Citation
Progress Report on Ford Foundation Projects 1963

Material Information

Title:
Progress Report on Ford Foundation Projects 1963
Creator:
Rojas, Pauline M. ; Robinett, Ralph F. ( author )
Donor:
Bess de Farber
Publisher:
Rojas, Pauline M.; Robinett, Ralph F.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 Volume
Measurements:
11 x 8.5 inches
Physical Location:
Box 1, Folder 4

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Coral Way Bilingual Elementary School
Genre:
Records (Documents) ( LCGFT )
Spatial Coverage:
USA -- Florida -- Dade County -- Miami

Notes

Abstract:
Progress Report on the Bilingual School Project, a report from the Directors of the Ford Foundation to Dr. Joe Hall, Superintendent of Dade County public Schools ( en )
General Note:
Related: https://uair.library.arizona.edu/item/293182

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Digital reproduction of this item is made available under an assertion of fair use (17 U.S.C. 107) for noncommercial educational and research purposes only. The University of Florida Libraries respects the intellectual property rights of others and does not claim any copyright interest in these materials. Written permission from the copyright owner and any other rights holders must be obtained for any reuse of this item that extends beyond fair use or other statutory exemptions. Furthermore, responsibility for the determination of the copyright status and securing permission rests with those persons wishing to reuse the materials. The Libraries would like to learn more about these materials, and welcomes individuals or organizations to contact Digital Support Services (ufdc@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.

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Coral Way

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) ) ., October 29, 1963 TO: Dr. Joe Hall, Su per intendent and Secretary FROM: Dr. Pauline M. Rojas, Director, Ford Foundation Project Mr. Ralph F. Robinett, Assistant Director, Ford Foundation Project SUBJECT: A REPORTPROGRESS R E PORT ON FORD FOUNDATION PROJF.GTS PART ONE INTRODUCTION The projects to which we are committed under the Ford Foundation grant are as follows: THE STAFF 1. The preparation of reading materials for non-English speaking bilingual pupils entering first grade. 2. The revision or adaptation of the books of the Fries American English Series for non-English speakin_g __ bilingual pupils who can read and write their verna cular 3. The preparation of guides and audio-visual materials for teachers of bilingual pupils: 4. The establishment of a bilingual school. Pauline M. Rojas, Director Ralph F. Robinett, Assistant Director Paul W. Bell, Coordinator for Bilingual Education Herminia M Cantero ) June Grange r ) Rosa G. Inclan ) Teacher Writers Mildred B. Lash ) Mary E. Perdue ) CONSULTANT SERVICES Among the specialists who have agreed to look over our work and advise us are: Dr. Charles A. Ferguson, Director of th~ Center for Applied Linguistics; Dr. Theodore Clymer, President of the International Reading Association; Dr. C. C. Fries, a linguist in the field of English, now retired from the University of Michigan; Dr. Ross R. Macdonald, a linguist in the field of English, now working -1

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on a machine translation project in Washington; Dr. Warren C. CUtts, specialist ( for reading of the u. s. Office of Education; and Dr. Alfreds. Hayes, Assistant Director for Research Center for Applied Linguistics. ( We are in the process of contacting at present Dr. John B. Carroll, psychologist at Harvard; Dr. Nelson Francis, linguist in the field of English at Brown University; Dr. David Reed, linguist interested in reading at U.C.L.A., and Dr. Wallace Lambert, psychologist at McGill University in Montreal. PART TWO OVERVIE.W OF PROGRESS TO DATE The grant became operative on January 1, 1963, the staff at that time consisting of the coordinator and the director only. The assistant director took over his duties on March 1, with instructions to spend some time acquainting himself with the on-going bilingual program for Cuban refugee pupils and with Dade County schools in general. In the late spring it was decided that the bilingual school would be organized in Coral Way Elementary and that an in-service curriculum workshop would be held there during the summer for the teachers who would teach the bilingual groups in the fall. This workshop would be held simul taneously with the in-service training workshop for teachers of English as a second language in the county wide bilingual program for Cuban refugee pupils. Both the Assistant Director and the Coordinator for Bilingual Education partici pated full time in these summer in-service training workshops. Almost all of the other members of the staff were to some degree involved in these summer programs. The Director also spent approximately three veeks visiting workshops on the teaching of English as a second language in Phoenix, Arizona; Tuscon, Arizona; San Jose, California; and Albuquerque, New Mexico. On August 1, work began on the reading materials project and on ~eptember 3, classes began in the bilingual school. -2

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} The staff is now working on the language units upon which the reading materials will be based. As the language materials and reading materials are prepared, they will be submitted to specialists for their suggestions, then revised, and finally tried out this year in certain classrooms of Spanish-speaking first graders in Dade County. It is expected that by next fall a body of materials will be ready to be tried out in other areas where there are large num bers of Spanish-speaking pupils, provided arrangements ean be made with school s7stems in suitable locations. For the time being nothing is being done on the revision of the Fries Series books nor on the audio-visuals. The revision project will be started as soon as the reading materials projects gets well enough along that part of the staff can be freed for working on it. The audio-visuals will be a natural outgrowth of the various materials as they are developed. We feel that we have an excellent staff, among whom there is a variety of abilities and talents. We are satisfied that in spite of the unavoidable delay in getting organized and the time devoted to the summer programs, we are moving ahead satisfactorily. p ART THREE SPECIAL REPORT ON nm BILINGUAL SCHOOL Our bilingual school represents a unique venture in American education. To our knowledge it is the only one of its kind to have been established so far. Because of the unusual interest it has aroused, we are including herein a detailed report on its organization and functioning. PMR:RFR/am -3

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/ PROGRESS REPORT ON TIIE BILINGUAL SCHOOL PROJECT Expected Outcome The expected outcomes of the program in bilingual instruction initiated in the Coral Way Elementary School are as follows: 1. The participating pupil will have achieved as much in the way of skills, abilities, and understandings as he would have had he attended a monolingual school and in addition will have derived benefits which he could not have attained in a monolingual school. 2. He will be approximately as proficient in his second language as he is in his first. If he is a skilled reader in his first language, he will be a skilled reader in his second languare. If he has mastered the fundamental processes and concepts in arithmetic in one lan~"\lage, he will handle them equally well in the other language. If he can express himself clearly and adequately in his first language he will be able to do likewise in the other language. 3. He will be able to operate in either culture easily and comfortably. 4. He will have acquired consciously or unconsciously an understanding of the symbolic nature of language and as a result will be able to achieve greater objectivity in his thinking processes. s. In general terms he will be more acceptive of stnange people and cultures and will thus increase the range of his job opportunities. 6. He will have skills, abilities and understandings which will greatly extend his vocational potential and thus increase his usefulness to himself and the world in which he lives. 7. He will broaden his understanding of people and the world and be able to live a richer fuller and more satisfying personal life. Organization During the first year of this project, 1963-64, twelve groups of pupils are involved: four first grade groups; four second grade groups; and four third grade groups. At each of the grade levels, two groups are made up of native speakers of English and two of native speakers of Spanish. An additional grade level will be added each year until the six grade levels will be participating. There are twelve teachers and three teacher aides working in the program. The teachers at each grade level are paired off into teams consisting of one native speaker of English and one native speaker of Spanish. The native English speaking teacher of each team is responsible for the academic instruction in English of one group of native English speaking pupils and one group of native Spanish speaking pupils. The native Spanish speaking teacher is responsil>le for the academic instruc tion in ~panish of these two ~oups of pupils. The three teacher aides assist in the music, art, physical education, and supervised play activities in all three grade levels, and use both English and Spanish as media of instruction. -4

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) The pupils participating in the bilingual program will receive approximately half of their instruction in each language. The time devoted in instruction in the second language is staged so as to increase the proportion gradually. During the first year the staging affects all three grade levels. In subsequent years it will affect the first grade only. The time allotted to the learning of the basic skills and concepts compares favorably with the time regularly allotted in Dade County in monolingual schools, the only difference being that in the bilingual school the time is divided between the two languages. In the beginning stages the basic skills and concepts are always introduced in the first language of the child. These skills and concepts are then incorporated into the second language program as part of a language learning experience. In this way the child reinforces the concepts and skills and at the same time advances in his mastery of the second language. Selection of Participants The pupils in the program are pupils who would normally attend the Coral Way School. Inasmuch as the native Spanish speaking pupil in the school have been pro portionately fewer than the native English speaking pupils, it has been necessary to open enrollment to Spanish speaking pupils from nearby Riverside and Shenandoah Elementary schools. Participation is voluntary and provision has been made for pupils who do not choose to participate. Participation is not limited to pupils with records of superior academic achievement. Only a few pupils with extremely low records were screened out after consultation with their parents. In general, the pupils reflect the normal range of the school population. The native English speaking teachers were selected from interested faculty in the school and participated in an in-service trainin~ program during the summer of 1963. The native Spanish speaking teachers and the teacher aides were selected in part from the staff of the school and in part from other schools; all were experi enced personnel of the Dade County system who had successfully completed a special training course at the University of Miami. Teacher Training and Curriculum Development As part of the sunnner in-service training program, a curriculwn workshop was held, in which all teachers and aides working in the bilingual program participated. In this workshop, the principal, teachers, and aides, with the cooperation of con sultants from the staff of the Board of Public Instruction, developed detailed plans and schedules for all aspects of the curriculum. In seven curricular areas, special attention was given to problems resulting from the bilingual nature of the program. Detailed linguistic sequences for the English as a second language and Spanish as a second language were developed in order to incorporate the concepts of the several content areas in the curriculum. Science was given special attention because the availability of parallel texts in English and Spanish make it possible to sharpen the science concepts through their study in divergent cultural settings. Spanish as the vernacular was given special attention because no satisfactory program was available and one had to be created. Music, art, and physical education were given special attention because in these areas intracultural relations will be greatest in the organization as it now stands. In all areas of the curriculum, the program in the bilingual school incorporates and is in harmony with the regular Dade County program as it appears in the official curriculum bulletins. -5

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( For the instruction in English, the state adopted texts in the school continue to be used. The only English texts especially ordered for the bilingual program are the three titles of the 1961 Heath Science Series, which served as the basis for the Spanish edition to be used in the program. For the instruction in Spanish, three series of texts were ordered: a Spanish basal reader series, the Spanish translation of the science series mentioned above, and a Spanish health series. All of these series are new and published by American publishers, and reflect modern American pedogogy in their approach to the content. Supplementary reading and ref erence materials in Spanish have been ordered for the library. Long Range Evaluation A design for evaluating the bilingual program is now being prepared. Appropriate devices are being assembled, such as standardized tests for English as a second lan guage and general ability tests in Spanish, and contacts are being made for cooper ative research with other school systems concerned with English as a second language or bilingual instruction. Evaluation of Progress to Date An analysis of the development of the program thus far leads us to conclude that the project is moving satisfactorily. The careful selection of personnel and the preliminary planning have been major factors contributing to a smooth beginning of a complex project. At this time two administrative problems confront the project: the need for increased enrollment of Spanish speaking pupils and the need for regrouping pupils in accordance with their proficiency in the second language. B oth problems are under consideration and solutions can be expected in the immediate future. On the instructional level the basic need is for cooperative planning and teaching in the area of second language instruction. A systematic approach to this problem will be initiated by the end of th~ current month. -6

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) ) PRINCIPAL Mr. J. Lee Logan FIRST GRADE Team I Team II SECOND GRADE Team I Team II TH.lRO GRADE Team I Team II AIDES Mrs. Teresa Brito Mrs. Eneida Guernica Mrs. Marta Pineiro APPENDIX A -STAFF CORAL WAY BILINGUAL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ENGLISH Mrs. Marjorie Cook Mrs. Shirley Borden ENGLISH Miss Marilyn Paepke Mrs. Margaret Heydrick ENGLISH Mrs. Frances Dye Mrs. Geraldine Martin CONSULTANTS Mr. Paul Bell Mrs. Henninia Cantero Mrs. Rosa lnclfn Mr. Ralph F. Robinett Dr. Pauline M. Rojas Miss Lois Taylor -7ASST. PRINCIPAL Mrs. Betty R. Adams SPANISH Mrs. Marta Sierra I Mrs. Lourdes Mene~dez SPANISH ,, Miss Haydee Iglesias Mrs. Julieta Gonz,lez SPANISH Mrs. Josefina Sanchez Mrs. Magda Lecours

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APPENDIX B TIME DISTRIBUTION GRADE ONE TOTAL BOTH SECOND SECOND LANGUAGE WEEKS TIME VERNACULAR LANGUAGES LANGUAGE DISTRIBUTION 1-4 Incl. 210 190 -020 (Enrichment (Songs, Games (Enrichment 5-12 Incl. 330 175 95* 60 (Systematic Drill (Arithmetic ( (Enrichment (Systematic Drill 13-24 Incl. 330 140 95* 95 (Arithmetic (Social Studies (Science, Health, Art (Enrichment (Systematic Drill 25-36 Incl. 390 140 95* 155 (Arithmetic (Social Studies (Science, Health, (Reading, Art Supervised Play 20 Lunch 30 Physical Education 30 Music 15 T O T A L 95 -8

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) WEEKS 1-6 Incl. 7-12 Incl. 13-36 Incl. Supervised Lunch TOTAL TIME 390 390 390 Play Physical Education Music TO TA L VERNACULAR 195 165 145 20 20 30 20 90 GRADE TWO BOTH LANGUAGES 100* 100* 100* -9SECOND LANGUAGE 95 125 145 SECOND LANGUAGE DISTRIBUnON (Enrichment (Systematic Drill (Arithmetic (Enrichment (Systematic Drill (Arithmetic (Reading (Enrichment (Systematic Drill (.Arithmetic (Reading (Social Studies (Science (Health

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TOTAL WEEKS TIME VERNACULAR 1-6 Incl. 390 7-12 Incl. 390 13-36 Incl. 390 Supervised Play 20 Lunch 30 Physical Education 30 Music 20 TOT A L90 195 165 145 GRADE THREE BOTH SECOND SECOND LANGUAGE LANGUAGES LANGUAGE DISTRIBUTION (Enrichment 100* 95 (Systematic Drill (Arithmetic (Enrichment 100* 125 (Systematic Drill (Arithmetic (Reading (Enrichment (Systematic Drill 100* 145 (Arithmetic (Reading (Social Studies (Health -10

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\ APPENDIX C DA I LY S C H E D U L E S GRADE ONE WEEKS 1-4 INCLUSIVE TIME MINUTES ACTIVITY 8:30-8:45 15 Opening Activities 8:45-9:35 50 Language Arts (Reading 9:35-9:55 30 SuEervised Play 9:55-10:15 20 LanguagP 10: 15-11:00 45 Social Studies, Health, Arithmetic, Art 11:00-11:30 30 Lunch 11 :30-11: 50 20 Second Language 11:50-12:00 10 Evaluation All subjects not listed as second language are in the vernacular except sec tions underlined. Those underlined activities are assigned to the aides and pennits the use of both languages. During the Second Language period, the teachers exchange classes. The English teacher works with the Spanish pupils and the Spanish teacher works with the English pupils. -11

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TIME MINUTES 8:30-8:45 15 8:45-9:35 50 9 :35-9: 55 20 9:55-10:25 30 10:25-11:00 30 11 :00-11: 30 30 11:30-12:30 60 12:30-1:00 30 1:00-1:15 15 1:15-1:50 35 1:50-2:00 10 12:30-12:45 15 12:45-1:00 15 1:00-1:30 30 1:30-1:50 20 1:50-2:00 10 GRADE ONE WEEKS 5-12 INCLUSIVE ACTIVITY Opening Activities Language Arts (Reading) Superivsed Play Language Arts, (Reading contt., ~riting, Language) Arithmetic, Science and Health Lunch Second Language (Enrichment, Systematic Drill, Arithmetic) TEAM I Physical Education Music Social Studies, Art Evaluation TEAM II Social Studies Music Physical Education Art Evaluation All subjects not listed as second language are in the vernacular except sections under lined. Those underlined activities are assigned to the aides and permits the use of both languages. During the Second Language peviod, the teachers exchange classes. The English teacher works with the Spanish pupils and the Spanish teacher works with the English pupils. -12

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\ GRADE ONE WEEKS 13-24 INCLUSIVE TIME MINUTES ACTIVITY 8:30-8:45 15 Opening Activities 8:45-9:35 50 Language Arts (Reading) 9135-9:55 20 Su_pervised P lay 9:55-10:35 30 Language Arts (Reading Con 1 t., Writing, Spelling, Language) 10:25-11:00 30 Arithmetic, Science Health and Social Studies 11:00-11:30 30 Lunch 11:30-12:30 60 Second Language (Enrichment, Systematic Drill, Arithmetic) TEAM I 12:30-1:00 30 1 Physical Education 1:00-1:15 15 Music 1:15-1:50 35 Second Language (Science, Health, Social Studies, Art) 1:50-2:00 10 Evaluation TE.AM II 12:30-12:45 15 Second Language (Science, Health) 12:45-1:00 15 Music 1:00-1:30 30 Physical Education 1:30-1:50 20 Second Language (Sooial Studies Art) 1:50-2:00 10 Evaluation All subjects not listed as second language are in the vernacular except sections under lined. These underlined activities are assigned to the aides and permits the use of both languages. During the Second Language period, the teachers exchange classes. The English teacher worKs with the Spanish pupils and the Spanish teacher works with the English pupils. -13

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( ( GRADE ONE WEEKS 25-36 INCLUSIVE TIME MINUTES ACTIVITY 8:30-8:45 15 Opening Activities 8: 45-9 :_35 50 Language Arts (Reading) 9:35-9:55 20 Supervised Play 9:55-18:25 30 Language Arts (Reading con't., Writing, Spelling, Language) 10: 25-11 :00 30 Arithmetic, Science, Health, Social Studies 11 :00-11: 30 30 Lunch 11:30-12:30 60 Second Language (Enrichment, Systematic Drill, Arithmetic) TEAM I 12:30-1:00 30 Physical Education 1:00-1:15 15 Music 1:15-1:50 35 Second Language (Social Studies, Science, Health, Art) 1:50-2:50 60 Second Language (Reading) 2:50-3:00 10 Evaluation TEAM II 12:30-12:45 15 Second Language (Science and Health) 12:45-1:00 15 Music 1:30-1:50 20 Second Language (Social Studies, Art) 1:50-2:50 60 Second Language (Reading) 2:50-3:00 10 Evaluation All subjects not listed as second language are in the vernacular except sections under lined. Those underlined activities are assigned to the aides and permits the use of both lan g uages. During the Second Language period, the teachers exchange classes. The English teacher works with the Spanish pupils and the Spanish teacher works with the English pupils. -14

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TIME MINUTES 8:30-8:45 15 8:45-9:55 70 9:55-10:15 20 10:15-10:35 20 10:35-10:55 20 10:55-11:15 20 11: 15-11: 45 30 11:45-12:15 30 12:15-12:45 30 12:45-1:30 45 1:30-2:00 30 2:00-2:20 20 2:20-2:50 so 2:50-3:00 10 12: 45-1: 40 55 1:40-2:00 20 2:00-2:30 30 2:30-2:50 20 2:50-3:00 10 GRADE TWO WEEKS 1-6 INCLUSIVE ACTIVITY Opening Activities Language Arts (Reading and Spelling) Supervised Play Science and Health Art Social Studies Lunch Arithmetic Language Arts (Language and Writing) TEAM I Second Language (Enrichment, Systematic Drill, Language, Arts) Physical Education Music Second Language (Arithmetic and Drill) Evaluation TEAM II Second Language (Enrichment, Systematic Drill, Arithmetic) Music Physical Education Second Language (Drill con't.) Eval uation All subjects not listed as second language are in the vernacular except sections underlined. Those underlined activities are assigned to the aides and permits the use of both languages. During the Second Langua ge period, the teachers excha n ge classes. The English teacher works with the Spanish pupils and th e Spanish teacher works with the English pupils. -15

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( GRADE TWO WEEKS 7-12 INCLUSIVE TIME MINUTES ACTIVITY 8:30-8:45 15 Opening Activities 8:45-9:55 70 Language Arts (Reading, Language, Spelling, Writing) 9: 55-18: 15 20 SuEervised Play 10:15-10:35 20 Science and Health 10 :35-10: 55 20 Art 10: 55-11: 15 20 Social Studies 11: 15-11: 45 30 Lunch 11:45-12:15 30 Aritlunetic TEAM I 12: 15-1:30 75 Second Language (Enrichment, Systematic Drill, Reading) 1:30-2:00 30 Physical Education 2:00-2:20 20 Music 2:20-2:50 30 Second Language (Aritlunetic and Drill con 1 t.) 2:50-3:00 10 Evaluation TEAM II 12:15-1:40 85 Second Language (Enrichment, Systematic Drill, Reading) 1:40-2:00 20 Music 2:00-2:30 30 Physical Education 2:30-2:50 20 Second Language (Arithmetic and Drill cont.) 2:50-3:00 10 Evaluation All subjects not listed as second language are in the vernacular except sections under lined. Those underlined activities are assigned to the aides and permits the use of both languages. During the Second Language period, the teachers exchange classes. The English teacher works with the Spanish pupils and the Spanish teacher works with the English pupils. -16

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GRADE TWO WEEKS 13-36 INCLUSIVE TIME MINUTES ACnVITY 8:30-8:45 15 Opening Activities 8:45-9:55 70 Language Arts (Reading, Language, Spelling, Writing) 9:55-10:15 20 Supervised Play 10:15-10:35 20 Science, Health, Social Studies 10:35-10:55 20 Art 10:55-11:15 20 Arithmetic 11:15-11:45 30 Lunch 11: 45-11: 55 10 Arithmetic con 1 t. 11: 55-1: 10 75 Second Language (Enrichment, Systematic Drill, Reading) ) TEAM I 1:10-1:30 20 Second Language (Science, Health, Social Studies 1:30-2:00 30 Physical Education 2:00-2:20 20 Music 2:20-2:50 30 Second Language (Arithmetic and Drill con 1 t.) 2:50-3:00 10 Evaluation TEAM II 1:10-1:40 30 Second Language (Science, Health, Social Studies and Drill) 1:40-2:00 20 Music 2:00-2:30 30 Physical Education 2:30-2:50 20 Second Language (Arithmetic and Drill can't.) 2:50-3:00 10 Evaluation All subjects not listed as second language are in the vernacular except sections under ; lined. Those underlined activities are assigned to the aides and pennits the use of both languages. During the Second Language period, the teachers exchange classes. The English teacher works with the Spanish pupils and the Spanish teacher works with the English pupils. -17

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TU1E MINUTES 8:30-8:45 15 8:45-9:05 20 9:05-10:15 70 10:15-10:35 20 10:35-11:05 30 11:05-11:30 25 11: 30-12 :00 30 12:00-12:45 45 12:45-1:30 45 1:30-2:00 30 2:00-2:30 30 2:30-2:50 20 2:50-3:00 10 8:30-8:45 15 8:45-10:15 90 10:15-10:35 20 10:35-11:05 30 11 :05-11: 30 25 11:30-12:00 30 12:00-12:25 25 12:25-1:15 50 1:15-1:35 20 1:35-2:00 25 2:00-2:30 30 2:30-2:50 20 2:50-3:00 10 GRADE THREE WEEKS 1-6 INCLUSIVE ACTIVITY TEAM I Opening Activities Music Language Arts (Reading and Language) Supervised Play Arithmetic Language Arts (Spelling and Writing) Lunch Science, Health, Social Studies Second Language (Enrichment and Systematic Drill) Physical Education Second Language (Arithmetic and Drill con 1 t.) Art Evaluation TEAM II Opening Activities Language Arts (Reading, Language, Spelling, Writing) Supervised Play Arithmetic Science and Health Lunch Social Studies Second Language (Enrichment, Systematic Drill) Music Second Language (Arithmetic and Drill cont.) Physical Education Art Evaluation All subjects not listed as second language are in the vernacular except sections under lined. Those underlined activities are assigned to the aides and permits the use of both languages. During the Second Language period, the teachers exchange classes. The English teacher works with the Spanish pupils and the Spanish teacher works with the English pupils. -18

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TIME MINUTES 8:30-8:45 15 8:45-9:05 20 9:05-10:15 70 10:15-10:3., 20 10: 35-11 :05 30 11:05-11:30 25 11:30-12:00 30 12:00-12:15 15 12:15-1:30 75 1:30-2:00 30 2:00-2:30 30 2:30-2:50 20 2:50-3:00 10 8:30-8:45 15 8:45-9:55 70 9:55-10:15 20 10: 15-10:35 30 10:35-11:05 30 11 :05-11: 30 25 11:30-12:00 30 12:00-1:15 75 1:15-1:35 20 1:35-2:00 25 2:00-2:30 30 2:30-2:50 20 2:50-3:00 10 GRADE TIIREE WEEKS 7-12 INCLUSIVE ACTIVITY TE.AN I Opening Activities Music Language Arts (Reading, Language, Spelling, Writing) Supervised Play Arithmetic Science, Health, Social Studies Lunch Science, Health, Social Studies con't. Second Language (Enrichment, Systematic Drill, Reading) Physical Education Second Language (Arithmetic and Drill cont.) Art Evaluation TEAM II Opening Activities Language Arts (Reading, Language, Spelling, Writing) Social Studies Supervised Play Arithmetic Science and Health Lunch Second Language (Enrichment, Systematic Drill, Reading) Music Second Language (Arithmetic and Drill con 1 t.) Physical Education Art Evaluation All subjects not listed as second language are in the vernacular except sections under lined. Those underlined activities are assigned to the aides and permits the use of both languages. During the Second Language period, the teachers exchange classes. The English teacher works with the Spanish pupils and the Spanish teacher works with the English pupils. _,Q_

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TIME MINUTES 8;30-8:45 15 8:45-9:05 20 9:05-10:15 70 10: 15-10:35 20 10:35-11:05 30 11 :05-11: 30 25 11:30-12:00 30 12:00-1:30 90 1:30-2:00 30 2:00-2:30 so 2:30-2:50 20 2:50-3:00 10 3:30-8:45 15 8:45-9:55 70 9:55-10:15 20 10:15-10:35 20 10:35-11:05 30 11 :05-11: 30 25 11 :30-12 :00 30 12:00-1:15 75 1:15-1:35 20 1:35-2:00 25 2:00-2:30 30 2:30-2:50 20 2:50-3:00 10 GRADE THREE WEEKS 13-36 INCLUSIVE ACTIVITY TEAM I Opening Activities Music Language Arts (Reading, Language, Spelling, Writing) Supervised Play Arithmetic Science, Health, Social Studies Lunch Second Language (Enrichment, Systematic Drill, Arithmetic, Reading) Physical Education Second Language (Science, Health, Social Studies, Drill con 1 t.) Art Evaluation TEAM II Opening Activities Language Arts (Reading, Language, Spelling, Writing) Social Studies, Science, Health Supervised Play Arithmetic Second Language (Social Studies, Science, Health) Lunch Second Language (Enriclnnent, Systematic Drill, Reading) Music Second Language (Arithmetic, Drill con 1 t.) Physical Education Art Evaluation All subjects not listed as second language are in the vernacular except sections underlined. Those underlined activities are assigned to the aides and permits the use of both languages. { ing the Second Language period, the teachers exchange classes. The English teacher works ~ -ch the Spanish pupils and the Spanish teacher works with the English pupils. -20

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TIME MINUTES 8:15-8:30 15 8:30-9:05 35 9:05-9:35 30 9:35-9:55 20 9: 55-10: 15 20 10:15-10:35 20 10:35-10:55 20 11:00-12:00 60 12:00-12:30 30 12:30-1:00 30 1:00-1:30 30 1:30-2:00 30 2:00-2:30 30 2:30-2:50 20 APPENDIX D D A 1 L Y S C H E D U L E AIDE ONE Supervise First Grade Corridor Clerical Duties (Pupil Accounting Routine) Planning Period Supervised Play (Grade 1) Supervised Play (Grade 2) Supervised Play (Grade 3) Art (Grade 2) Monday & Tuesday Team I English Wednesday & Thursday Team II Spanish Lunchroom Supervision Lunch Physical Education (Grade 1 Team I) Physical Education (Grade i Team II) Physical Education (Grade 2 Team I) Physical Education (Grade 2 Team II) Art (Grade 3 Team I English, Monday & Tuesday Team I Spanish, Wednesday & Thursday Assist. Librarian Friday -21

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TIME MINUTES 8:15-8:30 15 8:30-9:05 35 9:05-9:35 20 9:35-9:55 20 9:55-10:15 20 10:15-10:35 20 10:35-10:55 20 11:00-12:00 60 12:00-12:30 30 12:30-1:00 30 1:00-1:30 30 1:30-2:00 30 2:00-2:30 30 2:30-2:50 20 AIDE TWO Supervise Second Grade Corridor Clerical Duties (Pupil Accounting Routine) Planning Supervised Play (Gradel) Supervised Play (Grade 2) Supervised Play (Grade 3) Art (Grade 2) Monday & Tuesday Team I English Wednesday & Thursday Team II Spanish Lunchroom Supervision Lunch Physical Education (Grade 1 Team I) Physical Education (Grade 1 Team II) Physical Education (Grade 2 Team I) Physical Education (Grade 2 Team II) Art (Grade 3 Team II English Monday & Tuesday Team II Spanish Wednesday & Thursday Clerical Duties Friday -22

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AIDE THREE TINE MINUTES 8:15-8:30 15 Supervise Third Grade Corridor 8:30-8:45 15 Clerical Duties (Pupil Accounting Routine) 8:45-9:05 20 Third Grade Team I Sing 9:05-9:35 30 Planning 9:35-9:55 20 Supervised Play (Grade 1) 9:55-10:15 20 Supervised Play (Grade 2) 10:15-10:35 20 Supervised Play (Grade 2) 11:00-12:00 60 Lunchroom Supervision 12:00-12:30 30 Lunch 12:45-1:00 15 Grade 1 Team II Sing 1:00-1:15 15 Grade 1 Team I Sing 1:15-1:35 20 Grade 3 Team II Music 1:40-2:00 20 Grade 2 Team II Sing 2:05-1:25 20 Grade 2 Team I Sing 2:25-3:00 20 Clerical Duties -23

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( APPENDIX E PROJECT E D LONG RANGE TESTING PROGRAM Testing 1963-64 1. Compare pupils in grades 2 through 6 in the English Sections and Regular Sections. Are the test scores of the pupils in grades 2 through 6 the same as, higher than, or lower than those of previous years, for example 1960 and 1962? In 1966 when the pup i ls who are now in grades 2 and 3 are in grades 5 and 6, will the tests scores of these pupils be the same as, higher than, or lower than those of the pupils who are now in grades 5 and 6? Are the tests scores of the pupils in grades 2 and 3 of the English Sections the same as, higher than, or lower than the pupils in grades 2 and 3 of the Regular Sections? In subsequent years, will the tests scores of pupils who are in grades 2 and 3 in the English Sections be the same as, higher than, or lower than those of the pupils who are now in grades 2 and 3 of the Regular Sections? 2. Compare pupils in grades 2 through 6 in the English Sections and Regular Sections of Coral Way with pupils i n grades 2 through 6 in other schools. Have the test scor e s of the pupils in grades 2 through 6 in Coral Way been the same as, higher than, or lower than those of pupils in grades 2 through 6 in other schools in pr e vious years, for example 1960 and 1962? Are the test scores of the pupils in grades 2 through 6 in Coral Way the same as, higher than, or lower than pupils in grades 2 through 6 in other schools? In subsequent years, will th e test scores of the pupils who are now in grades 2 and 3 in Coral Way be th e same as, higher than, or lower than those of pupils who are now in g r a d e s 2 and 3 in other schools? 3. Compare the growth in En g lish of pupils in grades 2 and 3 of the Spanish Sections with the growth in English of Spanish-speaking pupils i~ other schools who have had all their schoolin g in Dade County. How well do Spanish-speakin g pupils who study only half time in English com pare with Spanish-sp e akin g pupils who study full time in English? -24

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) Testing 1964-65 1. Compare pupils in grades 2 through 4 in the English Sections and pupils in grades 2 through 4 in the Regular Sections. How do English-speaking pupils in the English Sections compare with pupils in the Regular Sections? 2. Compare pupils in grades 2 through 4 in the English Sections and Regular Sections against Coral Way pupils in grades 2 through 4 in 1962. How do English-speaking pupils in Coral Way in 1964 compare with the base line groups of 1962? 3. Compare pupils in grades 2 through 4 in the English Sections and Regular Sections with Regular pupils in other schools. 4. 5. How do English-speaking pupils in grades 2 through 4 of the bilingual school compare with regular pupils in other schools in 1964? Compare the growth in English of pupils in grades 2 through 4 in the Spanish Sec tions and the growth in English of Spanish-speaking pupils in other schools. How do Spanish-speaking pupils who study in English half time compare with Spanish-speakin g pupils who study in English full time? Compare the general growth of pupils in grades 2 through 4 in the Spanish Sections with the general growth of Spanish-speaking pupils in a Spanish-speaking country. How do Spanish-speaking pupils who study in Spanish half time compare with Spanish-spe a kin g pupils who study in Spanish full time in a Spanish-speaking country? -25

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Testing 1965-66 1. Compare pupil in grades 2 through 5 in the English Section and pupils in grad 2 through 5 in the Regular Sections. How do English-speaking pupils in the English Sections compare with pupil in the Regular Sections? 2. Compare pupils in grades 2 through 5 in the English Sections and Regular Sections against Coral Way pupils in grades 2 through 5 in 1962. How do English-speaking pupils in Coral Way in 1965 compare with the base line groups of 1962? 3. Compare pupils in grades 2 through 5 in the English Sections and Regular Sections with regular pupils in other schools. How do English-speaking pupils in grades 2 through 5 of the bilingual school compare with regular pupils in other schools in 1965? 4. Compare the growth in English of pupils in grades 2 through 5 in the Spanish Sec tions and the growth in English of Spanish-speaking pupils in other schools. How do Spanish-speaking pupils who study inEnglish half time compare with the Spanish-speaking pupils who study in English full time? 5. Compare the general growth of pupils in grades 2 through 5 in the Spanish Sections with the general growth of Spanish-speaking pupils in a Spanish-speaking country. How do Spanish-speaking pupils who study in Spanish half time compare with Spanish-speaking pupils who study in Spanish full time in a Spanish-speaking country? -26

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) Testing 1966-67 1. Compare pupils in grades 2 through 6 in the English Sections and pupils in grades 2 through 6 in the Regular Sections. How do English-speaking pupils in the English Sections compare with pupils in the Regular Sections? 2 ~ Compare pupils in grades 2 through 6 in the English Sections and Regular Sections against Coral Way pupils in grades 2 through 6 in 1962. How do English-speaking pupils in Coral Way in 1966 compare with the base line groups of 1962? 3. Compare pupils in grades 2 through 6 in the English Sections and Regular Sections with regular pupils in other schools. How do English-speaking pupils in grades 2 through 6 of the bilingual school compare with regular pupils in other schools in 1966? 4. Compare the growth in English of pupils in grades 2 through 6 in the Spanish Sec tions and the growth in English of Spanish-speaking pupils in other schools. ~) How do Spanish-speaking pupils who study in-English half time compare with Spanish-speaking pupils who study in English full time? 5. Compare the general growth of pupils in grades 2 through 6 in the Spanish Sections with the general growth of Spanish-speaking pupils in a Spanish-speaking country. How do Spanish-speaking pupils who study in Spanish full time compare with Spanish-speaking pupils who study in Spanish full time in a Spanish-speaking country? -27

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Testing End of School Year 1966-67 1. Compare pupils in grade 6 in the English Sections and Regular Sections. How do the English-speaking pupils in the English Sections who have had two years of English monolingual instruction and four years of bilingual instruc tion compare with English-speaking pupils in the Regular Sections who have had six years of monolingual instruction? 2. Compare pupils in grade 6 in the Spanish Sections with pupils in grade 6 in the English Sections. How do Spanish-speaking pupils after two years of English monolingual instruc tion and four years of bilingual instruction compare in English curriculum with English-speaking pupils in the same instructional plan? How do Spanish-speaking pupils after two years ~f English monolingual instruction and four years of bilingual instruction compare in Spanish cur riculum with Spanish-speaking pupils in the same instructional plan? Testing 1967-68, 1968-69 The pattern of testing of 1966-67 would be continued for 1967-68 and 1968-69, at which time pupils who began in the first grade inthe bilingual program will be finishing the sixth grade. Starting Starting Starting 3rd Grade 2nd Grade 1st Grade 1963-64 3 2 1 1964-65 4 3 2 1965-66 5 4 3 1966-67 6 s 4 1967-68 6 5 1968-69 6 -28

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