading of several newspapers to
keep me abreast of all the latest develop¬
ments, then a brief nap and a brisk walk
to clear the mind, followed by a long
lunch to hone my thoughts. She appar-
?ently thought otherwise. “Before you
make the letter t or i, you make a begin¬
ning stroke,” she pointed out, a sign that
I wasn’t being efficient “Cut that out”
By the time my first session with her
was over, I discovered that I had an infe¬
riority complex (that didn’t square, of
course, with the earlier analysis done
with Starkman that found good self¬
esteem) and that I was moody and rest¬
less at times. The signposts for these
problems, Leibel found, were easy to
spot the varying slants of my writing,
different size letters, too many extra
strokes. “All these have to change,” she
told me, before helpfully adding, “You
need psychological assistance,”
In lieu of the expensive psychological
tr* clinic nt" her handwriting diagnosis
seemed to indicate, I thought I might be
a prime candidate for the cheap, short¬
term approach: graphotherapy, a
method that supposedly changes behav¬
ioral problems by changing one’s hand¬
writing. Given how seriously disturbed
she said I was, I was willing to try
anything.
At our next session, Leibel told me I
had even more problems to tackle,
including thinking loo slowly. I always
had prided myself on my intellect, but
evidently my handwriting indicated that
I took too long to reach conclusions,
perhaps was even a bit slow-witted. “If
you work with me, yóur LQ.-rises,” she
assured me. (One possible solution she
suggested: Make the rounded top of the
m far sharper.) For now, though, she
wanted me to work primarily on ending
those pesky beginning strokes. She also
stressed the importance of making a
consistent, slightly rightward slant, to
help erase shitting moods from my emo¬
tional makeup.
“It takes work,” she warned me.'
Too much work, at least for someone
as moody, fatigued, and restless as me
(if her handwriting analysis of me was to
be believed). I was supposed to spend
30 minutes a night writing in my new
style, including 10 minutes writing an
“affirmation” I selected from a book she
gave me. It began, “The will to accom¬
plish all that I want to do is mine to draw
upon. 1 have the energy to make quick
decisions and to act when action is
called for....” I wrote it only one or .two
times,, then gave up.
.1 was in a Catch-22 limbo peculiar to
graphotherapy. Only by changing my
writing, Leibel believed, would 1 become
the focused, efficient, energetic person I
could be. But to practice the new hand¬
writing style consistently required me to
have the same positive qualities —
energy, efficiency, focus, et cetera —
she said I lacked.
The handwriting, I guess, was on the
wall: Graphotherapy wasn’t for me.
-Art Levine
February ¿’6—22, 1995
Writes
Continued from previous page
Irene Marcuse, and traveled back and forth
to New York to take private classes with
her. “It changed my life,” Leibel proclaims.
She studied Marcuse’s material for five
years, while taking other classes she con¬
tends taught her how to discern health
problems, including cancer, by examining
handwriting.
Handwriting analysis, although derided
by most psychology experts today, had
greater prestige when Leibel first started
practicing it. Her first teacher, Marcuse,
had served as a consultant to famed psy¬
chiatrist Carl Jung and had helped pro¬
mote the concept of handwriting as a key
to unlocking the subconscious. Leibel later
learned the tenets of graphotherapy — as
opposed to just handwriting analysis —
from á variety of books.,
Using all those insights, she slowly
began establishing a client base, first in
Boston, then in Miami after she moved
here in 1946. She gave lectures at Kiwanis
and Lions clubs as well as to members of
other civic groups, impressing those in the
audience and gaining a following that
brought her as many as three clients a day.
A Steel Quisp Clock â–º Spandex Light Sculptures
« 1
a
Crt i? r^O
CuiJc
t\o
i wU/jeftiir
fi?t
¡1
L o2lt\ Jcfcof
tic
t
uK-vílr^ trilito
el Ju
0 o
htc* tdy ' h
Lincoln Road Mall
1671 Michigan Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
305/534-8585
LUNAHKA -
A Lighting and Clock Gallery
i
tr\c, 0 J C J 11\
wr iti »\5*w
â–  After one talk, for instance, she studied a
woman’s handwriting and determined that
the rigid stroke leading into some letters
indicated a strong resentment against a
family member (her husband, the woman
admitted). Leibel asked her, “Do you have
ulcers?”
“I sure do,” the woman answered.
Leibel’s prescription: Abandon the rigid
stroke and steer clear of disturbing situa¬
tions. As Leibel tells it, about a year later,
she again met the woman, who reported
that her ulcers had disappeared along with
the writing stroke that Leibel decried.
Much of Leibel’s work over the years has
served men and women seeking to deter¬
mine the compatibility of potential mates
— she firmly believes it’s all revealed in
the writing. At various times, Leibel
claims, she’s forecast ill-fated relationships
that have ended in divorce, and warned
men against “gold diggers” (the giveaway:
enlarged lower loops). Sometimes she
even has found people who were well
matched. But often her clients are not
happy to hear what she has to say. Even
her own niece complained “that I was hor¬
rible and interfered with her relation¬
ships.” Leibel pauses for a moment and
then adds, “She finally had to admit I was
right.”
Given Leibel’s zeal, though, she never has
been content with merely counseling others,
but rather always has sought to spread the
graphology gospel. By the 1960s, she had
close to two dozen students she taught pri-
Contlnued on page 21
36 Nt First Street • in the Seybold building • Miami • d/d-6zed
Specializing in OIA Cciiiliccl Diamond Engagement and Anniveifiai
r— i
m
diamond!"!
riot in the rough
BÜCHWALD’S
JEWELERS SINCE. 19X2
MIAMI
New Times Page 19

to a Full Service Marina at your Doorstep!
ious one bedroom
s from prices
starting at
just
$79,900,
these deluxe
residences are complete with
and one and a half baths.
Venetia offers an array of ameni¬
ties including 2 swimming
pods, fitness center, tennis &
racquetball courts, 24 hour
security, shop¬
ping on premises
full kitchens, panoramic
bay views, oversized
windows, spacious terraces,
$79,900
CRESCENT
and access
to a full
service marina!
HEIGHTS
Studios, townhomes & 2 bedrooms available!.
IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY
1-800-327-0555
555 N.E. 15TH STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132
Sales office hours: Mon. - Thur. 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. Fri. 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Closed
Oral representations cannot lx; relied upon for accuracy and/or details. For correct representation by the developer, refer to the documents which are to he furnished by the developer to a buy»
or leasee as required by section 718.303. Florida Statutes: All contracts ate subject to tenants fust right of refusal and developer's approval.
EQUAL HOUSING
Page 20 New Times
February 16-22,
1995

Marketing consultant Jeff Starkman championed Leibel's
book after they met by chance
Writes
Continued from page 19
: vately in Miami Beach, and in 1972 Stein and
Day published about 2500 copies of her book,
; Change Your Handwriting... Change Your Life,
: a summation of her 30 years of work in the
field. It still can be found in many public
libraries around the country. She also devel-
I oped a flair for self-promotion, appearing a
[ few dozen times on local radio and lectur¬
ing widely to civic groups.
I Eventually, however, she drifted into
[ obscurity, and after her husband lost virtu-
f ally all their life’s savings through bad
investments in the commodities market
and then died about
r fifteen years ago,
Charlotte Leibel
faced a seemingly
grim existence. “We
were wiped out,” she
recalls, and, at agé
80, she went to work
part-time as an adult
education teacher
for Dade County
Public Schools, a job
she held until she
was 93 years old.
Through it all, her
feistiness and opti¬
mism remained
undiminished, even
as she found it nec¬
essary to move into a housing project for
the elderly about two years ago. (She likes
the amenities, but “as soon as I get a little
money, I’m out of here,” she declares, hop¬
ing for profits from sales of her book.)
About a year and a half ago, she met a
man who would put her back in the lime¬
light. At her chiropractor’s office, she
struck up a conversation with Jeff
Starkman, a long-haired, hard-charging
marketing consultant and real estate
investor. Skeptical at first when he scrib¬
bled a few lines for her, Starkman was *
wowed by Leibel’s ability to determine a “
variety of his traits and problems, from his
fondness for fast cars to his confused
thinking that led to serious mistakes (he
recently had lost a bundle in real estate).
He .remembers, “I’m thinking like, ‘Fuck,
this old lady is practically taking my
clothes off”, [by pinpointing so many per¬
sonal attributes]. She even spotted — but
didn’t tell him then — his bisexuality.
Starkman, now 44 years old, was so im¬
pressed that he vowed
to republish her book.
He also became a loyal
student and client,
changing his script to
write more clearly and
with smaller letters, in
order to improve his
concentration and men¬
tal clarity. But his goal
of putting out a revised
version of her book
remained an unrealized
ambition. “The book
was filled with great
material, but it had no
sizzle,” he says. He
needed a fresh angle,
and then he got his
lucky break: O.J. Simpson was arrested for
murder last June.
“He’s a great salesman,” Leibel now says
of her publisher and promoter. The new
book includes two analyses of Simpson’s
handwriting, including one by forensic
handwriting expert Ron Rice of Boston.
Additionally, its cover is emblazoned with
a pink headline about an “exclusive Q.J.
Simpson profile” and a reproduction of
O.J.’s famous note. Starkman and the
book’s printer, Sol Roskin of Miami-based
Hallmark Press, invested the funds needed
to produce a first run of about 7000 copies.
Along the way, Starkman has become a
skilled novice handwriting analyst himself.
During a recent meal, he casually asks the
waiter to write a few lines, and then begins
reeling off personality traits to the dumb¬
founded worker. “You do a lot of
self-preservation, keeping people
at a distance,” Starkman says.
“Very true,” the waiter, Alex
Pacallao, responds. Starkman
recites other personal features:
“You’re a most loyal friend....
You’re in control of your emo¬
tions.... You live a hermetic
lifestyle....” The waiter keeps
saying yes, and finally exclaims,
“This is scary. You’ve read me
more accurately than anyone has
ever come close to. I got goose
bumps listening to you.”
The real expert, of course,
remains Charlotte Leibel, who
Starkman successfully has placed
on Hard Copy, Channel 7, and in
the ultimate promotional coup,
The Tonight Show. He contacted a
producer on the show, hyped
Leibel’s Hard Copy appearance as
if everyone knew about it, and
managed to convince The Tonight
Show people that, based on tapes
of her broadcast appearances,
she’d be a hit on their program.
The days prior to her appear¬
ance seemed like a gobd omen.
On the flight out to Los Angeles
to do the show, she analyzed the
pilot’s and the crew’s handwrit¬
ing, impressing the pilot enough that he
sat down to chat with her for a while after
the flight was over. Leibel believes, “If I
could examine pilots’ handwriting, I could
find those pilots that are confused and
prone to accidents.” And the day before
Leibel taped her Tonight Show segment,
the ever-hustling Starkman talked his way
into the Los Angeles District Attorney’s
Continued on page 22
A f 5 iV
I Ou'u i
'¿c'bry
rehJ
Ha i Ha orC
cfcouTcl f £ I
cfr\^ 0 r\C A cD
ever ooy^c o¡ 05Í
fos
Magnaâ„¢ Deluxe
All the power and performance of Honda’s legendary V-4 Magna,”
but with a look all its own.
• Powerful V-4 engine offers performance no other custom can match.
• Quarter fairing, flat-style handlebar and chromed four-pipe exhaust
for a hot custom look.
• Special two-tone paint scheme on tank and fenders in your choice
of two color combinations.
• Long 65-inch wheelbase.
• Low, comfortable 28-inch seat height.
Come in and see the new Magna” Deluxe today.
GABLES HONDA
7300Bid Road (2 Blocks East of the Paknetto j
(305)266*8300
Rhonda
Come ride with us.
ALWAYS WEAR A HELMET. EYE PROTECTION AND PROTECTIVE CLOTHING. AND PLEASE RESPECT THE ENVIRONMENT. Obey the law. and read
your owner’s manual thoroughly. Magna” is a Honda trademark. For rider training information, call the Motorcycle Safety Foundation
at 1-800-447-4700.
â– 
at
Zero down.
|Zip.Zil(h.
Nada.
^dealer rightmow apd
buy a brand pew-
1994 Sea • Doo water-
craft with no money
¿own! 'Fhat’s right.
Zero down. Just apply
for your Sea • Doo
Action Credit
and in most cases, get
approval within 30
minutes. Then use
your credit for your
new boat and keep
using it for Sea* Doo..;
'“foshipris^ accessaries
arid service whenever
you want ft’s that
easy. Hey, no wonder
Everybody’s Doin’ It.
EVERYBODY'S DOIN' !T.M
1995 SP&SPI
NOW IN STOCK
â–  mi
â– â– 
â– rrsstfc.
*‘r
HI | -
;||p§ t r • -
llF
GABLES MARINE
7300SW 41 st (Behind Gables Honda) (305)267*2628
® Trademarks Bombardier Inc. © 1992 Bombardier Inc.
February 16-22, 1995
New Times Page 21

Need
A
Psychiatrist?
1 st Consultation Free.
(The Chair is on Sale for $575)
• THE CONNECTION •
DESIGN FURNITURE FOR LESS
5850 SOUTH DIXIE HWY • SOUTH I
661-9345*661-8077
.1 a¿.t. ■? Wmil nv’rtf#
Page 22 New Times
Writes
Continued from page 21
office and managed to present a copy of
the book — and a spiel about Leibel and
her TV appearance — to Marcia Clark’s
assistant. He says he actually was treated
courteously.
On the big day, Leibel came out lash after
Tom Arnold and a comedian. Leno held up
her book for millions to see and said, “From
Miami Beach, Florida, of course, please wel¬
come 95-year-old Charlotte Leibel.” He then
helpéd her walk to her chair, a little lady in a
colorful red jacket. She got the audience on
her side from the* outset, telling how she
analyzed the handwriting of the pilot and
crew on the flight out, to which Leno joked,
“A little late to find that out, isn’t it?”
“That’s true,” she answered, “but it’s good
to know you have capable men running
planes. I haven’t seen but one, but it was
very encouraging.” The audience howled
with laughter.
She patiently explained to Leno, as she’s
done for years, that handwriting analysis is a
science and is used widely in Europe. “Is
that right? Really?” Leno replied, treating
her respectfully.
He soon turned his attention to .the evalua¬
tions she’d done on different celebrities,
including himself. “I was very impressed
with you,” she said, and the audience burst
into raucous applause. Leno posed in mock
vanity as she continued, “You’re distinctly
above average in intelligence, ability, and
personality.”
“A lovely woman,” he said with the faint
air of a boulevardier.
“If I was very much younger, I’d make a
beeline for you,” Leibel told him with a new¬
found comic flair. It brought down the
house.
Leibel smiled broadly and, after the whis¬
tles and applause died down, Leno
remarked, “Now you know how she got on
the show — but don’t tell my wife.”
She then reviewed the anonymous
celebrity handwriting samples that had been
given to her earlier. The first was Tom
Arnold’s, and Leibel looked over at him and
asked, “Is that him?” After the crowd
stopped laughing, she began the matter-of-
fact evaluation, just like those countless
kitchen-table sessions back home. “What I
see here is that you like to be involved in big
deals,” she said. “I got a divorce, actually,”
Arnold offered, “and at one time I was fairly
involved in a big deal.” The audience
laughed, but Leibel, no follower of celebrity
trends, seemed unaware of his famous
breakup with Roseanne. Leibel continued,
“You need recognition...attention...and
admiration,” with which Arnold agreed. A
bit later she looked at the sample for Arnold
Schwarzenegger (with his name embla¬
zoned on the back of the card), but she
talked about him as if she was unaware of
his identity. “He’s a very ambitious and opti¬
mistic person, and wants big things, too.
There’s probably some dramatic ability,
too.”
Before ending with another plug for
.. Leibel’s book, Leno mentioned that she ana¬
lyzed 0 J.’s handwriting in it, but he avoided
discussing the specifics of her findings: “I
don’t want to be prejudicial.” As he held up
the book one last time, he said, “It’s fascinat¬
ing, it really is fascinating.” The segment
closed to loud applause. When she left the
stage, the producer who booked her gave
her a big hug.
A day later Leibel was back in her South
Beach public housing project efficiency,
ready to analyze some more handwriting. “It
was unbelievable to get all that notice,” she
said, and, as always, she’s looking to the
future: “I hope it boosts sales — and I think
Ill go on other shows.” CD
Vented Scenti
for that Spea'dl
Someone.
Women 1
Dept Store
Our Price
Caroline Herrera EDPSploz.
$35.00
$23.00
Champagne EDT Sp ,85oz.
$38.50
$32.00
Dune EDT Sp 3.4oz.
$60.00
$44.00
Poison Tenore EDT Sp 3.4oz.
$58.00
$38.00
273 EDPSploz.
$35.00
$19.95
Perry EHis 360° EDT Sp 1.7oz.
$48.00
$27.00
Sun, Moon, Stars EDT Sp loz.
$30.00
$24.95
H20 EDT Sp 2oz.
$32.00
$22.00
Men
Dept Store
Our Price
Boucheron EDTSp loz.
$35.00
$22.00
Carafma Herrera EDT Sp 1.7oz. $36.00
$26.00
Náutico EDT Sp 3.4oz.
$37.00
$25.00
Paco XS EDT 1.7oz.
$32.00
$19.95
Vented Seed»
8787 SW 132st Miami, 235-7058
1 blk North of the Falls
11401 Pines Blvd. Pembroke Lakes Mall, FL
(305)4300913
2103 Le Jeune Road,
Coral Gables, 305*447*8843
2 c jj- -e i \ t i si;*
February 1.6—>22» 1995

Only 10% Down
1BR from
Penthouses & Deep Water
Marina Slips Available
It’s the lifestyle that’s got all Miami Beach buzzing. Sunset Harbour’s
first waterfront residential tower made history, selling out in less
than 180 days, and is now under construction. Now the South Tower
is open for sales, offering even more of the spectacular Bay, City and
Ocean views, and outstanding at-home amenities just steps from
South Beach. Don’t wait! Visit today for superb pre-construction
prices, and the absolute best choice of floors, views, and floorplans.
Incomparable living, amid the most exciting of locations.
• Magnificent luxury waterfront towers_
with valet parking, 24-hr. security,
Existing world-class marina with baywalk
Sensational floorplans offering spacious living areas, fully
equipped kitchens, marble batns, washer and diyer, ample closets,
state-of-the-art security system
. ,|fa
acqi
media, meeting and
billiard rooms,
and more
•^paciFic^
B3
ffiewóoiM'
Condominiums, Townhomes and Yacht Club
(305)531-1150 1-800-940-1165
• Nearby championship golf course and tournament-quality
tennis courts
• Minutes from Coconut Grove,
Downtown Miami, Bal
Harbour and beyond
Models open daily 10 a.m. to
6 p.m. at 1928 Purdy Avenue
(Sunset Harbour Dr.), Miami
Beach, FL 33139. From the
Venetian Causeway, turn left
on Purdy Ave. Or from Alton
Road, go west on 20th St.
Another development of THE PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL EQUITIES, INC., GROUP OF COMPANIES. Your assurance of quality from Miami Beach's largest developer. Prices subject to change without notice. Broker participation invited.
ORAL REPRESENTATIONS CANNOT BE RELIED UPON TO CORRECTLY STATE THE REPRESENTATIONS OF THE DEVELOPER. FOR CORRECT REPRESENTATIONS, REFERENCE SHOULD BE MADE TO THE PURCHASE AGREEMENT AND TO THE DOCUMENTS REQUIRED BY EQUAL HOUSING
SECTION 718.503, FLORIDA STATUTES, TO BE FURNISHED BY A DEVELOPER TO A BUYER. OPPORTUNITY

f £ í' í »-■ fPO » ill'-i j’i l!<> O
Page 24 New Times
* o7í' i eviftfT

' _ ah» ^ „
imi]
8
VIH
fe "i si? * . v^;
■ »... - ItlJ
<*"»i - ' - r t. - - <
Mlf
\ ■; >- : .':->£/■ £’-■ ::-i;;:::i
um.
• ■.■-i.-, ¿j.. .-■
1
ÍÜÜÉ
I
ia^Mi*B®iiia
«
â– â– 
Everyone expected Charles Howze's Z Mart
to be a model for minority-run businesses in Dade.
In a sad way it was: It went bankrupt.
By Kirk Semple
his isn’t the way it was
supposed to turn out. The vast space on NW 54th
Street in Liberty City once teemed with colorful
merchandise that stretched from the clothing and shoe
departments on one side, through sporting goods and
electronics, to housewares, toys, and health-and-beauty
aids half a city block away. But barren racks and shelves
are about all that’s left now, metal skeletons scattered
across an endless landscape of linoleum. Like a stadium
after a devastating home-team loss, the life has all but
gone out of Z Mart, whose owner filed for bankruptcy last
November. On this cool winter afternoon during its last
weekend of business, the discount store is a cavernous
shell of its former self, littered with the detritus of failed
commerce.
The dregs that remain are strewn along the few short
aisles that are still intact-A smattering of cosmetics, a mot¬
ley assortment of hardware and auto parts. Toys and clean¬
ing solvents. Some of the merchandise is opened and dam¬
aged, elsewhere husks of empty packaging recall other
goods that presumably have been pilfered. Where a staff
of 75 employees once saw to customers’ needs, today a few
workers drag dollies loaded with salvaged inventory des¬
tined for a storage facility in Opa-locka and an uncertain
future. A few doubtful shoppers who’ve wandered in sift
through heaps of half-price odds and ends, looking for
nothing. A lone cashier absently sucks at a soda; the other
*131
February 16-22, 1966
eight checkout counters are empty, their shiny cash regis¬
ters like so many third-stringers sitting dejectedly in
unsoiled uniforms.
Surely no one who attended the store’s August 17,1991,
grand opening foresaw such a fate for this enterprise,
which had sprung from the ambitions of three former
department store managers, all of whom were black, all of
whom had staked their life savings and reputations on
Miami’s only black-owned department store. The trio had
pulled together a diverse team of private financial institu¬
tions to invest in a depressed area that long had been
shunned by most big retailers and financial lenders.
Z Mart was to be an unprecedented community-oriented
enterprise, one that would keep Liberty City dollars in
Liberty City by employing residents, buying merchandise
from local distributors, and gearing inventory toward
black consumers. It was going to provide,a needed boost
to the ailing community and set an example for the devel¬
opment of black-run businesses throughout Dade.
What actually came to pass, however, was three years of
lagging sales that led to major cutbacks in retail space and
staff, and, finally, Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection from
creditors. Charles Howze, the only founder still involved
in the company, has been forced to vacate the massive
retail space. Now, under the supervision of a U.S. bank¬
ruptcy court judge, he hopes to reconstitute his store else¬
where, in a significantly smaller form.
Z Mart’s failures have provoked considerable self-reflec¬
tion in the business community and accelerated an ongo¬
ing reassessment of the way minority businesses, specifi¬
cally black-owned enterprises, are nurtured and financed
in Miami. ‘This was the Super Bowl,” says Bill Wynn, a
long-time Liberty City business leader. “It’s a travesty,
because it had in its dream the potential to really establish
in Miami a visible, high-profile model for the black mer¬
chant class, which is what we really need.”
Indeed, some now wonder whether Miami will ever have
a healthy black entrepreneurial class. Even John Hall, an
executive vice president of the Beacon Council, a quasi-
governmental organization whose purpose is to promote
local businesses, is far from confident. ‘Think about it:
How long have we had to go to get to 1995 and not have
one?” Hall asks, shaking his head. “Are we going to go
another ten years and still not have one?”
â–  0 VISIT Z MART ON ITS
inaugural day was to understand the sense of hope
wrapped up in the enterprise. It’s not every day, after
all, that mayors, commissioners, civic leaders, and business
big shots — not to mention reporters and cameramen and
thousands of community residents — turn out for the open¬
ing of a store.
Continued on page 27
" New Times ^ágé 25

BEAUTY BY PRESCRIPTION
When was the last time anyone called you Babyface?
Is your skin damaged by the sun,
acne prone, oily? Do you have
uneven pigmentation (brown
spots)? BioMedic Ts a clinical skin
care and dermal rejuvenation pro¬
gram that helps smooth wrinkles,
retards the skin’s aging, improves
acne scarring and break outs, age
spots and discolorations all under
the supervision of a Plastic
Surgeon. Appointments available
Mon-Fri 9-6
BioMedic
clinical care lyit:. Sinai Medical Staff Building
* 4302 Alton Rd • Suite 620 • Miami Beach
Wr
i
V
S M ’
...ii#
\
(305)538-8658
FOUR POINTS
International Gifts
Folk Art
Native American Handcrafts
Southwestern Jewelry
Conveniently Located in
Downtown Miami Shores
9608 NE 2nd Ave
Miami Shores, FL • (305) 757-3897
Ree Gift Wrapping Available
Find a car fast in New Times Classified’s
Motor section!' All cars are listed alpha¬
betically, so it’s easy to find the wheels
you’ve been wishing for. You’ll also find
a variety of boats, motorcycles, trucks
and vans, and even Motor services like
car repair, window tinting and more. So
take a ride through Classified’s revved
up Motor section. To sell your car, call
an Advertising Representative today at
372-9393. Cost is only $10 for 2 weeks,
plus free renewal until your auto sells!
c
Representing over 50 Craft Groups from 16 Countries
If You* liked (Ik In San Jam,
You U low (Ik in South Beach! jdSm
Sterling, Vermei from Turkey
Vermeil & Semi-Precious f
Stones from India AK&Ksr _ ?L
932 Lincoln Rd. 534-6087
between meridian & Jefferson
Arnold Preston
Attorney At Law
441-9900
FREE CONSULTATION
Q PAYMENT PLANS Se Habla Español
999 Ponce De Leon Blvd, Suite 1040, Coral Gables, FL 33134
Criminal Law • Felonies • Driver License Suspensions • Misdemeanors
The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements.
Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information about our qualifications and experience.
The Finest
Now you can step out of the
shower every morning with:
• Eyes perfectly lined
• Brows neatly defined
• Lips flawlessly shaped
with a subtle shade of color
Hassle Free Day After Day...
Trained in Europe with seven years experience exclusively in
permanent cosmetic enhancement.
MIRINKA
Cosmetic Creations
...is a prime example of what Redbook Magazine cited as the ideal situation for
permanent make-up application -a clinical environment with a well-trained
technician applying make-up under the general supervision of a physician.
PLEASE CALL FOR A COMPLIMENTARY CONSULTATION
932-5557
One Tumberry-Place * 19495 Biscayne. Blyd.-«Suite 200 • Aventura.; Complimentary Valet Parking
- ■ - - - * - -■ " - - - •’ - 2: - * 4 - -r ^ " I 4 t ^ t ~ i f f * r 7 'F - r jr
NOT A LONG DRIVE
Only Minutes from your
hotel you'll find 2 of Miami
Beach's Finest Golf Courses.
No Clubs? No Problem
Pro-Line Rental
•Clubs Available
ñtt)
Call for Tee Times
532-3350 868-6502
2301 Alton Road 2401 Biarritz Dr.
Miami Beach Miami Beach
Present Coupon
and receive
$5 Off Green Fees
- Good Mon-Sun *
Expires 2/28/95
1 not gooddurinK Twilight
• American Coif.
Page.26 New Times -
February 16-22, 1995

Red
Continued from page 25
Amid all the celebrants, the balloons, and
the streamers, Z Mart had its biggest day of
business ever, recalls 45-year-old Charles
Howze, a man of medium build and a soft-
spoken yet direct demeanor. In a rare seden¬
tary moment, Howze is sitting in a small, win¬
dowless room in the rafters of the Z Mart
â– building, recounting the laborious birth of
the store he now must close. These days he
has been in constant motion, hammering out
the final details of his reorganization plan,
meeting with creditors, attempting to sell
them on his strategies for saving the corpora¬
tion while dismantling the existing store.
He’s so busy he’s had to cancel two sched¬
uled interviews and finally, reluctantly, he
has set aside a couple of hours on a Sunday,
his “rest day” as he calls it But even then, as
he charts Z Mart’s troubled history and unre¬
alized promise, business phone calls inter¬
rupt constantly.
Howze says he hatched the idea of owning
his own store while scaling the corporate lad¬
der. As an undergraduate at Miles College in
Birmingham, Alabama, he’d been recruited
in 1972 to join the Zayre department store
chain. Hiring on ajs a
manager trainee, Howze
rose through the ranks;
in his last position for
the corporation, he man¬
aged 24 stores in Dade,
Broward, and Monroe
counties. When the
department store divi¬
sion was sold to the
Ames chain in 1988,
Howze retained essen¬
tially the same job. Two
years later, Ames filed
for bankruptcy under
Chapter 11 and closed
82 of its Florida stores.
The company invited
Howze to transfer to
Baltimore, but rather
. than uproot his wife and
two kids and move
again, Howze and two of his store managers,
John Kilby and Joan Donaldson, joined forces
to open their own store. To the partners,
there was no question as to the site: Zayre,
and later Ames, had maintained a store at
1100 NW 54th St. in Liberty City, and all
three had worked as managers at that loca-
- (ion. (Howze says the Liberty City Zayre was
particularly successful, turning a profit of
about one million dollars per year at its
peak.) But when Ames pulled out, the neigh¬
borhood lost 100 jobs and for the first time in
eleven years was without a large retail dis¬
count store.
Set on eight acres of parking next to a large
indoor flea market, the new store was to pro¬
vide a commercial and aesthetic boost to a
shoddy corridor. Howze envisioned a thriv¬
ing mall that in addition to Z Mart as an
anchor tenant would include a grocery store
and smaller retail shops.
Howze, Donaldson, and Kilby pooled about
$500,000 in cash, deferred salaries, and prop¬
erty in order to raise collateral for a loan.
(Howze, Z Mart’s president, says his contri¬
bution was $300,000.) They agreed to forgo
vacations and incomes until the store, was up
and running, which meant radical changes in
lifestyles: Howze’s wife, an accountant,
returned to work after several years away.
Kilby’s son, at that time a 24-year-old assis¬
tant manager for Phar-Mor, became his fam¬
ily’s sole source of income. "We worked
every day for a year without a salary, she or
seven days a week,” recalls Donaldson. “I
couldn’t afford to do anything else — no
going out”
For help in clos¬
ing the deal, the three
called on Roderick
Petrey, a partner in the
legal firm of Holland &
Knight, who a decade
earlier had helped form
Tacolcy Economic De¬
velopment Corporation
in Liberty City.
(Founded by Otis Pitts,
who is now deputy
assistant secretary of
the U.S. Department of
Housing and Urban De¬
velopment, Tacolcy has
won national praise for
its efforts in housing
and commercial revital¬
ization.) Having leased
the space on NW 54th
Street, the group began approaching local fin¬
ancial institutions, hoping to raise sufficient
capital to open for business by year’s end.
But the reception wasn’t particularly warm.
‘We’d get commitments, then the commit¬
ments would fall through,” Howze remem¬
bers. “Then they’d renege on other commit¬
ments.”
Then-Miami mayor Xavier Suarez (right) joins Z Mart founders (foreground, from far left) Joan
Donaldson, John Kilby, and Charles Howze at the store's opening in 1991
The partners pushed back their target date,
first to February 1991, and later to May. Both
dates had to be rescheduled. Finally, at the
end of June, they signed a $1.38 million loan
agreement with eight lenders, and hired 75
people, most of whom were liberty City resi¬
dents. “There was a sense of pride, being part
of a startup operation like this,” says Howze,
contrasting the experience with his prior
stints at Zayre and Ames. “It is a lot easier to
feel part of an organization when if s all in one
location. It creates a close-knit organization,
more than if you’re working for a corporation
somewhere else.”
Business realities soon superseded the
communal optimism. In its first year, Z Mart
pulled in about $3.5 million in sales, Howze
says, well below the owners’ original projec¬
tion of $5.4 million. In July 1992 they sought
additional funding from the City of Miami,
which had provided $325,000 of the original
loan. Howze scaled back the staff to 60 and
reduced the retail space from 54,000 to
40,000 square feet As sales continued to flag,
the store subleased space to a hair salon, a
pharmacy, and an insurance business in an
effort to draw more customers. Z Mart also
expanded its niche marketing, opening an
African boutique and augmenting its selec¬
tion of clothing and paraphernalia decorated
with insignias of black colleges, sororities,
and fraternities. (That same year, John Kilby
left the business. While Kilby, now a store
manager for Office Max, refused to comment
for this stoiy, Howze says his former partner
was hard hit by Hurricane Andrew and left Z
Mart to take care of personal matters.)
Sales continued to fall. Second-year rev¬
enues dropped to about $2.5 million, while
third-year earnings hit $1.5 million. By the
third anniversary, the staff had been cut back
to twenty and the retail space to about 25,000
square feet. .Howze’s proposals to create a
mall were rejected by the lenders and devel¬
opment groups he approached. This past
Continued on page 29
<*■*»**%!•
Brimi '
FLORIDA
CORPORATION
INCORPORATE OVER THE PHONE... ITS EASY
COMPLETE - INCLUDES: Articles of
Incorporation, Corporate Minutes, By
Laws, Corporate Book, Corporate Seal,
Stock Certificate, Preliminary Name
Search, State Filing Fees, Attorney’s Fees
Corps also immediately available W/Tax I.D.#
Abo Sub S Corps., Non Profit Corps., Limited Partnerships, Lease
Reviews, LLCs, DBAs, Trademarks, or Business Sale/Purchase
*93, *94, & ’95 Corps also available for immediate delivery
@AMERÍLAWYER® 445-2700 792-8600
Counselor and Attorney at Law visa • m.* rrc.rd •normr-AmEx • Mum a.k
The hiring of â–  lawyer b an important dccWon (hat itinuld nnt be haxd ttArj upon
•drcribcacab. Before jroo decide, ask ni In «cod you free writtca Information about nor
qualification, mod experience. • Lawrnct J. Splegd,Eaq. - Cond Gabies
w
BETTER
HOMES &
BARGAINS
New Times Classified has
the best Real Estate
Listings in Town.
Neu/Ttmes
CLASSIFIED
372r9393
YójpuyGiftfor
the Body & the Mind.
NEW 5 WEEK
BEGINNERS
CLASS STARTING TUES.
FEB. 21 AT 5:45PM
callior more-info.
4
Vj
CLASSES IN HATHA
YOGA WITH
IYENGAR -
AWARENESS
JULIE SHULM AN
DIRECTOR
THE YOGA CENTER
OF MIAMI BEACH
960 Arthur Godfrey Rd, Suite 206
.' Phone: 673-8380
LEVI’S*9»
CD
UP
C0WB0YMTÍ
â–  II P I
ANOMS-JEWELRY-WATCHES
VINTAGE CL0THNG
MILITARY/OVERALLS
1950 FABRIC
1920-1970 S PARTY RENTALS
CHUnreNSL£vrs$5
February 16-22, 1995 â– 
New Times Page 27

"The Exclusive Ocean Drive Address"
ActDeco District, South
Beach-At last a brand new
building on famed Ocean
Drive! Only 50 condominium
villas. This location and
dramatic Mediterranean
architecture ensures the
value of owning one of these
spacious one or two bedroom
residences.
Stroll to the restaurants, dubs
and shops that have made
South Beach the hottest
report spot in the world today.
The details are beyond
ordinary. Large foyers set the
stage for sweeping living
areas. French doors open to
expansive terraces. Oversized
bathrooms enhanced by
degant imported marble
floors and walls.
A lavishly landscaped rooftop
pool and Colonnade Pteza
with dramatic views of
the ocean.
Sales Modd Center open
daily 10 am to 6 pm
Sundays 11 am
Parking on site.
One bedroom residences
from $195,900. Two bedroom
residences from $279900.
1458 Ocean Drive,
Miami Beach, FL 33139
Td: (305) 5353550,
1-800-237-5234.
Condominium Residences
February 16-22, 1995
Page 29 New Timas

Red
Continued from page 27
June, Donaldson, too, left the company
because, she says, “We couldn’t afford to have
both of us on salary.” (She is now a store man¬
ager for Marshall’s.) Finally, on November 15,
Z Mart filed for reorganization under Chapter
11, citing debts of $1.9 million and assets of
$135,499.
The news shook the black business com¬
munity. Under the headline “Z Mart failure is
ours too,” the Miami Times published an edi¬
torial lamenting “the painful process” of the
store’s existence. ‘This Christmas season, as
for any other, our community mil be spend¬
ing millions of dollars. Z Mart should get
some of those dollars,” the editorial urged.
“Mr. Howze and Z Mart should be given
every support For the failure of Z Mart will be
the failure of all of us black people in Miami.”
JS HOWZE AND HIS
creditors sift through the remains of
Z Mart, there emerges a primary —
and unsurprising — reason for the failure:
The store never had enough money. Howze
points out that it took nine months longer
than he had anticipated to finalize a loan,
during which time he paid rent and utilities
on an empty space.
A shortage of money meant shelves
couldn’t be adequately stocked. Howze
admits Z Mart was too big when it opened;
20,000 square feet was probably all that was
needed from the start “We intended to have
roughly $1.3 million worth of inventory, but
we actually opened with $700,000,” notes
the owner. “We could never build up the
inventory across the board:”
This shortcoming may have contributed a
deleterious psychological side effect, says
Elaine Black, executive director of Tools for
Change, a Liberty City-based organization
that provides technical assistance to fledg¬
ling businesses in predominantly black
Dade neighborhoods. “People like to see
well-stocked shelves,” Black asserts. “You
feel good about it, even if you’re only going
to buy one ink pen. People want to walk into
a department store and think they can get
everything they Want”
Money wasn’t the only factor. A full year
elapsed between the time Ames closed and
Z Mart opened. Some, Howze included, con¬
jecture that the delay eroded much of the
loyal customer base Z Mart had hoped to
capitalize on. Simultaneously, a powerful
commercial force was sucking customers
away from stores like Z Mart: a boom in
giant discount and wholesale stores/includ¬
ing Wal-Mart and Kmart. Competing against
these megacorporations, particularly in the
realms of advertising and inventory, was vir¬
tually impossible for a relátively minuscule
operation.
That said, Howze doesn’t fault the neigh-
borhood for not supporting the effort.
“Everybody wants to blame the consumers,”
he says. "If you can convince the world that
the community won’t support its own orga¬
nization, what better excuse is there for
banks and other investors not to invest in
the community? The reason black busi¬
nesses don’t survive in Liberty City is that
we don’t have enough resources to
compete.”
The Z Mart president faults the various
lenders and community-based organizations
for refusing to commit more money in the
beginning, then failing to support his
revised business plans. “They talked about
doing this shopping center, there was a lot
of lip service. But they never came
through,” Howze grumbles, adding that Z
Mart never should have opened without a
grocery store alongside it
The fact that the store opened at all says a
great deal about how emotion dominated
logic when it came to financing Z Mart.
Many observers and some participants say
the desire to open Miami’s only black-
owned department store prevailed over the
meticulous strategizing necessary to open a
financially healthy black-owned department
store.
While reliable statistics are hard to come
by, business leaders generally agree that
blacks own disproportionately few busi¬
nesses in Dade. According to the U.S.
Census Minority Business Enterprise
Survey of 1987, the most recent available,
blacks accounted for twenty percent of the
county’s population, whereas less than six
percent of Dade businesses were black-
owned. Of those firms, less than fifteen per¬
cent (981) had employees. The average
black business employed between two and
three people, far below the county average,
which fell between seven and eight.
(Leaders in the black community say the
numbers probably haven’t changed drasti¬
cally since 1987.)
“This was a chance you don’t see too often
among African-American entrepreneurs,”
observes Roderick Petrey, the Holland &
Knight attorney who helped put together Z
Mart. “They came forward with this plan
and banks thought it would be a good thing
to be involved with. It became a self-rein-
forcing thing. And it had symbolic impor¬
tance way beyond its economic importance.”
Adds Tools for Change’s Elaine Black: “I
think a lot of people realized going into it
that there wasn’t enough money. But do you
kill the business because you don’t have
enough money? Everybody wanted it so
much. We did a lot of soul-searching and we
Continued on page 31
805 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach
(305)673*0023
3117 Commodore Plaza
Coconut Grove
(305)446*5478
- .j§t -
February 16-22, 1995
New-Times Page 29

This is your opportunity
to purchase an ocean
view condominium right
on South Beach
Why rent?
When you can own
at Octagon Towers.
Visit us today.
In the heart of everything,
South Beach Prime location, ocean and city
views, pool, exercise facility, private
parking, walking distance from the beach,
security, and much more. Available Now.
2 bedrooms
from only
$79,900.
As Little As
$3900 Down
Corner of
Washington Ave. & 19th St.
Office Hours Sunday-Friday
Sales Models open daily
9:00am • 8:00pm, Sun. - Thurs.
9:00am - 3:00pm, Fri.
(Closed Saturdays)
1881 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
673-1700
Oral representations cannot be relied upon as correctly stating the representations of the Developer. For
LZüJ representations, reference should be made to the Purchase Agreement and the documents required
equal housing by section 718.503 Ronda Statutes, to be furnished by a developer to a buyer.
AUHMRIE WAYS TO HY
The All New S[9 Five] Schwinn
Aerospace Aluminum Mountain Bike
Come Fly With Us.
Take A Flight
In the All New Macro Maxxum
or the the All New Tarmac
by Rollerblade •
SKATE SHOP
2 Locations 726 Lincoln Road * 532-1954 * Fifth Street and Ocean Drive
532-0054 South Beach... Your Complete Bike and Skate Service.
SCHWINN
CYCLING AND FITNESS
If Your Space Isn't Working
For You, We Should Be
We'll give you exactly what you need to make the most of
the space in every room of your home
• California Closets
• Wall Beds
• Home Offices
• Garages
• Kids' Playrooms
• Laundry Rooms/Utility Rooms
• Entertainment Centers
• Pantries
• Workshops
• Hobby Centers
• Storage Areas
CLOSET COMPANY*
Simplify Your Life
WE EXPORT
CALL FOR A FREE
IN-HOME CONSULTATION
3301NW168 Street, Miami
(305) 623-8282
SE HABIA ESPAÑOL
O 1994 Califomta Coser Company Al Rights Reserved.
Wbdc?w»c» NeNvork Of Independently Owned And Operand franchises
February 16—22, 1995
Page 30 New Times

■¿Some feeTlfj
®re was doomed'
â–  the minute 1
shrewd business!
Judgment tookfl
s
Red
Continued from page 29
decided to take the leap of faith.”
Some feel the store was doomed the
minute shrewd business judgment took a
back seat to passion. “It’s not true business
assistance, it’s char¬
ity,” argues George
Knox, a black lawyer
who is a member of
the board of directors
of Barnett Bank, one
of the institutions that
loaned money to Z
Mart. “The concept
has to be changed
from charity to sen¬
sible investment”
T. Willard Fair,
president and CEO of
the Urban League of
Greater Miami, be¬
lieves too much of Z
Mart’s hope depend¬
ed on the hollow as¬
sumption that blacks
would shop at the
store simply because
it was black-owned.
“Anybody who gave an impression to the Z
Mart owners that they could make this
project work were doing a disservice,” Fair
says. “I think politicians, especially, got
caught up with being part of the announce¬
ment rather than the understanding."
The result, Fair warns, is that Z Mart’s
collapse may do more harm than good to
ongoing efforts to develop black busi¬
nesses in Miami: “It was destructive to the
participants and destructive to the image-
building we have to do in the black com¬
munity. We can ill-afford to continue not to
-be successful.”
a HILE MONEY ALONE
might not have been the answer, it
may have given Howze some time to redirect
the business when it began to fizzle.
Unfortunately, there isn’t
much flexible working capital
in the black community. “For
a long time, African
Americans have been locked
out of traditional sources of
financing,” observes Gregory
Hobbs, president of the BAC
Funding Corporation, another
entity that loaned Z Mart
money. “And we don’t have
‘rich uncles’ — wealthy indi¬
vidual private investors, ven¬
ture capitalists.”
The feet that banks always
have been loath to invest in
black businesses and black
neighborhoods is what
prompted the federal Com¬
munity Reinvestment Act
(CRA) of 1977,. which re¬
quires banks to make loans in
all communities where they
accept deposits. Still, South
Florida banks have an abys¬
mal record in this realm.
Citing federal data, Kenneth
Thomas, a local banking con-1
sultant, says Miami’s CRA
record is third-worst in the
nation, behind only Los
Angeles and Chicago.
Largely in response to pres¬
sure from the Clinton adminis¬
tration, some of South Florida’s biggest finan¬
cial institutions have made gestures to close
the lending gap. This past year, for example, a
group of banks tried to develop the so-called
Overtown Community Banking Center, a
branch office in which several banks would
provide basic services at the same location.
(Despite a population of about 14,000, the
impoverished downtown Miami neighbor¬
hood doesn’t have a single bank.) While
boosters argued that the plan would allow par¬
ticipants to survey the
market before committing
to a fulFservice branch,
critics called the move a
cowardly effort by power¬
ful institutions that have
the ability to do a lot
more. The plans were
shelved this past fall,
when the project was
deemed too cumbersome
to operate. Since then,
two local banks have
announced their inten¬
tions to open branches in
inner-city neighborhoods.
Without banks, minority
entrepreneurs must rely
on community-based pro¬
grams such as the Beacon
Council, Miami Capital (a
lending arm of the City of
Miami), and the BAC.
Once these organizations agree to loan
money to a venture, the thinking goes, banks
are confident enough to sign on, too. The
trouble is, the community organizations
themselves don’t have all that much money,
and what they do have isn’t always conve¬
niently available. The Beacon Council, for
instance, received $1.5 million in posthurri¬
cane aid through We Will Rebuild, but
although those funds were earmarked for
black businesses, they were restricted to pro¬
jects in South Dade.
Financial limitations have forced the BAC,
too, to restrict its program, according to presi¬
dent Gregory Hobbs. A nonprofit develop¬
ment organization established with private
contributions after the McDuffie riots of 1980,
the BAC is now almost exclusively devoting
its resources to financing investments associ¬
ated with minority set-aside governmental
Consultant John Copeland and attorney Roderick Petrey want to
see more “projects of scale" in the black business community
contracts. (Hobbs says the organization
changed its name from Business Assistance
Center to BAC “because we’re trying to stay
away from‘assistance’.”)
Continued on page 33
February 16—22, 1995
Miami 593-6800 CU I ICDf—)C^-T-\v'| fZ Mon-Fri 10-7
Outside Miami Call â–  1 ' â–  â–  ' ' * 1 1 1 Sat 10 - 6
1-800-588-2224 8349 NW 36th St. Sun 1-5
Imported
Sideboards
Available in
Black or Beech
Frames
with fronts in
Beech, Cherry,
Mahogany, Black,
Blue, Green or Red
sizes: 36", 58" & 75"
starting at
Italian'Counter Stools
3 piece entertainment system $1249 or purchase pieces individually:
. Armoire $699 & Bookcases $275 each
/■ y ill SO 4077 Ponce De Leon • Coral Gables
1 vcicwMib fejgr 445-3848
r//. • 'XJ Mon-Thurs 10am-6pm • Fri 10am-Xpm
'-W'K'HUM/tte ¿pf Sat & Sun llam-5pm
New Times Page 31

Incredible
ALL
DESIGNS ARE
EXCLUSIVELY
MADE WITH
TOP GRAIN
LEATHERS &
HARDWOOD
OAK FRAMES
WITHIN. .
..JI MtJl
1423 ALTON ROAD
Leather
305-534-9355
0% TO 30% G
ms
iMLHOor
nsu it
t0rrra K
RLS10MC
FINE SCANDINAVIAN FURNITURE FOR HOME & OFFICE
MAIN STORE: 450 Biltmore Way, Coral Gables, Call: 444-7469 E C© Wt, g£
PLAZA WEST: 12821 North Kendall Drive, Miami. Call: 386-3666
Page 32 New Ti
February 16-22, 1995

Community leader George Knox says banks must stop treating inner
city loans as “charity”
For his part, Charles ethnic communities in Dade County.
Red
Continued from page 31
John Copeland, staff director of Miami
Partners for Progress, argues that Miami
needs a large-scale equity fund for black
entrepreneurs. He envisions contributions
from a variety of private sources, all of which
would have a limited partnership in the ven¬
ture, and thus a stake in its investments. "The
idea is that all the folks would be sitting
around the same table, literally,” notes
Copeland, whose organization was estab¬
lished to help implement the “economic blue¬
print” that emerged from the black tourism
boycott that ushered in the 1990s in Miami.
The Beacon Council is trying to develop
such a fund, using the $1.5 million of hurri¬
cane money as a cornerstone to attract limited
partners from the private sector. The coun¬
cil’s goal: $25 million. “We want banks to be
able to leverage our deals and loan money to
the companies we invest in,” explains Beacon
Council vice president John Hall. Still, the
venture is crippled by its utter lack of a track
record.
Barnett Bank board member George Knox
cautions against viewing a venture capital
fund as a substitute for bank financing. It’s
more likely individual investors will step for¬
ward to participate in a business investment
once a bank has declared its interest in the
project, rather than vice versa, Knox argues:
“A bank’s level of scrutiny is necessary to give
confidence not only to potential investors but
to the community at large that this is a worth¬
while project”
Regardless, he continues, banks must radi¬
cally chánge the way they invest in black busi¬
nesses and low-income communities. As it
stands, many loans are made simply to com¬
ply with federal guidelines, with no hope of
return. “I think if s a recipe for disaster,” Knox
complains. “It’s just play money; no one is
really committed. The attitude here is, “What
can we dp in order to comply? How can we
keep federal regulators off of our backs?’
There’s no heartfelt equity on the part of the
investors. The banks satisfy their minority¬
lending commitments and write it off as a
business loss.”
Knox believes that if change is to occur,
banks must become partners in their invest¬
ments, financially and psychologically: “They
can be more proactive. They can help put
packages together rather than waiting for the
package to come to them. They have to step
forward and become team members. They’ve
got to have a stake in the outcome. They have
to go into it with a reasonable expectation that
there’s a return and that their investment is
big enough to inspire them to get involved.”
Howze welcomes any
movement of parties tak¬
ing a stock in their invest¬
ments. “If you’re serious
about economic develop¬
ment, you’re going to get
that dealing with people
who are interested in tak¬
ing dollars and getting a
return on that invest¬
ment,” he notes. “You’re
not going to get that deal¬
ing with [impersonal]
organizations.”
In recent weeks, the de¬
bate about boosting black
business development has
been informed by two lists
that appeared in the South
Florida Business Journal.
One list shows the 25
largest Hispanic-owned
businesses in South Flori¬
da. With 1993 revenues of
$236,520,000, Sedano’s Supermarkets of
Hialeah is the top-ranked firm. Personnel One
Inc., a temp agency that ranked 25th, showed
revenues of $36,890,000.
The second list ranked South Florida’s
largest black-owned businesses. Toyota of
Homestead topped the rankings with pro¬
jected 1994 revenues of $35 million, lower
than the 25th-place Hispanic firm.
“By and large I think it’s a function of the
lack of wealth in the black community,” con¬
cludes John Copeland of Miami Partners for
Progress, adding that the charts illustrate
how difficult it is for blacks to compete for
minority-designated funds.
Observes Knox: “Those lists are the most
visible expression of truth I’ve ever seen
about the state of the economy among the
HARLES HOWZE WASN’T
trying to save the world, not even a
small slice of it. And he doesn’t need
all the newspaper articles and editorials and
communal fretting and boardroom theoriz¬
ing and Monday-morning quarterbacking
that he and his enterprise have been sub¬
jected to.
“I didn’t really want the burden of having
to be held up as a btisiness that the develop¬
ment of the rest of Liberty City rides on. It
was an unexpected burden heaped on us
right from the\beginning,” he grumbles. “I
guess in a way I was naive. I guess I was
sheltered by corporate life; I perceived this
as a business venture to do something
that’s being done everywhere else. It’s just
a business, quite frankly. This is not a big
project. It’s no big deal.
“Somebody asked me, ‘Well, what if the
business isn’t going to survive?’And I said,.
‘So what if it don’t? Don’t I have a right to
fail?”’
Howze knows his failure might have a
chilling effect on loans to other businesses,
particularly black-owned businesses, that
wish to locate in predominantly black
neighborhoods. In fact, when he was apply¬
ing for funding, at least one bank used the
collapse of another black-owned business
venture — Long’s Office Supply Company
— as a justification for not participating in
the Z Mart project. (Long’s was acquired by
a local black businessman in the early 1980s
with the support of several financial institu¬
tions, but filed for bankruptcy and liqui¬
dated a couple of years later.) ‘This bank
said to me, *We don’t want to get into a deal
like that because this might be another
Continued on page 35
!FREE TO CALL*!
mJrimm mmm*
WITH
LIVE CONNECTIONS
Call and Listen
to very personal descriptions of as many
as 80 people online. Whatever your
mood,send private messages or
connect live. Your discretion
is always assured.
In Broward call: 749-1111
‘.Free call, long-distance charges may apply.For help or information call Customer Service 24|irs @ (305)749-2000. Credit Card memberships available;
Medial does not pre-screen callers and assumes no liability when meeting through this service. For adults only.18 & over. ©1995 Medial®
February 16-22, 1995
Nkw Ti mas i Page 33

Bow - WOW!
5.00 any purchase of
201bs or more ol
• A & A A V*
any purchase of
OFF 201bs or more of
I AMS*5 EUKANUBA*5
OK Feed Stored
Fet. Feed, Lawn G Carden CENTERS
SOUTH MIAMI • 1594 S. DIXIE HWY.
667-3456
HOMESTEAD • 22801KROME AVE.
246-3333
Dog Training Classes
Puppy Class
Basic Obedience
Advanced Obedience
Wednesday Nights
Taught by Canine Connection
Expires 2/23/95
‘WILL YOU JOIN IN OUR CRUSADE?”
Les Miserables
Scenes from past AIDS WALKS
.» AIDS VMtK Miami
Your p I e d g e t o help others
Help us reach our fund raising goal of $1,000,000!
First, take these steps:
* GET AN APPLICATION (AND GET YOUR FRIENDS’, TOO!)
(available at Dade County Public libraries, Spec’s Music, Blockbuster Video & TicketMaster outlets)
* GET YOUR SPONSORS’ COMMITMENTS EARLY
* COME TO SOUTH POINTE PARK FOR AIDS WALK MIAMI AND REGISTER
Sunday, February 26,1995
This year’s guest, Grand Marshall
Rosie O'Donnell
FOR MORE INFO. CALL 757-4444
Sponsors:
DIMENSION
Baptist Hospital of Miami, Hialeah Hospital, Mercy Hospital,
Miami Children’s Hospital, Mount Sinai Medical Center, North Shore Medical Center
Southern BeH
lSOUTH Company
" â– â–  â–  i. JUU//M company
6 jmU23WLTV ®
tJJletUtnvn/ ^eri/ei
(NAYA) 1 N9^¡E9,DN
TheOunkySoufco ^5=====,““**=““i^
PÍA ü! Rejal Caribbean Cruise Line PACE
\ A III 1
Aspen Towers Hotel
MUSI cl PVT Airlines AVuT'“*icmaoncom,
-AlR SOUTH STATSCRIPT Pharmacy IK ¿inii\;rti"^une.s
The year’s most Important fund raising event beneflttlng Health Crisis Network
FEB. 3RD TO MARCH 3RD. MON-SAT 10-6
1940 PONCE DE LEON BLVD. CORAL GABLES (305)567-9191
Living in the nineties means having an active, healthier lifestyle.
Imagine being able to live that lifestyle without being
hindered by thick glasses or bothersome contact lenses.
Don’t let Nearsightedness or Astigmatism keep you in corrective lenses!
TODAY, THERE’S RADIAL KERATOTOMY!
For qualified candidates, RK is an effective, outpatient procedure that
can reduce or eliminate your dependency on glasses and contact lenses.
RK has been improving the vision of nearsighted people for over 15 years!
If you’d like to learn more about the benefits of RK and live an active
lifestyle without glasses or contacts, call the Jaffe Eye Institute today.
We’ll schedule a FREE screening to determine if you’re a
candidate for RK, or send you a FREE RK audiotape brochure.
JAFFE 945-7433
EYE INSTITUTE, P.A.
CALL 945-7433 TO SCHEDULE
YOUR FREE RK SCREENING
Page 34 New Times
February 16-22, 1995

n—
So. Florida’s Premier
Adult Department Store
• leathers
• oils
• lotions
• lingerie
•gifts
• teddies
• new hot
sexy dresses
• dancewear
• sexy men’s
briefs
• adult novelties
• 3000 mature
theme videos
Discreet & Convenient Shop by Mail
from Something Sexy
â–¡ Adult Toy Catalog
$5™ per catalog • Si?1 off first order
â–¡ I lingerie Catalog
$3'°per catalog S3 w off first order
Send check or M.O. to:
Something Sexy
48 NE 167 St • No. Miami Beach 33162
WE EXPORT
&
WHOLESALE
Sexy-We’ve got it"
Something Sexy
for Him & Her
48 NE 167 St. NMB
949-6775
Fax:936-1352
(located 1/4 mile East of
Golden Glades Interchange)
President’s Day
get caught
with your
pants down.
I
1
$
to*
%
to
n
$
|
n
LIBRA
sou/A\6eacA
629 Lincoln Rd.Mall
Miami Beach • 531-1884
Red
Continued from page 33
Long’s,’” Howze remembers. “I said, “What
does that have to do with me?’ It’s amazing
how big Miami is and how small people
think when it comes to black business and,
in general, business in Liberty City.”
Howze’s observation notwithstanding,
some people are trying to think big. “In the
private sector, we have an awful lot of failure.
So one in Liberty City shouldn’t scare any¬
one off,” says attorney Roderick Petrey, who
is also the executive director of Miami
Partners for Progress. “It’s going to, I’m
afraid, but it shouldn’t. It’s too easy not to
make investments in this field. We need 100
more experiments like Z Mart”
Petrey and others hope that along with Z
Mart’s endeavor, projects such as the hotels
planned for Miami Beach and Overtown
signal a trend toward more ambitious black-
owned developments — “projects of scale” in
business-speak. But they want even more.
The Beacon Council’s John Hall has a goal of
a dozen in the next year, with the Beacon
Council financing more than $50,000 per
project.
While this will require new sources of
funding, if not the opening up of traditional
ones, it will also require careful planning —
or to employ another buzzword, “niche-ing,”
Explains BAC’s Gregory Hobbs: “With lim¬
ited sources of financing, it puts more pres¬
sure on the importance of technical assis¬
tance to define the niche for the black
business owner, and says, “You can survive
in this niche, but you have to work this niche
expertly.’”
In 1993 the Beacon Council undertook an
effort to encourage black businesses by rais¬
ing their public profile. The group created
the Network 100, a list of the area’s top 100
black-owned enterprises, ranked by revenue.
“We were trying to create the aura, the per¬
sonality in the black business community,
that success is in and success is good,”
explains Hall. ‘We were also trying to identify
candidates for either the black venture funds
or other sources of funds.”
The Beacon Council went even further,
picking a Network 10 — ten businesses with
the greatest potential to reach Black
Enterprise magazine’s “B.E. 100,” a list of the
top black-owned industrial and service com¬
panies nationwide. (Only two local compa¬
nies figure in the magazine’s current roster:
Urban Organization Inc., a general contract¬
ing firm, and Solo Construction Corp., a gen¬
eral engineering construction firm, which
rank 87 and 90 respectively.) Representatives
from each of the Network 10 companies were
enrolled in a minority-executive seminar at
the University of Miami. In addition, each
firm was given $10,000 worth of consulting
services to design a five-year strategic plan,
and assured of $250,000 in equity funding.
The money, unfortunately, only material¬
ized for South Dade projects. And a spot on
the list has been anything but a guarantee. At
number fifteen on the Network 100, and
included among the Network 10, was Z Mart.
Howze isn’t giving up, and he says he’s
more frustrated than discouraged by all the
talk of Z Mart’s demise and its resonance in
the black business community. As he sees it,
there ought to be a little more action and a lit¬
tle less blather. “I happen not to be impres¬
sed with people who talk about black eco¬
nomic development, unless you put it on the
line,” he says. “If you take the resources that
you have, and the time and talent you have,
and go put it on the line in a place like Liberty
City, then I believe you’re interested in eco¬
nomic development”
But on this-Saturday, the last weekend of Z
Mart’s tenure at 1100 NW 54th St, the nearly
vacant store is anything but alive with hope.
Continued on page 37
COME JOIN US AT THE
I LINCOLN ROAD
FARMERS MARKET
Lincoln Road between Meridian and Euclid'
LINCOLN ROAD
PARTNERSHIP. INC.
SUNDAYS, 10AM - 2PM
Through the end of March
CALENDAR OF FEBRUARY ACTIVITIES
Children's Activities at 11am
19: Books & Books presents Jo Bridges, storyteller
26: "Growing Herbs" with Claire Tomlin
Plant Workshops for Adults at Noon
19: "Floivering Plants" with Donald Rummelhoff
26: "Flowering Shrubs, Vines & Butterfly Plants" with
Glenn Patterson of Island Gardens Nursery
Also, don't miss BRUNCH ON THE BEACH !
- this Sunday hear Othello's Steel Jazz Quaitet
.February 19, llam-2pm, at SunBank Plaza .
For more information on this and other Lincoln Road
events call the Lincoln Road Partnership at 531-3442.
The Lincoln Road Fanners Market is produced as a service
of the Lincoln Road Partnership with the support of the
Miami Beach Visitor & Convention Authority
and the City of Miami Beach.
Miami
Beach
VISITOR AND
CONVENTION
AUTHORITY
"TALKPAK
a
We Are Just What You Always
Wanted from a Cellular Company...
285 NW 27th Avenue • Suite 13 • Miami
649-0260
FB
Pvte's Paging
February 16—22, 1995
New
Times Page 35

INVENTORY BLOWOUT!
The new models are coming! Get spectacular savings and
free installation on all remaining inventory while it lasts!
$128
installed*
Sony AM/FM Cassette with auto
reverse, 18 presets & digital clock
SONY
Sony AM/FM CD player with detachable face,
. 4x20 watt amp., dock & line output. Factory
Reconditioned. Full 1 Year Warranty
installed* SONY
Sony Universal 10 Disc
changer with handheld remote
SONY
AUTO ALARMS
CQDE^IL/IRm
$149 Installed
Systems from ,
Available Features: Remote arm-disarm • active/passive aiming
•motion/shock sensor • Ignition kill • (lashing LED • valet switch • remote
trunk release • power door locks • remote panic • MV-1 interior motion sen¬
sor for open vehicles (Jeeps, Convertibles, etc.)
Auto Alarm from
$
149
Available Features: Remote auto alarm • active/passive aiming
•motion/shock sensor • open door sensor • hashing lights • LED status
. indicator • valet switch • ignition kill • power door locks • remote panic
120 DB siren • Tornado
CLIFFORD
99 insi'
Systems from'
Available Features: 120 DB siren • remote arm-disarm • remote panic
shock sensor • (lashing lights • glass break sensor • flashing LED • valet
switch ignition kill • power door locks • remote trunk release • air horn kit
Cliflalarm AT made in usa
>0Z01LPINE.
Systems from JM
L^tU Installed
F*1
IV
$148
installed*
Kenwood AM/FM cassette with
auto reverse, digital clock
KENWOOD
installed
Kenwood AM/FM CD player with
detachable face, dock, dual
illumination & line output
KENWOOD
Kenwood HFpower AM/FM
cassette w/detachable face
plus 10 disc changer
KENWOOD
installed*
*208
installed*
Alpine AM/FM cassette player w/
detachable face 8 built-in 60 watt
amp. 7510
/////A\JP\WE
$338
installed*
Alpine AM/FM CD player w/ full
detachable face & built-in 100 watt
amp /////A\JP\VVE
Alpine universal 6 disc changer
w/ wireless remote. 5970
/////AVPXNE
â– installed
$248
installed*
Premier AM/FM cassette
with detachable face.24
presets & 88 watt amp.
KEH-490
aA A A Pioneer AM/FM CD player with 60
^8 ^8 wati hi-power amp, clock & line
installed* output OiD PIONEER4
. . DEH-520
$498
installed*
Pioneer Universal 12 Disc
changer with wireless remote
fij) PIONEER'
CDX-FArt 121
H
Portable cell phone (req activation) 1c
Kenwood eq w/ sub-out *49
ADS 6x20w AMP. 5149
Pyramid Gold Series 600w AMP. s149
Sony XR-7400 RAD/CASS/CD Control .'. s129
Punch 15" woofer{2) s65ea.
Boston Dome Tweeters -$50/pr.
Yamaha AM/FM CASS pull-out....; $129
Kenwood Speakers (new in box) From s29/pr.
Sony Speakers (new in box) From s29/pr.
7 DAY FULL CREDIT- Return purchase Within 7 days with all boxes, manuals, warranty
cards etc and receive full store credit. No additional installation charges either for a compara¬
ble unit (radio for radio, amp for amp, etc). Sorry, doesn't include olorms or phones.
30 DAY UPGRADE- Return your purchase within 30 days with all boxes, manuals
warranty cords etc. and pay only the difference between old and new unit, installation is
free! Sorry, doesn't include alarms or phones.
LIFETIME ALARM UPGRADE- Upgrade your auto alarm at any time with new feotures or
sensors for only the cost of the product, installation is free!
LIFETIME WARRANTY- Our trained installers and the highest quality installation
materials allows us to make this offer. Any work we. perform on your cor is guaranteed
under normal use or we will fix it for free as long as you own the cor
There&OnlyOne
SUPERIOR BUILDING PENETRATION
UNSURPASSED PORTABLE COVERAGE
MOTOROLA FUR PHONE
V
Requires new octivgtion en W
Cellular One /
AA2, AA3, or AA4 /
SCRATCH & DENT
Rockford Fosgote XV-2 Crossover
*99
Sony Det. Face AM/FM/CASS./CD CONT...
s219
ADS PS-5 2x40w AMP.
s199
Rockford Speakers
...From s40/pr.
Hi Fonics woofers.....
Closeout
RATE PLANS FROM ONLY
$19.95 A MONTH
GUARANTEED LOWEST
PRICES ON ALL
DIGITAL PHONES
Requires 12 month service agreement with
Cellular One and Sounds Good.
Penalties for early cancellation.
CELLULARONE'
Authorized Dealer
DIGITAL NETWORK
Sounds Good Stereo
2227 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami
"Existing wiring. Trim kits and custom installation extra.
576-4665
EST.1983
Mon.-Sat. 9-5:30pm • All major credit cards
Page 36 New Times
February 16—22, 1995

¡CUBA COCINA!
Joyce Lafray
20%Off All
NY Times Hardcover Best Sellers
BOOKWORKS
RED ROAD & SUNSET DRIVE
SOUTH MIAMI
661-5080
/'Now & Then'/
á Collectibles I
& Prints
4832 SW 72nd Avenue
10:30 to 5 Monday through Saturday
Miami (305) 667-5997
<, Opening Soon p
f in . <§
South Miami v*
Red
Continued from page 35
What hope exists is tucked away inside
Charles Howze, who is spending the day
tending to the last-minute details of reloca¬
tion. Good inventory needs to go to the Opa-
locka warehouse. Heap the other stuff up
front for the eleventh-hour scavengers.
Dismantle all the shelving and fixtures;
throughout the weekend, other merchants
with visions of their own success will be stop¬
ping by to cannibalize.
“It’s never pleasant to go through some¬
thing like this,” Howze says without dis¬
cernible emotion. “But one thing I’ve learned
is that there aré different stages of develop¬
ment you have to go through in life. And this,
I guess, is one of those stages.” He plants his
loafered feet firmly and crosses his arms in a
posture thafs equal parts defiant and defen¬
sive. Above him hangs a sign that reads,
“HAPPY HOLIDAYS, MERRY CHRIST¬
MAS.”
Wincing at the notion that his company has
failed, he prefers to use the phrase “a difficult
transition” to describe his straits. “The major¬
ity of businesses fail within the first two
years, a bigger percentage drop off within
three years,” he points out. “We’re in our
fourth year now. We beat the odds in staying
around as long as we have. There’s no doubt
the company will go on in some form.”
He knows it won’t be easy. Clearing out of
the store by Monday is one hurdle, but the
next involves persuading his creditors and
the bankruptcy judge to accept his reorgani¬
zation plan. He has already opened a T-shirt
stand at the I63rd Street Mall and is eyeing a
storefront in, a strip mall in Richmond
Heights for more of the same. He has also
begun discussing terms with the City of
Miami regarding the opening of a scaled-
down Z Mart in a 2500-square-foot space at
the Overtown Shopping Center. His credi¬
tors, he says, have given him “a good
response” so far. (Several creditors subse¬
quently voted against the plan during a bank¬
ruptcy hearing January 25, after which
Howze was given another month to gather
the support he needs to continue. “I’m wor¬
ried to death,” sighs former partner Joan
Donaldson, who still has her house tied up in
the business. “At this point in my life, I don’t
want to start over.”)
Howze says he isn’t agonizing about the
state of his enterprise. “I have a firm philoso¬
phy; Once I make a decision, man, I don’t
look back. I made the decision to reorganize.
And now I’m more convinced than ever this
project is doable and can be replicated in a lot
of locations. As soon as we get back on track,
believe me, this thing’s going to be done.”
Asked how he feels, he quickly responds,
‘Tired.” With that he turns and strides back
among the remains of his enormous store,
its emptiness making it look more vast
than ever. ED
$20.75 per month*
Well Equipped Gym with free Weights.
Body Building For Men and Women.
Pool, Showers, Lockers & Free (Marking.
Personalized Training.
BARCADO
Beach Club
At The Roney Plaza
Hours: Mon-Fri 7am-10pm
Sat 8am-8pm Sun 9am-2pm
2377 Collins Ave. • Miami Beach • 531-7357
* Based on Annual Rale
‘Best'Varietyof
Shoes onTheTJeach
‘Bonnie & Clyde
Shoes for iMen &‘Women
829‘Washington ¡Ave. • (Miami‘Beach
6749676
Open 7 ‘Days • lOam-lOpm,
Dedicated to making
you look your best.
Each and everyday.
GDSs?
BEAUTY SUPPLY
SERVICE « VALUE 'SELECTION
Coral Gables
Valencia Center 352 Andalusia,-446-6654
North Miami Beach
Rodeo Shops 18545 W. Dixie Hwy, 931-5291
Plantation
Shops at Broward 8136 W Broward Blvd., 473-2304
Boca Baton
Town Square Shopping Center 21302 St.
Andrews Blvd., (407) 394-8123
BUY ONI
EYED
IB
KI3MI
DNIH
IS
FBI
E!
THE GRIDIRON CLDB
FOR TOTAL
FITNESS
1676 ALTON I0AD MB, FL 33146 S3M743
GYM IBUIS M-F S:30AMT1PM SGI 8AM 8PM SUN SAM-CPM
February 16-22, 1995
New Times Page 37

Principal Dancers of the New York City Ballet set the pace Monday
Clown around at the Coconut Grove Arts Festival Saturday
n7
h
u
r
s
d
a
in
f
e
b
r
u
a
r
College Theater Wrapup: College
I” theater is B.M.O.C. this week as
three area colleges open three
I outstanding dramas. Tonight at
8:00 Florida International Univer¬
sity’s theater department presents Michel
Tremblay’s Bonjour, la bonjour, about a
Canadian family caught in a second gener¬
ation of .incest, abuse, and deception. The
play runs through February 26 at the Uni¬
versity Park Campus (Viertes Haus 100,
SW Eighth Street and 107th Avenue), with
showtimes Thursday through Saturday at
8:00, and a 2:00 Sunday matinee. Admis¬
sion ranges from four to eight dollars; call
348-3789. Tomorrow night at 7:30 New
World 'School of the Arts theater division
(25 NE Second St.) opens a new tangoized
version of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Broad¬
way smash hit Evita, also running through
February. 26. Tickets to tonight’s gala
opening cost $25; regular performances
cost $12. Call 237-3541 for times. The Uni¬
versity of Miami’s Ring Theatre is closed
for renovations, but that won’t stop its stu¬
dent theater company from presenting
Harvey Fierstein’s Torch Song Trilogy,
opening Wednesday at 8:00 p.m. at the
James L. Knight Center’s Ashe Auditorium
(400 SE Second Ave.). Tickets range from
$9 to $12; performances continue each
night at 8:00 through February 25, with
matinees at 2:00 on February 25 and at
3:00 on February 26. To gaze at the stage
call 284-3355. (GC)
Veterans Night: Some might write
them off as dinosaurs rehashing
the work of their long-past
primes. Others recognize them
as two of the most influential gui¬
tarists in contemporary rock. Jorma
Kaukonen — who appears tonight at 8:00
at the Stephen Talkhouse (616 Collins
Ave., Miami Beach; 531-7557) — made his
bones with Jefferson Airplane and Hot
Tuna. Throughout those heady'days,
Kaukonen’s guitar innovations (he was one
of the few musicians ever to use fuzz pedal
effectively) led several critics to call him
America’s answer to Eric Clapton. Admis¬
sion is $22. Roger McGuinn — performing
tonight and tomorrow night at the Musi¬
cians Exchange (729 W. Sunrise Blvd.,
Fort Lauderdale; 764-1912) at 9:00 — was
equally (if not more) innovative, taking the
Byrds to legendary heights with his trade¬
mark twelve-string Rickenbacker sound
(reference “Eight Miles High”). Many
attribute the very existence — or at least
the success — of acts such as the Eagles
and collaborator Tom Petty to McGuinn’s
influence. Kathy Fleischmann and John
the Cop open. Admission is $14. All this
history is júst dandy, but the fact is that
both of these 50-something artists can still
put on a hell of a live show. (GB)
Jane Olivor: New York chanteuse Jane
Olivor enjoyed a period of fierce popularity
in the late Seventies and early Eighties, fol¬
lowing the release of her 1976 album First
Night. Six years and four records later, she
retired from the spotlight, but her army of
admirers — enchanted by her breathy
vibrato and diverse repertoire — contin¬
ued to grow steadily through word of
mouth. In 1991 Olivor returned to perform¬
ing, and tonight at 8:00 she takes the stage
at the Gusman Center for the Performing
Arts (174 E. Flagler St.). Tickets cost $23
and $26. Discover a rediscovery at
372-0925. (GC)
Mirando al tendido: Painter Leandro Soto
has turned the Carrusel Theatre (235
Alcazar Ave., Coral Gables) into a bullring
for Teatro Avante’s production of this
award-winning Spanish-language play by
Venezuelan writer Rodolfo Santana. Miran¬
do al tendido combines the sacred Spanish
art of the bulls with Latin American mag¬
ical realism for a morality play in which
bullfighter and bull each plead their case
against each other with darkly comic dia¬
logue. Soto’s murals cover the theater
walls, depicting an audience of small-town
characters sitting in the stands of a slightly
dilapidated plaza. Magaly Agüero is the
smart-mouthed young bullfighter; Juan
David Ferrer is the swaggering macho
bull, leaping about the stage wrapped in a
ragged artificial hide. Shows are Friday
and Saturday night at 9:00 and Sunday at
3:00 p.m. through February 26. Tickets
cost $15. Give them two ears and a tail at
446-7144. (JC)
Miami International Boat Show: Boat-lovers
come together and rejoice as all manner of
watercraft, equipment, and nautical gear is
on display at the Miami Beach Convention
Center (1901 Convention Center Dr.,
Miami Beach), the Biscayne Bay Marriott
Marina (1633 N. Bayshore Dr.), and the
Watson Island Marina (off MacArthur
Causeway) today through Wednesday.
Admission is $20 for tonight’s “Red Car¬
pet” sneak preview; all other days, adults
pay $10 ($16 for a two-day pass), and kids
under age twelve enter for $3. The show
runs today from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.,
tomorrow from 10:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.,
Sunday and Monday from 10:00 a.m. to
9:00 p.m., and Tuesday and Wednesday
from noon to 9:00 p.m. (marina locations
close at 6:00 p.m. daily). Do whatever
floats your boat at 531-8410. (GC)
a
t
u
r
d
a
y
f
e
b
r
u
a
r
fpTt Coconut Grove Arts Festival: All
Hm kinds of visual and musical arts
are represented this weekend at
I Peacock Park (2820 McFarlane
w Rd.) as the 32nd annual Coconut
February 16-22, 1995
Page 38 New Times

College theater explodes with shows like Evita Thursday
Roger McGuinn flies again Friday
On Monday Maya Angelou looks back on her multifaceted career
Grove Arts Festival gets under way, featur¬
ing works by more than 300 artists and
craftspersons. But there’s art for your ears
as well as your eyes: Today Gary King and
the Dream (12:30), Nil Lara (2:00), and
Mary Karlzen (3:30) take the stage; tomor¬
row, Sha-Shaty (12:30), Lefty Perez (2:00),
and Miles Peña (3:30) perform; and on
Monday, check out headliners Roberto
Perera (1:00) and Dave Koz (3:00).
The festival runs today through Monday
from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Admission is
free. Put a little art in your heart at
447-0401. (GC)
Bill Baird: Veteran pro-choice activist Bill
Baird has faced off against some of the
biggest guns in the holy war over abortion
and reproductive rights during the past 30
years. In 1965, Baird was arrested for
“crimes against chastity” when he handed
a condom and contraceptive foam to a
Boston University student; the subsequent
case went to the Supreme Court and set
the precedent for Roe v. Wade. Baird also
opened the first legal abortion clinic in the
nation and debated militant pro-lifer Paul
Hill two months béfore Hill gunned down a
Pensacola abortion doctor and his escort.
Tonight at 7:30 Baird discusses his experi1
enees at the Unitarian Universalist Church
(3970 NW 21st Ave., Oakland Park).
Admission is free. Step onto the frontline
at 484-6734. (GC)
Legacy AIDS Benefit: Vocalist and musician
Ellen Bukstel-Segal named her six-piece
folk-pop-rock band Legacy in memory of
her husband, Doug Segal, a hemophiliac
who died of AIDS six years ago after con¬
tracting the disease from contaminated
blood-clotting medication. Tonight at 8:30
Legacy performs a benefit concert for local
AIDS service and research organizations
at the Dave and Mary Alper Jewish Com¬
munity Center (11155 SW 112th Ave.).
Tickets cost $25 and include dessert and
coffee. His legacy lives on at 271-9000,
ext. 273. (GC)
Stars on Ice: Just when you thought you’d
gotten through the winter without hearing
about malevolent ice skaters, the Stars on
Ice tour comes to the Miami Arena (721
NW First Ave.) tonight at 7:30, featuring
Olympic gold medalists Kristi “the Face”
Yamaguchi, Scott “the Enforcer” Hamilton,
Katarina “Bugsy” Witt, Paul Wylie “Coy¬
ote,” and Ekaterina “Bonnie” Gordeeva
and Sergei “Clyde” Grinkov, plus a mob of
fellow Olympians. Protection money (tick¬
ets) will set you back $24 and $36. Leave
the crowbar in the tool chest when you call
530-4444. (GC)
s
u
n
d
a
y
f e
b
r
u
a
r y
Run Away From Drugs SK: Run, walk,
or skate in the Run Away From
Drugs 5K today at the Hollywood
Beach Broadwalk Bandshell
Johnson Street and Hollywood
Beach Boulevard, Hollywood). The event
benefits the Starting Place drug rehabilita¬
tion center. Registration begins at 6:30
a.m. and costs $15; race time is 8:00 a.m.
Let your fingers do the running at
926-6923. (GC)
May the Circle Be Unbroken: Miami-born,
New York-based actor-playwright Lehman
Beneby presents this original musical
revue covering 50 years of gospel music
and documenting the careers of such
gospel acts ás the Harmonettes, Clara
Ward and the Famous Ward Singers, Ruth
Davis and the Davis Sisters, and Dorothy
Love Coates today at 4:00 at the Miami
Shores Performing Arts Center (9806 NE
Second Ave., Miami Shores). Tickets cost
$18 and $20. Performances continue
Thursday through Sunday until February
26; call for times. Sing their praises at
835-0321. (GC)
m
o
n
d
a y
f e
b
r
u
ary
Principal Dancers of the New York
City Ballet: Twenty top dancers
from the nation’s most-loved
classical dance company —
including Jock Soto, Heather
Watts, Lindsay Fischer, and Natalia
Bashkatova — perform works by artistic
director Peter Martins and master choreo¬
graphers George Balanchine, Marius Peti¬
pa, and others tonight at 8:00 at the
Broward Center for the Performing Arts
(201 SW Fifth Ave., Fort Lauderdale). The
program includes Balanchine’s Minkus pas
de trois and Tarantella, Martins’s Jazz, and
selections from Swan Lake by Petipa and
Lev Ivanov. Tickets range from $20 to $60.
They do the pas de deux at 532-3491. (GC)
Maya Angelou: Poet laureate and all-around
amazing woman Maya Angelou discusses
her multifaceted career as an author, play¬
wright, actress, producer, educator, and
civil rights activist tonight at 7:30 at Flori¬
da International University’s University
Park Campus (Graham Center Ballroom,
SW Eighth Street and 107th Avenue) as
part of FIU’s Black Heritage Festival.
Admission is free. They will rise at
348-2137. (GC)
German Expressionists: From the
turn of the century until the mid-
1920s, expressionism flourished
in Europe, especially in Ger¬
many. Expressionists turned to
their inner turmoil for inspiration and sub¬
ject matter, channeling their intense emo¬
tions into a representational terror (think
of Norwegian painter Edvard Munch’s
Scream). Through March 25, the Center
for Visual Communication (4021 Laguna
St., Coral Gables) presents the stark and
affecting prints and drawings of twenty
German expressionists, including Otto
Dix, Kathe Kollwitz, and Max Beckmann.
The show can be seen Tuesday through
Saturday from noon to 5:30 p.m., with free
admission. It’s all there in black and white
at 446-6811. (MY)
Becks + 4: Four Miámi-area artists have
joined together to form a group based on
mindless painting and a taste for beer
(they all drink Becks). Sergio Garcia, Luis
Delgado, Eduardo da Rosa, and Aldo Fari-
nati like to describe themselves as latter-
day fauvists, whose approach to art is vis¬
ceral rather than conceptual. The artists’
bright-colored, hectic paintings are on dis¬
play at Victoria Galleries (245 Giralda Ave.,
Coral Gables) through the end of the
month in a group show titled “No Food for
the Brain.” Admission is free. Play dumb at
442-2424. (JC)
|w e d n e s d a y|
february
Joe Clark: Joe Clark, the con¬
troversial former principal of
Eastside High School in Pater¬
son, New Jersey (actor Mor¬
gan Freeman portrayed Clark
in the critically acclaimed movie Lean on
Me), and author of Laying Down, speaks
tonight at 8:00 at Florida International Uni¬
versity’s North Campus (Wolfe University
Center, NE 151st Street and Biscayne
Boulevard, room 100) as part of the Wolfe
Pack Lecture Series. Clark discusses his
current plans to establish an inner-city
school in which self-respect is lesson one.
Admission is free. They’re laying down the
law at 940-5804. (GC)
The Calendar is written by
Greg Baker, Judy Cantor,
Georgina Cárdenas, Bob Weinberg,
and Michael VbckeL
For more listings, turn the page
February 16-22, 1995
New Times Page 39

SPECIAL CLEARANCE Full WT
FUTON MATTRESS Queen t3UK
TV & VCR STAND
DINETTES:
5 PIECES
3 PIECE COFFEE TABLES
m
iiiiiii
COMPLETE FULL SIZE SOLID WOOD FRAME
FRAME & FUTON & FUTON
ALSO AVAILABLE IN BLÁCK $159
STUDENT DESK/
CHAIR/ LAMP/ HUTCH
COMPLETE!
HEAD/FOOT/CANOPY
$
BUY SOFA AND GET
MATCHING LOVESEAT FREE
5 PIECE DINNETTE
149 $
LEATHER RECLINER
& OTTOMAN
â– 
509 NW 72ND STREET MIAMI, 754-7618
OPEN EVERYDAY
HALOGEN LAMP
$
19
SB
Calendar listings are offered as a
free service to New Times readers
and are subject to space restrictions.
Submissions should be mailed to
Calendar Editor, New Times, P.0. Box
011591, Miami, FL 33101. Items must be received ten days
prior to date of issue.
Music
Thursday, February 16
Florida Philharmonic: Guest conductor Eduardo
Diazmuñoz leads the orch in a performance of
Stravinsky’s Petrushka and Beethoven’s Symphony
no. 7. $12-$60.8:00, with a preconcert lecture at 6:45
p.m. Gusman Center, 174 E Flagler St; 930-1812.
God's Trombone: This stirring drama by James Weldon
Johnson captures the essence of the African American
preacher. Free. 11:00 a.m. MDCC-North, Lehman
Theatre, 11380 NW 27th Ave; 237-1082.
Israel Philharmonic Orchestra: Conductor Zubin Mehta
and the orch perform Mozart’s Symphony no. 40,
Ravel’s La valse, and Brahms’s Symphony no. 1
tonight at 8:00 at the Broward Center (201SW 5th
Ave, Ft Lauderdale; 532-3491). $20-$60: On Sunday
night, Mehta leads the orch in a performance of
Mozart’s Symphony no. 40 and Strauss’s Ein
heldenleben, at 8:00; on Monday at 2:00, the orch
performs Ravel’s La valse, and Brahms’s Symphony
no. 1. $30-$75. Both shows aré at the Kravis Center
(701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach;
800-KRAVIS-l).
Loehmann's Music Festival: Loehmann’s Fashion Island
hosts an ongoing series of community concerts
featuring local and national artists. Tonight’s show
features the Jack Siegel Trio; tomorrow, Hugo
Martinez performs. Free. 6:00 p.m. Loehmann’s
Fashion Island, 18815 Biscayne Blvd; 932-0520.
Friday, February 17
“Jazz on tfie Beach”: .Long-time SoFla jazz pianist Tony
Castellano and his quartet bring bop to the Broadwalk
alongside tenor saxman supreme Turk Mauro. $5.
9:00 p.m. Sugar Reef, 600 Surf Rd, Hollywood Beach;
922-1119.
Miami Symphony Orchestra: The Civic Chorale of
Greater Miami joins conductor Manuel Ochoa and
the orch to perform Brahms’s Uebeslieder Waltzes,
Lehár’s Waltzes from the Merry Widow, and pieces by
Richard and Johann Strauss. $10-$25. Tonight at 8:00 j
at Gusman Hall (1314 Miller Dr, Coral Gables) and I
tomorrow at 3:00 p.m. at the Lincoln Theatre (555 - j
Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach); 447-9500.
Bob Mover and Randy Johnston: Mover, an alto-
saxophonist in the Yardbird Parker mode, and
guitarist Johnston jam with the Mojazz rhythm
section tonight and tomorrow night. $10.9:00 p.m. |
Mojazz Cafe, 928 71st St, Miami Beach; 865-2636. :
Jane Olivor: See “Calendar.”
Rob Friedman-Lynne Noble Duo: This twosome blends 4
jazz and blues in original tunes. Free. 8:00 p.m.
Borders Book Shop, 9205 S Dixie Hwy; 665-8800.
Roméo et Juliette: The Florida Grand Opera celebrates!
the spirit of love with its first production in twenty
years of Charles Gounod’s operatic interpretation of |
the Shakespearean tragedy (in French with English |
projections). $18-$100. Tonight at 8:00, with a 2:00
p.m. matinee Sunday. Dade County Auditorium, 29011
W Flagler St; 854-7890.
Veterans Night See “Calendar.”
Saturday, February 18
Canadian Brass Ensemble: This five-member group
performs classical, jazz, and pop selections. $16.2:00
and 8:00 p.m. Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church, 5555:r
N Federal Hwy, Ft Lauderdale; 491-1103.
Candomblé Percussion: Brazilian percussion master
Caboquinho leads a workshop on this Afro-Brazilian
percussive style. $5.4:00 p.m. Scharf Schop, 435 -
Española Way, Miami Beach; 673-9308.
Close Encounters With Music: The Center for the Fme
Arts’s chamber-music series continues as pianist
James Tocco and cellist Yehuda Hanani perform the
complete cycle of Beethoven’s piano and cello
sonatas. $25. Tonight and tomorrow at 5:00 p.m.
Center for the Fme Arts, 101W Flagler St; 375-3000.
Fairfield Four Perhaps the most influential gospel
group ofthe Twentieth Century, the Four performs
compelling, inspiring selections. $20.8:00 p.m. Coral
Gables Congregational Church, 3010 De Soto Blvd,
Coral Gables; 448-7421.
Legacy AIDS Benefit See “Calendar.”
Juan Mercadal: Master guitarist Mercadal performs
favorite selections. $10.8:00 p.m. FIU University Park
Campus, SW 8th Street and 107th Avenue, DM-100;
348-2896.
Sunday, February 19
Alhambra Orchestra: The orch and guests Jubilate
perform works by William Grant Still, Ulysses Kay,
and Duke Ellington. $5.8:00 p.m. First Presbyterian
Church, 121 Alhambra Plaza, Coral Gables; 668-9260.
Atlantic Coast West Quintet This wind-and-brass
fivesome performs selections by Bach, Haydn, and
contemporary composers. $5.2:30 p.m. Art and
Culture Center of Hollywood, 1650 Harrison St,
Hollywood; 921-3274.
Brunch on the Beach: Othello Molineaux and his steel-
drum jazz quartet perform. Free. 11:00 a.m. Sunbank
H£LU
©iw
gy MAnT
6£.o£ni nO
I'M F6€.u*J6 MUCH
ftetrce. nod. bou
ICNOU). Foft ADMIRE
l X THOUGHT
I Ml GfiAiw IOAÍ 60I*»G/
TO fcXPUTOt.
I REMEMBER TH0SÉ OX**r.
THW TASTEO LouSy. I
ATE HAtF OF 'EM Amo FEO
THE REST TO THE P06.
X ftEAUXE^Ou) I DAS
JOST PROJECTING ONTO
you all My uNtxPRtsito
NEGATWE FEEUM6Í.
Page 40 New Times
February 16-22, 1995

LONG DISTANCE
only $179/mo.
anywhere anytime
(cont. USA)
WHY MBS HUT GUI?
I VOICE MAIL ANSWERING SERVICE I
7
ss
*9
/12 MONTH
/6 MONTH
/3 MONTH
BASIC SERVICE
BASIC SERVICE
BASIC SERVICE
S89.46 total
$51.12 total
$28.76 total
$127.80 with paging
$70.29 with paging
$38.34 with paging
I,
BEEPERS 45 LOW AS WANDAS LOW AS W/MONTH
(mammKLnmmm
Adult CD Roms 30% off. $20-‘55 each
DAD&9^4053BROWARDj35^88^|
BesfRolex & Cartier
*$ in Miami
No-Makeup
Makeup
MAJOR
SERVICE
INTERVAL
Recommended at
15,000 • 30,000 • 45,000 etc
‘Fuel injected models slghtty higher.
‘ Legends and Vigors are
sightly higher
Exp. 3-16%. Must present ad.
Exp3-16%MustpresentacL ¡ ¡_ ^ I L in LTL i
EXPERT HONDA & ACURA SERVICE
We wftutti likft to thank all of our customers for making Jap. Tech, a success since lg I
200lipstick colors • 63 lipliner colors
379eye shadows & blushes
73 eye pencil colors
Water, aloe, oil and
poivder-basefoundations * Wigs
I Eyebrow Shaping $10.00 |
1111
South Hvciclt Makeup
439Española Way ’• Miami Beam
5380805
IjP
rS
¡I , |1
mmm
■ u üi^H
*ow|
â– 
I 1 â– 
Open Saturday 8am-2pm
Miami location only
By appointment only
Monday-Friday 8arr>6pm: 3625 S. State Road 7 (441) Hollywood. 652-0959 Brwd. 981-1700
7311 S.W. 41 Street (2 blkseastof826, behind Gables Honda) 2610040 Brwd. Go. Lie# AR0404
A return to the Classics
Not just another futon store.
New Dawn brings you handcrafted Hardwood Furniture. Not steel and plastic. We serve the New Generation.
For those with a sense of Classic Style. Not the same old thing.
MH
BnujF
fefi
â– 
NEW DAWN
FUTON & FURNITURE
Contemporary Designs Classic Hardwood Furniture
Rounded comers. Soft colors. Each piece is a unique combination’of
I ’ warm .tte^fcmdí[nrá^eáll-^jpeáoih.Qar vte£ga.ttfe. futfltt xoiasaranasa.
comfortable as they áre beautiful. Come explore%ur éñtireííéiectíon
of Affordable Classic Furniture. And see die light of a New Dawn.
SOUTH MIAMI 5820 South Dixie Highway • 667-8830
PLANTATION South University Drive/The Fountains • 667-8830
February 16-22, X995
New Times Page 41

down to earth furniture
and objects from around the
wo r 1 d.
south beach
719 lincoln road 5349095
miami design district
56 NE 4 0 s t 5 76 8 799
Super Anniversary Maxima Savings!
Maxima Luxury,
Minima Moola.
Take advantage of our unbelievable anniversary savings! Bring this ad to Pass
Rent A Car and drive offin a new.1995 Nissan Maxima for only $33.95per
day with FREE UNLIMITED MILEAGE. Gas, Taxes, airport imposed fess if
any CDW ($12.95/day or less) and other options are not included. Restrictions
apply This offer is valid until March 19, 1995. 24 hour advance reservation
Plaza, lincoln Road at Lenox Avenue, Miami Beach;
531-3442.
Cuerpo a cuerpo: Cuban singers-songwriters Sergio
Fiallo and Sergio Rafart perform romantic Latin
songs. $20.8:30 p.m. Teatro Casanova, 21st Avenue
and SW 8th Street; 642-9171.
Erin O’Donnell Trio: This three-piece band performs jazz
standards. Free. 7:00 p.m. Barnes & Noble Bookstore,
7710 N Kendall Dr; 598-7292.
May the Circle Be Unbroken: Set “Calendar.”
Silver Nightingale: Flautist Laura Sue Wilansky
performs classical and contemporary music that
combines pop, jazz, rock, and Celtic influences. Free.
1:00 p.m. Sterling Worth Café, 801S University Dr,
Plantation; 474-7738. *
Singout in the Park: Grab your guitar, harmonica, or
other acoustic thing and share your original works or
just sit back and listen. Free. 1:00 p.m. Secret Woods
Nature Center, 2701W State Rd 84, Ft Lauderdale;
563-3328.
U.S. Navy Band: The Navy Band from Washington, D.C.
presents a variety of popular and classical marches,
symphonic selections, and patriotic works. Free.
Today at 3:00 at Young Circle Park (U.S. 1 and
Hollywood Boulevard, Hollywood) and Tuesday at
8:00 p.m. at Bayfront Park Amphitheater (301
Biscayne Blvd); 538-7550.
Monday, February 20
Afro-Cuban Percussion: Learn how to beat the bongos
and other percussion instruments with master
percussionist Lazaro Alfonso. $10. Beginning classes
at 6:30 p.m.; intermediate at 7:30. Higher Ground
Studio, Roney Plaza Hotel, ste PH A-31,2301 Collins
Ave, Miami Beach; 864-7943.
FIU Jazz Combo: The combo performs a free concert of
jazz selections tonight at 8:00 at the University Park
Campus (SW 8th Street and 107th Avenue, DM-100)
and tomorrow at 8:00 at the North Campus (Biscayne
Boulevard and NW 151st Street); 348-2896.
Greater Miami Youth Symphony: The winner of the
annual Piano Concerto Competition joins the
symphony for a piano concert. $10.3:00 p.m. Lincoln
Theatre, 555 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 263-8699.
Sergio Daniel Tiempo and Karin Lechner Pianists Tiempo
and Lechner join the Miami Chamber Symphony for a
performance of Saint-Saéns’s Carnival of the Animals,
Shostakovich’s Piano Concerto no. 1, Ravel’s Piano
Concerto in G major, and Mendelssohn’s Concerto for
Two Pianos and Orchestra. $12-$30.8:15 p.m. Gusman
Hall, 1314 Miller Dr, Coral Gables; 858-3500.
Tuesday, February 21
The Crowning Touch: The FIU Concert Choir presents
an evening of music for coronations. Free. 8:00 p.m.
St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, 8670 Byron Ave, Miami
Beach; 328-3359.
Florida Philharmonic: Violinist Viktoria Mullova joins
conductor James Judd and the orch in a performance
of music from Mendelssohn’s Midsummer Night’s
Dream, Tchaikovsky’s Romeo andjuliet, and Mozart’s
Violin Concerto no. 4. $12-$35.8:00 p.m. Bailey Hall,
3501 SW Davie Rd, Davie; 930-1812.
Rampart Street Jazz Band: This Dixieland jazz band
performs as part of the Nationsbank Noontime
Musicals series. Free. Noon. Broward Main Library .«
plaza, 100 S Andrews Ave, Ft Lauderdale; 761-5363. V,
Wednesday, February 22
Diaz String Trio: This chamber trio performs an artists-,
in-residence recital. $10.8:00 p.m. FIU’s Graham
Center Ballroom, SW 8th Street and 107th Avenue; '
348-2896.
Mostly Matinees: Martin Bookspan and Florida
Philharmonic conductor James Judd host a lecture
and a performance of Mozarf s Overture to Don
Giovanni and Symphony no. 41 Jupiter. $10-$35.2:00 1
p.m. Broward Center, 201 SW 5th Ave, Ft Lauderdale;
930-1812.
Theater
Bermuda Avenue Triangle: Two strong-willed widows,
roommates by circumstance in a South Florida condo,
vie for the affections of a “younger” man. Written by
and starring husband-and-wife team Renée Taylor and
Joseph Bologna (of Lovers and Other Strangers fame);
also with Bea Arthur. Through February 26. Evening
performances Thursday through Saturday, Tuesday
and Wednesday at 8:15; Sunday at 7:15; matinees
Wednesday, Thursday, and Sunday at 2:00. Coconut
.Grove Playhouse, 3500 Main Hwy, Coconut Grove,
442-4000.
Bopjour, la boqjour: French Canadian playwright
Michel Tremblay’s drama about a family caught in the
second generation of incest, deception, and abuse.
See “Calendar” for more info. Through February 26.
Evening performances Thursday through Saturday at
8:00; matinee Sunday at 2:00 p.m. Florida
International University Department of Theatre and
Dance, Vierte Haus 100, University Park Campus;
348-3789.
A Chorus Line: Twentieth anniversary production of
longest running play in Broadway history, chronicling
the trials and triumphs of seventeen Broadway
dancers. Conceived, choreographed, and originally
directed by the late Michael Bennett. Preview
February 16. Opening night February 17. Through
March 19. Evening performances Wednesday
through Saturday at 8:00; matinee Sunday at 2:00 p.m.
Actors’ Playhouse, 8851 SW 107th Ave; 5950010.
Come Blow Your Horn: Two bachelor brothers share a
pad in Neil Simon’s first Broadway hit Through
February 26. Evening performances Friday and
Ernie Pook’s Comeek
by Lynda J. Barry
^omtONE É t S e s
ITy ly/VQAflAgRtt- KA w VL.A'1^
WE NfcVER Se/vr
^ FLOWERS
ut neve ft» Cave
» CANDY
ME fv*vER TALKED orjl
Trtfc PHONE
M4D ttt ESPec/AUY
tiMtb SNNT VAUNT/Nb's
DAY r
WHEN HE \
•TOSSED OVT *
HER CARD.
Just coulonj
AX CALM
OR Little per
.NAMES
I
- L Do ft*» ) —
/a£ i
r\\\ $ 0 VTLooK
v WAS M /
Ü
V\g NEVER OA/C£
( \au6HeP WHEN
// * CA^HT RAIN
U\S FAVoRite
grey
Avid thats WHeA/
SHE LEfT HIM %
m
HÓW His PooH.
heart DID PINS
4 A
COM* back valewnvi
Ott 'r mine, Please ge MWE
Page 42 New Times
February 16-22, 1995

Saturday at 8:00; matinee Sunday at 2:00 p.m. Goodlet
Theatre, 4200 W 8th Ave, Hialeah; 651-5653.
Conversations With My Father Reviewed in this issue.
Through February 19. Evening performances
Thursday through Saturday at 8:00; matinee Sunday
at 2:00. Hollywood Performing Arts, 1938 Hollywood
Blvd, Hollywood; 9266065.
Crimes of the Heart: Beth Henley’s Pulitzer Prize¬
winning comedy-drama about one manic day in the
life of three eccentric sisters attempting to ward off
accident and tragedy as they reunite in their
Mississippi family home. Previews February 19,21,
22,23. Opening night February 24. Through April 2.
Evening performances Tuesday through Saturday at
8:00, Sunday at 7:00; matinees Wednesday and
Sunday at 2:00 p.m. Caldwell Theatre Company, 7873
N Federal Hwy, Boca Raton; 407-241-7432..
Dark Rapture: Reviewed in {his issue. Through
February 19. Evening performances Thursday
through Saturday, Tuesday, and Wednesday at 8:00;
matinees Sunday and Wednesday at 2:00 p.m. Pope
Theatre Company, Plaza del Mar, 262 S Ocean Blvd,
Manalapan; 407-585-3404. .
Dividends: Sentimental story of a grandson urging his
grandpa to have his bar mitzvah at age 83. Ongoing.
Evening performances Thursday through Saturday
and Wednesday at 8:00; matinees Saturday, Sunday,
and Wednesday at 2:00. Off Broadway Theatre, 1444
NE 26th St, Ft Lauderdale; 5660554.
Fools: In Neil Simon’s comedy, Leon Tolchinsky is
hired as schoolmaster in the Russian village of
Kulyenchikov, his dream job until he realizes the
townspeople have been cursed with chronic stupidity
for 200 years and hope the new teacher will break the
curse. February 24 through March 12. Evening
performances Friday and Saturday at 8:00; matinee
Sunday at 2:00 p.m. New River Repertory, 640 N
Andrews Ave, Ft Lauderdale; 523-0507.
Funny, You Don't Look Like My Grandmother Musical
revue starring Carol Lawrence based on Lois Wyse’s
best-selling book about thoroughly modem
grandmothers. Through February 26. Evening
performances Tuesday through Saturday at 8:00;
matinees Wednesday and Saturday at 2:00-p.m.
Parker Playhouse, 707 NE 8th St, Ft Lauderdale;
764-1441.
How the Other Half Loves: Three couples and their
domestic complications are explored in this bedroom
farce by Éngfish dramatist Alan Ayckbourn. Through
March 5. Evening performances Thursday through
Saturday at 8:00; matinees Thursday, Saturday, and
Wednesday at 2:00 p.m. Drama Center of Deerfield
Beach, 2345 W Hillsboro Blvd, Deerfield Beach;
570-9115.
Into the Woods: Tony Award-winning musical fairy tale
by Stephen Sondheim explores what happens when
wishes come true. Through February 19. Evening
performances Thursday through Saturday at 8:00;
matinee Sunday at 2:00 p.m. Barry University Theatre,
Broad Auditorium, 11300 NE 2nd Ave; 899-3186.
Itsel and Sophia: Itsel Levine falls in love with a 79-year-
old hippie in this stage adaption of the film Harold and
Maude, presented by the Maayan Tikva Theater
Company, a newly formed alternative Jewish theater.
Through February 20. Evening performance Sunday
at 7:30. Maayan Tikva Theater Company, University
Drive at Sample Road, Coral Springs; 407-278-1608.
Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat The Old
Testament goes high-tech in a revival of Andrew
Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice’s first musical, about
Joseph, his eleven brothers, and that infamous coat of
many colors. Through February 19. Evening
performances Thursday through Saturday, Tuesday
and Wednesday at 8:00; matinees Thursday, Saturday,
and Sunday at 2:00 p.m. Jackie Gleason Theater, 1700
Washington Ave, Miami Beach; 673-7300. February
28 through March 12. Evening performances
Thursday through Saturday, Tuesday and Wednesday
at 8:00; matinees Saturday, Sunday, and Wednesday at
2:00 p.m. Broward Center for the Performing Arts,
201SW 5th St, Ft Lauderdale; 462-0222.
Mirando al tendido: Venezuelan playwright Rodolfo
Santana’s theatrical meditation on life and death,
using the ritualistic spectacle of the bullfight as the
arena for a discourse between matador and bull. See
“Calendar” for more info. (In Spanish.) Through
February 26. Evening performances Friday and
Saturday at 9:00; matinee Sunday at 3:00 p.m. Teatro
Avante at El Carrusel Theatre, 235 Alcazar Ave, Cord
Gables; 4467144.
Old Business: Father and son wrestle for control of the
family business in Joe Cacaci’s play, with a twist The
two men never appear on stage together; their
struggle is conducted over the telephone. Through
April 23. Evening performances Tuesday through
Saturday at 8:15, Sunday, February 19, at 7:30;
WE WIU MM
OR BEAT Alii
COMPETnORSl
PRICE!
8 Piece -
Package
Sale Price
$199.00
Complete Metal Futon w/8" Mattress
Sale Price $159.00 -
60" Bar w/2 Bar Stools
Choice of Colors
Sale Price $149.00
BUY THE ROOM, SAVE A BUNDLE!
Entire Bedroom Set $599*00
(Excludes Boxspring & Mattress)
Individual Pieces Also Available IS
Barstool
Sale Price $29.00
5 pc Bedroom Set Sale Price $599.00
(Available in Black & Green w/ European Slides)
St
pi wMMMmm». «
W 1 ¡i
¡ip |¡
1
Buy the Sola; Get the
Matching Love Seat FRÉE j
(Choice of Fabricar Boltaflex Colors)
Sale Price $369.00
7 Tile Top Dining Room SiHlBI
w/4 Chairs
Sale Price 5229.00
Matching-Hutch & Larger-Table Avail.
b «mar
1 . Emm
, JE¡
n
â– m
ñ
' llif
I
11
declinen Choir & Ottoman
Sofa & Love Seat Sate Price $399.00
Sofa, Love Seat & Chair Sale Prioe $499.00
. B Piece Group Sale Price $599.00
Choice of Color
(available in 3 boltaflex colors)
Sole Price $129.Q€fll7
Mirror, Lamp, CD Racks
Each Individual Piece $25.00
Stone Table w/4 Parson Chairs
(Choice of Finish) Sale Price $299.00
HI - TECH WALL UNITS
w/ color combinations
Sale Price $299.00
Sale Price $399.00
Sale Price $499.00
Matching cocktail tables available
I lii 111 I
ONLY
$49
Desk, Chair
TV/VCR Stand
Major credit cards
accepted
Delivery Available
ultimate
furniture collection
6833 SW 59th PI
South Miami 663-1102
(next to S. Miami Post Office)
6326 Johnson St.
Hollywood 963-0073
(4 blocks west of 441)
Screens/Room
Divider
(Available in
Natural, Whitewash
+ Black)
Slim Cheval
Minor
30328 Old Dixie Hwy
Homestead 246-5364
(next to Scotty's)
February 16-22, 1995
« i . ÍÜ-Í5 A i '■ r, 'IT
New. Times Page 43
! ti-AVi. ai! -y, .-O*'- -»i*S- f-Té •} »

Why 3TC Lamivudine?
Lamivudine is especially useful for persons who cannot tolerate adverse
reactions to AZT. Depending on the situation, it is three to twenty times
more potent than AZT without adverse side affects and toxicity.
Free Medication.
During the Mayer Foundations clinical trials of 3TC*Lamivudinef
volunteers can receive this medication free of charge. There are absolutely
NO PLACEBOS used in this trial.
The Leader in HIV Care.
We provide some of the most comprehensive treatments and clinical trials
available anywhere. Our staff includes a research scientist fom the Pasteur
Institute in Paris and dedicated doctors who will develop a treatment plan
just for you. For more information on all that we offer.; call or visit one of
our two South Florida locations.
Miami Clinic
109N.E. 199 St.
(Ives Dairy Rd.) Suite 207
North Miami
652-6130
Ft Landerdalc Clinic
1749 N.E. 26 St.
Suite C
Ft. Lauderdale
5654030
Foundation for
Medical Therapies
Medicaid, Medicare, Private and Group
Insurance Accepted. Convenient Hours
by appointment.
Newest Approach
to Beautiful Skin
ERNEST M.
^WlQero^
ADVANCED PLASTIC &
RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY
' Remove outer, damaged
layers of skin
’ Improves fine lines
1 Doctor strength glycolic wash
& professional makeover
’ Evens pigmentation
’ Improves skin texture and acne
1 No scabbing or recovery period
1 Go back to work the same day
1 Enjoy a healthier fresher appearance & deeply cleansed face
COMPLIMENTARY GLYCOLIC WASH AND
COMPLIMENTARY MAKEOVER WITH THIS AD
19495 Biscayne blvd. Suite 200
Aventura, FL
Phone (305) 932-5557
The Patient and any person responsible, for payment has the right to refuse to pay,
CANCEL PAYMENT OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY SERVICE, EXAMINATION OR
TREATMENT WHICH IS PERFORMED WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO ADVERTISEMENT FOR
THE FREE, DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION OR TREATMENT.
This program is designed
FOR THE PERSON WHO WISHES
TO CONCENTRATE EXCLUSIVELY
ON COMPUTER GRAPHICS
TRAINING, CRAMMING ALL
THAT’S POSSIBLE IN THE
SHORTEST TIME POSSIBLE.
The COMPUTER PROGRAMS
ARE TAUGHT BY PRACTICING
PROFESSIONALS IN THE
ADVERTISING AND DESIGN
PROFESSIONS, ON EQUIPMENT
THAT’S TYPICALLY FOUND IN
OR GRAPHIC DESIGN STUDIOS.
Classes for the 6 month „
Computer Graphics
PROGRAM ARE TAUGHT
DURING THE DAY OR NIGHT
WITH SOME CLASSES
AVAILABLE ON THE WEEKEND.
A STUDENT WILL TAKE 4,
THREE-HOUR CLASSES EACH
WEEK, WITH AN ADDITIONAL 6
HOURS OF COMPUTER LAB
TIME AVAILABLE FOR PRACTICE.
l~FIRST SESSION—I
Electronic Publishing (Quark 3.3 ) 1
Digital Image Manipulation (Photoshop 3.0) 1
Computer Illustration (Freehand 5.0 / Illustrator 5.5 ) 1
Computer Illustration (Strata Studio Pro 1.5)
l-SECOND SESSION1
Electronic Publishing (Quark 3.3 ) 2
Digital Image Manipulation (Photoshop 3.0 ) 2
Computer Illustration (Freehand 5.0 / Illustrator 5.5 ) 2
interactive Multi-media (Macromind Director 4.0)
NEXT QUARTER BEGINS APRIL 3, MIAMI AD SCHOOL, 055 ALTON ROAD ON SOUTH BEACH, 538-3183
Page 44 New Times
February 1.6—22, ±995

BEAUTY SUPPLY
SERVICE • VALUE •SELECTION
Coral Gables
Valencia Center 352 Andalusia, 446-6654
North Miami Beach
Rodeo Shops 18545 W Dixie Hwy, 931-5291
Plantation
Shops at Broward 8136 W Broward Blvd., 423-2304
Boca Baton
Tbwn Square Shopping Center 21302 St.
Andrews Blvd., (407) 394-6123
Picture
Perfect
Skin
You can spend a lifetime trying to correct
the appearance of your skin by covering
it up. But modern technology has discov¬
ered the healthiest, most effective way to
better skin is to "uncover" it.
Today that way is MicroPeel
This 3-step twenty minute procedure
gently, safely, effectively and painlessly
rids the skin of its damaged, micro-thin
top layer, and unlike the traditional,
intense chemical peels, the Micro-Peel
can show improvement immediately.
For a free brochure or consultation regarding
your skin care or plastic surgery you may be
considering.
Please contact
Baruch Jacobs, M.D.,
Board Certified Plastic Surgeon
674-8586 • 524 Arthur Godfrey Rd. • Suite 204
Miami Beach, FL 33140
matinees Wednesday, Thursday, and Sunday at 2:15
p.m. Encore Room, Coconut Grove Playhouse, 3500
Main Hwy, Coconut Grove; 442-4000.
Ruthless!: Movie references and over-the-top musical
numbers run rampant through this deliciously campy
sendup about doing anything to become a star.
Winner of the 1993 Outer Critics Circle Award for
best off-Broadway musical. Through March 5.
Evening performances Thursday, Friday, and
Wednesday at 8:00, Saturday at 8:30, Sunday at 7:30;
matinees Wednesday at 2:00 and Saturday at 5:00.
Colony Theater, 1040 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
674-1026.
Torch Song Trilogy: Harvey Fierstein’s 1983 Tony
Award-winning comedy about the irrepressible
Arnold, who insists on leading a mainstream life as a
gay man. A landmark in gay theater. February 22-26.
Evening performances Wednesday through Saturday
at 8:00; matinees Saturday at 2:00 and Sunday at 3:00
p.m. University of Miami’s Ring Theatre, James L
Knight Center’s Ashe Auditorium; 284-3355.
The Value of Names: Jeffrey Sweet’s drama about two
former friends, separated by blacklisting in the 1950s;
who are reunited when one directs and produces a
play that stars the other’s daughter. Performed in a
double bill with George’s File, a companion piece
about another blacklisting victim. February 24
through April 2. Evening performances Thursday
through Saturday at 8:00; matinee Sunday at 3:00,
with a lecture on the play and playwright every
Sunday at 2:30 p.m. New Theatre, 65 Almería Ave,
Coral Gables; 443-5909.
Yiddle With a Fiddle: Jewish girl masquerades as a boy
in order to travel with her father as a musical duo in
1936 Poland; Isaiah Sheffer’s paean to Yiddish musical
theater. Through February 19. Evening performances
Tuesday through Saturday at 8:00, Sunday at 7:00;
matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday at 2:00
p.m. Royal Poinciana Playhouse, 70 Royal Poindana,
Palm Beach; 407-659-3310.
Film
Sunday, February 19
Cinema Vortex: The Alliance Film/Video Coop
presents screenings of milestone films; tonighf s
program features Jean Cocteau’s Testament of
Orpheus. $4 donation suggested. 7:00 p.m. BAR.,
1663 Lenox Ave, Miami Beach; 531-8504.
Wednesday, February 22
Cinema Wednesdays: Florida International University
reprises its weekly classic-film series with The Wizard
ofOz. Free. 8:00 p.m. FIU’s Graham Center 140, SW
Eighth Street and 107th Avenue; 348-2461.
Events
Thursday, February 16
Brokerage Yacht Show: More than 300 preowned luxury
yachts are on display and sale. Free. Today through
Monday from 10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Collins Avenue
and 47th Street, Miami Beach; 764-7642.
College Theater Wrapup: See “Calendar.”
Festa Italiana: Bask in the culture of Italy at this food
and fun festival. Free. Today from 5:00 to 10:00 p.m.,
tomorrow from 4:00 to 10:00 p.m., Saturday from
11:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m., and Sunday from 11:00 a.m.
to 9:00 p.m. Annabel Perry Park, 3200 SW 68th Ave,
Miramar; 966-9598.
Network Beach Party: The South Beach Business
Network hosts a networking party for small and large
businesses. Free. 6:30 p.m. 151 Ocean Dr, Miami
Beach; 531-3003.
Thursday Night Live: Have a night on the town in
downtown Miami with happy hours at area hotels,
restaurant specials, and cultural activities and
entertainment at various venues; tonight, the Florida
Philharmonic hosts a preconcert talk at the Gusman
Center (174 E Flagler St) , while Bayside Marketplace
(401 Biscayne Blvd) features live music and the
Center for the Fine Arts and the Historical Museum of
Southern Florida areopen. Free. 5:30 p.m. For details,
call 579-6675.
Friday, February 17
Harrison Street Art Walk: Galleries and artists’ studios in
the downtown Hollywood area open their doors for a
three-hour open house. Free. 6:00 p.m. Along
Harrison Street one block south of Hollywood
Boulevard, Hollywood; 920-4801.
Miami International Boat Show: See “Calendar.”
Mirando ai tendido: See “Calendar.”
Saturday, February 18
Children's Immunization: AvMed Health Plan,
All New Inventory
Sale
Full Size
Deco Frame
and Futon
now $339
reg. $699
Magic Frame
Full Size Couch Frame
and Futon $299
Magic Import is proud to
introduce our new line of Italian Futon
Frames, transformable couches and love-
seats with a Front Sliding device, support¬
ing structure Is made of steei tubu¬
lar bars, wheeled opening and closing
device. The metal is
finished in black power paint.
Our framés have been designed using
natural birchwood slals
for orthopedic comfort.
Genuine
Hand Made Rugs
from India Starting
at $65 reg. $129
-We Deliver-
Magic Import, Co. Hours: Mon-Thur 10-6, Fri 10-5, Sun 124
A New Concept in Futon Pricing Huge In-stock Selection‘Visit Our
2630 NW 2nd Ave • Miami • 576-2765 Warehouse‘Wholesale Orders Invited
iWAV
/¡Jaa,
Day Excursion from Ft. Lauderdale
to Grand Bahama
Includes: Round Trip Air,
$ 10 Casino Match Play, Free
Gaming Lessons, Unlimited
Tennis at Lucayan Beach
Resort & Casino
TO BREAKAWAY TODAY
CALL YOUR TRAVEL AGENT OR
CLUB BAHAMAS VACATIONS AT
1-800-447-9467
Your Best
Vacation
Value to the
Bahamas!
From Miami or Ft. Lauderdale
Nassau
FROiflS9
3 DAYS/2 NKjHTS
Grand Bahama
flovflÓP
3 DAYS/2 NKSHTS
Paradise Paradise
J229
3 DAYS/2 MGHT5
Eachoftheatxwe packages indudes: Round Trip
Airfare from either Miami or Ft Laúdentele, Hotel
Accomodations, and ground transfers. Bahamas
and other taxes addftonal. FMce6 subject to change
without notice. Subject to avaBabity. Prices per
person double occupancy. Vaíd to 4/1995.
Air Service Provided By
Bahamasair
VACATIONS
"RELAX. YOU'RE ON VACATION.
•Taxes where applicable are additional. Hotel Stay Required, 1 Night Min.
Expires 3/31/95. Fare subject to change without notice.
Tours operated by Uplink Investments.
Reg. No.19732
New Times Page 45
February 16-22, 1995

McDonald’s, and local hospitals are providing free
immunization for kids at area malls. 10:00 a.m. to 1:00
p.m. Mall of the Americas, 7795 W Flagler St;
261-8772,
Coconut Grove Arts Festival: See “Calendar.”
Coral Gables Farmers Market Local growers, bakeries,
and florists display their wares, while landscape
expert Dan Wood of Tropical Environments discusses
landscape trees at 9:00 a.m., and Parrot Jungle
presents a kids’ show at 11:00 a.m. Free. 8:00 a.m. to
1:00 p.m. Merrick Park, Miracle Mile and Lejeune
Road, Coral Gables; 460-5311.
Florida Renaissance Festival: Step almost 500 years into
the past as the Florida Renaissance Festival re-creates
a sixteenth-century village fair featuring hundreds of
costumed minstrels, musicians, artisans, jousters,
courtiers, and wenches, plus medieval rides and
games, a human chessboard, and authentic food and
drink. $10 adults, $5 kids under twelve. Today,
tomorrow, and Monday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Snyder Park, 3299 SW 4th Ave, Fort Lauderdale;
800-REN-FEST.
Latin Dance Party: Dance the afternoon away to Latin,
jazz, and world music every Saturday. $3.4:00 p.m.
Surfcomber Hotel, 1717 Collins Ave, Miami Beach;
538-5567.
Sunday, February 19
Autograph Show: Tommy “Butch” Bond (The Little
Rascals) and Russell Johnson (the Professor from
Gilligan's Island) are on hand as autograph dealers
from around the world display and sell tons of
autographed collectors’ items. $3.9:00 a.m. Holiday
Inn Calder, 21485 NW 27th Ave; 437-5562.
Shake-a-Leg Benefit Celebrities José Canseco, Romero
Britto, model Hunter Reno, and others host this
benefit for Shake-a-Leg, a sailing facility for the
disabled. $75.6:30 p.m. Grove Isle Club, 4 Grove Isle
Dr; 8580617.
Museums.
Art and Culture Center of Hollywood, 1650 Harrison St,
Hollywood; 921-3274. Through March 19—“Major
League/Minor League,” photographs of America’s
baseball stadiums by Jim Dow, and "Turning Twenty,”
selections from the center’s collection spanning two
decades.
Art Museum at Fill, University Park, SW 8th Street and
107th Avenue, PC rm 110; 3482890. Through
February 18 — “American Art Today: Night
Paintings.”
Bass Museum of Art 2121 Park Ave, Miami Beach;
6787530. Through February 26 — “Tomie Ohtake:
The Creation of the World, New Paintings, 1989-
1994.”
Boca Raton Museum of Art 801W Palmetto Park Rd,
Boca Raton; 407-392-2500. Through March 1 —
“Photography and Beyond: New Expressions From
France,” avant-garde photo-based art by Christian
Boltanski, Annette Messeger, Sophie Calle, and
others.
Center for the fine Arts, 101W Flagler St 375-1700:
Through February 26—Dade County Scholastic Art
Exhibition. Through March 12 — “life in a Boundless
Land: The Gaucho Scenes of Juan Manuel Blanes.”
Through April 16—“Burning Beds: Guillermo
Kuitca, A Survey of 1982-1994.” Through April 30 —
“Roberto Juarez: They Entered the Road.”
Center for Visual Communication, 4021 Laguna St Coral
Gables; 4486811. Through March 25—Twentieth-
century German Expressionist prints and drawings
from the Earn Collection. (See “Calendar.”)
Center of Contemporary Art 12340 NE 8th Ave, North
Miami; 893-6211. Through March 25—“Art +
Architecture = Miami,” a multimedia exhibition of
works by various artists that captures Miami’s visual
excitement.
Florida Museum of Hispanic and Latin American Art 1 NE
40th Sfr 5785171. Through March 4—Works by
Haitian artist Fenol Marcelin.
Historical Museum of Southern Florida, 101W Flagler St
3781492. February 17 through June 7 — ‘The Great
Ships: Ocean Liners and Cruise Ships,” an exhibition
of rare and antique models, paintings, and
memorabilia about Miami’s maritime history.
Through February 26—"The Golden Era of Gum
Cards.”
Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami, 1301 Stanford
Dr, Coral Gables; 284-3536. February 16 (lecture 8:00
p.m.) through April 2 — “Russian Imperial Porcelain,
1744-1917,” and “A Selection of Antique Russian
Icons.”
Main Library, 101W Flagler St 3782665. Through
April 28 — “Muhammad Ali: A Thirty-Year Journey,”
photographs by Howard L Bingham, and “Miami
Ringside: Muhammad Ali Boxing Memorabilia from
South Florida Collections.”
Metro-Dado Art in Public Places - Miami International
Airport Concourse E, Departure Level; 3785362.
Page' 4-6 New Times
f L ajyh
START THE NEW YEAR
WITH A NEW YOU NOW!
GET 12 MONTHS FREE SERVICE*
Nothing but skin between
you and your new hair...
UNIDERM, the revolution in hair replacement.
Hair applied cSrectly to your scalp through the amaz-
ing skin-to-skin™ technique. That’s what makes
Unfcleim evaything hair replacement should be. with
none of the drawbacks: • no bulky attachments* no
"built up" look • nothing to fed
if . . except your scalp. Ifyouwanta
v® natural hairline, if you want to
see thiuugh to your scalp, if you
<. want to fed nothing but hair
and skin, you want Uniderm,
the revolution in non-surgical
hair replacement. Call today or
XliHr send in the coupon bdow for a
free color brochure.
• some icssictuis apply see consta» for mac rtunraion Ufa Expíes 2-2805
r 1
j Name
11440 SW 88th SL,#111
(N. Kendall Dr.),
Kendall, FL 33176
598-5234
l Address.
I
I City
Cosmetic Laser
Surgery
Yellow/Green Laser
removes
• Sunspots • Freckles • Age Spots
• Spider Veins on Legs and Face
SilkTouch Laser
removes
Wrinkles • Scars
Collagen Injections
Biomedic Skin Peels
South Miami
598-0091
Bal Harbor
865-2281
DARRYL J. BLINSKI, MD, PA
Board Certified Plastic
& Cosmetic Laser Surgeon
STRATOGEN HEALTH
OF
MIAMI BEACH
comprehensive and compassionate
medical treatment and care
for
HIV/AIDS
Lori Bell, Acupuncture Physician
Ken Christiansen, M.S., L.M.H.C., Licensed Psycnotherapist
Fabian Escobar, Licensed Massage Therapist
Tom Fought, R.N., B.S.N., Clinical Coordinator
Susan Luck, R.N.. Health Educator
Patrece Frisbee, Doctor of Chiropractic
Joseph Piperate, M.D., Primary Care Physician
David Schmitt, M.D., Medical Director
Ray Vlasek, L.P.N., Medical Assistant
Melanie Walgrenj R.D., L.D.N., Nutritionist
Stratogen Health of Miami Beach
300 Arthur Godfrey Road, Suite 200
Miami Beacti, Florida
305^538-1400
Through May 12 — “Midnight’s Trees,” photographs
by Lori Robbins.
Metro-Dade Cultural Resource Center, 111 NW 1st St;
375-4635. Through March 1— Works by Gigi
Lilavois.
Miami Museum of Science and Space Transit Planetarium,
3280 S Miami Ave; 8544247. Through May 29 —
“Dinosaurs!” an interactive exhibition about those
prehistoric reptiles.
Museum of Art 1E Las Olas Blvd, Ft Lauderdale; 528
5500- Through March 5—Works by Dalva Duarte.
Through March 19 — “Alfred Eisenstaedt
Photographs from Life" Through April 2 — “My
People: The Portraits of Robert Henri,” and “Henri’s
Disciples: William Glackens and John Sloan.”
Through May 7 — “Fernando Botero: Monumental
Sculptures and Drawings.
Museum of Discovery and Science, 401 SW 2nd St Ft
Lauderdale; 467-6637. Through April 23 — “Backyard
Monsters: The World of Insects,” an interactive
exhibition featuring giant robotic bugs and an exotic
insect collection. Ongoing—Seven interactive
exhibition areas featuring “Florida Ecoscapes,”
“KidScience,” “Space Base,” “Choose Health,”
“Sound,” and “No Place Like Home.”
Young at Art - A Children's Museum, 801S University Dr,
Plantation; 424-0085. Through April 23 — “Spirit of
Native America,” a hands-on exhibition of authentic
Native American artifacts.
Galleries
Abacus Fine Art 1659 Michigan Ave, Miami Beach; 531-
3210. Through March 9 — “Ivan Santos and Lina
Velazquez: Landscapes and Nudes.”
Adamar Fine Arts, 177 NE 39th St 5781355. Through
April 1 — New works by Jack Amoroso.
Alliance Frangaise, 1414 Coral Way, Coral Gables; 859-
8760. Through February 16—"The Art of Love,”
paintings and writings by Melinda Porter.
Alliance Gallery, 927 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 531-
7912. Through March 4 — “Valentines,” an
installation by artist Dina and poet Jeffrey Knapp.
Americas Collection, 126 Aragon Ave, Coral Gables;
4485578. Through February 28—Recent works by
Costa Rican artist Rodolfo Stanley.
Art Collectors, 4200 Aurora St Coral Gables; 4486624.
Through February 25 — “A Passion for Color,” recent
paintings by Jean Messagier.
Art 800,800 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 674-8278.
Through February 28 (reception, Saturday, February
18, at 7:00 p.m.) — “Body and Soul,” paintings by
Cynthia Goodman.
Artefacts Galtety, 609 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 674-
3233. Through March 9—Original movie posters
from 1920 to 1994’s Pulp Fiction.
Artist's Studio. 2897 SW 69th Ct 261-0888. Through
March-18—“Southwestern Collection.”
Artspace/Virginia Miller Galleries, 169 Madeira Ave,
Coral Gables; 444-4493. Through February 28—
“Figuration,” works by Michael Collins, Tom
Hopkins, Lucas Johnson, and others.
Artworks Gallery, Omni International Mall, 1601
Biscayne Blvd; 539-1012. Through March 17 — “New
Media, Future Images: Printmaking and Technology
Exhibition,” a juried exhibition of experimental
printmaking techniques by Dade County public-
school students.
Astoria Fine Art, 2980 Ponce de Leon Blvd, Coral
Gables; 461-1212. Through February 28—Paintings
by Jaime Camacho.
Aureus Art and Jewelry Gallery, -2914 Ponce de Leon
Blvd, Coral Gables; 442-0098. Through Februaiy 28
— ‘Wooden Vessels,” works by Bill Carr.
BCC Fine Arts Gallery, 3501S Davie Rd, Davie; 4786517.
Through February 16—Works by sculptor Dean
Roman and painteF Carlos Hidalgo.
BCC South Campus Art Gallery, 7200 Pines Blvd,
Pembroke Pines; 963-8895. Through March 31 —
“Raymond Olivero: Tropical Tropes.”
Bakehouse Art Complex, 561 NW 32nd St; 5782828.
Through March 4 — Eighth Annual Anniversary
Exhibition, and “One-Man Exhibit Jack Hopkins.”
Barbara Gillman Gallery, 939 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
534-7872. Through March 8—“Boats: From Picture
to Object,” works by Sam Cady. Through March 7 —
“Martyrs and Saints,” recent works by Rosario
Marquardt
Barbara Scott Gallery, 1055 Kane Concourse, Bay
Harbor Islands; 8689393. February 17 (reception 7:00
p.m.) through March 12 — “Willy Heeks: Recent
Paintings.”
Barry University, Library Gallery, 11300 NE 2nd Ave,
Miami Shores; 899-3424. Through March 17 —
Recent works by Angi Curreri and Rick Yasko.
Belvetro Glass Gallery, 934 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
673-6677. Through February 28—Glass sculpture by
Louis Sclafani.
Bianca Lanza, 1633 Jefferson Ave, Miami Beach; 672-
4940. Through March 9 — Works on paper by Pascal
February 1,6-2?, 1995

ROUNDTRIP
FARES
SPECIALS
New York *178
Montreal $238
San Jose, C.R. $299
Plus tax certain restrictions apply
Many more destinations available.
We provide service on all major airlines
Don’t forget we have Great Cruise
Specials also!!
899-9123
11900 Biscayne Blvd
TOP 10 REASONS WHY
YOU SHOULD CALL
JEWISH MATCHMAKING CO.
#10. Personal ads, computers and single
dances just aren’t your*style.
#9. Jewish moms across the country
recommend us.
#8. We offer a complimentary consultation.
#7. Because we all are looking for a "Mench”.
#6. We have over 13 years of experience.
#5. Anyone can do the Hora but only
two can Tango.
#4. Matchmaking works, we’ve helped
match over 400 clients.
#3. Because your parents are hocking you to
China about Grandchildren.
#2. Most people actually meet through
an introduction.
AND THE NUMBER ONE REASON
IT IS THE PERFECT ALTERNATIVE
FOR JEWISH SINGLES WHO WISH
TO SEE THEMSELVES IN A
SINCERE RELATIONSHIP.
(305) 9894202 or (305) 9890828
mvESMmiEm
QUEST
I I
É¡ü
1 LJVB CONNÉ
m
FREE TO CALL*
mSlSMimS
In Broward call: 749-1111 |
Me? SÍ °n9^,Stance Gorges may apply. For help or information call Customer Service 24hrs @ (305)892-7777. Credit Card memberships available.
,ia. 065 00 Pre*screen callers and assumes no liability when meeting through this service. For adults only 18 & over. ©1995 Media 1® *

CIVIL WAR
DAYS
FEB. 25 & 26
FORT ZACHARY TAYLOR
KEY WEST
Visitors wanted for the 9th Annual Civil War Days, at Fort Zachary Taylor,
Key West, Florida. This two day event will feature reenactments, skills
demonstrations, sea skirmish, and a candle-light tour. See what life was
like in 1863 when Union troops occupied the fort.
An opportunity not to be missed!
FOR INFORMATION
CALL (305) 292-6713
Sponsored by the Florida Park Service, Friends of Fort Taylor and
THE FLORIDA KEYS'
& KEY WEST € >
lC«y largo. IsKmcxoda, Morcithyn. Lower Sponsored by the Florida Park
Service, and Friends of Fort Taylor
The Chopin Foundation of the U.S.
Presents
The Fifth American National Chopin Piano Competition
March 4 - 12,1995
Featuring America's Future Master Pianists!
Gusman Center For the Performing Arts
174 East Flagler Street
Miami, Florida
Preliminary & Quarterfinal Rounds - March 4 - 7,10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Open to the public. Please call the Chopin Foundation for details.
Semifinal Rounds - March 8 and 9,10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
General Admission $10
Final Rounds - March 11,7 p.m. and March 12,3 p.m.
Six finalists will be accompanied by the Florida Philharmonic Orchestra under the
direction of Stanislaw Skrowaczewski.
Reserved Seating $37.50 to $10.
For information and ticket reservations contact the Chopin Foundation,
305-868-0624. Tickets to the Final Rounds may also be purchased through
TicketMaster, 305-358-5885.
The Chopin Foundation deeply appreciates the support of:
â– H MIAMI TRANS 1 BRASIL Noftl H TI I
El)C lltinmi Herald cmSAA/«? KF Kn^tF^ndauon £07"
Metro-Dade County Cultural Affairs Council and Metro-Dade County Board of County
Commissioners; Metro-Dade County Tourist Development Council; Metro-Dade County
Public School Board; City ofMiami and City ofMiami Board of Commissioners; Stale of
Florida-Division of Cultural Affairs; Chopin Foundation Councils; Gusman Center for
the Performing Arts; Coral Gables Congregational Church; Morgan Music; Batchelor
. and Rosenstiel Foundations; Steinway and Sons.
Ferandou.
Books & Books, 296 Aragon Ave, Coral Gables; 442-
4408. Through February 27 — “The Goggle Series,”
photographs by Cindy Seip.
Britto Central, 818 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 531-8821.
Through March 9 — “Boom Britto.”
C. Firgau Art Gallery, 1940 Ponce de Leon Blvd, Coral
Gables; 567-9191. Through March 3 — “Figurative
Art,” featuring nine Latin American artists.
Carefully Chosen Gallery, 827 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
531-2627. Through March 10—Judaica gift art
Carel Gallery, 928 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 5344384.
Through March 9—“Post-Impressionists,”
nineteenth- and twentieth-century masters, including
works by Bernard Buffet and new acquisitions.
Caroline Gallery, 2920 Ponce de Leon Blvd, Coral
Gables; 443-8989. Through February 25—Works by
Jorge Ramos.
Chad Elliott Gallery, 922 Lincoln Rd; 534-8547. Through
March 9 — Recent works and works-in-progress by
Chad Elliot and works by photographer Ali.
Coconut Grove Gallery, 2790 Bird Rd, Coconut Grove;
445-7401. Through February 20.— “Memories of the
Sky,” paintings by Karen Vernon and Ken
Muenzenmayer.
Common Space, 1655 Lenox Ave, Miami Beach; 674-
8278. Through March 9 — Collaborations by James
Herring andCesarTrasobares.
Continuum Gallery, 927 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 538-
3455. Through March 9—Group show.
Design Gallery of the Americas, 1NE 40th St; 573-6508.
Through March 4—“Grupo Perspective,” works by
Brazilian artists Claudia Cámera, Alexandra de
Cárdenas, Perla Egan, and Annunciata Morelli.
Donald Brecker and Klein/Brecker Galleries, 1019 Lincoln
Rd, Miami Beach; 673-6559. Through March 5 —
“Missing Pieces,” photographs by Olivia Parker.
Through March 12 — ‘Treasures: Small Works by
Studio Furniture Makers and Contemporary
Metalsmiths.”
Dorsch Gallery, 2157 SW 13th Ave; 8564080. February
17 (recéption 6:00 p.m.) through March 9— “Franklin
Einspruch: Painting With Drawing.”
Elite Fine Art Gallery, 3140 Ponce de Leon Blvd, Coral
Gables; 448-3800. Through February 24—Works by
Panamanian artist Guillermo Trujillo.
Engman International, 2111 Ponce de Leon Blvd, Coral
Gables; 445-5125. Through February 24—Works by
Orlando Agudelo-Botero.
Exit Gallery, 904 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 672-1280.
Through March 9 — Paintings by Peter Staniek.
Fredric Snitzer Gallery, 1810 Ponce de Leon Blvd, Coral
Gables; 4488976. Through February 28 — Recent
sculpture by Carol K. Brown.
Gallery of the Eccentric, 233 Aragon Ave, Coral Gables;
446-5550. Through February 27—“Angels and
Devils: Forces in Folk Art,” works by U.S., Haitian,
and Latin American artists.
Gallery of the Dnknown Artist 745 Washington Ave,
Miami Beach; 532-2265. February 17 (reception 9:00
p.m.) through March 17 — “Sex, Sin, and Crime in a
Southern Slum,” works by underground artists
Andrea Anderson, Albert Sgambati, and Joseph
Seeman. Through February 18—“UFO in South
Beach,” a daily video presentation (11:00 am.) about
extraterrestrials by the U.S. Raelian Movement.
Gutierrez Fine Arts, 1628 Pennsylvania Ave, Miami
Beach; 674-0418. Through March 9 — “Jorge Pantoja:
Uterodoxias.”
Hetzer Gallery, 4030 N-Miami Ave; 576-9141. Through
March 6—“Posturas hartas (Many Postures),” recent
works by Peruvian artist Rossana Montoya.
Jacques Harvey Gallery, 815 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
672-6427. Through March 9—“Dogs and Cats.”
Jeanine Cox Fine Art 1029 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
534-9003. Through March 4 — New work by Oscar
Lakeman and Louis Mueller.
Joel Kessler Fine Art 927 Lincoln Rd, ste 208, Miami
Beach; 5328075. Through March 8 — Recent works
by Venezuelan artist Elba Damast.
Joya, 527 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 534-5191.
Through March 9—“J.W. Paclipan: Latex on
Canvas.”
Kirschnertiaack Gallery, 1014-A Lincoln Rd, Miami
Beach; 531-7730. Through March 9—“Christian
Pierre: Swamp Root Series and Other Delights.”
Latin American Art Center, 3301 Coral Way, level U; 444-
8890. Through February 28—“En junio como en
enero (In June as in January),” an exhibition of works
by fifteen Latin American artists honoring the
birthday of José Marti.
LeMar Gallery, 856 Washington Ave, Miami Beach; 665-
4380. Ongoing—Recent works by Alain Despert
MDCC Centre Gallery, 300 NE 2nd Ave, ste 1365; 237-
3278. Through February 25—“Forces of Change:
Women Artists of the Arab World.”
MDCC Gallery North, 11380 NW 27th Ave, Collins
Campus Center, rm 4207-1; 237-1532. TTirough
February 23—“American Beach: A Haven in the
Time of Storm,” photographs by Bob Self.
MDCC InterAmerican Art Gallery, 627 SW 27th Ave, ste
3104; 237-3278. Through February 25—“Forces of
Change: Women Artists of the Arab World.”
MDCC Kendall Campus Art Gallery, 11011 SW 104th St;
237-2322. Through February 24—“Zimbabwe Now,”
contemporary sculpture.
Margulles Tapiin Gallery. 3310 Ponce de Leon Blvd,
’’'Coral Gables; 447-1199. Through February 25—
Works by artists Michael David and James del
Grosso.
Mayfair Fine Art 701 Lincoln Rd, ste 701, Miami Beach;
534-1004. Through March 9 — Russian oils and
tempera.
Menelik I & II, 1661 Michigan Ave, Miami Beach; 534-
5556. Through March 9—“Life Scenes of Haiti,”
works by Haitian artists Sophia Lacroix and Lionel
Sammy.
Metamorphosis, 9463 Harding Ave, Surfside; 864-9484.
Through February 25—“Nonoo.”
Meza Fine Arts, 275 Giralda Ave, Coral Gables; 461-
2723. Through February 27—“Southern Hybrids III,”
works by Guillermo Kuitca, Bill Albertini, Natalia
BabarOvic, and others, and “Origin and Construction,”
paintings by Gabriel Orenstein.
Miami Institute of Expanding Light 8905 SW 87th Ave;
279-0052, ext 201. February 17 (reception 8:00 p.m.)
through March 15—“Magram Deux: A Celebration
of Family Art” works by Selma and Ron Magram.
One Man Sho Gallery and Studio, 166 Alhambra Cij, 2nd
fl, Coral Gables; 461-9911. Through March 1 —
“Ready to Wear Women and Men of Fashion and
Taste,” new works by Julio Blanco; ‘The Object
Named Delirium,” furniture and sculpture by Louis
Durot; and “Europe 1994,” photographs by Joe
Blanco.
Photogroup Center, 130 Madeira Ave, Coral Gables;
444-0198. Through February 17—“Evon Streetman:
Recent Works,” and “Photowork ’95,” works from the
national juried photography competition.
Photo's and Photo's, 1037 Kane Concourse, Bay Harbor
Islands; 864-2624. February 17 (reception 6:00 p.m.)
through March 14—“Eclectic Views,” photographs
by Louis A. Williams.
Rita Gombinski Contemporary Art 900 Lincoln Rd,
Miami Beach; 5324141. Through March 9—“Group
' Show,” and a collection of Israeli art
Salon 1000,1000 West Ave, Miami Beach; 5314614.
Through February 28—Art Deco Weekend posters
from 1987 to 1994.
Sher Galleries, 3585 NF 207th St North Miami Beach;
932-9930. Through February 17—“Russian Artists,”
works by Martiros, Yuroz, and Erte. February 18
(réception tonight at 8:00 and tomorrow at 5:00 p.m.)
through February 26—“Gregory Hawthorne.”
Sky Gallery, International Place, 100 SE 2nd St 539-
7100. Through February 28—“In Full Bloom,”
paintings by Bonnie Bloom.
South Florida Art Center - ClaySpace, 1035 Lincoln Rd,
Miami Beach; 534-3339. Through March 4 — “Clay
Art for the Garden.”
South Florida Art Center - Ground Level, 1035 Lincoln Rd,
Miami Beach; 674-8278. Through March 4 — ‘Trees,”
works by José Bedia, Carol Brown, Tome Downs,
Roberto Juarez, and others.
South Florida Art Center - Upper Story, 924 Lincoln Rd,
Miami Beach; 567-2416. Through March 4—“Fresh
Paint Studio: A One-Man Group Show,” works by Alan
Pimentel.
Southeast Collection Gallery, 3211 Ponce de Leon Blvd,
Coral Gables; 371-2711. Through March 1 —
“Florida’s Own,” works by local and state artists.
Steiner Galleries, 9700 Collins Ave, Bal Harbour, 866-
1816. February 16 (reception 6:00 p.m.) through
March 31— “Ma Jaya: Newest Series.” Ongoing—
Contemporary artworks by several gallery artists.
SunBank International Gallery, 1SF 3rd Ave; 444-7618.
Through February 28—American Artists
Professional Le