Citation
Cuba illustrated

Material Information

Title:
Cuba illustrated with the biography and portrait of Christopher Columbus, containing also general information relating to Havana, Matanzas, Cienfuegos, and the island of Cuba with illustrations and maps together with an Anglo-Spanish vocabulary
Translated Title:
Cuba ilustró con la biografía y el retrato de Cristóbal Colón, que contiene también información general relacionada con La Habana, Matanzas, Cienfuegos y la isla de Cuba con ilustraciones y mapas junto con un vocabulario anglo-español. ( spa )
Creator:
Prince, John Critchley, 1808-1866 ( compiler )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
N. Thompson & Co., printers
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Edition:
6th ed.
Physical Description:
1 online resource (viii, 260 pages) : illustrations 2 folded map ;

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Guidebooks -- Cuba ( lcsh )
Cuba ( fast )
Genre:
Guidebooks. ( fast )
Guías ( qlsp )
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Title from online title page / Título de la página de título en línea.
General Note:
Print version:Prince, John Critchley, 1808-1866. Cuba illustrated.,6th ed .New York, Napoleon Thompson, ©1894, (OCLC)81742658.
Statement of Responsibility:
compiled by J.C. Prince.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
UF Latin American Collections
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
785209182 ( OCLC )
36100497 ( ALEPH )
Classification:
F1758 .P95 1894 ( lcc )

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Fals, Gloves, Umfbrellas aid Canns.
CUBAN, SPANISH AND MEXICAN CURIOS.
ANTIQUE FANS.
Solid Silver Spoons as Souvenirs.
Tourists will be welcomed at this store to examine the great collection of fans of all kinds, with paintings representing the beautiful scenery of the Island.
MANUEL CARRANZA, Proprietor.
ENGLISH SPOKEN.
S ESTABLISHED 01T86.Y
ESTABLISHED 1886.




From the "Florida Times-Union," the leading paper of Jacksonville, Florida.
Mr. Prince's Illustrated Guide Book of Havana and the Island of Cuba has been a perfect boon to the traveler, who not only learns what is interesting to do and see, but can easily make himself understood by the aid of the Anglo-Spanish Vocabulary contained in the Guide Book.







SETH W., FOX.







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ATAP OF TIIE CITY OF HAVANA, EXPRESSLY ENGRAVED FOR THIS NVORI -







CUBA ILLUSTRATED
WITH THE
BIOGRAPHY AND PORTRAIT
OF
CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS
CONTAINING ALSO
GENERAL INFORMATION RELATING TO
HAVANA, MATANZAS, CIENFUEGOS,
AND THE ISLAND OF CUBA
WITH ILLUSTRATIONS AND MAPS
TOGETHER WITH AN
ANGLO-SPANISH VOCABULARY
COMPILED BY
J. C. PRINCE
T893-1894
SIXTH EDITION-ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
NEW YORK
NAPOLEON THOMPSON & Co., PRINTERS AND TRANSLATORS
Nos. 33-43 GOLD STREET




aso78 9At 7




PREFACE.
The principal object of this book, which, under its present increased and revised form, reaches the sixth edition, is to give American tourists reliable information about the beautiful Island of Cuba, so appropriately surnamed the Pearl of the Antilles. Spots having an historical interest are scrupulously depicted; ancient cities like Havana, Mlatanzas, Crdenas, Cienfuegos, Santiago, etc., are the object of special and elaborate descriptions.
The author has thought fit and proper that in this memorable year, which marks the close of the fourth century of the discovery of America by Christopher Columbus, to add to this book a portrait with a brief historical sketch of the genius who has given, through perseverance and innumerable sufferings of all description, a continent to the human race During the last five years, the literary talent of our generation has done wonders to unearth from the ancient and dusty parchments hidden in the libraries and museums of the old world, everything of interest relating to the discovery of America. These combined literary efforts have been embodied in the present historical and biographical sketch of Christopher Columbus, and it may not be pre-




VI CUBA ILLUSTRATED.
sumptuous on our part to hint that these pages will not only be read with pleasure by the present generation, but may eventually be of some help to those historians of the future who will recount the high deeds of Columbus on the occasion of the fifth century of the discovery of America, and recall the prowess of the imperishable Latin race for its unselfish spread of civilization.
In rearanging this work, and in order to make it accurate in all of its details and valuable to tourists, new illustrations have been added.
The Anglo-Spanish vocabulary has been carefully revised, and notable additions have been made to it; all of which leads me to think that the present edition will be of great assistance to those travelers who are unacquainted with the beautiful Spanish language.
Inquiries upon any subject treated in this work will be cheerfully answered by addressing J. C. PRINCE,
43 Gold Street,
New York.
N. B.-The attention of tourists is respectfully called to the firms advertised in this book. It is important for travelers to be acquainted with first-class houses while visiting foreign countries; those advertised in this book enjoy the confidence of the public for their honorable dealings and strict integrity.




TABLE OF CONTENTS.
PAGE.
PREFACE ............................. ....... V-VI
CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUs-The discovery of America ...... 1
C U BA .............................. ................... 25
C lim ate ........................................ .... 27
Soil- Population .................................... 28
Government- Religion ............................... 3
Maritime Department-A trip to Havana ............... 33
K EY W EST ............................................. 36
Entrance to the Bay of Havana ....................... 39
HAVANA .............................................. 41
El Prado ................................. ......... 45
The Casino Espafiol .................. .............. 48
T heatres ........................................... 49
Plaza de A rm as ..................................... 53
Carnival- Bull-fights ................................. 55
Churches .......................... ................ 59
F orts ............................................... 62
Markets-Cock-pits-General places of interest .......... 63
The Cocoa-nut tree .................................. 71
The Chicken dealer ................................. 73
Base Ball Clubs-Foreign Consuls ..................... 74
H ack fares .............. : ........................... 75




Vill CUBA ILLUSTRATED.
PAGE.
Ferries................................................ 76
City Cars-Stage Routes-Foreign traveling ..............77
Excursion Steamship Guide...................... ...... 79
MATANZAS............................................... 81
CARDENAS................................................ 87
CIENFUEGOS.............................................. 89
The TomAs Terry Theatre................... I....... 91
The Constancia Sugar Estate...................... 98
Fort Cast illo.......................................... 95
ISLE OF PINES............................................ 97
SAN DIEGO DE Los BASOS........................ ........ 99
PUERTO PRINCIPE................... ..................... 99
SANTIAGO DE CUBA............... ...................... 100
USEFUL HINTS AND SUGGESTIONS......................... 101
THE HOTELS OF HAVANA................................ 103
RAILWAYS........................................... 106-107
GUIDE TO CUBAN CIGAR MANUFACTURERS ................108
DUTIES ON TOBACCO, ETC................................. 116
PRINCIPAL CIGARETTE FACTORIES........................ 117
THE CIGAR FACTORIES OF HAVANA......... ............. 119
SUGAR PLANTATIONS IN THE ISLAND OF CUBA ............125
SHOPPING IN HAVANA.................................... 175
ADVERTISEMENTS.................... ............... 178-224
PRINCIPAL STEAMSHIP LINES AND RAILROADS ............225
VOCABULARY...................... ...................... 281
NOTICE To HOTEL-KEEPERS.............................. 260
CALENDAR............................ .................. 262
MEMORANDUM....................................... 263-264




CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS.
THE DISCOVERY OF AMERICA.
According to the most reliable historians Columbus was boru in Genoa, Italy. In his tenderest years he was bereft of both father and mother, and left to his own resources, having no friend, no guardian to advise him or to whom he could look for help and support.
Columbus passed his younger days in Genoa, a seaport surrounded by high mountains and bearing the. same name as that of the city of his birth.




2 CUBA ILLUSTRATED.
During his youth, lhe would pass at play many hours of the day on the sea shore, listening with the curiosity of his age to the stories of travels recounted by the sailors. Christopher Columbus was of fair complexion, with curly red hair and very bright, fiery eyes.
Oftentimes he would be found alone, walking silently on the beach, contemplating the infinite vastness of the ocean and listening to the murmur of the waves. Who can tell if at that very time Columbus did not entertain already the idea of circumnavigating the globe?
In his youth he made long sea voyages. His courage and agility gained for him the admiration of his superiors. It was at the beginning of his career as a sailor that he visited Greece, the shores of Africa, England, and that his inclination for adventures made him undertake a trip to Iceland, surrounded by the icy Waters of the Arctic seas Old sailors entertained him of the stories of ancient mariners who had been carried by south-eastern winds and had seen immense stretches of rich lands, which they had named country of the vine, and which according to their narration were inhabitated
Those stories preoccupied his mind; they spurred his desires and aspirations, and he doubted sometimes whether they would be ever satisfied or realized. In his dreams he thought he saw an enchanted nymph, clad in brilliant garments, holding in her hand exotical flowers, and crowned with flowers no less beautiful and rare. He would bow to the charming apparition, who would tell him in soft musical tones: "Leave, and go far! Very far! beyond the seas! discover a New World!




CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 3
When thou bast reached that strange land, preach the religion of Peace and not that of War! "
When he would awaken from those dreams, be would study with increased ardor the maps of the lands and the charts of the seas. He would ref use to take part in the amusements of his companions, in order to devote all his time to his studies.
In those days men in general believed that the earth was a flat disc. Few among the learned men believed in the Pythagorean doctrines, which had been enunciated before Jesus Christ. No more credence was given to Ptolemy who declared in Alexandria, one hundred and forty years after Christ, that the earth had the form of a ball.
Columbus who was studying incessantly this important question, finally mastered the trustworthiness of those assertions. He haa by that time acquired a thorough knowledge of navigation, and moreover he was full of life and valor, and his anxiety to travel west was on the increase.
He believed that by following a westernward course he would reach India directly; but divers voyages undertaken in the western zones without any tangible success had finally dampened his ardor, inasmuch as he was short of resources for Such costly undertakings.
After marrying in one of the most illustrious Italian families, he settled in the Portuguese island of Porto Santo. One day he accidentally discovered a few maps which bad been left by his great grandfather. The study of those maps confirmed him in the correctness of his ideas




4 CUBA ILLUSTRATED.
while it endowed the stories he had heard about Iceland and the fabulous country of the vine, a certain degree of trutlifulnes.
From that instant Columbus was persuaded of the possibility of finding his way to a new continent. The dreams of his youth, the desires and the ardor of the past were again awakened in the full grown man, and he could not remain any longer in the island of Porto Santo.
Accompanied by his wife and his son, he left for Lisbon, in order to ask from the King of Portugal the necessary means to carry out his gigantic undertaking. The King was loth to believe in his plans, and played false with the man's noble aspirations.
Upon the death of his wife, which occurred during his sojourn in Lisbon, Columbus undertook on foot the voyage to Spain. Here Providence, who had marked him for a glorious destiny, was manifestly instrumental in changing the course of the eventful life of the great discoverer.
After a day of fatiguing march on the highways, father and son came by a monastery. The son, feeble and footsore, asked his father with great persistency to knock at the door and beg for a night's hospitality from the monks. His son's condition, who was almost dying with the fatigue of the long umarch, had the better of hip, pride, and Columbus knocked at the door of the monastery.
The monks gave a friendly greeting to the man pale with hunger and fatigue and to the delicate and worn-out son. When both had been revived with food and rest,




CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 5
the Father Superior questioned them upon the object of their voyage. Columbus told his story, and was listened to attentively by the Superior, who was struck by his language and the magnitude of his ideas. Thereupon he called in his two friends, one, Hernandez, a learned doctor in medicine, and the other, Valazco, an intrepid and wise sailor. It was thus, in a small room of the monastery of La Rabida, that Columbus explained his plans to those learned men.
When he got through with his demonstration, Superior P6rez exclaimed with enthusiasm: "Your project will be realized, and Spain will share with you the honor and glory of this great enterprise!"
It was then decided that Columbus should go to the Court of King Ferdinand, with a letter of recommendation to the father-confessor of the Queen. At that epoch the King with his spouse, Dona Isabella, was in the camp before the city of Granada, where the Moors were intrenched in this their last foothold in Spain after an occupation of seven hundred years. The fatherconfessor, who was a friend of Superior PNrez, listened with interest to Columbus' plans; however, he could do no better than to advise him to be patient. Once the war ended, there would be some favorable chances to win the sovereigns to his project. Once more, the poor and weak had to wait for the rich and powerful.
Weak and discouraged he visited several states, and finally he had made up his mind to leave for France, where he had had promises of ships,. when Superior




CUBA ILLUSTRATED.
Perez decided to make a last effort. He saddled his mule and went to the camp in order to speak in person to the Queen, who was at last persuaded.
Columbus was called to the court, at the very time, thanks to good fortune, the war was ending. Boabdil, the last King of the Moors had to leave the beautiful castle of Alhambra, and with broken heart had to surrender to the victors the keys of Granada.
The Sovereigns where now in a position to grant Columbus the necessary means for the enterprise. This had for consequence to give him renewed energy, and the audacious mariner seeked an audience from the King and Queen. He unfolded his plans with great enthusiasm. The Queen was under the impression that Columbus intended to preach the christian faith; but the King, who was of a suspicious character, ref used to accept the propositions of Columbus. "You want to be Admiral and Vice-Roy of the countries you discover," said the King angrily, "to this, assuredly, I shall never consent."
However, Columbus was inflexible in his just demands, and again left court with the intention of going to France. But the Queen who had finally succeeded to overcome the objections of her spouse prevented Colurnbus' departure. And at last the sun of good fortune shone radiantly upon the man who had passed through the bitter experience of a life of incessant disappointments.
Ferdinand acceeded to all the demands of Columbus, and the Queen assuaged his paternal anxiety regarding




CUBA ILLUSTRATED.
his son, which he had to leave in Spain, by assuring him that she would create him a page in the suite of her own son. "I shall do all in my power to help you in this great undertaking," said the Queen, "and I will sell my jewels in order to equip the ships you need !"
It was on the 3d of August, 1492, that this extraordinary man sailed from the port of Palos with his small crafts, and directed the little squadron towards unknown lands. Columbus had waited eighteen years for this propitious event, sorrow and misery had already whitened his hair, but his energy and faith were still unshaken, while his heart was full of hope.
He sailed upon the caravel Santa Maria, while the Niha and Pinta were respectively commanded by the brothers Pinzon. When they had lost sight of the Canary islands, surrounded by the immensity of the Atlantic ocean, the enthusiasm of the sailors was somewhat dampened. A whole month had already passed, and the caravels were still in the midst of the ocean without the least sign of land. It was at that period of the voyage that his companions began to murmur, and wanted Columbus to return to Spain.
It was with humility that the Admiral prayed his rebellious companions to have patience, and exhorted them to perseverance. "Follow me a little while longer," said Columbus, "and we shall reach the end of our jour"ney. Remember that plants from an unknown clime "as well as corpses of a strange race have been carried "by the waves upon the shores of the Canary islands; "consequently, there must exist in the West, which




CUBA ILLUSTRATED.
D
D am




CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 9
"is the course we follow, a land yet unknown to us. "Learned men, among them Martino de Behain, of Nur"mberg, and the Italian Toscanelli, are of opinion that in following a western course, unknown lands must be "discovered."
" Very well," answered the sailors, "we shall follow "thee for a few days longer; but if after that respite the "desired land is not reached, we shall exact from thee to "return to Spain."
A few days passed away, and notwithstanding that Columbus was fully convinced the little squadron was nearing land, no sign of it was yet perceptible, and despair was hourly on the increase among the crews.
However, Columbus remained undaunted and firm as the rock before his mutinous companions.
The evening of the 11th of October was already clad in darkness, and the Admiral, who had consulted his maps all day, was then pacing the deck in a pensive mood and scrutinizing the horizon with anxiety. While thus engaged he saw a light which appeared and disappeared at intervals. Columbus communicated his discovery to two of his sailors, who also perceived the light, but did not attach any great importance to the fact.
This luminous apparition, however, filled the Admiral with new hopes; again concentrating his sight in the direction where the light had shone, his heart palpitated with stronger energy. le thought the morrow might reveal the land bo much desired. Wakeful nights had exhausted his strength, and towards morning he sue-




10 CUBA ILLUSTRATED.
cumbed to sleep. It was then that the goddess of his youth again appeared to him in his slumber. The beautiful fairy, crowned with exotic flowers as of yore, bent towards him, and while touching his forehead, exclaimed : "Thy golden and ideal dream, which thou hast pursued "over the deep sea is at last realized. Thou art near the "New World! "
At that very instant, the first rays of the rising sun were reflected upon the water, and the cry of Land! Land!" was heard. The happy tiding came from the Pinta, from whose deck the sailor Rodrigo de Triana had first seen the land.
As if blinded by lightening, Columbus awoke from his sleep. There could not be any illusion about the discovery, for before him could be seen a beautiful green isle. The naked eye could already distinguish clusters of trees as well as human beings of a dark color. Later on, birds with brilliant plumage were flying and singing over the decks of the caravels, as if to bid "Welcome to the visitors of the New World. Columbus fell upon his knees to thank the Almighty, while his sailors pressed around him to beg his pardon for their incredulity.
A short time afterwards, Columbus ordered the anchors to be thrown and the boats lowered. Dressed in his costume of Admiral, he stepped on the first boat, and in a few minutes he landed with his men upon the shore, which presented an admirable spectable on account of the beautiful plants which covered it in abundance.
When he landed, Columbus planted the Spanish flag, thus taking possession of the newly discovered land-




CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 11
which he named San Salvador, and later on Guanahaniin the names of his sovereigns.
His companions, who had immediately followed him on shore, kissed the earth and cried with joy. They erected a cross as a sign that the christian faith was to be preached to the human beings who inhabitated this strange land. The Indians, who were of a copper color, with a mild physionomy and beautiful eyes, at first were timid and kept at a distance, while admiring apparently the white meni, whom they saw for the first time. Gradually they lost their shyness and came nearer the Spaniards. Columbus received them with great amiableness, and ordered his companions to treat them with equal consideration.
In this manner, pleasant relations were established between the Indians and the Spaniards, and the sojourn of the worn-out sailors in the enchanted island was thus made agreeable while resting from the fatigue of a long sea voyage.
However, with Columbus' insatiable activity, their rest was of short duration. Shortly after this first landing, they set sail again on their mission of discovery. At the expiration of two months they had landed in several islands, and visited various savage tribes. Columbus was yet of the opinion that those islands formed part of the group of India. Having discovered them while sailing West, he called them the West Indies, a designation which they have borne to these days.
At Christmas of the year 1492, the expedition met with a great misfortune. At sundown, after having




12 CUBA ILLUSTRATED.
given the pilot his instructions and recommended him great carefulness, Columbus went to his cabin to take a much needed rest. The pilot disobeyed the precise orders of the Admiral, and the consequence was the loss of the caravel Santa Maria, who struck the rocks near the island of Cuba. In this circumstance, the presence of mind and the coolness of Columbus were remarkable; it was due to him that the lives of the whole crew were saved, but the caravel was a total wreck.
It was after this accident that Columbus, with a few of his companions -the majority remaining in the New World-sailed back to Spain in the Niha.
The return trip was full of hardships ; heavy weather prevailed most of the time. Notwithstanding, they finally arrived safely in Spain, and on the 4th of March landed at the port of Palos, which had seen, seven months previously, the departure of the expedition amidst the mockeries of many.
The contrast between the reception and departure could not have been greater; for the ovation granted Columbus could not have been more enthusiastic. The Indians which the Admiral had taken along with him on his return trip to Europe had the effect of creating considerable curiosity. Their copper color, and their queerly painted face, the earrings which ornamented their nose and ears had the effect of astonishing the spectators. Following the Indians were men carrying birds of variegated plumage; these in turn were followed by sailors leading animals which had never been seen before in Europe, while others disembarked with rare plants from




CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 13
the New World. T his part of the procession was closed by other sailors carrying large vases with rings of gold, which had been secured from the Indians in exchange for some trinkets. The profusion of the objects thus landed, gave an adequate idea of the richness of the foreign land just discovered.
Then came Christopher Columbus seated upon a magnificent steed. 1-is stately and imposing hearing ; the softness of his great blue eyes, into which determination was plainly readable, mi~de of the famous discoverer a picture of intrepidity allied to greatness. Like a vic torious king, he was worthy of being seen; and like a victorious kiug he was acclaimed.
Ferdinand and Isabella had a platform erected in one of the squares of Barcelona. It was there, seated upon a throne richly Ornamnted, that they awaited the arrival of the courageous sailor.
On his coining before the throne, the monarchs rose and came forward to meet him. Columbus made a movement as if to kneel, but he was prevented from doing so, and the sovereigns invited him to a seat at their side. This was a most extraordinary distinction, unknown to the etiquette of the Spanish court.
Columbus began by recounting the various incidents of his voyage. He was listened to with great interest by all, as he enumerated the great advantages the King and Spain would derive from the immense natural resources of the countries he had discovered.
All knelt, and with tears of joy, began to sing a hymn of thanks to the Almighty, who had chosen Columbus as




14 CUBA ILLUSTRATED.
the worthy instrument for the accomplishment of so great deeds.
Thereafter, King Ferdinand reaffirmed Columbus' privileges to the twelfth portion of all royal rights; he also conferred upon him and his descendants the perpetual title of Admiral for West Indies; he granted him an escutcheon bearing the royal arms of Castille and Leon with this inscription : "For Castille and Leon, Columbus discovered a New World !"
While the honors thus bestowed on Columbus were of a nature to gratify the pride of the mariner, he experienced great satisfaction on the other hand in finding that his son Diego had made marked progress both physically and mentally, and promised to be an object of just pride to his family.
In the meantime, the good fortune of Columbus began to excite envy among the courtiers, they were intriguing to deprive him of his laurels.
At a grand feast, given by the High Cardinal of Spain in honor of Colombus, some of the courtiers-secretly at first, but openly later on-began to make sport of the distinctions and honors showered upon the Admiral. "What has he accomplished that is so very marvelous ? said one of them, "if the King had given me the necessary ships with the same equipment, I could have discovered the New World easy enough! "
"Same with me! Same with me exclaimed the
other envious courtiers.
Columbus remained quiet under these jealous taunts, and gave the order to a domestic to bring him an egg.




CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 15
When the domestic had brought him the desired article, he said with great coolness: "Who, among of you, 4 gentlemen, can make this egg stand upon one of its ends?" The courtiers, one after the other, tried the experiment unsuccessfully. Then Columbus took the egg, and by a gentle knock depressed one of its extremeties so as to make it stand upright, and in this manner solved the problem apparently so difficult.
Undaunted, the courtiers exclaimed: "But this we "also can do!"
" Undoubtedly, gentlemen!" answered Columbus, "but not before I showed you how to go to work at it. "The same thing with the discovery of the New World; "you know now how to proceed since I have shown you "how it was done!"
COLUMBUS' SECOND EXPEDrION.
On the 25th of September, 1493, Columbus set sails on his second expedition to what is now known as the West Indies. Howsoever brilliant and enthusiastic the reception that greeted Columbus at Barcelona on his return in the sunny resplendence of the spring of the year, the occasion of his second departure was made no less brilliant and enthusiastic, although it took place under an autumnal sun.
On this occasion the vessels did not leave from the little port of Palos, but from the grand bay of Cadiz. The expedition, as formerly, was not restricted to but three caravels; on the contrary, the Vice-Roy was




16 CUBA ILLUSTRATED.
at the head of a majestic fleet, fully equipped in order to strenghten the colonies already established and enable its commander to proceed to new discoveries.
The approaches to the port, were crowded by the multitude that had come from all quarters. The spectacle presented by the variety of costumes of this great affluence was not less remarkable than the diversity of the contingent that forced its way through it to reach the vessels upon which they were assigned. Here could be seen a scion of a noble family, dressed in his most brilliant costume, winding his way through the great and cheering crowd, while a little further back, priests and monks, with ascetic faces and austere mien, wrapped in the sombre vestments of their orders, were no less anxious to reach the deck of their respective ships.
Then last, came Columbus. All eyes were set upon this hero of great physical stature, who, accompanied by his son Diego, trended his way to the shore amidst the acclamations of the multitude.
At last father and son parted ; the latter to resume his functions at the court, the former to give the signal of departure for new perils and privations, more discoveries and glory.
In the course of this expedition, and of several others undertaken by Columbus, he discovered many more islands and founded numerous colonies. At last, entering the mouth of the Orinoco, he discovered the mainland of the new continent. The glory of this discovery is due to him; but he was shorn of the so well-earned honor of giving his name to the New World. This




CUBA ILLUSTRATED. iT
honor was bestowed upon an Italian named Americo Vespucci, who had explored the regions of Brazil.
The last years of Columbus were years of bitter suffering and great affliction. Death was already claiming this noble heart, who was bleeding at the spoliations to which the peaceable indigenous inhabitants of America were the victims on the part of the Spaniards. In their anxiety to accumulate gold, the Spaniards were forgetting they were dealing with human beings like themselves; consequently, the poor Indians were treated with the utmost cruelty when they manifested the least reluctance in parting with their riches. Even the priests, who had been specially sent to the West Indies to evangelize the aborigenes, behaved in the most rapacious manner. Far from preaching the religion of peace and good-will, they would resort to extreme measures of physical coercion to force the natives to receive the baptismal rites. Discontentment was on the increase. Repeated uprisings were the natural consequences of proceedings so unfair and inhuman.
Columbus suffered greatly because of so shameful conduct on the part of his companions. The very nobleness of his heart made him the natural protector of the persecuted. He punished the offenders severely, and without distinction. Birth or position could not shield the culprit or prevent Columbus from exercising impartially the attributes of justice. This had for effect to exasperate the rapacious nobles and the cruel priests. They conspired together and resolved the ruin of Columbus by all possible means. It was with this object in view that they secretly dispatched a vessel to Spain, with an




18 CUBA ILLUSTRATED.
emissary on board who had the mission of proffering before the King charges against Columbus.
Ferdinand, who had only as a last resort granted Columbus a twelfth of the royal rights upon the new domains, was rather well disposed to lend credence to the infamous charges made against his Vice-Roy.
lie ordered a hidalgo by the name of Bobadilla-a man known for his unscrupulousness-to sail for the West Indies, with the special mission of bringing Columbus back to Europe. This miserable instrument of a cowardly conspiracy accepted the mission with alacrity and discharged it with infamy.
Once in West Indies, he ordered the great navigator to be placed in irons, and had him conveyed to the ship like a common malefactor.
What a fall for a man who so recently had had the greatest honors bestowed upon him; what humiliation for so illustrious a personage to be treated so contemptuously at a sudden. The thought that he was innocent and the victim of envy, and the consciousness of having discharged his duties with impartiality, sustained him in this great affliction.
The conduct of captain Andres Martin, to whom had been entrusted the command of the ship that brought Columbus back to Europe, was of great contrast with that of the miserable Bobadilla. The moment he raised anchor in the port of Santo Domingo, he approached the noble prisoner with great respect, and asked him to give him his hands in order to free him from the chains that were cutting his flesh.




CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 19
"I thank you for your offer," answered Columbus, "the King has sent me word in writing to submit to all "the orders of Bobadilla ; I will carry these chains until "Ferdinand relieves me of them, and even until death "if I should be called away sooner. They will bear tes"timony of Spain's ingratitude, and of the manner she "rewards the services of a man she recently raised so "proeminently."
When the vessel reached the port of Cadiz, Columbus was conveyed to the shore like a common criminal. The indignation of the people, who held Columbus in great esteem, knew no bounds. Every Spaniard, imbued with a sentiment of justice, felt for the noble man's ill-treatment, and murmurs of anger could be heard against the Regent who had allowed the consummation of so shameful an action.
Universal discontent and the influence of the Queen, who had never ceased to befriend the illustrious Admiral, finally convinced Ferdinand that he had been guilty of a great injustice. A letter of Columbus written to their Majesties, and in which he passed in review the accusations made against him, and where he exposed the malice and hatred of Bobadilla, dispelled all the doubts the Queen might have still entertained, and decided Ferdinand to immediately summon Columbus to Granada.
On his arrival, the Queen, with tears in her eyes, gave him her hand to kiss. For the first time the great Admiral, worned and demoralized, lost his nerve and presence of mind. -Te fell, crying, at the feet of Queen Isabella, and allowed her to take off his chains.




20 CUBA ILLUSTRATED.
THE COLUMBUS TABLET IN THE CATHEDRAL OF HAVANA.




CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 21
At all hazards it seemed as if Columbus was on the way to be reinstated in the King's favor; however, the appearances proved false, for his star was on the decline, and doomed to disappear altogether in a very shft time.
King Ferdinand was unrelenting in his annoyances of every description, and at the death of the noble and generous Isabella the Catholic, the discoverer of a continent, the man who had been the instrument of refilling the coffers of the crown and create a hallow of glory around the Spanish name, was shorn of all his rights and despoiled of most all his property.
Ingratitude, bitter sufferings and abject privations were his lot. On the 21st of May, 1508, at the age of 70 years, he died of a broken heart, while uttering these last words:
"Father, I place my soul in thy hands!"
There is something strange in the fact that the remains of a man whose career had been so agitated, and who had known no repose in his life of adventurous travels, foulid a last resting place only many years after his death.
At first his body was buried in Valladolid, the city where he died. Thence in Seville, from which place, in 1536, it was transferred to Santo Domingo. When this island passed into the hands of France, his ashes were transferred to Havana, in the island of Cuba, where they are now interred, side by side, with those of his son Diego, to whom, as a tardy reparation for the injury done his father, was granted a dukedom with vast estates.
Fernando, second son of Columbus by his marriage




tO
,4 Ti
S 7
THE CATHEDRAL QF HAVANA.




CUBA, ILLUSTRATED. 23
to a Spanish lady, is buried in the cathedral of Seville.
The chains with which Columbus was shackled were, according to his desires, buried with him.
Tourists who visit Cuba will see, at the peristyle of the cathedral of Havana, the new monument which has been erected to Columbus on the occasion of the 400th anniversary of the discovery of America, and where his ashes are definitively laid.
Four hundred years have passed since Columbus discovered the American continent. Monuments in his honor have been erected in all parts of the world, and the people of the United States, the foremost nation of the New World, have held the grandest exposition yet known in commemoration of the grandest discovery yet made. These marks of honor, this era of general thankfulness towards a man like Columbus, whose chief characteristics were exalted perseverance and brilliant daring, toned down by nobleness of heart, are the natural tribute the whole human race owe this really great man.




tC
MORRO CASTLE, HAVANA, CUBA.-ENTRANCE TO THE BAY.




CUBA.
T IHE finest and largest of the West India islands, was
discovered by Columbus, on the 28th day of October, 1492, and was named by him Juana, in honor of Prince John, the son of Ferdinand and Isabella, the sovereigns of Aragon and Castille. Upon the death of Ferdinand, the island was called Fernandina, receiving afterwards the name of Santiago, as a mark of reverence for the patron saint of Spain ; and still later, the inhabitants -to illustrate their piety- gave it that of Ave Maria, in honor of the Holy Virgin. Cuba extends from Cape Maizi, on the East, to Cape St. Antonio, on the West, in a curved line of 790 miles. It lies between 19' and 230 north latitude, and 740 and 850 west longitude. It is 117 miles wide in the broadest part, from Cape Maternillos on the north, to the western point of Mota Cove, on the south, 21 miles east of Cape Cruz.
The narrowest part of the island is 22 miles, from the mouth of Bahia del Mariel on the north to the Cove Mavana on the south. From Hfavana to Batabano, it is 28 miles; near the centre of the island, the breadth, north and south, is about 75 miles. The periphery of the island, following a line less tortuous, and cutting the bays, ports and coves at their mouth, is 1,719 miles, of which 816 are on the north and 903 on the south. Its




26 CUBA ILLUSTRATED.
area is about 55,000 square miles; and taking into the estimate the adjacent islands or keys which belong to it, it is 64,000 square miles. The form of the island is exceedingly irregular, resembling that of a long, narrow crescent, the convex portion of which looks toward the Arctic pole. Her situation in regard to said pole is nearly from east by south to west by northwest. It is the most westerly of the West India Islands, and her western part is advantageously situated at the mouth of the Gulf of Mexico, leaving two spacious entrances ; the one of the northwest, 124 miles wide, between Point Hicacos, the most northerly of the island, and Point Tancha, or Cape Sable, the most southerly of East Florida. The other entrance into the Gulf to the southwest, is 97 miles in its narrowest part, between Cape St. Antonio de Cuba and Cape Catoche, the most salient extremity of the Peninsula of Yucatan; from Cape Mola, or St. Nicholas, in the Island of St. Domingo, the eastern extremity of Cuba, or Maizi Point, is separated by a channel 42 miles wide. From Maizi to Great Enagua, the nearest of the Lucayas, or Bahama Islands, the distance northeast is 45 miles. From Point Lmcrecia, in Cuba, the most easterly point of the great banks of Bahama, is the old Bahama channel, called St. Domingo's Key, 34 miles. From Punta del Ingles, on the south of Cuba, to the nearest point of the northern coast of Jamaica, the distance is 75 miles.
Cuba contains the following ports, on the north, viz.: Guadiana, Bahia Honda, Cabarias, Mariel, HIabana, Cogimar, Bacurana, Jilcaro, Matanzas, Cairdenas, Sagna la




CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 27
Grande, San Juan de los Remedios, Guanaja, Nuevitas,* Nuevas Grandes, Manati, Puerto del Padre, Puerto del Mangle, Jibara, Jururu, Bariai, Vita, Naranjo, Salma Banes, Nipe, Lebisa, Cabonico, Tanamo, Cebollas, Zaguaneque, Zaragua, Taco, Cuyaguaneque, Navas, Maravi, Baracoat and Mata. On the south: Batiqueri, Cienfuegos, Puerto Escondido, Guantinamo, Santiago de Cuba, Mota, Manzanillo, Santa Cruz, Vertientes, Masio, Casilda, Sagua, Eusenada de Cortds and Ensenada de Cochinos.
CLIMATE.
The climate of the Island is of the pleasantest, both in the spring and winter; in the latter season prevails what is called la seca, or dry weather. The rainy season begins in May and continues until November. The annexed tables, based upon the Fahrenheit thermometer, illustrate the almost even temperature of Cuba:
MEAN TEMPERATURE.
Degrees.
Mean temperature of the year at Havana and the
northern part, near the sea . . . . .77 Mean temperature at Havana, the warmest month, 82 Mean temperature the coldest month . . 70
* Nuevitas was the first place on the island visited by Columbus, October 28th, 1492.
t Baracoa was the first town built on the island by the Spaniards, under Diego Velazquez, in the year 1511, and until 1522 was reckoned as the capital.




28 CUBA ILLUSTRATED.
Degrees.
Mean temperature in the interior for the year, where
the land rises from 600 to 1,050 feet above the
level of the sea, ... ............... 74
Mean temperature in the coldest month, . . 62 for the year at Santiago de Cuba, 80 for the warmest month, 84
for the coldest month, ..... .64
EXTREME TEMPERATURE.
At Havana it is cold when ... ......... 60
The coldest is about .... ........... 45
The warmest day seldom above .. ....... .95
At all times a pleasant breeze prevails.
SOIL.
The soil of the island may be said to rest almost generally on a great mass of calcareous rock of a porous and diversified character (Seborucos or Mucara). Near the middle of the northern coast, a slaty formation is to be found, on which the calcareous rock seems to rest.
POPULATION AND FERTILITY OF THE SOIL.
According to the last official census, the population of Cuba is 1,521,684-the census of 1866 gave 1,359,238, which shows an increase during a period of 26 years of 162,446 inhabitants. The Island of Cuba is about six times larger than Jamaica Island, of which the English are so proud. Only one-sixth of the Island of Cuba is under cultivation, and there is now in full operation-




...........
A TOBACCO PLANTATION.




30 CUBA ILLUSTRATED.
1,200 sugar plantations,
5,000 tobacco
160 coffee
25 cocoa
5,000 breeding farms,
17,000 small farms,
95,000 stores, workshops, factories and warehouses.
As to the fertility of the soil in Cuba, little can be said which may be new-it being so well known that it is almost proverbial. An area of 65,000 square miles, equivalent to nearly 34,560,000 acres, the greater part of which is of the first quality for cultivation, and a great portion of which still remains uncultivated, are circumstances which offer an industrious emigrant a vast field to exert his efforts in, with the prospect of a very brilliant reward.
Immense forests of precious woods are to be found in the Island, whose products enter into the finest art gems of the cabinet-makers of New York, Paris and London.
The principal products are sugar, tobacco, coffee, cocoa, corn, rice, yuca, yame, sweet potatoes, potatoes, vanilla, etc. Exquisite fruits, as the pine-apple, oranges, sapodillo, anon, cocoanut, caimitos, berries, guanbana (the strawberry of the Antilles), mamey, guava, bananas, marafi6n, etc.
The situation of Cuba, commanding the entrance of the Gulf of Mexico and the communication between North and South America, gives it a high commercial and political importance. Indeed, such designations as "The Queen of the Antilles," "The Key of the Gulf,"




CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 31
"The Sentinel of the Mississippi," "The Beautiful Antille," "The Gem of the American Seas," indiscriminately bestowed upon this enchanting island, are sufficiently significant of its advantageous commercial position and its remarkable natural beauty and fertility.
GOVERNMENT.
Politically, the island is composed of a single Province under the control of a Superior Governor, who is at the same time Captain-General. It is subdivided into four political governments (gobiernos politicos) or Lieutenancies, which are further divided into Gobiernos and Captaincies. There are thirty-one political districts, each of which has an Ayuntamiento or Town Council at the head of affairs. The military divisions likewise include the whole island, and constitutes a Captaincy-General. It is divided into two departments, with Havana for its capital in the west, and Santiago in the east; the former under the command of the Captain-General, the latter under the Governor of Cuba. Each department consists of military districts (gobiernos) and districts of arms.
RELIGION.
The Roman Catholic is the religion of the country, and the ecclesiastical government consists of the Archbishopric of Cuba and the Bishopric of Havana-the two dioceses being separated as above. Other rites are also tolerated.
The house situated in Dragones and Zulueta Streets,




Lo . . . . . . .
...........
BIRD $-EYE VIEW OF HAVANA,




CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 33
fronting the Irijoa Theatre, has been recently purchased for a place of worship by the Baptists of Havana. Americans and all foreigners are cordially invited to attend the religious services which are held on Sundays, in English, at 11.30 A. m., and in Spanish at 7.30 P. M.
MARITIME DEPARTMENT.
The maritime division comprises five Provinces: Havana, Trinidad, San Juan de los Remedios, Nuevitas and Cuba; the whole under a General Commander. The public domain and public works are controlled by a General Superintendent. As Cuba is the most important of the Spanish colonies, its Captain-General can not be of a lower rank than a lieutenant-general in the army, and the post is one of great power.
A TRIP TO HAVANA.
Tourists desiring to escape the rigors of a northern winter, pleasure-seekers who wish to enjoy a mild and delicious climate, will surely be satisfied by going to Cuba. Every year the number of tourists increases from all parts of the United States, and if you meet in your travels southward some one coming from the Queen of the Antilles-which lies in the South Sea 80 miles from the United States (Key West)--you will surely feel anxious to enjoy the charms of its climate.
By enumerating the principal points of interest in the, island, the compiler will have accomplished his dutyWhile leaving to every one its own appreciation of that




34 CUBA ILLUSTRATED.
delightful country, whose scenery is so rich and varied, allow me to indicate the different ways to reach Havana from New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Washington, New Orleans and Chicago, by the different lines of steamers and railroads.
FROM NEW YORK.
The palatial steamers of the Ward's Line, 113 Wall Street, New York, leave on Wednesdays for Havana, and every Saturday for Havana and Vera Cruz, at 3 P. m.; for Cienfuegos, calling at Nassau, twice a month, from Piers 16 and 17, East River. The distance by sea from New York to Havana is 1,200 miles, and the trip is generally made by these steamers in 4% days.
The Spanish steamers of the Spanish Transatlantic Line," J. M. Ceballos & Co., Agents, No. 80 Wall Street, leave every ten days for Havana, from Pier 21, North River. These steamers have first-class passenger accommodations, European table-wine included.
The Mallory Line, Pier 20, East River, New York, in addition to the service between New York to Fernaudina, makes semi-weekly trips to Galveston, Texas; steamers leaving on Saturday stop at Key West, Florida; the time between New York and Key West is but 3Y2 days, and connection is made there for Tampa and all parts of South Florida, as well as for Havana, Cuba. This is a most convenient and cheap route to southern Florida, or to the West Indies; these beautiful steamers are of great speed, and have first-class accommodations for passengers.




CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 35
The Clyde's New York, Charleston and Florida Steam. ship Line; the elegant steamers of this line are advertised to sail from Pier 29, East River, New York, every Tuesday and Friday at 3 P. m. Tuesday's ships stops at, Fernandina, and Friday's ships at Jacksonville. Passengers' accommodations by this line are unsurpassed, Theo. G. Eger, Traffic Manager, 35 Broadway, New York.
The Ocean Steamship Company, Pier 35, North River, New York. The palace steamers of this line connect with the Savannah, Florida and Western Railway (Way Cross Short Line), and offer to tourists attractions Surpassed by no other line.
FROM BOSTON.
Via New York by the New York, New Haven and Harlem Railroad to New York, and from New York by the Pennsylvania Railroad to Port Tampa (via Atlantic Coast Line). Also by the beautiful palace steamers of the Fall River Line which leave daily.
FROM PHILADELPHIA.
By the Pennsylvania Railroad to Port Tampa (via Atlantic Coast Line).
FROM WASHINGTON.
Pennsylvania Railroad and Atlantic Coast Line to Port Tampa.
FROM NEW ORLEANS.
Morgan Mail Steamship Line Steamers leave New




36 CUBA ILLUSTRATED.
Orleans every Thursday to Havana direct. And also by the Southern Pacific Railroad (" Sun Set route) to Jacksonville, Sanford and Port Tampa, connecting with the Plant Steamship Line.
FROM CHICAGO.
By the Pennsylvania Railroad to Savannah via Atlantic Coast Line, thence to Jacksonville by the Savannah, Florida and Western Railroad, thence to Sanford by the Jacksonville, Tampa and Key West Railway; from Sanford to Port Tampa by the South- Florida Railroad, and thence to Havana by the beautiful steamships Olivette and Mascotte, of the Plant Steamship Line.
As the steamers of the Plant Line stop at Key West, the most important city of Florida, a description of this city will be interesting to Americans.
KEY WEST.
Key West is an island with 20,000 inhabitants, and celebrated for its manufactures of cigars made with ilavana tobacco; next to Jacksonville she is the largest city in Florida. It is situated upon the island of the same name, off the southern extremity of the peninsula, and lying in the important part of the key facing the Gulf of Mexico. The island is about 6 miles long by 3 miles wide, and is 11 feet above the sea level. The temperature in the winter is delightful, the air is pure, and the climate healthy; the thermometer at mean temperature in the winter is about 700 and in the summer seldom




CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 37
rises above 900. The public buildings are: the Customh,)use, Naval Stores, Marine Hospital, County CourtHouse, County Jail, a Masonic Hall and an Opera House. A monument of dark-gray granite, erected in 1866 to the memory of the sailors and soldiers who died in service at this station during the civil war, is near the Naval Stores. The city contains Episcopal, Baptist, Methodist and Roman Catholic churches. Outside the manufacturing of cigars, the principal industries of Key West are turtling, diving for sponges and fishing for the Cuban Market. The drives are charming, and the fishing and boating unsurpassed.
Seven miles of railroad are now run daily by 14 cars. Key West claims the greatest permanent population of any city in Florida, and is the richest city of its size in this country. It is in importance the ninth port of entry in the United States, and the third naval strategic point. The city alone pays more import duty and internal revenue tax than all the rest of the State of Florida, and the vast States of Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi combined.
The island enjoys several modern improvements: it is lighted by gas; it counts one of the finest fire departments in the State, under the command of Mr. B. F. H. Bowers, consisting of four first-class latest improved fire engines, one large hook-and-ladder truck, and four firstclass hose-carriages. Three handsome Methodist churches and a Cuban Mission chapel; Episcopal, Baptist, Presbyterian and Catholic churches, one colored Baptist, two public schools, and several private schools, all under




00
ST. MARY'S CONVENT FOR YOUNG LADIES, KEY WEST, FLA.




CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 39
excellent management with large attendance. Besides these there is the finest Catholic convent to be found in the State, with pupils from nearly every State and foreign countries.
This institution is under the direction of the Sisters of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Maria. The convent is advantageously situated on the south beach of the island. The various (14) students' rooms are perfectly ventilated and well provided with modern school furniture; they all connect together, and when the partitions are thrown open the sight of 400 female students is charming. The curriculum embraces a thorough English education, the Latin, French and Spanish languages, drawing, painting and needlework. A visit to this institution will well repay tourists on their way to Havana.
From Key West to Havana the distance is about 90 miles. The steamer leaves Key West in the evening and arrives at Havana early in the morning.
ENTRANCE TO THE BAY OF HAVANA.
When nearing Morro Castle, a pilot comes aboard the steamer, and soon after it is visited by two government boats, having on board the Custom-House and the Board of Health officials, who alone are authorized to give a landing permit. The general aspect of the bay is wonderful; at the left rises the fort of Morro Castle and the heights of La Cabaha surmounted with flags ; at the right is Fort La Punta. The port is full of steamships of every nationality and of all tonnage. The bay is three miles in circumference, and is one of the finest in the




PARLOR IN THE PALACE OF THE CAPTAIN-GENERAL, HAVANA.




CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 41
world. Steamers anchor at their respective buoys. (No ship except Spanish vessels or steamers of the Spanish Transatlantic Line are allowed to dock.) Immediately upon their arrival they are surrounded by small boats with hotel agents, who clamor for the privilege of taking tourists ashore. The health authorities having acconplisbed their work, you have then the Custom-House officers to please. Agents, interpreters for the hotels, will take passengers and baggage in charge, have boats ready to land and have baggage registered at the CustomHonse. Expenses of landing and going to the hotel, including boat, carriage and express are $1.50 gold and upward, according to the number of pieces of baggage; the best way is to put yourself in the hands of the interpreters or agents of the hotels, who are reported to be the most reliable in the world, according to the statement of experienced tourists. You may find it a good way in Havana to live on the European plan; that is, room in one place and take your meals at the restaurants, which are the best in the world. It is well to have an understanding beforehand in order to avoid recriminations.
HAVANA.
The city of Havana; advantageously situated, is built upon a tongue of land, the head of which is protected by the fort of Morro Castle and the heights of La Cabafha. The entrance to the port is protected: on one side by the fort of Santos Reyes del Morro, garrisoned by 800




A FASHIONABLE STORE IN HAVANA,




CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 43
soldiers, and an apparent battery, that of the Doce Apostoles, built at the level of the water, which gives shelter to the garrison ; on the other side by fort La Punta. At the southeast of the Morro, rising above the city, is the fortress of San Carlos de ]a Cabafla, which can shelter 4,000 men. The batteries of La Cabana and La Pastora are built at water level, as the Twelve Apostles, and armed with 245 guns. On the east, about one mile, is Fort No. 4, and on the southeast, about 4 miles, is the Tower of Cogimar. Both the fires of Morro and La Cabafja on the one side, and of the fort of Principe and Santo Domingo de Atar~s on the other, are designed to put the city in ashes in a few hours, while the lower batteries of La Pastora and the Twelve Apostles command the sea. Besides these forts and batteries there are other important fortifications, among them the fort of San Nazario, the bulwark De ]a Plaza, the Santa Clara battery, the fort of La Chorrera and the Tower of Banes, representing in all about 650 guns. These fortifications have entailed the outlay of considerable sums of money.
The population of Havana is about 250,000 inhabitants; it is one of the finest and most important cities in the West India and South America, and is essentially cosmopolitan. Tourists will notice the carriages, entirely different from those seen in the United States; a few thousands of small victorias circulate in the streets of the ancient city for very low fares; some of them are very comfortable; the horses are about half the size of American horses, and according to an American writer: "Wonderful because they never fall down in the streets and




THE PRADO WITH THE MORRO CASTLE IN THE DISTANCE.




CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 45
never get tired." Driving through the city and passing the narrow streets of the old town, one will enjoy the sight of the stores with their employees, in shirt-sleeves behind the counters, smoking cigarettes in very good humor, and ready to show fine imported goods and curiosities. If you have never been in Spain, you may realize yourself to be there while in Havana, because Cuba represents Spain in many of its different characteristics. The picturesque aspect of the city, which is a vast museum of curiosities, excite your attention at every moment. The principal street for shopping is Calle del Obispo, or Bishop Street, where I recommend tourists to visit the stores La Habana, Las Ninfas, La Granada, first-class stores for dry goods and silks; La Especial and La Complaciente, fan stores; El Kovator, tailors and fancy articles; Wilson's American book store; La Carolina, great depot for cigars and cigarettes. Oreilly Street, parallel with Obispo, is the street of the photographersthe most fashionable gallery is that of S. A. Corner. In Muralla or Ricla Street, parallel with Obispo Street, are the wholesale houses. By showing this Guide at any store or business house advertised in it, tourists will be attentively waited upon, and will obtain the lowest prices for their purchases.
EL PRADO.
With its walk of two miles in length, lined with Indian laurel trees and evergreen on each side, the Prado is enchanting at night.




46 CUBA ILLUSTRATED.
INDIAN FOUNTAIN-PILA DE LA INDIA.




CUBA. ILLUSTRATED. 47
From the fountain of La India, as the illustration shows, to La Punta (entrance of the bay), the walk is very pleasant; going down the Prado is to be found, on the right side, the beautiful Hotel Pasaje, and the greatly renovated Payret Theatre; while on the left is the beautiful Tacon Theatre. In the centre of the Paseo is the celebrated Central Park, with the beautiful marble statue of Isabel Segunda, an artistic work of the great sculptor Vega. The military band plays almost every other evening in the Park. The general aspect at night is wonderful ; the park, crowded with agreeable and pleasant people who enjoy themselves; the private carriages, here and there, with the charming segoritas, under the Indian laurel and palms, in their light and pretty dresses, surrounded by their friends, who deem it a duty to pay them compliments, chattering en p1ein air, is a tropical scene of the greatest interest. In the Park are the great Caf6 Central, Caf6 Tacon, the celebrated Helados de Paris, which attracts the leading society of Havana for their sorbets and famed ice-cream; and the Gran Hotel Telegrafo, the great favorite of the American tourists, the great Tacon Theatre, the popular circus of Pubillones, and the Albisu Theatre. The walk or drive on the
Prado is always interesting. In the Prado, Nos. 67-69, is the hydrotherapic hnd bathing establishment of Dr. Belot, one of the most elegant of its kind in the world. Do not fail to visit Dr. Belot, who will take a special pleasure to show you his great establishment.




48 CUBA ILLUSTRATED.
THE CASINO ESPAROL.
The Spanish Casino is one of the finest buildings and one of the principal attractions in Havana. This Club was founded in 1859; it averages 2,500 members. Almost every city in the Island has a club, corresponding with the main club of Havana. Tourists should not fail to visit the Casino, where they will always be welcomed. Its amiable and distinguished President, Mr. Garcia Tun6n, and its members, take great pleasure to show tourists the interesting curiosities it contains. There is a fine collection of paintings, copies from celebrated Spanish artists, representing the history of the nation since the remotest epoch. Among the collection of oilpaintings, I call the attention of visitors to the beautiful group, full of expression and historical truth, representing Isabella the Catholic, when she gave the royal diamonds to help the expedition of Columbus. It is one of the greatest and most sublime episodes of the history of Spain. During the winter splendid balls are given there, as well as lyric and dramatic entertainments. The masquerade balls of the Casino during the carnival are justly noted to be the most gorgeous in the world. The Casino supports a free academy where the English and French languages, book-keeping, drawing, etc., are taught. The Casino Espafiol, which was at first near the park, is now located in one of the finest buildings in Havana, on Zulueta Street. Tourists should not fail to visit the Casino, where they will be welcomed.




CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 49
THEATRES.
GRAND TACON THEATRE.
The Grand Tacon Theatre was erected in 1837, in memory of Captain-General Don Miguel Tacon, who was then in command of the Island of Cuba. It was built by Mr. Francisco Marty, and Torrens estimated its cost at $400,000. It is situated in the better part of the city, between Prado and Consulado Streets, fronting on the celebrated Central Park. The Tacon Theatre occupies a superficial area of 6,176 square yards, it has three doors on the front, six on San Rafael Street, three on Consulado Street, and two on San Jos6 Street. At the other angle of the Theatre, formed by Prado and San Rafael Streets, is the Salon Brunet, the leading Caf6 of Havana. The stage is 42.83 metres in length by 20.68 in width, and the entrance 17.63. The seating capacity is as follows: 56 boxes on first and second floors, 8 boxes on third floor, 4 grilles on first and second floors, 2 grilles on third floor, 112 butacas on third floor, 552 orchestra seats, 101 chairs in the tiers and front, 1,203 chairs front and back of tiers. Total number of seats, 2,287; therefore, 3,000 people can be seated very comfortably at the Tacon Theatre. The luminary consists of 1,034 gas jets; the decorations comprise 751 shifting scenes; the armory possesses 605 different sorts of arms; the wardrobe 13,787 costumes; the furniture and tools for the stage number 782; the archives contain about 1,200 partitions of opera, operabouffe, tragedies, dramas, comedies, etc., besides a large number of songs and piano




TACON THEATRE ON CENTRAL PARK.




CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 51
und military band pieces. This Coliseum was inaugurated with the performance of the drama Don Juan de Austria." Ten years ago $20,000 were expended in repairs; the busts of Tasso, Dante and Arioste were also added in the dome. Tie Tacon Theatre is a great public ornament, and indicates great love for the arts, and offers tourists to the capital of the Island of Cuba a matchless place of amusement.
PAYRET OPERA HOUSE.
In Prado Street, fronting on Central Park, near the Grand Hotel Pasaje. It is a beautiful structure, fully equal to the Tacon Theatre as to architecture and seating capacity. The Payret was erected about fourteen years ago. In 1883 the theatre was partly destroyed by a terrible tornado, and was abandoned until 1890, when the edifice was entirely restored, and has again become the home of the great operatic school.
THE ALBISU THEATRE.
Is an elegant hall located in the building of the Centro Asturiano (Asturies Club), and has lately been restored ; it is one of the prettiest theatres of its kind, where comedy, drama and opera are performed.
THE IRIJOA THEATRE.
Named in memory of the industrious and distinguished owner, Mr. Irijoa. It is a handsome, commodious and well ventilated theatre, lately built, and specially adapted for summer performances. Elegant balls are




17
t7' t, C
w tj
111,j
nil u
PLAZA DE ARMAS-QQVIER iOR'S FALACI .




CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 53
given there every season by the leading societies of Havana. A garden with fountains, in the main entrance, attracts the eye. Small tables are placed here and there to partake of refreshments, which gives it the appearance of the "Champs Elys6es," or Paris caf6s concerts. Mr. lrijoa has made his name very popular by the erection of his theatre.
PLAZA DE ARMAS.
Is situated at the lower extremity of Obispo Street. It is here that the winter residence of the Captain-General and the main official government buildings are. By consulting the illustration, the reader will notice a garden of tropical flowers, plants and palms. The statue in the centre, an artistic marble monument, is that of Ferdinand the Seventh. The illustration, el Templete, opposite the Captain-General's residence, represents a little chapel erected to the memory of Columbus. It was at this place that, in the year 1519, was celebrated the first mass in the Island, under a large ceiba, a beautiful tree known as the cotton-tree of the West Indies. Tourists will notice a bronze tablet at the frontispiece with the following inscription:
Reinando el Senor Don Fernando V11, eiendo Presidente y Gobernador Don Francisco Dionisio 'ives. La fdelieima Rabana religious y pacifXea erigi6 este sencillo monumento decorando el sitio donde el ago 1519 se celebr6 la primera misa y cabildo; el Obispo Don Juan Jo8 Diaz de Espada solemniz6 el mismo Augusto Sacri4cio el dia 9 de Marzo de 1598.




54 CUBA ILLUSTRATED.
[TRANSLATION.]
"During the Reign of His Majesty Don Fernando VII, under the Presidency and Governorship of Don Francisco Dionisio Vives, the faithful, religious and pacific Havaneses erected this modest monument, consecrating the place where, in the year 1519, was celebrated the first mass and holy office by the bishop Don Juan Jose Diaz de Espada, solemnizing the Divine Sacrifice of the Mass on the 9th day of March, 1598."
THE LITTLE CHAPEL-EL TEMPLETE.




CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 55
CARNIVAL.
During the Carnival, public masquerade balls are given every Sunday after the performances at the Tacon Theatre. Dancing commences at about 12 P. M., and continues until daylight. For that purpose the floor of the parquette is raised to a level with the boxes and the stage, converting it into a vast and commodious ballroom. The theatre is open to all, and access to the boxes and galleries is free to the public, who can thus enjoy the sight of the ball and listen at the same time to the peculiar Cuban dancing music. During the carnival the Paseos are very attractive. A drive to the Prado and Carlos Tereero, which are crowded with carriages and fantastic masqueraders is also very interesting.
BULL FIGHTS.
(La corrida de toros.)
This old Spanish entertainment and amusement has also its lovers in Havana, and offers every year an exceptional interest. The Captain-General being generally present at the corrida, it attracts the fashionable society of Cuba. Havana has been favored with the best matadore8 of Spain. Every season the best bulls are imported from Lerida at enormous prices. A few years ago Cuba was raging over the espada Luis Mazzantini. His engagement was made at a great expense- $30,000, and a benefit, for fourteen performances, all expenses paid to and from Madrid, as well as during his stay in Cuba for




56 CUBA ILLUSTRATED,
himself and company. The portrait and biography of Mazzantini may be interesting to Americans.
Luis Mazzantini was born in the Province of Guipuzcoa in Spain forty-two years ago. His father was an Italian, his mother a Spanish lady: he was educated
LUIS MAZZANTINI,
at Rome, Italy, where he graduated and received the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Mazzantini was at one time the secretary of one of the confidential advisers of King Amadens I., of Spain. Having learned telegraphy, he became an operator, was promoted chief of station, and for his efficiency was again promoted to a high position in the administration of a great railway company at Madrid, where he was protected by Jos6 Echegaray, the




CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 57
great Spanish writer and dramatist, who was at the time manager of the railway. Mazzantini said that he discovered there was but two ways by which a man might become eminent in Spain: either by singing or bullfighting.
He failed as a singer and was left to do the other, or else remain a telegraph operator. His fondness for the amateur bull-ring was such as to take a great deal of his time from the office. This was noticed by the manager, who finally told him that he must choose between bullfighting and railroading. "All right," said Mazzantini, "I'll give up the railroad." He left the office and went directly to the Plaza de Toros. He reported that he was ready to enter the arena as a professional; he was well and favorably known as an amateur, and his coining was
A BULL-FIGHT.




MAIN ALTAR IN THlE CATHEDRAL, HAVANA.




CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 59
hailed with delight ; he was placed in the front rank as Primer Espada or Matador, and the next Sunday he appeared in the arena with the white satin costume of a d~butant; though it rained he killed his three bulls like an old hand in the business, and became famous as the first bull-fighter in Spain.
The Plaza de Toros, where the sport takes place, is situated near the Paseo de Carlos III. From any part of the city a carriage will take you to the arena for 50 cents silver (same price for two). Tourists should arrive before the opening, in order to be present at the entry of the cuadrilla, when the President is saluted and gives the signal to commence the performance. It is a lively scene well worth seeing. Tickets can be had almost anywhere. Bull-fights take place every Sunday at 3 r. m.
CHURCHES.
are devoid of beauty, both externally and internally, as such edifices can be made.
The foundations of the Cathedral were laid in 1656, and the church finished in 1724. It is situated on Empedrado Street. The architecture is of the Latin-Gotbic style. The ceremonies on feast days are magnificent and solemn. High mass is celebrated every Sunday at 8 A. M. The ashes of Columbus lie in one of the vaults of the Cathedral. On the left side, in the rear, tourists will notice a slab, upon which is a bust in relief of Columbus, as the illustration shows (see page 20), with this inscription:




60 OUBA ILLUSTRATED.
MAIN ALTAR IN THE MERCED CHURCH, HAVANA.




CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 61
Oh restos b image del grande Colon !
Mil siglos durad guardados en la urna,
Y en la remembranza de nuestra nation.
[TRANSLATION.]
Oh! remains and image of the great Colon!
A thousand ages thou will be preserved in this urn,
And in the remembrance of our nation.
THE MERCED,
built in 1746, is on Cuba and Merced Streets. It is one of the wealthiest and most aristocratic churches of Havana. At its rear tourists will notice two chapels with fine and artistic cupolas. The oil paintings are very fine, one especially, "The Last Supper." The rear of the church has been remodeled during the last twenty years. High mass is celebrated on Sunday at 9 A. m.
SAN AGUSTIN,
corner of Cuba and Amargura Streets-built in 1608formerly a monastery.
SANTA CLARA,
is a large nunnery, on Cuba Street, between Luz and Sol; it was founded in 1644, and is to-day the wealthiest nunnery in the city.
SANTA CATALINA,
on Oreilly Street, at the corner of Compostela Street, built in 1698, and dedicated in 1700. The bodies of the martyrs, Celestino and Lucida, were brought as relics from the City of Rome (Italy), and deposited here.




62 CUBA ILLUSTRATED.
BELEN,
on Compostela Street, at the corner of Luz. This monastery was built in 1704 by Bishop Diego Evelino de Compostela, in his garden ; he had in 1695 built a church called San Diego de Alcahi. These monks kept the only free-school up to the latter part of the last century. The school existed until 1854, when the whole building was given to the Jesuits for the establishment of the Royal College of Havana.
Tourists are welcomed visitors to the churches at any time.
FORTS.
MORRO CASTLE AND LA CABANA
can be visited every day. Tourists must first procure an application from the United States Consul to the Military Governor of the city, and they will receive in return a permit to visit the forts. Tourists will go down the wharf (mnuelle caballeria) and take a guadaftero (boatman) and cross the bay; arriving at the fort the permit is presented to a soldier on guard, who gives the right to pass. The officers are very courteous. A soldier is detailed to accompany the tourists through the forts. At one end of Morro Castle, tourists will notice a wooden bridge uniting the two forts and built by the English during the occupation in the year 1762. They will also notice the light-house constructed when General O'Donnell was Commander of the Island, in the year 1844. The lighthouse is a revolving one, of the Fresnell model, with a minute flash-light that is seen at a distance of 25 miles.




CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 63
MARKETS.
Are very attractive for the variety and abundance of fish, vegetables and tropical fruits; the best time to visit them is at early morning. The Tacon is the leading market, the largest and finest in Havana. It occupies an entire block, opened all around; it is surrounded by all kinds of stores with the greatest assortment of goods and novelties, where tourists can purchase, at a trifling cost, charming souvenirs. The Colon market, on Zulueta Street, has been recently completed, and the Cristina market, on the Plaza Vieja, is the oldest of Havana. Tourists should visit them in order to get acquainted with the richness of the products of the soil.
COCK-PITS.
Cock mains take place every Sunday afternoon. While bull fight lovers enjoy themselves at the Plaza de Toros, the excitement of cock-fights prevail at Manrique Street. The cock-pits of Cuba are the most famed in the world.
GENERAL PLACES OF INTEREST.
El Circulo Militar.-Military Society founded in 1883 by officers of the Spanish army in Cuba.
Real Casa de Beneficencia.-Orphan Asylum, on Calle Ancha del Norte.
Asilo de Mendigos.-Almshouse (Calzada Belascoain).
Asilo San Jos6.-Reformatory Asylum for boys, on Ancha del Norte.




64 CUBA ILLUSTRATED.
Mazorra.-Lunatic Asylum, at about 10 miles from Havana.
Casa de Recogidas.-Female convicts and abandoned women are confined in this asylum; it is situated on Calle de la Fundici6n
Royal Economical Society of the Friends of the Country.-Public library (free). Opened from 12 m. to 4? P. M.
Studio of Painting and Sculpture, in the same building, 60 Dragones.
Royal Scientific Academy.-Museum of Natural History of the Antilles, Cuba Street, between Teniente Rey and Muralla Streets, where all antiquities and relics since the discovery of the island are kept and can be seen. Opened from 12 m. to 4 P. m.
HOSPITALS.
San Felipe y Santiago.--Located in the City Prison, a large edifice which tourists will notice when entering the harbor, at the right side of the bay, fronting the Morro Castle.
Hospital Paula.-Assigned specially to women.
Hospital San LAzaro.-Leprosy patients are only admitted.
Hospital de San Ambrosio.-Military hospital, situate beyond the Arsenal.
Tourists of the medical profession and visitors are admitted to the above establishments at any time.




CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 65
POST-OFFICE.
On Calle Oficios, near the landing. Tourists will notice two boxes for mailing letters: one, "Nacional," where letters for the Island, Spain and her possessions are mailed ; the other, "Extranjero" (foreign), for letters to foreign countries
A list of letters directed to Havana, without address, is published, and letters are delivered to the addressees only.
Letters can be mailed also in auxiliary boxes, placed in different parts of the city.
Postage for the United States is 5 cents; for the city 2, cents; for the Island 5 cents. Universal postal cards, 2 and 3 cents.
TELEGRAPHS.
The telegraph lines in Cuba are under the supervision of the Government. The main office is on Calle Oficios, same building as the post-office. Wires communicate with the principal points of the Island. Submarine cable to Key West and Punta Rassa, in Florida, etc.
SUBURBS OF HAVANA.
A carriage drive to the Captain-General's summer residence, known as "Quinta de los Molinos," is very interesting. The route is picturesque, the garden profusely planted with various kinds of palms, fruit-trees of all kinds, flowers, and adorned with artificial waterfalls. From the garden-drive to the cemetery, upon the




66 CUBA ILLUSTRATED.
APPROACH TO THE BISHOP'S RESIDENCE AT TULIPAN.




CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 67
MAIN ENTRANCE TO THE CEMETERY.
hill, the scenery of the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico is one of the grandest sights. The portico of the cemetery, as the illustration shows, and the chapel within the gates, are two exquisite pieces of architecture. Returning, drive to the Vedado, where are willas and fine summer residences. Passing the Ancha del Norte, stop at the Campos Eliseos bathing-houses, which are worth seeing.
THE CERRO AND TULIPAN
dotted with beautiful summer residences, is the rendezvous of the fashionable society of Havana. A benevolent society established at the Cerro in 1875, composed of select members, frequently gives dramatic and lyric




68 CUBA ILLUSTRATED.
QUINTA DE PALATINOS, CERRO, HAVANA.




CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 69
soir6es, and lectures by celebrated speakers of the country.
The Marianao Railroad stops at the following stations: Tulipan, Cerro, Ceiba, Buenavista, Quemados, and Marianao. Marianao, about 15 miles from Havana, is a nice and pleasant town of 5,000 inhabitants. The railroad extends to the beach of Marianao, three miles from that place, where sea-bathing can be enjoyed. About three miles from the Marianao station lies one of the finest sugar plantations in Cuba-the Ingenio Toledo. A permit is required to visit the plantation; it can be obtained through a prominent person or a business house in H1ivana. Trains leave every hour from 6 A. m. Tourists will enjoy the trip very much and pass an agreeable morning. The round trip takes three hours.
Tourists will also enjoy a visit to Guanabacoa, one of the oldest cities in the Island, with a population of about 20,000 inhabitants. This city possesses excellent mineral waters, especially beneficial for disorders of the digestive organs. Trains leave every half hour, and run in connection with ferry-boats at the wharf Muelle de Luz.
EXCURSION TO THE CELEBRATED RESIDENCE "CQUINTA DE
PALATINOS, AT THE CERRO, HAVANA.
Tourists will enjoy a visit to this beautiful country residence, 12 miles from Havana. Trains leave the Bahia Railroad station, near the Mascotte flotel, at 1 P'. m. every day, returning to Havana at about 5.30 P. m. The name of this great property comes from the Count of




70 OUBA ILLUSTRATED.
A COCOA-NUT TREE AT THE PALATINOS GARDENS.




CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 71
Palatinos, who was formerly its owner. Mine. Rosa Abreu, Countess of Palatinos, who resides in Paris, is the present owner. The Countess is married to Dr. Granger, a prominent French physician, who is at the head of the celebrated Pasteur laboratory.
Mr. Betancourt, the gardener and keeper of the property, will kindly show tourists the great variety of tropical trees, comprising twelve species of mangoes, orange, cocoa-nut, etc. A fine collection of marble statuary, valued at $40,000, is an additional ornamentation to this beautiful place.
THE COCOA-NUT TREE.
The cocoa-nut tree shown in the accompanying illustration can be seen in its natural condition at the Palatinos gardens. The specimen shown in the engraving was planted six years ago, and consequently has entered in its second fruit-bearing year. The cocoa-nut tree bears fruit incessantly, as new nut formations are made with every change of the moon, and consequently once arrived at its fruit-bearing stage, the cocoa-nut tree is never devoid of nuts. When freshly plucked from the tree the nut is filled with a delicious milky water, which has certain medicinal properties. This water is quite cool and very refreshing in tropical climes, and can be drank without the least danger. The nut after a lapse of time, becomes dry and coated on the inside with a deposit from the milky water; it is generally in this condition that it reaches the United States, where this hard matter enters




-r
THE CHICKEN DEALER, HAVANA-EL POLLERO.




CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 73
to a large extent in the manufacture of candies, pies, etc. The agriculturist finds in the cocoa-nut tree and its fruit, a source of income which day by day goes on increasing, as the fibre enters more largely into the channels of the industrial arts. From the ordinary door-mats, ropes, bagging, efc., the textile qualities of the plant have so appreciated that it enters in almost everything where strength, pliableness and durability are desired. It figures to-day into the construction of the modernized man-of-war. The French and American war navies
use it as a filler between the hull and the armor of their most powerful vessels, as well as between decks. The fibre not only diminishes the concussion on board a manof-war firing a broadside, but it helps wonderfully in filling up holes made by the firing of the enemy, according to experiments lately made.
THE CHICKEN DEALER (El Pollero).
Among the characteristic types of Cuban peddlers the chicken dealer is one of the most interesting. He comes every day to the city, as he lives in the neighborhood of Havana. He goes on his rounds among his customers and sells live poultry. No one in Cuba would think of buying chickens as it is done in the United States, where the poultry is killed by steam and kept on ice. The Havana chicken dealer is well patronized, and can be seen every day around the town attending to his business. The accompanying illustration, taken from nature, cannot fail to interest American tourists




74 CUBA ILLUSTRATED.
BASE BALL CLUBS.
The spacious and commodious building of the Almendares Club is situated opposite the Quinta de los Molinos, or Captain-General's summer residence.
The Havana Base Ball Club is at the Vedado, up the north shore. Games are played every Sunday afternoon, and many spectators are attracted to the sport on account of American clubs coming almost every season to play with the Cubans, who are great lovers of that athletic sport. The main floors of both club houses are also especially arranged for dancing. Very fine balls are given here during the season.
FOREIGN CONSULS.
United States of America, . . 92 Agniar Street. France, . . . 106 Teniente Rey Street.
Germany . . . 12 San Ignacio Street.
Russia, . . . . 5 Mercaderes Street. China, . . . . . 74 Prado Street.
Austria and Hungary, .... 7 Mercaderes Street.
Belgium, . . . . 2 Mcrcaderes Street. Great Britain, .... ... 13 Oficios Street.
Denmark, . . . . 78. Cuba Street.
Greece, . . . . 5 Mercaderes Street. Holland, . . . . 53 Cuba Street.
Italy,.. . . . . 136 Amistad Street.
Portugal, .. . . . 2 Mercaderes Street. Sweden and Norway, . . 37 Obrapia Street.
Mexico. . . . . 43 Tejadillo Street.




CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 75
Argentine Republic .... ..... (_post not filled.) Uruguay .... .......... 43 Cuba Street.
Dominican Republic ........ .101 Galiano Street. Haytian Republic ......... ..30 O'Reilly Street.
Venezuela ... .......... 3 Baratillo Street.
Peru, .. ........ 84 San Ignacio Street.
Honduras ......... . 108 Jesus del Monte.
Guatemala, ... ....... 31 Amargura Street.
HACK FARES.-SPANISH CURRENCY.
One journey in any direction within the limits of Belascoain Avenue:
Two persons, .... 20 cents silver.
Three persons, .....25 cents silver.
Four persons, .... 30 cents silver.
Beyond Belascoain Avenue, not beyond Calzada de la
Infanta:
Two persons, .... 30 cents silver.
Three persons, 35 cents silver.
Four persons, .... 40 cents silver.
By the hour in any direction within the city limits:
Per hour, two persons, $ .75 silver.
Per hour, three persons, .90 silver.
Per hour, four persons, . 1.00 silver.
In engaging hacks for trips outside the city limits the price should be agreed upon before starting, in order to avoid annoyances and misunderstandings. Carriage for two can be had for $1.50 to $2.00 silver per hour.




76 CUBA ILLUSTRATED.
SPANISI COIN.
A knowledge of the various coins in circulation in Cuba, and of their respective value, should be acquired by tourists. The following is a table of the principals: Spanish -1 ounce, gold ...... ...is worth $17.00
. . 8.00
" called doublon, 4.25
"" escudo, 2.12
" center, .......... C9 5.30
American gold and greenbacks command a premium on Spanish gold, according to the exchange. On arriving, tourists should change some of their money for Spanish currency, to meet their small expenses.
Tourists will receive the highest premium at the exchanges advertised in this book.
FERRIES.
BAIIIA DE LA IIABANA RAILROAD FERRY.
Wharf-Muelle de Luz.
Havana to Regla every day, from 4.45 A. M. to 10.30 P. m., and vice versa.
Boats leave every 30 minutes, and connect with the Bahia Railroad and Guanabacoa Branch. Fare 5 cents silver.
EMPRESA VIEJA (OLD COMPANY).
Wharf-Muelle de Luz.
Havana to Regla every day, from 4.35 A. M. to 10.20 P. m.




CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 77
Boats leave every 15 minutes, and connect with the Puebla Railroad to Guanabacoa. Fare, 5 cents silver.
CITY CARS.
From Plaza San Juan de Dios to the Cerro, cars leave from 6 A. m. every 15 minutes. First-class fare, 10 cents, silver. Cars run until 11 P. m.
From San Juan de Dios to Jesus del Monte, same as above.
From Plaza San Juan de Dios to the Chorrera, Vedado and Carmelo every half hour. Fare, 10 cents silver, this line rUms until after the closing of the opera at night.
STAGE ROUTES.
From Castillo del Principe to the Cemetery, stages leave every half hour. Fare, 10 cents each way. From Plaza de Armas to Jesus del Monte, stages leave every 15 minutes-through fare, 15 cents.
FOREIGN TRAVELING.
At Havana tourists will find first-class steamship lines for almost every part of the world.
The steamers of the French Transatlantic Line, from St. Nazaire, arrive at Havana about the 10th of every month, and leave Havana the 22d of every month.
In the interval they go to Vera Cruz, Mexico, and return in time to make their direct trips.
Ward's Line from New York to Vera Cruz arrives at Havana every week, and leaves a few hours after for




IllN
CAVES OF BELLAMAR, MATANZAS, CUBA.




CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 79
Vera Cruz. Leaves Havana for New York on Wednesdays and Saturdays also.
The Spanish Transatlantic Line leaves every 10 days for Spain, also for New York.
At St. Thomas tourists will find steamers for all the West India islands and Central America. At Santiago de Cuba connections are also made for Haytian ports, St. Domingo, Puerto Rico, St. Thomas and Jamaica.
EXCURSION STEAMSHIP GUIDE.
New York, Cuba Mail S. S. Co., for Cuba and
Mexico, Ward's Line.
A first-class powerful iron steamship sails direct for New York and for Vera Cruz every week.
HIDALGO & Co., Agents, 25 Obrapia Street. Spanish Transatlantic Mail S. S. Co.
Leaves every 10 days. Some of the steamers stop :at Puerto Rico on their way to Spain; all stop there coming to Havana ;also for New York every 10 days.
M. CALVO & Co., Agents, 28 Oficios Street. French Transatlantic Mail S. S. Co.
Arrives at Havana; leaves for Vera Cruz, returns and sails for St. Nazaire, stopping at Puerto Rico and "St. Thomas, once a month.
BRIDAT & Co., Agents, 32 San Ignacio Street. Plant Steamship Line.
United States Fast Mail Route, S. S. .Mascotte and




80 CUBk ILLUSTRATED.
I !zi
Cf)
pt
0
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0
Oll




CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 81
Olivette, connecting at Tampa with the Southern Florida Railway.
LAWTON BROS., Agents, 35 Mercaderes Street. Morgan Steamship Line.
Between New Orleans and Havana, weekly, stopping at Key West and Punta Gorda, Florida.
LAwTON BRos., Agents, 35 Mercaderes Street. South Coast Steamers.
Leave for Cienfuegos and Santiago de Cuba via Batabano twice a week.
MENENDEZ & Co., Agents, 75 San Ignacio Street.
There are several coast line steamers from Havana to Cdrdenas, Nuevitas, Jibara, etc.
M ATANZAS.
This beautiful city, situated 85 miles east of Havana, and called the city of the two rivers, was founded in the year 1693. The etymology of the name Matanzas is much disputed by antiquarians in Cuba. Some, ascribing it to the slaugther of Indians in 1511 at the time of the conquest of the Island, contend that the supposed Indian name Yumuri, which is also that of one of the two rivers between which the city stands, is synonymous, in poor Spanish, with the Indian name of the locality where the massacre took place. The story goes on that an Indian spy of the conquerors, when pursued by them,




RM5 ---7VALLEY OF THE YUMURI, MATANZAS.




CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 83
ran away shouting: "Yu-muri," which in poor Spanish means "I die." The rivers St. John and Yumuri divide the city in three parts. The northern part, on the Yumuri, is called Versailles; the central part, between the two rivers, is known as the old town; and the southern part, on the St. John, is called Pueblo Nuevo. Many beautiful squares, the San Carlos Church and the Esteban Theatre embellish the city. It has also numerous hospitals and benevolent societies. The principal attractions for tourists are the Ynmuri Valley and the Caves of Bellamar. In the Plaza de Armas, as the illustration shows, are the interesting Spanish and Cuban Casino clubs.
The Bahia Railway connects Havana to Matanzas. The trains leave every day at 6.50 A. m. and arrive at Matanzas at 9.15 A. m. The beautiful valley of the Yumuri and the caves of Bellamar may be visited the same day. At the station, a carriage will take you to, the hotel of your choice. The Hotel San Carlos is situated in the centre of the city and the Hotel Frances is near the Bahia Railway station. I take pleasure to inform American tourists that the beautiful caves of Bellamar have been purchased by Messrs. Garcia & Co., proprietors of the Hotel Franc6s, where tourists will find the best accommodation, polite attendance and the greatest coinfort. While at breakfast the necessary arrangements for a volcntc-the ancient and commodious vehicle of the Island-and guides, if necessary, should be retained to visit the caves and the Yumuri Valley.
First, visit the Yumuri Valley, about three miles




VOLANTA IN THEt VALLEY OF THE VUMURI, MATANZAS,




CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 85
northwest of Matanzas. Once upon the hill you are charmed by the beauty of the valley, with its grounds broken into sharp peaks and genteel undulations; its cane-fields,, with their pea-green verdure, and the darkgreen foliage of the palms, naturally scattered over them; its orange groves and luxuriant plantations, with broad waving leaves; the cocoa, the cocoa-nut and almond trees and its coffee plantations, while here and there an enormous ceiba-tree spreads out its massive branches high in the air. The landscape has no rival even in the pictures(que scenery of Switzerland. Visit the chapel of Monserrate, and drive to the eaves of Bellamar, about three miles east of Matanzas. Guides provided with torches accompany visitors throughout these marvellous caves. Speaking of the main chamber, Mr. Hazard says: "This temple, I should think, is quite 200 feet long by about 70 wide, and is about 150 feet from the entrance of the cave; and while it far surpasses in richness and splendor the temple of the same name in the Mammoth Cave, it does not equal it in size or solemn grandeur." *
The sparkling columns of crystal produce a most wonderful effect; their color changing, when a torch is held behind them, from white to amber, warmed up by lovely rose-tints, the effect is indeed magical and enchanting. Each of these caves have a name: one "The Mantle of Columbus," another "The Temple of Benediction," "The Guardian Spirits," and so on. The caves were
* Cuba, with Pen and Pencil, by Sam'l Hazard.




17
t7'
FLAZA DE ARMAS IN CARDENAS.




Full Text

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Fans, Gloves, Umbrellas an C es. (7 C 'm t X. JI ** >7 .1 r7 CUBAN, SPANISH AND MEXICAN CURIOS. ANTIQUE FANS. Solid Silver Spoons as Souvenirs. Tourists will be welcomed at this store to examine the great collection of fans of all kinds, with paintings representing the beautiful scenery of the Island. MANUEL CARRANZA, Proprietor. ENGLISH SPOKEN. o]N]R~E OnzY. ESTABLISIHI-D i886.

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From the Florida Times-Union," the leading paper of Jacksonville, Florida. Mr. Prince's Illusraed Guide Book of Havana and the Island of Cuba has been a perfect boon to the traveler, who not only learns what is interesting to do and see, but can easily make himself understood by the aid of the Anglo-Spanish Vocabulary contained in the Guide Book.

PAGE 4

4r R pY

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SETH W. FEx)

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a t "~u y nrp < J LJL Pa -.-.. MAP A' TE T to .;

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CUBA I ILLUSTRATED WV ITH TI E BIOGRAPHY AND PORTRAIT OF CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS CONTAINING ALSO GENERAL INFORMATION RELATING TO HAVA NA, MATANZAS, CIENFUEGOS, AND THE ISLAND OF CUBA WITH ILLUSTRATIONS AND MAPS TOGETHER WITH AN ANGLO-SPANISH VOCABULARY COMPILED BY J. C. PRINCE 1893-I894 SIXTH EDITION-ALL RIGHTS RESERVED NEW YORK NAPOLON THOMPSON & Co., PRINTERS AND TRANSLATORS Nos. 33-43 GOLD STREET

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-78 2 74 ISzLKAN D OF c n "0 0 00 tO U 40 -Q ro 0"0 o~f' 4t 9,~vM t *' q 21 ~ P"t Irflrw' ltrj' R7 "c ~ // -/ opt' Qf nur a n ~ ~~ / o~~0 &y c -4e l 22 s l ( t /Ut l O q \ -r' 7 L'" yyy .i 7lw J t, qo 84 SI a 1 13 s4 s2 so 78 IVG

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PREFACE. The principal object of this book, which, under its present increased and revised form, reaches the sixth edihon, is to give A merican tourists reliable information about the heajutiful Island of Cuba, so appropriately surnamed the Pearl of the Antilles. Spots having an historical interest are scrupulously depicted ; ancient cities like Havana, Matanzas, Cirdenas, Cienfuegos, Santiago, etc., are the object of special and elaborate descriptions. The author has thought fit and proper that in this memorable year, which marks the close of the fourth century of the discovery of America b y Christopher Columbus, to add to this book a portrait with a brief historical sketch of the genius who has given, through perseverance and innumerable sufferings of all description, a continent to the human race During the last five years, the literary talent of our generation has done wonders to unearth from the ancient and dusty parchments hidden in the libraries and museums of the old world, everything of interest relating to the discovery of America. These combined literary efforts have been embodied in the present historical and biographical sketch of Christopher Columbus, and it may not be pre-

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CUBA ILLUSTRATED. sumptuous on our part to hint that these pages will not only be read with pleasure by the present generation, but may eventually be of some help to those historians of the future who will recount the high deeds of Columbus on the occasion of the fifth century of the discovery of America, and recall the prowess of the imperishable Latin race for its unselfish spread of civilization. In rearanging this work, and in order to make it accurate in all of its details and valuable to tourists, new illustrations have been added. The Anglo-Spanish vocabulary has been carefully revised, and notable additions have been made to it; all of which leads me to think that the present edition will be of great assistance to those travelers who are unacquainted with the beautiful Spanish language. Inquiries upon any subject treated in this work will be cheerfully answered by addressing J. C. PRINCE, 43 Gold Street, New York. N. I.-The attention of tourists is respectfully called to the firms advertised in this book. It is important for travelers to be acquainted with first-class houses while visiting foreign countries; those advertised in this book enjoy the confidence of the public for their honorable dealings and strict integrity. VI

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TABLE OF CONTENTS. P R EFACE..... ........................................ V-V I CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS-The discovery of America...... 1 CUBA.............................. ................... 25 C lim ate ....................................... .... 27 Soil-Population ................................. 28 GovernmentReligion ............................... 31 Maritime Department-A trip to Havana. .............. 33 K EY W EST ............................................. 36 Entrance to the Bay of Havana ....................... 39 H A VA N A .............................. ................ 41 E l P rado ................................. ......... 45 T he Casino E spanol................................. 48 T heatres .............. ............................. 49 Plaza de A rm as..................................... 53 Carnival-Bull-fights................................. 55 Churches ....................................... 59 F o rts ............................................... 62 Markets-Cock-pits-General places of interest......... 63 T he Cocoa-nut tree.................................. 71 The Chicken dealer ................................. 73 Base Ball Clubs-Foreign Consuls..................... 74 H ack fares.......................................... 75

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CUBA ILLUSTRATED. Ferries.................................. City Cars-Stage Routes-Foreign traveling. Excursion Steamship Guide ............... M ATA N ZAS ................................. CA RDEN AS ............... .............. ..... C IEN FU EGOS ................................ The Tomis Terry Theatre................. The Constancia Sugar Estate ........ Fort Castillo.. .......... ................. ISLE O F P IN ES... ............................ SAN DIEGO DE LOS BANOS ................... PUERTO PRINCIPE ................ ......... SANTIAGO DE CUBA ............. ........... USEFUL HINTS AND SUGGEST IONS............ THE HOTELS OF HAVANA ................... R AILW AY S .................................. GUIDE TO CUBAN CIGAR MANUFACTURERS ... DUTIES ON TOBACCO, ETC. ..... ........... PRINCIPAL CIGARETTE FACTORIES. ......... THE CIGAR FACTORIES OF HAVANA....... .. SUGAR PLANTATIONS IN THE ISLA SHOPPING IN HAVANA ........... ADVERTISEMENTS............... PRINCIPAL STEAMSHIP LINES AND VOCABULARY...... ............. NOTICE TO HOTEL-KEEPERS...... CALENDAR ...................... MEMORANDUM ................... ND OF CUBA-..... RAILROADS....... ................. ................. ........ .. .... ... ................. PAGE. 76 77 79 81 87 89 91 93 95 97 99 99 100 101 103 107 108 116 117 119 ... 125 ... 175 178-224 225 231 ... 260 ... 262 263-264 VIII

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7 t 44 CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS. THE DISCOVERY OF AMERICA. According to the most reliable historians Columbus was born in Genoa, Italy. In his tenderest years he was bereft of both father and mother, and left to his own resources, having no friend, no guardian to advise him or to whom lie could look for help and support. Columbus passed his younger days in Genoa, a seaport surrounded by high mountains and bearing the same name as that of the city of his birth.

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2 CUBA ILLUSTRATED. During his youth, le would pass at play many hours of the day on the sea shore, listening with the curiosity of his age to the stories of travels recounted by the sailors. Christopher Columbus was of fair complexion, with curly red hair and very bright, fiery eyes. Oftentimes he would be found alone, walking silently on the beach, contemplating the infinite vastness of the ocean and listening to the murmur of the waves. Who can tell if at that very time Columbus did not entertain already the idea of circumnavigating the globe? In his youth lie made long sea voyages. IIis courage and agility gained for him the admiration of his superiors. It was at the beginning of his career as a sailor that he visited Greece, the shores of Africa, England,and that his inclination for adventures made him undertake a trip to Iceland, surrounded by the icy waters of the Arctic seas Old sailors entertained him of the stories of ancient mariners who had been carried by south-eastern winds and had seen immense stretches of rich lands, which they had named country of the vine, and which according to their narration were inhabitated Those stories preoccupied his mind ; they spurred his desires and aspirations, and he doubted sometimes whether they would be ever satisfied or realized. In his dreams he thought he saw an enchanted nymph, clad in brilliant garments, holding in her hand exotical flowers, and crowned with flowers no less beautiful and rare. le would bow to the charming apparition, who would tell him in soft musical tones: Leave, and go far Very far beyond the seas discover a New World

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CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 3 When thou hast reached that strange land, preach the religion of Peace and not that of War!" When he would awaken from those dreams, he would study with increased ardor the maps of the lands and the charts of the seas. le would refuse to take part in the amusements of his companions, in order to devote all his time to his studies. In those days men in general believed that the earth was a flat disc. Few among the learned men believed in the Pythagorean doctrines, which had been enunciated before Jesus Christ. No more credence was given to Ptolemy who declared in Alexandria, one hundred and forty years after Christ, that the earth had the form of a ball. Columbus who was studying incessantly this important question, finally mastered the trustworthiness of those assertions. Ile had by that time acquired a thorough knowledge of navigation, and moreover he was full of life and valor, and his anxiety to travel west was on the increase. He believed that by following a westernward course he would reach India directly ; but divers voyages undertaken in the western zones without any tangible success had finally dampened his ardor, inasmuch as he was short of resources for such costly undertakings. After marrying in one of the most illustrious Italian families, he settled in the Portuguese island of Porto Santo. One day he accidentally discovered a few maps which had been left by his great grandfather. The study of those maps confirmed him in the correctness of his ideas

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CUBA ILLUSTRATED. while it endowed the stories lie had heard about Iceland and the fabulous country of the vine, a certain degree of truthfulnes. From that instant Columbus was persuaded of the possibility of finding his way to a new continent. The dreams of his youth, the desires and the ardor of the past were again awakened in the full grown man, and he could not remain any longer in the island of Porto Santo. Accompanied by his wife and his son, he left for Lisbon, in order to ask from the King of Portugal the necessary means to carry out his gigantic undertaking. The King was loth to believe in his plans, and played false with the man's noble aspirations. Upon the death of his wife, which occurred during his sojourn in Lisbon, Columbus undertook on foot the voyage to Spain. here Providence, who had marked him for a glorious destiny, was manifestly instrumental in changing the course of the eventful life of the great discoverer. After a day of fatiguing march on the highways, father and son came by a monastery. The son, feeble and footsore, asked his father with great persistency to knock at the door and beg for a night's hospitality from the monks. Iis son's condition, who was almost dying with the fatigue of the long march, had the better of his pride, and Columbus knocked at the door of the monastery. The monks gave a friendly greeting to the man pale with hunger and fatigue and to the delicate and worn-out son. When both had been revived with food and rest, 4

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CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 5 the Father Superior questioned them upon the object of their voyage. Columbus told his story, and was listened to attentively by the Superior, who was struck by his language and the magnitude of his ideas. Thereupon he called in his two friends, one, Ilernandez, a learned doctor in medicine, and the other, Valazco, an intrepid and wise sailor. It was thus, in a small room of the monastery of La Rabida, that Columbus explained his plans to those learned men. When lie got through with his demonstration, Superior P6rez exclaimed with enthusiasm: Your project will be realized, and Spain will share with you the honor and glory of this great enterprise !'' It was then decided that Columbus should go to the Court of King Ferdinand, with a letter of recomnmendation to the father-confessor of the Queen. At that epoch the King with his spouse, Dona Isabella, was in the camp before the city of Granada, where the Moors were intrenched in this their last foothold in Spain after an occupation of seven hundred years. The fatherconfessor, who was a friend of Superior Perez, listened with interest to Coumbus' plans; however, he could do no better than to advise him to be patient. Once the war ended, there would be some favorable chances to win the sovereigns to his project. Once more, the poor and weak had to wait for the rich and powerful. Weak and discouraged lie visited several states, and finally he had made up his mind to leave for France, where lie had had promises of ships, when Superior

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CUBA ILLUSTRATED. Perez decided to make a last effort. Ile saddled his mule and went to the camp in order to speak in person to the Queen, who was at last persuaded. Columbus was called to the court, at the very time, thanks to good fortune, the war was ending. Boabdil, the last King of the Moors had to leave the beautiful castle of Alhambra, and with broken heart had to surrender to the victors the keys of Granada. The Sovereigns where now in a position to grant Columbus the necessary had for consequence to the audacious mariner King and Queen. Ile iu thusiasm. The Queen Columbus intended to the King, who was of a accept the propositions o Admiral and Vice-Roy means for give him seeked an folded hi was under preach th suspicious f Colnmbr of the con the enterprise. This renewed energy, and audience from the s plans with great enthe impression that. e christian faith; but character, refused to is. You want to be ntries you discover," said the King angrily, to this, assuredly, I shall never consent." however, Columbus was inflexible in his just demands, and again left court with the intention of going to France. But the Queen who had finally succeeded to overcome the objections of her spouse prevented Columbus' departure. And at last the sun of good fortune shone radiantly upon the man who had passed through the bitter experience of a life of incessant disappointments. Ferdinand acceeded to all the demands of Columbus, and the Queen assuaged his paternal anxiety regarding fi

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CUBA ILLUSTRATED. his son, which lie had to leave in Spain, by assuring him that she would create him a page in the suite of her own son. "I shall do all in my power to help you in this great undertaking," said the Queen, and I will sell my jewels in order to equip the ships you need It was on the 3d of August, 1492, that this extraordinary man sailed from the port of Palos with his small crafts, and directed the little squadron towards unknown lands. Columbus had waited eighteen years for this propitious event, sorrow and misery had already whitened his hair, but his energy and faith were still unshaken, while his heart was full of hope. le sailed upon the caravel Santa J1aria, while the Nifta and Pinta were respectively commanded by the brothers Piuzon. When they had lost sight of the Canary islands, surrounded by the immensity of the Atlantic ocean, the enthusiasm of the sailors was somewhat dampened. A whole month had already passed, and the caravels were still in the midst of the ocean without the least sign of land. It was at that period of the voyage that his companions began to murmur, and wanted Columbus to return to Spain. It was with humility that the Admiral prayed his rebellions companions to have patience, and exhorted them to perseverance. Follow me a little while longer," said Columbus, and we shall reach the end of our jour"ney. Remember that plants from an unknown clime "as well as corpses of a strange race have been carried by the waves upon the shores of the Canary islands; "consequently, there must exist in the West, which 7

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---s THE TH]REE CARAVELS OF COlUMBUS.

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CUBA ILLUSTRATED. "is the course we follow, a land yet unknown to us. Learned men, among them Martino de Behain, of Nur" emberg, and the Italian Toscanelli, are of opinion that in following a western course, unknown lands must be discovered." Very well," answered the sailors, we shall follow thee for a few days longer; but if after that respite the desired land is not reached, we shall exact from thee to return to Spain." A few days passed away, and notwithstanding that Columbus was fully convinced the little squadron was nearing land, no sign of it was yet perceptible, and despair was hourly on the increase among the crews. However, Columbus remained undaunted and firm as the rock before his mutinous companions. The evening of the 11th of October was already clad in darkness, and the Admiral, who had consulted his maps all day, was then pacing the deck iln a pensive mood and scrutinizing the horizon with anxiety. While thus engaged lie saw a light which appeared and disappeared at intervals. Columbus communicated his discovery to two of his sailors, who also perceived the light, but did not attach aily great importance to the fact. This luminous apparition, however, filled the Admiral with new hopes ; again concentrating his sight in the direction where the light had shone, his heart palpitated with stronger energy. Ile thought the morrow might reveal the land so much desired. Wakeful nights had exhausted his strength, and towards morning lie sue9

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CUBA ILLUSTRATED. cuinbed to sleep. It was then that the goddess of his youth again appeared to him in his slumber. The beautiful fairy, crowned with exotic flowers as of yore, bent towards him, and while touching his forehead, exclaimed Thy golden and ideal dream, which thou hast pursued over the deep sea is at last realized. Thou art near the New World At that very instant, the first rays of the rising sun were reflected upon the water, and the cry of Land! Land was heard. The happy tiding came from the Pinta, from whose deck the sailor Rodrigo de Triana had first seen the land. As if blinded by lightening, Columbus awoke from his sleep. There could not be any illusion about the discovery, for before him could be seen a beautiful green isle. .The naked eye could already distinguish clusters of trees as well as human beings of a dark color. Later on, birds with brilliant plumage were flying and singing over the decks of the caravels, as if to bid Welcome" to the visitors of the New World. Columbus fell upon his knees to thank the Almighty, while his sailors pressed around him to beg his pardon for their incredulity. A short time afterwards, Columbus ordered the anchors to be thrown and the boats lowered. Dressed in his costume of Admiral, he stepped on the first boat, and in a few minutes he landed with his men upon the shore, which presented an admirable spectable on account of the beautiful plants which covered it in abundance. When he landed, Columbus planted the Spanish flag, thus taking possession of the newly discovered land1Q

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CUBA ILLUSTRATED. which lie named San Salvador, and later on Gn anahani in the names of his sovereigns. His companions, who had immediately followed him on shore, kissed the earth and cried with joy. They erected a cross as a sign that the christian faith was to be preached to the human beings who inhabitated this strange land. The Indians, who were of a copper color, with a mild pliysionomy and beautiful eyes, at first were timid and kept at a distance, while admiring apparently the white mi1, whom they saw for the first time. (iradually they lost their shyness and came nearer the Spaniards. Columbus received them with great amiableness, and ordered his companions to treat them with equal consideration. In this manner, pleasant relations were established between the Indians and the Spaniards, and the sojourn of the worn-out sailors in the enchanted island was thus made agreeable while resting from the fatigue of a long sea voyage. however, with Columbus' insatiable activity, their rest was of short duration. Shortly after this first landing, they set sail again on their mission of discovery. At the expiration of two months they had landed in several islands, and visited various savage tribes. Columbus was yet of the opinion that those islands formed part of the group of India. Having discovered them while sailing West, he called them the West Indies, a designation which they have borne to these days. At Christmas of the year 1492, the expedition met with a great misfortune. At sundown, after having II

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CUBA ILtTs'r'IRATED. given the pilot his instructions and recommended him great carefulness, Columbus went to his cabin to take a much needed rest. The pilot disobeyed the precise orders of the Admiral, and the consequence was the loss of the caravel Santa Maria, who struck the rocks near the island of Cuba. In this circumstance, the presence of mind and the coolness of Columbus were remarkable ; it was due to him that the lives of the whole crew were saved, but the caravel was a total wreck. It was after this accident that Columbus, with a few of his companions -the majority remaining in the New World-sailed back to Spain in the AYisa. The return trip was full of hardships ; heavy weather prevailed most of the time. Notwithstanding, they finally arrived safely in Spain, and on the 4th of March landed at the port of Palos, which had seen, seven months previously, the departure of the expedition amidst the mockeries of many. The contrast between the reception and departure could not have been greater ; for the ovation granted Columbus could not have been more enthusiastic. The Indians which the Admiral had taken along with him on his return trip to Europe had the effect of creating considerable curiosity. Their copper color, and their queerly painted face, the earrings which ornamented their nose and ears had the effect of astonishing the spectators. Following the Indians were men carrying birds of variegated plumage ; these in turn were followed by sailors leading animals which had never been seen before in Europe, while others disembarked with rare plants from 12

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CUBA ILLUSTR'ATED. 13 the New World. This part of the procession was closed by other sailors carrying large vases with rings of gold, which had been secured from the Indians in exchange for some trinkets. The profusion of the objects thus landed, gave an adequate idea of the richness of the foreign land just discovered. Then came Christopher Columbus seated upon a magnificent steed. IIis stately and imposing bearing; the softness of his great blue eyes, into which determination was plainly readable, made of the famous discoverer a picture of intrepidity allied to greatness. Like a victorious king, he was worthy of being seen ; and like a victorious king lie was acclaimed. Ferdinand and Isabella had a platform erected in one of the squares of Barcelona. It was there, seated upon a throne richly ornamented, that they awaited the arrival of the courageous sailor. On his coming before the throne, the monarchs rose and came forward to meet him. Columbus made a movement as if to kneel, but lie was prevented from doing so, and the sovereigns invited him to a seat at their side. This was a most extraordinary distinction, unknown to the etiquette of the Spanish court. Columbus began by recounting the various incidents of his voyage. He was listened to with great interest by all, as he enumerated the great advantages the King and Spain would derive from the imm ense natural resources of the countries lie had discovered. All knelt, and with tears of joy, began to sing a hymn of thanks to the Almighty, who had chosen Columbus as

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CUBA ILLUSTRATED. the worthy instrument for the accomplishment of so great deeds. Thereafter, King Ferdinand reaffirmed Columbus' privileges to the twelfth portion of all royal rights ; he also conferred upon him and his descendants the perpetual title of Admiral for West Indies ; lie granted him an escutcheon bearing the royal arms of Castille and Leon with this inscription : For Castille and Leon, Columbus discovered a New World !" While the honors thus bestowed on Columbus were of a nature to gratify the pride of the mariner, he experienced great satisfaction on the other hand in finding that his son Diego had made marked progress both physically and mentally, and promised to be an object of just pride to his family. In the meantime, the good fortune of Columbus began to excite envy among the courtiers, they were intriguing to deprive him of his laurels. At a grand feast, given by the High Cardinal of Spain in honor of Colombus, some of the courtiers-secretly at first, but openly later on-began to make sport of the distinctions and honors showered upon the Admiral. "What has lie accomplished that is so very marvelous?'' said one of them, "if the King had given me the necessary ships with the same equipment, I could have discovered the New Woidd easy enough " Same with me Same with me exclaimed the other envious courtiers. Columbus remained quiet under these jealous taunts, and gave the order to a domestic to bring him an egg. 14

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CUBA ILLUSTRATED. When the domestic had brought him the desired article, lie said with great coolness: Who, among of you, gentlemen, can make this egg stand upon one of its ends ? The courtiers, one after the other, tried the experiment unsuccessfully. Then Columbus took the egg, and by a gentle knock depressed one of its extremeties so as to make it stand upright, and in this manner solved the problem apparently so difficult. Undaunted, the courtiers exclaimed :' But this we also can do " Undoubtedly, gentlemen !" answered Columbus, but not before I showed you how to go to work at it. The same thing with the discovery of the New World; you know now how to proceed since I have shown you how it was done CoLUMBus' SECOND EXPEDITION. On the 25th of September, 1493, Columbus set sails on his second expedition to what is now known as the West Indies. howsoever brilliant and enthusiastic the reception that greeted Columbus at Barcelona on his return in the sunny resplendence of the spring of the year, the occasion of his second departure was made no less brilliant and enthusiastic, although it took place under an autumnal sun. On this occasion the vessels did not leave from the little port of Palos, but from the grand bay of Cadiz. The expedition, as formerly, was not restricted to but three caravels; on the contrary, the Vice-Roy was 15

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CUBA ILLUSTRATE). at the head of a majestic fleet, fully equipped in order to strenghten the colonies already established and enable its commander to proceed to new discoveries. The approaches to the port were crowded by the multitude that had come from all quarters. The speetacle presented by the variety of costumes of this great affluence was not less remarkable than the diversity of the contingent that forced its way through it to reach the vessels upon which they were assigned. Here could be seen a scion of a noble family, dressed in his most brilliant costume, windinghis way through the great and cheering crowd, while a little further back, priests and monks, with ascetic faces and austere mien, wrapped in the sombre vestments of their orders, were no less anxious to reach the deck of their respective ships. Then last, caine Columbus. All eyes were set upon this hero of great physical stature, who, accompanied by his son Diego, trended his way to the shore amidst the acclamations of the multitude. At last father and son parted ; the latter to resume his functions at the court, the former to give the signal of departure for new perils and privations, more discoveries and glory. In the course of this expedition, and of several others undertaken by Colhnbus, he discovered many more islands and founded numerous colonies. At last, entering the mouth of the Orinoco, he discovered the mainland of the. new continent. The glory of this discovery is due to him ; but lie was shorn of the so well-earned honor of giving his name to the New World. This 16

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CUBA ILLUSTRATED. honor was bestowed upon an Italian named Americo Vespucci, who had explored the regions of Brazil. The last years of Columbus were years of bitter suffering and great affliction. Death was already claiming this noble heart, who was bleeding at the spoliations to which the peaceable indigenous inhabitants of America were the victims on the part of the Spaniards. In their anxiety to accumulate gold, the Spaniards were forgetting they were dealing with human beings like themselves; consequently, the poor Indians were treated with the utmost cruelty when they manifested the least reluctance in parting with their riches. Even the priests, who had been specially sent to the West Indies to evangelize the aborigenes, behaved in the most rapacious manner. Far from preaching the religion of peace and good-will, they would resort to extreme measures of physical coercion to force the natives to receive the baptismal rites. Discontentnent was on the increase. Repeated uprisings were the natural consequences of proceedings so unfair and ItinUman. Columbus suffered greatly because of so shameful conduct on the part of his companions. The very nobleness of his heart made him the natural protector of the persecuted. Ile punished the offenders severely, and without distinction. Birth or position could not shield the culprit or prevent Columbus from exercising impartially the attributes of justice. Tfhis had for effect to exasperate the rapacious nobles and the cruel priests. They conspired together and resolved the ruin of Columbus by all possible means. It was with this object in view that they secretly dispatched a vessel to Spain, with an 17

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IS CUBA IrLLsTRATKI). emissary on board who had the mission of profiering before the King charges against Colmibus. Ferdinand, who had only as a last resort granted Columbus a twelfth of the royal rights upon the new domains, was rather well disposed to lend credence to the infamous charges made against his Vice-Roy. Ile ordered a hidalgo by the name of Bobadilla-a man known for his unsernpilousness-to sail for the West Indies, with the special mission of bringing ColumbUs back to Europe. This miserable instrument of a cowardly conspiracy accepted the mission with alacrity and discharged it with infamy. Once in West Indies, lie ordered the great navigator to be placed in irons, and had him conveyed to the ship like a common malefactor. What a fall for a man who so recently had had the greatest honors bestowed upon him ; what humiliation for so illustrious a personage to be treated so contemptuously at a sudden. The thought that he was innocent and the victim of envy, and the consciousness of having discharged his duties with impartiality, sustained him ill this great affliction. The conduct of captain Andres Martin, to whom had been entrusted the conmnand of the ship tIhat brought Columbus back to Europe, was of great contrast with that of the miserable Bobadilla. The moment lie raised anchor in the port of Santo I)oimingo, lie approached the noble prisoner with great respect, and asked him to give him his hands in order to free him from the chains that were cutting his flesh.

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CUBA ILLUS'A'rE. 1 I thank you for your offer," answered Columbus, the King has sent me word in writing to submit to all the orders of Ilobadilla ; I will carry these chains until Ferdinand relieves me of them, and even until death if I should be called away sooner. They will bear testimuony of Spain's ingratitude, and of the manner she rewards the services of a man she recently raised so proeminently." When the vessel reached the port of Cadiz, Columbus was conveyed to the shore like a conunon criminal. The indignation of the people, who held Columbus in great esteem, knew no bounds. Every Spaniard, imbued with a sentiment of justice, felt for the noble man's ill-treatment, anreand murmurs of anger could be heard against the Regent who had allowed the consummation of so shamefill an action. Universal discontent and the influence of the Queen, who had never (eased to befriend the illustrious Admiral, finally convinced Ferdinand that he lmd been guilty of a great injustice. A letter of Columbus written to their Majesties, and in which he passed in review the accusations made against him, and where he exposed the malice and hatred of Hobadilla, dispelled all the doubts the Queen might have still entertained, and decided Ferdinand to immediately sumnnon Columbus to Granada. Omi his arrival, the Queen, with tears in her eyes, gave him her hand to kiss. For the first time the great Admiral, worned and demoralized, lost his nerve and presence of mind. Ile fell, crying, at the feet of Queen Isabella, and allowed her to take off his chains. 19

PAGE 34

CUBA ILLUSTRATED. &k 2* -r tt tri HB N H TI --r TH COUMU TAY TI H AHDA FHVN 20

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CUBA ILLUSTRATED. At all hazards it seemed as if Columbus was on the way to be reinstated in the King's favor ; however, the appearances proved false, for his star was on the decline, and doomed to disappear altogether in a very short time. King Ferdinand was unrelenting in his annoyances of every description, and at the death of the noble and generous Isabella the Catholic, the discoverer of a continent, the man who had been the instrument of refilling the coffers of the crown and create a hallow of glory around the Spanish name, was shorn of all his rights and despoiled of most all his property. Ingratitude, bitter sufferings and abject privations were his lot. On the 21st of May, 1508, at the age of 70 years, he died of a broken heart, while uttering these last words : Father, I place my soul in thy hands There is something strange in the fact that the remains of a man whose career had been so agitated, and who had known no repose in his life of adventurous travels, found a last resting place only many years after his death. At first his body was buried in Valladolid, the city where he died. Thence in Seville, from which place, in 1536, it was transferred to Santo Domingo. When this island passed into the hands of France, his ashes were transferred to Havana, in the island of Cuba, where they are now interred, side by side, with those of his son Diego, to whom, as a tardy reparation for the injury done his father, was granted a dukedom with vast estates. Fernando, second son of Columbus by his marriage 21

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ti -TCHE CATHEDRAL OF HAVA A.

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CUBA I ELUslUATE]. 23 to it Spanish lady, is buried in the cathedral of Seville. The chains with which Columbus was shackled were, according to his desires, buried with him. Tourists who visit Cuba will see, at the peristyle of the cathedral of Havana, the new monument which has been erected to Columbus on the occasion of the 400th anniversary of the discovery of America, and where his ashes are definitively laid. Four hundred years have passed since Columbus discovered the American continent. Monuments in his honor have been erected in all parts of the world, and the people of the United States, the foremost nation of the New World, have held the grandest exposition yet known in commemoration of the grandest discovery yet made. These marks of honor, this era of general thankfulness towards a man like Columbus, whose chief characteristics were exalted perseverance and brilliant daring, toned down by nobleness of heart, are the natural tribute the whole human race owe this really great man.

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xvaI 3IHJ O.T. i7 21T-Vr il'VVA.XI H TTSV9P; CYHflIO S .r

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CUBA. T iIE finest and largest of the West India islands, was discovered by Columbus, on the 28th day of October, 1492, and was named by him Jnana, in honor of Prince John, the son of Ferdinand and Isabella, the sovereigns of Aragon and Castille. Upon the death of FAerdinand, the island was called Fernandina, receiving afterwards the name of Santiago, as a mark of reverence for the patron saint of Spain ; and still later, the inhabitants -to illustrate their piety -gave it that of Ave Maria, in honor of the Holy Virgin. Cuba extends from Cape Maizi, on the East, to Cape St. Antonio, on the West, in a curved line of 790 miles. It lies between 19" and 23 north latitude, and 740 and 851 west Iongitude. It is 117 miles wide in the broadest part, from Cape Maternillos on the north, to the western point of Mota Cove, on the south, 21 miles east of Cape Cruz. The narrowest part of the island is 22 miles, from the mouth of Bahia del Mariel on the north to the Cove Mavana on the south. From Havana to Iatabano, it is 28 miles; near the centre of the island, the breadth, north and south, is about 75 miles. The periphery of the island, following a line less tortuous, and cutting the hays, ports and coves at their mouth, is 1,719 miles, of which 816 are on the north and 903 on the south. Its

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CU [BA LUSTER ATEI. area is about 5.5,000 slnare miles ; and taking into the estimate the adjacent islands or it is 64,000 square miles. The eeedingly irregular, resembli o crescent, the convex portion of Arctic pole. 11er situation in nearly from east by south to we the most westerly of the West western part is adVantg eosly s the Gulf of Mexico, leaving two keys form th liIt whic rega st b Indi ituatc spaci whiell belong to of the island is of a long, nary h looks toward rd to said pole y northwest. It a Islands, and ed at the month ous entrances ; it, exow the is is lei1 of the one of the northwest, 124 miles wide, betwee n Plint THiacos, the most northerly of the island, aid Point Tancha, or Cape Sable, the most southerly of East Florida. The other entrance into the (ulf to the southwest, is 97 nlelos iin its narrm-est part, between Cape St. Antonio de Cuba and Cipe Catoeiie, the most salient extremity of the Peninsula of Yucatan ; from Cape Mola, or St. Nicholas, in the Island of St. Domingo, the eastern extremity of Cuba, or Malizi Point, is separated by a channel 42 miles wide. From Maizi to Great Enagua, the nearest of the Lucayas, or Lahana Islands, the distance northeast is 45 miles. From Point Lu erecia, in Cuba, the most easterly point of the great banks of Bahama, is the old Bahama channel, called St. Domingo's Key, 34 miles. From Plmta del Ingl6s, on the south of Cuba, to the nearest point of the northern coast of Jamaica, the distance is 75 miles. Cuha contains the following ports, oil the north, viz.: Guadiana, IBahuia Honda, Cabanas, Mariel, I abana, Cogimar, Pacuraln,, Juearo, Matatzas, Cirdenas, Sagna la 26

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CUBA 97USTI.r1n. (rande, San Jun de los Remedios, G anaja. Nnevitas,* Nuevas (randes, Manati, Puerto del Padre, Puerto del Mangle, Ji1ara, Jururn, Barii, Vita, Nanijo, Salima uanes, Nipe, Lebisa, Cabonico, Tanamo, Ceol las, Zaguaneque, Zaragna, Taco, Cuyag uaiieque, Navas, AMaravi, l3aracoat and Mata. On the south : Batiqueri, Cienfuegos, Puerto Escondido, Guantanamo, Santiago de Cuba, Mota, Manzanillo, Santa Cruz, Vertientes, Masio, Casilda, Samgia, Ensenada de Cortes and Ensenada de Coehinos. CLIMA TE. The climate of the Island is of the pleasantest, both in the spring and winter; in the latter season prevails what is called la seea, or dry weather. The rainy season begins in May and continues until November. The an11exed tables, based upon the Fahrenheit thermometer, illustrate the almost even temperature of Cuba MEAN TEMPERATURE. Degrees. Mean temperature of the year at Havana and the northern part, near the sea, ........77 Mean temperature at Havana, the warmest month, .S2 Mean temperature the Coldest month. ......70 Nuevitas was the first place on the island visited by Columbus, October 28th, 1492. f Baracoa was the first town built on the island by the Spaniards, under Diego Velazquez, in the year 1511, and until 1522 was reckoned as the capital. 27

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CUBA ILLUSTRATED. Degrees. Mean temperature in the interior for the year, where the land rises from 0o to 1,050 feet above the level of the sea, ..........74 Mean temperature in the coldest month, .62 for the year at Santiago de Cuba, 80 for the warmest month, ...84 for the coldest month, ....64 EXT REIE TEM PERATURE. At Havana it is cold when .........0) The coldest is about ...........45 The warmest day seldom above .......95 At all tunes a pleasant breeze prevails. SOIL. The soil of the island may be said to rest almost generally on a great mass of calcareous rock of a porous and diversified character (,Sorcos or Jlia ra). Near the middle of the northern coast, a slaty formation is to be found, on which the caleareous rock seems to rest. POPULATION AND FERTILITY OF TEEi SOIL. According to the last official census, the population of Cuba is 1,521,684-the census of 1866 gave 1,359,238, which shows an increase during a period of 26 years of 162,446 inhabitants. The Island of Cuba is about six times larger than Jamaica Island, of which the English are so proud. Only one-sixth of the Island of Cuba is under cultivation, and there is now in full operation-

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I I A TOBACCO PLANTATION C-. b r -4

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CUBA JLSTRA'rEn. 1,200 sugar plantations, 5,000 tobacco 160 coffee 25 cocoa 5,000 breeding farms, 17,000 small farms, 95,000 stores, workshops, factories and warehouses. As to the fertility of the soil in Cuba, little can be said which may be new-it being so well known that it is almost proverbial. An area of 65,000 square miles, eiiivalent to nearly 34,560,000 acres, the greater part of which is of the first quality for cultivation, and a great portion of which still remains uncultivated, are circumstances which offer an industrious emigrant a vast field to exert his efforts in, with the prospect of a very brilliant reward. Immense forests of precious woods are to be found in the Island, whose products enter into the finest art gems of the cabinet-makers of New York, Paris and London. The principal products are sugar, tobacco, coffee, cocoa, corn, rice, ylea, yame, sweet potatoes, potatoes, vanilla, etc. Exquisite fruits, as the pine-apple, oranges, sapodillo, anon, cocoanut, caimitos, berries, gaanbana (the strawberry of the Antilles), naney, guava, bananas, maraflbn, etc. The situation of Cuba, comnalding the entrance of the Gulf of Mexico and the communication between North and South America, gives it a high commercial and political importance. Indeed, such designations as The Queen of the Antilles," The Key of the Gulf," 30

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CUBA ILUsRA'TED. The Sentinel of the Mississippi," The Beautiful Antille," "The Gem of the American Seas," indiscriminately bestowed upon this enchauting island, are sufficiently significant of its advantageous commercial position and its remarkable natural beauty and fertility. GOVERNMENT. Politicallv the island is composed of a single Provinee under the control of a Superior Governor, who is at the same time Captain-General. It is subdivided into four political governments (gobierno'l politico) or Lieutenancies, which are further divided into Gobwernos and Captaincies. There are thirty-one political districts, each of which has an Auntamwn to or Town Council at the head of affairs. The military divisions likewise include the whole island, and constitutes a Captaincy-General. It is divided into two departiments, with IIavana for its capital in the west, and Santiago in the east ; the former under the command of the Captain-General, the latter under the Governor of Cnba. Each department consists of milita ry districts (gobirno~s) and districts of arms. RELIG ION. The Roman ('atholic is the religion of the country, and the ecclesiastical government consists of the Archbishopric of Cuba and the Bishopric of IIavana-the two dioceses being separated as above. Other rites are also tolerated. The house situated in Dragones and Zulueta Streets, 31

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~-<~~r ~ BIRD'S-EYE VIEW OF HAVANA. i t Ss

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Cl BA ILLUSTRATED. fronting the Irijoa Theatre, has been recently purchased for a place of worship by the Baptists of Havana. Americans and all foreigners are cordially invited to attend the religions services which are held on Sundays, in English, at 11.30 A. m., and in Spanish at 7.20 P. M. MARITIME DEPARTMENT. The maritime division comprises five Provinces: havana, Trinidad, San Juan de los Remedios, Nuevitas and Cuba ; the whole under a General Commander. The public domain and public works are controlled by a General Superintendent. As Cuba is the most important of the Spanish colonies, its Captain-General can not be of a lower rank than a lieutenant-general in the army, and the post is one of great power. A TRIP TO HAVANA. Tourists desiring to escape the rigors of a northern winter, pleasure-seekers who wish to enjoy a mild and delicious climate, will surely be satisfied by going to Cuba. Every year the number of tourists increases from all parts of the United States, and if you meet in your travels southward some one coming from the Queen of the Antilles-which lies in the South Sea 80 miles from the United States (Key West) -you will surely feel anxious to enjoy the charms of its climate. By enumerating the principal points of interest in the island, the compiler will have accomplished his duty.. While leaving to every one its own appreciation of that 33

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CIB ILLUSTRATED. delightful country, whose scenery is so rich and varied, allow me to indicate the different ways to reach Havana from New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Washington, New Orleans and Chicaoo, by the different lines of steamers and railroads. FRoM NEW YORK. The palatial steamers of the Ward's Line, 113 Wall Street, New York, leave on Wednesdays for Ilavana, and every Saturday for Havana and Vera Crnz, at 3 r. m. for Cienfuegos, calling at Nassau, twice a month, from Piers 1 and 17, East River. The distance bI y sea from New York to Havana is 1,200 miles, and the trip is gererally made by these steamers in 4'; days. The Spanish steamers of the Spanish Transatlalti( Line," J. Al. Ceballos & Co., Agents, No. 81) Wall Street leave every ten days for Havana, from Pier 21, North River. These steamers have first-class passenger accommodations, European table-wine included. The Mallory Line, Pier 20, East river, New York, in addition to the service between New York to Fernandina, makes semi-weekly trips to Galveston, Texas; steamers leaving on Saturday stop at ey West, Florida ; the time between New York and Key West is but 3> days, and connection is made there for Tampa and all parts of South Florida, as well as for Havana, Cuba. This is a most convenient and cheap route to southern Florida, or to the West Indies ; these beautiful steamers are of great speed, and have first-class accommodations for passengers. 34

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CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 35 The Clyde's New York, Charleston and Florida Steamship Line ; the elegant steamers of this line are advertised to sail from Pier 29, East River, New York, every Tuesday and Friday at 3 P. M. Tuesday's ships stops at Fernandina, and Friday's ships at Jacksonville. Passengers' accommodations by this line are unsurpassed. Theo. G. Eger, Traffic Manager, 35 Broadway, New York. The Ocean Steamship Company, Pier 35, North River, New York. The palace steamers of this line connect with the Savannah, Florida and Western Railway (Way Cross Short Line), and offer to tourists attractions surpassed by no other line. FROM BOSTON. Via New York by the New York, New Haven and IIarlem Railroad to New York, and from New York by the Pennsylvania Railroad to Port Tampa (via Atlantic Coast Line). Also by the beautiful palace steamers of the Vall River Line which leave daily. FROM PHILADELPHIA. By the Pennsylvania Railroad to Port Tampa (via Atlantic Coast Line). FROM WASHINGTON. Pennsylvania Railroad and Atlantic Coast Line to Port Tampa. FROM NEW ORLEANS. Steamship Line steamers leave New Morgan Mail

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CUBA r sLrRATED. Orleans every Thursday to Havana direct. And also by the Southern Pacific Railroad ("Sun Set route) to Jacksonville, Sanford and Port Tampa, connecting with the Plant Steamship Line. FROM CHICAGO. Jy the Pennsylvania Railroad to Savannah via Atlantic Coast Line, thence to Jacksonville by the Savannah, Florida and Western Railroad, thence to Sanford by the Jacksonville, Tampa and Key West Railway ; from Sanford to Port Tampa by the South Florida Railroad, and thence to Havana by the beautiful steamships Oliceite and 31(ascotte, of the Plant Steamship Line. As the steamers of the Plant Line stop at Key West, the most important city of Florida, a description of this city will be interesting to Americans. KEY WEST. Key West is an island with 20,000 inhabitants, and celebrated for its manufactures of cigars made with Havana tobacco ; next to Jacksonville she is the largest city in Florida. It is situated upon the island of the same name, off the southern extremity of the peninsula, and lying in the important part of the key facing the Gulf of Mexico. The island is about 6 miles long by 3 miles wide, and is 11 feet above the sea level. The temperature in the winter is delightful, the air is pure, and the climate healthy; the thermometer at mean temperature in the winter is about 701 and in the summer seldom 36

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CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 37 rises above 9w-. The public buildings are: the CustomIhUse, Naval Stores, Marine Hospital, County CourtHouse, County Jail, a Masonic Hall and an Opera House. A monument of dark-gray granite, erected in 1866 to the memory of the sailors and soldiers who died in service at this station during the civil war, is near the Naval Stores. The city contains Episcopal, Baptist, Methodist and Roman Catholic churches. Outside the manufacturing of cigars, the principal industries of Key West are turtling, diving for sponges and fishing for the Cuban Market. The drives are charming, and the fishing and boating unsurpassed. Seven miles of railroad are now ru daily by 14 cars. Key West claims the greatest permanent population of any city in Florida, and is the richest city of its size in this country. It is in importance the ninth port of entry in the United States, and the third naval strategic point. The city alone pays more import duty and internal revenue tax than all the rest of the State of Florida, and the vast States of Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi combined. The island enjoys several modern improvements: it is lighted by gas; it counts one of the finest fire departments in the State, under the command of Mr. B. F. H. Bowers, consisting of four first-class latest improved fire engines, one large hook-and-ladder truck, and four firstclass hose-carriages. Three handsome Methodist churches and a Cuban Mission chapel ; Episcopal, Baptist, Presbyterian and Catholic churches, one colored Baptist, two public schools, and several private schools, all under

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'H U __fr ST. MARY'S CONVENT FOR YOUNG LADIES, KEY WEST, FLA,

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CUBA LLusrRATED. excellent management with large attendance. Besides these there is the finest Catholic convent to be found in the State, with pupils from nearly every State and foreign countries. This institution is under the direction of the Sisters of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Maria. The convent is advantageously situated on the south beach of the island. The various (14) students' rooms are perfectly ventilated and well provided with modern school furniture; they all connect together, and when the partitions are thrown open the sight of 400 female students is charming. The curriculum embraces a thorough English education, the Latin, French and Spanish languages, drawing, painting and needlework. A visit to this institution will well repay tourists on their way to havana. From Kev West to Havana the distance is about 90 miles. The steamer leaves Key West in the evening and arrives at Havana early in the morning. ENTRANCE TO THE BAY OF HAVANA. When nearing Morro Castle, a pilot comes aboard the steamer, and soon after it is visited by two government boats, having on board the Custom-House and the Board of health officials, who alone are authorized to give a landing permit. The general aspect of the bay is wonderful ; at the left rises the fort of Morro Castle and the heights of La Cabana surmounted with flags ; at the right is Fort La Punta. The port is full of steamships of every nationality and of all tonnage. The bay is three miles in circumference, and is one of the finest in the 39

PAGE 54

0A ( f 4--f ;t. ..'{yal y4 84$ 1 at 3P~q". s'.: M PARLOR IN THE PALACE OF THE CAPTAIN-GIEN ERAL, HAVANA.

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CUBA ILJ"'T A'ED. world. Steamers anchor at their respective buoys. (No ship except Spanish vessels or steamers of the Spanish Transatlantic Line are allowed to dock.) Immediately upon their arrival they are surrounded by small boats with hotel agents, who clamor for the privilege of taking tourists ashore. The health authorities having accolnplished their work, you have then the Cu stom-House officers to please. Agents, interpreters for the hotels, will take passengers and baggage in charge, have boats ready to land and have baggage registered at the Customhonse. Expenses of landing and going to the hotel, including boat, carriage and express are 1.50gold and upward, according to the number of pieces of baggage; the best way is to put yourself in the hands of the interpreters or agents of the hotels, who are reported to be the most reliable in the world, according to the statement of experienced tourists. You may find it a good way in Ilavana to live on the European plan; that is, room in one place and take your meals at the restaurants, which are the best in the world. It is well to have an understanding beforehand in order to avoid recriminations. HAVANA. The city of Havana, advantageously situated, is built upon a tongue of land, the head of which is protected by the fort of Morro Castle and the heights of La Cabana. The entrance to the port is protected: on one side by the fort of Santos Reyes del Morro, garrisoned by 800 4t

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A FASHIONABLE STORE IN ITAVANA. ly I 'iu u lo-s 7 X16 ail t t li li W, II I' 11111, !! ln+ Y4 :; 2 YIP

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CUBNk ILLUSTRATED. soldiers, and an apparent battery, that of the Doce Apostoles, built at the level of the water, which gives shelter to the garrison ; on the other side by fort La Punta. At the southeast of the Morro, rising above the city, is the fortress of San Carlos de la Cabana, which can shelter 4,000 men. The batteries of La Cabana and La Pastora are built at water level, as the Twelve Apostles, and armed with 245 guns. On the east, about one mile, is Fort No. 4, and on the southeast, about 4 miles, is the Tower of Cogimar. Both the fires of Alorro and La Cabana on the one side, and of the fort of Principe and Santo Domingo de Atar6s on the other, are designed to put the city in ashes in a few hours, while the lower batteries of La Pastora and the Twelve Apostles command the sea. Besides these forts and batteries there are other important fortifications, among them the fort of San Nazario, the bulwark De la Plaza, the Santa Clara battery, the fort of La Chorrera and the Tower of Banes, representing in all about 650 guns. These fortifications have entailed the outlay of considerable sums of money. The population of Havana is about 250,000 inhabitants; it is one of the finest and most important cities in the West India and South America, and is essentially cosmopolitan. Tourists will notice the carriages, entirely different from those seen in the United States ; a few thousands of small victorias circulate in the streets of the ancient city for very low fares ; some of them are very comfortable; the horses are about half the size of American horses, and according to an American writer: "Wonderful because they never fall down in the streets and 43

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Lt -, 'd THE PRADO WITH THE MORRO CASTLE IN THE DISTANCE.

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CEUBA ILUsRATED. 45 never get tired." Driving through the city and passing the narrow streets of the old town, one will enjoy the sight of the stores with their employees, in shirt-sleeves behind the counters, smoking cigarettes in very good humor, and ready to show fine imported goods and curiosities. If you have never been in Spain, you may realize yourself to be there while in Havana, because Cuba represents Spain in many of its different characteristics. The picturesque aspect of the city, which is a vast museum of curiosities, excite your attention at every moment. The principal street for shopping is Calle del Obispo, or Bishop Street, where I recommend tourists to visit the stores La iabana, Las Ninfas, La Granada, first-class stores for dry goods and silks ; La Especial and La Complaciente, fan stores ; El Novator, tailors and fancy articles ; Wilson's American book store ; La Carolina, great depot for cigars and cigarettes. Oreilly Street, parallel with Obispo, is the street of the photographersthe most fashionable gallery is that of S. A. Corner. In Muralla or Ricla Street, parallel with Obispo Street, are the wholesale houses. By showing this Guide at any store or business house advertised in it, tourists will be attentively waited upon, and will obtain the lowest prices for their purchases. EL PRADO. With its walk of two miles in length, lined with Indian laurel trees and evergreen on each side, the Prado is enchanting at night.

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46INDIAN FOUNTAIN-PILA ('UIA ILT ~R1 TM). V 7 kk. DE LA INDIA.

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CUBA ILLUSTRATE. From the fountain of La India, as the illustration shows, to La Punta (entrance of the bay), the walk is very pleasant ; going down the Prado is to be found, on the right side, the beautiful hIotel Pasaje, and the greatly renovated Payret Theatre ; while on the left is the beautifal Tacon Theatre. In the centre of the Paseo is the celebrated Central Park, with the beautiful marble statue of Isabel Seguiida, an artistic work of the great sculptor Vega. The military band plays almost every other evening in the Park. The general aspect at night is wonderful ; the park, crowded with agreeable and pleasant people who enjoy themselves; the private carriages, here and there, with the charming ac ort/, u(1nder the Indian laurel and palms, in their light and pretty dresses, surrounded by their friends, who deem it a duty to pay them compliments, chattering cii p/ein air, is a tropical scene of the greatest interest. In the Park are the great Cafe Central, Caf6 Tacon, the celebrated Ilelados de Paris, which attracts the leading society of lavana for their sorbets and famed ice-cream; and the Gran hotel Tlegrafo, the great favorite of the American tourists, the great Tacon Theatre, the popular circus of Pubillones, and the Albisu Theatre. The walk or drive on the Prado is always interesting. In the Prado, Nos. 67-69, is the hydrotherapic and bathing establishment of Dr. Belot, one of the most elegant of its kind in the world. Do not fail to visit Dr. Belot, who will take a special pleasure to show you his great establishment. 47

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cU:BA ILLrsTri ATEI). TILE CASINO ESPANOL. The Spanish Casino is one of the finest buildings and one of the principal attractions in ILavana. This Club was founded in 1659 ; it averages 2,500 members. Almost every city in the Island has a club, corresponding with the main club of Havana. Tourists should not fail to visit the Casino, where they will always be welcomed. Its amiable and distinguished President, Mr. Garcia Tun6n, and its members, take great pleasure to show tourists the interesting curiosities it contains. There is a fine collection of paintings, copies from celebrated Spanish artists, representing the history of the nation since the remotest epoch. Among the collection of oilpaintings, I call the attention of visitors to the beautiful group, full of expression and historical truth, representing Isabella the Catholic, when she gave the royal diamonds to help the expedition of Columbus. It is one of the greatest and most sublime episodes of the history of Spain. During the winter splendid balls are given there, as well as lyric and dramatic entertainments. The masquerade balls of the Casino during the carnival are justly noted to be the most gorgeous in the world. The Casino supports a free academy where the English and French languages, book-keeping, drawing, etc., are taught. The Casino Espanol, which was at first near the park, is now located in one of the finest buildings in Havana, on Znlueta Street. Tourists should not fail to visit the Casino, where they will be welcomed. 48

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CUBA ILLUS'IRATED. TIIEATRES. GRAND TACON TIEAT1RE. The Grand Tacon T1heatre was erected in 1837, in memory of Captain-General Don Miguel Tacon, who was then in command of the Island of Cuba. It was built by Mr. Francisco Marty, and Torrens estimated its cost at $400,000. It is situated in the better part of the city, between Prado and Consulado Streets, fronting on the celebrated Central Park. The Tacon Theatre occupies a superficial area of 6,176 square yards, it has three doors on the front, six on San Rafael Street, three on Consulado Street, and two on San Jos6 Street. At the other angle of the Theatre, formed by Prado and San Rafael Streets, is the Salon Brunet, the leading Caf6 of Havana. The stage is 42.53 metres in length by 20.68 in width, and the entrance 17.63. The seating capacity is as follows: 56 boxes on first and second floors, 8 boxes on third floor, 4 grilles on first and second floors, 2 grills on third floor, 112 butacas on third floor, 552 orchestra seats, 101 chairs in the tiers and front, 1,203 chairs front and back of tiers. Total number of seats, 2,287 ; therefore, 3,000 people can be seated very comfortably at the Tacon Theatre. The luminary consists of 1,034 gas jets ; the decorations comprise 751 shifting scenes ; the armory possesses 605 different sorts of arms; the wardrobe 13,787 costumes; the furniture and tools for the stage number 782 ; the archives contain about 1,200 partitions of opera, opera-bouffe, tragedies, dramas, comedies, etc., besides a large number of songs and piano 49

PAGE 64

TACON THEATRE ON CENTRAL PARK. ark

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CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 51 and military band pieces. This Coliseum was inaugurated with the performance of the drama Don Juan de Austria." Ten years ago $20,000 were expended in repairs ; the busts of Tasso, Dante and Arioste were also added in the dome. The Tacon Theatre is a great public ornament, and indicates great love for the arts, and offers tourists to the capital of the Island of Cuba a matchless place of amusement. PAYRET OPERA hOUSE. In Prado Street, fronting on Central Park, near the Grand Hotel Pasaje. It is a beautiful structure, fully equal to the Tacon Theatre as to architecture and seating capacity. The Payret was erected about fourteen years ago. In 1883 the theatre was partly destroyed by a terrible tornado, and was abandoned until 1890, when the edifice was entirely restored, and has again become the home of the great operatic school. THE ALBISU THEATRE. Is an elegant hall located in the building of the Centro Asturiano (Asturies Club), and has lately been restored ; it is one of the prettiest theatres of its kind, where comedy, drama and opera are performed. THE IRIJOA THEATRE. Named in memory of the industrious and distinguished owner, Mr. Irijoa. It is a handsome, commodious and well ventilated theatre, lately built, and specially adapted for summer performances. Elegant balls are

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__ __ ___jf t 1 PLAZA DLE ARMAS-GOVEI NO S PALACE.

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CUBA ILLUTsriATEn. 53 given there every season by the leading societies of Havana. A garden with fountains, in the main entrance, attracts the eye. Small tables are placed here and there to partake of refreshments, which gives it the appearance of the Champs Elys6es," or Paris cafes concerts. Mr. Irijoa has made his name very popular by the erection of his theatre. PLAZA DE ARMAS. Is situated at the lower extremity of Obispo Street. It is here that the winter residence of the Captain-General and the main official government buildings are. By consulting the illustration, the reader will notice a garden of tropical flowers, plants and palms. The statue in the centre, an artistic marble monument, is that of Ferdinand the Seventh. The illustration, el Templete, opposite the Captain-General's residence, represents a little chapel erected to the memory of Columbus. It was at this place that, in the year 1519, was celebrated the first mass in the Island, under a large ceiba, a beautiful tree known as the cotton-tree of the West Indies. Tourists will notice a bronze tablet at the frontispiece with the following inscription : Ieinando el &enor Don Fernando VII, siendo Presidente y Gobernador Don Fancisco Dionisio Fives. La #delsima Habana xeligiosa y })acflea erigi6 este s4encillo monfumento decorando el sitio donde el (ro 1519 se celebr la primera misa y eabildo ; el Obispo Don Juan Ise Diaz de spada solemniz el mismo A ugusto Sacricio el i a 9 de Jlarzo de 1598.

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54 CUBA ILLUSTRATED. TRANSLATIONON] During the Reign of His Majesty Don Fernando VII, under the Presidency and Governorship of Don Francisco Dionisio Vives, the faithful, religions and pacific Havaneses erected this modest monument, consecrating the place where, in the year 1519, was celebrated the first mass and holy office by the bishop Don Juan Jose Diaz de Espada, solemnizing the Divine Sacrifice of the Mass on the 9th day of March, 1598." 4 i THE LITTLE CHAPEL-EL TEMPLETE.

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CUBA ILLUSTRATED. CARNIVAL. During the Carnival, public masquerade balls are given every Sunday after the performances at the Tacon Theatre. Dancing commences at about 12 r. 2.., and continues until daylight. For that purpose the floor of the parquette is raised to a level with the boxes and the stage, converting it into a vast and conunodious ballroom. The theatre is open to all, and access to the boxes and galleries is free to the public, who can thus enjoy the sight of the ball and listen at the same time to the peculiar Cuban dancing music. During the carnival the Paseos are very attractive. A drive to the Prado and Carlos Tercero, which are crowded with carriages and fantastic mnasqueraders is also very interesting. BULL FIGIITS. ( La corida de toros.) This old Spanish entertainment and amusement has also its lovers in havana, and offers every year an exceptional interest. The Captain-General being generally present at the corrie, it attracts the fashionable society of Cuba. IIavana has been favored with the best matadotes of Spain. Every season the best bulls are imported from Lerida at enormous prices. A few years ago Cuba was raging over the espala Luis Mazzantini. His engagement was made at a great expense-$30,000, and a benefit, for fourteen performances, all expenses paid to and from Madrid, as well as during his stay in Cuba for 55

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CUBA ILPSTITED. himself and company. The portrait and 1biography of IMlazzantini maybe interesting to Americans. Luis Alazzantini was born in the Province of Guipnzeoa in Spain forty-two years ago. lis father was an Italian, his mother a Spanish lady : lie was educated LUIS MAZZANTINI. at Rome, Italy, where lie graduated and received the degree of B~achelor of Aits. Mazzantini was at one tune the secretary of one of the confidential advisers of King Amadeus 1., of Spain. llavimg learned1 telegraphy, lie became an operator, was promoted chief of station, and for his efficiency was aai. promoted to a high position in the administration of a great railway company at Madrid, where lie was protected by Jos6 Echegaray, 60 the

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CUBA ILLUSTRATED. great Spanish writer and dramatist, who was at the time manager of the railway. Mazzantini said that he discovered there was but two ways by which a man might become eminent in Spain : either by singing or bullfighting. He failed as a singer and was left to do the other, or else remain a telegraph operator. His fondness for the amateur bull-ring was such as to take a great deal of his time from the office. This was noticed by the manager, who finally told him that he must choose between bullfighting and railroading. All right," said Mazzantini, I'll give up the railroad." Ile left the office and went directly to the Plaza de Toros. le reported that he was ready to enter the arena as a professional; he was well and favorably known as an amateur, and his coming was r -r A BULL-FIGHT. 57

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VT CC/ f. YF i i1jijrt MAI ALAtNTEiI.FRL AAA

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CUBA ILLUSTRATED. hailed with delight ; he was placed in the front rank as Primer Espada or Matador, and the next Sunday he appeared in the arena with the white satin costume of a debutant; though it rained lie killed his three bulls like an old hand in the business, and became famous as the first bull-fighter in Spain. The Plaza de Toros, where the sport takes place, is situated near the Pasco de Carlos III. From any part of the city a carriage will take you to the arena for 50 cents silver (same price for two). Tourists should arrive before the opening, in order to be present at the entry of the cuadrilla, when the President is saluted and gives the signal to commence the performance. It is a lively scene well worth seeing. Tickets can be had almost anywhere. Bull-fights take place every Sunday at 3 P. m. CHURCHES. are devoid of beauty, both externally and internally, as such edifices can be made. The foundations of the Cathedral were laid in 1656, and the church finished in 1724. It is situated on Empedrado Street. The architecture is of the Latin-Gothic style. The ceremonies on feast days are magnificent and solemn. high mass is celebrated every Sunday at S A. M. The ashes of Columbus lie in one of the vaults of the Cathedral. On the left side, in the rear, tourists will notice a slab, upon which is a bust in relief of Columbus, as the illustration shows (see page 20), with this inscription : 59

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CUBA iLLI"N'1'l el'1'ID. v b +i Me 4 I E S S t Y fI Y y 1 I f + t y ,Y i 1 { i t w G m iA1N ALTAR IN TH, [FRCI D CHURCH, HAVANA.

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CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 6 Ot
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CUBA ILLUSTRATE]). BELEN, on Compostela Street, at the corner of Luz. This monastery was built in 1704 by Bishop Diego Evelino de Compostela, in his garden ; lie had in 1695 built a church called San Diego de Alcalt. These monks kept the only free-school up to the latter part of the last century. The school existed until 1854, when the whole building was given to the Jesuits for the establishment of the Royal College of havana. Tourists are welcomed visitors to the churches at any time. FORTS. MORRO CASTLE AND LA CABANA can le visited every day. Tourists must first procure an application from the United States Consul to the Military Governor of the city, and they will receive in return a permit to visit the forts. Tourists will go down the wharf (muelle ebtdleria) and take a gtadunero (boatman) and cross the bay ; arriving at the fort the permit is presented to a soldier on guard, who gives the right to pass. The officers are very courteous. A soldier is detailed to accompany the tourists through the forts. At one end of Morro Castle, tourists will notice a wooden bridge uniting the two forts and built by the English during the occupation in the year 1762. They will also notice the light-house constructed when General O'Donnell was Commander of the Island, in the year 1844. The lighthouse is a revolving one, of the Fresnell model, with a minute flash-light that is seen at a distance of 25 miles. 6J

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CUBA ILLUSTRATED. MARKETS. Are very attractive for the variety and abundance of fish, vegetables and tropical fruits; the best time to visit them is at early morning. The Tacon is the leading market, the largest and finest in havana. It occupies an entire block, opened all around ; it is surrounded by all kinds of stores with the greatest assortment of goods and novelties, where tourists can purchase, at a trifling cost, charming souvenirs. The Colon market, on Zulueta Street, has been recently completed, and the Cristina market, on the Plaza Vieja, is the oldest of Havana. Tourists should visit them in order to get acquainted with the richness of the products of the soil. COCK-PITS. Cock mains take place every Sunday afternoon. While bull fight lovers enjoy themselves at the Plaza de Toros, the excitement of cock-fights prevail at Manrique Street. The cock-pits of Cuba are the most famed in the world. GENERAL PLACES OF INTEREST. El Circulo Militar.-Military Society founded in 1883 by officers of the Spanish army in Cuba. Real Casa de Beneficencia.-Orphan Asylum, on Calle Ancha del Norte. Asilo de Mendigos.-AInshouse (Calzada Belascoain). Asilo San Jos6.-Reformatory Asylum for boys, on Anclha del Norte. 63

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64 CUBA ILLUSTRATED. Mazorra.-Lunatic Asylum, at about 10 miles from Havana. Casa de lRecogidas.Female convicts and abandoned women are confined in this asylum ; it is situated on Calle de la Fundici6n Royal Economical Society of the Friends of the Country.-Public library (free). Opened from 12 m. to 4 P. ir. Studio of Painting and Sculpture, in the same building, 6i) Dragones. ioyal Scientific Academy.-Mnseumin of Natural Ilistory of the A ntilles, Cuba Street, between Teniente lley and Muralla Streets, where all antiquities and relics since the discovery of the island are kept and can be seen. Opened from 12 rt. to 4 r. -N. IOSPITA LS. San Felipe y Santiago.--Located in the City Prison, a large edifice which tourists will notice when entering the harbor, at the right side of the bay, fronting the Morro Castle. Hospital Paula.-Assigned specially to women. Hospital San Lazaro.-Leprosy patients are only admitted. Hospital de San Ambrosio.-Military hospital, situate beyond the Arsenal. Tourists of the medical profession and visitors are admitted to the above establishments at any time.

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CUBA ILLUsTAjTED. I..POST-OFFICE. On Calle Oficios, near the landing. Tourists will notice two boxes for mailing letters: one, "Nacional," where letters for the Island, Spain and her possessions are mailed ; the other, Extranjero (foreign), for letters to foreign countries A list of letters directed to IKavana, without address, is published, and letters are delivered to the addressees only. Letters can be inailwd also in auxiliary boxes, placed in different parts of the city. Postage for the United States is 5 cents ; for the city ?2, cents ; for the Island 5 cents. Universal postal cards, 2 and 3 cents. TEL LGRA PIIS. The telegraph lines in Cuba are under the supervision of the (overnnent. The main office is on Calle Oficios, same building as the post-office. Wires cominnnicate with the principal points of the Island. Submarine cable to Key West and Punta Jassa, in Florida, etc. SUBURBS OF IIAVANA. A carriage drive to the Captain-General's summer residence, known as "Quinta de los Molinos," is very interesting. The route is pictures(jue, the garden profusely planted with various kinds of pains, fruit-trees of all kinds, flowers, and adorned with artificial waterfalls. From the garden-drive to the cemetery, upon the (l 5

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CU:A ILLI'sTRATED. hu~~j> APPROACH TO THE BISHOP'S RESIDENCE AT TULIPAN. 08

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CUBA ILLUSI RATED. 67 MAIN ENTRANCE TO THE CEAMET ERV. hill, the scenery of the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico is one of the grandest sights. The portico of the cemetery, as the illustration shows, and the chapel within the gates, are two exquisite pieces of architecture. Returning, drive to the Vedado, where are willas and fine summer residences. Passing the Ancha del Norte, stop at the Campos Eliseos bathing-houses, which are worth seeing. THE CERRO AND TULIPAN, dotted with beautiful summer residences, is the rendezvous of the fashionable society of Havana. A benevolent society established at the Cerro in 1.875, composed of select members, frequently gives dramatic and lyric

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CUBA ILLUSTRAT1EI. 4 Q UINTrA DE PA LATINOS, CERRO, ITAVA NA. 6s

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CUBA ILLUSTRATED. soirees, and lectures by celebrated speakers of the Country. The Marianao Railroad stops at the following stations: Tulipan, Cerro, Ceiba, Buenavista, Qnemados, and Marianao. Marianao, about 15 miles from Havana, is a nice and pleasant town of 5,000 inhabitants. The railroad extends to the beach of Marianao, three miles from that place, where sea-bathing can be enjoyed. About three miles from the Marianao station lies one of the finest sugar plantations in Cuba -the Ingenio Toledo. A permit is required to visit the plantation; it can be obtained through a prominent person or a business house in II vana. Trains leave every hour from 6 A. m. Tourists will enjoy the trip very much and pass an agreeable morning. The round trip takes three hours. Tourists will also enjoy a visit to Guanabacoa, one of the oldest cities in the Island, with a population of about 20,000 inhabitants. This city possesses excellent mineral waters, especially beneficial for disorders of the digestive organs. Trains leave every half hour, and run in connection with ferry-boats at the wharf Muelle de Luz. EXCURSION TO THE CELEBRATED RESIDENCE QUINTA DE PALATINos,"1 AT THE CERRO, HAVANA. Tourists will enjoy a visit to this beautiful country residence, 12 miles from Havana. Trains leave the Bahia Railroad station, near the Mascotte Hotel, at 1 P. m. every day, returning to Havana at about 5.30 P. a. The name of this great property comes from the Count of 69

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-,CHMIV0 SQIXILV'IVC 3H.ll IV 1ii .fl'K-VODOD Vi 1' (-LLvNjM JrS1T II VI(1 0 t Al ()

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CUBA ILLUSTRATED. Palatinos, who was formerly its owner. Mine. Rosa Abreu, Countess of Palatinos, who resides in Paris, is the present owner. The Countess is married to Dr. Granger. a prominent French physician, who is at the head of the celebrated Pasteur laboratory. Mr. Betanourt, the gardener and keeper of the property, will kindly show tourists the great variety of tropical trees, comprising twelve species of nangoes, orange, cocoa-nut, etc. A fine collection of marble statuary. valued at $40,000, is an additional ornamentation to this beautiful place. THE COCOA-NUT TREE. The cocoa-nut tree shown in the accompanying illustration can be seen in its natural condition at the Palatinos gardens. The specimen shown in the engraving was planted six years ago, and consequently has entered in its second fruit-bearino year. The cocoa-nut tree bears fruit incessantly, as new nut formations are made with every change of the moon, and consequently once arrived at its fruit-bearing stage, the cocoa-n ut tree is never devoid of nuts. When freshly plucked from the tree the nut is filled with a delicious milky water, which has certain medicinal properties. This water is quite cool and very refreshing in tropical climes, and can be drank without the least danger. The nut after a lapse of time, becomes dry and coated on the inside with a deposit from the milky water; it is generally in this condition that it reaches the United States. where this hard matter enters (1

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if X3 r}TFIKt~rt !A TH CHCE JA R -IA N-LPLEO

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CUBA ILLUsTRATED. !3 to a large extent in the manufacture of candies, pies, etc. The agriculturist finds in the cocoa-nut tree and its fruit, a source of income which day by day goes on increasing, as the fibre enters more largely into the channels of the ind ustrial arts. From the ordinary door-mats, ropes, bagging, efe., the textile qualities of the plant have so appreciated that it enters in almost everything where strength, pliableness and durability are desired. It figures to-dav ilito the construction of the modernized man-of-war. The French and American war navies use it as a filler between the hull and the armor of their most powerful vessels, as well as between decks. Thle fibre not only diminishes the concussion on board a manof-war firing a broadside, but it helps wonderfully in filling up holes made by the firing of the enemy, according to experiments lately made. TIlE CHICKEN DEALER (El Pollero). Among the characteristic types of Cuban peddlers the chicken dealer is one of the most interesting. ie comes every day to the city, as he lives in the neighborhood of Havana. Ile goes on his rounds among his customers and sells live poultry. No one in Cuba would think of buying chickens as it is done in the United States, where the poultry is killed by steam and kept on ice. The Havana chicken dealer is well patronized, and can be seen every day around the town attending to his business. The accompanying illustration, taken from nature, cannot fail to interest American tourists

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714 (BA I sTR LLUSATED. BASE BALL CLUBS. The spacious and commodious building of the Alnendares Club is situated opposite the Quinta de los Molinos, or Captain-General's summer residence. The Havana Base Ball Club is at the Vedado, up the north shore. Games are played every Sunday afternoon, and many spectators are attracted to the sport on account of American clubs coming almost every season to play with the Cubans, who are great lovers of that athletic sport. The main floors of both club houses are also especially arranged for dancing. Verfine balls are given here during the season. FOREIGN CONSULS. lInited States of Amiierica, France, ...... (erm Iany, .. RussIa, ... China, ...... Austria and IIungary, Pelginm, ..... Great Britain, Denmarlk, ..... Greece, ...... llolland, ..... Italy, ....... Portugal, Sweden and Norway,. Mexico, ...... ....92 Agiar .100 Teniente Rey ..12 San Ignacio ...a Mercaderes ....74 Prado ...Mercaderes ...2 iMlereaderes ....13 Oficios .. ..78. Cuba ...: Mercade res .....53 Cuba ...18( Amistad 2 Mercaderes ....87 Obrapia ...43 Tejadillo Street. Street. Street. Street. Street. Street. Street. Street. Street. Street. Street. Street. Street. Street. Street.

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CUBA ILLUSTRATED. Argentine Republic, Uruguay, ... Dominican Republic, IIaytian Republic, Venezuela, ... Peru, Honduras, ... Guatemala, ..(post not ft'led.) ...43 Cuba Street. ..101 Galiano Street. .30 O'Reilly Street. ..3 Baratillo Street. 84 San Ignacio Street. .108 Jesus del Monte. .31 Amargura Street. IIACK FARES.-SPANISH CURRENCY. One journey in any direction within the limits of Belascoain Avenue: TWo persons, Three persons, Four persons, Beyond Belascoain Avenue, Infanta Two persons, Three persons, Four persons, .20 cents silver. .25 cents silver. .30 cents silver. not beyond Calzada .30 cents silver. .35 cents silver. .40 cents silver. de la By the hour in any direction within the city limits: Per hour, two persons, Per hour, three persons, Per hour, four persons, ..75 silver. .+0 silver. 1.00 silver. In engaging hacks for trips outside the city limits the price should be agreed upon before starting, in order to avoid annoyances and misunderstandings. Carriage for two can be had for $1.50 to $2.00 silver per hour. 75

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CUBA iLLUSTRATED. SPAN ISII COIN. A knowledge of the various coins in circulation in Cuba, and of their respective value, should be acquired The following' is Spanish -1 ounce, gold .4 1 a table of the principals: is worth $1T.00 ..."8.00 called doibloi, escudo, center, 4.25 2.12 5.30 American gold and greenbacks command a on Spanish gold, according to the exchange. premiumOn arriving, tourists should change some of their money Spanish currency, to meet their small expenses. Toil rists will receive the for highest premium at the exChanges advertised in this book. FERRIES. BAlIA DE LA IiAnANA RAILROAD FERRY. Wharf-Muelle de Lu'z. Havana to Regla every day, from 10.30 1'. M., and viCe Tv8U). Boats leave every 30 minutes, and connect with the Bahia Railroad and Guanabacoa Branch. Fare 5 cents silver. EMPRESA VyIFdA (OLD COMPANY). Wharf-muelle de Luz. IIavana 10.20 P. M. to Regla every day, from 4.35 A. m. to by tourists. 4.45 A. M. to 76 f

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CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 77 Boats leave every 15 minutes, and connect with the Puebla Railroad to Guanabacoa. Fare, 5 cents silver. CITY CA RS. From Plaza San Juan de Dios to the Cerro, cars leave from 6 1x. AI. every 15 minutes. First-class fare, 10 cents, silver. Cars run until 11 P. M. From San Juan de Dios to Jesus del Monte, same as above. From Plaza San J an de Dios to the Chorrera, Vedado and Carmelo every half hour. Fare, 10 cents silver, this line runs until after the closing of the opera at night. STAGE ROtUTES. From Castillo del Principe to the Cemetery, stages leave every half hour. Fare, 10 cents each way. From Plaza de Armas to Jesus del Monte, stages leave every 15 minutes-through fare, 15 cents. FOREIGN TRAVELING. At H avana tourists will find first-class steamship lines for almost every part of the world. The steamers of the French Transatlantic Line, from St. Nazaire, arrive at Havana about the 10th of every month, and leave Havana the 22d of every month. In the interval they go to Vera Cruz, Mexico, and return in time to make their direct trips. Ward's Line from New York to Vera Cruz arrives at Havana every week, and leaves a few hours after for

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II* Q jM li) il' I 11 q I 2 kll rlU 11R h! 1 i 1. i"Iar tf )g I J CAVES OF BEILLAMAR, MATANZAS, CUBA.

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CUBA ILLUSTRATED. 79 Vera Cruz. Leaves Havana for New York on Wednesdays and Saturdays also. The Spanish Transatlantic Line leaves every 10 days for Spain, also for New York. At St. Thomas tourists will find steamers for all the West India islands and Central America. At Santiago de Cuba connections are also made for Haytian ports, St. Domingo, Puerto Rico, St. Thomas and Jamaica. EXCURSION STFAMSIHIP GUIDE. New York, Cuba Mail S. S. Co., for Cuba and Mexico, Ward's Line. A first-class powerful iron steamship sails direct for New York and for Vera Cruz every week. IITALOo & Co., Agents, 25 Obrapia Street. Spanish Transatlantic Mail S. S. Co. Leaves every 10 days. Some of the steamers stop at Puerto Rico on their way to Spain ; all stop there coming to Havana ; also for New York every 10 days. M. CALVO & Co., Agents, 28 Oficios Street. French Transatlantic Mail S. S. Co. Arrives at Havana ; leaves for Vera Cruz, returns and sails for St. Nazaire, stopping at Puerto Rico and St. Thomas, once a month. BRim-r & Co., Agents, 32 San Ignacio Street. Plant Steamship Line. United States Fast Mail Route, S. S. iMascotte and

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.I ( l =1 jA TIT0 (II.,,1' V I 'IIT V11 1)

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CUBA ILLUSTRATED. Olivette, connecting at Tampa with the Southern Florida Railway. LAwTON BRos., Agents, 35 Mercaderes Street. Morgan Steamship Line. Between New Orleans and Havana, weekly, stopping at Key West and Punta Gorda, Florida. LAWTON Pros., Agents, 35 Mercaderes Street. South Coast Steamers. Leave for Cienfuegos and Santiago de Cuba via Batabano twice a week. 1I\ENENDEZ & Co., Agents, 75 San Ignacio Street. There are several coast line steamers from Havana to Cardenas, Nuevitas, Jibara, etc. M ATANZAS. This beautiful city, situated 85 miles east of havana, and called the city of the two rivers, was founded in the year 1693. The etymology of the name Matanzas is much disputed by antiquarians in Cuba. Some, ascribing it to the slangther of Indians in 1511 at the time of the conquest of the Island, contend that the supposed Indian name Yuemitri, which is also that of one of the two rivers between which the city stands, is synonymous, in poor Spanish, with the Indian name of the locality where the massacre took place. The story goes on that an Indian spy of the conquerors, when pursued by them,.

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S VZ NV V 'I .I PC A A alHA O A llT IV A i & & Ii

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CUBA ILLUsTRATED. ran away shouting: "Y -muri," which in poor Spanish means "I die.' The rivers St. John and Yumuri divide the city in three parts. The northern part, on the Yinuri, is called Versailles ; the central part, between the two rivers, is known as the old town ; and the southern part, on the St. John, is called Pueblo Nuevo. Many beautiful squares, the San Carlos Church and the Esteban Theatre embellish the city. It has also numerous hospitals and benevolent societies. The principal attractions for tourists are the Yuniuri Valley and the Caves of Bellamar. In the Plaza de Armas, as the illustration shows, are the interesting Spanish and Cuban Casino clibs. The Bahia Railway connects Havana, to Matanzas. The trains leave every day at 6.50 A. m. and arrive at Matanzas at 9.15 A. i. The beautiful valley of the Yumuri and the caves of Bellamar may be visited the same day. At the station, a carriage will take you to the hotel of your choice. The Hotel San Carlos is situated in the centre of the city and the Hotel Frances is near the Bahia Railway station. I take pleasure to inform American tourists that the beautiful caves of i3ellamar have been purchased by Messrs. Garcia & Co., proprietors of the Hotel Frances, where tourists will find the best acconmodation, polite attendance and the greatest comfort. While at breakfast the necessary arrangements for a volanta-the ancient and commodious vehicle of the Island-and guides, if necessary, should be retained to visit the caves and the Yumuri Valley. First, visit the Yumuri Valley, about three miles 83

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r. j r A1 VOLANTA IN THE VALLEY OF THE VUMURI MATAN/AS,

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CUBA ILLU'LIrRtAED. northwest of Matanzas. Once upon the hill you are charmed by the beauty of the valley, with its grounds broken into sharp peaks and genteel undulations ; its cane-fields, with their pea-green verdure, and the darkgreen foliage of the patens, naturally scattered over them; its orange groves and luxuriant plantations, with broad waving leaves; the cocoa. the cocoa-nut and alInond trees and its coffee plantations, while here and there an enormuos Ceiba-tree spreads out its massive branches high in the air. The landscape has no rival even in the pietures jue scenerv of Switzerland. Visit the chapel of Monserrate, and drive to the caves of Bellamar, about three miles east of MAtanzas. Guides provided with torches accompany visitors throughout these marvellous caves. Speaking of the m1ain chamber, Mr. Ilazard says: "This temple, I should think, is quite 200 feet long by about 70 wide, and is about :150 feet from the entrance of the cave ; and while it far surpasses in richness and splendor the temple of the same name in the Ma nuoth Cave, it does not equal it in size or solemn gran denr."* i sparkling columns of crystal produce a most wonderful effect; their color changing, when a torch is held behind them, from white to amber, warmed ap by lovely rose-tints, the effect is indeed magical and enchantin. Each of these caves have a name : one The Mantle of Colunbus," another The Temple of Benediction," The ( nardian Spirits," and so on. The eaves were Cuba, with Pen and Penci/, by Sam' Hazard. S5

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7 f PLAZA DE ARMAS IN CARI)ENAS. tr ,,rr 1,T r xiK ui ry' ~i9

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CUBA ILLUSTRATED. accidental discovered some thirty years ago by a laborer losing a tool down a hole ; a search for the tool revealed an opening into this fairy grotto. At the cave tourists are near the Bahia Railroad station, where the train leaves at 1.10 r. m. Magnificent plantations stretch away as far as the eye can reach, until your return to Havana, at about 3.40 P. M. CARDENAS. This new city, the youngest of note in Cuba, was founded in 1828, and has now more than 3,000 houses and establishments of all kinds. Its growth is unequaled in Cuban annals. It has a population of about 20,000 inhabitants. It is the first city which has erected a monument to Cristopher Columbus. Its prosperity is attributed to the great fertility of the surrounding country. It has fine sugar plantations and does a large export business with the United States. Two sugar refineries have been established a few years ago; they supply the whole Island and export some of their products besides. Society in Cardenas is amiable and hospitable. The Hotel Leon de Oro, and the hotel Isla de Cuba are the best in the city. The distance from havana is about 180 miles. Trains leave Havana daily at 6.50 A. ai. and arrive at Cdrdenas at 1 r. M.

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CTA I LU S1ATE D. htt f 58

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CUBA ILLUsTIRATI. CIEKNFUEvGOS. The city lies on the south coast of the Island. It is famed among geographers as possessing ole of the finest bays in the world. Cienfuegos is about 300 miles from IHavana ; it lies 22' 1.) north latitude and 81 west longitude. It is connected 1y railways with the principal towns of the island, being the terminal point of the PBahia Railroad. The population numbers about 20,000 ; the city is built in the modern style, with wide Streets, which are kept in fine condition. The Plaza de Armas is one of the most beautiful front is the Cathedral, and the government t buildings other side stands a beautil Cruz Street are two social The climate is both lovely springs of Cienfuegos are properties. Two hotels ar Tlue Grand Union hotel, Mr. F. G. Roves, offers ec the only first-class hotel in neighborhood of the city squares on the Island ; on its on one of its lateral sides are and the barracks, and on the fill smAll theatre. On Santa -lubs whIch deserve a visit. and healthy. The mineral renowned for their curative e to be found in Cienfuegos. under the proprietorship of excellent accommodations and is the city. In the immediate there are m numerous lovely country residences and a large area of fertile lands yet nncultivated, although very important sugar plantations have already been established. Cienfuegos is probably the locality which can boast of the most rapid progress of all the young cities of the SO

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THEATRE TOMAS TERRY, CIENFUEGOS.

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CEBA ILLUSTRATE. Island of Cuba. Seventy-three years ago, the which Cienfuegos now stands was merely a grove of tropical trees, washed by the waters of ficent natural safe harbor, into which Columus in 1494. Columbus was so much pleased with the gr the panorama and with the natural advantages o that he constructed a fort to protect its entra named it Nuestra however, until 18 of safety for the During that year Piette, undertook, who was at the tim colonization of this 1819, forty-six stur landed at the port, ural resources of th was for the first successful manner. the city of Cienfu importance. site upon bealltiful a magnianchored undeur of f the hay nee, and Senora de los Angeles de Jagua. 19 Cienfuegos remained a mere harbor coastwise and transatlantic trading. a French colonel, M. de Clonet de with the help of General Cienfuegos, ie Governor of the Island of Cuba, the rich Province. On the 10th of April, dy Frencheon from Bordeaux, France, and the development of the rich nat1 I t time It egos den of the attempted was from sprung to Queen of the Antilles in a methodical and this first impulse that its present commercial THE TOMAS TERRY THEATRE is to be found at the angle formed by San Carlos and San Luis Streets, and fronting the Plaza de Armas. This edifice was presented to the city of Cienfuegos by the heirs of the lamented capitalist, Sr. D. Tomis Terry. The construction covers an area of 1,792 square metres. 91

PAGE 106

THE sUGAR ESTATE CONSTANTN CIA," CIE NFUEGOS.

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CUBA ILLUSTRATED. The form of the theatre is rectangular, with balcony over the main entrance. The main ceiling is embellished by paintings executed by the great artist Salaya. Twelve hundred people can be comfortably seated in the theatre, which has cost over $200,000. Its receipts support an art-school, and the balance is distributed to benevolent societies. T lE (ONSTANCIA SUGAR ESTATE, in the district of Cienfuegos, is one of the largest in the world. While en route from Nassau to Cienfuegos, American tourists should not fail to visit this immense plantation, where sugar is made from the syrup of the sugar-cane. The machinery is principally from France and Scotland, but there is twenty S. S. IIepworth's patent centrifugals of the West Point Foundry of New York State. The sugar-cane to feed this great central manufacture is gathered from the neighboring country, which furnishes from 100 to 120 millions pounds of sugar every year. This sugar estate, the property of Mr. Julio Apezteguia, is situated about 12 miles from Cienfuegos. Steamers leave Cienfuegos at 6 A. 1i. and arrive at "Constancia at 7.30. The trip on the beautiful bay of Cienfuegos is very agreeable and quite picturesque. On entering the river Damuji, which is both narrow and shallow4tourists will naturally notice the beautiful and luxuriant vegetation, especially the queen palms which are so abundant in the Pearl of the Antilles. I advise 93

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" Y'C< t k" 'b:-... (q fve Y irrY Y 4 r;I K r 3 ram. 'oil wt r 7. m ~ H a r r 7 a 3 mac, a s E& 'izu, _er.. 4 4 9KGL'I:ILI:S S'l'KI:I;'1', CIENFUEGOS.

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CUBA ILLUSTRATED. tourists to secure the services of an interpreter in order to avoid any inconvenience while visiting this interesting place. At the Gran Union hotel tourists will find attentive interpreters ready to give all the desired information about this excursion. IFroin Cienfuegos to Havana there is two means of communication, one by steamers and the other by rail. The steamers leave for Iatabano twice a week, and the train leaves Cienfuegos for Iiavana every morning. Travellers will receive at the Gran Union hotel all necessary information. FORT CASTILLO. An excursion to this fort, 10 miles distant from Cienfuegos, is well worth the short time it takes to complete it. The structure is centuries old and rests upon the solid rock. It is in charge of a military governor and garrisoned by a company of regular soldiers. The steamer leaves every hour, and the sail is very pleasant. Stoppages are made on the way to various suburban residences, which are occupied principally in the summer months by the rich families of Cienfuegos. The view from the summit of the fort is one not to be forgotten. The trip is ordinarily accomplished in three hours time, and the fare, 40 cents for the round trip, is very moderate. 9J

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SAN FERNANDO STREET, CIENFUEGOS, 4 *M.7{ 9 1 1 v 1 .sn ^2FV \ %r fix M1, y,.e YJI .eu ; ..}, .,.r" a k. xd 4 4 4 r. r 4 F ,}x k e K".'; ..{ kF >p'" w^ t 4s 'k 3 t : '^ 4.. "k ; +.xyv 'alm a t htl 8 =,'k w {' x 3 4,e } : Yw M .4 .a%' xl S tN i k;,; Ra ;n vN',W '' ii .k y y.. K 4 44 I{( 'Y tr h 4{h pp f' YF Ys.

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CUBA I IxsAri.rED. 97 ISLE OF PINES. This island lies in the Caribbean Sea, 33 miles off the coast of C nba, and is under the jurisdiction of the polititical governor of IHavana. It is 43 miles long and 35 miles wide in its widest part, with an area of 1,200 square miles and a population of about 2,000. The coast is deeply indented by bays and inlets, some of which afford comHodious anchorage, though surrounded by innumerable rocky islets or keys. A1 mountain-chain, over 1,00 feet high, the Sierra de la Canlada, traverses the Island, and the con utry is well irrigated by several rivers. Tie centre is somewhat marshy, but the soil is otherwise ve. fertile. Timber aid precious woods aboutd. Amuotg the mineral productions are silver, quieksilver, iron, sulphur and rock crystal, while marble of various beautiful colors occur in large qnitities. The climate is exceedingiv mild and salUbl)rions, and there is no place in the West Indies better adapted for invalids. Leing sheltered on the north by Cubit, the thermometrical range is very small, and the winters are wonderfully mild and equable. The towns on the Island are N neva (}erona (which in 1887 had a population of 1,000), Santa F+ and Jorobado. The Island was discovered by Columnbus in 1494. It is reached from Ilavana twice a week. Trains leave Ilavana on Wednesdays nid Sundays at 6 A. M.; arrive at latabauo at S A. m., connettivg with the steamer El Nuevo Cuba;wu, of Mr. Angel Ceballos, a beautiful steamer with all modern improvements, which reaches the Island of Pines at about 4 r. M.

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soo3Dtn3tI L22NILS z t tes V,VS -. ~ym 7$ -~ ~~~ -k""trar

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GC U A ILrUsTRATID. SAN DIEGO DE LOS BANOS. The sulphur sprinligs and waters of San Diego are celebrated and known for their medicinal properties and wonderful effects. Reports by eminent chemists say that the springs are highly charged with sul ph rated hydrogen, and contain sulphate of litme, hydro-chlorate of magesia and carbonate. During the season a large inurmber of visitors, pleasure-seekers and invalids, are attracted there. Tere is no case of rhenmatismI, paralysis, female complaints, ulcers, eruptions or tumors, which have not been relieved or cured by its use. Trains from Cristina station, Western Railway, leave daily at 3 x. m., arriving at Paso Real about 1 P. M. From Paso Real a ro/alta takes the traveller to San 1)iego in a few hours. The hotel recommended is the Cabanclho. Madruga, also very falmons for its sulphur 1aths, is only second to San Diego, and is about 6.) miles, midway between Havana and Matazas, and is connected by rail to both places. The temperature of the water is little lower than at San Diego. Trains leave from Villanueva station daily. PUERTO PRINCIPE". Puerto Principe is the principal city of the interior, and in population nearly equals Matanzas. It is the capital of the Central Department, and lies about mid90

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cUBA I[LUSrr'IZAII. way between the north and south coast, .30 miles east southeast of Havana. The city is irregularly built between two small streams, the Timima and the latibonico, in a rich agricnltiral district, the chief products of which are su gar and tobacco. Its trade is insignificant compared with its population. The principal buildings are several chiurelies and monasteries, a hospital and two theatres. The town was threatened several times during the recent rebellion, by the Cuban patriots, and two or three battles were fought in its neighborhood. The climate is hot and moist, but the winters are remarkably mild, and at that season the town is somewhat sought for by those invalids who dislike the proximity of the coast. Puerto Principe is connected by a railway, 5d miles long, with the port of N nevitas, through which extend its exterior coinnunication. SANTIAGO DE CU131A. Locally called Cuba, is situated almost at the other end of the Island, and on its south side. It was formerly the capital of Cuba, and is still the second city in rank and population, and contained in 1 888 about 50,000 inhabitants. It lies on the river Santiago, six miles from its month, and has a port four miles 10110, which is deep enough for war vessels, and strongly fortified. The city is regularly laid out on a steep declivity, with wide streets, some very precipitous, and handsome houses, which are chietly built of stone, The cathedral, com1 00

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(TBA ILLUsTRATI. pleted in 1819, is the largest on the Island, and there are several other choices, a theatre, a custom-house, barracks, a college, and three hospitals. Santiago is an archbishop's see, and the residence of the Governor for the Eastern Department. Next to Havana, Santiago is the liveliest city in Cuba, and probably the oldest town in the West Indies. The finest coffee and sugar plantations are located in its surroundings. It is, furthermore, an important commercial town, and the principal centre of the copper mining district of Cuba. The winter climate is remarkably healthy. Santiago may be reached by railway from I[avama to latabano, connecting with steamers stopping at Cienfuegos, Trinidad, Santa Cruz and Manzanillo. The distance from H1avana is about 500 miles. USEFUL I NTS AND SUGGESTIONS. There are certain things with which every traveller must supply himself before undertaking his journey, and certain facts, a knowledge of which will be useful to him while on his way. On this account, a little time devoted to the examination of the advertising pages will be profitably spent. It is advisable to telegraph in advance for rooms at hotels. A single room means a room for one person ; a double room means a room for two persons ; a double-bedded room means a room with two beds. The following notice has been published by the leading papers of New York I01

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CUBA iI.STRATErI. AmIRc1uAs IN CUBA: No passport needed by those who wish to lanid or live on the Island. -aan a, October 15th, 18S7.-Some time ago the government published new regulations, according to which Ameri" can citizens are now allowed to land at or depart from Cuban ports without being obliged to present a passport or other doenment signed by a Spanish Consul at the port of entry. A simple certificate from the American Consul will be sufficient for the identification of any citizen of the United States, and will enable him to travel all over Cuba, to remain on the Island as long as he pleases, and leave whenever he wishes without molestation." I advise tourists going to Cuba to provide themselves with a certificate issued by a Notary Public, to avoid trouble. A great many people exaggerate considerably when speaking about the climate of Cuba. From December to May the fever is almost unknown. There is no danger whatever for tourists. But while changing suddenly from winter to summer care should be taken ; the clothing used North in midsummer will do in Cuba. Tourists are respectfully invited to visit the stores advertised in this book. By presenting this Guide they will be specially waited upon and will receive the benefit of all discounts. While purchasing goods, ascertain if the amount asked is in gold or silver and thus avoid confusion. Cuba is like any other place in the world, and one who cannot speak the language may sometimes be imposed upon. 102

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CUBA ILCSJRAT1CD. TilE HOTELS OF 11AVA NA. Ilotel Pasaje-on the Prado, 110 rooms. Hotel Mascotte-Oficios Street, 100 rooms. Motel J(glaterra-fronting the Central Park, 80 rooms. Hotel Roma Continental-on Zulueta and Teniente key Streets, 45 rooms. Hotel Telegrafo-facing the Park, 40 rooms. Ilotel Saratoga-facing Campo Marte, 30 rooms. Hotel Perla de Cuba-on Amistad Street, 60 rooms. To properly visit the cities of havana and Matanzas a week at least is necessary. Tourists will be most agreeably surprised when they find out the excellency of Havana hotels, they have almost all the modern improvements and are managed on both the European and American plans. The Hotel Mascotte, the palatial hotel of Havana, conducted by J. Carbonell & Co., has been newly furnished and renovated. It is located near the Bay, as the illustration shows, overlooking the harbor, the city, and the Gulf of Mexico. All the rooms are front rooms, and the accommodations are strictly first-class. The Pasaje Hotel, so named for the covered passage at the rear of the hotel-leading from the Prado to Zulueta Street-is beautifully located ; it is under the management of Messrs. Manuel Linares and Son, so favorably known to American tourists. The hotel Saratoga is situated on Principe Alfonso Street, fronting on Campo de Marte, and is under the management of Mrs. It. de Aliarte. The Telegrafo hotel, so well-known among 10n

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-h

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(LilA ILLT'IATICI. 10 Anerican tourists, has been removed on the Prado, fronting the Central Park. It is always admirably man aged by Messrs. F. Gonzalez & Co., under both the European and American plans. The restaurants in lavana are equal to the best of New York and Paris. The restaurants El Casino,' El Louvre," Las Tullerias," El Palacio de Cristal," El Carabanchiel," El Snizo," in the new quarter of the city (up-town) are patronized by the best society of liavana. The Restaurant de Paris, down town, is the rendezvous of the leading merchants for breakfasting. If you desire to enjoy the coolness of the breeze of the Gulf of Mexico, you will surely be pleased by going to the lotel and Restaurant Cosmopolitan, at "La Chorrera," about 5 miles from Havana. Street cars leave every half hour from Plaza San Juan de Dios and from La Punta," at the end of the Prado; fare, 10 cents silver. The Ilotel and Restaurant Chair, under the direction of Mr. Chaix, is famous for its dinner parties ; it is situated three miles distant from Havana, on the beautiful spot El Vedado, fronting the Gulf of Mexico. Tourists will please remember to recommend themselves with this Guide to the places advertised, as every one will be pleased to give them a heartier welcome on that account. 105

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CT:I3A s I sLr1'A1'rEI). UNITED RAILWA Y OF HAVANA. ]%'partai'es f/POi/ h avana. For Matanzas, Cienfuegos, Saguna, etc. ..(.50 Batabano ...........5.50 Union ............5.20 G( iines ...........12.50 G n aines ...........3.50 Gnanajay ...........3.20 CJrdenas and Colon .......2.20 Matanzas ...........3.45 ienfuegos, ienfegos, .a a .t. A. A. P. M. "C "4 1nia ? tls n haea na. From latabano, C l3atabano, C Gaines "' Union Union Guanajay "' Guanajay Matanzas "' Cardenas Cienfueoos, Steamer Railroad every Wednesday. every Sunday. ...10.15 A. M. ...12.50 P. Al. ...S ...3.15 S. .'7.50 A. A. ...8.15 ...10.40 3.45 1. M. I0 )(

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CUBA ILIAS'RATED). 107 WESTERN RAILWAY. Leaving L stina Station, Ilvana. At 6 A. M., General Train No 1.-For Pinos, Arroyo, Naranjo, Calabazar, Rancho Boyeros, Santiago, RinCu1, Salud Gabriel, Giiira, Alquizar, Dagame, Camas, Arteniza, Mangas, Punta brava, Candelaria, San Cristobal, Taco-Taco, Palacios, Paso Teal, Ilerradura, Consolacion ; arriving at Puerta de Golpe about 11.00. At 8 A. M., Special Train No. 3.-For Pinos, Arroyo, Naranjo, Calabazar, Rancho 1oyeros, Santiago ; arriving at Rincon at 8.41. At 5.20 r. i., Special Train No. 5.--For Pinos, Arroyo, Naranjo, Calabazar, Rancho Boyeros, Santiago ; arriving at Rincon at 6.01. Tourists will receive any further information about railroads by applying at the hotels of Havana.

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CUA ILU1TRATED. 0-ITTIDSR To Cuban Cigar Manufacturers. Tourists desiring to find the manufacturer of a special brand of cigars or cigrqrettes, should consult this Guide. The following list of manufacturers, their addresses and the various brands they manufacture have been carefully compiled, and by calling upon them tourists will, when showing this Guide, not only have the privilege of visiting the factory, but of purchasing a box of cigars at the wholesale price. The cab fare from any part of the city to any one factory is 20 cents silver. A Nanme and A cdtess. Acosta, C., 267 Ancha del Norte, Aenlle y Ca., hlipolito, 116 Suarez, Alvarez y Gonzalez, 1 Zanja, Alvarez, <., 183 Alaurique, Alvarez y Ca., Segundo, 1 Reina, Alvarez y Gonzalez, 17 Maloja, .3/yand (. ..La luelvana SVegas de Aenlle El A mbar y la Galata ..Alejandrina ...La Corona ...Libre Cambio 108

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CUNIA IIll usT rAE'). ;Vame and Ad ll'reS8. Brands. Alvarez, Inocencio, 129 Animas .Romeo y Jilieta Alvarez y Ca., Justo, 188 Campanario, .F. lor de P. A. Estanillo Alvarez, Casimiro, Santiago de las Vegas, .Cnsimiro Alvarez Allones, Ramon, 99 San .Jos6, .R.. Ramon Alloues Allones, Antonio, 2 A B~elascoain,. .Antonio Allones Allones, Nicolas, 93 San Rafael, ..high Life Amat, Manuel, 110 Lealtad, ......La Gloria Arce, Mannel, 137 Virtudes, .La Garita y la India de la Htabana Argiielles y Ca., Rainon, 134 Cuba, .For de Joaquin Arguelles y ilermano Arenal y Ca., Lucio, 125 Prado, El Industrial, El Ecuador Asay, R., Pasco Tacon 8, Carlos III, ...La Raiz Azeano, Sebastian, 68 Suarez,. ..Flor de las Flores B Bancells y Iermano, C., Santiago de las Vegas, .Flor de Agosto Bances, J. A., 160 Industria, ...Flor de Tabacos, Partagas y Ca. Dances y Lopez, 80 Sol, .......Lo Mejor Bances y Snarez, 100 Annias, ..La Carolina Batista y Gonzalez, 94 Lzayo, .La Rosa de la Habana Be jar, Jos6, 190 Lealtad, ..Reenerdos de Cuba Bejar y Alvarez, 155 Maloja, Flor de Bejan y Fernandez Benda, Jos6, 7 Mercaderes, ......Flor Linda 109

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C1UBA I LLsTIKED. Na ie awl Add tresk. Illiands. ioler y Ilermanos, 15 Teniente Rey, .La Iareelonesa C Cabal y Ca., F., 99 San Rafael, .La Granadina y Flor de Cabal y Cabal Cabrera, Mora, N icolas, 71 Peflalver, .Flor de Cabrera Ciambas Y Ilermano, 10 Vig uras, Flor de Cambas y llermano Campo y Rivero, Santiago de las Vegas, .La Cancin Cano y Ilermano, 6( Rayo, ....La Leonora Capote, Mora y Ca., 28 Rayo, .......Figaro Ca rvajal L., 320 Principe Alfonso, ..L. Carvajal Carvajal y Ca. L., 8 D agoes l ija do Cabafias y Carvajal Castro y Ca., 277 Azncha del Norte, La Dulznra Cubana Castro y' Ca., Maniie M., 25 San Jos(, .Manuel Al. Castro y Ca. Celorio y Ca.. I)., ()3 Consulado, ....La Espanola Chao y Ca.. Juan, 35 Estrella, .La Capitana y Flor de Juan Chao Colmenares y Prieto, 115 San Rafael, ....Mignon Cortina v Gomez 134 Estrella, ......Estrella Crespo, Antonio, :33 Tenerife, .... Cueto y Ca., Juan, 19 Estrella, Don Quijote D Diaz, Cristobal, 126 San Rafael, La Riq Diaz, J. C., 76 Virtudes, .La F or de Diaz, Tonnis, 7 Indio, Saratoga de la Mancha ueza de Cuba C. Diaz y La Protegida La Miel 1 1() ....

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CBA I LLUS-RATED. -m and A ddl(Kress. Ban(is. Diaz y Ca., J., 36 Maloja, ......AMazzantini Diaz y Maya, 136 San Rafael, ....Mapa Mundi Diaz Lazo, Luis, Santiago do las Vegas, .Model de la Antiguedad E Estauilo v (Ca. (1oclk y Ca.), 226 Manrique, El A gilila de Oro Estanillo, Junco y Cornjo, 34 Belascoain, La Intimidad F Fernandez, Corral Y Ca., 120 Virtudes, .La Comercial Fernandez, Garcia, A., 172 Neptuno, .Guardian Feal y Posada, 11 Belaseoain, ......Newton Fernandez y Garcia, 77 Estrella, .El Leon de Castilla Fernandez y Montoto, 13 San Jos6 Y 60 Sierra, La HItoja de Vuelta Abajo Fernandez y Ca., I., 52 Tenerife, .Manuel Fernandez iernandez y Ca., Manuel, 1.21 Belascoain, La Aroma de Cuba Fernandez y Ca., Jesns, 11 San Jose, ..La Ley Fernandez y Arruinada, 55 Corrales, .El Crepusculo Ferran y Dalnases, F., 267 Ancha del Norte, Dos Cabanas Franqui, Pedro, 33 Concepcidn, flor de Pedro Franqui G Garcia Vega, 55 Estrella, .2 ..La Flor de Anton Garcia, Jose Antonio, S Paseo Tacon, Carlos III., .La Ingenuidad Garcia C. Ca., 70 Maloja, .El Gran Galeoto y la Lolita 111

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CUBA ILLUs"7.'1E). iVmnt a& d Adtd(/r <" .I3atnds. Garcia Cnervo, G., Santiago de las Vegas, .Manuel Garci A lonso (Dep. Miercaderes) Garcia y Ca., Manuel, 11 Concepcion de la Valla, .La Libertad del Afundo Gener. Jose, 7 Principe Alfonso, .La ixcepcioin y Iioyo de Monterrey Garcia Sanchez, Rafael, llejucal,. For de R. Garcia Gonzalez Medrano y Ca., 113 San Miguel, .Armonia Govantes y Rodriguez, Francisco ; Bej neal, ..La Floor de mis IIijos Garbalosa y Iermano, Santiago de las Vegas, .La Floor de Garbalosa Grana, Angel do la, 12, ...El Trovador H IAevia, ., iIejncal, 27 Obispo (Depot), I Iniclan, Francisco, 58 San Mliguel, Floor de Ilevia Flor de Inclan v la rTrinidad L Lopez, Antonio, 37 (Obispo (Depot), .Los Ainericanos Leal y Ca., Felipe C., 17 de la Valla, ...Mi Sueilo Labarthe, Pedro, 175 Ancha del Norte, La Invencible Looft y Ca., Wi., 21 Cuba,. ..La II ija de Cuba Lopez, Juan, 140 Industria, Flor do Juan lopez Lopez y Ca.., Mame], 2( Fignras, ...La Venccdora Lopez y Ca., A., 201 Campanaria, .La Rosa Aromatica Lopez, Ferreira, Francisco, 27 Gervasio, .La Elecei6n 112

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CUBA IsLLSrATED. Im and AIciddyess. Lopez y Corripio, 87 San Rafael, Llorens y Ca., Mariano, 171 Gloria, Brands. ....Punch .La Flor del Tunmbadero M Marrero, AT., Bejncal, ........A. Marrero Marinas, Manuel, 144 Gervasio, .....Marinas Marx, Luis, 64 Prado, .......Luis Marx Model y Ca., S., 4 Monte, ..Floor de Sebastian Model Media y Ca., 115 Manrique, ..Lord Beaconsfield Menendez y Ca., S., 115 Virtudes, ....iadeina Menendez y Suarez, 118 Manrique, ...Flor el Todo Alenendez, Francisco, 96 Gervasio, ....Belinda Menendez, 1., 100 Estrella, ..Memories de Garfield Menendez, Benito, 267 Ancha del Norte, ..La Ltgica Morales y Ca., Joso, 127 Galiano, ..La Flor de Morales y la Matilde Alosqueira y Perez, 138 Gervasio, ....Mi Flor Moreda, Pedro, 51 Dragones, ....La Diligencia Mora Celestino, 147 Corrales, Flor de Celestino Mora Murias y Ca., J. S., Bejucal, 37 Obispo, Flor de J. S. Murias y Ca. Murias, Pedro, Zulneta y Apodaca, ...La Meridiana Murias y Ca., Felix, 69 Zanja, ..Felix Mura y Ca. N Nogueira, Alfredo, 162 Escobar, O Otto, D. iDropp, 35 Mercaderes, Flor de Nogueira Santageno 113

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C1BA ILLUSTRATED. Name and Address. B/bands. Ojeda, Isidoro, J., Matanzas, ....El Kayo Verde Olmo, Ignacio, 6 Angeles, ......El Comercio Ozeguera, Pablo, 188 Manrique, ..La Voz de Cnba P Palacios y Ca. Manuel, 7 Obispo, La Nobleza de M. P. y Ca. Pages y Diaz, 47 San Jos6, ...Paso a Ia Industria Perez y Velez, 11 Sitios, ......El Brillante Perez del Rio, Francisco, 32 Figuras, .La Legitimidad Perez y 11ermano, Sabino, 7 Concepcion,. .La Sabrosa Perez y Ca., Antonio, 167 Maloja, Flor del Puro Habana Perez, Jesus, 152 San Nicolas, ....La Igualdad Pijuan y Ca., C., 31 Maloja, ...La Bella IIabanera Pino y Villamil, 198 Pasco de Carlos III, La Africana Piflera y Ierniano, Rosendo, 129 Salnd, La Resolucion Pons, Orta y Ca., 1 Empedrado, La Flor de Pons, Orta y Ca. R i., A. y Hermano, 2 Maloja, ....Modelo de Cuba Ramirez, Angel, 49 Rayo, ..El Nuevo Mundo Real y Hermano, 1 Maloja, .......Filoteo Real, Isidro del, S Paseo Tac6n (Carlos III), Flor del Real Rendueles, Rosendo, 63 Rayo, ...La Flor Cubana Rivero, Martinez y Ca., 20 Belascoain, .Por Larranaga Rivero, Manuel C., 93 Estrella, El Fnmar de mi Gusto Rodriguez y Garcia, 105 Sitios, .....La Venus Rodriguez, Rosendo, 2 Carmen, .Rosendo Rodriguez Rodriguez, Francisco, M., Bejncal, ...La Justicia Rodriguez, Andr6s, 39 Dragones, ..La Belleza 114

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CUBA ILLUs'rFED. 3Tccme and Address. Brands. Rodriguez, Manuel, 133 Estrella, .....La Sirena Rodriguez, Antonio, 152 Escobar, .La Sociedad Rodriguez y Ca., Tiburcio, 222 Campaiario, La Ofetia Rodriguez, F., 53 Teniente-Rey, .La Union Comercial S Saavedra y Ca., J., 140 Manrique, ..Antilla Cubana Sala y Ca., J. de la, Santiago de las Vegas, La Rosa de Vuelta Abajo Sanchez y Ca., 70 Factoria, ....La Santa Isabel Sanchez, B., 38 Angeles, Flor de Bernardo Sanchez Selgas y Garcia, 117 Sitios, .....La IIabanera Soler y Ca., S., 44 Lealtad, ........Alida Suarez y Ilermano, V., 95 Anistad, Flor de Vicente Suarez Suarez, Benito, 137 Reina, ..Flor de Benito Suarez Suarez y Armas, Jos6, 126 Reina, Jos6 Suarez y Armas T Ten-Cate y Ca., 101 San Rafael, Flor de Ten-Cate y Ca. Tres Palacios, Segundo, Santiago de las Vegas, La Flor de Tres Palacios Upmann y Ca., 11., 46 Cuba, ....I. Upmann V Vald6s y Ilermano, Angel, 57 Monte, .La Flor de I. Vald6s y Hermano Valle y Ca., M., 102 Galiano, ...La Flor de Cuba 115

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CUBA IL UCSTRA'l:n. i'ame awl Airt/ess. Valle, E., 96 Virtudes, Valle y Ca., A., 02 Marina, Villamil, Jose, 137 Gervasio,. Villar y Villar, A. de, 174 Industria, Viuda de i. Costales y Campo, San Lb ands. .La Flor de Murias ..La Colonial .. ...Nen6 Villar y Villar tiago de las Vegas, La Flor de Mayo Viuda de Julian Alvarez, 9'2 O'Reilley, .Henry Clay Viuda de Suarez, 15 Callejbn de la Valla, La Victoriana Viuda de Roger, 2 C. Eelascoain, La Rosa de Santiago Y Yarre, Ignacio de, 75 Zanja, ...La Africana Ybaseta, Jos6, 90 Dragones, .La Flor de Jose Ybaseta DUTIES ON TOBACCO AND CIGARS IN SOME OF TIlE PRINCIPAL COUNTRIES. United States of America.-Leaf fillers, 35 cents per lb. Wrappers, $2.00 per lb. Cigars and Cigarettes, S4.50 per lb., and 25 per cent. ad valorein. England.-Leaf, 2s. 6d. per lb. Cigars and Cigarettes, 5s. per lb. Germany.-Leaf and stems, 85 marks per 100 kilogrammes. Cigars and Cigarettes, 270 marks per 100 kilogrammes. In Austria, France, Italy and Spain the commerce of tobacco is monopolized by the Government, under the direction of a Regie. 116

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CUBA ILLUsTRATE. 1 PRINCIPAL CIGAREITwYTE FAC'ORIEIS. lN amle ((P (I Add lY/s. 1. M. It, 82 A guila,. It'tauts. La America Manuel, Camacho, Ponce de Leon, 9 Santa Clara, lAI Competidora Gaditana Prudenoio, Rabell, 193 Paseo de Tacon (Carlos III), La Legitinmiidad Gabriel, llidalgo, S ? Dragrones, Villar y Villar, 174 Industria, Ignacio, Ohio, G Angeles, Diego, Gonzalez, 20 leina, ...k. rtagnan ...\Villari y Villar ....El Comercio ...Cabanas L. Guerra y Vald6s, 15 San Rafael, La Ilija de Guanajiy Andres, Rodrigi ez, 47 Dragones, La lelleza .No me olvides 1ll Diaz yCa.,

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cry i. uynll I I I01 "" -III'i(i IIIIIIIII W I I IU nllln ul a I I II Itl I Illllp .I d I W I IIII VIII VIII .. I VIII Illilll m II III I u u I i0 I i I I1 /I II ,nn n I III HIINJJ II I 1 111,11, 11III II n ) II -1 tJ 101Y 1!, II la I. II I I 1 4 :. IIII I:I I ) p i .I C I I I I I I I E r I I 11 I Ip III r I n I 4 I __ I I 1 01 I i I I I I I I I i .II III Lrh III 'S1Y' 11 II P II I _.. E I 3 I I II u I I p I u l l w I ,.: p ,y I I III I 'II IIII II III II M1 rv i l 1( I I IIII III) (IIII I IIII If Pll I I n Willi ITT, CIGAR FACI'ORV OF CALIXTO LOPE/ CO., IJAV:1vA.

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CUJA ILLUSTRATE 1' 1-1Ei CIGAR FACTORIES OF H AVANA. It is conceded that the Ilavana tobacco has no equal in the world ill flavor and quality. This is due to the climate and the nature of the soil, which, together with the purity of the water, makes the Iavana cigars the most recles 1)y all connoisseurs. Tourists are welcoined to visit all the tobacco factories advertised in this Th1e factory of Messrs. CAxu'ro LoPEZ & Co. (brands ha E dn,'' Lo Mejor,'' etc.), who use only the Vuelta Ahajo tobacco, is situated, as the illustration shows, on Zulueta Street, Nos. 48-50. The building has all the modern improvements, is specially adapted for the manunfacture of cigars, and is a credit to the firn, who are among the principal manufacturers of cigars on the Island of Cuba; they keep the best stock of lIavana leaf tobacco, grown upon their own plantation in the Vuelta Abajo district. Cigar and tobacco dealers will be convinced of this fact by visiting their factory. The comfort of the workmen, 400 in number, has been studied, and in that respect the factory has no superior in the 119

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is ,T ~ C GAP FACTORY OF LA CORONA HAVANA CUBA

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CUBA ILLUS,T II'). world, with its ventilators changing the air constantly. The building cost about 8500,000, Spanish gold. No. 48 is the depot or warelhouse for the tobacco leaf, and No. 50 is the factory. Tourists and tobacco dealers should not fail to visit this great Tobacco Exchange, as Messrs. Calixto Lopez & Co. will take pleasure in showing them their premises. The cigar factory of L\ CoRoNA, one of the oldest in Havana, was established in the year 1845 for the mannfactnre of cigars and cigarettes. It has a universal fame, and its products are highly esteemed by smokers the world over. The present proprietors, Mr'. Segundo Alvarez and Mr. I). Perfecto F. Lopez, decided to make all the necessary outlays to place this factory on the highest industrial level by equipping it with all the necessary modern improvements. To attain this object they had to change their location, as the factory was too sina l for the growth of their business. Thev became the owners of the most beautiful and largest building in Iavana, known as the Palacio de Aldama, situated in the most aristocratic quarter, and fronting on the great park Canpo de Marte, as shown in the illustration. This innense building has been entirely refitted, at an expense of $50,000 gold, for the manufacture of cigars. Tihe cigarette department has a large engine which furnishes power to a great munber of machines of the most modern pattern; this factory has exclusive patents for their cigarettes, especially those known everywhere and called Sport." Tourists visiting Cuba should visit the cigar and cigarette factory of La Corona, for they will 121

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. L LCIGAR BRAND OF LA FLOR DE MORALES.

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CUBA ILLUSIA'I he agreeably surprised at the ingenuity and progress developed in the manufacture of those goods. Tie finest Vuelta Abajo tobacco leaf is solely used in the manufacture of their cigars and cigarettes. Travelers are cordially invited to visit this beautiful building. LA iLOR DE MORALES is situated on No. 127 Calzada Galiano, near the great town market. This factory was founded by the late Jose Morales, in the year 1845, and is continued under the same name by his son, Mr. Jose Morales. This factory has received the highest award at the Antwerp Exposition. The brands manufactured by 1 ose Morales & Co. are familar to A mericans, and are general favorites everywhere: La IFor de Morales," "La Matilde," and Cuba Industrial." IL R. I. the Count of Flanders has favored the proprietors with the appointment as purveyors to his household. Mr. Jos6 Morales speaks English ; he will take special pleasure to show his factory to tourists, where they will always be welcomed. 12>

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R i t a xx 5g ha THE MPHIHEARE A TH PLAA DETORS, HVAN

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SUGAR PLANTATIONS IN THE ISLAND OF CUBA. Name of the Plantation. Abraham.......... Abreus ........... Acana .......... A dela ............ Adelaida ......... Admiraci6n ....... Adolfina........... Aguedita......... Aguica ........... A guila ............ A lava ........ ... Alcancia.......... Alegria ........... Where situate. .Amarillas .. ...... .Santa Clara....... .M atanzas ......... .Caibarien ........ .Sta. I. de las Lajas.. .Cardenas.......... .Puerto Principe.. .. .M atanzas .......... .Agtiica ........... .Guanajayabo ...... .Col6n ............. Name and address of owners. .Ram6n Mallea. .Condesa de More ; 9 Baratillo, Havana. .Joaquin Giel y Rente ; 416 Cerro, Havana. .Zozaya y Ca.; calle de la Marina, Caibarin. .Agustin Garcia Mora ; Cienfuegos. .Rita Duquesne ; 25 Santa Clara, Havana. .Francisco Cosio; 4 Sta. Ana, Puerto Principe. .Rossell 6 Hijos ; 48 Oficios, Havana. .Perfecto Lacoste ; 4 Teniente-Rey, Havana. .Angel A. Arcos ; 49 Obispo, Havana. .Viuda de Zulueta ; r Cuba, Havana. ..Jovellanos..........Condesa de S. Fernando ; 1 Monte, Havana. .Cienfuegos.........Emilio H. de Mairmol ; Cienfuegos.

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Name and address of owners. Alejandria..........Guines ..... Algorta.............Cdrdenas ... Alianza. ..........Nueva Paz.. Alicia ............. R ecreo.... Aljovin............San Antonio Vegas .... Altamira...........Camajuani .. Amistad ........... Cuanajayabo Amistad.... Amistad ... Amparo.... Andorra ... Andrea..... Andrea .... Andreita. Angel de S. Angeles ... Angelita ... Angelita ... Angelito ... ton de G uines........... Jovellanos ....... Cienfuegos....... Hato Nuevo ..... Bataban6 ........ M acurijes ....... Las Cruces....... Calabazar (Sagua) .Jose Maria Mora. ...Sociedad An6nima. ..Gregoria Navarro ; Madruga. .Ernesto Castro ; Recreo. las .Bardelld y Martos ; Espana. .Antonio Ortiz ; Caibarien. .Sebastian Ulacia ; Ingenio Tivo-Tivo," Campo Florido. .J. Romero y Ca. (at the Plantation). Herederos de P. Torriente. .Amelia Cabrera y Hermanos ; Palmira. .'Tomis Barroso y Cartaya. Francisco Diaz Piedra ; 47 Prado, Havana. .Manuel Peralta ; 52 Reina, Havana. Lino Montalvo ; Ingenio S. Lino, Cienfuegos. Medina y Garcia ; Calabazar. Sta. Ana (Matanzas).Jose de la C. Gutierrez ; Matanzas. Guamutas .. Las Cruces. Guamutas .. ........ Francisco Delgado. ........ Angeles Suarez Argudin ; Madrid. ........ Ernesto Castro ; Matanzas. Name of the Plantation. Where situate. .. .. ..

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Name of the Plantation. Anguila.......... Animas........ Antilla........... Antonia.......... Antonia.......... Antonia.......... Antonica......... Apuro. ......... Aracas Iznaga.... Arbol de Guernica Arcadia ......... Arco Iris ......... Ariadna .......... Armantina....... Armonia ......... Armonia......... Armonia ......... Armonia......... Armonia......... Where situate. Cirdenas ...... Guamutas ..... Colon ........ Aguacate...... Caobas....... Guanajayabo .. Ceja de Pablo. Manzanillo .... Trinidad ...... Ceja de Pablo Guamacaro .... Bolondron .... Limonar...... Las Lajas .... Bolondr6n .... Col6n ........ Nueva Paz .... Quintana ...... Sagna ........ Arroyo ............ Guamutas .. Name and address of owners. .... Rafael del Castillo ; Cardenas. .... Calvo y Torres. ....Manuel Romano ; 38 Habana, Havana. .... Pilar D. de Otamendi (at the Plantation). .... Herederos de Antonia Madan ; Havana. ....Jose Roque Escobar. ....Borrdn, Gazmuri y Hermano. .... Juan Ledn Bello ; Manzanillo. .... Barbara Iznaga ; i Alameda, Trinidad. .A. Guillen (at the Plantation). .... Eduardo Booth. ....Luis D. Ulzurrun ; r Cuba, Havana. ....J. Grave de Peralta ; Guanabacoa. Torriente Hermanos; 72 Santa Clara, Havana. .... Francisco Cuadra ; 42 Inquisidor, Havana. ....Juan Jose Ariosa ; 11 Mercaderes, Havana. .... Herederos de F. Scull ; 6o Aguila, Havana. ....Suarez y Felin. .... Carmen Ribalta ; io5 Amistad, Sagua. .... Sebastiin Ulacia ; Ingenio "Tivo-Tivo," Campo Florido.

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Name and address of owners. Asentista .... Asuncion .... Asuncion .... Asuncion .... Asturias ..... Asturias ..... Atrevido ..... Atrevido ..... Audaz ....... Aurelia ...... Aurora ...... Aurora ...... Australia .... Aventador .. Averhoff ..... Bag4........ Bagaes....... Balbina ...... Banagises.. Banco ....... ...... Cabanas .. ...... Canasi ,. ......Cardenas ...... Quiebra H ...... Cifuentes .......Matanzas ...... Bolondrdn ...i. lacurijes. ...Cimarrones ...... Las Cruces .......Guamutas ...... Jovellanos. ...... Colon .... ..... Guarnacaro ...... Aguacate ...... Remedios. .... Palos .... .Cimarrones ...... M acurijes .......San Nicola ......... Joaquin Freixas ; 28 M ercaderes, Havana. ..........Angel Ortiz ; 1 12 O'Reilly, Matanzas. ......... Josd Arrechavala ; calle Garnica, Cardenas. acha..... Juan Pedro y Bard ; 131 Compostela, Havana. .........Agustin Landa y Fuentes ; Cifuentes. ......... Vicente Urbistondo ; Cardenas. .......... Paulino y Desiderio Diaz. ......... Jose Melgares ; 52 Reina, Havana. .........Herederos de Ana Hernandez ; Cimarrones. ......... Salustiano Fernandez ; Sagua. ......... J. Martinez Valdivielso. ......... Antonio Gobel ; 67 San Nicolis, Havana. ......... Alvarez, Valdds y Ca.; 7 Ricla, Havana. ........ Andres Barroso ; Limonar (at the Plantation). ......... Matias Averhoff ; 148 San Lazaro, Havana. .........Antonio Menendez Quintero ; Remedios. ......... Cuervo y Ca.; 105 Compostela, Havana. ........ Herederos de Joaquin Anchia ; Cardenas. ......... Viuda de Zulueta ; r Cuba, Havana. s........ Jose Francisco Scull ; 6o Agniar, Havana. ....Atilano Colond ; 20 Sama, Marianao. Name of the Plantation. Where situate. Baracoa........ .... Hoyo Colorado

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Name and address of owners. Baracoa....... Batalla........ Begoia....... Begofia....... Belfast, ....... Bella Luisa... Bella Vista .... Belleza ....... Botija ........ Bramales...... Buena Amiga.. Buen Amigo .. Buenaventura. Buenaventura.. Buenavista .... Buen Suceso.. Cacaibin ..... Cacocun...... Calabazar. .... .... Remedios.......... Manuel Mfartinez. ...S. Jose de los Ramos.Pablo Tavio. .. Mariel ............. Herederos de B. Larrinaga-Admor.: Conde de la Reunion ; 15 Empedrado, Sagua .............Isabel y Esperanza Yanis ; Sagua. ...Altamisal .......... Jose Melgares ; 52 Reina, Havana. Havana. ..... Sagua ............. Enrique Gonzalez Solar; calle de Col6n, Sagua. ..... Calabazar (Sagua) ..Bernardo J. Arenas. ..... Santiago de Cuba. ..Eligio Bueno ; Poblado Songo, Cuba. ... Santiago de Cuba... Castulo Ferrer ; Santiago de Cuba. ......Bahia Honda....... Alfredo Labarriere ; 2 A Virtudes, Havana. ..... S. Francisco de Paula.Elvira Ferrer ; Havana. ..... Alfonso XII....... J. Diaz y Torres. ..... Bolondrdn ......... Herederos de Emilia Samr ; r Cuba, Havana. ..... Cabezas ............Margarita Torres ; Havana. ..... Trinidad .......... Meyer, Thode y Ca.; 48 Desengao, Trinidad. ..... Matanzas .......... Herederos de Ramon Llanos ; Matanzas. .Trinidad .......... Herederos de Arrechea; 40 Alameda, Trinidad. .. Puerto Principe ..... Antonio Pichardo y Hermanos ; Pto. Principe. ..... Santa Clara ........ Herederos de Pedro Hernandez. .... Rodas............. Manuel Blanco y Ramos ; Cienfuegos. 71F Name of the Plantation. Where situate. . . Caledonia .... ..

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..... Cimarrones ......... Isabel Xenes ; 6o Prado, Havana. ..... Manacas(Cienfuegos)Trinidad Sanchez de Sudrez ; Cienfuegos. Campo Aleg Candelaria. Caney...... Cantabria. Cantabria. Cauamabo.. Caias.... Capitolio. re ........ Palm illas... ........ Corral Falso. ... ...Ojo de Agua ........ Trinidad.. .. .........M ariel...... ......Sagua..... .. Herederos de Jose Maria Fernandez Mederos. .. Ignacio Remirez ; 61 Aguiar, Havana. ........ Domingo Sarria ; 56 S. Fernando, Cienfuegos. ........ Guillermo Schmidt y Ca.; 47 Guti6rrez, Trinidad. .......Anselmo Balsinde ; r1i Galiano, Havana .......Francisco Sagua. y J. Justo Martinez; Amistad, Caracas.......... Carambola ....... Sta. I. de las Lajas Cardenas........ Caridad............ Cienfuegos.. Caridad............ Caonao..... Caridad............ Gibara...... Caridad............ Guanajayabo Caridad............ Macagua.... Caridad............ Nuevitas... Caridad............ Sierra Moren ..Emilio y Francisco Terry ; 29 Dortic6s, Cienfuegos. ..Suarez y Ruiz ; Cardenas. ....... Fowler y Ca.; Dortic6s, Cienfuegos. ........Vicente Fernandez ; Cienfuegos. ....... Rafael E. Sanchez ; 70 Contreras, ....... Marques de Villalba. ........Felipe Malpica. ..... ..Riopedro y Ca.; Nuevitas. Matanzas. .. Juana Pascual ; 58 Compostela, Havana. ...... Jovellanos .. ...... Torriente Hermanos. Name and address of owners, Name of the Plantation. Where situate. ... ..... Carlota .. ...

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..........Bainoa.............Rafael Fernandez de Castro; Carmen. Carmen. Carmen. Carmen. Carmen. Carmen. Carmen. Carmen. Carmen. Carmen. 121 Cuba, Havana. ....... .Cabezas............N. Amor6s. .......... Cuba..............Conde Duany ; Cuba. ........ Guanajayabo ....... Patricio Ballester. ........ Jovellanos ......... Emilio Cespedes ; 22 Mercaderes, Havana. ......... Lagunillas.. ....... J. y R. Delgado. ..........M acurijes..........Antonio Estalella. ..........Navajas.. ........ Sabanilla. ..........Sagua ... Carmen........ ..........C. Heckman.-Admor.: H. Alexander; 17 y 19 San Ignacio, Havana. .. ........ Rosalia Huguet de Hernindez. ..........Sinforiano Perez Cortina ; Sagua. .Uni6n de Reyes .... Maria Teresa Beltranena, 64 A Prado, Havana. viuda de Crespo ; ...........Palm illas. ..........Sagua ... .......... Jaruco.. .......... Guillermo H. Stewart ; Paris.-Admor.: Juan 0. Bourque (at the Plantation). .......... Marcelino Garcia ; Sagua. .......... Casanova y Montalvin ; Havana. 11 Mercaderes, Casualidad. ........ Alfonso X II... Casualidad ......... Matanzas ...... .... Sucesi6n de Desiderio G6mez. .... Rita Duquesne ; 25 Santa Clara, Havana. Carolina. Carolina. Casanova Name of the Plantation. Where situate. Name and address of owners. CJ

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Name and address of owners. Cataluna....... Cayajabos..... ...Guamutas.. ... Madruga.. Central ............ Cienfuegos. Central............Guamutas.. Central ............ Nueva Paz. Ceres.............. Cimarrones. .......Oliver Hermanos. ....... Andres Terry ; Paris.-Admor.: Carlos Siliva (at the Plantation). ....... Sebastian Ulacia ; Ingenio Tivo-Tivo," Cpo. Florido. ....... Ram6n Gonzilez. ....... Manuel Froilan Cuervo ; 1o Virtudes, Havana. ....... Marques de la Real Campiha; Havana. 91 Cuba, Cieneguita .. Clarita...,. Clementina.. Coliseo.... Colombia ... Colombia.. Colono ..... Coloso..... Combate... Combate ... ...... Los Abreus .... ...Pozo Redondo ... ....... Jovellanos ....... ........Matanzas ........ ....... Gispert (Palmillas) ........G ibara........... .......Cardenas ........ ....... Guanajayabo ..... ....... Cabezas ......... .......Calimete......... ...... Fermin y Havana. ..Cecilia Alvarez Havana. Leopoldo Sold ; 2 1 Amargura, de la Campa ; 104 Prado, A. Gomez Mena. Arturo Amblard ; 4 Teniente-Rey, Havana. Herederos de J. M. Fernandez, Mederos. G. Chapmann ; Gibara. Salvador Sanchez. Teodoro Sanchez. Eusebio de la Arena ; r ; Manrique, Havana. .Herederos de Pedro R. Sinchez. Name of the Plantation. Where situate.

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Name and address of owners. Combate..... Comodidad... Complaciente Conchita .... Conchita .... Conchita .... Concepci6n .. Concepcion .. Concepci6n .. Concepci6n .. Conclusion .. Confianza.... Confluente ... Conformidad. Congreso .... Congreso .... Conquista .. ......Gfira de Macurijes..Francisco Carrera Jdstiz ; 40 Cuarteles, Havana. .......Guamutas.......... Herederos del Marques Duquesne ; Havana. ...... Guantinamo........ Rosa y Leticia Bueno ; Cuba. ...... Alfonso XII ........ Concepci6n Bar6, viuda de Pedro ; 131 Compostela, Havana. .Amarillas ... ...... Medero y Martinez. ...... S. Jose de los Ramos. Herederos de Balsinde ; Guanajay. .Ceiba del Agu .Cimarrones .. .Palmira ..... Sabanilla ... .Agnica ....... ..Alfonso XII .. Guantinamo.. Cimarrones .. ..Alfonso XII .. .Nuevitas ..... Guanajayabos a..... P. Gonzalez Larrinaga ; 84 Cuba, Havana. ...... Jose C. Gain y Gonzilez. .......Sucesi6n de Montalvo ; Cienfuegos. ....Herederos de Aldaina ; 12 Mercaderes, vana. ...... Jose Francisco Scull ; 6o Aguila, Havana. ...... Ricardo Farret. ...... Rosa y Lecticia Bueno ; Cuba. .......Viuda de Busto. ...... Pella y Caso. ...... Bernabd Sanchez Adan ; Nuevitas. ...... Torralba, Perez y Ca. HaC. ....... .Hermanos Apezteguia (at the Plantation). Name of the Plantation. Where situate. .... .... .. .. .... .. .. .... .... ... ... .... .. .. Constancia .. .. .. ... Cienfuegos

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Name of the Plantation. Constancia ..... Conteo .......... Convenio........ Convenio ........ Conyedo ......... Coraz6n de Jesus. Corojal.......... Covadonga ...... Cristalina ...... Cuabalejo........ Cuatro Hermanos. Cuatro Hermanos. Cuatro Pasos..... Cubano .......... Cuentas Claras.... Charco ......... Chilena .......... China ........... Chucha.......... Where situate. Name and address of owners. ..Sagua ............. Manuel Larrondo ; Sagua. .Cimarrones ........ Mahy, Jimeno y Ca. ..Guanajay .......... Juan Manuel Bolivar ; 3 Empedrado, Havana. .Remedios.......... Jos6 Vergara ; Remedios. Santa Clara. .Sagua ............. Am zaga y Ca.; 30 Gloria, Sagua. Bahia Honda ....... Tapia y Eguillor ; Havana. .S. Jose de los Ramos.Roque del Rio. ..Rodas.......... ..Cimarrones .... .Cardenas........ ..Sagua .... ..... .. Canasi ......... .,Santo Domingo.. ..Man zanillo ..... .Ceja de Pablo ... Macagua ........ Matanzas ....... .Cervantes....... ... Antonio Cabrera (at the Plantation). Ricardo Garcia Ona. ... Fernandez y Villegas ; Cirdenas. Agustin Cobo ; 9 Inquisidor, Havana. Agustin y Maria Martinez Alfonso. ... Jose Diaz Perez. ... Eduardo Bertot 6 Hijos ; Man zanillo. ... Pedro Retania. ...Herederos de Cayetano Ortiz. ... Demetrio Perez de la Riva ; 71 Teniente-Rey, Havana. Herederos de Valdes Fauli ; 14 San Ignacio, Havana. 4:r

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Name and address of owners. Chuchita ......... D eleite .......... D eleite .......... D elirio ........... D elta ............ Descanso ........ Desengano....... Desenga o....... Desempeo ....... Desquite ......... Desquite ......... Destino.......... Destino.......... Destino ......... Diamante ........ Diana.......... Dichoso ...... Divina Pastora. ..Col6n .......... ..Guamacaro ...... ..Guamutas..... .Guanajayabo .... ..Sagua .......... Coliseo ......... ..Cabezas......... Calimete ........ .El Roque....... Canasi.......... Palmilla ........ ..Macagua........ ..Sagua .......... .. L ajas ........... .Guamacaro ..... ..Navajas ........ ...Bolondr6n...... .... Bahia Honda ... .. Sim6n Martinez. ...Herederos de Patricio Ponce. ... Emilio Gaitin. ... J. Hernindez Piloto. ...Francisco Lamadrid ; 115 Colon, Sagua. ..Langra y Solis. ...Sebastian Ulacia; Ingenio "Tivo-Tivo," Campo Florido. ... Manuel Carreno ; 21 5" Vedado, Havana. ... Joaquin Larrea ; Havana. ...Sebastian Montalvo y Mantilla ; Havana. ...Elena Rosa Hernandez ; 559 Cerro, Havana. ... Miguel Arrandonea. ... Santiago Rodriguez Lopez ; Sagua. ...Carlos Alfert ; Sagua. ...Laureano Angulo (at the Plantation). ...Sucesi6n de Cristina Bard ; 50 San Ignacio, Havana. ...Antonio Armas. ...Ricardo G. Pina. ..........Bainoa .............Juan de la MNaza Munoz ; 9 Ricla, Havana. Name of the Plantation. Where situate. Dolores

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Name and address of owners Dolores .... Dolores... Dolores .... Dolores.... Dolores .... Dolores .... Dolorita .... Dolorita .... Domingo ... Dominico .. Dos Amigos Dos Amigos Dos Amigos. Dos Amigos. Dos Felices. Dos Herman Dos Herman Dos Herman Dos Herman Dos Herman ....... Camajuani. ....... Canasi..... .........Guamutas ....... Lagunillas. ........ Matanzas .. ........ Remedios.. ....... Guanajayab ...... Hato Nuev ....... Calabazar ( ........ M atanzas ........Esperanza. ........ Calabazar.. ....... Manzanillo ....... M atanzas .. ....... Bolondr6n as...... Cervantes as...... Las Cruces as. as. os ........ Herederos de Caturla ; Remedios. ........ Viuda de Pedro Calvo ; potrero Vegueria," Gilira de Melena. .........Concepci6n Quiniones. .........Antonio Fernandez Chorot. ........ Rosell e Hijos ; 48 Oficios, Havana. ........ Diego Abreu de ]a Torre ; 68 Prado, Havana. o ....... Antonio Marquetti. o ........ Sucesidn de E. Crespo ; Matanzas. Sagua)... Bea, Bellido y Ca.; 17 Ricla, Matanzas. ........ Juan P. Dihigo ; io San Ignacio, Havana. ......... Pedro Goicoechea (at the Plantation). ........ Ruiz y Masset. ......... Feliciano Aldergufa y Ca.; Campechuela. ........ Juan P. Dihigo ; Rio San Ignacio, Havana. ........ Herederos de J. Serra. ......... Almeida y Hermano. ......... Fowler y Ca.; calle Dorticds, Cienfuegos. .....San Juan y Martinez.Caridad Gener ; I21 Sol, Havana. ..... Santa Clara ........ Rosa Abreu ; 72 Prado, Havana. .....Bahia Honda ....... Ignacio Sandoval ; 4 Cuba, Havana. Name of the Plantation. Where situate.

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Name of the Plantation. Dos Hermanos Dos Hermanos Dos Hermanos Dos Hermanos Dos Hermanos Dos Marias .. Dos Mercedes. Dos Rosas .... Duenas.......... Dulce Nombre ... Ecuador......... Eden Park....... El Carmen ....... El Carmen....... Where situate. ..Cabanas....... ..Cienfuegos.... ..... Contreras...... ..... M acurijes ..... ..... Roque ......... ..... Puerto Principe. ..... Bolondr6n .... ..... Cardenas ....... ..Roque. Macagua ....... Col6n. ..M acurijes ...... .Gibara ........ ..Santa Ana...... El Combate ....... .Puerto Principe. El M aria...........Calimete ....... El Pan ............ M atanzas ...... El Paso Real....... Trinidad.. ..... El Salvador........Duran......... Name and address of owners. ....Alfredo Valdes Gallol ; r5 Empedrado, vana. Ha... Nicolis Acea ; 71 San Carlos, Cienfuegos. .... Francisco Muro. .... Herederos de A. Jorrin ; 522 .... Marcos Sardinas ; Cardenas. Cerro, Havana. ....Rodriguez y Dominguez ; Puerto Principe. .... Jose Maria GAlvez ; 42 Prado, Havana. .. ..Bartolome y Francisco Casafias ; Cardenas. ....Perfecto Faez ; 2 Monte, Havana. .... Sucesi6n de Elena B. Deschapelles; Cardenas. .... Silva y Rodriguez ; Gibara. .... Pedro Hernandez. ...Amado Ruiz ; Puerto Principe. .. Ferro y Compania. .... Ortiz Barberia ; Matanzas. ... .Guillermo Smith ; calle Gutierrez, Trinidad. ... Ignacio Herrera, Conde de Barreto ; 76 Oficios, Havana. -4I

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Name of the Plantation. El Salvador .... El Salvador .... El Solitario .... El Tiempo.... E lena ......... Elena ......... E lisa .......... Elizalde ....... Elozegui....... Em ilia ......... Emilia ......... Emilio......... Empresa ....... Empresa ....... Encarnaci6n... Encarnaci6n .. Encarnacibn... ..Manzanillo ...... .... Sagua .......... .... Trinidad ........ ..... Matanzas ....... .... Canasi .......... .... L ajas .......... .... Palma Sola ...... .... MIacurijes ....... ... Le6n 6 Hijos ; Cuba. Emilio Cespedes ; 22 Mercaderes, Havana. Jose Fernandez Val Lloveras (at the Plantation). Felipe L. Garcia ; 70 Gelabert, Matanzas. ... Grande, Solaun y Ca.; r Magdalena, Matanzas. ...Manuel Rivero. ... Patricio Greek. ... Salvador Elizalde 6 Hijo ; Paris. trador : Alberto Broch (at the P ... GUira de Melena ... .Francisco Mestre. ... Aguacate .......... Sucesi6n de Pedro Havana. Armen ...San Nicolas........ Fermin Calvet6n ; Madrid. ...Quemados de Giines.Herederos de Luis Delgado. ... Candelaria (Pinar ~Herederos de Izaguirre. ... Mangas del Rio). ... Caimito ........... Herederos de Diego Conz teros ; alez ; -Adminislantation). 94 Prado, 20 Reina, Havana. ... Lagunillas .......... Maria de los Angeles Rodriguez de la Contera. .. .Santa Clara ........ Jose Cartaya. Where situate. Name and address of owners.

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Name and address of owners. Espana..... Esperanza.. Esperanza... Esperanza.. Esperanza.. Esperanza.. Esperanza.. Esperanza .. Esperanza.. Esperanza.. Esperanza........ Esperanza........ Esperanza........ Esperan za..... ... Esperan za........ Esperanza. .......Cardenas..... ....... Alfonso XII.. ....... Bolondr6n ... ....... Carahatas .... ....... Calim ete.... ....... Cardenas ... .......Cirdenas .... .......Cardenas .... ....... Guamutas... ....... Guantanamo.. Guisimas ......... G aines ........... .Los Abreus.. .Manzanillo.. .Sagua ............ ........ Sagua ........ ......Romero Robledo y Hermanos ; Madrid.Administraci6n : i Cuba, Havana. ...... Herederos de Esteban Santa Cruz de Oviedo. ...... Jose Rodriguez. ..... Joaquin Glell y Rent6 ; 416 Cerro, Havana. ...... Manuel Carreno ; 21 5' Vedado, Havana. ... Alfredo Ruiz del Castillo ; Havana. 31 Campanario, .......Felipe Pelayo ; Matanzas. ...Luis Alzagaray ; Cardenas. ...Jose A. Acevedo ; Cirdenas. ...... Rosa Cuni, viuda de Bard; 42 Galiano, Havana. .J. M. Moran. .Conde Romero ; 69 Aguiar, Havana. ....... Herederos de Terry ; 29 Dortic6s, Cienfuegos. ...... Jose Venecia Pedraja ; Man zanillo. .Herederos de Ram6n Francia ; 21 Amargura, Havana. ..... Lutgarda Reyes de Martinez Quintana ; 43 Esperanza.........Santa Clara. Campanario, Havana. .... Juan M. Arrillaga. Name of the Plantation. Where situate. ... a r a a H

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Name and address of owners. Estrella............Cardenas..... Estrella............Cienfuegos... Estrella............Sagua ....... Eugenia ...........Cardenas... Eugenia ........... Nuevitas.... Europa............ Matanzas .... Fajardo............ Punto Gabriel Farolito............ Guamutas... Favorita ........... Guamutas... Fe ................Camajuani.. Feijoo..............M acagua..... Felicia ............. Rancho Veloz Felix..............Bolondr6n ... Felix........... .. Lagunillas .. ......J. M. Quian ; Cardenas. .......Domingo Cabrera. ...... Andres Casas y Ca.; Sagua. ...... Lorenzo Ruiz. ..... Vicente Rodriguez ; Nuevitas. ...... Javier Peralta (at the Plantation). ...... Benito Arxer ; 3 Obrapia, Havana. ......Sebastian Ulacia; ingenio "Tivo-Tivo," Campo Florido. ...... Sebastiin Ulacia ; ingenio "Tivo-Tivo," Campo Florido. ......Jose Maria Espinosa ; 4 2a Vedado y 14 San Ignacio, Havana. .......Felipe Malpica, Havana. ...... Lutgarda Reyes de Martinez Quintana ; 43 Campanario, Havana. ...... Piedra y Compahia. ......Orosia Gonzilez. Flor de Gtiira Flora........ ...... M acurijes .... ...... Bolondron .... Flor de Sagua......Sagua........ ..... Jose Sainz y Sainz ; 33 O'Reilly, Matanzas. .... .Agustin de Armas. .. .. .Amezaga y Ca.; 30 Gloria, Sagua. -I CL Name of the Plantation. 4 0 Where situate.

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Name of the Plantation. Flor de Cuba .... Flor de Cuba..... Florentina ....... Floridanos....... Fortuna......... Fortuna......... Where situate. Name and address of owners. Sagua ............. Francisco Rodriguez L6pez ; Sagua. S. Jose de los Ramos.Joaquin Arangoiz. ..Ceja de Pablo Camajuani ... Alquizar..... .Esperanza.... Fco. del Semillero... Palmillas.... Fraternidad ........Cirdenas.... Gabriela ........... Bolondr6n ... Ganges............San Antonio Banos..... Gerardo ........... Bahia Honda. Gesoria... ........ Sagua ....... Gonzalo ........... Bolondr6n ... Gratitud ........... Jovellanos ... Gratitud........... Santo Doming Guacamaya.........San Juan y M Guadalupe......... Matanzas .... Guadalupe ......... Sagua....... Guadalupe.........San Nicolas ...... Juan Restoy. ......Zozaya y Ca.; calle Marina, Caibaridn. Jos6 Garcia Barb6n ; 546 Cerro, Havana. Antonio Gattorino (at the Plantation). Julian Arango y Quesada ; Havana. Somville y Arteaga. ......Salvador Castaer ; 8 Comercio, Matanzas. de los .... Benito Arxer, 3 Obrapia, Havana. ...Herederos del Conde San Ignacio ; Hava ...... Herederos de Fabian Garcia ; Santa Clara. ...... Ambrosio Morej6n. ...... Herederos de J. Carrera ; Havana. a na. o..... Raurell y Hermano ; 50 San Ignacio. artinez.Herederos de Bartolome Mitjans. ......Guadalupe Junco ; Matanzas. ...... Santiago Rodriguez L6pez ; Sagua. ...... Jose Delgado Hernandez ; San Nicolas. ... Guamutas .......... J. M. Santiuste. ...... ...... ...... .. .. .. Guamutica. .. ....

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Name and address of owners. Guaimarico.... Guaimaro..... Guasimal .... Guayabo ...... Guerrero ..... Habana ...... H atillo ....... Hatuey. ..... Hatuey....... Helvecia ...... Hormiguero... Iberia ........ Ignacia....... Indarra ....... Indio ........ Indio ........ Industria...... Intrepido.... Isabel........ Isabel........ ... Las Yeras .......... Antonio Chavez. .Trinidad ...........Pilar Polo ; Cidiz. .. Guamutas .......... Luisa Mesa Galarraga. .Santa Clara. .S. Jose de los Ramos.Juan Bautista Elizalde. .Col6n .............Viuda de Zulueta ; i Cuba, Havana. .Cuba.............. J. Bueno y Ca.; 44 Valdes baja, Guantanamo. .. S. Jose de los Ramos.Augusto Madan. .Macagua. ..Alfonso XII ....... Sebastian Ulacia ; Campo Florido. .Cimarrones......... Elias Pouvert. Ingenio Tivo-Tivo, ..... Remedios.......... Joaquin Bofill ; Remedios. .Matanzas ..........Setien Hermanos. ... Calimete...........Conde Morales ; i9g Cuba, Havana. .. Aguada de Pasajeros.Manuel Carrenio ; Cienfuegos. .. Sagua.............Condesa viuda de More ; 9 Baratillo, Havana. .Bolondr6n ......... J. Rodriguez Basso. .Col6n ............. Marques de San Miguel ; 525 Cerro, Havana. ..... Guanajayabo ....... Jose Maria Gonzalez. ..... Guantanamo........S. Limonta y Socios (at the Plantation). ., Name of the Plantation. Where situate.

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Name of the Plantation. Isabel........... Isabel........... Isabel........... Jacinto.......... J agua............ JagUey........... Jagiey....... ... Jesus Maria ...... Jesus Maria ...... Jesus Maria ...... Jesds Maria ...... Jesus Maria ...... Jesus Maria Jicarita .... Jicarita .... Jicoteita ... Jiquiabo... Jobo ...... Where situate. .Macurijes ....... .M anzanillo ...... Matanzas ....... .Esperanza...... Esperanza....... .Manzanillo ..... .Remedios ....... Banes........... Bolondr6n ...... Guamutas ....... Sabanilla ........ Santa Ana ...... .Santa Clara..... Bolondr6n ...... Sagua .......... Matanzas ....... .Jaruco .......... .San Nicolas..... Name and address of owner,. Esnard Hermanos. Beattie y Hermanos ; Media Luna. Pedro Arenal y Saez ; Jovellanos. T. Ricardo Jova ; 6o San Carlos, Cienfuegos. Fernandez y L6pez ; Sagua. Gregorio E. Santisteban ; Manzanillo. Martin Zozaya ; Caibaridn. Perfecto Lacoste ; 440 Cerro, Havana. Herederos de Josd Serra ; Matanzas. Marques de Montalvo ; 198 Habana, Havana. Jose Rafael y J acobo Perez. Francisco de Paula Lluria ; 51 Manzano, Ma. tanzas. Jose Cardenas. Joaquin Piedra. Pedro L. Fernandez ; 6o Cuba, Havana. Salvador Castaner ; 28 Contreras, Matanzas. Carlos Pedroso ; 36 Bernaza, Havana. Marau6n y Hermano ; Sevilla.-Apoderado : Galindez ; 33 San Ignacio, Havana. ......., Leopoldo Diaz de Villegas ; Cienfuegos. Josefa ... .... .. .. ..Caonao

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Name of the Plantation. Josefina ........... Josefina .......... Josefita........... Josefita........... Juanita........... Jucaro ........... Juguetillo......... Julia ............. Julia ............. Julia............. Julia ............. Julia ............. juragu ............ La Carolina....... La Casualidad.... La Ceiba.......... La Chucha ....... La Esperanza...... La Esperanza ..... Where situate. Name and address of owners. Guamacaro ........ Ruperto Nicolas. Nuevitas ........... Juan Adan ; Puerto Principe. Cuevitas........... Leandro Cejas (at the Plantation). Los Palos .......... Antonio Flores Estrada; 78 Amistad, Havana. Santo Domingo ..... Pedro de Llera (at the Plantation). Sagua .............Franco y Velazquez ; Sagua. Canasi ............ Domingo Belausteguigoitia. Cienfuegos.........Hermanas de Depestre. Guamacaro ........Esteva y Aldecoa. Limonar...........N. Otero. Macurijes..........Domingo Ponce. Sabanilla ...........Gonzalo Jorrin ; 522 Cerro, Havana. Cartagena .......... Andrds Terry ; Cienfuegos. Guamutas (Cirdenas)Vicente Garciarena ; Sagua. Puerto Principe..... Antonio Castanedo ; Puerto Principe. Calabazar ..... ..... Francisco Lamadrid ; 115 Colon, Sagua. Melena del Sur .... Raimundo Cabrera ; 79 Galiano, Havana. Esperanza.......... Pascual Pifieiro ; Esperanza. .Sancti Spiritus.... .Herederos de J. C. Pdrez ; Sancti Spiritus. 55 Amargura, ....... Vicente Rodriguez ; Nuevitas. 4La Eugenia ..... ... Nuevitas ..

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Name of the Plantation. La lora ...... La La La La La La La La La Florida Gia ... Isabel. Isabel. Isabel. Isabel. Julia .. Luisa Luisa La Merced....... La Merced....... La Mferced ....... La Merced....... La Palma...... La Pastora....... La Paz .......... Where situate. ..Giira Macurijes .. .uantinamo..... D urin ........... ..Calim ete ......... .. Manzanillo ....... ..M atanzas ........ ..Sagua ........... ..Caibaridn. Cabanas......... ..C irdenas......... ..Bahia Honda..... Cardenas......... ..Guamacaro. Guamutas........ L imonar......... .agua.......... ..Col6n .... Name and address of owners. .Josd Sainz y Sainz ; 33 O'Reilly, Matanzas. .Catasds y Maim6 (at the Plantation). .Conde Barreto ; 76 Oficios, Havana. .Carlos La Rosa ; Jagtiey Grande. .Thomas V. Reatkins ; Cuba. .Leandro J. de la Torriente ; 117 Contreras, Matanzas. .F. S. Lamadrid ; 115 Col6n, Sagua. ..Jacinto Averhoff ; 148 San Liz Luisa Garcia de Lara y Luisa L tinez. ..Arozarena. .. Miguel Valdds Chac6n ; Havana. aro, Havana. ara de Mar.Herederos de Ignacio Motntalvo. Josd y Francisco de la Portilla ; 9 Baratillo, altos, Havana. Antonio Berenguer. .....Josd P. Negrin. La Pepilla. , ...,Sagua .............. Condesa viuda de Mord ; 9 Baratillo, Havana, 4

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Name of the Plantation. La Permuta .... La Purisima .... La Rosa ....... La Rosa....... La Sierra...... La Union ...... La Vega....... La Vija ........ Laberinto ...... Laberinto...... Labores........ Labrador ...... Las Bocas..... Las Cafas ...... Las Cafias...... Las Chivas..... Las Mercedes.. Las Palmas..... Laqueitio ...... Where situate. .... Trinidad .... .... Melena del Sur .... Cimarrones ... .... Uni6n de Reyes ....Cayajabos..... .... Guantanamo .. ... Palmillas ..... ................. ....R oque........ .....Sagua ........ ....Guamutas ..... Calabazar (Sagu .... Trinidad ...... ....Alfonso XII .. .... Guantanamo ... ....Cuba......... .... Puerto Principe .... Sabanilla...... .... L ajas ........ Name and address of owners. .Manuel Zarragori ; 66 Bocas, Trinidad. ..... Enrique Pascual ; 66 Amistad, Havana. .. Hijas de A. Midan ; 84 Cuba, Havana. .. ..Domingo Ochotorena (at the Plantation). ......Jose Martinez Risco. .. Juan Diaz Garcia (at the Plantation). .. Tirso Mesa ; Colon. .....Nicolis de Cirdenas ; Havana. ..... Jos6 M. Fernindez. ..... Herederos de Rojas y Garcia ; Sagua. ......Herederos de Herrera. a).. .Condesa viuda de More ; 9 Baratillo, Havana. .Meyer y Thode ; 47 Gutierrez, Trinidad. .(Antes de Poey.) Adolfo Munoz Mendoza ; 23 Amargura, Havana. ...Brooks y Ca.; 43 Real, Guantanamo. ..... Castulo Ferrer. ..... Nipoles Marcos ; Puerto Principe. ..... Sebastian Ulacia ; Ingenio "Tivo-Tivo," Cpo. Florido. .Agustin Goitizolo; 73 Santa Elena, Cienfuegos.

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Name of the Plantation. Limones..... Los Angeles.. Los Angeles.. Loteria...... Where situate. ...... Limonar.......... ......C idra............. ...... Cifuentes ........ ......Jaruco............ Name and address of owners. .Emilio Terry ; 29 Dortic6s, Cienfuegos. .Jose de la Cruz Gutierrez. .Santiago Rodriguez L6pez. .Pedro Fernandez de Castro ; vana. Luciano ....... Lugareno ...... Luisa.......... Luisa.......... Luisa.......... Luisa....... .. Luisa y Antonia Lutgardita ..... Luz....... ... L uz........... Macagua....... Macasta ....... Magdalena.. ... Magna......... Mamey........ .Macagua .... .Nuevitas..... .Hoyo Colorado .Jovellanos.... .Matanzas ..... Melena del Sur .Alvarez....... .... Luciano G. Barb6n ; Havana. .... Melchor Bernal. .... Perfecto Lacoste; 4 Teniente-Rey, Havana. .....Salvador Castauer ; 23 Contreras, Matanzas. .Jose Mendndez Junquera. .Josd M. Herrera ; 62 Prado, Havana. .Felix Cabello ; Sagua. Quemados de Guines.Mamerto Pulido; 116 Aguiar, Havana. Las Vueltas (Provincia de Sta. Clara) .Fernandez y Jimenez. .Remedios;.........Estela Vigil ; Remedios. .... Sagua .............Juan Betharte ; i1o Tac6n, Sagua. ....Hoyo Colorado.....Marques de Pefalver ; 94 Prado, Havana. ... .Benavides.......... Juan P. Dihigo ; 1ro San Ignacio, Havana. .... Trinidad...........Pedro Iznaga Lara ; 4 Pena, Trinidad. .... Guamacaro......... Domingo Gonzalez Guerra (at the Plantation). N-I 121 Cuba, Ha.... .... .... ... ... ... ... .. ... ... ... ... ... 4

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Name of the Plantation. Manaca Iznaga... M anuelita. ...... M anuelita........ M anuelito........ M apos........... M aravilla ........ M aravilla ........ M aria ........... M aria ........... M aria ........... M aria .......... M aria ........... M aria ........... M aria ........... Maria Josefa ..... Maria Luisa...... Maria Teresa..... Matilde.......... Where situate. .Trinidad..... .. .Calabazar.... .Palm ira....... .Macurijes.... .Sancti Spiritus. .Mangas ..... .. .Matanzas .... Las Vueltas ... .Limonar ...... .Macurijes.... .Palmillas...... .Remedios.. .. .Remedios.... .San Diego de N .Rancho Veloz. .Cuevitas ..... .. .Jovellanos .... .Camajuani .... Name and address of owners. .... Herederos de Iznaga (at the Plantation). ..... Carmen Ribalta ; Sagua. ..... Javier Reguera d Hijos ; 69 S. Carlos, Cienfuegos. .... Conde de Diana ; 68 Galiano, Havana. ..... Jose Maria del Valle Iznaga ; Sancti Spiritus. .... .anuel Clemente Cafarte (at the Plantation). .....Severino Caraballo ; 27 Gelabert, Matanzas. ..... Bernardo I. Dominguez ; 33 Prado, Havana. .J. M. Aballi ; Matanzas. .Herederos de Marcial Ponce. ......Francisco M. de la Torriente ; Havana. .Miguel Gutidrrez ; Remedios. .Nicasio Balmaseda (at the Plantation). un5ez.Gabriel Pdrez Ricart (at the Plantation). .Herederos de Baldomero Delgado ... Emilio Lobek (at the Plantation). .Antonia Perez. .Rosa Cuni, viuda de Bar6 ; 42 Galiano, Havana. .....Cuba..............Sucesi6n de Manuel de la Torre ; Cuba. a Mejorana ....

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Name and address of owners. Mena..... Merced... Merced... Merced... Merced... Merced... Mercedes. Mercedes. Mercedes. Mercedes. Mercedes Mercedes. Mercedes. Mercedes Mercedita. Mercedita. Mercedita. Meteoro .. Mi Rosa.. Montana.. ..........Palmillas.... ..........Lagunillas... ..........Guamutas... ......... M ariel...... ......... M ariel...... .........San Diego de ......... Alfonso XI I ......... Bainoa..... ....... Cabezas..... ...... Col6n ...... ...... Cruces...... ...... Guamacaro.. ......... Jovellanos .. ..........Macurijes... .........Cabanas.... ......... Melena del S .........Sagua ...... ..........Guamutas... ..........Quivican.... ..........Bahia Honda ....... Antonio G6mez Arango. .......Francisco Laferte. .......A. J. Manuel y Vidal. ....... Emilia Piquero. ........Herederos de Francisco Pedro. Nunez. Maximo Arozarena. ....... .Miguel Casales Ramos. ... ...C. L. Deetjen y Ca.; 20 Matanzas, Matanzas. .......P. M. Garcia (at the Plantation). ....... Maria Josefa Benitez ; 6 Jesns Maria, Havana. ....... J. R. Jova ; 6o San Cirlos, Cienfuegos. ....... Jose Pedro Roig (at the Plantation). ....... Roque Garrigo. ........Pablo Hernindez Rios. .... Ernesto Longa ; 22 Salud, Havana. ur ..... Enrique Pascual ; 66 Amistad, Havana. .......Matilde Rivero ; 15 Lagunas, Havana. ....... Manuel Fernandez. .......Elena Rosa Hernandez ; 559 Cerro, Havana. .......Conde Ibiez ; 5 Cuba, Havana. N arcisa............Sabanilla........ Name of the Plantation. Where situate. .. Condesa de Madan.

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Name and address of owners. Narcisa....... Natalia ....... Natividad .... Nazareno .... Neda......... ......Santa Clara ....... Mariano C. Artis ;136 Gelabert, Matanzas. ..... Calabazar (Sagua)... Federico Jova ; Calabazar. ..... Sancti Spiritus...... Francisco del Valle Iznaga ; Havana. .....San Diego de Ntiiez.Jose Bisso Vidal ; 49 Aguiar, altos, .....Matanzas ....... N ena .............. Palm illas ........ Neptuno ........... Artemisa ........ N ieves ............Baja ............ Nieves .......... ..Jovellanos....... Nieves ............Santo Domingo.. Nombre de Dios.... Guiines.......... Noriega.......... .Yaguajay ....... Noroa............Guanajay ....... Ntra. Sra. de las Mercedes............Palm illas........ Ntra. Sra. de las Nieves ............. Guamacaro ...... .Antonio Fernandez Criado ; vana. ..Antonio Gonzalez Arango. ...Lorenzo Ponce de Le6n; Marianao. 114 Habana, Havana. 72 Oficios, Ha23 Dominguez, n4 r. ... Indalecio Fernandez Perez (at the Plantation). ... Miguel Almagro y Hermanos ; Havana. Jose Rodriguez L6pez ; Sagua. ... Alberto Ortiz ; 90 Galiano, Havana. Pablo Gamiz ; I Cuba, Havana. ... Bernardo D. Granda ; Guanajay. ...Andrds Carrillo ; Havana. .Enrique Freville ; 56 Obispo, altos, H avana. ... Juan Ventosa y Hna; 56 San Ignacio, Havana. Name of the Plantation. Where situate. Ntra. Sra. de la Paz. Matanzas ..... ..

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Ntra. Sra. del Carmen.Jaruco ............ Rafael FernAndez de Castro; 121 Cuba, Havana. Ntra. Sra. del Rosario.Cienfuegos ......... Maria A. de Sarria ; Cienfuegos. Ntra. Sra. de los Dolores ..... Nueva Empr Nueva Esper Nuevo Teres O'Reilly.... Oceano .... Occitania ... Ojo de Agua Ojo de Agua Olallita..... Olimpo..... Olimpo..... Oriente. .. Oriente..... esa. anz a .. ... Sagua .............Francisco A. Garcia ; Sagua. -.... Camarioca ......... Antonio Aldave y Urroz ; Camarioca. a ...Cabezas.......... .. Jose I. Dominguez ; 119 Burriel, Matanzas. .... Cabanas ............ Mendieta y Ducassi ; 22 Galiano, Havana. ..Quemados de Goines. ........Remedios.......... Jose Boffill ; Remedios. ....... Macagua.......... Herederos de Himely ; 13 Oficios, Havana. ....... Calabazar (Sagua).. .Antonio Alvera ; Calabazar. ....... Coliseo ............ Antonio Fernandez Vallin ; 61 A Amista Havana. ....... Santo Domingo ..... Juan Betharte ; iio Tac6n, Sagua. c; M C r r, zr r. ad, r ....... Cimarrones......... Herederos de Amalia Baro ; 42 Galiano, Havana. ....... Cuba .............. Jacobo de los Reyes Gavilan ; 132 Consulado, Havana. ....... Calabazar .......... Rodriguez y Sarda. .......Cuevitas...........Antonio Galindez Aldama ; 6 tanzas. Canimar, MaName of the Plantation. Where situate. Name and address of owners. ..

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Name of the Plantation Oriente.......... Oto5o........... Palestina......... Palma Cubana. .. Palmarejo ....... Palmarejo .... .. Panchita ......... Panchita......... Panchita.. .... .. Panchita......... Papayal ......... Paraiso.......... Parque Alto ..... Paso Real ...... Pastora.......... P az ............. Where situate. Guamutas ......... Cardenas... Roque .... Guamutas .Cardenas... Cuba...... Cimarrones Sagua ... Sagua ... S. Jos6 de Trinidad Cabezas ( Rodas .. Trinidad Sagua ... Sumidero lo M Name and address of owners. .Eduardo Pumariega. ........Felipe Quintana ; Cirdenas. .........Gabriel Sobrado. .........Merced Fernandez. ........ M. Aguirregaviria ; Cardenas. ........ Francisco Portuondo ; Cuba. ....Sebastian Ulacia ; Ingenio "Tivo-Tivo," CpO. Florido. ........ Gutierrez y Casals. ........ Herederos de Glean ; Sagua. s Ramos.Roque Manrique y Recio. .... ... Manuel Santander (at the Plantation), atanzas). Juan M. Valera. ........ Fowler y Ca.; calle Dortic6s, Cienfuegos. .........G. Schmidt y Ca.; 47 Gutierrez, Trinidad. ........Carlos Font ; 17 Aguiar, Havana. .........lvira y Juan Ventosa ; 56 S. Ignacio, HaPe6n.... vana. ....... Matanzas .......... Marques Du-Quesne ; 198 Habana, Havana. Pepilla .............Santo Domingo ..... Antonia Rodriguez Mora ; Santa Clara. Perla..............Col6n ............. Herederos de Jose Maria Gonzalez.

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Name and address of owners. Perla ..... Perseveran Perseveran Perseveran Perseveran Petrona ... Piedad.... Pilar ... Pilar ... Pilar.. ... Pojabo ... Por Fuerza Portugalete Portugalete Porvenir. Pozon .... Precioso.. Precioso.. Primavera. cia. cia. cia. cia Guamacaro ... Cardenas..... Guanajayabo.. Guantanamo Vieja Bermeja. .Caobas......... .Canasi .......... ......... A rtem isa........ ......... C abezas......... ..........Mariel .......... .........Sancti Spiritus... ......... Guamutas ...... .Cienfuegos...... .. S. Jos6 de las Lij ..... .Palm illas........ ...... M anzanillo ...... .........C irdenas ....... .........Cardenas ....... .........San Nicolas..... ...Pedro Martinto ; Guamacaro. ...Diaz y Ferrer. Candido Matas. l. Manuel Masforroll (at the Plantation). ...Manuel Viera Montes de Oca ; 62 Zanja, Havana. ... Garcia Bango y Ca.; 3 Ricla, Matanzas. .. Andrea Garcia y Diaz. ... Fermin Goicoechea ; 44 Bernaza, Havana. ...Manuel Zayas Trigueros (at the Plantation). .. Bernardo Diaz Grande. ...Olazar y Tome; 6o San Rafael, Sancti Spiritus. C. Gomez ; Cdrdenas. ..Sotero Escarza; 69 San Fernando, Cienfuegos. as. Manuel Calvo ; 98 Aguiar, Havana. ... Gabriel Forcade ; 478 Cerro, Havana. ...Miguel Raventos ; Jibacoa. ... Fco. Figueras y Ca.; 14 Laborde, Cardenas. ..I. Hipolito del Hoyo Cuesta. .. .Maria de la Luz Armenteros ; 47 Monte, Havana. Name of the Plantation. Where situate.

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Name and address of owners. Progreso ...... Progreso...... Prontitud..... Providencia.. Providencia... Providencia... Providencia ... Providencia... Providencia .. Puerto ......... Punch ......... Purio ......... ......Lagunillas......... Suarez y Ruiz ; Cirdenas. ......S. Jose de los Ramos.Viuda de Lacoste ; 440 Cerro, Havana. ..... .Guanajayabo.. ..... Banaguises.... .....Cabanas...... .....Camajuani .... ..... Cardenas. ..... ......Col6n ........ ... .G iines ........ .... Canasi ........ ..... Alfonso XII .. ... Calabazar ..... Purisima Concepci6n.Guira de Melena.. PurisimaConcepci6n.Lagunillas........ Recompensa........ Cabanas ......... Recompensa........ Macagua ......... Recreo ............Alfonso XII .... Recreo .... ....... Matanzas ........ ..... Torres e Hijos. ..... E. Lacoste ; 440 Cerro, Havana. ..... Matias Averhoff ; 148 San Lazaro, Havana. .....J. M. Leal ; Remedios. ..... Suarez y Ruiz ; Cardenas. .....Ram6n Mallea. .. .....Pascual Goicoechea ; 95 vana. .....Jose Fernandez Blanco. A San Lizaro, ..... Edelberto Ferrer ; 4 Santa Catalina, HaCerro, Havana. Viuda de Ofa ; Sagua. Manuel Peralta ; 52 Reina, Havana. .Manuel B. Mor6. .Marqu6s de Veitia ; Havana. ..Manuel N. Martinez; 22 Mercaderes, Havana. .Marques de Villalva. ..Antonio Becali. Recuerdo..........Cardenas....... Name of the Plantation. Where situate. c s ... Fermin Menandez ; Cardenas.

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Name of the Plantation. Recuerdo. Recuerdo. Recurso .. Where situate. .........Cardenas......... .........Sierra M orena.... Name and address of owners. .. J. Alzugaray ; Cdrdenas. ..Jos6 y Francisco de la Portilla ; 9 Baratillo, altos, Havana. ......... Calabazar (Sagua)... Laureano Rodriguez ; Sitio Grande, Sagua. Recurso .......... Redenci6n Redenci6n Reforma.. Refugio .. Regla..... Reglita ... Reglita ... Reliquia. Reparador Reserva... .Jovellanos........ .........Bahia Honda..... ......... N uevitas ......... ......... Remedios...... ..Francisco G. Rolando. ..Emilio Kessel ; 16 Empedrado, Havana. ..Compaiia Andnima ; Admor.: Sr. Espinosa (at the Plantation). ..Martinez y Fernandez Valverde. .......San Diego de Nunez.Francisca Rodriguez (at the Plantation). .........Manacas .......... .........Cardenas.......... .........Santa Clara ....... ......... Sagua ............ .........Cienfuegos........ .........M acagua ........ Resoluci6n ...... Resoluci6n ...... Resultas ........ ... Roque ......... ...Sagua ......... ...Sagua ......... Domingo Sarria y Albis ; Cienfuegos. .Cesareo Sardifia ; Havana. .Miguel Solis. .F. Lamadrid ; Sagua. 56 San Fernando, .Herederos de Terry ; Cienfuegos. .Gabriel P. Ricart. .Francisco Suris y Ca. .... Jos6 Maria Lezama ; 112 Tac6n, Sagua. .... Joaquin Alfonso y Hermano ; 84 Cuba vana. Ha..

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Name and address of owner=. Retribuci6n .. Romelie .... Rosa........ Rosalia...... Rosario...... Rosario...... Rosario..... Rosario ..... Rosario..... Rosita....... Rubi........ Sabanilla..... Salvador ..... Salvador..... Salvador..... Salvador..... Salvador..... San Agustin .. San Agustin.. San Agustin.. ...... Sabanilla...... ......Guantanamo... ...... Palmillas ..... ...... Caobas ....... ......Aguacate..... ...... Arim ao ....... ...... C ol6n ........ ...... Jovellanos.... .......Guamacaro ... ......Esperanza.... ...... Ranchuelo .... ......Cuba......... ......Guamacaro.... ...... M acagua ...... .......Manzanillo.... .......Palmillas .... .......Sagua ........ .......Alfonso XII .. ......Cabanas...... ......Cartagena..... ...Vicente Querol ; 38 Jesus Maria, Havana. .....Santiago Mackinlay y Sobrinos (at the Plantation). ....Rarn6n Mendez y Hermanos Maribona. .... Carlos Tejidor ; Matanzas. .....Guillermo y Pedro Morales; 2 Salud, Havana. ..... Mariana Albis, viuda de Sarria, Cienfuegos. ..... Uriarte y Hermano (at the Plantation). ..... Higinio Gonzalez. .Herederos de Basilio Martinez. .Herederos de Rosa Perez ; Esperanza. .J. R. Jova ; 6o San Carlos, Cienfuegos. ...Salazar y Pezuela ; Cuba (Songo). ......Arturo Amblard ; 4 Teniente-Rey, Havana. ......Miguel Angel Cabello ; 78 Cuba, Havana. ..... Ramirez y Oro ; Manzanillo. ..... Rosell y Malpica ; Havana. .....Emilio Cespedes ; 22 Mercaderes, Havana. ..... Angel A. Arcos ; 29 Obispo, Havana. .....Antonio Iznaga ; 114 Habana, Havana. ..... Viuda de Goitizolo; 73 Sta. Elena, Cienfuegos. name of the Plantation. Where situate.

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Name and address of owners. San Agustin ..... .Lagunillas... San Agustin (a) Mosquera ...........Quivicin ... San Agustin........ Remedios.. San Agustin ........ Sta. I. de las S. Alejo de Manacas. Trinidad ... San Andrs ... .... Guamutas .. San Antonio....... Alfonso XII San Antonio ....... .Alquizar.... San Antonio........ Calabazar... San Antonio ..... ...Guantinamo. San Anton io........ Cienfuegos. San Antonio........ La Cidra ... San Antonio........ Matanzas ... San Antonio........Matanzas ... San Antonio........ Remedios ... San Antonio........Sabanilla ... San Antonio........Sagua ...... San Antonio........ San Nicolis. .......Sth. Morgan. ........Mariano de la Torre ; 48 Oficios, altos, y 38 Tulipan, Havana. ....... Juan J. Ariosa ; i1 Mercaderes y 33 Oficios, Havana. Lajas. .N. Andi6 ; Cienfuegos. ....... Benito Alvarez Medina ; Trinidad. .Elvira Perovani. .ercedes y Rita Fernindez. ....... Mamerto Pulido ; 116 Aguiar, Havana. ....... Antonio Flaque ; Sagua. ....... Luis Redor ; 37 Valdds baja, Guantanamo. ....... Josd Rodriguez Trujillo ; Cienfuegos. ....... Julio Serrate Ruiz ; 119 Daoiz, Matanzas. ....... Julian Gomez ; 68 O'Reilly, Matanzas. .......Pedro de Cardenas. ....... Celestino Gomez ; Remedios. ........Zayas y Gilvez. ........Francisco Delgado ; Sagua. .. ....Fernando Perez. -4 Name of the Plantation. Where situate.

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Name of the Plantatior San Antonio... San Antonio Polo San Antonio..... San Benito ...... San Blas........ San Carlos ...... San Cayetano ... San Cayetano ... San Claudio..... San Cristobal .... San Cristobal... San Dionisio .... .Where situate. ...Santa Clara ... ... Sancti Spiritus ... Vieja Bermeja. ...I3olondr6n .... ... Matanzas ..... ...Guantinamo .. ...Cidra ........ ...Guamutas.... ...Cabanas...... Name and address of owners. ......Vicente Gonzalez Abreu ; Santa Clara. ......Garcia y Ca. ; Cienfuegos. ..... Jesus Benigno Galvez ; 92 A 7n Vedado, Havana. .Jos6 Sainz y Sainz ; 33 O'Reilly, Matanzas. .Sucesi6n de J. Calvo. .Jose Gorgis y Miguel tion). Mestre (at the Planta..... Julio y Gonzalo Alfonso ; 9 Baratillo, Havana. ......Francisco Duquesne ; 198 Habana, Havana. ..... Eduardo Delgado ; 5 Prado, Havana. .S. Jos6 de los Ramos.Felipe Malpica ; Havana. Santa Clara .... ...Francisco Cardoso. .. Cardenas........... D. de los S. Tellechea. San Esteban ........ Cienfuegos ......... Juan M. Arrillaga y Ca. San Eusebio ........Coln .............Gabino L6pez. San Federico ....... Nuevitas ........... Bernal y Ca. (at the Plantation). San Felipe .......... Guamacaro ......... Francisco Barrio ; 17 Paseo Vedado, Havana. San Felipe ......... S. Jose de los Ramos.Felipe A. Delgado. San Fernando ...... Lagunillas.......... Ricardo Perez. San Fernando ..... .Sagua ....... ..... .Eugenio Fernindez Espinosa ; Sagua. Cc w~

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Name and address of owners. San Fernando San Fernando San Florencio San Francisco San Francisco San Francisco San Francisco San Francisco San Francisco ...... Sancti Spiritus ...... Sumidero.... ...... Bolondr6n ... ...... Bolondr6n ... ...... Carahatas..... ......Cruces........ .......Guamacaro .... ...... Guanajay .... ...... Jovellanos..... ..... Francisco L. del Valle 6 Iznaga ; 1 14 Habana, Havana. .Felix Govin ; 95 Virtudes, Havana. .J. Sainz. .Servia y Gonzalez. .Armenteros. ..... Luis Estevez ; 72 Prado, Havana. ......Aballi Hermanos ; Matanzas. ..... Miguel Herrera ; 486 Cerro, Havana. ..... Cosme de la Torriente ; tanzas. 117 Contreras, MaSan Francisco ...... Matanzas ..... San Francisco ...... Roque ........ San Francisco ...... Sagua ......... San Francisco......Santo Domingo San Francisco ...... Sagua........ San Francisco ...... Sabanilla ..... San Francisco ...... San Nicolas ... San Francisco Asis.. Sagua ........ San Gabriel.. ..... R. D. Gonzalez Chavez. ..... Castro y Junco ; Roque. ..... Ciriaco Delgado ; Sagua. .....Jose M. Nt'iiez ; Remedios. .....Belisario Galceran ; Encrucijada. .....Anastasio Herques ; Cardenas. ..... Damaso del Campo. .....Adolfo Moliner ; 530 Cerro, Havana. ......San Diego de Niez.Herederos del Conde Lombillo ; i Empedrado, Havana. Name of the Plantation. Where situate.

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Name and address of owners. .. Guanajay..........Jose Inda Zozaya. ..San Diego del Valle.Gabriel Aguilera y Zayas ; Sagua. ......Unidn de Reyes ....Joaquin Giell y Rent6 ; 416 Cerro, Havana. .. ..Alfonso XII........ Arango, Sobrino y Ca. San Ignacio ... San Ignacio ... San San San San San San San San San San San San .Canasi ..... ....... Francisco Chac6n, Conde de C. Ballona ; Oficios, Havana. 76 .....Esperanza.......... Condesa viuda de MVor6 ; 9 Baratillo, Havana. Ignacio ........ Union de Reyes .... Josd Fernandez Lopez ; Uni6n de Reyes. Ignacio ........ .San Diego de Ndez.Herederos del Conde de San Ignacio; Havana. Ignacio ........ Palmira .............orriente Hnos. ; 72 Santa Clara, Cienfuegos. Ildefonso.......Guantanamo........ J. Bueno y Ca.; 44 Valdes baja, Guantanamo. Isidro Labrador.Sagua .............. Condesa viuda de Mor6 ; 9 Baratillo, Havana. Isidro .......... Hoyo Colorado .... Manuel Borrell ; Havana. Isidro .........Lajas.............. Avilds y Leblanc ; Cienfuegos. Jacinto ........ Cabahas ........... Marques de Sandoval ; 4 Cuba, Havana. Jacinto ........Santo Domingo..... Condesa viuda de More ; 9 Baratillo, Havana. Joaquin ...:.... Las Pozas.......... Joaquin Mier ; 12 Mercaderes, Havana. Joaquin........ Macurijes.......... Conde Ibanez ; 5 Cuba, Havana. Joaquin ......... acurijes.......... Gonzalo Joaquin Pedroso ; Cr11 Mercaderes y 4 Compostela, Havana. S. Joaquin (a) BaracORernedios.......... M. Martinez Gonzalez ; Remedios. San San San San Gabriel ... Gabriel ... Gonzalo. Ignacio ... C DNme of the Plantation. Where situate. ... ...

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Name and address of owners. San San San San San San San San San San San San San San San San San San San Jorge ....... Jose ........ Jos6........ Jos6........ Jose........ Jos6..... .. Jos6........ Jose....... Jose (a) Sord Jose........ Jose........ Jose..... .. Jose (a) (6m Jose........ Jose........ Jos6........ Jose........ Jose......... Jos6........ Sagua ............ Alfonso XII ....... holondron ........ Canasi ............ Cim arrones........ Col6n ............ Cuevitas.......... Guamutas ........ Guamutas......... Guantinamo....... Guanajay ......... Gira de Melena... M arianao ..... ... Manacas. ........ M ariel ............ M'elena del Sur. ... Placetas.......... Sabanilla.......... Sancti Spiritus .... San Jos6.......... Tosca (Matanzas) .. .Maribona v Rodriguez. .EI"uloi PI'rieto ; Sagiua. .7albala Bea. .Manuel Olano y Molina. .ose Diaz Bolaho. M enendez y Sobrino. .J. M. Fernandez Medero. Herederos de Josd de Marcos ; Malanzas Hernindez y H ermano. .Herederos de Delgado. Sociedad de Furnier. .Juan Meoki (at the Plantation). Tomas Escarza ; Havana. Manuel Peralta ; 52 Reina, Havana. .Cirilo Gonzailez (at the Plantation). .Conde de Fernandina ; 586 Cerro, Havana. .Carolina Lacoste ; 440 Cerro, Havana. .Agustin Goicochea ; 2 Paula, Havana. ., E. Dominguez ; Matanzas. Herederos de Domingo Amdzaga (at the Plantation). Name of the Plantation. Where situate.

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San Jose..........Union de Reyes .... Julio y Gonzalo Alfonso ; 9 Baratillo, Havana. San Jose Abajo.....Trinidad ...........Mariano Borrell (at the Plantation). S. Jose de Caunabaco.Matanzas .......... Jos6 Maria Gilvez ; 42 Prado, Havana. San Jos6 de la Cruz. Las Bocas (Trinidad).Meyer Thode y Ca.; Trinidad. San Jose de la Vega. Rodas ............. Atkin y Ca.; Boston. San Juan........... Calimete ..........M. Cobos Ruiz. San Juan..... San Juan..... San Juan..... San Juan..... San Juan..... San Juan..... San Juan..... ...... Camarioca ......... R. Heidegger ; 30 Contreras, Matanzas. ......C anasi.......... ......Col6n .......... .......Guamutas ....... ...... Guanajayabo .... .. ...R oque .......... ......Santa Clara..... ...Laureano Ramos Perez. ..Carlos M. Mazorra ; 20 Prado, Havana. ... Roque del Rio. ... Felipe Pelayo ; Matanzas. ... Carlos Mazorra. ...Enrique Heyman ; Havana. 74 Oficios San San Juan Bautista...Bolondron .. Juan Bautista.. .Cabanas .... San Juan de Dios.. .Gibacoa .... San Juan de Wilson .Matanzas ... San Julian.........Mangas..... .......Rafael Mendoza. ....... Maria de la Luz Armenteros ; 47 Monte, Havana. ....... Condesa de Casa Bayona; 76 Oficios, Havana. ....... Roberto Cutting. .......Maria Rosario Capetillo. San Laureano ...... Guamacaro...... .dA i y 743 Cerro, Where situate. Name and address of owners. Name of the Plantation. .Herederos de Antonio Benitez.

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Name and address of owners. San Leon ....... San Lino....... San Lorenzo .... San Luciano..... San Luis........ San Liis........ San Luis........ San Luis........ San Luis... San Luis... ...Artemisa ...... ...Rodas........ .. .Sagua....... ... Macagua...... ... Canasi ........ ...Cuba......... ...Guamutas..... ... Hato Nuevo... ...... Jaruco ....... ...... .M acurijes.... ..... Francisco de la Sierra ; 68 Villegas. .....Montalvo y Hermanos (at the Plantation). ..... Nicolas Peraza ; Sagua. .....Adolfo Sanchez Arcilla; Havana. 1o6 San Ignacio, .Herederos de Catalina Calvo. .....Sucesidn de Antonio Norma, Cuba. .....Serafin Herrera. ..... Miguel Valdes Chac6n ; 92 Concordia, vana. ....Rafael Fernandez de Castro ; vana. Ha121 Cuba, Ha.....Herederos de Alberto Jorrin ; 522 Cerro, Havana. San Luis........... M anzanillo ..... San Manuel ........ Puerto Padre .. ... L. Ruiz ; 8 O'Reilly, Havana. ... Viuda y herederos de Jose Pla ; Havana. 38 Galiano, San Manuel San Mateo. San San Miguel. ........ Remedios.... ........ Q uivicin ...... ... .... Guamacaro .... Miguel......... Guantanamo .... .. Juan Ariosa ; 11 Mercaderes, Havana. ... Tomas del Calvo (at the Plantation). ... Florencio Armas (at the Plantation). ... Jose y Ticito Bueno ; Cuba. C-: Ct 5, = Name of the Plantation. Where situate.

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Name of the Plantation. Where situate. San Miguel.........Giiira de Macurij San M iguel.........Jaruco ......... San Miguel.........Sabanilla. S. Miguel (a) Varela.Cabaias ....... Narciso. Pablo.. Pablo... Pablo... Pablo.. Pedro.. San San San San San San San San San San San San San San .Sabanilla..... .Alfonso XII Cimarrones .. .Colon....... .Remedios... .Sagua ....... Sagua ....... .Bolondrtin ... Rancho Veloz Carahatas.... Guamacaro .. Remedios.. .Cimarrones .. .Manzanillo., Name and address of owners. jes .Salvador Mir6 ; Matanzas. .... Josd Maria Montalvin ; i Mercaderes, Havana. Eduardo Usabiaga (at the Plantation). V. ..iuda de Bolet. .... Ilerederos de Pablo Bango ; Alfonso XII. .. ..Francisco Secada ; Cdrdenas. .... Carlos La Rosa ; Cardenas. ....Pablo Figuerola. .... Francisco y Lorenzo Ferran ; 7 Baratillo, I lavana. ... Pedro Espinosa ; Sagua. ....Gonzalo Jorrin ; 522 Cerro, Havana. Tornas Pavia (in Spain).-Apoderado : Alfredo Morales ; r i Monte, Havana. ....O'Farrill y Morales ; Havana. ....Carlos Tejidor ; Matanzas. .... J. J. Rojas ; Remedios. .... Herederos de Polledo v Rionda ; Matanzas. ....Roque Reig Escalante ; Manzanillo. 4Pedro......... R afael........ Rafael...... .. Rafael......... Rafael......... Rafael...... .. Ram6n........ Ramon........

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Name and address of owners. San San San San San San San San San San Ram6n.. Ram6n Ramon.. Ricardo. Ricardo. Romin.. Sebastiab Silvestre Vicente. Vicente. San Vicente. San Vicente San Vicente. San Vicente. San Vicente. Santa Agusti Santa Amalia Santa Amalia Santa Amelia. .... M anzanillo... ........Sagua ........ .......Sagua ........ ....... Guamutas ..... .......Itabo ......... ....... C anasi ........ ........ C uba ......... .......Santa Ana .... .......Cardenas...... ....... Cuevitas ...... ....... Guamutas ..... .......Guantanamo... ....... Jovellanos .... ....... Rancho Veloz .......Sierra Morena. na..... Lagunillas..... ........Guamacaro ... ......Sta. I. de las La ....... Sta. Maria del Ro .....Sindicato Americano ; U. S. of America. .Doroteo Godines ; Sagua. .....A. F. Arechavaleta ; Sagua. ..... Ana Borden ; Guamutas. .....Ricardo Dorengh ; Cardenas. ..... Beldn Cartaya ;23 Gelabert, Matanzas. .....Tomas Brode y Ca.; Songo, Cuba. .....Herederos de Alfonso ; Havana. ......R. Ferro ; Cirdenas. ..... Herederos de Evaristo Mazas (at the Plantation). .... H. Barreto. ...Arturo E. Simon; 6 Valdes baja, Guantanamo. ..... Josd Sainz y Sainz ; 33 O'Reilly, Matanzas. ..... Manuel Calvo ; 98 Aguiar, Havana. .....Narciso Rodriguez ; t 28 Lealtad, Havana. .T.omis Morgan. .. Herederos de Webster. jas.. Herederos de Taylor. sario. Jose y Francisco de ia Portilla ; 9 Baratillo, altos, Havana. Where situate. Name of the Plantation,

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Santa Ana .........Alfonso XII .......Segundo Alvarez ; Havana. Santa Ana.......... Bolondron ......... Josd Grande ; 1 Magdalena, Matanzas. Santa Ana .........Camajuani .........Celestino G6mez ; Remedios. Santa Ana.......... Cuba..............Azna y Escoriaza ; Cuba. Santa Ana......... Col6n .............Gonzalez y Hermano. Santa Ana......... Macurijes.......... Leandro Soler ; 113 Aguila, Havana. Santa Ana..........Sagua .............Jorge K. Thondike ; Sagua. Sta. Ana (a) Verdugo.Las Vueltas (provinSanta BIrbara.. Santa Barbara .. Santa Catalina.. Santa Catalina.. Santa Catalina.. Santa Catalina.. cia de Sta. Clar ... Col6n .......... ...Quintana. .... .. ...Las Cruces ...... ...Limonar ....... ... M acurijes ....... ... R ecreo ......... Santa Catalina......Yaguajay ....... Santa Cecilia ... Santa Clara .... ... Guantanamo ..... ... Rancho Veloz.. a) .Vicente Perez Llamedo. .Joaquin Casta-er ; Matanzas. .Casas y Obaya ; Quintana. ...Angela Mora, viuda de Abreu; 70 Prado, Hvna. ... Herederos de Pedro Hernandez de la Cruz.Administrador : Jose R. Mesa ; Matanzas. ...R. Heidegger ; 30 Contreras, Matanzas. ...Herederos de Ortiz y Coffigny ; 41 O'Reilly, Matanzas. ...Herederos de Jos6 Carb6 (at the Plantation). ...Arturo Simon ; 6 Valdes baja, Guantanamo. ...Francisco de P. Xiques y Ramos ; 30 Concepcidn, Guanabacoa. Name of the Plantation. Where situate. Namec and address of owners.

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Name of the Plantation. Santa Clara..... Santa Polonia.... Santa Elena.... Santa Elena.... Santa Elena..... Santa Elena..... Santa Elvira .... Santa Emilia.... Santa Eulalia.... Santa Fe........ Santa Filomena. Santa Gertrudis.. Where situate. ... Santo Domingo. ...Sagua ......... ...Cervantes..... ...Cervantes...... ... M atanzas...... .Trinidad ....... ...Guamutas ...... ...Sierra Morena ...Cayajabos...... Guantinamo .... ... M acurijes ...... ... Banagu-ises ...... Name and address of owners. Herederos de Nunez ; Rodrigo. .... Maria Joaquina Santos ; Col6n. .... Jose Zavas y Jimenez. S. .. Usabiaga, Inigo y Ca. (at the Plantation). .... Ramiro Pedroso ; zi Amargura, Havana. ....Castaho y Ca.; Cienfuegos. .... Elvira Perovani. ....Jose Soroa ; 4o Aguiar, Havana. ......onifacio Jimenez (at the Plantation). Sucesi6n de Faure.-Leased to Justiniano Blanco (at the Plantation). ..Leandro Soler y Havana. ...Antonio Gonzalez Havana. Morell ; 113 Aguila, altos, Mendoza ; 21 Amargura, Santa Ines..... Santa Isabel.... Santa Isabel .... Santa Isabel.... Santa Isabel.... Santa Isabel.,. ....Santa Ana...... .... Bolondrdn ...... .... Cimarrones ...... .... Guamacaro ...... .. ..Guamutas ...... .... Guanajayabo .... ... Serafin Rivero. ...Juan J. Nicols. ... Diaz Argielles y Hermanos. ...Juan Neninger. ... Teresa Menendez. .. .Viuda de Fernandez de Castro ; Havana.

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Name of the Plantation. Santa Santa Santa Santa Santa Santa Santa Santa Santa Santa Santa Santa Santa Santa Santa Santa Santa Santa Santa Isabel... Leocadia. Lucia ... Lucia.... Lucia .... Lutgarda Lutgarda. Maria.. .. Maria... Maria ... Maria .. Maria .... Margarita. Marta.... Matilde .. Petrona .. Rita ... R ita..... Rita..... Where situa .S. Jose de los .Matanzas .... .Gibara....... .Guamacaro .. San Antonio Vegas..... .Sagta ....... .Sierra Morena Corral Falso .Guantanamo. .Lagunillas ... Macurijes ... .S. Josd de los .i\atanzas .... Cienfuegos... .Aguacate..... Cardenas..... .Bolondr6n ... .artagena .. Colon ....... tc. Name and address of owners. Ramos.Pedro Lacoste ; 416 Cerro, Havana. ...... Ratrell y Hermano ; 6o San Ignacio, Havana. ...... Rafael E. Sanchez ; 70 Contreras, Matanzas. .......Lorenzo Delgado ; 98 Contreras, Matanzas. de las .. Casuso y Hermanos ; 37 Virtudes, Havana. .Jose Maria L6pez ; Sagua. ......Carlos Sanchez Benitez ; Havana. ...... Sucesi6n de Marcial Ponce ; Macurijes. ....... Fernando Pons ; Coldn baja, Guantinamo. .. ... Viuda de Camps. ..... Jose Melgares ; 52 Reina, Havana. Ramos.Herederos de Francisco G6mez. ...... Ramon Menendez. ...... Arturo Grossio ; Cienfuegos. ...... J. j. Portela ; 556 Cerro, Havana. ...... Marcos Sardifa ; Cardenas. ...... Herederos de Fabian Garcia. .Santiago Rivero (at the Plantation). .. Leandro Soler y Morell ; 113 Aguila, altos, Havana.

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Name and address of owners. Santa Rita Santa Santa Santa Santa Santa Santa Santa Santa Santa Santa Santa Santa Santa Santa Santa Santa Santa Santa Santa Rita.. Rita.. Rita. Rita.. Rita. Rita. Rita.. Rita.. Rosa.. Rosa.. Rosa.. Rosa.. Rosa.. Rosalin Rosalia Rosali Rosali Rosalia Sofia.. ....... Guanajayabo .......Jose Carol Hermano y Ca. .......La Esperanza.......Antonio Berenguer ; Havana. .acturijes .........Sucesidn de Antonio RoldIn ; Havana. ....... Madruga ........... Antonio Galindez ; Canimar, Matanzas. ........Matanzas .... .....Pedro Amdizaga ; Matanzas. ....... Rancho Veloz ...... Dolores Bruzdn, viuda de Portillo ; Havan .... Roque ............... Sucesidn de Cristina Bard de Soler ; 50 Sa Ignacio. .......S. Jose de los Ramos.Ricardo Trujillo. ........Santo Domingo.....Jose Robau ; Sagua. ........Cimarrones.........Juan P. Dihigo ; 110 San Ignacio, Havana. ....... Lagunillas.......... l .Torres. ....... .atanzas .......... Herederos de Pastor Hernandez. .... Sumidero ......... .Aniceto Martinez ; Matanzas. .Unidn de Reyes ....Joaquin Mier ; 1 2 Mercaderes, Havana. ........ Arimao............ Manuel Blanco y Ramos ; Cienfuegos. ........ Camajuani ......... J. B. Llanza y Ca.; Caibaridn. ........ Esperanza..........Gimenez y Hermano ; Matanzas. .........acurijes .......... Salvador Castaher ; 2Contreras, Matanzas. ........ Rodas ............... Manuel Blanco y Ramos ; Cienfuegos. ....... Jovellanos......... .Herederos de Josd Lucas Diaz. a. u Where situate. Name of the Plantation.

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Santa Teresa.......Ceja de Pablo ......Fernando Molina ; 10 Cornpostela, Havana. Santa Teresa ....... Palmillas .......... Pedro Lacoste ; 440 Cerro, Havana. Santa Teresa.......Sagua .............Viuda de Ona ; Sagua. Sta. Teresa de Jesus.Cienfuegos ......... .Sebastian P. Gald6s ; Cienfuegos. Santa Victoria..... .Bolondr6n .........Juan J. Nicolas. Santiago ...........San Diego de Nauez.Condesa de Santiago. Santiago ........... S. Jos6 de los Rarnos.Jose Tavio ; San Josd de los Ramos. Santisima Trinidad.. Jaruco ........... Santisima Trinidad.. Jovellanos ....... Santisima Trinidad. .Sabanilla......... Santisima Trinidad.. Sagua .......... Santisima Trinidad.. Tapaste .......... Santo Cristo........ Cabezas .......... Santo Domingo.....San Felipe ....... Santo Domingo.....Uni6n de Reyes... Sto. Tomis del Abra.Sagua .......... Saratoga ........... Bolondr6n ....... Saratoga...........Rodrigo ......... Seibabo ...........Santa Clara...... .Saturnino Lastra ; 26 Mercaderes, Havana. M. Pontoni y Ca. Francisco A. Barthelt. Condesa viuda de Mord ; 9 Baratillo, Havana. Marques de la Real Proclamaci6n ; 110 iOficios, Havana. Herederos de Heredia. Herederos de Dominguez (at the Plantation). .Garcia Serra y Ca.; 6 Oficios, Havana. .Isabel Iglesias ; Sagua. ..Herederos de Drake.-Apoderado: Enrique Heydegger ; 30 Contreras, Matanzas. Francisco Seilie ; Sagua. ..Domingo Cardoso (at the Plantation). rI Name of the Plantation. Where situate. Name and address of owners.

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Name of the Plantation. Senado ........... Sirena ............ Soberano.......... Soberano.......... Sociedad ......... Socorro ........... Socorro........... Socorro........... Sofia ............. Soledad ........... Soledad........... Soledad........... Tartesio .......... Tentativa.... .... T eresa ............ Teresa .... Teresa .... Teresa .... Tinima .. Tinaja .... Name and address of owners. Nuevitas ... Cabanas... .Remedios.. Yaguajay .. Macagua... .Caobas .... .Col6n..... .Sierra More .Manzanillo .Arimao.... .Guantinam .Jovellanos Rancho Vel .Col6n .... .Cruces..... ........ Manzanillo ........ Melena del ........San Nicolas .........Palmillas .. ........ .Mariel .... ........Bernabe Sanchez Adan ; Nuevitas. ........ Jose Barberia Rojas. ........ Eduardo Sansaric ; Remedios. ...Basilio Subero (at the Plantation). .........Viuda de Lacoste ; 440 Cerro, Havana. .........Herederos de Macias ; Matanzas. .........Socorro de Armas. na......Conde de Ibanez ; 5 Cuba, Havana. ........ Pedro Valles. .........Atkins y Ca.; Boston, United States. o........ Brooks y Ca.; 43 Real baja, Guantanamo. .........Francisco Secada ; Cardenas. oz...... .Mariano Diaz (at the Plantation). ........Concepci6n Duefas ; 207 Habana, Havana. ........ Andres Terry y Hermano ; 27 Dorticds, Cienfuegos. ......... T. Rigney y Ca.; Ceiba Hueca. Sur..... Marques de la Gratitud ; 547 Cerro, Havana. .........Ramiro L6pez de Mendoza ; San Nicolas. ........ Jorge Barroso, Cardenas. ... Carlos Laza, Where situate. ., ...

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Name of the Plantation Tinguaro....... Tivo-Tivo ....... 'T'oledo .......... 'T ol6n ........... Tomasita......... Toro ........... Tran guilidad ..... Trinidad ......... Trinidad......... Triunfana....... 'Triunfana........ ITriunfo ..... .... T riunfo.......... Triunfo.......... Triunvirato ...... Triunvirato....... Tuinicd .......... U nidad .......... U nidad .......... U nion ........... Where situate. Pijuan ......... Campo Florido M arianao ..... .Alfonso XII .. M ariel ......... Cimarrones .... Manzanillo ..... .Jovellanos...... .Union de Reyes. .Calimete ....... Cardenas....... .Guamacaro .... .Guanajayabo ... Lagunillas...... .Matanzas ...... Sagua ......... .Sancti Spiritus.. .Cifuentes. .Sagua ......... .Coliseo ........ Name and address of owners. .... Carlos La Rosa ; Cardenas. ....Sebastian Ulacia (at the Plantation). ....Herederos de la viuda de Duraiona ; 66 Oficios, altos, Havana. .... Garcia, Bango y Ca.; Matanzas. ....Abelardo Ledesma ; 35 Prado, Havana. ... Joaquin C. Carrillo. S. .. Roque Reig Escalante ; Manzanillo. ....J. Argtielles. ....Isidoro y Saturnino Hernandez. .... Ana Delgado ; 442 Cerro, Havana. .Francisco Noda ; Cardenas. .Estanislao Sotelo ; Matanzas. ....Herederos de Hevia y Perez. ....Pilar S. Ruiz. .... Eduardo Echarte ; 30 Campanario, Havana. .. Rodriguez L6pez ; Sagua. .... J. M. Ceballos y C.; Wall Street, New York. .... McCulloch Hermanos ; Sagua. .. Alberto Marill ; 21 Aguiar, Havana. -1r

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Union..... Unin...... Uni6n..... Uni6n...... Union..... Uni6n..... Unin..... Urumea.... Valiente ... Valladares Vega...... Verdug6n.. Victoria ... Victoria ... Victoria ... Victoria .. Victoria .. Victoria ... Victoria .. .......Cuba .............. Rousseau y Dusac ; Havana. ....... Cuevitas .......... Pedro L. Fernandez ; 66 Cuba, Havana. .... ...Guarnutas .......... Herederos de Bolaio y Gonzilez. ...Guanajayabo .......SebastiAn Ulacia ; Ingenio Tivo-Tivo," Cpo. Florido. ........Macurijes ..........Andrds Fernandez ; 102 7a Vedado, Havana. .......Sagua.............Antonio Mesa Reyes ; Sagua. ....... Sagua .... .. ....TBasilio Ortiz (at the Plantation). ......... osd de los Ramos.Herederos de Zuaznavar ; Havana. ......Alfonso XII... ....Silvestre Garcia 13ango ; 33 O'Reilly, Mtzas. .......Alfonso XL [........ Angel A. Arcos ; 49 Obispo, Havana. .......Col6n. .......Remedios. ...... Calabazar (Sagua) ..Pedro Mora ; Sagua. ....... Col6n ............. Manuel Fabidn Escobio. ....... Gibara ............. Sucesi6n de Anastasio Calderon ; Gibara. ....... Guamacaro ........ Bernardo R. Navarro (at the Plantation). .......G.ira de Melena....Madrona Elexalde ; 131 Manrique, Havana. ....... Jovellanos .......... Viuda de Ugarte ; 126 Manrique, Havana. ........aguajay ..........Pablo Gamiz ; 1 Cuba, Havana. Vigilancia..........Sagua Name and address of ownerr. Where situate. Name of the Plantation.

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Name of the Plantation. V ila ............. Villarrueda ....... Where situate. Name and address of owners. .. Encrucijada de Sagua. .. Canasi ......... ...Josd Hernindez Blanco ; vana. 22 Inquisidor, HaVista Hermosa... Vista Hermosa.. Vizcaino ........ Vizcaya ........ Vueltas ......... Yaguaramas .... Y ara ........... Zabala .......... Zapatin ......... Zayas... ...... .. .,. Cifuentes ....... ...M adruga........ .. .Guara .......... ... Col n ........ .. ...Palm ira ......... ... Yaguaramas ..... ... Manzanillo ...... .atanzas. ... Union de Reyes M. .. ariel .......... ... ..Placetas ........ ...Domingo Betharte ; 84 Amistad, Sagua. ...Antonio Fernandez Vallin ; 61 A Amistad, Havana. Fernando Herrera (at the Plantation). Viuda de Zulueta ; i Cuba, Havana. .., Torriente Hermanos ; 72 Santa Clara, Cienfuegos. M. Gonzilez (at the Plantation). ...Domingo Maja (at the Plantation). ... Julian Campos ; Matanzas. ... Manuel Perez Ochoa ; 253 Aguila, Havana. Viuda de Zulueta ; 71 Cuba, Havana. I 40 w r r r, h w tt Zaza .... .. ..

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CUBA ILLUSTRATED. SHOPPING IN HAVANA. American ladies can roam at their sweet will in Havana just as they do in their own country ; they are admired for their independence and not criticised at all as many slanderous and exaggerated Cuban sketches might lead them to think. Among the first places they will want to see will be the store LA ESPECIAL, in Obispo Street, No. 99 (the principal business street, and the finest in havana). It has the greatest assortment of fans, bull-fight fans, silk fans, representing Cuban scenery ; also satin and lace fans at all prices, from 10 cents to 300 dollars ; there is to be found also the finest assortment of gloves, umbrellas and parasols, all made at their own factory. The proprietor, Mr. Manuel Carranza, speaks English, and is most courteous and hospitable. Tourists are cordially invited to visit his store. Los ESTADos UNmos, San Rafael Street corner Galiano ; LA IIABANA, 95-97 Obispo Street, where the finest silks, Spanish mantillas and laces can be had at all prices ; LAS NINFAS, 71 Obispo Street ; LA GRANADA, 26 Obispo Street, are the names of the best Dry-Goods Stores. Laces, pine-apple cloth, Chinese goods, linens and all the light fabrics adapted to the climate, including silks, satins, etc., are to be found in a great variety, and the 175

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a I FT I IN .T Hs R Y' E A I E T LISHMENT. I l IE ')II I II r

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CUBA ILLUSTRATED. latest novelties are here received by steamers from Europe. The proprietors of these stores will be honored by the visit of American tourists. No. 43 Obispo Street is the WILsON'S AMERICAN BOOK S'roRE, where American and English newspapers, novels and periodicals are received by every mail. Photographs of Cuban scenery, guide books, stationery and drawing materials are kept on sale. BELOT'5 s IDROTHERAP1 I ESTABLISHMENT w\'as founded in 1873, at a cost of $120,000, Spanish gold. It has the necessary apparatus known to science as the methodical hidrotherapie treatment, such as the various showers, the hypogastric perineales, etc., etc., the steambox or Russian baths, a great number of marble tanks for plain or artificially prepared mineral baths, either alkaline, sulphurous iodide of iron, etc. Pleasure seekers and tourists should not fail to visit Doctor Belot's establishment, where they will most assuredly be welcomed. Tourists will be welcomed at all the establishments advertised in this GuimE, whose proprietors will be glad to show them all the curios imported and made on the Island. 1w 177

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178 Special House For Tourists Visiting Havana. Large Stock of First-Class Assorted Goods. Prices Moderate. .STEIN if DN A -6B, HAVANA. In the American Consulate Building (LA CASA BLANCA). We can fill orders in two days if necessary. LV & CO ., 92, As 92

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179 EDWIN WILSON'S AMER ICAN BOOK STORE 43-OBISPO STRE ET-43 Come and see our photographs of tropical scenery, types, customs, public buildings. They are the best in the city. Select assortment of Solid Silver, Souvenir Spoons, Pencil cases, Glove Hooks and other Curios. American andEuropean newspapers received by every mail. Conie to us if you want maps, phrase books, etc., or if you feel tired of hearing Spanish, as we all speak English. WILSO T 'S AM~EERICAN BOOK STORE 43-Obispo Street-43 HAVANA.

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4( EL FENIX-JE WELRY STlORE & FAN~CY GOODS, HIERRO & FIGUE RAS, P1,0P i1s.

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18s EL HI ERRO FENIX. & FIGUERAS, Obispo 68 y 681, Aqiacate 31, and O'Reilly 61, -EIAVANTA, CU-A. Jewelry and Fancy Goods. WATCHES OF ALL KINDS AND OF ALL PRICES. An immense variety of Goods to select from. A Permanent AMERICAN exhibition Toukis rs in Havana. are cordially invited visit our stores, the in the city. English spoken. largest and most complete Man spricht Deutsch. to On parle franeais.

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182 T-T-EJ H]RST $ouvenir of Quib. A PHOTOGRAPHIC VIEW ALBUM Containing 42 of the most interesting views of HAVANA, MATANZAS and CIENFUEGOS, including the most characteristic costumes of the country and the bull-fight and cock-fight scenes. Fine Leatherette Binding. FOR SALE AT M. CAR1IANZA'S FAN STORE 99 Obispo HAVANA. Street

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183 -< IM I IIt S 3 OL T HIDROTHERAPIC Nos. 6 ESTABLISHMENT. 7 & 69 PRADO ST., I-IAVANhA. The Finest and Largest Establishment for SIIOWER Bxrns, Surtnur, Ere., ETC., Opened daily from 6 A. M. to 10 .m. for Ladies and Gentlemen. Doctor E. IELoT can be seen daily from 7 A. m. to 5 ta and will kindly attend to Tourists visiting his establisEme.ETt. DOCTOR E. IBELOT, Director and Proprietor.

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dry Goods Store SERANLA 95 and 97 OBISPO & ALO]NSO, STREET, PROI->R=ETORS AA IS riy 0. i ti Yf i i ppu C H k tF: j t}f } [f a Cf La Habana. -.s. jr per' *.x. f t" JE 10 w .c 4 t rv. y t {J {f I va V y }( I 1 4 .W I. k tb'fl f l S j n (I 3 Y n 5" ., .y LY I f.f 4 aq i ti LL. t: ^l if

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185 LA HABAN One of the most interesti A. ng sights for strangers visiting H avana, is the beautiful DRY GOODS STORE JT A_ 95-9'7 OiSPO S TE&J-HT. will find at the beautiful Dry Goods Store "LA 1A13ANA," the greatest stock of Spanish Silks, Laces, MIantillas, Pine-Apple Cloth, and always a great display of Bull-Fight Handkerchiefs and Fans. Novelties received by every steamer. Americans are cordially invited to visit our Store while in Havana. [English spoken]. SERNA & ALONSO, Proprietors, 95-97 Obispo Street, ----HAVANA, CUBA. JI Tourists

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s0 qpL ip L -1a e} DRY GooDs STORE "LA GRANADA."

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187 7k P7 AYIY~pk" DRY GOODS STORE. Very well known for All kinds of Ladies' Dress G its articles. oods, Gentlemen's Underwear, Spanish Laces, Mantillas, Silk Novelties, Pine-Apple Cloth, Handkerchiefs, and Printed Linens, I imported by every steamer from the best manufactories of Europe and America. ENRIQUE DIAZ 26 omsro Prop'r. sTzHzET, ]~A~VA]TNA, Fans,

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rV i a k { i y v X k k } Y k f } tl if k 1 r 5 t. t k 'Ft 1 {" DR Von STORE -LOS F'T MS L' Dns. its 4 Z k. f s t tw

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189 LOS ES TADOS UNID OS (The United States.) PROFITS AND LARGE The Handsomest Dry Cuds Stuie In Havana. GREAT DEPOT FOR CORSETS AND SPANISH LACES, 31y SAN RAFAEL, Cor. GALIANO, HAVANA, CUBA. will be pleased by calling at which claim to have the most complete assortment in this line, as well as for the cheapness and carefulness of our sales. Novelties received by every steamer. AYARZA & SANTARANA, COR. GALIANO, HAVANA, CUBA. SMALL SALES. Tourists our house SAN RAFAEL,

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190 La Flor de Calixto Lopez & Co. CIGAR FACTORY OF CALIXTO LOPEZ & CO. Nos. 48 & 50 Zulueta Street, HAVANA, CUBA. LEADING BRANDS: La Sin Rival. Lo Mejor. El Mejor. La Coquette. La Grandeur. Lo Bueno. El Bueno. La Flor de Calisto Lopez & Co. While visiting this beautiful building, tourists will enjoy the finest panorama of the city and the bay of Havana.

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191 LA VENCEDORA. GRAND CIGAR AND CIGARETTE FACTORY. RAMON LOPEZ Prop'r., Successor to MANUEL LOPEZ Y CIA, 234 Principe Alfonso Street, IEAWA-TrA, -~-~ ~e b.+ ANNEXED BRANDS: VICTOR HUGO. FLOR DE REMATES. MANUEL This factory Prize Gold Medal lona Expositions, and Paris, 1889. LOPEZ Y CIA. has been awarded the First s at the Brussels and Barcealso at the Exposition of CABLE ADDRESS: ZEPOL. CZTBA.

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192 -N CIGARS ALL-TOBACCO CIGARETTE MANUFACTORY, La Flor de Morales," La Mathilde," Cuba Industrial," Etc. Num. 127 CALZADA de GALIANO, Car. Zanja St., HAVANA, CUBA. JOSE MORALES & CO., PROPRIETORS. Diploma of Honor, Highest Award, Antwerp Exposition, Gold Medal, Highest Award, Chili Exposition. H. R. H. the COUNT or FLANDERS, has favored this Factory by the appointment of its proprietors as purvey ors to L. R. H.'s household. Parties visiting our city arE requested to cal and inspect our premises. ENGLISH SPOKEN. Factory at Ocala, Branch Florida.

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193 Cigar Factory JAl Yn Q rrtrrn (CHICAG La Victoriana Schiller. La Bella Cuba Tourists are inv try our cigars mad ToJ lNa fG BRANDS: o IEXI[1rrI'Fo .) La Delfina. General Stewart. na. La Verdad. ited to visit our factory and e with the finest Tobacco Leaf of the Vuelta Abajo. RAFAEL Factory: REYNA No. Telephone 853. Warerooms: No. 3 Baratillo Street. HAVANA, CUBA. Proprietor., 53 Maloja Street,

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LEO OMET *t TRADE: MARK OF r LA CR1:/ RO)A -CIGAR FACTORS,

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]_A O]~AUZ EOJA. Great Cigar and Cigarette Factory rS n sA'9f A t IC 99, Y LA AA J vGsY Ca VALES & CO. No. 99 San Jose Street, HAVANA, CUBA, Fb 0 N 0 aj 0o

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19U T.a a. c 0 nA o1% .. E CAT FACTORY OFR H CIGARS, CIGARETTES --AND --Smoking Tobacco. SEGUlNDO ALVAREZ & CO., No. '1 Reilla St In tis celebrated and we I -known Cig 1ar and T0obacco factory (est allished in 1845) consumers wilI find a good variety of ine Cigars of all sizes and colors to suit the most refined in taste. Moderate prices. We also recommend to fastidious Cigarette smokers our fancy brands, solely manufactured with the pues of Vuelta Aliajo Tobacco. These are preferred by the society cown/e i/ fru/ ini every civilized country. Please give us a call.

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197 RESTAURANT PALAGIO D E ORISTAL This Restaurant is located in the central part of the city, in the neighborhood of the Great Tacon Theatre. First-class service, moderate prices and unsurpassed cuisine. A visit will convince tourists of the truthfulness of our claims. Private rooms for families and dinner parties. GARCIA & IGLESIAS, Prop'rs. Consulado Street, corner San Jose, HAVANA, CUBA. Great Tobacco Warehouse. The best leaves from the Plantations (vGas) of the districts of Vuelta Abajo, Remedios, Semi-Vuelta and Partido. THE GREATEST FACTORY Of Stripped Tobacco for Specialties, We can fill all orders for Stripped Tobacco and furnish samples. CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED. GO]IZA]4EZ 8]E0S-, 43 Dragones Street, HAVANA, CUBA. E L The

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198 Grand Hotel Mascotte. THE IloTEL MASCOTTE is the largest and coolest in Havana. It has accommodations for 250 guests and occupies an entire block ; facing on a street (Oficios), on a Public Square (Plaza de Luz), on a beautiful promenade, that of Pasco of Alameda, and fronting on the Bay ; travelers will consequently understand that all rooms are front rooms, affording also the advantage of seeing the arrival of steamers. It is the only hotel in Havana which, by reason of its situation on the bay, with its cooling breezes, insure strangers against all inconveniences resulting from a change of climate. Rates from $2.50 to $4 00 a day Spanish Gold, according to the size of the room ; special rates to families. Several stage lines start from the hotel at every five minutes for all the principal points of interest in the city. Commercial travelers will find elegant rooms for the exhibition of their samples. Barber shop, Baths, and Interpreters, in several languages, are attached to the Hotel, which affords every comfort to make an agreeable sojourn with us. J. CARBOfl~L & CO. Proprietors, HAVANA, CUBA.

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19" Hotel and Restaurant Ir A ATZ VEJDADO A BRANCH OF TM. RESTAURA NT PARIS OF No. 14 O'REILLY STREET, IN HAVANA. This Hotel very cool is located and healthy quarter in hood of Havana, fronting in the Vedado, a the neighboron the Gulf of Mexico. for Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner Parties. Salons et Cabinets particuliers. Salones para Banquetes y Cuartos reservados. EDOUARD CHAIX, Ielephzone, 779. C Private Rooms Proprietor. XM

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2(m GRAND HOTEL TELEGRAFO. So well known the Prado, fronting to American tourists, is the celebrated Central situated On Park. The proprietors take pleasure in informing their numerous friends that this popular Hotel has been entirely renovated and refurnished, and is now located in the finest spot in Havana. EUROPEAN AND AMERICAN PLAN, Rates : $3.00 to $5.00 per day iLm gold. ROOMS SECURED BY MAIL OR WIRE. Cable Address: Telegrafo Hotel, Havana. :" Attentive agents will be on hand at the arrival of Steamers and Railroad trains. GONZALEZ & GIRALT, Proprietors. T-IAVAA, CU~BA ,t4 k i r

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201 American Lunch Room -ANDR]STAURA]TT 120 Prado Street, HAVANA. FRONTING THE CELE;RATED) C1'NTRAL The Best House of its kind in Havana. Tourists will find at this restaurant all the delicacies for Lunch and also a Restaurant A la carte, cuisine unsurpased. BEER ON DRAUGHT FRO i THE Irsr BiEW IPIEs IN THE UNITED STATES. PORTAS, it1EDIO & CO., Proprietors. HELADOS DE PARIS (ICE-CREAM SALOON), Connected with the Telegrafo Hotel, No. 116 PRADO STREET, HAVANA. (Fronting the celebrated Central Park) ICES AND SORBETS, With the finest fruit flavors on the Island. CELEBRATED HOUSE FOR ICES, Tortonis, Mantecados, Cremas, Etc. In this establishment, tourists will find the choicest Cigars and Cigarettes of the celebrated manufactories of Havana. JINES RAMOS, Proprietor. PARK.

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202 GRAND. Restaurant HOTEL Union, CIENFUEGOS, CUBA. t1 {fir ~ ~ j~ This hotel, kept on the American and European plan, is situated in the most central part of the city, and fitted up in the best style with all modern improvements. PRICES TO SUIT EVERY ONE. Coaches may be had at all hours. AT= ILA T CTAGES F. G. ROVES, SPOC-EfIT. Proprietor. P. O. Box 51

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2 0,3 FRENCH HOTEL AND --R J-~STAU-ALT T, Matanzas, Cuba. En este bien montado establecimiento se ofrece al pUl)lico tin buen surtido de cuanto concerned al buen gusto culinario, aseo en el servicio y precios moderados. Dans cet etablissement, meubl6 dans le derniergenre, le public trouvera un assortiment complet de tout ce qui concern 'art culinaire, exactitude dans le service et surtout des prix mod&6rs. On parole frangais. The owners of this first-class Hotel Offer to the public a general asssortment of the best victuals that the market can afford, at moderate prices. They have purchased the celebrated Caves of Bellamar. Volantes to drive to the Caves, surroundings, etc., and the Valley of the Yumuri, are to be found at the Hotel. English Spoken. MANUEL GARCIA Y C!A, No. 40 Calzada de Tirry, MATANZAS.

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2"( S. A. COH N ER, ARTISTIC PHOTOGRAPH GALLERY, 02 R'IEILLY STREETr, HAVANA. The I ho n l llr utw ofrn a6x I c collet of B l-6 h '4 IIG I -~ Pho graphc I Vews etti. A.AN abb n ES 1)2 r 'rcI ng s, exx hA. Theonlyst aler invie towclnd ffering a ne collection of Vuigts Photographic Views, etc. S. A. CONNER, 62 O'REILLY STREET, HAVANA. Photog rapher of the Princess Euba/ia of Spain.

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205 Nos. 69-71 Obispo Street, HAVANA, cor. Havana Street, CUBA. Telephone 543. its Nin[s GOODS ESTABLISHMENT. Highly known for the excellency of its articles. All kinds of Ladies' Dress Goods. Gentlemen's Underwear. Spanish Laces Mantillas. Silk Novelties. Pine Apple Cloth and Handkerchiefs. Fans and Hosiery. Printed Linens. ONE PRICE STORE. JUAN PASCUAL & CO. Proprietors. Man Spricht Deutsch, On parole Frangais. Si parla Italiano. DRY English Spoken.

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206 .f A. OA DE 7 o L \ Y LA MARINA, THE LEADING SHOE STORE -OFFine Shoes for Ladies and Gentlemen recei ved by every steamer. Trunks, Satchels. Chairs, etc. WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. PLAZA DE LUZ, under the Hotel Mascotte, HAYANA, CUBA. PIR11S & ESTIU, Proprietors. CAFE DE LOS AMERICANOS, MONEY EXCHANGE OFFICE, No. 3 Obispo, ATEGE-ET & CO. Buy and sell Greenbacks, American Silver Coins ; English, French, Mexican and all kinds of Coins in circulation. The Highest Prices are Paid Here,

PAGE 221

207 EL CASINO GRANDA STORE & CORRAL Proprietors, oBIsro swTrrm Cor. BERNAZA, H AVAN A. Tourists will find in this store the greatest assortment of Panama at reasonable prices. Hats made to order. GRAND & CORRAL, Proprietors, HAT H ats

PAGE 222

205 n..a W H F1 Ml 0 lYE aFR A6 VICToRIA1hNo SAMPErDRO 87 Obrapia Street. HAVANA. (Telephone 372.) CaRRA GES AN'D LANDAUS AT ALL HoURs. The proprietor of this Livery Stable informs tourists that elegant carriages, with fine horses and careful coachmen. Reasonable prices. DIAMONDS, Pearls and Emerald $100,000! AT IIALF PRIoE, Proceeding fromn Paw IC Shops. HONEY LOANED ON JEWELRY AND DIAMONDS. ANDRES BARALLOBRE 39-41 Neptuno Street, HA (TELEPHONE 1452.) & C0. VANA, CUBA. Pearls, Antique Fans and Curios. U) '3 w J lie has s. r f

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209 Drug Store LA LABORA T CENTRAL. ORIO QUIMICO Y FARMACEUTICO. CHEMIICAl. PRODUCTS IN GENERAL. -NATIONAL AND FOREIGN PATENT MEDICINES. Reliable House for Prescriptions. WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. LOBS Y TOR RALBAS. Proprietors, 33-35 Obrapi ANSELMO a, HAVANA. LOPEZ, SUCCESSOR OF EDELMANN & Co., No. 23 Obrapia Street. IMPORFPE OF MLt Si CAL Large variety of Musical INSTRUM ENT Albums and Boxes, Instruction Books, and Music for all Instruments. Sole Agent of the Celebrated Pianos of PLEYEL, \VOLFF & Co., and Pianos of CHASSAIGNE FILS. No. 23 Obrapia Street, IIAVANAS.

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2 10 G-RAND CAF A. Imported Liquors of First Choice. LUNCH AND DELICACIES. Baths MACEIR for Ladies and Get A Y ALVAREZ, tlemen. Prop'rs., No. 4 San Rafael Street, HAVANA, CUBA. EXCHANGE (IN OFF THE SAME EsrAx;LrSHMENT.) The Highest Pr American ices paid here for Greenbacks, Silver and all kinds of Foreign Coins. CIGARS and CIGARETTES of the BEST BRANDS. JOAQUIN GONZALEZ, Proprietor, HAVANA, CUBA. LA GRANJ I CE

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211 CAR LES & Co., COMMISSION MERCHANTS, Sole Agents for the celebrated Spanish Wines and Brandies of PEDRO DOMECQ, from JEREZ DE LA FRONTERA, which cellar was founded in 1730. 63 Villegas St., Havana, CUBA. P. O. ~OX 529. Write for Price-List. M. CAR LES Y CIA., COMISIONTISTAS. Unicos Agentes de los afamados Vinos y Cofds de PEDRO DOMEcQ, de JEREZ DE LA FRONTERA, cuya bodega fue fundada en 1730. Villegas 63, Habana, CUBA. APAJ~TAro 529. J. E. MARESMA. J M J J. M. CARLES.

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212 J. M. BORJES BANKERS, No. 2 Obispo Street, cor. & CO., Mercaderes, PAYMENT HAVANA, TRANSFEIRS CUBA. MADE BY CABLE. LEirn'Ias OF C 1Un Vr. on Nev Fork, London, II aimbnrg, lirenmen, Berlin, and towns off Sell values P)a ris, Italyv, Aniitwerp, and all the SPAIN. capitals Agland, also DOCTOR D. M. BU RGESS, No. 23 OBISPO STREET Havana, Cuba. AMERICEIAIN rOC T O R 30 yefrl' experience in Cuba. THE LIEBER'S PUBLISHING CO. 17-19 Broadway, NEW YORK. LIEBER'S TELEGRAPHIC CIPHER. The Best i LIEBER'S MANUAL. AGENCy IN CUBA : WILSON'S A)LERICAN BOOK STORE. Drafts Buy and Of Spai/n, Irance, States Bonds. United

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GARDENS OF ACCLIMATE ATION OF HAVANA. JULES LACHAUME, Director, French and American Gardener. SPECIALTY OF TROPICAL PLANTS AND CUT FLOWERS FREE TO STRANGERS. FIRST PRIZE AWARDED at the WORLD'S FAIRS. Paseo Carlos III (Tacon), HAVANA, CUBA. Printing Establishment A Jo Translating and Printing in Foreign Languages. Business and Visiting Cards made at shortest notice. CATALOGUES, BooKS, ETC. NARCISO LOPEZ, Prop'r., 63 Amis/ad Street, HAVANA, 213 EL TR A B CUBA. "uCE amer

PAGE 228

214 EL PALO GORDO, No. 88 San Fernando Street, CIENFUEGOS. Tourists will find in this Establishment a great assortment of Novelties, such as FRENCH JEWELRY and PERFUMES, OF THE BES'r MAKERS OF EuRoi'E. S ] ATIS~E F'AN S FRoM VALENCIA (SPAIN). TOYS, STATIONERY OF EVERY KIND, AND A GREAT VARIETY OF BOOKS, ENGLIsH A ENGLISh N) SPANISH. SPOKEN. Tourists will find here the Illustrated Guide of Cuba. VILLAR & CO 88 San Fernando ., Street, CIEDITUTYEGOS, CUBA.

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21o flnra flonIHase0 -tA 3 rr s c = o Ventilated rooms, nicely furnished for travelers. J. BOLIO, rRO'R. Duval Street, KEY WEST, FLA. OCKLAWAHA NAVIGATION COMPANY. Take the well established and reliable HART'S LINE STEAMERS For OCKLAWAHA RIVER and SILVER SPRINGS. STEAMER OKEEHUMKEE, Captain W. H. Harrison. STEAMER ASTATULA, Captain H. A. Gray. One of above Steamers leaves Palatka EVERY DAY at 12:05, on arrival of Train from Rockledge, Ormond, Jacksonville and St. Augustine. Also, leaves Silver Springs EVERY MORNING at 10:30, or on arrival of Train from Ocala and South. These Steamers, having new Hulls and Boilers and refurnished throughout, are in first-C/ass condition in evey respect, and for the Ocklawaha River are unsurpassed for Speed, Comfort and Safety. H. L. HART, General Manager, Palatka, Fla.

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21{ Hotels recommended to Tourists by the Publisher. FLORIDA. JACKSONVILLE.-St James Hotel, Windsor Hotel. Everett Hotel, Travellers Hotel, Clarendon mont Hotel, Grand Viev Hotel. Hotel, Duval ST. AUGUSTINE.-Ponce de Leon Hotel, Alcazar Hotel, TreHotel, Cordova Hotel, San Marco Hotel, Florida House, Magnolia and St. George Hotel. ORMOND.-Hotel Ormond and Hotel Coquina. Hotel ROCKLEDGE.-Hotel Indian River and New Rockledge Hotel. PUNTA GORDA.-Hotel Punta Gorda. TARPON SPRINGS.-Tarpon Springs Hotel. ST. PETEIISRUIIGH -Hotel Detroit. ORLANDO.-San Juan Hotel and Arcade Hotel. OCALA.-Ocala House. GREEN COVE SPRINGS.--Clarendon Hotel. TITUSVILLE.-Indian River Hotel and Grand View Hotel. TAMPA.-Tampa Bay Hotel and Almeria Hotel. PORT TAMPA.-The Inn. SUTHERLAND.-Hotel San Marino. WINTER PARK.-Seminole Hotel. SANFORD.-Sanford House. PALATKA,-Putnam House. MAGNOLIA SPRINGS.-Magnolia Hotel. KEY WEST.-Russel House and Duval House. GEORGIA. SAVANNAH.-De Soto Hotel, Screven House, Pulaski House and Marshall House. THOMASVILLE--Mitchell House, Hotel and Stuart's Hotel. Piney Woods Hotel, CUBA. HAVANA.Pasaje Hotel, Mascotte Hotel, Telegrafo Hotel, Continental Hotel, Perla de Cuba Hotel, and Saratoga Hotel. Masury

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217 ~~yOSPECTfo7 Este hotel es ei mnismo que fui establecido en 1874, en ci lado del CanadA, desde donde fud trasladado A este sitlo A causa de apropiarse ci Gobierno ei local para convertirlo en un parque. Hoy se hall bajo l misma direccion y propietario, y est situado en lugar muy conveniente, cerca de las Cataratas. Es el 6nico hotel de primer orden que permanece abierto todo el ano. Entre sus numerosos y distinguidos favorecedores cuenta con Su Excelencia el Senor Marques de Lorne ; S. S., R. R. la Princesa Louise y el Principe Leopoldo, K. G.; Antonio Batres, Ministro de Guatemala y el Salvador en Washinton ; Presidente Porfirio Diaz, de Mdxico ; M. C. Romero Rubio ; E. Canedo ; Jose M. Espinosa ; General de Castalla, Espana ; E. Dupuy-de-L6me, Encargado interino de Negocios de Espana ; Henry Budd, Subdirector del Banco Nacional de Bolivia ; C. A. de Pacheco, Presidente de Bolivia, y familia ; S. F. Koppel, Ministro de BogotA ; C. A. G6nima, General del Ejdrcito colombiano ; Rafael Zaldivar, Presidente de la Rep6blica del Salvador; Rafael Cobos, Coronel efectivo y telegrafista, Ayudante del Presidente Zaldivar ; General Carlos Milladuetto, BogotA ; Felipe N. Robertson y familia, Miraflores, Mexico. Para evitar abusos de parte de los cocheros, se recomienda A los Senores huespedes alquilen sus carruajes en la oficina del Hotel. D. ISAACS, Propietario.

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218 HOTEL AMERICA Irving Place and 15th Street, NEW YORK. AHIUHO T. BEHUJICH & E. SPINETTI, Propis. SU~CCURsALIE A PARIs (FRANCE): BRAxN IN CHICAGO: HoteI A merica, 56 Rue Lafayette. Hotel America, 1449 Michigan Ave. Sc itabla francds, ingids y espa Jol. Cocina 4 Ia franCesa y espola. Situado en el punto nids entrico deC Ia ciudad.Situated in the finest spot of New Vork, near Union Square. EUROPEAN ANI AMERICAN ILAN. RATES, FROM $2.50 U P. ROOMS, $1.00 UP. CABLE ADDRESS: Berutich, New York.

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219 MOBILE. TAMPA. KEY WEST. HAVANA. PLANT STEAMSHIP LINE. The West India Fast Mail Route. Three trips per Week from Nov. 1st to April 30th. Two trips per week from May 1st to October 31st. S. S. MASCOTTE. S. S. OLIYETTE. These elegant Steamships have been specially fitted out with the latest improvements for Safety, Speed and Comfort. Fer further informations apply to J. D. HASHAGEN, Eastern Ag't, W. M. DAVIDSON, Gen'1 Pass. 261 Broadway, New York. Ag't, Jacksonville, Florida. JOHN BRADLEY, Agent, PORT TAMPA, Fla. R. W. SOUTHWICK, Agent, KEY WEST, Fla. LAWTON BROS., Agents, 35 Mercaderes St., HAVANA, Cuba.

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220 Mail Steamship Line New Orleans, Punta Gorda, Florida, Key West and Havana. The fine iron steamships of this popular line leave New Orleans every Thursday, Punta Gorda, Florida, every Saturday, and Key West every Sunday for Havana. Leave Havana every Wednesday, Key West Thursday and Punta Gorda every Friday for New Orleans. Superior accommodations for Passengers, to whom every facility is given for prompt connections and comfort, over a delightful smooth water route. Tickets and information can be obtained of the Agents of the FLORIDA SOUTHERN RAILWAY, or of the MORGAN S. S. LINE. A. C. HUTCHINSON, Gen't Manager, LNEW ORLEANS. J. G. SCHRIEVER, Traffic Manager, E FLORIDA SOUTHERN RAILWAY, Key West, Florida. P. W. FILBRICK, Key West, Florida. GALBAN, RIO & CO., 36 San Ignacio Street, Havana, Cuba.

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221 VAPORES CORREOS DE LA eOMPANIA TRANSATLANTICA (ANTES DE A. LOPEZ Y CIA.) New York Line to Havana direct, and also a regular service between New York, Island of Cuba, Mexico, U. S. of Colombia, Venezuela; and connecting at Havana with all the other branches of the Line for all parts of the World. The beautiful Steamers of this popular Line leave New York, Pier 10 E. R., for Havana direct on the 10th, 20th and 80th of every month. Passengers will find on this Line first-class accommodations. Table unsurpassed, with wine. EXCURSION TICKETS. All information will be cheerfully given by M. CALVO & CO., J. M. CEBALLOS & CO., 28 OFIcios, PIER 10 EAS' RivER, HfAVA\NA, CUBA. NEW YORK.

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222 -CLYDE'S STEAMSHIP LINES, York, Charzlesloni AND FL O RI Unsurpassed Passenger Accommodations, TO REACH FLORIDA, Schedules, Maps, Guides and all informations will be promptly furnished by addressing the Agents of the Line. J. A. LESLIE, Sup't., JACKSONVILLE, FLA. I JAS. E. EDGERTON, GT.t &JP. A. CHARLESTON, S. C. Al. H. CLYDE, Assistant Traffic Manager, 5 Bowling TiEo. EGER, Trafic Afanzager. W. P. CLYDE & CO., Gen'l 5 BOWLING GREEN, Green, N. Y'. Ag'ts, NEW YORK. 12 S. DELAWARE AVE., PHILADELPHIA. New D A

PAGE 237

The Great Northern Railway Line Operates 3,500 miles of track, reaching many of the best towns of the Northwest. Has its eastern terminals at St. Paul, Minneapolis, Duluth and West Superior. Is the Tourist Line of the Northwest. Also reaching the finest game and fishing resorts. Has three lines through the wonderful wheat valley of the Red River of the North. Runs the only trains without change to Great Falls, Helena and Butte. Is the largest carrier of wheat from original points of any railroad in the world. Owns and operates its own entire equipment of Sleeping, Dining, Colorist Cars, etc. Offers choice of two routes to Pacific Coast, via Montana and( a M~lanitoba. A. L. MOHLER, General Manager. P. P. SHELBY, F. I. WHITNEY, Gen'l Passenger and Ticket Ag't. F. L. PARKER, NEW YORK OFFICE, 240 BROADWAY. Milwaukee Office, 393 Broadway. Detroit Office, Hammond Bldg. Boston Office, 228 Washington St. Cleveland Office, 155 St. Clair St. General Traffic Manager. Gen'] Fr't Ag't, St. Paul, Minn. Chicago Office, 232 So. Clark St. RI Is~~ A S SI IB 01 A,_ T 0 B Am r1 r----SA 3 o e 9a N e G s,0t.; I I l CO5j -~ --CA D L T SxNttxB -T I L 9 oa, voliarb CS M 0 N T A A N. D A K e' 'Ca C ,,B d o0 AwA' 'i E G u N GR EAT Elendale w.' bAahlana N O RT H E R Ne t ttto r / o ~aliade -allw y Line. -Jowa .11 GREAT NORTHERN 2,762 A K aO> tOT ;Gt A, I I' ACa M NT GENl. xvl S D K' al wrub Siouxt aI FALLS i14 PtaIII a iT~) J A1 1v al ,I E A EAST'N MINN 72 C belrlai. Gnr $S O 11 9 S 'i C TA L 9,44~-G. .W xl ux H s R tao 'a Frt Casper Dakota Sc. I i dc Z WY N tU c IO W A -us N E B R A S K A -l Los A geles ---~ -oMA -unc%_ C i L -ROto.t ( \ an Dieg,; Da~a xn" _.-.__ -.-.M 06BPh A ., Pittsburg Offce, 94 Fourth Ave.

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294 WA RD' S LINE .' i 'S..Nim4.> '_-w 5-' ,] BETWEEN NEW YORK, HAVANA AND MEXICAN PORTS. The magnificent Steamers of this Line, well regu !arit y, go( Saturday at 1 d table and attendance, leave NE' known for their W YORK every P. M. for HAVANA and MEXICAN PORTS, from Pier 16 E. River, and every Wednesday at 3 P. Md. for HAVANA. Leave HAVANA for NEW YORK every Thursday and Saturday at 6 I) P. For passage JAMES a nd .yeter tl E. WA information, apjli/ RD & CO. 113 Wall Street, J E]~ W YORE HIDALGO & CO.. HAVANA, CUBA. to 23 Obrapia Street,

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225 PRINCIPAL I STEAMSHIP LINES AND RALRLOAS. General information for tourists contemplating a trip around the world. STEAMSHIPS. CJOlPAGNIE GENERATE TRANSATLANTIQUE. (French Line to Havre direct.) The beautiful steamers LA TOURAINE, LA BRETAGNE, LA CHAMPAGNE, LA GASCOGNE, leave every Saturday from New York Havre and vice-versa. A. FORGET, General Agent, 3 Bowling Green, New York. AMERICAN LINE. Between New York, Southampton, London, by the beautiful steamers Nnw YORK, PARis, BERLIN, CHEST ER. Leave New York every Wednesday. CO., 6 Bowling Green, N. V. for INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION

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226 RED STAR LINE. (For Antwerp and Paris.) First-class steamers, leave every Wednesday from Jersey City. INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION CO., 6 Bowling Green. N. V. NORTH GERMAN LLOYD S. S. C0. (Short Route to London.) These fast Express Steamers sail from foot of Second Street, Hoboken, every Tuesday and Saturday. Mediterranean line leaves every week for Genoa (Italy.) OELRICHS & CO., General Agents, 2 Bowling Green, New York. WHITE STAR LINE. The beautiful steamers TEUTONIC, MAJESTIC, BRITANNIC and GER-MANIC, leave every Wednesday for Queenstown and Liverpool. 1. MAITLAND KERSEY, General Manager, 29 Broadway, N. V. GUION LINE. (For Queenstown and Liverpool.) The fast steamers ARIZONA, ALASKA, etc., leave Pier 1, foot of Grand Street, Jersey City, every Saturday. A. 14. UNDERIIILL & CO.. General Agents, 35 Broadway, New york.

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CUNARD LINE. (For Liverpool via Queenstown.) The beautiful steamers LUCANIA, CAMPANIA, ETRURIA, UMIBRIA, etc., leave every Saturday, from Pier 40, North River. VERNON H. BROWN, General Agent, 4 Bowling Green, New York. HAMBURG AMERICAN PACKET CO. from New York to London (Fast line via Southampton, and to Berlin via Wilhelmshaven.) The beautiful steamers AucUSTA VICToRIA, FURS'r BISMARCK, NORMANNIA, COLOMBIA, etc., leave every Thursday from Iamburg Piers, Hoboken, New Jersey. HAMBURG AMERICAN PACKET CO., 37 Broadway, New York. 11AILROADS. PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD. Station foot of Desbrosses Street. Station foot of Cortlandt Street. The leading fourtrack line out of New York. S. M. PREVOST, General Manager. J. R. Woon, General Pass. Agent. SAMUEL CARPENTER, Eastern Pass. Agent. W. W. LORD, Jr., Ass't Eastern Pass. Agent. Main Office in New Vork, 1196 Broadway. 227

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g28 NEW YORK CENTRAL & HUDSON RIVER R. R. All trains arrive and leave from Grand Central Station, Fourth Avenue and 42d Street, New York. The only Railroad station in the city. For particulars see Ticket Agents. JOHN M. TOUCEY, Gen'l Mf'ger. BALTIMORE & OIB Station, foot of GtoRGEi R. I)ANIELS, Gen'l Pass. Agt. 0 RAILROA ). Liberty Street. ROYAL BLUE LINE. Main Office, 415 Broadway, New York. CHAS. O. ScULL, General Passenger Agent, Baltimore, Md. C. 1'. CRAIG, Gen'l Eastern Passenger Agent, 415 Broadway, New York. WEST SHORE RAILROAD. (N. Y. C. & H. R. R. Co., Lessee.) The New Double Track Rail Line along the historic and picturesque West shore of the Hiudson River and the Mohawk Valley. West Shore Station, foot of West 42d Street, and foot of Franklin Street. H. B. JAGOv, Gen'l Eastern Passenger Agent, 363 Broadway, New York. NEW YORK, ONTARIO & WESTERN RAILWAY. New Trunk Line to the West, via Niagara Falls. Buffet Sleeping Coaches. Elegant Day Cars. Reclining Chairs and luxurious accommodations. J. E. CuILDS, Gen'l Manager. J. C. ANDERSON, Gen'l Pass. Manager. JAS. R. DUNBAR, Gen'1 Eastern Pass. Agent, 371 Broadway, New York.

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229 CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY. Through Line between Boston, Portland, Montreal, Toronto, Detroit and Chicago. D. McNicoL, General Passenger Agent, Montreal. C. E. E. USSHER, Assistant General Passenger Agent, Montreal. E. W. SKINNER, General Eastern Agent, 363 Broadway, LACKAWANNA ROUTE. New York. (Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad.) Short Line between New York and Buffalo. Lackawanna Stations foot of Christopher Street and foot of Barclay Street. W. F. IIALSTEAD, General Manager, Scranton, Pa. WV. F. HOLWILL, General Passenger Agent, New York. C. J. GUMIMERSBACH, Eastern Pass. Agent, 429 Broadway, New York. MEXICAN NATIONAL RAILROAD. Laredo Route. The scenic short line between Mexico and the United States. Five days from New York to Mexico, via Pennsylvania R. R., New York Central, Baltimore and Ohio, Erie, etc. NORFOLK & WESTERN RAILROAD. Shenandoah Valley Route. vania Railroad. 41 Via Pennsylhours from New York to New Orleans. W. 1;. BEVILL, General Passenger Agent, Roanoke, Va. C. 11. GAITHER. New England Agent, 290 Washington Street, Boston. L. 1. ELLIS, Eastern Passenger Agent, 317 Broadway, New York.

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230 FLORIDA CENTRAL & PENINSULA RAILROAD. Florida Trunk Line. The longest and most important railway system in Florida. 690 miles of completed railroad. For maps and schedules apply to A. O. MACDONELL, General Passenger Agent, Jacksonville, Fla. WALTER G. COLEMAN, General Traveling Agent. JACKSONVILLE, TAMPA & KEY WEST R. R. .(The Tropical rTlrunk Line.) The Florida Southern R.R. Co. l R. B. C a LE, Indian River Steamboat Co. iGen'1 Mgr., Jupiter & Lake Worth R. R. Jacksonville, I Ha. For Schedules and all information, apply to G. D. ACKERLY, General Passenger Agent, Jacksonville, Florida. SOUTH FLORIDA RAILROAD. (From Sanford to Port Tampa, Florida.) It. R. SwoPE, Sup. M. W. DAVIDSON, Gen'1 Pass. Ag't, Jacksonville, Fla. WVILBUR McCoY, Division Passenger Agent, Sanford, Fla. NOTICE TO TOURISTS. Having for miany 'years organized excursion parties around the world, I ai prepared to furnish tourists contemplating traveling all the information they may desire, also prices, etc., regarding Avinter and S anner Resorts. From May to November, address J. C. PRINCE, 43 Gold Street, New York. From Pecember to May, all communications should be directed J. C. PRINCE, Grand Motel Telegrafo, Havana, Cuba ; or, at Everett house, Jacksonville, Fla.

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VOCABULARY. A few moments of leisure, consecrated daily to the study of this vocabulary, will be of good profit to American travelers unacquainted with the Spanish language. It is principally composed of those words and short phrases which convey the expression for all immediate needs. A (ah) in the Spanish language has but one sound, and is pronounced as the open English a in alarm. E (a or ay) is pronounced in Spanish as the English words bed, fed, red, etc. I in Spanish is sounded like the English e in even or i in idiotism. 0 (oh) is pronounced in Spanish like the English a in /ot, lot or got ; O in sea-charts signifies West. U (oo) in Spanish is sounded like the English word ooze; it loses its sound after q and g, and becomes a liquid, except where it is followed by an a, as in guarismo, or when marked with a dirresis, as in agiero, ungliento, etc., when it retains is proper sound. Y in the Castillian alphabet stands as a vowel and consonant ; j,, when alone, or after a vowel, and followed by a consonant or at the end of a word, is a vowel, and sounds like the English e or ee, as Hoy y majiana (To-day and tomorrow).

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232 Numerals. One Two Three Four Five Six Seven Eight Nine Ten Eleven Twelve Thirteen Fourteen Fifteen Sixteen Seventeen Eighteen Nineteen Twenty Twenty-one Twenty-two Twenty-three Twenty-four Twenty-five Twenty-six Numerales. Uno Dos Tres Cuatro Cinco Seis Siete Ocho Nueve Diez Once Doce Trece Catorce Quince Diez y Diez y Diez y Diez y Veinte Veinte Veinte Veinte Veinte Veinte Veinte seis site ocho nueve y y y y y y uno dos tres cuatro cinco seis

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233 Numerals. Twenty-seven Twenty-eight Twenty-nine Thirty Thirty-one Thirty-two Forty Forty-one Forty-two Fifty Fifty-one Sixty Seventy Eighty Ninety One hundred One hundred and one One hundred and two Two hundred One thousand Two thousand One hundred thousand One million Two millions Numerales. Veinte y siete Veinte y ocho Veinte y nueve Treinta Treinta y uno Treinta y dos Cuarenta Cuarenta y uno Cuarenta y dos Cincuenta Cincuenta y uno Sesenta Setenta Ochenta Noventa Ciento-cien Ciento y uno Ciento y dos Doscientos M iI Dos mil Cien mil Un mill6n Dos millones

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234 Days. Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Months. January February March April May June July August September October November December Seasons. Spring Summer Autumn Winter Dias. ]lines Martes M iercoles Jueves Viernes SAbado Domingo Mess. Enero Febrero Marzo Abril Mayo Junio Julio Agosto Setiembre Octubre Noviembre Diciembre E staciones. I a primavera El verano El otoho El invierno

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235 Celestial bodies. Heaven, the heavens Celestial The sky A star The sun The disk of the sun Sunrise Sunset '[he moon New moon Full moon The division of time. A century, an age A year Annual A month Monthly A week Weekly A day Holiday Daily An hour Half an hour An hour and a half A quarter of an hour Cuerpos celestes. El cielo, los cielos Celestial El firmamento Una estrella El sol El disco del sol Salida del sol Puesta del sol La luna Luna nueva Luna llena Division del tiempo. Un siglo, cien anos Un ano Anual Un mes MXensual Una semana Semanal Un dia Un dia de fiesta Diariamente Una hora Media hora Una hora y media Un cuarto de hora

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236 The division of time. A minute A second The morning The afternoon The evening Night By night Midnight To-day Yesterday The eve The day before yesterday To-morrow The next day The day after to-morrow Water. A bay An arm of sea A calm The channel of a river A cascade The stream of a river The mouth Clarified water Sweet water Spring water Division del tiempo. Un minuto Un segundo La manana La tarde El anochecer La noche Por la noche Media noche Hoy Ayer La vispera Antes de ayer Mafiana El dia siguiente Pasado manana Agua. Una bahia Un brazo de mar Calma El canal de un rio Una cascada La corriente de un rio La embocadura Agua clarificada Agua dulce Agua mineral

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27 Water. Salt water Muddy water A great river A fountain A lake The tide High tide Low tide The sea A well The waves Hankind. The white race A white man The black race A negro A man, men A woman, women A wife A child A girl A bachelor A young man A young maid An old man An old woman Agua. Agua salada Agua turbia U n gran rio Una fuente Un lago La area Marea alta Marea Baja El mar Un pozo Las olas El g6nero humano. La raza blanca Un hombre blanco La raza negra Un negro (moreno) Un hombre, los hombres Una mujer, las mujeres Mujer casada Un niho Una nifia Un soltero Un joven Una joven Un viejo Una vieja

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238 Mankind. An old maid A widow A widower Senses. El genero hinnano. Una solterona Un viudo Una viuda Sentidos. Vision Vision The sight At sight A glance Visible Invisible La vista A la vista Una ojeada Visible Invisible Clear-sighted Long-sightedness Short-sightedness To see, to perceive Hearing A noise A sound To hear Smelling, the smell To smell The taste A savour, taste, relish Feeling, touch To relish, to savour Sensibility Insensible Perspicaz Larga vista Corta vista Ver, percibir Oido Un ruido Un sonido Oir Olor, el olfato Older El gusto Sabor, el gusto El tacto Saborear, gustar Sensibilidad Insensible Concepci6n Perception

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239 Different periods of life. Life To live Age and youth The prime of life birth Born Growth Youth Old age To grow or look old Ordinal numbers. The The The The The The The The The The The The first second third fourth fifth sixth seventh eighth ninth tenth eleventh twelfth thirteenth Diferentes periodos de la vida. La vida Vivir Edad e infancia La flor de la edad El nacimiento Nacer Crecer La juventud La vejez Envejecer Nnineros ordinales. El primero-la primera El segundo-la segunda El tercero-la tercera El, la cuarta El, la quinta El, la sexta El, la sdptima El, la octava El, la novena El, la decima El, la undecima El, la duodecima El, la decima tercera

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240 Ordinal numbers. The fourteenth The fifteenth The sixteenth The seventeenth The eighteenth The nineteenth The tentieth Collective numbers. A couple, a pair Two pairs A dozen Half a dozen A hundred Two hundred A thousand Two thousand Fractional numbers. The half The third, a third A fourth, a quarter A fifth A sixth Two-thirds Three-fourths Four-fifths, etc. Nnmeros ordinales. El, la decima cuarta El, la decima quinta El, la decima sexta El, la decima septima El, ]a ddcima octava El, la decima novena El, la vigesima Nnimeros colectivos. Marido y mujer, un par Dos pares Una docena Media docena Un ciento Doscientos Un millar Dos millares Nnimeros fraccionales. La mitad El, un tercio El, una cuarta El, una quinta El, una sexta Dos tercios Tres cuartos Cuatro quintos

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241 Numbers of repetition. Once Twice Thrice, three times Four times, etc. Conjugations. The verb To have conjugated with substantives Indicative present. I have a house Thou hast a room He has a looking-glass We have a chair You have a cushion They have a carpet Imperfect. I had a bed Thou hadst curtains She had a chimney We had bellows You had a shovel They had the~tongs Past. I had an iron Thou had coals Ninmeros de repeticiOn. Una vez Dos veces Tres veces Cuatro veces, etc. Conjugaciones. El verbo Haber conjugado con substantivos Indicativo presente. Tengo una casa Tienes un cuarto Tiene un espejo Tenemos una silla Vd. tiene una almohada Tienen una alfombra Imperfecto. Tenia una cama Tenias cortinas Ella tenfa una chimenea Teniamos fuelles Tenia una pala Tenian las tenazas Pret6rito. Tuve una plancha Tuviste carbones

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242 Past. He had some wood We had matches You had a fire They had ashes Perfect. I have had a fan Pluperfect. I had had a table Future. I shall have a lamp Thou will have wax candles He will have a fork We shall have a knife You will have a spoon They will have a dish Future anterior. I shall have had a cup Imperative. Have some mutton Let her have some veal Let us have some beef Have some fowl Let them have eggs Pret6rito. Tuvo madera Tuvimos f6sforos Vd. tuvo fuego Tuvieron cenizas Perfecto. He tenido un abanico Pluscuamperfecto. Yo habia tenido una mesa Futuro. Yo tendr6 una lampara Tendras velas de cera Tendra un tenedor Tendremos un cuchillo Vd. tendri una cuchara Tendri un plato Futuro anterior. Habre tenido una taza Im perati vo. Tome Vd. carnero Que tenga ternera Tengamos care Tengan aves Que tengan huevos

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243 Subjunctive present. That I may have any ham i doubt whether thou hadst any oil I will have him have some pastry His mother must have some butter Whether she has grapes or not I do not think that he had any fruit In case we should have some pears Whatever merit you may have Subjunctive. It is possible that you may have some fritters It is impossible that you should have some cakes If they come they may have some cream It is necessary that they should have some wine God grant they may have good examples Subjuntivo presente. A fin de que tenga jam6n Dudo que tengas aceite Quiero que tenga pasteleria Es necesario que su madre tenga mantequilla Que tenga uvas 6 que no tenga No creo que haya tenido fruta En caso que tengamos peras Cualquier merito que tenga Vd. Subjuntivo. Es posible que Vd. tenga buiuelos Es imposible que Vd. tenga pasteles Si ellos vienen que tengan crema Es necesario que tengan vino Dios quiera que tengan buenos ejemplos

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244 Imperfect. Whatever beer I might have had Though I had some sugar It was necessary that thou shouldst have some tea He was the first to have some coffee If we had any liquors at all It was not proper that you should have sweetmeats They were very near having ices I should be sorry if they had any punch Perfect. Although I have had some brandy Is it true that-thou hast had any cider He must have had some sorbet So far from his having had any syrup Imperfecto. Qualquiera cerveza que pudiera tener Aunque tuviera azdcar Era necesario que tuvieras t6 Era el primero que tuvo caf6 Si tuvieramos algunos licores No era conveniente que Vd. tuviera dulces Poco faltaba para que tuvieran helados Estaria enojado si tuvieran algdn ponche Perfecto. Aunque haya tenido aguardiente Es verdad que hayas tenido sidra Ha debido tener algdn sorbete Lejos de haber tenido almfbar

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245 Pluperfect. He was waiting till I had vegetables Suppose that you should have had truffles Conditional present. I should have a napkin Thou wouldst have a glass He would have a plate We should have a dish You should have a pot They would have fifty bottles Past. I should have had a lid To have had a salt cellar Having a coffee pot Having had a corkscrew Infinitive present. To have a soup dish Pluseuamperfecto. Esperaba que tuviera legumbres Suponga Vd. que hubiera tenido trufas Conditional present. Tendria una servilleta Tuvieras una copa Tuviera un plato Tuviramos un plato Tuviera Vd. un jarro Tuvieran cincuenta botellas Pasado. Hubiera tenido una tapadera Haber tenido una salsera Teniendo una cafetera Habiendo tenido tin tirabuz6n Infinitivo presente. Tener una sopera Dialogue. A journey Are you going to Havana ? Yes, sir Un viaje Va Vd. para la Habana ? Si, senor

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246 Dialogue. I shall have the pleasure of your company, for I am going there myself I shall be very happy with the pleasure of your company In company time passes imperceptibly This steamer goes very fast With this fine weather we shall arrive soon When do you think we shall arrive ? I hope we shall arrive tomorrow morning Good night It is late, we shall meet tomorrow morning on the arrival Arrival. We are safe in the beautiful bay of Havana The aspect of the city is beautiful Tendre el gusto de su compaia, porque voy allA tambidn Celebraria infinito tener el gusto de su companfa En compaufia el tiempo pasa muy rapidamente Este vapor tiene una marcha rapida Con este tiempo hermoso llegaremos pronto Cuandb6 piensa Vd. que Ilegaremos ? Espero que llegaremos mafana por la manana Buenas noches Se hace tarde, nos veremos manana a la llegada La llegada. Estamos salvos en la hermosa bahia de la Habana El aspecto de la ciudad es hermoso

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247 In what hotel will you stop ? I did not choose any yet, but a friend recommended me as the first-class hotels in Havana the Pasaje, the Hotel Mascotte, the Telegrafo, the Roma, Grant, the Saratoga, the Perla de Cuba, etc. As soon as we land we shall decide it Breakfast. I am glad to arrive because I have good appetite Will you do me the favor to have breakfast with me ? With pleasure, but you will have to accept my invitation to-morrow night at the Chaix Restaurant After breakfast we will take a drive to the Captain General's residence ; the drive is a beautiful one A qu6 hotel va Vd. a parar ? No me he decidido todavia, pero un amigo me ha recomendado como hoteles de primera clase en la Habana el Pasaje, el hotel Mascotte, el Telegrafo, el Roma, Grant, el Saratoga, La Perla de Cuba, etc. En seguida que pisemos tierra lo decidiremos El almuerzo. Estoy muy contento de llegar porque tengo mucho apetito Quiere Vd. hacerme el obsequio de almorzar conmigo ? Con mucho gusto, pero Vd. me hard el obsequio de aceptar mi invitaci6n para mahana por la noche al Restaurant Chaix Despues del almuerzo iremos 4 dar un paseo en coche a la residencia del Capitan General ; es un paseo muy agradable

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248 Useful phras I want to travel I want to eat I want to drink I want a good room I want to go to the theatre I want to go to the bull-fight I want to take a bath I want my luggage in my room I want to take a carriage drive I want to write At the restaurant. Waiter Bill of fare Coffee and milk Bread and butter A glass of milk A cup of English tea Soft boiled eggs Hard boiled eggs Ham and eggs Scrambled eggs Poached eggs Omelette with parsley es for a traveler. Quiero viajar Quiero corner Quiero beber Quiero un buen cuarto Quiero ir al teatro Quiero ir a los toros Quiero tomar un bafio Quiero mi equipaje en mi cuarto Quiero pasear en coche Quiero escribir En el restaurant. Mozo Lista de comida Cafe con leche Pan con mantequilla Un vaso de leche Una taza de t6 ingl6s Huevos pasados por agua Huevos duros Huevos con jam6n frito Revoltillo de huevos Huevos escalfados Tortilla con peregil

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249 At the restaurant. Omelette a la Frangaise Omelette a l'Espagnole Omelette with green peas Chicken broth Vegetable soup Rice soup Fried fish Broiled fish Entrees Vegetables Potatoes Fried potatoes French peas String beans Sweet potatoes Smashed potatoes Boiled potatoes Sliced tomatoes Tomatoes salad Roast beef Roast mutton Mutton chops Roast veal Veal cutlets Broiled chicken Broiled kidneys En el restaurant. Tortilla a la Francesa Tortilla i ]a Espanola Tortilla con petit pois Sustancia de gallina Sopa de legumbres Sopa de arroz Pescado frito Pescado a la parrilla Entradas Legumbres Papas Papas fritas Chicharos Habichuelas Boniatos Pure de papas Papas cocidas Tomatoes en tajadas Ensalada de tomates Roastbeef Carnero asado Costillas de carnero Ternera asada Costillas de ternera Pollo asado Rifiones 4 la parrilla

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250 At the restaurant. Broiled steak Tenderloin steak Celery Lettuce Watercresses Oysters Crabs Clams Sea mussels Shrimps Dessert Pies, cakes Fruits Cuban oranges Cuban pine apple Bananas Mangoes Mamey of San Domingo Sapodilla Guanabana Cocoanuts Guava Caimitos Strawberries Cherries Blackberries En el restaurant.. Beefsteak a la parrilla Filete a ]a parrilla Apio Lechuga Berros Ostiones Cangrejos Ostras pequenas americanas Almejas Camarones Postres Pasteles Frutas Naranjas de Cuba Pifa de Cuba Platanos Mangos Mamey de Santo Domingo, Zapotes Guan abana Cocos Guayaba Caimitos Fresas Cerezas Moras

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251 At the restaurant. En el restaurant. Apples Manzanas Peaches Melocotones Currants Grosellas Pears Peras Cheese Queso Check La cuenta All kinds of semi-tropical fruits can be had in their natural state or in preserves at the best restaurants of Havana.. A great assortment of tropical fruits in jars can be found at the Aguila de Oro, 18 Inquisidor Street. At the theatre. Do you go to the play this evening ? I have a good mind to go To what theatre shall we go? If you like we will go to the Tacon Theatre, the finest in Havana Do you know what play is performed to-night ? There is a very nice opera performed to-night Have you the tickets ? To what place do you vish to go ? En el teatro. Va Vd. al teatro esta noche ? Tengo muchos deseos de ir A que teatro iremos ? Iremos si Vd. quiere al teatro. Tac6n, el mAs bonito de la Habana Sabe Vd. que pieza dan esta noche ? Dan esta noche una 6pera muy bonita Tiene Vd. los billetes ? A qu6 sitio desea Vd. ir ?

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252 At the theatre. I can procure you two tick ets for the first tier of boxes I would rather go to the pit Very well, I will have the tickets ready What do you think of the house ? It is beautiful The orchestra is admirably conducted and the scenery is splendid What splendid dresses! The first female singer and the tenor are truly admirable In the morning. Good morning, gentlemen Good morning, madame How do you do? What are you going to do this morning ? Let us go shopping We shall go to Obispo, Habana and O'Reilly Sts., where we will find the nicest stores: En el teatro. Puedo procurarle dos asientos en palco de primera Preferiria ir al patio Muy bien, tendr6 los billetes listos Que dice Vd. de esta sala ? Es hermosa La orquesta esti admirablemente dirigida y la escena es esplendida Que lujo de trajes La primera actriz y el tenor son verdaderamente admirables Por la maiana. Buenos dias, caballeros Buenos dias, senora Como esti Vd ? Que va Vd. i hacer esta mahana ? Vamos A visitar las tiendas Iremos a la calle del Obispo, calle de la Habana y calle O'Reilly, donde encontraremos las bonitas tiendas :

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253 In the morning. La Habana La Especial Las Ninfas La Granada La Complaciente and a great many others with notions and novelties Very well I am at your disposal We shall take a carriage by the hour Driver, No. 99 Obispo St., store La Especial Thence you will take us to the dry-goods store La Habana, 95 & 97 Obispo Thence to the store La Complaciente, ioo Habana St. All these stores are very handsome and we will return to them We must go also to the store The United States, where they have very nice and cheap goods, San Rafael St., cor. Galiano Por la malana. La Habana La Especial Las Ninfas La Granada La Complaciente y muchas otras llenas de curiosidades Perfectamente Estoy a su disposicion Tomaremos un coche por hora Cochero, Obispo 99, tienda La Especial Despuds nos llevar4 A la tienda de generos La Habana, Obispo 95 Y 97 Luego a La Complaciente, calle de la Habana ndm. ioo Todas estas tiendas son muy bonitas y volveremos a visitarlas Tenemos que ir tambien a la tienda Los Estados Unidos, donde hay articulos muy bonitos y baratos, San Rafael esquina d Galiano

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254 In the morning. We ought also to have our portraits taken by the great photographer Mr. Cohner, 62 O'Reilly St. Hints. Tourists shall be welcomed on visiting the Cigar factories La Flor de Calixto Lopez, La Flor de Morales. The Cigarette factories La Corona, La Vencedora, La Cruz Roja. Wilson's stationery for newspapers and novelties, No. 43 Obispo Street. By showing this GUIDE, special attention will be given to tourists If you wish to go to Matanzas, you must wake up early in the morning and take the Railroad at Bahia Station. The Hotel Frances at Matanzas, advertised in this GUIDE, has interpreters and all Por la mahana. Deberiamos tambien retratarnos en ]a gran fotografia del Sr. Cohner, calle O' Reilly num. 62. Ideas. Los turistas seran bienvenidos al visitar las fabricas de tabacos La Flor de Calixto L6pez, La Flor de Morales. Las fabricas de cigarrillos La Corona, La Vencedora, La Cruz Roja. La casa de Wilson para periddicos y novelas, calle del Obispo nnm. 43 Enseando esta GULA, los turistas recibirin una atenci6n especial de estas casas Si Vd. desea visitar Matanzas, debe Vd. levantarse temprano por la maiana y tomar el ferrocarril de la Bahia. El Hotel Frances en Matanzas, anunciado en esta GUIA, tiene interpretes y todas las convenien-

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255 Hints. conveniences for tourists. By mentioning this GUIDE they will be treated reasonably Do not forget to visit the Chorrera. Steam cars leave every half hour from San Juan de Dios Square and from La Punta way down the Prado. The Chorrera is a very nice summer resort, where breeze always prevails. Tourists will see the old fort Columbus, which was built in commemoration of the Great Admiral, on the spot where the historians suppose he landed Price of landing will be $1.50 silver for passenger, including satchels, from the steamer up to the Hotel of your choice ; trunks pay 25 cents extra each Ideas. cias para los turistas. Mencionando esta GuIA sertn tratados con esmero y consideraci6n No se olvide Vd. de visitar la Chorrera. Los carros de vapor salen todas las medics horas del parque San Juan de Dios y tambi6n de la Punta, abajo del Prado. La Chorrera es un lugar muy bonito de temporada, donde la brisa existe siempre. Turistas verin el antiguo fuerte Col6n, construido en conmemoraci6n del Gran Almirante en el sitio que los historiadores suponen hizo su desembarque El precio de desembarque es $1.50 Plata por cada pasajero, incluso las maletas, del vapor hasta el hotel de su gusto ; por los bales se pagara 25 centavos extra cada uno

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256 Hints. As you do not know the Spanish language, p u t yourself in the hands of the interpreters of hotels, which are famed to be the most reliable in the world As you have in Havana firstclass restaurants, you may find a good way to live on the European plan : that is, to have a room in one place and get your meals at the restaurant If you wish a souvenir of your trip to Cuba, Mr. Gomez Carrera, a -well known artist among American tourists, will take a photograph of yourself or your friends, in any of the tropical scenery around the city. Firstclass work, at reasonable rates. Mr. Gomez Carrera visits the hotels daily from 9 to i1 A. M. Ideas. Como Vd. no posee el idioma. espafol, p6ngase en manos de los intdrpretes de hoteles, los cuales tienen fama de ser los mis honrados del mundo Como hay en la Habana restaurants de primer orden, puede Vd. encontrar el plan europeo muy conveniente : es decir, tener su habitaci6n en el hotel, y tomar su comida en el restaurant Si Vd. desea tener un recuerdo de su viaje a Cuba, el Sr. Gomez Carrera, artista muy conocido entre los turistas americanos, puede tomar su retrato 6 el de sus amigos en uno de los lugares pintorescos de los tr6picos cerca de la ciudad Trabajo de primera clase, A precios moderados. El Sr. Carrera visita diariamente los hoteles de 9 a 11 de la

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957J Hints. and from 7 to i r P. M. Address : 46 Empedrado When you arrive at Havana it is necessary that you should go to the Agents of the Plant SS. Line, to reserve your stateroom for the date of your departure. Certificate of identity must be delivered at the ticket office of the Line before i1 A. M. of sailing day, with the visa of the Civil Governor Mails for the United States and Europe : Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays Letters. Mr. and Mrs. : We have just arrived in this city, and have the pleasure to notify you that Mr. B., of Boston, has given us a letter of recommendation for you. Ideas. mahana y de 7 4 ii de la noche. Direcci6n : Empedrado 46 Cuando Vd. llegue a la Habana es necesario que vaya a la oficina de la Compaia de Vapores de Plant, para reservar su camarote para el dia de la salida. El certificado de identidad debe ser remitido al despacho de boletas de la Linea Plant antes de las i de la maiana, el dia de la salida, con el visa del Gobierno Civil Malas para los Estados Unidos y Europa : los Martes, Jueves y Sibados Cartas. Sr. y Sefora : Acabamos de llegar 6 dsta, y tenemos el gusto de avisarles que el Sr. B., de Boston, nos ha dado una carta de recomendaci6n para Vds.

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258 Letters. We shall take pleasure to hand it to you and we remain yours faithfully Mr. and Mrs. : In reference to your referred letter with the recommendation of Mr. B., our friend, we have the pleasure to inform you that we are entirely at your disposal for what you may require in this city. Very truly yours Mr. and Mrs. B. present their most respectful compliments to Mr. and Mrs. I). and request the honor of theircompany to dinner on Thursday at 6 o'clock Answer. Mr. and Mrs. D. present their respects to Mr. and Mrs. B. and will not fail to accept their kind invitation Cartas. Tendremos el gusto de remitirsela y ofrecernos de Vds. atentos y seguros servidores Sr. y Senora: Respecto a la carta referida por Vds. y la introducci6n del Sr. D. B., nuestro amigo, tenemos el gusto de informarles que nos tienen Vds. a su entera disposicion por Io que se les pueda ofrecer en 6sta. Quedamos de Vds. affmos. y s. s. Q. B. S. M. El Sr. y la Sefora B. tienen ei gusto de saludar al Sr. y Sra. D. y estarian agradecidos de ser honrados con su compahia en la comida del jueves A las 6 de la tarde Contestaei6n. El Sr. y ]a Sra. D. tienen el gusto de saludar al Sr. y la Sra. B., y con gusto aceptan su amable invitaci6n

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259 Answer. My dear friend : In case you have no previous engagement, will you come and dine with us to-morrow without ceremony. Mr. A. and I shall be very happy to see you. Believe me yours truly Asking for an inter view. Mr. R. sends his compliments to Mr. D. and desires to know the day and hour he may call upon him. Mr. R. hopes Mr. D. will excuse his importunity My dear friend : I have just arrived from New York. Please call and see me as soon as possible. I shall be at home the whole day. Very truly yours It gives me pleasure to hear that you have arrived in this city. I shall call on you to-morrow Very truly yours Contestaci6n. Querido amigo: Si Vd. no se halla comprometido, quiere Vd. venir a comer con nosotros manana, sin ceremonia. El Sr. A. y su servidor se alegrarian de verlo. Creame su affmo. y s. s. Pidiendo una entrevista. El Sr. R. manda sus expresiones al Sr. D. y desea saber a qud dia y hora puede verlo. El Sr. R. espera que el Sr. D. dispense la molestia Mi querido amigo: Acabo de Ilegar de Nueva York. Tenga ]a bondad de venir a verme lo mas pronto posible. Estare en casa todo el dia. Su affmo. y s. s. Me ha causado placer saber que Vd. habia Ilegado a esta. Pasard a visitarlo manana. Su affmo. y s. s.

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260 IMPORTANT TO RAILWAY AND STEAMSHIP LINES AND llOTIL-KiEPE RS ..N TIE UNITED TATES. Five tlionsand copies of CUBA ILt:STRATErD are pblished every year, about the middle of November. CUBA I LLUSTRATED1 (til'eutires among ie best society and tourists travelling around the world. Railway and Steamship lines and Hotel-keepers will find it to their benefit to advertise in CUBA ILLUSTRATED. J. 0 EKETRIT ~ ~, Publisher, 43 Gold Street, NEW YORK. Correspondance solicited.

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A A t ~*, A. V A TRANSLATING -ANDPRINTING IN FOREIGN LANGUAGES Estimates Furnished. Accurately translated into SPANISH, PORTUGUESE, FRENCH, and all other EUROPEAN LANGUAGES. The only printing-house in the United States which gives to the MANUFACTURER SEEKING ExPIRT BusiESKS the guarantee of correctness in translation and printing-all executed under one management. Napoleon Thompson & Co. 33 to 43 Gold Street, New York.

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S I 15 22 29| CALENDAR JANUARY. S M TWIT F S 1 2 3I 4 5 6 7 8 910 1112 13 14 1516 17 1S 19 20 2112223'241252627 28'293031.. .. .. FEBRUARY. S MIT WIT FIS .. ... ..I 1 3 4 5 6 7 S 910 11.12 13 14 15 16 17 18192021 222 2 252627 .. S 4 11 18 .. MARCH. MIT W T F S .. .. .. 1 2 3 5 6 7 S 910 12 13 1415 16 17 1920 2112223 24 26 27 22,2913031 ..I. .... APRIL. S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 S 91011 121314 1516117 1819 20121 222324'25 2627 28 29 30'.. ........ MAY. S [ MT W T 1 2 3 6 7 8 110 13 14115 16 17 20 21 22 23 24 27128 2930 31 JUNE. S 3 10 17 24 MT 41 5 1112 25126 4 5 1112 18 19 25 26 F S 1 2 8 9 1516 2223 29130 M 6) 9 1 u 23 30 1894. JULY. 10 17 24 31 W 4 11 18 25 T 12 19 26 FIS 'S 13 14 1 20 21, 13 2728 20 .27 AUGUST S M T!W TIF'S 11 2 3 4 5 6 7 9:1011 12 13 14 1561711 5 1920212223:2425 2627 2I29 3031 SEPTEMBER. S MIT W T F S ........... 2 3' 4 G6 91011 1213 16117 1 1920 2312425 2627 30'.! .. .... OCTOBER. S M T W' T F S ..1 2 3 4 5 6 78 910111213 14151617 181920 211222324 25 2627 28 9 3031...... NOVEMBER. S M 4 5 11 12 18 191 2526 T W'T F S 1 2 3 61 7 8, 910 13'14 15'16 17 20 21:22'23 24 27282930.. DECEMBER. W T 13 14 20 21 2S8 S 1, -V 15) 29 S M T W T 2 3 45 6 91011 12 13 16 17 1119 20 23 24 25 26 27 3031.. 1. ... F 7 14 21 28 1 895. JANUARY. M T W T Fi S 1 2 3 41 5' 7 8 9101112 141516 171819' 21 22 23 24 25 26 2$ 29 30 31.. FEBRUARY. S M T W'T F S ... 1 2! 3 41 5 6 7' 8 10 11'12 131415 16 1715 1920212223 24252627d. S.. |MARCH.__ M S M T W T F S 1 .. I. .. '.. 1 2 K ; 4 6 7 8 f it 1 1 1213 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 212223 2425,26 27 282980 31 .. .. .. I.. .. APRIL. S M TIW T'F Sf ..1 2, 3, 4I5 7 8 91011112 131 141516 17:1819 20 .21 222324252627 282930 .. MAY. S M T W T F'S ...I 1 2' 3 4 5 6 71 8 91011 12:13 14 15 16 1718 19 2021 22 23 24 25 26272829 3031 JUNE. SIM T W|T F S .. ... ...1 2I 3 4.5.6 7 8! 91011,12|13 14 15 1617 18119 2021 22 2324 252627 28 29 30.. ..I 14 21 28 I ) I

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MEMORANDUM.

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MEMORANDUM.

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A

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UNIV. OF FLORIDA 3 1262 04276 4257 d 7 ../t~ LA COMPLACIENTE, Vo. z00 nt$X$sYJ4JeME HAS BEEN MICROFILMED .y THE UNIVERSITY OF tLORIDA LIBRARIES. )V ES, N FES, \ \NZA, election of Satin, different LlE I'AICIE ONl Y. ? j a* 4Nt''^< [[r 4 -> 7 E A LAIIN .4

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