Citation
The Florida cattleman and livestock journal

Material Information

Title:
The Florida cattleman and livestock journal
Abbreviated Title:
Fla. cattlem. livest.
Creator:
Florida State Cattlemen's Association
Florida Cattlemen's Association
Place of Publication:
Kissimmee, Fla
Publisher:
Cody Publications
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Monthly
regular
Language:
English
Edition:
Volume 43 no.9, June 1979
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 30 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Cattle trade -- Periodicals -- Florida ( lcsh )
Cattle -- Periodicals ( lcsh )
Dairying -- Periodicals ( lcsh )
Cattle ( fast )
Cattle trade ( fast )
Dairying ( fast )
Florida ( fast )
Genre:
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with vol. 8, no. 7 (Apr. 1944).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 8, nos. 7-11 (Apr.-Aug. 1944) are misprinted v. 7, nos. 7 -11. Vol. 9, no. 2 (Nov. 1944) misprinted as v. 8, no. 2.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 11, no. 5 (Feb. 1947) misprinted as v. 11, no. 4, but then from v. 11, no. 6 through v. 12, no. 1 the misprint is 2 issues off until it was corrected with v. 12, no. 3 (Dec. 1947), for instance, v. 12, no. 2 is misprinted as v. 11, no. 12.
Numbering Peculiarities:
In January 1974, two issues were published: v. 38, no. 4, and a "progress edition" numbered v. 38, no. 5. That issue throws off the numbering of the issues for the rest of the volume, so v. 38, no. 12 is August instead of September. They fix it by having both the September and October 1974 issues called v. 39, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 52, no. 10 (July 1988) was misprinted as v. 52, no. 11.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 53, no. 12 to v. 54 no. 8 were misprinted one issue off as v. 53, no. 11 to v. 54, no. 7. This was corrected with v. 54, no. 9 (June 1990).
Issuing Body:
Official publication of: Florida State Cattlemen's Association, <Mar. 1945->; of: Florida Cattlemen's Association, <Oct. 1960->
Funding:
Funded by Project Ceres, a collaboration between the United States Agricultural Information Network (USAIN), the Agriculture Network Information Collaborative (AgNIC) and the Center for Research Libraries (CRL).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Florida Cattlemen's Association
Rights Management:
Copyright, Florida Cattlemen's Association. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
09105128 ( OCLC )
sc 88010916 ( LCCN )
0015-3958 ( ISSN )
ocm09105128
Classification:
637 ( ddc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida cattleman and dairy journal

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
e JUNE 1979
lotita .at tiema
AND LIVESTOCK JOURNAt
A -Mai&




calves
Would you like to grow a Let's face it, creep feeding
larger framed calf this year doesn't always pay. But
with 80 To 100 Pounds More r this Nutrena's Calf
Gain? Those are the results Kwik will put extra dollars
you can expect from Nutrena's in your pocket and doing
Calf Kwik creep feed. This this is the best way we
palatable ration is designed to know to earn your feed
make full use of your calves business.
growth potential. Plus, your cows
will benefit by going into the winter
with better condition. We want to es your
*eed business.
* NUIRENA FEED DIVISION
4014-40th Street, Tampa, Florida 33601 Phone (813) 626-5171




FLORIDA CATTLEMEN'S ASSOCIATION FLORIDA
CATTLEMEN'S
A Report from the Executive Vice President ASSOCIATION
(305) 846-6221, Box 1929, Kissimmee 32741 Market News-305/628-0412
President
Henry Douglas, Zephyrhills
Phone 813/782-1571 (off.)
Phone 813/782-1936 (res.)
First Vice President
Harvey Dahl, Melbourne
Second Vice Presidents
W. G. Welles, Arcadia
E. R. Felton, LaBelle
Executive Vice President
Jim Mummey, Kissimmee
DO UGLA S DA HL M UMME Y Secretary
E. D. "Buddy" Neel, Chipley
Treasurer
Ralph Cellon, Jr., Alachua
WITH ONLY A LITTLE OVER TWO WEEKS REMAINING IN THE 1979 LEGISLA- Executive Director Fla. Beef Council
Ron Stephens, Kissimmee
tive session, the major issue to be resolved is the amount and method of tax re- Past Presidents
lief for the citizens of Florida. The Governor's plan has not found favor in either G. H. Rather (Deceased)
liefforthecitzensof lorda.P. E. Williams, Davenport the Senate or the House and those two bodies are still far apart in their proposals Dave Turner, (Deceased)
Irlo Bronson, (Deceased)
on the subject. Unless a compromise is reached soon, it appears likely that Cushman S. Radebaugh, Orlando
session or a special session could be necessary. The matter Ben Hill Griffin, Jr., Frostproof
either an extended sJay B. Starkey, St. Petersburg of tax relief needs to be resolved in order to make final decisions on the state B. J. Alderman (Deceased)
J. 0. Pearce, Jr., Okeechobee
budget for the next two years and at this point, it does not seem that the chances Alto Adams, Jr., Fort Pierce
Louis Gilbreath, Ocala
are good that the legislature will come up with a program that will also satisfy George Kempfer (Deceased)
the Governor. Ralph Cellon, Sr., Alachua
W. D. Roberts, Immokalee
Latimer H. Turner, Sarasota
Charles Lykes, Tampa
AS REPORTED IN A PRIOR ISSUE, THE LEGISLATURE SURPRISED MOST OB- R. D. Bennett, Greenwood
Thomas J. Sloan, Fort Pierce
servers by coming to early agreement on the new Workers Compensation plan Pat Wilson, Frostproof
and passed the legislation which has been signed into law by the Governor. This Gilbert A. Tucker, Cocoa
Cedrick M. Smith, Jr., Wacaooa
was probably the single most important issue in the state and the elected officials State Directors
responded to the concern by approving the new wage-loss concept. The law man- Ralph Cellon, Sr., Alachua
Ed Yarborough, Baker
dates at least a fifteen percent lowering of rates and many believe that the say- J. W. Lowrey, Bay
Fred Mueller, Bradford
ings will exceed that amount. All those who were involved in the tremendous Andy Tucker, Brevard
amount of work that resulted in the new plan have pointed out that there will be Martin Woodward, Broward
amountGerald Cayson, Calhoun
problems and that it will take time to make all the necessary adjustments. There Bayard Toussaint, Charlotte
Mike Van Ness, Citrus
is general agreement, however, that the new program will be a major improve- S. D. Saunders, Clay
R. A. Roberts, Collier
ment over the bad situation of the past years. James 1. Terry, Columbia
John DuPuis, Jr., Dade
Lloyd Ryals, DeSoto
FCA LEGISLATION HAS MOVED WELL TO THIS POINT IN THE SESSION. THE Ben H. Floyd, Dixie
E. D. Gregory, Duval
bill to remove the conflict between state law and federal regulations concerning Thomas Lenssen, Flagler
payment for livestock at the auction markets passed both houses early and the Alton NesSmith, Gilchrist
Billy Peeples, Glades
Governor signed the bill the last week in April. Our bill to exempt cattle and Robert Ray Smith, Hardee
Wilson Ward. Hendry
hogs from the implied warranty sections of the Uniform Commercial Code has D. S. McAleer, Hernando
Dan Childs, Highlands
passed all committees in both houses and should be considered on the floor very Angelo Massaro, Hillsborough
soon. A bill we have supported along with other agriculture groups to help Ralph Neel, Holme
correct the major problem of dogs killing cattle has also passed the committees Doyle Stephens, Jackson
John E. Hawkins, Jefferson
in both the Senate and House and will be heard shortly by the legislature. Donald Bronson, Lake
Nat Hunter, Lee
James Fogarty, Leon
FCA PEAS T TH NE PR- J P. Sandlin, Levy
THE FINAL BILL OF MAJOR CONCERN TO FCA SPEAKS TO THE NEW PRO- I -B. Shuler, Liberty
gram for eradication of brucellosis in Florida. While the bill has moved through Ronnie Smoak, Madison
gram Vick Blackstone, Manatee
the necessary committees, we are having considerable problems obtaining the Cecil Perry, Mariona
Ricar ery, Marin
necessary appropriations commitment. This bill is predicated on approval by Richard Kelley, Martin
the USDA of the program and funding by Congress of the necessary funds to put Jerry Hall, Northwest
Marion Tidwell, Northwest
it into effect. We are receiving fine cooperation in Washington from our Senators Jeff Adams, Okaloosa
J. C. Bass, Okeechobee
and Congressmen in this effort. Representatives of FCA will travel to Washig- Joe Walter, Orange
Irlo (Bud) Bronson, Osceola
ton for a committee hearing this month to plead the case. We are continuing Dave Young, Palm Beach
Jve Bartng, Pasmc
to work to obtain the necessary state appropriations and appreciate the help Jo Barthle, Pasco
A[ Bellotto, Polk
from our members from all over the state who have called or written their state W. W. Tilton, Jr., Putnam
Alln Nease, St. Johns
Senators and Representatives asking their support in obtaining the funds. Please Wayne Carlton, St. Lucie
continue the good work. B. T. Longino, Sarasota
Wayne Jacobs, Seminole
C. Aubrey Caruthers, Sumter
Frank Garrard, Suwannee
AT THIS TIME IN THE SESSION, NO BILLS OF MAJOR PROBLEM FOR THE Robert Ecell, Taylor
r a C ra f r d e, SU n
cattle industry or agriculture have been approved. However, the last few weeks Ray Crawford, Union
Elmer McDonald, Volusia
of the session are always critical and we will be watching closely. PLEASE Jerry Spears, Wakulla
Earl Brogdon, Walton
make your reservations for the annual convention now and also the group trip to U. S. Harrison, Washington
Hawaii. Call the office if you have any questions on either.
---- Jim Mummey, Executive Vice President---THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 3




CaOaledae e
JUNE
1-2-Kerrville Brangus Days ............. Kerrville, TX
2-Hughes Angus Dispersion ..................Ellenton
2-RW Bar Club Calf Sale ..... Ocala
3- Brinks Brang su s ..... Kerrville: TX
Santa ertrudis Field Day ......... Lake City VOL a3tO.m
9-Cinco 5 Angus Prod. Sale ........ Munfordville, KY VOL. 4., NO. 9 AND LIVESTOCK JOURNAL
9-Ponder Beefmaster Sale...............Longview, TX
Il-Crane Hereford Sale ...............Demopolis, AL
11-14-ABS lnseminating School................ Ocala Editor-James J. Flanagan, Associate Editor-Donald E. Berry, Field Repre13-16-National SG Junior Heifer Show ... Brenham, TX
15-Corn/Sorghum Field Day..................Ona sentative-Holly Kemp, Advertising Coordinator-Mrs. Jan Linville. Circulation16-N. B. Hant Ranches Heifer ale. Ft. Worth, TX Mrs. Kate Smith. Write Box 1403, Kissimmee, Florida 32741. Phone (Area 305) 84616-Vollmering Beefmnasler Sale ........... Beeville, TX
16-Ga. Brahman Field Day .............Ray City, GA 2800. Florida Toll Free (800) 432-9192.
16-Wiggins Brahman Dispersal .......... Ashburn, GA
23-Brahman Field Day ....................Kissimmee Owned and Published by the Florida Cattlemen's Association
23-Florida Limousin Sale.................. Lake City
27-29-FCA Convention............. Lake Buena Vista
30-Florida Club Calf Sale ...................Tampa
30-Georgia Limousin Field Day ..........Edison, GA
30-American Brahmantal Sale ..............Nixon, TX
30-Moore/Miller Beefmaster .........Three Rivers, TX
JULY
7-Enfinjer Red Angus Sale ...............Chumuckla RglrD nrm ns osN w .
7-Payne s Cove/Whitworth Beefmaster Sale Pulaski, a Regular Departments ... Horse, Rodeo News. .
"-: 3-ASA Summer Simmental Conf. .. Black Hills, SD FCA Reports ................... 3 Two Rodeos Reported .......... 96
12-14-Fla. Feed Ass'n. Convention ....Port St. Lucie
21-Ga. Santa Gertrudis Field Day ........Athens, GA Editor's Desk .................. 6 Cowboy Standings Announced . 97
28-Beefmaster Field Day ............San Antonio, TX Latest Statistics .. 6
30-31-American Angus Futurity ........ Louisville, KY Now It's History .............. 8 Breed Information ..
AUGUST Livestock Roundup ............ 40 Limousin Breeders Meet ........ 30
4-Indian Summer Red Angus Sale..Fayetteville, TN LvsokRudp. .0Lmui reesMe....3
4-Confederate Valley Red Angus Sale.... Franklin, TN Animal Science Highlights ..... 84 Simmental Group Holds Field Day36
4-Beefmaster Field Day .............. Comanche, OK Stories By-Stancil .......... 98 Tom Childs Reelected .......... 73
5-Confederate Valley Red Angus Sale.... Franklin, TN Diagnostic LbN t Li 104 Angus Plans Reviewed.........82
24-Hillshorough/Pasco Calf Sale ..............Seffner DigotcLab N~otes-R'ubin 0 nu ln eiwd.....8
29-30-Florida Forestry Ass'n. Meeting Tarpon Springs Editorials .. .............. 106 EBA Field Day Scheduled ...... 96
SEPTEMBER
7-8-Leo Jasik Beelmaster Sale ..........Pleasanton, TX Fenera, el. .
13-Canning's Coll. of Cow Knowledge Rougemont, NC Convention Features ... Chipley Field Day Covered ...... 33
v-Southeastern Beefmaster Sale Jackson, MS Convention Program Listed ..... 47 Short Course Highlights Given . 34
22-Live Oak County Beefmnaster Sale .Three Rivers, TX
29-Young Acres PH Sale ...............Valdosta, GA Meeting Highlights Announced .. 48 "Hall of Fame" Kicked Off .....42
OCTOBER FCA Special Page .............50 Meat Price Hearings Held ......65
3-5-National Hay Convention ..... Fort Walton Beach President's By-Lines ........... 52 Judging Team Gets Honors ..... 99
4-Anhinga P' Hereford Sale .............. Tallahassee Recipe Contest Winners Told ... 54
6-King Ranch Sale ...................Kingsville, TX
13-University of Florida Bull Sale ..........Gainesville FCA Committees, Locals Listed 58 Dairy News .
19-Singletary PH Bull Sale ...............Kissimmee Ladies Invited to Attend Reception60 Use DHI Program- Webb ...... 100
20-Barield Farms Beeftntster Sale ....Immokkalee
20-Still House Hereford Bull Sale .......... Wauchula Lucy Gunn Passes Away ....... 62
22-Cowman's Beefmaster Bull Sale ............Bartow Shows and Sales .
24-25-BBU 19th Annual Convention Corpus Christi, TX Limousin at Putnam 30
26-South Texas Beefmaster Sale ........ Robstown, TX Compete
27-Blue Denim Angus Sale ... ........ Scottsville, VA Pasture Features .. S'Gertrudis Show Strong ...... 65
27-Florida Polled Hereford Bull Sale ....Arcadia
29-Briar Creok P' Hereford Sale ........... Alma, GA Armyworms Under Control .....37 Two Steer Shows Reported .....74
Range Group Active!- Yarlett . 66 Beefmasters Average $2559 ...... 78
3-Three Rivers Brahman Breeders Sale .... Dothan, AL Ona 'Star' Grass Offered ....... 68 Angus Exhibit at Palatka ....... 82
9-Rocking T Beefmaster Sale ...........McNeill, MS Taxes and Production-Abbitt et a170 Charolais Sale Averages $1257 .. 88
G2-13-Beefalo Kentucky National Louisville KY Grazing Comparisons-Bertrand .76 Brahmans Show at Putnam Event92
19-Ga. Santa Gertrudis Sale ............Tifton, GA
28-29-Hereford Pen Bull Show & Sale .........Bartow IFAS Research-Koehler et al ... 91 Brahman Sale Averages $1419 ... 95
DECEMBER
8-Flu. Angus Bull Sale........ ....Bartow
or nhBl S............ Vero Beach The Cover for June 1979
14-Adams Ranch Braford Sale ............Ft. Pierce
Our full color cover picture for this annual June pasture edition shows a group of
cattlemen during a tour last fall at Bar G Bar Ranch, Fort Pierce, where owner Barney Greene, Jr., showed his plantings of "Florida" Carpon Desmodium, a perennial tropical forage legume which has provided quality pastures when grown in mixtures with the permanent grasses.
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION
Florida Cattlemen's Association, Henry Douglas, President, Zephyrhills Eastern Brahman Association, Andy Tucker, Service Issues of President, Rockledge Florida Charolais Association, John Corr, President, Ocala Southeastern Brangus Associstion,
R. A. (Pete) Griffin, President, Talledega, Alabama Florida Angus Association, J. R. Thompson, President, Marianna Florida Santa Gertrudlis Association, Fred Dietrich Ill, President, Orlando Florida Shorthorn Breeders Association, Jack The Hooker, President, Plant City 0 Florida Hereford Association, Tom Childs, President, Lake Placid Florida Meat
C t1 Packers Association, Joe Teijerio, President Florida Beef Council, Bill Stark, Fort Pierce, Chairman Florida Cutting
C t ean Horse Association, R. D. Welles, President, Arcadia 0 Florida Association of Livestock Markets, Buddy Williams, President,
Marianna a Florida Shmmental Association, R. L. Davenport, President, Ocala a Association of Florida Rodeos, Herb for 1979 Peel, President, Bonifay Florida Polled Hereford Association, Robert F. Lee, President, Tallahassee Florida Limousia
Association, Mrs. Gladys Freeman, President, Okeechobee.
January....... American Breeds The Florida Cattleman and Livestock Journal (ISSN 0015-3958); is published monthly for $5.00
February....... Horses and Rodeos for 2 years at Cody Publications, Inc., 410 West Verona Street, Kissimmee, Florida 32741.
March....................... Brahmans Second Class Postage paid at Kissimmee, Florida 32741. Postmaster: Send address changes to
May................... Animal Health The Florida Cattleman and Livestock Journal, P. 0. Box 1403, Kissimmee, Florida 32741. Rate
June................. Florida Pastures Card mailed on request. Closing date 5th of preceding month. In circulation 25th of preceding
July.............. Better Bulls month. Member Agricultural Publishers Association, American Agricultural Editor's AssociaAugust..................... Marketing tion, Florida Magazine Association, Livestock Publications Council, Audit Bureau of CirculaSeptember ...... Continental Breeds tion.
October ............. H&P Herefords
November .............. Angus
December ................... Charolais
4 /THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979




ENERGY
Increases Summer Weight Gains
In Your Growing and Fattening
Program For Weaned
Steers and Heifers
ThereforeFEED
USSC'S SUGA.LIK NO. 5
high in total
16% PROTEIN solids and sugar ENERGY produces these important profit making results when you feed USSC's Suga-Lik liquid feeds to:
Weaned Steers Weaned Heifers
I. Increased carrying capacity of pastures. 1. Increased rate of growth and development.
2. Increased weight gains and grade. 2. Increased heat cycling and increased conception
rate.
3. Increased resistance to diseases and increased
general health. 3. Decreased calving problems on first calves.
4. Increased consumption and more efficient 4. Increased conception rate at second breeding
utilization of available roughage. period while suckling her first calf.
If you have tried the rest, now try the best
Suga-Lik Liquid Feeds are produced and distributed by the United States
Sugar Corporation. Please call our sales department for more information.
United States Sugar Corporation
Telephones: 813/983-8121, 983-7946 CLEWISTON, FLORIDA 33440
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 5




Grazing Editor's )eek
cattle? Range conservationist says
thanks for coverage
Are you protecting yours from Gainesville
horn flies which can cut gains up ... Thanks so much for the excellent
to 1/2 lb per head or daily milk writing on the last tour of (Society for
flow as much as 20%? Range Management) ... These reports
in your magazine are much appreciated
Check advantages of feeding Moor- by the membership as well as those who Man's IGR Minerals: are notified of these tours in advance.
Lewis L. Yarlett LAT TURNER, right, Sarasota, past FCA E!1 Insect growth regulator president and current chairman of NCA's
stops horn flies before they fly IFAS entomologist sends taxation committee, received the support
in article on mole crickets of Congressman Sam Gibbons, 7th
SEffective against horn flies GaineDistrict, on repeal of the carryover basis
resistantto conventional insecticides Gainesville provisions of the Tax Reform Act of 1976
Enclosed is an article ... to con- during a recent trip to Washington, D.C. L.1 Economical--only pennies sider publishing in The Florida Cattleper animal daily man. As you know, mole crickets are a
severe pest of pasture grass in Florida, first one issued. I believe the editor was L!I Convenient--just feed and and we would like to inform cattlemen the son of P. E. Williams. He worked
animals treat themselves of our new research project. hard in getting it started before Al and
ET' NP.G. Koehler Bob Cody, who also did a great job in
co No spray or other horn-fly 7/The article on this grass pest appears on the early days.
controls needed when used asJ.BStre
directed page 91 of this issue of The Cattleman. 7/It was good hearing from Mr. Starkey,
1[r Minimum time and labor Mongtime reader comments who is a past president of the Florida
Cattlemen's Association; and past FCA
Ifl Only mineral feeders needed on Cattleman president P. E. Williams' son, J. E., was
St. Petersburg the editor beginning in 1936 until the ... Provides base and trace Please change mailing address for publication was acquired by the Kissimminerals, vitamin D and 200,000 (The Cattleman) ... J. B., Jr., will con- mee Gazette, Inc., in December 1940. Al
units per pound of vitamin A tinue to receive his copy at Odessa ... Cody was managing editor and then pur[! Can be used in milking ration I have never missed a copy since the chased the magazine in July 1942 and
r Proven by 6 universities'
research plus ours
Iir Cattlemen bought enough Latest $ atistics
in '76-'77-'78 for summerlong
feeding to 4 million head.
Get the details on I G R when the Commercial Slaughter and Average Weight (USDA)...
MoorMan Man stops to see you. Cattle Calves Swine Sheep
M Head Wt. M Head Wt. M Head Wt. M Head Wt.
March 1979 (Fla.) 35.6 1009 6.8 475 8.9 230 -March 1978 (Fla.) 46.5 960 15.7 447 31.1 220 .1 72
March 1979 (U.S.) 2851.5 1057 271.6 233 7397.3 238 444.1 120
March 1978 (U.S.) 3470.1 1027 438.9 236 7069.8 234 501.9 112
Slaughter Under State Inspection, Head (AITC)...
Cattle Calves Swine
April 1979 4367 26 9770
ADVERTISE April 1978 4787 74 6648
Brucellosis Testing (AITC)...
Tested Reactors Vaccinated
1' ATTLEIMIENS Cldeo Adults
7((ONSTRUCTO _. Beef Cattle, April 1979 39,183 1177 12,617 1311
OMPANY# I Dairy Cattle, April 1979 38,643 502 4152 4775
SLIVESTOCK Swine, April 1979 169 2 .. ..
SYSTEMS Livestock Prices Per Hundred (USDA)...
Cattle Feedlots Cattle Cows Strs. Hfrs. Calves Swine Chickens
Swine Facilities Fla., April 15, 1979 $68.40 $56.00 $73.90 $97.00 $42.90 $27.50
* Dairy Facilities Fla., March 15, 1979 68.40 55.10 74.70 101.00 49.20 28.50
* Turn-key Projects U.S., April 15, 1978 47.20 35.30 50.20 53.70 45.00 27.80
* Nationwide U.S., April 15, 1979 72.40 56.20 76.40 96.40 44.30 28.20
Construction
* Retail Sales Field Crop Prices Per Bushel and Ton (USDA)...
C.ll today
813-665-2424 Corn (Bushel) Hay, Baled(Ton)
t &1.0. Im ,5
F- 3o U.S., April 15, 1979 $2.24 $49.50
U.S., April 15, 1978 2.24 51.40
6 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979




Get the jump on fall
bull buying season
Better Bulls of all breeds are important to Florida's commercial
- jLV cow/calf programs.
1004WThe July issue of The Florida Cattleman will be the annual "Better a : ;:; ,.Bulls" feature edition. Editorial conVE~tC sou jotent will focus partly on the role of proven bulls for increasing better production, along with research findings tailored to Florida, and current industry news.
It will also be a timely issue for Purebred cattle producers to advertise and promote herds and bloodlines.
Get the jump on fall herd bull buying season. Advertise in the "Better Bulls" issue of The Florida Cattleman.
Closing date for reserving space is June 5. Call us and we will help with layout and copy.
ja Floida
AND LIVESTOCK JOURNAL
P. 0. Box 1403, Kissimmee, Florida 32741
Phone Florida toll free 800/432-9192
Out-Of-State 305/846-2800
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 7




became publisher/editor until joined by
his brother Bob Cody, in 1946, when the
latter took over the editor's position. Only
three others have held the title of editor
through the years, the late Bill Gephart,
Harry Hammond of Gatlinburg, Tet~nesF R R see, and the current editor. FICA purYEAR-ROUND chased the publication in June 1978.
OH~ Subscriber moved, but
C N R Lwants to get magazine_Grand Turk Island
10 Ibought a two-year subscrip- THE PATZ Model 350 manure spreader
tion to The Florida Cattleman and has corrosion resistant sides with wood
V MM MSenjoyed reading it very much until I bottom axle-connected hitch.
since November .. I mailed a change
of address notice ... Thank you ... I 973-Patz spreader has look forward to receiving it again,
Richard Lmod The Patz 350 bushel (220 cubic feet
"~PASTU RE-AID" emn struck level) Manure Spreader with a
R" "KI"worm gear apron drive, driven by a hyItem on IFA S research draulic motor, controls the spreading
\,Afurnished for publication rate by varying the apron speed from 0
~4%I to 15 feet per minute.
Ona Spokesmen for the Pound,
... (The) summary .. (regards) a Wisconsin, based firm say combined hyvariety release from IFAS. You will draulic control of apron drive and
observe from the text that we are mak- optional end gate positioning lets the ing this available as a grass having operator "fine tune" application in
potential to some, cattlemen in some sit- trso aeadmauecnitny
uaritistl no t dispralace othqer- Other options include a choice of 540 or varetes nanwraltfqus 1000 R.P.M. PTO and upper beater kit.
tions-just provide one more practice Th PazMdl30 anr
that may fill some needs. Spreader features positive lock apron
Grass for increase plantings is expec- chi,2inhdaerbatwlkg ted o b avilabe b mi-Jun, 179. beam tandem axles, corrosion resistant TThe article is about Ona Star grass and siewthodbtomadaichht
1 appears on page 68 of this issue of The pulls directly on the axles, not the box.
Cattleman. For additional information check
number 973 and return the form on page
S Reader sends picture 8 of this issue.
MAKES of son receiving award Wacar -- -- -- -- --1
GO DSES.After seeing your cover for April, I I W an Ml voreI
GOOD SENSE.thought you might be interested in this I
Dalyue f ..S PATUEAI" picture . Steve (Durrance) has beaI f r ain
wih uhntsie o n aS conSTUous yAr-" member of Florida Cattlemen's Asso- The Florida Cattleman
wit Penthazneon cntnuusyer- ciation for several years, listed as 2-13 I Drawer 1403
round basis means extra profit for you! Cattle Company. j Kissimmee, Florida 32741
" HEAVIER COWS I, HEAVIER CALVESOfcushsateanIhvebn BETTER CONDITION MORE BLOOM members for a number of years. Pes e eifraino h
" BETTER CALVING PERCENTAGES Gloria R. (Mrs. Williard K.) Durrance material below. (Check more than/
7J We appreciate receiving the photo and one box if you wish.) V.M.S. "PASTURE AID" happy to learn about the beef production Offer goodI
Available in block or grandular form- award received by young Durrance fromuniSetm r1,97
Mineral-vitamin nutrition plus phenothia- Sperry New Holland. The picture appears ISetm r1,17
zine to give you an all-in-one package for on page 66 of the May issue. LI 973. Patz Spreader
supplementation, fly control and a con- 01 974. Round Bale Dispenser
tinuus wrmin proram 0 975. Shoo-Fly Control
tinou wrmngprgrm.Advertiser wants to continue 0 976. Koopers Fence System I
promtin prouct0 977. Quonset Booklet pro otng roucti0 978. VMS Products Lake Wales 0 979. Cullor Sprayer-Feeder I
Attached is a rough outline of ad I'd El 980. Butler BuildingsI like to start in the June issue .. It I IDwould appear it would be to our advan______________________tage to go on the 12-time rate .. Name .................. ..
lTIfE ULTIMTE IN MNERAL VITA1IN NUITRITION" We have been very pleased wihthe
MANUTACTIUING response we have had from the ads in IAdd ress.........
-F MR [ C The Cattleman Keep up the good city..........
V...,Ic. .O ox46work. MayL d it State ......ZIP ..
Mongoer AL 360.258461 Adsit MuaCs ry dct LL Adsit- --8/THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979




OI~h MRON
Toughest feeders in any pasture...
won't rust, rot or splinter- ever.
Double-capacity
Turtle Back
U.S. Patents D-205655 M-3324833
You can't beat these Steel 'Tuff feeders for durability. Their super-duty tubular steel and high-impact poiy- Weather-beatlng
ethylene construction means they can take the Twister
toughest weather or animal abuse- yet keep their new look longer. And without costly and time-consuming maintenance. Innovative trough designs assure nearly 100% clean-up every time. Count on Poli-Tron-for all your feeding needs.
DEALER
INQUIRIES
INVITED
12' or 8'
Bunk Feeders
U.S. Patent
No. D234,607 WRITE FOR FREE BROCHURE
OR CONTACT OUR FLORIDA DISTRIBUTOR Poll-Tron, Inc. Bob Sharp
Box 581-C Tower Products Co.
3001 Rouse Ave. 991 Packinghouse Road
Pittsburg, Kansas 66762 Sarasota, Florida 33580
O L R N (316) 232-2400 TE(813) 371-0094 I UE1




Lightweight pigs should be sorted for best results
If given the proper attention, lightweight pigs, runts and tail-enders can perform as well as their heavier littermates. And at today's hog prices, they LY K ES PASCO are worth the effort.
"Depending on who you're talking to, a baby pig is worth from $15 to $27 the minute it hits the ground," says Dr. Steve Haye, swine research specialist for Central Soya, Fort Wayne, Indiana. Pasture Grove Haye recently completed research
study which demonstrates that light birthweight pigs can not only survive, but perform economically, if they can be Fertilizer Division segregated so that they do not have to
compete with larger pigs. P. O. Box 97, 904-567-5622, Dade City, FI. 33525 In Haye's 13-month study, 431 light
birthweight and late farrowed pigs were used. The pig's performance was measured during a 33-day nursery period. Of the group, 426 pigs survived, For your pasture or grove materials call: or 98.8 percent. The average starting
JOHN F. HARRIS 904-567-2420 PAT CAIN 904-567-3014 weight was 8.86 pounds and the final
RALPH GOODSON 904-567-3511 SHERMAN YOUMANS 813-465-0337 weight averaged 27.54 pounds. Daily
BOBBY HALL 904-793-2527 CAESAR RINALDI 904-588-3385 gain averaged 0.58 pounds on 1.03
PAT HAMILTON 904-567-7390 MARK MAFFETT 904-588-2367 pounds of feed, or a 1.8 feed-to-gain
ratio.
"The post-weaning period is one of the most stressful periods in a pig's life. This stress is often compounded when lightweight weanling pigs are placed in WE STRIVE FOR REPEAT CUSTOMERS nursery environments where they are
WE STRIVE FOR REPEAT CUSTOMERS allowed to compete with older, larger,
pigs," says Haye.
PLAN NOW FOR
. FLY CONTROL
Feed Super-Mol Fly and Worm
Control Blocks on a regular program
eC., !ol ~ Super-Mol BLOCK POWER...
* Full 2% Phenothiazine 0
" 50,000 Units-Vitamin A
* Rich in energy-sugars
* Highly palatable-cane molasses
* Minerals, salt added Costs just pennies a day!
Write or Call:
".tt 41K HUCO, INC.
HU Super-Mol Division
AI Px Rt. 33619
800/282-9149, 813/677-9181 Feed Ingredient Div.
Route 1, Box 498 813/722-4523
DRIED MOLASSES Products Tampa, FL 33619 Palmetto, FL
BROKERS & JOBBERS
10 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979




sue-haptinpnthrisal pics the pa ifroeigntoehr sldhae uou~hac fan' affrdtolis.
Hig rtetin. o oble
ofh ta is fas an positi0ve.-Reten-H tio i s exrm l hih Th re ut 0 00 0 0 .0
system0- 0 in Am ria Syaue N.Y 10 1-.
*~~~~~~~ (P).- 0
They~~~~ go infst..an o nfrod




"Our program calls for segregation of small pigs according to size in pens where they have 2.5 square feet per pig," Fo F ord C w- af M e :he said. "Mixing litters after weaning is
*not as important a consideration as is maintaining size uniformity."
Central Soya research uses flat-deck cages to pen the lightweight pigs. The T h e B i B lu flooring is either aluminum slats or perforated metal raised eight inches above
"The flat-deck cages help maintain a M anagem ent Tool dry, clean environment that is also critical at weaning time," said Haye.
Haye uses neo-terramycin in the water during the first five to 12 days after weaning for disease control.
Manaemet isthekey o a"The important thing to remember succgessfulbeef orkaiy toais that lightweight pigs can perform as succssfu bee or airywell as other pigs if they are not put in a operation. And the competitive environment," says Haye.
Harvestore System is the "While some feeders will not take
key to good management. the trouble to segregate according to
Use it to store any kind size because of the extra labor in-.
of forage for use when you volved," he adds, "they are making a
11need it. This is needed trade-off with increased hospital care
HMI11 in Florida especially due and inefficient performance if the pigs
to the extended periods of are mixed with larger hogs."
slow growth common during
Winter cold and Spring 9 74-Company has
Drouth. Harvestores are rudbl ipne
obeng se umerfu Turnbow Manufacturing Company,
Fora aire andero Oilton, Oklahoma, has announced the
Flrahs Phoniefo an development and production of the
rances.Phon fo anRound Bale Dispenser, an all-hydraulic appointment at your ranch hay feeding system that allows one man
or farm, or write for our to feed 1,000 head of cattle per hour.
Guide to Harvestore Ranch tested for five years, the
processed forages. equipment can handle all standard bales
(from 800-2,500 pounds) and now allows one person to do a job formerly accomplished by six men in an 8-hour shift. Ranch hands can be taught to use
95 m ittthe dispenser in just 15 minutes.
Bales are easily loaded onto the dispenser's tilt pallet, which has a revolvig drum. The machine hauls the hay to HARV STOR thefeeding area, and with the use of two
PROD CTSINC.reversible drums, distributes feed to the cattle in an even manner no matter GEORGIA-FLORIDA which direction the. hay is wound.
HARVESTORE, INC. Side panels insure that all parts of
Tobacco Road the bale are guided into the dispenser
Attapulgus, Ga. 31715 drums and evenly distributed on the
(912) 465-3987 ground. The equipment features heavyduty materials, excellent workmanship and a low-maintenance design.
TrojanFor a free brochure check number 974 and return the form on page 8. DistrbutorConner names O'Brien
Phon C405 772280 to investigative post
Phone(405 7722801Commissioner of Agriculture Doyle Box 69A, Route 6 Conner has appointed John O'Brien, 33,
Weatherford, OK 73096 as chief of the livestock theft investi*Hydraulic Chutes gative unit in the division of animal
industry, Florida Department of Agri3 sizes)culture and Consumer Services.
* rpeDuyCue O'Brien has been a deputy sheriff in
*Calf Tilt Machine Jackson County for the past two years
4WTHE COW PREGNOSTICATOR and was shift supervisor and crime
a new approach to investigator there after six years as a
pregnancy testing Leon County deputy sheriff and almost
SOON AVAILABLE three years with the Florida States University campus police.
12 /THE FLORIDA CATITLEMAN / JUNE 1979




Proven through progeny
Sugarland's "Superior-Meat-Type" Brahmans are the sires of one of the largest F1 crossbred herds in the Southeast. They exhibit their superior beef characteristics through the cow herds, into their calves, and in the feedlot. Sugar bulls are bred to produce a profit through performance.
-
414k
AOV
~ 4
_ _( '
"F '
I II li4
' Ii 'i'
-o i i'"




O'Brien graduated in 1963 from Daytona Beach Seabreeze High School, @ attended Daytona Beach Community
College and took his associate and T ranusolbachelor's degrees at FSU in criminSO I ology. He has completed course work
for his master's degree in criminal jusIt pays off better because tice at Eastern Kentucky University,
07 Richmond, Kentucky, and has been a
it w rks beter.police standards instructor at Chipola it wo ks beter.Junior College, Marianna.
O'Brien, who grew up in Ormond Beach, now is interviewing candidates for field investigator positions in south
________ -and central Florida. The two vacancies rfranmisol TraniisolO were a result of one retirement and a
Control Injectable Drench -Phenothiazmne **TBZ..6 resignation for a higher-paid position in
No. Steers 30 30 31 31 31 private investigation work. O'Brien says
he hopes to fill the two field positions by Initial wt. lb 440 432 436 4436 4439 May.
The unit has four Field investigator Total gain, lb 334 362 385 327 350 positions. The field investigators assist
local law enforcement agencies in solvAverage daily 1.69 1.83 1.94 1.65 1.77 ing livestock and other farm theft and
gain, lb. are of material assistance in some cases
Adde vale ofgainbecause they are not restricted by abovleont ga,'in 10.19 19.24 -2.99 5.47 1 county political boundaries.
9 75-Product keeps flies and ticks off cattle
Mike Wright, president of Livestock Fly Control Company of Arnold, Missouri, has announced the introduction of a While other dewormers talk about what they don't do, we want new product that keeps flies and ticks
you to know what TRAMISOL levamisole does best. Things off cattle. The product is called "Shoolike giving you greater gains and saving you more money than any Fly and is designed for the prevenother dewormer. That's the Tramisol Payoff. tion and control of pink-eye.
The device is clipped to the animal's
*Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station 3-year summary of ear and a combination of controlled
average performance of steers given anthelmintics before winter grazing (198
days). 'Based on steer price of $39/cwt., less cost of anthelmintic. *"Trademark of release insecticide and the flicking Merck & Co., Inc. action of the two wick-like "tails,"
repels the insects, Wright said. One application lasts all season. The product is equally effective on beef and dairy cattle.
Wright said, "This product began as the humanitarian dream of one man and
- has grown into the dedicated belief of a
Seffner 813/6854333 Jacksonville 800/342-5231 much larger group. It represents over 15
Okeechobee 813/763..0225 Ocala 904/7324078 years of development and University
813/763.3195 A fl b and field testing on thousands of cattle.
The product holds both U.S. and for1800 East North ar Street eign patents."
OKEECHOBEE, FLORIDA 33472 For more information check number
975 and return the form on page 8.
__________________ Pasture management book
L Dabneyavailable
P. L. abney"Profitable Pasture Management" is a complete volume on the details of forage W ELD IN Gproduction and utilization, including soils preparation, varieties to be used, and Machine Shop fertilizer treatments, management pracP. 0.Box 10 tices, and other information needed for
Summerfield, Fl 32691 a successful program.
Phone 904/245-2700 The book is authored by Roy A.
Chessmore, vice president for agri* Repairs on all types of *We do all types of culture, The Kerr Foundation, Inc.
Farm and Ranch machinery. aluminum welding The book also covers the basic principles of livestock production and the
* We can rebuild and remodel *We build to suit economic information necessary to be
all your old equipment. specialized needs successful in a livestock-forage
program. Based on research from Located on Hwy. 301 at Summerfield experiment stations and from
experiences of leading cattlemen, the 14 /THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979




as FF
~' ~--,4
The Payoff:.
Control Tranmisol Tramisol Pheno- **TBZ-6 Control Injectable Drench thiazine No. Steers 30 30 31 31 31
Initial wt. lb 440 432 436 436 439
Total gain, lb 334 362 385 327 350
Average daily 1.69 1.83 1.94 1.65 1.77
gain, lb
Added value ofgain $1019 $19.24 $-2.99 $5.47
above control'
While other dewormers talk about what they don't do,
Tamisol levamisole wants you to know what it does best.
Things like giving you greater gains and saving you more money
than any other deworner. That's the Tramisol Payoff.
*Misippi Agrcultural and Forestry Experiment Station 3-year summary of average performance of steers given
anthenii before nter grazing (198 days). 'Based on steerprice of $39/cwt, les cost of antlielmintic.
demsrkofMrck&Co. Inc.




KOPPERS COMPANY has introduced a
__ 7 farm and ranch fence system using pressure-treated posts.
- book includes information that is howto-do-it oriented.
tfi For information on how to obtain a
copy, which is listed at $13.95, write The Cattleman Press, P. 0. Box 1403, Kissimmee 32741.
976-Koppers introduces
farm, ranch fence system
A farm and ranch fence system which A LO TGCESINcombines press ure-treated wood posts ~I~ l U L I U ~ E .and high tensile wire to form a strong,
long-lasting barrier, is being introduced PZ RI ULT RE11111in the U.S. by Koppers Company, Inc.,
A lot goes into making your farm. a success. Like a Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
dependable source of credit. Called the H-igh Tensile Wire Fence
FarmCreit povies cpitl tomor farersandSystem, the fence consists of strands of FarmCreit povies cpitl tomor farersandsmooth wire held in tension along their cooperatives than any other lending institution. In pressure-treated wood posts. Koppers
fact, that's the only reason we're in business, can supply all components-posts, wire
Let us provide the money you need, when you and hardware items.
need it, with repayment plans to suit your situation. The system uses strained high tensile smooth wire for a fence that may be FARMV c EDT COERS I1ALLI adapted to meet specific needs; offers
simple maintenance and reduced handling problems; may be installed by one or two people; and minimizes animal hide damage.
Long-term Financing for Short and Intermediate-term The pressure-impregnated posts and
Farm Credit Farmer Cooperatives Farm Credit end assemblies will take heavier loads at
*@ ALuN!.THEnAWJyor-FAwMcRmDT sERViC a lower cost per mile than any commerR. cially available alternative. The greater
LENDER strength of the posts allows wider spacings along the fence line, spokesmen say.
For excessively wet conditions or Ready to Work for You soft soil, best results are obtained by
increasing the standard embedding 10 ft.-8000 l b. Rome Disc depth of the posts-an example of the
13 ft.-7000 lb. Amco Disc flexibility of design allowed by the use of
8 ft.-Howard Rotivator timber fence foundation. Standard premodified for sod fields servative for the posts is creosote; however, they may be treated with other Much more equipment not listed chemicals by Koppers.
The wire recommended and distribFor omplte arm nd Rnchuted by Koppers is Max Ten 200, a Frma teFamromntsnc galvanized wire produced by United
Mainenane/imroveentsStates Steel Corporation. It hasa 200,000 psi minimum tensile yield David Parks Land Clearing strength, meeting or exceeding the most
Phone 81 3/322-1 269 demanding standards for animal conRoute 1, Box 80d trot. Its high elastic limit eliminates
Myakka City, Florida most of the common stretch or sag
problems that result when weight is
16 /THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN /JUNE 1979




-mup4LiK in your tanks;*
superior performance from your cows.
Cattlemen on test ranches across wheel. And you can get the performthe country have said their cows ance complete nutrition delivers.
"look better," "stay in better condi- Ask your Purina dealer to fill tion," "breed back faster," when your tanks with Sup-R-Lix' Get the
given Sup-R-Lix compared to cattle performance supplement working fed conventional liquid supplements. for your cows today.
Performance improvements like
those are built into Sup-R-Lik It's
homogenized, so the complete u
nutrition your cows need stays IM Purina...
uniform from tank top to tank bottom. planning tomorrow Your cows get a nutritionally complete supplement every time they lick the with research today
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 17




placed against conventional fence wire.
The fence may be built with various FOR A VARIETY OF USES wire configurations based on the type
and size of animals being restrained by the fence. Erection is simple and, for L RF- 15 BU LD IN G S most fences, requires no unusual equipment. The durability of the pressuretreated posts and the tensile strength of the Max Ten 200 wire help reduce maintenance.
Initially, two major styles of High Tensile Fence will be sold: A 10-wire and an 8-wire system. Post spacings are on 16 ft. centers. By using pressure-creosoted hardwood Droppers, which are engineered to maintain wire separation, post spacing for the 10- and 8-wire systems can be extended to 60 ft. maximum for non-electric fence on relatively level terrain. Again, post spacing THE FIRST ALL-METAL, LOW-PROFILE will vary due to terrain and design.
There are two types of Droppers. BUILDING DESIGNED FOR AGRICULTURE The Multi-groove Dropper is creosotetreated hardwood, with the fence wire being attached with a wire clip. The Dropper is grooved every inch for any wire spacing necessary. This Dropper is ideal for a six or ten wire, electric or non-electric system.
The second type of Dropper is the Angle-groove Dropper. It is alternately grooved at an angle so that when a 250 pound tension is pulled on the wires, the gripping-action of the pressure creosoted hardwood brings the wire straight and "locks" the Dropper to the wire. This is principally for 8-wire fence (electric and non-electric) only, since For building beauty and maximum usable space, there are eight grooves on the Dropper.
For additional information check check out Butler's LRF-15 agricultural buildings. number 976 and return the form on page
Loaded with product features and customer benefits, 8 of this issue.
LRF-15 is ideal for feed, grain and seed facilities;
livestock housing; indoor horse arenas; and machin- Noba offers beef
ery storage. See us for details on the LRF-15. sire directory
A newly published Beef Sire Directory is just off the press and available from Noba. This 1979 book contains pictures, Frank Anderson pedigrees and complete details on 63
Sales & Service Inc. bulls from 18 different breeds, includ1315-5th Ave., Tampa, FL 33605 ing some of the nations most popular Phone 813/247-5649 sires.
Frank Anderson 813/961-5048 The 1979 Noba Beef Bull Book can
Harold Still 813/949-7154 be obtained by contacting, Noba, Inc.,
P. 0. Box 607, Tiffin, OH 44883 or phone 419/447-6262.
977-Quonset has booklet Ag"tar, I |nu for farm building planners
Anyone who owns a farm needs the new P.O. Box Q Farmer's Building Guide just issued by
Statesboro, GA 30458 Quonset, Houston, Texas, the agriculPhone: 912/764-9761 tural division of National Steel Prod904/269-3677 ucts Company.
Farm building planners will find Distributors for all types of help in things they might not have expected-like the five essential items a Cattle and Hog Handling & Feeding Equipment farm building has to have and 10 ways
to avoid expensive mistakes in planning Head gates 9 Palco Automatic Equipment farm buildings.
Quonset's guide shows how much Squeeze Chutes Clay Equipment space is needed in each part of hog
* Portable Corrals Conrad-American building and feedlot operations-and
how much difference there is in space
18 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979




.... RA A SL
- *6 S. .5 . .0
50 5 OS 6.I* .5 OS
THER NEE A ETRBRAN
Whe yo'r lokn fo a50 THIFY CO V IN way toS prvd you S nial wit yerron wor cotrl loo for PHE SOTHIAZN in los miea or meiae bloks 30nohan product cos jus pene pe da 0o feed.And the reur noetahnln6fyu aias nadtote
pssil prdc fo yerron w r cot pl. cotolo




SIGN ON STALEY PHEHOTHIAZIRE
NN hO
FOR YEAR ROUND -WORM & FLY @ aStaey
Lvestock Products
LCONTP0 2200 Eldorado Street
Decatur, Illi ois 62525
START YOUR YEAR-ROUND PROGRAM TODAY!
NU
IS YOUR
CHOICE
FALL & WINTER SPRING&SUMR ily
SLooe Mineral No.10 SPRING &SUMM Delivers 2 grams of
SPRING & SUMMER phenothiazine
FALL & WINTER SWEETLIXO Fly & Worm Control Block per day per
SWEETLIX@ All-In-One Block Medicated animal when fed free
Medicated Delivers phenothiazine to the animal choice.
* Delivers 2 grams of phenothiazine per for control of stomachworms, nodular For the control of stomachworms,
day per animal for control of worms, large-mouth bowelworms, nodular worms, large-mouth
stomachworms, nodular worms, and hookworms. bowelworms, and hookworms.
large-mouth bowelworms, and Aids in preventing the breeding of Prevents the breeding of horn flies and
hookworms. horn flies and face flies in the manure face flies in the manure of treated cattle
* Contains adequate amounts of of treated cattle. Contains 10% Phosphorus from highly
Protein, Calcium, Phosphorus, Trace Provides the added nutrition of cane available sources.
Minerals, and Vitamins to supplement blackstrap molasses, Vitamins A and Contains Vitamins A and D and trace
normal feeding conditions. D, salt, and trace minerals. minerals.




Pasture Spreaders
Available in Truck Bodies, 4 and 6 Ton Pull Types
Conibear Equipment Company, Inc.
P. 0. Box 376 e Lakeland, Florida 33802
0 ~7 Miles North on U.S. 98 Ph: 813/858-4414
FARM BUILDING planners will find help through the building guide published by Quonset of Houston, Texas.
requirements in buildings for breeding ,
stock, the farrowing house, and the growing and finishing areas.
Dairy cattle need different facilities 64
from beef animals, and the guide shows just what the differences are. There is A
sound advice on storing both grain and grain-harvesting equipment-all sorts of farm machinery, in fact.
The guide also offers tips on how to make sure a fast-talking salesman doesn't disappear with farm improvement dollars, leving a second-rate building, or no building at all, behind him. Wi
For a copy check number 977 and return the form on page 8.
Double-crop silage cuts weeds, boosts output
A two-crop silage system can wallop your weeds and top any feed production system you've ever tried, says Sperry New Holland's Larry Fisher.
It'll only work as far north as winter KLN
grain production, admits Fisher, who is FIR.
product manager for forage equipment at New Holland. But it 's a winner from there south. I
For example, corn silage harvest in the fall gets fields cleared earlier, before most grassy weeds have dropped their seed. Mixed with the silage, the weed LDINS
seed germination is destroyed and the V I MLWCS
grass and seed make some contribution ff -TE BUILDINGS.
to the feed in volume if not in quality. In any case, there's less weed seed lying out-, 4.s in the field to cut into next year's crop.
The silage also comes off the field inP0.Bx3 5
time to seed winter wheat, barley or rye. 44O.48 FOREST CITY
This small grain crop makes good use of TERMS AVAILABE L ORD25 4% 11
any leftover fertilizer from the corn 4# ~
crop. It also comes on strong in the Ho
spring. By corn planting time, you can c
take off a robust yield of silage-call it ICU barlage, wheatlage, or ryelage, says <
Fisher. By any name, it's a headstart on ~'
the next year's forage need.
Wit awide-cutting mower- AlMCHN Ilk" 10
conditioner you can cut the crop in a NAESTOPE*10 ,
hurry and get it wilted down to aAN TAG
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN /JUNE 1979 /21




DRAINIIFT
BUCKET, ELEVATORS
Now 4 models
to choose trom.
SPERRY New Holland says double-crop silage is one way around weed problems.
moisture content to make attractive feed in plenty of time to hustle in another corn silage crop, according to Fisher.
This early spring silo fill is a nearly
free ride in silo cost because your silos will have space for the small grain silage They Look Right ... They Work Right come spring. And the additional feed is
Leg sections are continuous welded and assembled very nice to have in the summer when
with precision jigs at the factory. Grainlift goes up pastures shrivel up. Come fall, you'll
fast, looks right, and works at whatever capacity have the silo space available for corn
you need from 800 to 8000 BPH. again, Fisher points out.
Let Us Give You a FREE ESTIMATE In addition to the high potential profor Modernizing Your System duction from the double-threat 2-crop
routine you get a very important bonus Frank Anderson Sales & Service in weed control management. By har1315-5th Avenue, Tampa, FL 33605 Phone 813/247-5649 vesting everything from the ground up
-24 Hour Service- as silage twice a season, you largely prevent weeds from going to seed.
Frank Anderson 813/961-5048 Harold Still 813/949-7154 Fisher points out weed seeds lie dor_______________________________________________________ mant a long time so you need a number of years without additional weed seed AGRI-GUARD "Ole Aggie" production before you can get on top of
a problem. In the meantime, you can High Protein Liquid Supplement hold weeds down to prevent much comWe fill the feeders petition for plant food and moisture.
The cows feed themselves This will become a more important consideration as scarce oil pushes up herbicide cost. It's also one way around the FEED "escapes" weed problems caused by
LIQUIDcontinuous use of herbicides that only FEED get "most" of your problem weeds.
TlpoeP. 0. Box 923 HCL-978-V.M.S., offers products
813 Lak land, FL WAY o s
688-3325 33802 frsie os s
"Visit our Feed Store now open at 3340 U. S. Hwy. 92, Eest' V.M.S., Inc., Montgomery, Alabama,
has announced that its product En-ProA COMPLETE LINE OF ANIMAL FEEDS --Al Molasses-Mineral Block has been
formulated for use by swine raisers and horse owners.
MINERAL FEEDERS The new swine block comes as a
result of approximately two years of New Fiberglass Construction study and research by the animal nutrition experts at V.M.S. It combines all of
*More Durable the features of En-Pro-Al plus a corn*Maintenance Free bination of all major minerals, trace
*Keeps Minerals Dry minerals and vitamins A, D and E in
Helps pireentCwaser high levels. The blocks can be fed withKeep Mieral Colerout special feeders or racks and come individually packaged in boxes weighEN T O NI ing 40 pounds. The blocks are designed
FEEDERfor all ages of swine.
The En-Pro-Al supplement blocks
for horses contains high energy along F EEDERSwith a medium level of protein from five Ph. 813/494-2727, Route 1, Box 124 natural sources. All essential major
ARCADIA, FLORIDA minerals are included plus trace
minerals and vitamins.
22 /THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN /JUNE 1979




Bigyild
ar remembered0longer
you nee is yil S We Sc com fal hs
das you ca'-afr
no to ge evr u
mangas -ral
itca e ifeec
exeine A premium
prga fo6pemu
prfis R-- abw
.~~ ~ ~ .. .....
.......... ....R A N B W
YOUR AINBO DEALERO
Good~' ashs od
An is wr is'prmiurn .g .6




BUILDINGS
DESIGNED TO
MEET YOUR
REQUIREMENTS
Strongpanel Roofing
and siding in stock
to 24 ft.
Cannonball hardware
Penta treated
structural posts
STRONGPO61ST STRUCTURES
THE UPJOHN Company's facilities were visited recently by a group of University of
1629 N. Ohio Ave. Florida veterinary students.
Live Oak, FL 32060 Call collect 904/362-2548
for building quotes During the two years of research on
in Gainesville call this product, periodic field trials were
904/375-2331 conducted which indicated that consumption of the new supplement would be from four to six ounces per day. The blocks may be fed with or without a AGRICULTURAL covered feeder as weather and the elements have little or no effect on the
1. Cattle blocks.
2. Swine For more information on the En4. Poultry Pro-Al blocks for swine and horses
INDUSTRIAL check number 978 and return the form
COMMERCIAL on page 8 of this issue of The Cattleman.
TURNKEY or
BUILDING PKGS.
Future veterinarians visit
Upjohn facilities
CUSTOM CATTLE FEEDING DUniversity of Florida veterinary stuFeed Florida Cattle in Florida Billy H. Wells dents recently toured the Kalamazoo,
Davis Farms Livestock Auctioneer Michigan, facilities of The Upjohn
P.O. Box 97 Ring Service Company. Upjohn is one of the largest
Balm, Fla. 33503 Sale Consultant manufacturers of human and veterinary
We Buy Feeder Cattle Sale Management pharmaceuticals in the nation.
Wayne Davis Phones 121 Aldean Dr., Sanford, FL 32771 The University of Florida veterinary
610 Dali Drive Day 813/634-3344 Home: 305/323-2820
Brandon, Fla. 33511 Night 813/689-5021 Office: 305/886-5400 students visit featured a guided tour of
Upjohn production facilities and the company's veterinary research farm. WORLD'S FINEST The university students also met with a
panel of Upjohn agricultural research LIVESTOCK TRAILERS and marketing personnel for a question
FEATURES (p,,,,, and answer session.
" All Steel Construction The visit by future veterinarians
* Treated 2" x 8" Floor from the University of Florida is part of
" 6'4" or 7'8" Wide The Upjohn Company's educational
" Divider. Escape and Slide/Swing Rear Doors service to the veterinary profession.
" Full Roof *8-Ply Tires Electric Brakes N+. W M I'd" r1,,
" Many Options Available W"dIt BSNN. lN* 24 CM 979-Kansas company has
sprayer-feeder line
Buy Direct From The Call faorytr E-Z PU LL Cullor Enterprises, Inc., of Fort Scott,
Factory and Save: to e why E-Z T RA I E Kansas, has marketed a sprayer-feeder
(1) Delivery Charges Pull Trailers TRAIL they claim can save users time and
are De world's energy and is also a money-saver.
(2) Dealer Markup Ong 111111111 Rt. 1, Box 1213 O How does the Cullor Sprayer-Feeder
Tavares, Fl. 32778 work? Quite simply, according to the
1-904-343-1000 company. It automatically sprays cattle
1-904-343-2438 with a fine mist of insecticide each time
1-305-859-5009 they get salt or mineral.
Call or Write- Spokesmen point out unlike dust
Shown by Appointment Only bags or chain oilers-which begin treat42-Foot Flatbed hauls up to ment only after infestation has taken 4 tractors or 500 bales of hay. place-the sprayer-feeder works continuously, automatically, to prevent Parasite problems before they develop.
24 /THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN /JUNE 1979




DISTRESS SALE!.
VARIOUS types of mailboxes are to be
found in the newly published book entitled
"Mailbox Mania" as shown in the photo
above.
They call this "revolutionary" and a
major breakthrough in parasite control.
Efficiency is also claimed because
the sprayer-feeder enables stockmen to
feed and spray cattle at the same time in
one automatic operation. Also, says
Cullor, it's economical because no other
spraying method can do such a
thorough, effective job for less money.
Testing in initial marketing areas by HOOD TRACTOR COMPANY, Orlando, must liquidate this brand new FORD FW-30,
university and private programs and 265 H.P. 4-wheel drive tractor IMMEDIATELY!
customers shows, according to the com- Fully equipped, including 540 RPM P.T.O., Catagory Ill 3-point hitch, and all accessories.
pany, that the Cullor method is "the HOOD TRACTOR CO. will sell this unit at DEALER COST or below! No demo time on this
best livestock spraying system ever." unit ... immediate delivery to buyer anywhere in the Southeast.
For more information check number If you are in the market for this or any other large agricultural two or four wheel drive
979 and return the form on page 8. tractor, call Hood Tractor Co. today!
We have other distressed merchandise in inventory. No wait, delivery immediately from Cosby-Hodgres staff stock at YOUR PRICE!
change announced
C. L. Alsbrooks, Jr., president of
Cosby-Hodges Milling Company,
the appointment of Ted Reed to the
position of vice president, purchasing TRACTOR CON
and traffic. Reed was formerly the firm's H & S EQUIPMENT RENTAL, INC.
director of purchasing. Sales 422-4548 Parts 422-2752 Rentals 841-3592
The company produces and markets livestock and poultry feeds, as well 2120 NORTH ORANGE BLOSSOM TRAIL
as dog food. Its general lines of dog food OLNO LRD 20
and feeds are marketed under the OLNO LRD 20
"Jazz" and "Field and Show" labels.
iBo x offere on rG7tlmen: Please contact me with Inf ormation on the
mailox mnia'o snm tm o n folowin: ElHayStorage El DairyBan
El Horse Barns El Hay Covers
Over 100 photos of one-of-a-kind ELP)L IL LJA0 D U Swine Buildings El machine Sheds
country mailboxes created by rural 0Grgs 0Wrhue
families are featured in the newly- SEMINOLE STEEL BLDG., INC. E Otargs Elarhse
released "Mailbox Mania" book. P. 0. Box 3093-FO, Longwood, Florida 32750 3Use 2 (~~)If you plan to build soon.I
The book, which also features a PHONE: (305) 869-0111
number of articles about the lives of
rural mail carriers, curious historical NAM
mailboxes, and mailbox-deco rating ADDRESS_________customs, is an offshoot of the successful 3
"Mailbox of the Month" contest spon- -CITY___________sored for a number of years by Farm FINANCING AVAILABLE 3
Wife News magazine. Toll Free (800) 824-5120 Op. #60 STATE __________ZIP ____The book Mania is divided into 18 ACT NOW MAIL TODAY
chapters, with unique and interesting The answer to every common shelter problem. UPHONEam.)- M(
photos of mailboxes perched in tree mt
THE FLORIDA CATITLEMAN / JUNE 1979 /25




APA
PROVE IT LASTS
DESIGNED especially for farmers and
ranchers, Butler's latest building design is
available in a choice of 11 colors.
F or fence posts, corner posts, trunks, soldered from assorted farm
tools and scrap metal, and even shaped
brac poss, b rn p leslike the old-time Pony Express ponies.
* U.. DpartentThe 100-page book sells for $2.95 USDeatetof Agriculture reports show that and is filled with the first-hand stories of
only.8% of the posts treated with PENTAchioro- mailmen on horseback, motorcycles,
phenol were lost, compared to a 39% loss with the railroads and foot, who delivered the
MUU~ best creosote used. Coleman Evans uses South- mail to country homes "through snow
ern ellw Pie ct frm lve, oun timerand rain and gloom of night," from em Yllo Pin cu frm lie, oundtimernostalgic days all the way to the present machine peeled and straight bodied. It is treated in time.
accordance with specifications of the American To order copies of "Mailbox
* Wood Preservers' Assoc. Mania," write to Country Store, 611 E.
WRTEFO PICS R AL CLLCT0 TRUCK DELIVERY Wells Street, Milwaukee, WI 53202.
Coleman Evans WOOD PRESERVING COMPANYInld50fopstgadhnli.
P.O. Box 1221 /Jacksonville, Florida 32201/904-356-6453 980-Butler introduces
added building line
A newly developed line of all-steel farm
buildings has been introduced by the
"TEST and WEIGH Agri-Products Division of Butler ManuTO MAKE BEEF CATTLE PAY" Lee & Sons facturing Company. The new AgAsk about Joining-Contact Cattle Service K w Master 2:12 building is available in a
mm. IA l broad range of sizes, designed to meet
BOB S0AND R. C. Lee, owner F
am- F U FCIA Sec' 904/Catt68le requirements in various parts of the
I-Rolfa Hall, U. of Ia. Star Route Box 820 For Shw nation.
A--leFoid 20 Eustis, Fla. 32726 And Sale Designed especially for farmers and
Barn-15 Mi.East ofEustis on SR.44 ranchers, the Ag-Master 2:12 building
features a 2-in- 12 roof pitch, attractive
trim, and optional guttering and downspouts. The pre-engineered, clear-span
STAL AKER building also features large, factorylocated doors in both the endwalls and
FAR~i & ANCH SUPP Y, INC.the sidewalls. Other accessories include
FARM & R NCHSUPPY, NC. pre-finished walk-in doors, windows,
TAMPA, FLORIDA roof ventilators and Lite*Panl skyPhone collect (813) 248-6238 P.O. Box 172 lights. The Ag-Master 2:12 building is
available in a choice of 11 factoryTampa, Fla. 33601 applied colors.
Come see us at 33rd st. and East 7th Ave., Tampa According to the manufacturer, the
Largest Inventory of Fencing for Farm & Ranch In Florida building is designed for easy erection,
FA MFENCING GATE HARDWARE and is suitable for many usesFARM machinery storage, grain storage, or a
BARBED WIRE ELECTRIC FENCE combination of the two; farm shop;
GAUCHO BARBED WIRE SYSTEMS animal housing; or general utility. The
Ag-Master 2:12 building is marketed
POULTRY NETTING AMERICAN POWER PULLS through a nationwide network of indeFARM GATES -HI LIFT JACKS pendent businessmen, known as Butler
GalvaizedAgri-Builders.
Gavnzdsteel, wire WELDED WIRE For more information check number
GAL VAN IZED ROOFING HARDWARE CLOTH 980 and return the form on page 8.
5-crimp NAILS Bright or Y- Tex Corporation announces
FENCE POSTS -Steel. galvanized. Florida distributors
STAPLES W E D L V RY-Tex Corporation, Cody, Wyoming,
W E DE IVERhas announced a list of Florida firms handling the company's All American
26 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979




"Snap-Lok" ear tag system.
Florida firms listed included Aid
Labs., Inc., Jacksonville, Okeechobee,
Ocala, and Seffner; Imperial Livestock
Supply, Seffner; International Cryo-Bio B ankruptcy
Services, Inc., Miami; M&M Supply,
Thonotosassa, Graceville, and Okeechobee, and Poultry Health Supply,
Jacksonville.
Y-Tex says the tag is a two piece
button type tag that gives positive
straight-line "Snap-Lok" application
plus much more.
ESTATE OF HAMPTON J. WALKER
Florida Lime appoints
Beamon vice president OVER 9,000 ACRES ALONG
W. E. "Willie" Beamon, of Yalaha, has SAINT MARY'S RIVER
been appointed vice-president of ag AND
products sales for Florida Lime and
Dolomite Company in Ocala. 104 UNIT APARTMENT COMPLEX KNOWN AS
Beamon comes to Florida Lime and EASTWOOD OAKS
Dolomite from
Dixie Lime & Nassau County-Hilliard, Florida
Stone Company, JUNE
where he was gen- WEDNESDAY, 20,1979 10:00 A.M.
eral marketing Sale Site: North of Hilliard-4 Miles U.S.1
manager for their Only 30 miles from Jacksonville, Florida
rock, ag-lime and Bankruptcy No.# 77-599-BKJ
Trustee-Lansing J. Roy, Gainesville, Florida
chemical p rod- Judge-Honorable George L. Protctor
ucts divisions. u.s. District Court Of Middle District Of Florida
Beamon was as- Jacksonville, Fla. Division
soc iated with LAND: Over 9,000 acres to sell in tracts and/or
Dixie Lime & combinations.
Stone for 13 years. Beamon 8 % miles of River Frontage on beautiful St. Mary's River
Willie and his Fantastic Home Sites on River 104 UNIT APARTMENT COMPLEX KNOWN AS
wife, Erma, reside in Yalaha. Road Frontage Home Sites EASTWOOD OAKS
Established in 1972, Florida Lime TIMBER: eHAS OWN SEWAGE SYSTEM
Over 6,000 acres of timber with approximately eLAUNDRY FACILITES and Dolomite Company has become a 60,000 cords of wood. eEXERCISE ROOM
leader in the agricultural limestone mar- DEVELOPERS AND INVESTORS: *CLUB ROOM,W/KITCHEN & BAR
ket in the southeast. Florida Lime dis- (Selling in tracts and as a whole) *CHILDREN'S PLAYGROUND
1600 Acres around beautiful 48 acre Lake Hampton *SWIMMING POOL tributes Dolomite, Hi-calcium Lime- and 5 other lakes *TENNIS COURTS & VOLLEYBALL COURTS
stone, Aragonite, Fairfield Slag and Already engineered for subdivision AND MANY OTHER ASSETS
Gypsum for the agricultural market. Frontage on U.S.Hwy. 1 and Lake Hampton Road
"Beamon's appointment is another FARM AND CATTLE RAISERS:
reflection of our faith in the unlimited Several small farms in various sizes to sell future of Florida agriculture. His FOR INFORMATIONCATALOGUE,BROCHURE OR APPOINTMENT CALL:
experience will enable our growing firm
to better serve our customers' needs," The i W
says Fred Montsdeoca, Florida Lime A co
and Dolomite Company president. auti r associates
Weed control important I'J[I:.B I I 103 /Iaane G r I024 [404 1 1911
for pasture improvement FLORIDA FIELD OFFICE (904) 845-2612
"In a short-term price squeeze, or,
specifically, in 1979, if I had to choose
between weed control or fertilizer practices for pasture improvement, I'd pick
weed control," said Dr. Vance Watson,
research agronomist at Mississippi State CATTLE AND
University and guest speaker at a series C LFOR SALE
of pasture weed control meetings held
recently by Velsicol Chemical Corporation, Chicago, Illinois.
Florida beef and dairy producers DICKS GRAIN & CATTLE
from the Okeechobee, Immokalee, LOW OR HIGH MOISTURE CORN -MOSTLY COMMERCIALCATTLE
Wauchula, Mango, Belle Glade and LAKE CITY, FLORIDA
Kissimmee areas heard Watson say the BONDED
best results in pasture weed control
depend on a combination of weed con- F.J. DICKS DAYTIME 752-0028
trol, fertilizer and good management, J. L. DICKS 752-5620
but that weed control offers the farmer HARRY DICKS 752-0017
the greatest single advantage when all LEONARD DICKS 752-9456
three practices are not affordable. I I
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 27




I5~I NOW IT'S HISTORY
1943: Jacksons entertained Alachua cowmen
C n tu ry A feature article covered the Alachua County Cattlemen's Association meetSteelBuiligsa ing which was hosted by Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Jackson, Gainesville, and
CALL COLLECT attended by 150 members, families and friends .. Parkdale Farms near
1-9 4-3 7-2 89 Largo reported a Guernsey-Jersey cow gave birth to twin heifer calves .. A
1-904 387-2field day was held at the Range Cattle Experiment Station, Ona.
1953: Pasture progress was noted
26 GAUGE STEEL 30 x48 x12-$ 2,949 An article by E. M. Hodges, D. W. Jones and W. G. Kirk of the experiment OPEN SPAN I-BEAM 40 x 72 x 14-$ 4,947
CONSTRUCTION 45 x96 x16-S$ 6,938 station at Ona pointed out pasture progress in Florida has been made as a
result of research conducted at the station ... Five hundred cattlemen
* mUattended the University of Florida's Livestock Producers' Day ... Zibe
- Williams and E. P. Scarborough purchased the Okeechobee Livestock Market.
ALL STEEL -Other 27 x 30 x15- $ 2,795 1963: M anatee County hosted convention
Sizes Available 40 x 75 x 12-S 5,990
Limited Quantities 60 x108 x15-$11,865 The annual mid-year conference at Bradenton of the Florida Cattlemen's 69 F LOA ZONG MAACTR PRCE Association was hosted by the Manatee County Cattlemen's Association ..
69 LCALZONNG AY AFEC PRCESA feature of the annual Beef Cattle Short Course was a tour of the V. E.
CETUYSTELB IIG Whitehurst and Sons Ranch near Williston ... A feature story covered the
3991St.John Avnuepasture program at the Brighton Seminole Indian Reservation.
1904389-9391973: FCA sweetheart was featured on cover
SEN EPOL Debbie Floyd, Cross City, FCA's sweetheart, was featured on the June
"TheNew erfrmane Bred" pasture edition cover of The Cattleman in a photo taken at the Beef Research
FThe NeisPrfuorAvn c red Unit at the University of Florida ... M. E. "Max" Hammond, Bartow, was Plant City Ph: 813/75248572 (home) named "Man of the Year" by the Eastern Brahman Association .. C. M.
813/752-3181 (office) Payne & Son, Inc., Sebring, seed harvesters and processors, were featured in
SOUTHEASTERN SENEPOL, LTD. a story which covered benefits available to cattlemen from harvesting grass
Freeman Wingard, Rt 2 Montezuma, Ga. Ph:
912/433-6702 tofficet 9i27472-7885 home) seed . A. Duda and Sons, Cocoa, announced plans for their first Brahman production sale.
The Best in Beetala Cattle
'Vfhite Oak plantation
Beetalo Semen Available
Contact Ken Woehrle Star Route 1, Box 1296
Yulee, Florida 32097 Phone: 904/225-5204
Member Nat'l. & Local ABA
Half-Blood Cows Bred To
Have Three-Quarter Calves j
SBEEFALO SEMEN(
&A.I.Technician Available
*LatAlso Sales for Slaughte LatGristle, Eono 0 HighestProtein;
& Fat Per Head Lowest Cholesterol
lo 0Eaist, Safest Calving @ Tastiest, Tenderest,
Moat Heahful
SProvyen Superior In Every Way,
'\Facts Sent Free When Requested COWBOYS WORKING F1 CATTLE (in background) at Sugarland Ranch, Clewiston, On Your Ranch Letterhed around 18 / years ago were from left, Wendy Batey, Henry Pelham and Donald Sutton.
1001 Montgomery Lane, Leesburg, Fie. 32748 The picture was furnished by Jim Fielder, longtime employee at the ranch. The Cattleman needs old photos for this space and will return the picture undamaged after use.
28 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979




ofn
Spraying permanent pasture with WeedmasterO" Your Velsicol representative or distributorcan help herbicide to increase carrying capacity can pay plan a Weedmaster program based on your specific astonishing dividends. For example, university weed problems and the kind of goals you want to tests have shown crude protein production jumped set for brood cows or calves. Look over his cost500 or 600 percent following Weedmaster and-return figures. And don't be surprised if you
applications. And when the quantity and quality of see aprojection forfive tons of extra beef-or more forage goes up, so does beef production. -from a drum of Weedmaster.
The value of Weedmaster in your pasture depends For assistance or information, contact on a number of variables, of course. Grazing pressure, weather, type of cattle and other inputs Philip B. Couch Forrest Gregory
can all affect bottom-line performance. But Hersh Bldg. 11 saeWo rv
5Y2 W. Washington Street Brandon, Florida 33511 there's no doubt that suppression of noxiousweeds Newnan, GA 30262 with Weedmaster is the practical way to unlock a 4025-32836992
pasture's beef-making potential.40-56328-8992
Weed master'
Herbicide
The easiest management decision Before using any pesticide, read the label. you'll make this year.
Velsicol Chemical Corporation 341 East Ohio Street Chicago, Illinois 6F061 1 E S C L Velsicot is a subsidiary of Northwest Industries, Inc.
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 29




Purebred & Percentage
Cattle For Sale Limousin breeders meet
SLJD B -RJIN K Members of the Florida Limousin Breeders Association held a meeting in conLimosin anchjunctioni with the Beef Cattle Short Course, May 2-4, at Gainesville.
Limosin anchOfficers were elected at the meeting. They were: Gladys Freeman, Okeecho-.
Archie Bailey, mgr. bee, president; Maynard Osborne, Davie, vice-president; Jonell Webb, MaxMadison, Florida 32340 Vilie, secretary; and George Adams, Jacksonville, treasurer.
Phone 904/973-6963 Four directors were re-elected, they were: Paul Emery, Quincy; Freeman; H.
M. Shirley, Palatka; and Barney Greene, Vero Beach. Three new directors were appointed at large by the president. They include: Carl Petterson, Jacksonville; "Carcass Quality Limousin" Lance Ham; and Jim Simmons, Ocala. Other directors are: W. E. Webb, MaxVille; Art Schrader, San Antonio; and Rick Williams, Ocala. A & R FarmsGeorge Adams gave a report on the "Super Summer Limousin Sale" the association is planning for June 23, at 1:00 P.M., Lake City, at the Columbia 1711 17th St. West County Fairgrounds. Adams also mentioned there would be a youth judging
Palmetto, FL 33561 contest at 10:00 a.m. with $200 in prize money to be given to individual winners.
813/722-9777 322-1120
Limousin Cattle
Purebred & Percentage A & R, Osborne,and Lasher take
H. MA Shirley championship honors at Palatka
Winners at the open Limousin cattle Senior calves, calved 9/1/77 thn 10/31/77 (I)-TOPW
4005S. 18th St. Palatka, Fla. 32077 show held at the Putnam County Fair, El Macho 51.1 (reserve grand champion, calf champion), Lasher Feed Limousin Ranch, Okahumpka;
Ph: 904/325-2525 Palatka, listed by class to the first three Late Summer yearlings, calved 7/1/77 thru 8/31/77
12. mi. north of Palatka near Bostwick places, with the number of entries (Il)-Pare Eclair (grand champion, junior champion), A & shown in parentheses, follow: R:Tvo balls (l)-A & R;
Pair of calves Ill-A & R;
Spring calves, calved 3/l/78 and after (3(-AEWF 2K Pair of yearlings (1)-A & R: Miss Osceola (reserve junior champion). A. E. Whaley, Kis- Prodace of dam (l)-A & R; Greene's Limousin stasmee: AEW 3K Miss Kissimmee, Whaley: Miss A &'R Get of sire Ill-A & R;
142, A & R Farms, Bradenton; Five head (ll-A & R.
Percentage and Fuiibioods Senior calves, calved 9/1/77 thra 10/31/77 (Il-Miss
Brahman Crosses Simmons 504 (reserve grand champion, junior champion), A
& R:
Barney & Harlot Greene Spring yearlings, calved 3/1/77 thn 4/30/77 (1)-Lass's
4855-1 6th Street, Vero Beach, Fla. Fan (grand champion, senior champion), Osborne Cattle
Phone 305/562-2817CopnDve
Bar BarRanh, S. A. 68andTwo females (2)-A & R; Whaley;
Minute Maid Rd., Ft. Pierce Spring calves, calved 3/1/78 and after (]l-Mr.
________________________________________ l-anchaon (reserve calf champion), Oshorne:
"~Quality made for the Tropical Trade"
SIMM ONS
LIMOUSINS
Jim & Ones Simmons, owners
Rt. 4, Box 2865 904/629-6465
OCALA, FLORIDA 32670
EMERY LIMOUSIN Where performance counts
Paul Emery k
QUinc la. 251 A & R FAMBradenton, showed the OSBORNE Cattle Company, Davie
Grand champion Limousin bull at the exhibited the grand champion Limousin
Putnam County Fair. female at the Putnam County Fair.
Advertising Aids
Your Personal
Salesmanship
Contact any of our fieldmen 1
for full details.
(~F louda
ANDLIVSTCK OUNA
P.O. Box 1030 LASHER Feed Limousin Ranch, RESERVE Grand Champion Limousin
Kissimmnee, Fla. 32741 Okahumpka, owned the reserve grand female was exhibited by A & R Farms,
champion Limousin bull in Palatka. Bradenton, at Palatka.
30 /THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979




FLORID
A S S OC 0' ON
70 To Quait Cosgnet
of Puebe to 50 Feae
.& Purbre to 75 Buls. --3
Adam Liosi of N. Fla H. M. Shre0ig am Gan Juntio Fam Jo Brw Jaen Kngh Tio' Lioui Cora Pau Emer JiKigtI




bRMS SW
'Alp
For fly control that works fastthen lasts. Protect your cattle. Zap irritating disease-carryingl lice, ticks, and flies with Ravap. It provides the long lasting residual control you need. Ravap easily mixes with oil in backrubbers or with water for spraying. And for a complete fly control program, start with Rabon Oral Larvicide to stop fly population buildup before they hatch into a problem.
F t Always follow label directions.
SHELL CHEMICAL COMPANY, Animal Health,Sh l
One Shell Plaza, Houston, TX 77001




Annual field dayMM M M M M M M M M M
at Chipley M
draws crowd METBIHE 83 S p M
The seventh annual field day at the M M
Chipley Beef Demonstration U nit,M Chipley, was held April 5 with around MT C= X______________ M
00 in attendance. The program was M t o to
opened by A. F.Jelik, area livestock t o t
specialist at the AREC, Quincy.MM
Special guests were introduced by MI V
Don Hargrove, assistant chairman, MLICE -TICKS ~ M
animal science department, University
of Florida, Gainesville. He welcomed MHO RNFLIES M
those present and presented a five year M
service pin to Jaimes A. Clemmons,
manager of the BDU.
Speakers heard giving informative M
talks on various aspects of beef cattleZ, production were Hargrove on a new A
method of classifying Florida calves asM to type, frame and physiological ZM _M /
maturity scores; Jelik on selection of
herd replacement heifers; F. S. Baker, Jr., animal scientist at Quincy, on grow- M25 % MORE FINISHED SPRAY
ing tockrs o anual astues- ohnSTRONGER MORE ECONOMICAL.
inge sofCr on Lanalptrs; J o hne M ONE GALLON WILL MAKE 200 GALLONS OF FINISHED M
Cree ofC &L Frms Ja, o witerSPRAY, AS COMPARED TO 150 GALLONS OF COMPETITIVE
grazing in a double cropping system,; SPRAY. Contains 62 %HERCULES Toxaphene & 2.5 % Lindane. M
Charles Walthall, beef specialist from SO'ALPESTCIDESCAN BEHARMFUL TO HEALTH ANDOTHE ENVIRONMENT
Crestview, on the importance of cattle M 1 FM USED. READ THE LABEL CAREFULLY AND USE ONLY AS DIRECTED.M
scales in a beef operation. Walthall also -FO
conducted a contest so that all present Dpnal
could check their skill at weight estima- 606~ WETMINSRE
Lion. 1883 BOXA108
Eight top winners in the weight NAODOHS TEAS756
estimation contest were awarded prizes
from Ron-Don, Chipley; Wells F.R.M. _________________Store, (Shipley, and Mineral Consul- GIGEIRE A MLIMOUSIN FOR SALE
tants of Malvern, Alabama. IG R ED F M
The Wash ington- Holmes Cattle- 1977 Premier Limousin Exhibitor
mien's Association served lunch which Giant Bermuda Grass ~EA
was followed by demonstrations on W. E. & Joenell Webb EA
iniplanting growth stimulants; frame Box 278, Rt. 15 1CATTLE CO.
score classification, and winter plantings Maxville, Fl. 32265 P. 0. Box 636-813/763-3610
of' rye, Rye grass and clover pasture. 904/289-2701 OKEECHOBEE, FLA. 33472
Georgia Limousin OSBORNE CATTLE COMPANY
field day set
The Georgia Limousin Association has
scheduled a field day on June 30, 1979, Lass's outstanding
at Rocking E Limousin Ranch, Edison, femininity and corGeorgia. rectness led her to
Registration will start at 10:00 a.m., grand championship
followed by a Limousin judging contest honors at every show
for juniors and adults, Prizes will be in Florida this fall and
awarded to the first three places. As a winter. We are sorry
special attraction, a Limousin steer or to see her retire
heifer will be awarded to the top junior though her competijudge. tors may not be. We
A "'Limousin earthen roast" lunch have more of her type
will be served at 12:00 noon, compli- at home and invite
nients of Rocking E Ranch. you to visit.
Adams Limousin LASS'S FAN 1978-1979 Premier Female
of North Florida This undefeated Limousin female will be featured
Home of: in the Florida Limousin Association Sale,
Prince E. G. Jaudon 007-H June 23, in Lake City.
George E. Adams and Family Maynard Osborne, owner 4760 S.W. 82nd Ave.
614 Ricker Rd, Ph: 904-771-8769 Ph. 305/434-5065 Davie, Florida 33328
Jacksonville, Fl 32210 _________________________________________THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 /33




get ord n ge eticannual Florida premier awards presenProd cer ge wor on gen tictations. Receiving awards this year for
accumulating the most points in show
Coursecompetition at the 1978-79 Florida liveadaptation at Beef Short Co restock shows were: RW Bar Custom Fitters, Ocala; Bellemeade Farms, Lake
Genetic adaptation was the featured discussed by Earle W. Klosterman of City; Bozzuto Angus Ranch, Lake City; topic of discussion at the opening ses- the Ohio Agricultural Experiment Sta- Partin & Sons' Heart Bar Ranch, Kission of the 28th annual Beef Cattle tion at Wooster. He cited studies indi- simmee; L. M. Tucker, Tifton, Georgia; Short Course, held May 2-4, at Gaines- cating that the most efficient cattle will Martin's Casa Grande, Lake City; ville. produce the most carcass weight of Barton Charolais Ranch, Tallahassee;
Beef producers, researchers and desired grade at the youngest age. Wasdin Charolais Ranch, Tallahassee;
industry representatives from Florida The performance of exotic breeds Sans Souci Farms, Ocala; Gingerbred and out-of-state appeared on the pro- were discussed by Larry Cundiff of the Farms, Maxville; A & R Farms, Bragram at the three day event to discuss Animal Research Center, Hastings, denton; Osborne Cattle Company,
the latest findings. Nebraska. He said he believed many of Davie; and D. L. Thomas Ranch, Lake
Marvin Koger of the University of the exotic breeds would make an im- City.
Florida served as chairman of the Short portant contribution to the beef indus- John Hunt of International Mineral Course, and Dr. H. D. Wallace, chair- try through crossbreeding. and Chemical Company, Bartow, preman of the animal science department at F. M. Peacock of the Agricultural sented the Florida Beef Carcass Value the University, presided at the opening Research Center, Ona, presented some Award, jointly sponsored by Gainessession, information on the performance of ville Stockman's Supply. John Tedder, a
Opening speaker was Henry Doug- Charolais. Studies have been conducted Lake County FFA'er, was the winner of
las, Zephyrhills, president of the Florida for a number of years at Ona. this year's award.
Cattlemen's Association. Douglas Performances of exotics in the Ever- Joe Bertrand of the Agricultural
pointed out that the cattle industry is glades was covered by Joe Crockett of Research Center, Jay, presided at the constantly changing and that producers the Agricultural Research and Educa- Thursday morning session. must prepare now to meet future tion Center, Belle Glade. He gave results Don Hargrove and Don Wakeman,
demands. He called for support of the of studies involving several breeds which both of the University staff, appeared proposed Beef Referendum, revealed no superior breed, first with a presentation on the characDouglas pointed out that Florida is A producer panel on 'adaptability teristics which contribute to the marketstill primarily a cow/calf producing and performance in Florida was next on ability of cattle. They cited type/grade, state. He said consumers are turning the program. Appearing were cattle pro- uniformity, breed composition, permore and more to lean beef and sug- ducers Alto Adams, Jr., Fort Pierce, formance, good management, and salesgested that feeders consider feeding Dick Kelley, Stuart, and Mike manship as major factors.
bulls, as an alternative to steers, to pro- Milicevic, Clewiston. Koger discussed genetic systems for
duce more lean beef at a faster rate. Adams outlined his selection pro- commercial cow/calf operations. He
W. C. (Cal) Burns, director of the gram which is based on natural selec- outlined straight breeding and systemBeef Cattle Research Station at Brooks- tion in the environment where cattle are atic crossbreeding systems. ville, discussed genetic adaptation of being produced. Mike Fields, of the University staff,
cattle to local environments. He said his Kelley covered his management pro- made a presentation comparing Brahexperience with purchasing cattle from gram, including selecting bulls from man and Angus bulls in semen traits and many different areas and moving them within his commercial herd for breed- other fertility factors. Fields made to Brooksville over the years has ing purposes. suggestions for insuring fertile herd
revealed that no matter where cattle Milicevic outlined his systematic bulls.
come from they undergo an environ- crossbreeding program which includes Jim Pace, extension animal husmental shock at Brooksville. producing first cross Brahman-Here- bandman at the University, gave some
Burns said results of studies at ford and Brahman-Angus cows in Mis- pointers on selecting sound bulls for Brooksville and other places indicate sissippi and utilizing a terminal cross breeding. genetic adaptation is important in com- with Charolais for market calf produc- Selecting and culling females was mercial beef production. tion at Clewiston. discussed by Tim Olson of the UniverThe importance of genetic adapta- Jim Flanagan, and Don Berry, Kis- sity staff. Olson said strict culling protion to nutrition and management was simmee, Cattleman editors, made the cedures should be a part of any sound
14tT0W- A Sk I -,management program.
Olson teamed up with Bryan Melton for a presentation on the economics
of culling open and poor producing
cows.
Bernardo Bauer of Bolivia gave a
presentation on the genetic improvement of Criollo, Zebu and Crossbred
cattle in the Bolivian tropics. He said
production has been improved greatly in
the humid tropics of Bolivia by improved methods of selection and breeding.
The Florida Beef Cattle Improvement Association program and how it
can be utilized by producers was discussed by Bob Sand of the Animal
Science Department, University of
Florida.
Following Sand's presentto a
producer panel on the utilization of
SPEAKERS FOR the opening session of the Beef Cattle Short Course included, from left, records. Appearing were Max HamDick Kelley, Aldo Adams, Jr., Mike Milicevic, and FCA President Henry Douglas. mond, Bartow; Walter Richardson,
34 / THE FLORIDA CATlTLEMAN / JUNE 1979




to the Florida
Limousin Sale
June 23
PREMIER BEEF cattle show winners for 1978-79 received awards at the Short Course Loreia
from Jim Flanagan, far right, editor of The Florida Cattleman. Accepting awards this yearFlrd were, from left, Mike Partin, Carl Story, L. M. Tucker, W. E. Webb, Calvin Bozzuto, Jackie Thomas, D. L. Thomas, Marlin Nicely, Larry Martin, Rick Williams, and Maynard Osborne. 3/4 C ow
Evinston; Jeanette Chitty, Gainesville; range, and Bill Ocumnpaugh of the Uni- by Dandin C bred
and John Stitt, Clewiston. versity staff covered creep grazing for toPic P mp d u
Herb Chapman, director of the calves.toPic P mp d u
ARC, Ona, presided at the Thursday The breeding season was discussed 1/6/79 and examined
afternoon session. by Jim Hentges of the University staff, saf e.
Speakers included Clarence Ammer- l-entges said many producers could take man of the University, on mineral and advantage of yearly price fluctuations protein needs of cattle; Zane Palmer, and get double use of bulls by observmeats specialist with the University, on ing two breeding seasons for fall and 7/8 H-eifer
problems and opportunities with forage spring calves. b rv
finished beef; Sloan Baker, head of the Alvin Warnick discussed breeding Open, byPai
AREC, Quincy, on finishing cattle in and the management of first calf hei- Chief. Actual
north Florida; Findlay Pate, AREC, fers. He said breeding heifers to calve at.
Belle Glade, on finishing cattle in South two years old was economical if proper~ weaning weight 591.
Florida, John Holt, economist with the management is applied. Ready to breed.
University, on hedging; Elder Sumner Demonstrations on minimizing
of the Production Credit Association, death losses in calves was the last pre- H ie
Okeechobee, on rancher financing; and sentation on the Short Course pro-3/ Ted Gallo of the Southeastern National gram. Veterinarians appearing were 4 H i r
Bank, Bradenton, on agricultural lend- Marten Drost, DVM, University of Open, by El Macho.
ng. Florida; Bobby Anderson, DVM,
Pate was in charge of the Friday Gainesville Animal Hospital, and Ken One year old.
morning session. Pastures were featured Braun, DVM, University of Florida. first, with Chales Ruelke, agronomist Drost emphasized that natural birthHedSrs
with the University, giving some back- is best, but demonstrated the properHedSrs ground on the study of warm-season methods of pulling a calf, and of deliver- EL MACHO
permanent pastures in Florida. ing a dead calf.
Gordon Prine, of the University Anderson covered the care of the BOURBON
staff, covered legumes and minimizing young beef calves, and Braun conclu- CHARLEMAGNE
nitrogen fertilization. Rob Kalmbacher ded the program with a presentation on WASHINGTON
of the ARC, Ona, discussed native vaccination programs for beef calves. (he is polled)
Top 0' The
Hill Farm
L ".t' 0 1'1Rhodes Frost 912/263-7026
U.S. 84
H. C. WALLACE, head of the Animal D. L. WAKEMAN, left, and Jim Hentges, Quitman, Ga. 31643
Science Department at the University of both of the University staff, appeared on Florida, is shown here listening intently to the Beef Cattle Short Course Program at one of the speakers. Gainesville.
THE FLORIDA CATITLEMAN / JUNE 1979 /35




C
C E
0- E E .Simnafildaprg m
* 6
Cc or 0= ~ X 00
- 0
I p o There is no single best breed of cattle." lowed by the Marion 4-H Club with 538
C F.
-O 8 9 o That's what Joe Crockett, animal points.
0 (A A LARGgeneticist from the Agricultural High point FFA individual at the
- -u .. g Research and Education Center, Belle event was Cindy Alderman, Bradford,
,g a Glade, told the group of people attend- scoring 216 points. The 4-H- high indiu C O)ing the Florida Simmental Association vidual was Lisa Hemminger of the
g a ao Field Day on April 20, at Bronson. Marion Chapter, tabulating 189 points.
* E
. C 5 Crockett was featured speaker at the Fred Pace of Carnation Genetics,
9 E O event and gave a report on research Hughson, California, gave a slide preresults involving Simmentals and other sensation on embryo transplants. Pace
Cc >. 00 HT exotic breeds at the Belle Glade Center. covered both surgical and non-surgical
0- 0 "Many of the breeds have desirable techniques. He said present surgical proa go "5a and some undesirable traits," Crockett cedures produce about a 60 percent con,g Tg said. In order to have a brood cow caption rate, while about 40 percent sucC 0 t .0- ~ p gg~ adapted to Florida and produce a cess is obtained with the non-surgical
a 0 ** U n g desirable market calf the breeds must be method.
0 0
F *? 5 1 E-: blended, Crockett said, in a systematic A Ralgro ear implant demonstraD W % g crossbreeding program to suit idi- tion was presented by Bob Sand, extenP to Fe vidual environments, management sion beef specialist with the University
%- systems, and market goals. of Florida.
~. ~ The field day was sponsored by the Emcees for the event were Bob
Florida Simmental Association and Davenport, Ocala, president of the
Over 150 registered for the event. Miller of Millercrest Farm.
0% ~~hse by M(Decrs Fam Brnsn lloridainolin Simmental Asster sna n mrociratnland Jae
S eThe program got underway with a Door prizes for the event were spon~ Simmental judging contest. F. S. Baker, sored by American Breeders Service,
director of the Agricultural Research Curtiss Breeding Service, Moorman's S and soedut ibCenteratsi," srvedt and Bea ca u awe of Chicefndon
~ I as official judge. Lunch was prepared by Pete Asbell
1 sThe Bradford FFA Chapter took and the Bronson FFA Chapter.
0 -first place honors in the judging contest, O scoring 592 points. In second place was Commercial production of red meat in
Bronond FFA Chapter with 569 points, the U.S. for March was 3093 million 0- cr4-H team competition was won by pounds, seven percent below March a
IOS. M I
21stemGlcst Club wirkth 548ls poits follyerda.codngt SA
woo
-~~ F -8. ---- BAKERa lmet sevdAsoffciao jud BDavenpORTaih, president of the
forsteb FlrSmetalm Arssoiton. Florida Simmental Association, handlJedf 0J I
LL z zina judging contest. Fiel day hosaSener the off miciane atrtefedd ay Here
Millectr ssown t ArihcussingResacs isrvistn Boeith Srimentalobreeder
an Edcto -ete at ........., withe Bkrat orgndVr Beach. daeofCifa
36 /
0 E. <20 X
wC ;. B AKERnFF leftere ast offici s thdg BOB DAENorT rht pes303ideonh
_J 0. a.Iin 4fo tea Florida tSim nas Asoion Florid, seenta Asciainhnde
2 jud heGigcontst. ld daythost8pncer th ea offcacrmonieg the fidDAy.H
Z5 Mile is shw6trgtdsusn ,ls sviiigaoewt imna ree
L- -- -- -- -- -- -- it Bae.PtCriano eoBah
36 / H ULRD) AI'EA UE17




Rancher combats
armyworm invasion
of pastures The World's
Two hundred brood cows live just south M osto E f i i n
of the Jacksonville city limits. M s f i i n
Their home is Sweetwater Farm, aB r o
ranch rich in improved Coastal Ber- B r o C ow .
muda grass pastures surrounded by
native timber. The cow-calf operation source for J. E. Williams for nearly 40 years. He has built a top herd of Charolais-Angus-Hereford crossbred cows Ju st fact
that regularly produce strong, healthy t
calves with heavy weaning weights.
Williams sells the steer calves at local auction markets and keeps the heifers for replacement stock.
Pastures on this operation are Coastal Bermuda grass and Bahia grass which are regularly fertilized and topdressed to produce quality forage high in protein and TDN. This pasture improvement program isn't without problems, however. More than cows enjoy the lush, tender blades of Bermuda grass, says Williams.
Invasion
Fall armyworms invaded the pastures in 1977 with an attack that quickly became a raging inferno. 4
The armyworm is no stranger to the area. Williams starts checking pastures in late July and August for the tell-tale signs of infestation. When he sees it, he begins his insect control program.
But 1977 was an unusual year. Insect pressure was unusually high. Climatologists now say that upper wind patterns n
brought on conditions that were highly favorable for insects. For information cocrnn sales, pa
"When the armyworm was reported, breed literature and nweucaioa fimcotat
we started our usual control program," says Williams. "But I could see that we In e r fo -1B-np
weren't getting control. We'd find worms at the edge of a pasture and in no B e d r t o i to
time they would be everywhere. I knew 9500 Tioga Drive I San Antonio. Texas 7823Q 1 (512 696-831~
that something needed to be done.''
In about as much time as it takes to Any Countryis Brangus Cou~ntry. /An Amerian Breed Sne 99
rope a calf, this rancher retired his 25year-old duster and purchased a new 300-gallon spray rig. He then mixed one-half pound "Lannate" insecticide and sprayed at the rate of 18-20 gallons water per acre. Cows were rotated to Sm e-edY u
nontreated pastures for a week. S m e-edY u
'Lannate' really did the job," says CT SRSWeaned Heifers
this Duval County rancher. "We got FoiaM lse
good control of armyworm and we held FoiaM lse
them back."U'.
"Lannate" gives excellent control of FLRDRE ESNAIS
armyworm because it works two ways, DnyYn
he points out. Quick contact action Hieri Rote Bo 2
gives fast knockdown while the product GenCv pigFa 24
Provides longer control for a period of 1 hn S042438 time to get emerging worms.EueeD it
Prodctio programs34 Florida Molasses Exchange, Inc.
Williams starts a pasture producing by sprigging Coastal Bermuda grass. This Ofern see on al darndbe Phone 305/996-7711, P.O. Box 507
is overseeded with rye in the winter or aBelGadF.340 hybrid millet in the summer and harTHE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 37




TThe Home of
Premier Winners
COASTAL Bermuda grass and Bahia
grass on Sweetwater Farm is cut for hay
and around two tons an acre per cutting is
obtained. Owner Williams claims he has a
sound program to combat armyworms by
using "Lannate" insecticide.
18/7 MCG Black Powder Miss MWF Rocky 20/7 rowed in. He fertilizes and top-dresses
The 1979 Premier Brangus Bull is This outstanding 1979 Premier on a regular program.
offered for sale at private treaty. Brangus Female will be featured Pasture fields for hay average two
Come by for a look at him and our in the Southeastern Brangus Sale tons an acre per cutting. This grower
usually cuts hay about three to four
other show prospects for next this fall, though we have more like times with six to eight weeks between
year. her at home. cuttings. His big round baler reduces the
heavy labor requirement needed in con1978-79 Premier Exhibitor ventional hay making.
"This year (1978) the armyworm has
Bruce Martin Rt. 2, Box 96 C3 Larry Martin not been as severe," he says. "In August
904/755-0803 Lake City, Fla. 32055 904/755-0816 we saw a few armyworms. I sprayed the
pastures with one-quarter to threeeighths pound per acre of 'Lannate' and
it did the job. We never had much of an
infestation."
Circle R Ranch REGISTEREO BRANGUS The armyworm in Florida conn"W're never too busy for you to visit" tinues to be a problem for many RE(;. ANGUS & BRANGLJS R. J. Mitchell Farms ranchers, but Williams now feels he
ARKY E. ROGERS, OWNER has corralled it on his ranch. He's now
904/752-2103 Rt. 6, Box 175 P.O. Box 187 Quitman, Georgia 31643 looking for ways to control fire ants and
U.S. Highway 221 South-7 miles out horn flies. LAKE CITY, FLORIDA 32055
Located 7 miles south n U.S. 41 Day Phone 912/263-41 27
Located_7_milessothonU.S._41 Night Phone 912/263-8306 Moratorium on nitrite
Registered Brangus use proposed
Sar-A-,rangus Lenholt Farms' The Carter administration has proRiver Ranch posed the use of nitrite in food products
Proven Crossbreed Since 1949 Deep be phased out. In legislation submitted
Box 1088, Wauchula, Fl. 33873 Star Route 2, Box 20 to Congress, Secretary of Agriculture
DELAND, FLORIDA 32720 Bob Bergland and Secretary of Health,
Russeli Suggs Albert & Barbara Carlton Education and Welfare Joseph A.
Foreman Owners Ranch 8 miles west on Hwy. 44 Cali fano Jr. recommended the phase out
813/322-1090 813/773-6867 Phone DeLand 904/734-2534 be preceded by a one year moratorium
during which no action would be taken
Promote BEE HAYMAN '7 to reduce or prohibit the use of nitrite as
y B AgHAYMAN'Si 7c11 a preservative.
aNvery day BBergland said the Department of
8 "" W RAND Agriculture is taking this action today
Registered Red and Gray Brahman because the Justice Department has Support Your (Indu-Brazil), Branus, Bralord and ruled the Federal Meat Inspection Act
Florida Beef Council P.O. BOX 117, KENANVILLE, FLA. 32739 which governs the use of nitrite as a
Paul Hayman, Owner Ph.: 305/436-1062 preservative in products, and the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act which regulates
use of nitrite and other products do not
complete A.I. permit a phase out of nitrite use.
IN. Services The Meat Inspection Act states that
"IER a product is adulterated and may not be
EEF -DAIRY approved for sale as wholesome if it
Quality Semen Supplies Southeast Brangus Association contains a substance which may be
904/383-3772 813/763-5822 Rt. 5, Box 25 injurious to health.
Bardstown, Ky. 40004
Noba-Ga. 912/987-2171 Phone: 502/348.3279 Join your local county Cattlemen's
Association.
38 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979




DEALER INQUIRIES WANTED
Join the Vermeer team-Contact nearest district office
DISTRICT LOCATIONS:
Willis Parts Depot Dilly Jo Williams Crews Equi ment U. S. 441, South Rt. 3, Box 195B P. 0. Box 1169
by Columbia Livestock Mkt. Graceville, FL 32440 Avon Park, FL 33825
P. 0. Box 1546 904/638-7146 813/453-3142
Lake City, Fl. 32055 904/638-1132
904/755-2300
New This Year Financing Available
Three "IF" Model Baler sizes available 60517-6 ft./5 ft. bale, 1200-2000 lbs. 50417-5 ft.14 ft. bale, 800-1400 lbs. 40317-4 ft./3 ft. bale, 400-800 lbs. We have all your haying needs-feeder rings, mowers, rakes, tedders, hay mowing equipment.
ASK US ABOUT THE 18 FEATURES OF THE '"F" MODEL BALERS
DEALER INQUIRIES WANTED
Join the Vermeer team-Contact nearest district office.




ROUNDUP
~~-- FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 7, ~ ~
AND CONSUMER SERVICES
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE
ECONOMICS, STATISTICS, & COOPERATIVES SERVICE, USDA
Cattle prices have continued to increase during the first four Average Prices Received per cwt.
months of 1979 in response to a declining availability of re- for Slaughter and Stocker Cattle and Calves
placement cattle. The 14 percent reduction reported on April I through 14 Florida Auctions, April 1978, 1979
in heifers on feed (steers were down 1 percent) is an indication CosCle
that more heifers are being retained for breeding purposes. This Grade Iw Cave
factor, plus the sharp reduction in cull cow slaughter indicates 1978 1979 1978 11979
strong entry into the expansion phase of the big cattle cycle. SLAUGHTER: Over 250 Lbs.
This phase can be expected to last about five years, which means Choice --- --58.39 97.82
that producers will have to expand herds this year to take full Good --- --- 50.68 90.06
advantage of the cycle. (Note: See the article "Cattle Cycles: A Standard -- --41.18 80.82
Guide for Cattlemen" in the January, 1979 issue of The Florida Utility 37.93 59.59-- -Cattleman. Cutter 32.88 55.39-- -Fed cattle prices jumped up $6 from February to March and Canner265 4.8-- -another $4 to $74-75 in April. Prices should hold fairly steady at All Grades 35.29 57.34 53.11 92.48
this level for the next 6 months unless there are adverse political STOCKER Over 300 Lbs.
announcements. Choice 37.14 66.86 59.05 118.54
Feeder cattle prices have also increased about $10-15 in the Good 37.50 61.02 52.74 104.18
past two months. Continued strong demand is expected with Standard 34.21 55.53 45.02 91.55
additional strength likely in the summer and early fall. Utility318 493 3.7 -Slaughter cow prices will continue to increase with a $65 Inferior 23.87 40.20-- -average for Utility cows by next fall. All Grades 34.91 58.91 52.75 104.09
Hog prices for 200-220 lb. barrows and gilts averaged $42-43 SUC:FA&CDvso fMreig aktNw
in April, down about $12 from February. Continued low prices, SUC:FA&CDvso fMreig aktNw
possibly in the $40 areas are expected in the fall due to rapid ex- Average Prices, Dollars per Cwt.
pansion in the hog industry.
Slaughter Steers, Omaha
Week Choice Choice Good
PRICE RANGES-ACTUAL AND PROJECTED Ended (900-1100 Lbs.) (1100- 1300 Lbs.) (900-1100 Lbs.)
Omh loiaFeb 24 45.75 65.22 46.20 65.32 41.25 61.58
900-1100 400-500 lb. 600-700 lb. Mar 31 49.94 71.35 50.38 71.58 45.56 67.05
pound Steers Steers Apr 28 -52.98 75.95 53.35 76.05 48.25 70.95
YearSluheCosOma and Choice UtilitySluheCosOmh _______Month Steers CIeChoice oc Good Cows Week Com'l Utility ] Cutter
1978 Actual Dollars per cwt. Ended 197L1i979I 197 1j3~~ 1979i E1
Dec. 55-56 72-84 62-75 60-68 53-62 41-51 Feb 24 32.85 52.35 31.65 51.50 29.75 49.75
1979 Mar 31 34.44 55.70 33.62 54.55 30.75 53.10
Jan. 59-60 82-94 73-86 69-74 6 1-70 47-55 April 28 39.25 59.90 38.10 58.95 36.60 56.40
Feb. 64-65 89-102 78-91 73-81 65-75 50-59
Mar. 70-71 95-110 85-100 79-88 71-81 55-65 SOURCE: U.S.D.A.-AMS
Apr. 74-75 99-114 88-104 78-87 73-83 56-66
Projected Ipre oeesBe nWihDt sPi rs
May 72-73 100-115 90-105 79-88 73-82 57-67 Imote onlss d Bef nd h S.h Dut9i7Pid- reh9
June-Jul. 74-75 100-115 90-105 78-87 72-8 1 58-68FrznFlidadUS,1979
Aug.-Sept. 73-75 105-120 95-110 80-88 74-83 59-69 February Jan.-Feb.
SOURCE: Florida Cooperative Extension Service. Change Change
Year Quantity from Quantity from Calendar
Re'. prey. yer Rcd prey. year Year
Average Prices Received, Effective Parity and Percent 1000.I
of Parity for Livestock, U.S., April 1978 and 1979 Pound Percen Pond0eren 0oud
Florida:
Prices Parity Av. Prices 1977 15,424 +94 47,612 +83 223,716
Item Received Prices as % of Parity 1978 16,731 + 8 34,133 -28 221,074
19817 9817 98117 1979 25,993 +55 60,328 +77
19817 19717 U.S.:
Dols. per Cwt. Dols. per Cwt. Percent 1977 97,762 +38 184,478 1 1,192,600
Beef Cattle 47.20 72.40 61.80 71.30 76 102 1978 101,467 + 4 193,869 + 5 1,392,568
Calves 53.70 96.40 71.20 82.80 75 116 1979 126,020 +24 264,507 +36 ,
Hogs 45.00 44.30 60.40 70.70 75 63 SOURCE: U.S. Department of Commerce
40 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979




An Opportunity To Share In Our 9 Years Of Breeding Registered
Red Angus With The Sale Of 24 Cow Calf Pairs 24 Heifers 6 Bulls
AHE BERTHA 492 Born 1-2-78 AHE RED SOPHIE Born 12-22-74
Wn. Wgt. 563-Ratio 114-20 Contemporaries Wn. Wgt. 510-Ratio 112-24 Contemporaries
365 Day Wgt. 792-Ratio 115-20 Contemporaries HAS LINEBRED HEIFER CALF AT SIDE
SIRE: SUPERCHARGER-A.I.'d UMPIRE 1000 SIRE: CPR ROYAL 034-Rebred McQueboy 109
COME TO WHERE SOME OF THE STARS Co-Owner & Exhibitor of Supercharger
IN THE RED ANGUS BREED ARE- Sired 1977 National Grand Champion.
*GRAND CHAMPION PEN of FIVE Red *Supercharger Sired the 1978 American
Angus Bulls at All Breeds Bull Sale in Royal Grand Champion Female.
Montgomery, Ala. 14 Breeds-415 Bulls. *A Full Brother to my McQueboy Bull
*Two HIGHEST SELLING Heifers and Sired the 1975 National Grand ChamCow-Calf Pair in the 1976 Southeastern pion Female.
Red Angus Association Sale. Grand Champion Female and Three
*GRAND CHAMPION BULL in 1976 & Highest Selling Animals in 1978 South1977 Tennessee-Kentucky Invitational eastern Sale, and Highest Selling in 1978
Show and Sale. in Tennessee-Kentucky Sale.
*The HIGHEST SELLING Cow-Calf Pair, *ENFINGER Owned Sires: Gibbs Branic
Heifer and two Bulls in the 1977 South- 8, Supercharger, and AHE McQueboy eastern Red Angus Association Sale. 109, each in successive years sired the
Top Gaining Group of Bulls at IBIA
Winter Test in Grundy Center, Iowa.
ON JULY 7, 1979-6 P.M.-At RANCH HEADQUARTERS
CHUMUCKLA, FLA. (30 MILES N.E. OF PENSACOLA, FLA.)
Doris and I will be looking forward to seeing each of you. Please make reservations early because of the 4th of July Holiday Weekend. We solicit phone-in bids-they will be honored at lowest possible purchase price. Write for a Catalogue.
SALE HEADQUARTERS: AUCTIONEER: OWNERS:
RODEWAY INN WEST Gayle Ingram Al & Doris Enfinger
Interstate 10 (N.A.S. Exit) P. 0. Box 579 Rt. 3, Box 683
Pensacola, Fla. Quitman, Tx. 75783 Jay, Fla. 32565
TOLL FREE 1-800-228-2000 214-878-2225 Ph. 904-994-7033
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 41




ON HAND for the Hall of Fame Federation
dinner in Tampa were FCA President Henry
Douglas, Zephyrhills, left, and Commissioner of Agriculture Doyle Conner.
Kickoff dinner held
for Agri project
A few weeks ago the kickoff dinner for
Florda orn 3 Yars the Florida Agricultural Hall of Fame
Florda orn 3 Yars Federation was held in Tampa. ComnRod Angus hull calf- Herd Performance missioner of Agriculture Doyle Conner
9 months old, Data Computer said the job of the Federation will be to
905 pounds Analyzed select individuals from a list of quality
nominees for induction into the Florida
Agricultural Hall of Fame.
The membership of the federation
*The world's most efficient breed of cattle: YES, more live calves born unassisted. YES, they shall be as representative of the various grow faster, finish faster, grade better. YES, the calves are always red when bred to other red facets of the agricultural industry as cattle. YES, you should put performance tested Red Angus bulls to work in your cow herd, possible. This would include, but not be YES, save better heifers to improve mothering and milking ability. limited to: production, marketing, sales,
For lit o RedAngs boodes witepromotion, research and education.
This membership shall be comprised of
FLORDA ED NGUSASSCIAIONthe president, or his representative, of Rt. 3, BoI8,Jy l265eP:949473 each member organization.
A federation selection committee
consisting of four members and a chairHIDDEN VALLEY RANCH Red Angus Superiority man will be appointed by the federation
Red Angus Cattle Born and Bred Herd EMIL EMULATION 1-adj. 205 chairman. The purpose of this commitIn Florida to Meet the Needs Sires: day wt. 665, ADG on test 3.61 tee will be to make the final selection of
of Florida Cattlemen. CHEROKEE REBEL PV-weanJack Swe er we er atn g.Ing wt. 552, yearling wt. 1103 candidates for induction into the
gerownr Trry artn, gr.Florida Agricultural Hall of Fame. The 813/581-5638 904/796-5296 Chipola Red Angus Ranch members of the Selection Committee
904/796-5868 Ken and Nell Williamswilrmnaoyou adreiv
Rit. 3, Box 170 Brooksville, Fla. 33512 Ph:e1,Bo 90 995-762-8Forda3259 appointments annually, said Conner.
Ph: 04/96-955-62-259The first group of candidates to be
Hele & Carli Marin ducted into the Florida Agricultural RED ANGUS Hee hri atn Hall of Fame will be honored at the
o RED ANGUS 1980 Hall of Fame Federation dinner
QUALTY RD ANUS Rgistrednext spring. At that time a maximum of
QUaITYl RediAg SRgse 10 Hall of Fame members will be
46 Hkee Digo inducted. After 1980, a maximum of five
4162aShoecres32Dr. C & H FARMS 904/547-3098 new members may be chosen annually.
305/647-6283 P. 0. BOX 52 Members of the federation have
Bus. 305/843-1270 BONIFAY, FL. 32425 1 until September 30 of this year to submit
_____________________________the names of their nominees for possible induction into the Hall of Fame. Names
C URTISS Promfote EE should be sent to: Mr. Bob Morris,
chairman, Florida Agricultural Hall of
BREEDING SERVICE e very day .. Fame Federation, P. 0. Box 420,
"Breeding cattle for your next Tampa 33601.
generation."~ SupotYu Said Conner, "I think everyone will
Rodney Moore Jim Ziegler Bill Harris oragree that the time has come for us to
91 2/244-4181 813/465-0166 904/783-2008 Florida Beef Council begin officially recognizing those
___________________________persons who have made significant con____________________________tributions to Florida agriculture.
FLORIDA __Federation members should strive to
'ilmake it a difficult task for the Selection ~nm m e rnt .~Jz~1rnCommittee to choose the first group of
6 imm ntat(KAW" ) nduceesinto the Hall of Fame. Give
'~ L ASSOCIATION them plenty of quality nominees to
14k~l 0!JOII1 Him tal choose from so that those individuals
904/486-2797 ultimately selected will be able to feel
u Bronson, Fia. 32621 The Davenports Fit. 1, Box 21 -B
904/591-1156 Reddick, Fi. 32686 justifiably proud of the honor and
acclaim they receive."
42 / THE FLORIDA CA'TTLEMAN / JUNE 1979




SoteatrnRdAnu Asoitn
S~AL
SATURDAY, JULY 21, 1979
Show 9:00 a.m.-Sale 1:00 p.m. at the Auburn University Agricultural Center
AUBURN, ALABAMA
60 Lots Registered Red Angus
All females under 8 years of age, bulls from 12 to 36 months of age, bred cows and bred heifers guaranteed safe in calf.
Corral show consisting of 5 classes. All catle in the show sell. Open heifers Bred heifers
Cows and calves Bred cows
Bulls 12 to 20 months Bulls 21 to 36 months
Come see this innovated way of showing cattle. Selected as if you were purchasing them f-rm the farm or ranch.
For IformtionP. 0. Box 579
Frnoain Quitman, TX 75783
Free Brochure 214/878-2225
or contact the sale committee:
Al Enfinger Dr. Billy Powell
Rt. 3, Box 683 Mobile, Alabama
Jay, Florida 32565 205/344-8888
904/994-7033
THE FLORIDA CATiTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 /43




Bond Simmental Ranch is dispersing their half blood Simmental herd ... and is currently offering for sale 90 cows bred to proven, fullblood bulls. These top quality, fullbodied females include a limited selection of fine, breeding age heifers.
For prices and additional information, contact:
BOND"
Simment d Kdnch4i
Perry Bond
Office: 912/498-4835, Home: 912/228-1381 Patty Fournier
912/498-7745
Route 1, Box 116
Boston, Georgia 31626
44 /THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN /JUNE 1979




li
1k'!
Special Section of 'je
Ugttlernan,
AND LIVESTOCK JOURNAL for June, 1979
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 45




ALLIED MEMBERS
Your continued support of the Florida Cattlemen's Association and Florida Beef Council,
evidenced by your joining our association as an allied member is deeply appreciated.
Particularly, we appreciate the fact that your dues help defray the expenses of putting on
our annual convention. We will remember our indebtedness to you for your continued
outstanding support.
FLORIDA CATTLEMEN'S ASSOCIATION ALLIED MEMBERS
Aid Laboratories, Ocala Greater Jacksonville Fair, Jacksonville
American Breeders Service, Jacksonville Griffin Fertilizer Company, Frostproof
Anchor Laboratories, Inc., Kissimmee Haile-Dean Seed Company, Inc., Orlando
ACLI Int'l Commodity Svcs., Inc., Altamonte Springs I.M.C. Chemical Group, Inc., (Ral gro) Bartow
AgriFeed Inc, DuedinI.M.C. Development Corp., Lakea American Cyanamid Co., Casselberry i.M.C. Rainbow Div., Mulberry
Austin Fertilizer & Chemical Co., Sanford Kaplan Industries, Inc., Bartow Cattlemen's Construction Co., Bartow Lakeland Cash Feed Company, Inc., Lakeland
Central Florida PCA, Orlando Loeb Rhoades Hornblower, Winter Park
Central Molasses Company, Tampa Merck Chemical Division, Goldenrod
Cody Publications, Kissimmee Mixon Milling Company, Cairo, Georgia
Cutter Laboratories, Brooksville M&M Supply Co. of Fla.,lnc., Thonotosassa
DoLime Minerals Company, Bartow Okeechobee County Bank, Okeechobee
Elanco Products Company, Tampa The P.D.Q. Company, Lakeland
Exchange Bank of Osceo la, Kissimmee Poultry Health Service, Jacksonville
Farm Credit Service, Lakeland Ralston-Purina Company, Tampa
Federal Land Bank of Orlando Ranch Fertilizer Company, Okeechobee
Federal Land Bank of Tampa Riechold Chemical, Inc., Pensacola
Federal Land Bank of Wauchula RICO Liquids, Inc., Aliceville, Alabama
First National Bank of Kissimmee Riviana Foods, Inc., Houston, Texas
Florida Ass'n of Livestock Markets, Kissimmee Southeast First National Bank of Miami Florida Favorite Fertilizer, Inc., Lakeland S.E. Molasses & Supply Co., Okeechobee Florida Feed Mills, Jacksonville Southern Culvert Company, Pinellas Park
Florida Fence Post Co., Inc., Wauchula Sun Bank of St. Cloud, St. Cloud
Florida Lime & Dolomite Co., Inc., Ocala Sun City Center Bank, Sun City Center Georgia-Florida Harvestore, Inc., Attapulgus, Ga. Syntex Agribusiness, Inc., Clearwater W. R. Grace Company, Fort Pierce U.S. Sugar Corporation, Clewiston
\(Fkrida Beef Counci
i i "Promoting the product of one of Florida's leading industries."
______________P. 0. Box 1929, Kisslimbee, Florida 32741
46 /THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979




1979 FCA Convention Program
(Registration Desk Open Daily, 9:00 a.m.-Meeting Rooms Posted in Lobby)
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 27, 1979
9:00 a.m.-Registration in Hotel Lobby 10:00 a.m.-FCA Executive Committee Meeting and Luncheon
(Courtesy The First National Bank of Kissimmee)
12:00 noon-Cowbelles Executive Committee Luncheon Meeting 3:30 p.m.-FCA Committee Meetings
6:30 p.m.-Hospitality Hour
(Courtesy Ben Hill Griffin, Inc., and Griffin Fertilizer, Frostproof) CITRUS CHEMICAL
THURSDAY, JUNE 28, 1979 COMPANY, INC.
Breakfast-No Planned Breakfast
7:30 a.m.-Exec. Comm; County Ass'n Presidents; State Directors; dibla Peoples Fertilizer
Sweethearts and Judges Breakfast cm lt
(Courtesy Ralston-Purina Company, Don Plagge, Host) A co peeline of
9:00 a.m.- 1979 Florida Cattlemen-Florida CowBelles Opening Session Pasture and Grove
Call to Order: Henry C. Douglas, President
Invocation, Pledge of Allegiance and Salute to the Flag Fertilizers to
Welcome: Mike Partin, President, Osceola Cattlemen's Ass'n me ornes
Response: Harvey Dahl, First Vice President, FCA me ornes
9:15 a.m.-Florida CowBelles Ass'n Report: Mrs. Katharine Simms, CUTM IXN
President CUTM IXN
Address: National CowBelles President Mrs. Rose Harris e SUPERIOR SERVICE
10:00 a.m.-Address: Doyle Conner, Fla. Comm. of Agriculture *CMEIIEPIE
10:30 a.m.-Address: NCA President Lauren Carlson *CM EIIEPIE
12:00 noon-Cowboy & CowBelle "Sweetheart" Luncheon
Invocation: J. 0. Pearce, Jr., Okeechobee Telephone Lakeland
Presentation of Sweethearts by Mrs. Winkie LeFils, Chairman 813/665-2332
Introduction of new Allied Members; Chairman Herb Weimer
Presentation of "Outstanding CowBelle Nominees," Mrs. P. 0. Box 1087
Jack Johnson, Chairman Eaton Park, Fla. 33840
Golf & Tennis Tournaments (Information at Registration Desk) 2:30 p.m.-FCA Directors Meeting and Committee Reports Exec. Vice President's Report: James F. Mummey 2:30 p.m.-CowBelles General Membership Meeting 6:30 p.m.-Cocktail Hour-Reception for Registrants and Visiting Dignitaries
(Courtesy U. S. Sugar Corporation, Clewiston)
7:30 p.m.-Fiesta Buffet
9:00 p.m.-Sweetheart Coronation by Commissioner Doyle Conner 9:30 p.m.-Dance, Country and Western Band
FRIDAY, JUNE 29, 1979 131c
Breakfast-No Planned Breakfast To Last!
7:00 a.m.-CowBelles Breakfast
(Courtesy The Clarence Cross Family, Colquitt, Georgia) LIQUID FEEDERS
9:00 a.m.-FCA General Business Session Call to Order: President Henry Douglas 3 or 4Wheel
Pledge of Allegiance and Salute to the Flag
Budget & Finance Report: Ralph Cellon, Jr. Manufactured in
AITC Report: R. D. Bennett Lk aeFa
President's Report: Henry Douglas Lk aeFa
10:30 a.m.-Address: Lt. Governor Wayne MixsonFulase b d
Honorary Director Awards: Henry DouglasFulase b d
Election of FCA Officers for 1979-80 Delivery available
12:00 noon-No Planned Luncheon for Cattlemen 12:00 noon--CowBelles Luncheon, Past Presidents & Exec. Committee SUMMER DISCOUNTS
(Courtesy Federal Land Bank & Production Credit A ss'ns of Florida)
6:30 p.m.-Hospitality Hour Call or Write
(Courtesy Florida Lime & Dolomite Company, Inc., Ocala) for Brochure
7:30 p.m.-Banquet-Master of Ceremonies Ralph Cellon, Jr.A slDuaC t
Address: Governor Robert Graham diDuaC s
Presentation of 1979-80 President for Remarks Products
9:30 p.m.-Dance P.O0. Box 812
(Orange Juice during the convention, courtesy Ben Hill Griffin, Inc., Frostproof- Lake Wales, FL 33853 Orchids for the Ladies, courtesy DoLime Minerals, Bartow; Registration Badges, courtesy Florida Lime & Dolomite Co., Inc., Ocala; Diamond Pendant for CowBelles Phones:
drawing, courtesy Florida Association of Livestock Markets; Coffee during the con- 813/676-4116
vention, courtesy Florida Angus Association). 813/285-8874
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 /47




L& A> A
WALT DISNEY WORLD VILLAGE at Lake Buena Vista will be one of the feature attractions awaiting ECA conventioneers at the annual June event. Visiting the shops and restaurants such as the Empress Lilly shown above will occupy some of the leisure time of ECA members and their families during the four-day convention.
Lake Buena Vista-convention site!
The annual convention of the Florida
Cattlemen's Association is slated for
June 27-30 at the Dutch Inn Resort
CowB elles plan active program Hotel, Lake Buena Vista. With a
number of important issues to be
Members of the Florida CowBelles Association have planned a full schedule of covered during the business sessions, meetings and social activities when they hold their annual meeting in conjunc- FCA officials expect one of the largest tion with FCA's convention at the Dutch Inn Resort Hotel, Lake Buena Vista, crowds to be on hand in recent years.
June 27-30. All meeting places will be posted in the hotel lobby. Registration will This year's program will include be at 9:00 am., daily. both business and social activities along
The CowBelles program is as follows: with both golf and tennis tournaments.
WEDNSDAY JUN 27The registration desk will open at WEDNSDAY JUN 279:00 am., Wednesday, June 27, and will 9:00 a. m.- Registration in Hotel Lobby be open daily from then on at the same
12:00 noon-Executive Committee Luncheon Meeting hour. Meeting rooms for committee and
6:30 p. m.- Hospitality Hour the main sessions will be posted in the
hotel lobby.
THURSDAY, JUNE 28 The first session presided over by
Henry Douglas, Zephyrhills, president,
7:00 a.m.-Outstanding CowBelle Breakfast will be a joint one with the CowBelles
9:15 a.m.-President's Report to FCA which will officially open the convenAddress by Mrs. Rose Harris, ANCB President tion. Welcome to the area will be given
10:30-11:30 a.m.-Ladies Reception (Guest: Mrs. Ruth Ann Fowler) by Mike Partin, Kissimmee, president of
12:00 noon-Cowboy & CowBelle "Sweetheart" Luncheon the Osceola County Cattlemen's AssoPresentation of Sweethearts, Mrs. Winkie LeFils ciation. The response will be given by
Presentation of "Outstanding CowBelle" Nominees, Harvey Dahl, Melbourne, first vice
Mrs. Jack JohnsonprsdnofFA
Golf and Tennis Tournaments (Information at prsenthrn fms ECA., ow
Registration Desk) Belles president, will address the mem2:30 p.m.-General Membership Meeting bership and will then present Mrs. Rose
Drawing for Diamond Pendant Harris, Waitsburg, Washington, presi(Courtesy Florida Association of Livestock Markets) dent of the American National Cow6:30 p.m.-Cocktail Hour and Reception Belles who will give a talk on CowBelle
7:30 p.m.-Fiesta Buffet acmlsmns
9:00 p.m.-Sweetheart Coronation by Commissioner Doyle Conner amlshents.reois oheana
9:30p~m-DaceCoutry nd estrn andbanquet will be Ralph Cellon, Jr., of FRIDAY, JUNE 29 Alachua. Principal speaker at the banquet on Friday evening, June 29, will be
7:00 a.m.-CowBelles Breakfast and General Membership Meeting Florida Governor Bob Graham.
(Courtesy The Clarence Cross Family, Colquitt, Georgia) FCA's 1979-80 Sweetheart will be Guest Speaker: Mrs. Rose Harris, ANCB President crowned by Commissioner of AgriculPresentation of Awards ture Doyle Conner at the Fiesta Buffet
Election of Officers which is set for Thursday evening, June
12:00 noon-Executive Committee and Past Presidents Luncheon 28. A country and western dance will
(Courtesy Federal Land Bank & Production Credit A ss'ns follow the sweetheart ceremonies and a of Florida) dance will also follow the annual ban6:30 p.m.-Hospitality Hour quet affair on Friday night.
7:30 p.m.-Annual Banquet and Dance Current industry topics and
I problems, committee reports and other
48 /THE FLORIDA CATT'LEMAN / JUNE 1979




items will be covered during the business
sessions. Election of officers for the new
year will also be held and resolutions
will be adopted by the membership.
Honorary FCA directors will also be
named.
The Florida CowBelles Association
under the leadership of Mrs. Katharine
Simms will conduct its annual convention and hold committee meetings during the same period as the cattlemen.
Lieutenant Governor Wayne Mixson, Commissioner of Agriculture
Doyle Conner and NCA President
Lauren Carlson, Chokio, Minnesota,
will be program speakers during the
general sessions.
Registration fee for the convention
will be $45.00 per person which includes
a number of meals, hospitality hours
and other entertainment. There will be PLAYGROUND FACILITIES are available at the Dutch Inn Resort Inn Hotel where the no registration charge for children youngsters can gather. It's located adjacent to the swimming pool area. unless they desire to attend a particular
function. Individual tickets will be sold represent the firm. matters given by R. D. Bennett, Greenat the registration desk for those func- The joint session of FCA and the wood. Douglas will give his president's tions. CowBelles will convene at 9:00 a.m., report for the year and then the mempresided over by President Douglas. At bers will hear from Lieutenant GoverOpening day 9:15 a.m., Mrs. Katharine Simms, Cow- nor Wayne Mixson. Following this talk,
FCA President Henry Douglas has Belles president, will give her report to Douglas will present the honorary direccalled an executive committee meeting the membership. A report will also be tor plaques. Election of officers will at 10:00 a.m. June 27 to lead off the con- given by ANCB President Rose Harris. follow. vention. A luncheon will follow the ses- Commissioner Conner is scheduled to No formal luncheon is planned at sion at 12:00 noon courtesy of The First address the members at 10:00 a.m. noon for the cattlemen but the National Bank of Kissimmee. At 12:00 noon the annual Cowboy CowBelles' past president and execuThe CowBelles executive committee and CowBelle "Sweetheart" luncheon tive committee luncheon hosted by will also hold a luncheon meeting be- will be served. The invocation will be Federal Land Bank and Production ginning at 12:00 noon. given by J. 0. Pearce, Jr., of Credit Associations of Florida is set for
FCA committees will meet begin- Okeechobee. The sweetheart con- 12:00 noon.
ning at 3:30 p.m., Wednesday, June 27. testants will be presented by Mrs. A hospitality hour hosted by FlorOpening day's events will close with a Winkie LeFils, Osteen, chairman of the ida Lime and Dolomite Company, Inc., hospitality hour hosted by Ben Hill sweetheart contest. Herb Weimer, Kis- Ocala, is slated for 6:30 p.m. The annual Griffin, Inc., and Griffin Fertilizer, simmee, chairman of the allied mem- banquet is scheduled for 7:30 p.m., with Frostproof, set for 6:30 p.m. bers committee, will present new mem- Ralph Cellon, Jr., serving as emcee.
Thursday bers, and Mrs. Jack Johnson, Highlight of the evening will be an
Immokalee, will present the "Outstand- address by Governor Bob Graham. There is no planned breakfast for ing CowBelle" nominees. Prior to the dance, which is
registrants on Thursday, June 28, At 2:30 p.m., Douglas will call the scheduled for 9:30 p.m., the FCA presialthough the executive committee, directors meeting to order and the dent for 1979-80 will be introduced for
county association presidents, state annual meeting of the CowBelles is also remarks. directors, sweetheart contestants and scheduled for that hour. FCA Executive Orange juice during the convention judges will be hosted at a 7:30 a.m. Vice President Jim Mummey, Kissim- will be furnished by Ben Hill Griffin, breakfast by Ralston-Purina Company, mee, will report on association and Inc., Frostproof. Orchids for the ladies St. Louis, Missouri. Purina district legislative matters at the directors meet- will be provided by DoLime Minerals, manager Don Plagge, Tampa, will ing. Other committee reports will also Bartow. Registration badges are probe heard. vided by Florida Lime and Dolomite
A cocktail hour and reception Company, Inc., and morning coffee
honoring the registrants and visiting during the convention is courtesy of the The cover dignitaries will be hosted by U.S. Sugar Florida Angus Association.
The Dutch Inn Resort Hotel at Corporation, Clewiston, beginning at Other contributions, assistance and
Lake Buena Vista will be the head- 6:30 p.m. Following the "Fiesta Buffet" donors for various activities during the quarters hotel for the annual FCA at 7:30 p.m., Commissioner Conner will convention are acknowledged from convention. A photo of the facility crown the 1979-80 cattlemen's sweet- Allied Members of FCA; Florida Assoappears on the cover of this annual heart. A country-western dance will ciation of Livestock Markets; The First convention section. conclude the evening's social activities. National Bank of Kissimmee; Florida
FCA President Henry Doug- Lime and Dolomite Company, Inc.,
las, Zephyrhills, and Mrs. Doug- Friday Ocala; The Clarence Cross Family, Collas, extend an invitation to all to No breakfast is planned for the final quitt, Georgia; Ralston-Purina Comattend the convention and enjoy the day, June 29, and cattlemen will be on pany, St. Louis, Missouri; Federal Land area of Lake Buena Vista and its their own. The CowBelles will be hosted Bank Association of Florida; Producfacilities, at a breakfast by the Clarence Cross tion Credit Association of Florida; U.S.
A number of social activities are Family, Colquitt, Georgia, at 7:00 a.m. Sugar Corporation, Clewiston; sweetplanned for FCA members and The final FCA general business ses- heart judges; Mrs. Winkie LeFils, sweetfamilies during the period of the sion will be convened by President heart contest chairman, and Mrs.
convention. The convention com- Douglas at 9:00 a.m. A budget and Katharine Simms, CowBelles presimittee is chaired by C. Aubrey finance report will be by Ralph Cellon, dent.
Caruthers of Oxford. Jr., treasurer, followed by a report on
Animal Industry Technical Council
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 49




FCA activities
around the nation
A variety of activities are participated in by FCA members, CowBelles, and industry supporters all around the country as shown by the accompanying photos.
Top left, NCA President Lauren Carlson, Chokio, Minnesota, will be on the FCA convention program at Lake Buena Vista. He's shown checking some information on beef promotion with Mrs. JoAnn Smith, Wacahoota, chairman of NCA's beef promotion and consumer relations committee during an out-of-state meeting.
Second from top, J. Charles and Saundra Gray of Gemini Springs Farms, DeBary, hosted the annual Block and Bridle field tour a short time ago and are shown greeting the group.
Third row, left, Mrs. Jan Stephens, Kissimmee, first vice president of the Florida CowBelles, had some helpers during a beef promotion held in Starke.
Third row, center, Mrs. Sarah Childs, Lake Placid, left foreground, second vice president of the Florida CowBelles, shows that CowBelles also join in working cows when called upon.
Third row, right, Honorary members of the University of Florida Block & Bridle Club named this year were the late 0. L. "Slim" Partin, accepted by Mike Partin, Kissimmee, at left; J. E. Pace, longtime beef extension specialist at the University, center, and E. L. "Geech" Partin, of Kissimmee.
Bottom row, left, Mrs. Katharine Simms, right center, president of the Florida CowBelles, has led the group on a number of beef promotions during the past year. Shown here is an event at the Fashion Square Mall, Orlando.
Bottom right, FBC Executive Director Ron Stephens, left, conferred with Bob
- Morris, Tampa, during the recent Florida Agricultural Hall of Fame banquet at
teState Fairgrounds, Tampa.
jv
50 /THE FLORIDA CATITLEMAN /JUNE 1979




Af
Sp '4 j
WINDII COESFLRD Cogauain n C' is erofonrhpo h
BEFPA \ lrd ate a n ietc ora n etwse
fo otscesu ndfutu ovnin
THE IN-IIECVR FLORIDA TLMN/JN 995




room was completed inundated. The
Beef cookoff ~workshop is rescheduled for SeptemberFlrd o els
19 and 20. Since this will be after theFlrd Co ele
te m dDenver meeting, you will have the Association
(outstanding" opportunity to hear the information and Affiliated with
guidelines brought forth at that impor- American National CowBelles PRESIDENT'S BY-LINES tant workshop. Rt. 1, Box 56
The Florida Beef Cook-Off was very adWe are happy to hear that Ralph Lithia, FL 33547
adGertie Cellon are much improved.
successful. Donna Pettit, chairman, Gertie sent a letter to the CowBelles in President
planned and conducted an outstanding appreciation of the love and concern Mrs. Ray Simms, Lithia
event. The cook-off was held in the shown to them during this trying time. 1 813/689-3990
Agricultural Center at Seffner, April 20. felt it would be good to pass along her We are most indebted to Ruth Ann words to you now rather than wait until First Vice President
Fowler, home extension economist and next meeting time. They expressed Mrs. Ron Stephens, Kissimmee
her staff for their invaluable assistance tak o l h hn alcrs
an ue f her acliie. hee asalo visits and prayers as well as the planter Second Vice President
good support from Cow Belles. Travel- given by the Cow Belles. Our prayers are Mrs. Tom Childs, Lake Placid ing to H-illsborough County were vice- that they will recover speedily and againTraue chairman of the cook-off, Jeannie be with us.Traue
Carpenter, Brevard County president Brevard County reports that a class Mrs. Mildred Sherrod, Immokalee
Ruth Tucker and immediate past presi- was given to 4-H members, ages nine dent Jeanette Barthle of Pasco County. through 14, on "The Basics of Beer' on Recording Secretary
Hillsborough County CowBelles help- March 12. This will be followed up by a Mrs. Jack Stokes, Williston ing were Louise Massaro, Jane Mas- test given to the group on April 12 with Corresponding Secretary
saro, Ola Alderman and Claire Bryant. a beef gift certificate awarded to theMr.HveDalMlbun
Our publicity chairman, Billie Jo high scorer. The Brevard CowBelles Mr.HveDalMlbun
Simmons, had arranged for extensive have been requested to also give the 4-H press coverage. There were repre- group a class on the bones of the retail
sentatives from Brandon News, Plant cuts of beef and the bones of the beef City Courier, East Hillsborough Tribune animal.
and Tampa Times. Both Channel 8 and Hope you have your "Beef For
Channel 13 taped portions of the cook- Father's Day" promotions well-planned off and this was seen on noon and even- by now. Brevard County is using the liw
ing news in Tampa. Beef Quiz from the placemnat in the
The fact that the top three winners newsletter "The Orbit." This idea could were men attracted a lot of attention. be utilized in several ways. Most of your There were seven contestants and we local newspapers would be glad to print appreciate each of them participating. the quiz. Restaurants are usually quite First place winner was Avritt Grace, eager to use the place mats in their place county cook-off winner from St. Lucie of business and this is good beef adverCounty with his fantastic recipe for Bee tising. Don't forget to cook beef for the Burgundy Fiesta. Other winners an~d seilctlmni orlfnhsdy
recipes are in a separate article in this spcaY atlni our lifeboo ohisday! issue of The Florida Cattleman. Georgiann Sumner, wishes to remind COMMISSIONER of Agriculture Doyle
Grace will be attending the national you to finish your scrapbooks in time Conner and Mrs. Katharine Simms, Cowbeef cook-off in Omaha, Nebraska, for the convention and bring them to be Belles president, compare notes on beef
September 27 and 28. Donna Pettit and judged. Her letter has already been promotion during a recent meeting. Jeannie Carpenter are making plans to mailed covering judging procedures. We also attend and we wish much success are looking forward to seeing some out- dyatrongnrlmmesi and good luck to our State winner. stnigsrpokinJn.dyaenon eealm brhp
Woudn' i beexctig t hae Flr- Audrey Johnson, Outstanding Cow- meeting to a lucky CowBelle. We are ida national winner! Blecaraakthtyubsre again most appreciative to the Florida
Midyear meetings and workshops one person (the president or director) Asoiatin ofi Lieosit .akto
will be held beginning July 17 at 8:00 from your county is designated to vote doin thisn' g leneu gitebauiu a.m. and adjourning on July 18 at 4:00 at the Outstanding CowBelle breakfast Yuwud' eiv h euiu
p.m. As you probably read in the na- for the candidate of your choice. The prizes CowBelles bring from their countional newsletter, we are urged to make breakfast will be on Thursday monn ties to be given as door prizes at the reservations for plane and hotel im- othcnvtina7:0amorin annual CowBelle Breakfast on Friday,
mediately as it is all first come, first oftecneto t70 ~.but you must have that membership
served basis. Some flights for the sum- Let's all work hard to sell the beef card to be eligible. That would be very mer are already completely booked due drawing tickets that provides the easy to obtain. Just send your $5.00
to the fuel shortage. Send your hotel res- scholarship for our Cattlemen's Sweet- state dues and $5.00 national dues to ervations directly to the ANCB, P. 0. heart. I have had a peek at a couple of Mildred Sherrod, P. 0. Box 875, Box 569, Denver, Colorado 80201, care the contestants already and they are Immokalee, 33934 if you are not in a of Dottie Curtis. sweetheart material if I've ever seen it. county organization. We'd be so happy
The Region 11 workshop in Jackson, We'll have a treat in store when the new to have you!
Mississippi, was canceled because of the Sweetheart is chosen and it will I'm looking forward to seeing many flood conditions. I know your prayers encourage her with the nice prizes you old friends at the convention looking were for everyone involved in the tragic help provide, forward to making new friends, having
situation. I received a letter dated April Ladies if you are not a member of our national president, Rose Harris, in 25 from Region Il co-ordinator, the Florida CowBelle Association, we our midst and being part of the best conCynthia Curtiss, who said that even then urge you to join in time to be a part of vention that we've ever had. Hope that the situation had not improved greatly. the convention activities. There will be many of you are looking forward to the The Ramada Inn, where we would have interesting programs, exciting work to same thing!! met, had water up to the second story. talk about and lots of fun. A diamond -Katharine Simms, President
The cattlemen's office with a CowBelle pendant will be given away at the Thurs- Florida CowBelle's Association
52 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979




WAREHOUSE Wc &LitnMo ManFow mx Bo 1AG LOTS
HOURS TRUCK LOTS
8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
MONDAYRAL R
THROUGH QUALITY ... PRICE ... SERVICE ... for 45 years to theRAL R
FRIDAY Florida Cattlemen, Dairymen, Farmers and Citrus Growers LOTS
TIFLEAF-11 MILLET BAHIA, ARGENTINE AESCHYNOMENE
JAPANESE MILLET BAHIA, PARAGUAYAN STRAIN 22 ALYCE CLOVER
BROWN TOP MILLET BAHIA, PENSACOLA HAIRY INDIGO
PROSO MILLET BERMUDAS GAME BIRD PLANTING MIX
Nitragin Brand Inoculants ... Scarifying & Hulling ... Seed Broadcasters
SHAREIHARVESTING AND SEED PROCESSING
from our Arcadia plant-Call us
CATTLEMAN'S CHOICE
SORGHUM-SUDANGRASS HYBRID
Cattleman's Choice is a Sorg h um-Sudang rass Hybrid selected as the ideal spring and summer-planted multipurpose forage crop.
Natural genetic hybrid vigor plus the sweet juicy, succulent, leafy plants offer luscious palatability for grazing, green chop, and high quality hay.
Cattleman's Choice grows to a height of 8-10 feet under favorable conditions when not clipped or grazed. Cattleman's Choice has excellent drouth survival and remarkable regrowth ability.
Plants have high leaf to stem ratio. Excellent tonnage yields, high feed value, and fast regrowth offer the grower maximum TDN per acre. For most digestive and high energy feed, utilize the crop from two feet to the bloom stage.
Under favorable conditions, Cattleman's Choice often will produce up to four hay crops per growing season. Because of the fast regrowth, conditioning the hay crop speeds curing and facilitates baling. When cut or grazed, ~ .-----six inches of stubble should be left to facilitate quick regrowth.
Cattleman's Choice has been proven in Florida farmer, rancher, dairy-conducted field and grazing trials and has proved its adaptability under a wide range of conditions.
FOR POUNDS PER ACRE
Plant-1O to 15 in 36 to 40 inch rows 15 to 25 in 20 to 24 inch rows
25 to 40 BROADCAST
Plant-20 to 25 in 36 to 40 inch rows 25 to 30 in 20 to 24 inch rows
30 to 50 BROADCAST
Plant-20 to 25 in 36 to 40 inch rows a 25 to 30 in 20 to 24 inch rows
30 to 40 BROADCAST
Plant-15 to 20 in 36 to 40 inch rows
-O ECO 20 to 40 BROADCAST
~ SEDiROeRSea Seed CoInc.
SEE GRWER PROCESSORS JOBBERS MERCHANTS
1333 W. Church Street P. 0. Box 5517, Orlando, Florida 32855 305/425-3426




Fort Pierce
man wins
beef cookoff
Sponsored by the Florida CowBelles, the annual beef cookoff finals were held April 20 with first place going to Avritt Grace, Fort Pierce. The cookoff was held at the Hillsborough County AgriA h me s culture Business Center in Seffner.
Chairman for this year's series of contests across the state was Donna Petitt of Brandon. The cookoff is held for the purpose of featuring beef recipes; understanding the various cuts of beef and their preparations; promoting the beef cattle industry, and selecting a state winner to represent Florida in the National Beef Cook-off Contest.
The state finals at Seffner matched the seven best recipes submitted from ... deliver moe f a d id county cookoffs held throughout the
state. The beef dishes were judged in compliance with national beef cookoff criteria on taste, appearance, originality and ease of preparation.
Winner of the first place recipe is maitre d'hotel at the Pelican Yacht Club in Fort Pierce. With his recipe, Grace received top prize of $225 and an expense paid trip to Omaha, Nebraska, in September to compete nationally. TWinning second place for the second hydraulic AG-BAGGER straight year was Lee Donin of Satellite
provides the perfect Beach. His prize was $50. Third place
system for unlimited went to Kurt Weil from Hillsborough
storage capacity. Easily County. Of the seven contestants in the
transportable ... puts finals, the first three winners were men,
silage where you want it, Mrs. Petitt noted.
when you want it. The winning recipe was named "Beef
Stockman like the versatile Burgundy Fiesta," second place was
feeding capabilities ... "Chili Colorado," and third was called
self feed directly from the "Beef Roulade with Mushroom Sauce."
bag or load and haul as Fourth prize was won by Mrs.
you choose. Bettye Galvin of St. Augustine, and fifth
AG-BAGGER shown in operating position place was taken by Johanna Borg of
with conveyor attachment Port Richey. Honorable mention went
to Mrs. Blanche Scharf of Lakeland and ,Mrs. M. M. Sperranza of New Smyrna For free details on the Ag-Bag program, contact: Beach.
The winning recipe follows: Beef Burgundy Fiesta
SC/cup salad oil; 4 pounds beef P.O. Box 418, ASTORIA, OREGON 97103 503/325-2488 round, chuck, or tenderloin, cut in 1inch pieces; 2 tablespoons flour; 3 cloves
MAKE
NCA
TWICE AS Ifn in" STRONG
" fuly 25 I979FIRST PLACE winner in the state beef
cookoff was Avritt Grace from St. Lucie
County.
54 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979




It's tim e to
FEED and WEED
With Austin Fluid Fertilizer
Maxidmize available moisture levels by promoting strong root systems and high production levels on pastures and hay fields by FEEDING and WEEDING now.
Growing to meet tomorrow's Agribusiness needs
Ausi Fertilizer & Chemical Co.,I.
Largest Liquid Fertilizer Custom Applicator in the Southeast
Plant and Office at Sanford, Florida 32771. 305/322-0443
Night: Spencer G. Douglass 305/834-6849
Dick Harvin 813/494-0306, Donnie Yoemnans 813/983-6791
Jack Jones, Apopka 305/889-3597
Lake Placid Plant: 813/465-5203. Nites: 813/465-0572




EV ADAMS RANCH
Home of the Adams Ranch Braford
Alto Adams, Jr. Buddy Adams
Lee Adams
Ronald Harvey Mike Adams Bob Walker J. R. Skaggs
P. 0. Box 1030 Ft. Pierce, FL 33450
Phone:
305/461-6321
IT TAKES A PROGRAM-NOT JUST A BULL
The Adams Ranch Program produces those good Braford mother cows as well as the choice feeder steers and highly productive bulls.
This is a "hurry-up" program. Heifers will breed early and calve unassisted. (Every animal on the Adams Ranches was born without assistance). Finished steers are produced in one year instead of two. Selection is based on muscling and maturity as well as weight for age.
FIRST PUBLIC SALE DECEMBER 14, 1979
to be held at the headquarters ranch on State Road #68, West of Ft. Pierce, Fla.
Founder Member of International Braford Association
56 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979




Welcome
Florida Cattlemen and CowBelles
PASCO COUNTY'S entry Johanna Borg, took fifth place with her beef recipe.
HONORABLE MENTION was won by Blanche Scharf, representing Polk County in the state cookoff.
garlic, minced; 3 cups dry Burgundy; 2 We are pleased that the Dutch Inn Resort Hotel was
cups beef stock; 2 stalks celery; few spr- selected for your 1979 convention. We trust your stay igs parsley; 2 carrots, whole; butter; 30 will be a pleasant one and that you will enjoy our
small white onions, cooked; 30 fresh mushrooms, quartered; salt and white facilities and the attractions at Lake Buena Vista.
pepper.
Heat oil in large pot. Add flour and cook until foamy. Stir in garlic, wine, broth and bring to a boil. Add celery, parsley and carrots. Cover and simmer about two hours or bake at 350 degrees until beef is tender. Discard celery, parsley and carrots. ~t jZ n
Saute mushrooms and onions in but- u c e n
ter. Add to beef mixture and simmer until thoroughly hot; adjust seasonings. RESORT HOTEL
Transfer to a shallow three quart casserole dish. P.O. BOX 22202, LAKE BUENA VISTA, FLORIDA 32830
Corn Bread Topping____________________________________2 eggs, well beaten; 1 / cups milk; 3/4 cup melted shortening; 2 tablespoons chopped green peppers, or chiles 5E D S IB T R
or jalapeno peppers; 2 tablespoons O E M I I B T RU
chopped onion; 2 tablespoons chopped AW*frmjrAia elhPout
pimiento; 3/4 cup grated American frmjrAia elhPout
cheese; 2 '/2 cups flour; I teaspoon salt; 2 *for Powder River Equipment
tablespoons baking powder; 2 tablespoons sugar; 4 tablespoons plus I teas- A~wGainesville Stockman Supply
poon cornmeal. 5001 N.W. 13th St. (Stockyards)
Mix egg, milk and shortening. Add Gainesville, Fla. 32601
green peppers, onions, pimento and *904/372-8916
cheese to the flour, salt, baking powder, A1111111t 4
sgradcornmeal. Add milk mixture Stockman Supply Co.
saSr anyeog omx odfi The
andstr nl enug t mx. ol filstores Hwy. 27 South, 3 miles
toftcasserole. Add corn bread mixture tha (A *-Civic Center)
and bake on a greased cookie sheet at 813/382-2526~l. 387 1
450 degrees until crisp. Remove foil and built81/ -2 6
slide cornbread mixture onto top of cas- "Your most dependable source of supply
serole. Garnish with watercress and slivered horseradish.
THE FLORIDA CATITLEMAN / JUNE 1979 /57




FCA committees, local officers MARKETING COMMITTEE-Chairman Pete
Lakeland; Kim Barley, Orlando; Clarence Bissett, Orlando
are listed for current tBranter, Orlando; L. W. Cohb, Gainesville Ji are listed for current term Gaither, Thomasville, Ga.; Fred Goedert, Jacksonville; M.
E. Hammond, Bartow; Burl Little, Okeechobee; Tommy
AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH COMMITTEE-- R. Sellers, Brooksville: Jim Carter, M. E. (Max) Hammond, Mann, Palmdale, Gerald Mason, Cambellton; Bob
Chairman: Sid Sumner. Bartow; Vice Chairman: John M. Bartow: Angelo Massaro, Lithia. McGarity, Daytona Beach; Dr. Z. Palmer, Gainesville; Gif.
Stitt. Clewiston: R. D. Bennett, Greenwood; Glenn Bissett, CONVENTION COMMITTEE-Chairman: C. Aubrey ford Rhodes, Tallahassee; Robert Ray Smith, Wauchula;
Winter Haven: William Calvin Burns. Brooksville; R. V. Caruthers, Oxford: Vice Chairman: Jim Mummey, Kissim- John Stiles, Tallahassee; Robert A. Tucker, Cocoa; Martin Chadwvell. Zephyrhills: Carrol Chambliss, Bradenton; H. L mee; Mrs. Henry Douglas, Zephyrhills; Mrs. Belle Jeffords, Woodward, Ft. Lauderdale; Cecil Yates, Kissimmee RayChapman, Ona; Tom Childs, Lake Placid; John Daugharty, High Springs; Mrs. Carolyn Kempfer, Melbourne; Jay mond Young, Goldenrod; James R. Simpson, Gainesville
DeLand: Edgar Davis, Wauchula; P. M. Fussell, Polk City; Hebert, Orlando; John A. Barker, Lakeland; Leroy Fortner, NATURAL RESOURCES COMMITTEE-Chairman: Kinney Harrison, Arcadia: John Hunt, Bartow; Jack Sarasota; Grady Pate, St. Cloud; H. Clyde Patterson, Joe Marlin Hilliard, Clewiston; ViceChairman: Lloyd Ryals
Johnson, Jr., Iimmokalee; Dave Jones, Gainesville; T. L. Brooksville; Jim Flanagan, Kissimmee; Mrs. Julia Parrish, Fort Ogden; Donald Bronson, Clermont; Tommy Clay, Mack. Lowell; Bob Oxer. Lake Placid; Charles Patrick. Myakka City; Mrs. Jeanette Barthle, San Antonio; Mrs. Grandin: Harvey Dahl, Melbourne; Edgar Davis; Larry Sneads: G. C. Perry. Belleview; John P. Platt, Ona; Dave Sylvia Leitner, Micanopy, Mrs. Jackie Bennett, Green- Davis. Sebring; P. M. Fussell, Polk City; J. "Wes" Ross: James Simpson, Gainesville; Ron Smoak, Madison; wood: Chuck Downs, Sarasota; Anita Radebaugh, Ft. Hutchison, Haines City; Stanlo Johns, Okeechobee; Riley
David Tice. Bartow; Doug Tinner, Orlando; Wayne Wade, Pierce, Ron Stephens, Kissimmee; Theresa Williams, Kis- Miles, Kissimmee; Jack Price, Melrose; Alvaro Sanchez, Jr Plant City: Joe Walters; Coleman Ward, Gainesville. sitmmc; Patricia Wilson, Frostproof. Belle Glade; Al Waggoner, Okeechobee; David Willis,
ALLIED MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE-Chairman, COUNCIL OF 100-Representative: Pat Wilson, Frost- Cocoa.
Herb Weimer, Anchor Laboratories, Inc., Kissimmee; ACLI proof. PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE-Chairman: Cedrick
International Commodity Services, Inc., Altamonte Springs; DUES, ASSESSMENTS, MEMBERSHIP-Chairman: Smith, Jr., Micanopy; Vice Chairman: Fred Montsdeoca,
Agri-Feed, Inc., Dunedin; Aid Laboratories, Inc., Ocala; Harvey Dahl, Melbourne; Vice Chairman: Louis Gilbreath. Ocala; Ralph Cellon, Jr., Alachua; Harvey Dahl, MelAmerican Breeders Service, Lake Placid; American Ocala: Ralph Cellon, Jr., Alachua; Henry Douglas, Zephyr- bourne; Henry Douglas, Zephyrhills; Jim Flanagan, KissimCsanamid Co., Casselberry; Austin Fertilizer & Chemical hills: Jim Flanagan, Kissimmee; Jim Mummey, Kissimmee; miee; Charles Lykes, Tampa; Jim Mummey, Kissimmee. Co., Sanford: Cattlemen's Construction Co., Bartow: Buddy Neel, Chipley; Earl Raulerson, Okeechobee; Ron RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE-Chairman: David
Central Florida Production Credit Ass'n, Orlando; Central Stephens, Kissimmee: Mike VanNess, Inverness; Pat Tice. Bartow; Vice Chairman: Jim Flanagan; Kissimmee; Molasses Co., Tampa; Cody Publications, Kissimmee; Wilson. Frostproof. Steve Bronson, Moore Haven; Wayne Carlton, Ft. Pierce; J.
Cutter Laboratories. Brooksville; Dolime Minerals Co., ENVIRONMENTAL & ECOLOGY COMMITTEE- Pat Corrigan, Vero Beach; R. S. Dunaway, Felda; Donnie
Bartow: Elanco Products Co., Tampa; Exchange Bank of Chairman: A. W. Lee, Wildwood; Vice Chairman: Reed Lundy, Moore Haven; G. C. Perry, Belleview; Al Robinson,
Osceola. Kissimmee: Farm Credit Service, Lakeland; Kempfer, Melbourne; Fritz Stein, Belle Glade; Ken Sarasota; Jim Tillman, Sarasota.
Federal Land Bank Ass'n of Orlando, Orlando; Federal Bracken, Moore Haven; Bob Deriso, Land O'Lakes; Solan TAXATION & LAND USE COMMITTEE-Chairman:
Land Bank Assn of Tampa. Tampa; Federal Land Bank C. Mills, LaBelle; Tommy Bronson, Moore Haven; Dallas Pat Corrigan, Vero Beach; Vice Chairman: Billy Peeples,
Ass'n of Wauchula, Wauchula; First National Bank of Kis- Dort, Sarasota; Wayne Mixson, Marianna; Marvin Tucker, Moore Haven; Buck Bird; Irlo Bronson, Jr., Kissimmee; Leo simmee, Kissimmee; Florida Ass'n of Livestock Markets, Cocoa: Alric Pottberg, Hudson; Randy Barthle, Dade City; Charnes. Lakeland; Charles Gray, Orlando; Frank Kelley, Kissimmee: Florida Favorite Fertilizer, Inc., Lakeland; Larry Davis, Sebring; Albert Dawson, Brooksville: Randy Baker; Jennings Overstreet, Kissimmee; Rudolph Parker, Florida Feed Mills, Inc., Jacksonville; Florida Fence Post Barthle. Dade City; Russ Kiser, Immokalee. Perry; Herschell Parrish, St. Augustine; Glenn Sumner,
Co., Inc., Wauchula; Florida Lime & Dolomite Co., Inc., FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL COUNCIL- Brandon: Latimer Turner, Sarasota; Bill Wolfe, Jr., Dade
Ocala: Georgia-Florida Harvestore, Inc., Attapulgus, Ga.; Representative: Cedrick M. Smith, Jr., Micanopy. City; George Wright, Port Charlotte.
W R. Grace Co., Ft. Pierce; Greater Jacksonville Fair, FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL TAX COUNCIL- THEFT COMMITTEE-Chairman: Andy Tucker,
Jacksonville: Griffin Fertilizer Co., Frostproof; Haile-Dean Representative: Latimer H. Turner, Sarasota. Rockledge; Vice Chairman: W. F. VanNess, Inverness;
Seed Co., Inc.. Orlando; I.M.C. Chemical Group, Inc., Ral- FEEDLOT COMMITTEE-Chairman: D. S. McAteer, Wendy Batey, Zolfo Springs; Donald Bronson, Clermont;
gro Div., Bartow: I.M.C. Devevelopment Corp., Lakeland; Brooksville; Vice Chairman: Angelo Massaro, Lithia; Jack Burger II, Bunnell; Charlie Hammer, Ft. Pierce; ClifI.M.C.. Rainbow Div., Mulberry; Kaplan Industries, Inc., Horace Fulford, Ocala; Ralph Armstrong, Graceville; Dr. ford Fertic, St. Cloud; Sanford Hartt, Avon Park; Bill Roy Bartow: Lakeland Cash Feed Co., Inc., Lakeland Loeb Kary Mathis, Gainesville; E. D. Neel, Chipley; Cary F. Hutchinson; Carl A. Johns, Kissimmee; R. C. Lee, Eustis;
Rhoades Hornblower, Winter Park; Merck Chemical Div., Carlton, Sebring; J. A. Perry, Belleview; Elliot Whitehurst, Larry Lewis, Fellsmere; Archie Maynard, Jay; Richard Goldenrod: Mixon Milling Co. of Cairo, Inc., Cairo, Ga.; M Wiliston, Raymond Tucker, Bunnell; Wm. Russell, Howey- McClelland, Okeechobee; Perry Nichols, Arcadia; Carlyle & M Supply Co. of Florida, Inc., Thonotosassa; in-the-Hills; Jim Glisson, Ocala; Pug Whitehurst, Williston; Platt, Melbourne; Alvin Sapp, Ft. Pierce; Ray Simms;:James
Okeechobee County Bank, Okeechobee; P.D.Q. Company, True L. Story, Brooksville; Doug Tinner, Orlando; Gene I. Terry, Lake City; Claude A. Tindall, Belle Glade; Cecil
Lakeland: Poultry Health Service, Jacksonville: Ralston Felton, LaBelle; George Francis, Brooksville; Horace Ful- Yates, Kissimmee; E. L. Yates, Sr., Orlando; John D. Purina Co., Tampa; Ranch-Fertilizer Co., Okeechobee; ford, Ocala. Brown, Bushnell; Capt. Frank Fogleman, Belle Glade.
Riechhold Chemical, Inc.. Pensacola; RICO Liquids, Inc., FLORIDA BEEF COUNCIL-Chairman: William D. UNITED STATES ANIMAL HEALTH
Aliceville, AL.. Riviana Foods, Inc., Houston, Tx.; South- Stark, III, Ft. Pierce; Vice Chairman: B. J. Harris, Lake ASSOCIATION-Representative: J. O. Pearce, Jr.,
east First National Bank of Miami, Miami; Southeastern Placid; Jim Flanagan, Kissimmee; Vick Blackstone, Parrish; Okeechobee. Molasses & Supply Corp., Okeechobee; Southern Culvert, Dr. Robert S. Sand, Gainesville; E. D. Gregory, JacksonPinellas Park: Sun Bank of St. Cloud, St. Cloud; Sun City ville: Charles Williams, Avon Park; Bob Morris, Tampa; Presidents and Directors o Center Bank, Sun City Center; Syntex Agribusiness Inc., Mrs. J. W. Barthle, San Antonio; Mrs. Mary Caruthers, residents and Directors of Clearwater: U.S. Sugar Corp., Clewiston. Oxford; Mrs. Nellie Lee, Wildwood; Clyde Crutchfield, County Associations
NATIONAL CATTLEMEN'S ASSOCIATION-Board Graceville; Don Kaplan, Bartow; H. Barrow, Gainesville;
of Directors: Pat T. Wilson, Frostproof, regional vice presi- Harry Gibson, Brooksville; Elbert Shelton, Altha; A. Z. ALACHUA (Gainesville)-Pres: Bobby Anderson, dent; Cedrick M. Smith. Jr., Wacahoota; Henry C. Douglas, Palmer. Gainesville; Ron Stephens, Kissimmee; Ted Gainesville; Dir: Ralph Cellon, Sr., Gainesville. Zephyrhills. Members of committees: Resolutions: C. Barefield, Tallahassee; Ralph Cellon, Jr., Alachua; Pat BAKER (Macclenny)-Pres: E. L. Crews, Jr., SanderAubrey Caruthers, Oxford; G. C. Perry, Belleview; Harvey Cockrell. La Crosse; Jim Mummey, Kissimmee; Katherine son; Dir: Ed Yarborough, Geneva. A. Dahl,. Melbourne; Animal Health, Disease & Identifica- Simms, Lithia. BRADFORD-UNION (Lake Butler)-Pres: Ray
tion: J. O. Pearce, Jr., Okeechobee; Gilbert A. Tucker, FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL AGRICULTURAL Norman, Starke; Dir: (Bradford) Fred Mueller, Starke;
Cocoa; Dan B. Childs, Lake Placid; Beef Cattle Research & TRADE COUNCIL-Representative: Max Hammond, (Union) Ray Crawford, Lake Butler.
Improvement: Alto Adams, Jr., Fort Pierce; R. A. Roberts. Winter Haven. BREVARD (Cocoa)-Pres: David Willis, Cocoa; Dir:
Immokalee; Gerald Cayson, Blountstown; Beef Promotion HISTORICAL COMMITTEE-Chairman: Seth Andy Tucker, Rockledge.
& Consumer Relations: Mrs. C. M. (JoAnn) Smith. Alderman, Wimauma; Vice Chairman: Fred Waldron, BROWARD (Ft. Lauderdale)-Pres: Martin G.
Micanopy, chairman; Pat Wilson, Frostproof; William H. Wildwood; G. E. Barkoskie, Fellsmere; Reuben W. Carlton, Woodward, Ft. Lauderdale; Dir: Martin G. Woodward, Ft. Peeples, Moore Haven; Environmental Management; R. D. Ft. Pierce; Murray Harrison, Sun City Center; Mrs. Carolyn Lauderdale. Bennett, Greenwood; Russ Kiser, Immokalee; Foreign Kempfer, Melbourne; Miss Mary McFadden, Alachua; CHARLOTTE (Punts Gorda)-Pres: Earl Schworm,
Trade: Joe Duda, Cocoa; W. G. "Kayo" Welles, Arcadia; Horace Miley, Lithia; Cushman Radebaugh, Sr., Orlando; J. Placida; Dir: F. Bayard Toussaint, Punta Gorda. Labor-Agricultural & Industrial: Joe Marlin Hilliard, B. Starkey. Sr., St. Petersburg; Fred Waldron, Wildwood; H. CLAY (Green Cove Springs)-Pres: Donald McKee, Clewiston: Charles Lykes. Tampa; Elwyn Bass, Okeecho- L. Williams, Dover; Cecil Whaley, Sr., St. Cloud; P. E Middleburg; Dir: S. D. Saunders, Middleburg. bee; Marketing: Pete Clemons, Okeechobee; V. Elliott Williams, Davenport; Charlie Lykes, Tampa; Mrs. Vernon CITRUS (Inverness)-Pres: John Thomas, Inverness;
Whitehurst, Jr., Williston; Chalres Lykes, Jr., Okeechobee; Hill, Alachua; John W. Mason, Brooksville; John DuPuis, Dir: W. F. (Mike) Van Ness, Inverness. Membership & Revenue Development: Ralph Cellon, Jr., Miami; Doyle Conner, Tallahassee; Carl Van Landingham, COLLIER (Immokalee)-Pres: Fred Barfield,
Alachua; J. P. Sandlin, Williston; Cedric Smith, Micanopy; Ft. Pierce, Joe Ackerman, Madison. Immokalee; Dir: R. A. Roberts, Immokalee.
Private Lands & Water Usage: Alric Pottberg, Hudson; Der- IMPORTS COMMITTEE-Chairman: Bayard Tous- COLUMBIA (Lake City)-Pres: Bud Fraser, Lake City;
rill S. McAteer, Brooksville; Jack Bain, Sebring; Product saint, Punta Gorda; Vice Chairman: Ralph Cellon, Sr., Dir: James I. Terry, Lake C y. Standards, Labeling & Inspection: A. W. Lee, Wildwood; Gainesville; Tommy Clay, Grandin; Spencer Kirton, Okee- DADE (Miami)-Pres: Donald G. Switzer, Hialeah; Dir: Bill Voss, Brooksville; Andy Tucker, Rockledge; Public chobee; Paul Emery, Quincy; B. T. Longino, Sr., Sarasota; John G. DuPuis, Jr., Miami. Lands: E. R. Felton, LaBelle; Joe A. Hilliard, Clewiston; J. Elmer McDonald, Daytona Beach; W. Richardson, DESOTO (Arcadia)-Pres: Ed Horton, Arcadia; Dir:
Pat Corrigan, Vero Beach; Taxation: Latimer Turner, Evinston; Lee Radebaugh, Fort Pierce; Alex D. Sapp, Lloyd Ryals, Ft. Ogden.
Sarasota. chairman; William D. Stark III, Ft. Pierce; Henry Vernon; Chas. Stephenson, Campbellton; S. J. D'Andrea, DUVAL (Jacksonville)-Pres: Dalton Dowdy, JacksonDouglas. Zephyrhills; Transportation: E. D. Neel, Chipley; Brooksville; Bubba Mills, LaBelle. ville; Dir: E. D. Gregory, Jacksonville.
Ken Harper, Plant City. LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEE-Chairman: Henry DIXIE (Cross City)-Pres: L. B. King, Jr., Cross City;
BRANDS COMMITTEE-Chairman: Earl Raulerson, Douglas, Zephyrhills; Vice Chairman: Harvey Dahl, Dir: Ben H. Floyd, Cross City.
Okeechobee; Vice Chairman: Joe Barthle, Dade City; Mabry Melbourne; W. G. Welles, Arcadia; E. R. Felton, LaBelle; FLAGLER (Bunnell)-Pres: Rob Tucker. Bunnell; Dir: Carlton, Jr., Arcadia; Warren Adams, Tallahassee; Elwyn Jim Mummey, Kissimmee; E. D. "Buddy" Neel, Chipley; Thomas Lenssen, Bunnell. Bass, Okeechobee; James BuhI, Ocala; Dave Chasteen, Palm Ralph Cellon, Jr., Alachua; Charles Lykes, Tampa; William GILCHRIST (Trenton)-Pres: Larry Lindsey, Bell; Dir: Beach; Andrew Chisholm, Melbourne; George M. Hancock, Stark III, Ft. Pierce. Alton Nessmith, Bell.
Alturas; Billy Kempfer, Melbourne; Manuel Lopez, Tampa; LIVESTOCK DISEASE & TECHNICAL GLADES (Moore Haven)-Pres: Joe H. Peeples Ill, Lake
R. E. Padgett, Jr., Lake Wales; H. P. Scroggins, Archer; COMMITTEE-Chairman: Dan Childs, Lake Placid; Vice Placid; Dir: W. H. (Billy) Peeples, Moore Haven.
Julian Wright, Arcadia; Albert Pruett, Haines City; William Chairman: Dr. Bobby Anderson, Gainesville; Bill Adkinson, HARDEE (Wauchula)-Pres: Marcus Shackelford, O. Delo, Brooksville; Tommy Woodward, Palmdale; Robert Lake Wales; Bruce Blount, Lake Placid; Dr. Clarence Wauchula; Dir: Robert Ray Smith, Wauchula.
F. Nolan, III, Seville; Glenn Bisset, Winter Haven; Tom Campbell, Tallahassee; Tom Christian; Whit Goolsby, HENDRY (Clewiston)-Pres: Herbert Harbin,
Childs. Lake Placid; Oscar Crosby, Melbourne; Tommy Gainesville; J. W. Gray, Ft. Pierce; Dr. Arthur E. Hall, Clewiston: Dir: Wilson Ward, Ft. Myers.
Crum, Okeechobee; John Hartigan, Ocala; Harold Price, Miami Springs; Dr. J. Arlin Hawkins, Sarasota; L. H. Buck HERNANDO (Brooksville)-Pres: Bennie Rivenbark, Okeechobee. Hawkins, Sarasota; Jim Hendry; Joe Hilliard, Clewiston; Brooksville; Dir: D. S. McAteer, Brooksville.
BUDGET & FINANCE COMMITTEE-Chairman: Roy Hutchison; Dr. C. Bronson Lane, Orlando; Dr. George HIGHLANDS (Lake Placid)-Pres: Dan Childs, Lake
Ralph Cellon, Jr., Alachua; Vice Chairman: J. P. Sandlin. Meyerholz, Gainesville; F. G. Mueller, Orange Park; Ed Placid; Dir: Dan Childs, Lake Placid. Williston; Bruce Blount. Lake Placid; Bud Adams, Ft. Partin, Jr., St. Cloud; J. O. Pearce, Jr., Okeechobee; Ray HILLSBOROUGH (Tampa)-Pres: Louis Massaro,
Pierce; John Adicks, Gainesville; J. C. Bass, Okeechobee; Raulerson, Okeechobee; Dr. Henry Ross; Dr. Harvey. L. Lithia; Dir: Angelo Massaro, Riverview. Henry Douglas, Zephyrhills; Charley Gaskin, Wewahitch- Rubin, Kissimmee; Sam Saunders; Cecil Scott, Dunellon; INDIAN RIVER (Vero Beach)-Pres: Mark Tripson,
ka; Thomas L. Lenssen, Bunnell; Robert H. Milton, Forrest Smith, Punta Gorda; Gilbert A. Tucker, Cocoa; Vero Beach; Dir; Pat Corrigan, Vero Beach.
Marianna: Robert Morris, Tampa; Earl W. Patterson, Pierre Van Landingham, Ft. Pierce; Bill Voss, Brooksville; JACKSON (Marianna)-Pres: R. D. Bennett, GreenBrooksville; Guy Thompson, Center Hill; Charles Wilson Kayo Welles, Arcadia; Buddy Williams, Graceville; David wood; Dir: Doyle Stephens, Grand Ridge. Ward, Sr., Ft. Myers, Jennings Overstreet, Kissimmee; W. Willis, Cocoa; Charles Lykes, Tampa. JEFFERSON (Monticello)-Pres: W. L. Rabon, Mon58 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979




We Are Ready To Buy Your Calves NOW!
Or When You're Ready To Sell
Give some thought to letting us buy your cattle now or handle them for you until the best marketing time.
Here are a few other ways you can go with your calf crop by following the Duda program:
Grow them out at our LaBelle feedlot.
Grow them out on our combination pasture/feeding program.
We now have a representative in the High Plains area for direct contact to assure timely marketing and best price.
The Duda program can provide a sound marketing plan at the right time for best profits. See us for additional options to go with your Florida calves.
We also have feeder cattle for sale periodically.
Bud Vadnals 305/678-3877 *Van Lindsey 305/327-1030 Bob Nelson 405/338-5669
THE FLORIDA CAT1TLEMAN /JUNE 1979 /59




An invitation!
The Florida CowBelles Association cordially invites all ladies
am s 5 0to sD I attending the state conventions to a
reception, Thursday morning, June 28, 1979, 10:15 'til 11:15 a.m.
Mrs. Katharine Simms, president, says, "We would like you to meet our American National CowBelle president, Rose Harris, our state officers and many interesting people.
"-.-'.' "Mrs. Ruth Ann Fowler, home extension economist from Hillsborough County, will be our special guest.
arn S .."Refreshments will be served.
u r n.u v. l lSo Please come and let's get better
Cattle Wor acquainted."
OBLETS _ticello; Dir: John E. Hawkins, Monticello. Tram~sor ?'i LAKE (Tavares)-Pres: Stan Bainter, Eustis; Dir:
I .. Donald Bronson, Clermont.
NJECTABLE 50 -LEE (Ft. Myers)-Pres: Harry Flint, Ft. Myers; Dir: Nat
b* H. Hunter, Ft. Myers.
'xi : ; 0s Dir LEON (Tanllahassee)-Pres: P. H. Roberts, Tallahassee;
solub Odm J POWder Dir: James Fogarty, Tallahassee.
LEVY (Bronson)-Pres: Donald Quincey, Chiefland; Dir: J. P. Sandlin, Williston.
MADISON (Madison)-Pres: Ron Smoak, Madison; Dir: Ron Smoak, Madison.
MANATEE (Palmetto)-Pres: Henry Parrish, Myakka City; Dir: Vick Blackstone, Parrish.
MARION (Ocala)-Pres: Jack Cullison, Ocala; Dir: Cecil Perry, Belleview.
MARTIN (Stuart)-Pres: Paul McMillion, Indiantown; (And its the only wormer that does.) Dir: Dick Kelley, Stuart.
NASSAU (Callahan)-Pres: Arthur Lynn, Hilliard; Dir: E. D. Gregory, Jacksonville. Onel the most common and desutieof To get control Coopi ih the othe NORTHWEST (Santa Rosa-Escambia)-Pres: Jerry
OneI tc mst ommn addsttructivcol To gct control of Cool'ria with the other H1l, McDavid; Dir: Jerry Hall, McDavid; Marion Tidwell,
all cattle wonuis is (nolria (small intestinal well known worker, you need their standad Hall, MDavid; Dir: Jerry Hall, MDavid; Maon Tidwell,
worm). Tramisol" levamisole is the only leading dose, plus another 66",! In short, you wind up Milton.
dcwrrner thatcan claim ellectiveness( 90-tX100 payingmore andgettingless. Tr amisolisalsothe OKEECHOBEE (Okeechobee)-Pres: Pete Clemons,
rerroval in all instances) against CGoxria wvith onlyvwormrvyou can buy that gcts all ninemajor Okeechobee; Dir: J, C. Bass, Okeechobee.
one standard dose. wsornus in cattle. CAAr1 ORANGE (Orlando)-Pres: LaVerne Yates, Orlando;
7 Dir: Joe Walter.
OSCEOLA (Kissimmee)-Pres: Andy Chisholm, St. Cloud; Dir: Irlo (Bud) Bronson, Kissimmee. Only Tramisol gets all the worms worth getting. PALM BEACH (Belle Glade)-Pres: Alvaro Sanchez,
Belle Glade; Dir: Dave Young, Loxahatchee.
PANHANDLE (Walton-Okaloosa)-Pres: Earl Brogden, Florala, Ala.; Dir: (Okaloosa) Jeff Adams, Baker; (Walton) Earl Brogden, DeFuniak Springs.
PASCO (Dade City)-Pres: A. O. "Pete" McKendree, Dade City; Dir: Joe Barthle, Dade City.
POLK (Bartow)-Pres: Harris W. Fussell, Polk City; Dir: Al Bellotto, Lakeland.
PUTMAN (Palatka)-Pres: Hugh Byrd, Pamona Park; Dir: W. W. Tilton, Jr., East Palatka. SUPPLY COM PANY DiSARASOTA (Sarasota)-Pres: Arlin Hawkins, Sarasota;
andP Dir: B. T. Longino, Jr., Sarasota.
SEMINOLE (Sanford)-Pres: Edward Yarborough, \of FL D t CGeneva; Dir: Wayne Jacobs, Oviedo.
oT rL IUA INL. ST. JOHNS (St. Augustine)-Pres: Richard Pacetti, St.
Augustine; Dir: Allen Nease, St. Augustine.
- -eST. LUCIE (Ft. Pierce)-Pres: Edgar Brown, Ft. Pierce; 1300 N.W. 9th St. Dir: Wayne Carlton, Ft. Pierce.
... Fla. Hwy. 579 & Main St. Okeechobee, FL SUMTER (Bushnell)-Pres: A. W. Lee, Jr., Wildwood;
' Thonotosassa, Ph: 813/986-2491 Ph: 813/763-0261 Dir: Aubrey C. Caruthers, Oxford.
Thonotosassa, Ph: 813/986-2491 Ph: 813/763-0261 SUWANNEE (Live Oak)-Pres: Hugh Mills, Live Oak;
Dir: Frank Garrard, Mayo.
TAYLOR (Perry) -Pres: Rudolph Parker, Perry; Dir: Robert Ezell, Perry.
VOLUSIA (DeLand)-Pres: Stanley Cowart, Seville; C R ES LU EDir: Elmer McDonald, Daytona Beach.
WASHINGTON-HOLMES-Pres: E. D. "Buddy" C Y P R ESS LU M B ER Neel, Chipley; Dir: (Holmes) Ralph Neel, Bonifay;
(Washington) U. S. Harrison, Chipley. "The W ood Eternal' WEST FLORIDA (Gulf, Bay, Franklin, Calhoun,
Liberty, Wakulla)-Dir: (Bay) J. W. Lowrey; (Calhoun) Rough Sawn Square Posts (Gerald Cayson, Blountstown; (Liberty) O. B. Shuler;
(Wakulla) Jerry Spears, Crawfordville.
Slats Round Posts
Mulch Pecky Cypress Sale toppers!
Standard or Special Cuts About the highest prices to date for
PRESSURE TREATING AVAILABLE calves were reported- by Pete Clemons,
Okeechobee Livestock Market,
[305 k lefl 0o To *r Okeechobee, at the market sales of April
305 3956 oL e 30-May 1.
339-4456 200 Marvin Rd., Longwood, Fla. 32750 Clemons reports that Sunset Ranch,
Kenansville, and Wayne Carlton, Fort Pierce, topped the market at $2.50.
60 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979




Do You Want ..*.
Real Security?
When you sell your livestock?
You'll get it at your local livestock auction market! The management from top to bottom is recognized for knowledge of the industry. In dealing with your marketman, you'll get,.the benefit of his many years of experience. Why risk your investments-use the person with the
knowhow to give full protection to your financial stake in marketing your stock!
Sell and Buy at Your
Local Livestock Auction Market
The Auction Market Way is the Best Way!
CONTACT ANY OF THESE MARKETS, ALL MEMBERS OF THE STATE ASSOCIATION
Arcadia State Livestock Market* Kissimmee Livestock Market West Florida Livestock Market* Edwards Livestock Company"
Auctions Every Wednesday Auctions Every Wednesday Sale Every Thursday Hog Auction Every Monday
Pat Kelly, Mgr., Ph. 813/494-3737 Kenneth Caldwell, Mgr.. 9 305/847-3521 Buddy Williams, Mgr. e Ph. 904/482-2229 Cattle Auction Every Wednesday
1808, 3250 ARCADIA, 33821 KISSIMMEE, 32741 482-8684 MARIANNA, 32446 0. W. Edwards, Jr., Mgr. e 904/627-9584
QUINCY, 32351
Chipley Livestock Company* Columbia Livestock Market* Mills Auction Market" a
Auctions Every Tuesday Hog Auctions Every Monday Hog Auction Every Wednesda Hardee Livestock Market, Inc.
E. 0. (Buddy) Neel, Mgr. Cattle Auctions Every Thursday Cattle Auction Every Thursday Auctions Every Monday
Ph. 904/638-0267, 638-498 H. Tom Willis, Mgr. Ph. 9041755-2300 Clarence & Dot Mills, Mgrs. Mgrs: Doyle Carlton, Ill, Robert Ray Smith
CHIPLEY, 32428 LAKE CITY, 32055 Ph. 904/732-4454 Phones 8131773-9747, 773-9560
OCALA, 32670 WAUCHULA, 33873
Gainesville Livestock Company* Cattlemen's Livestock Markets"
Cattle Auctions Every Mon.-Wed. Monday o Sales e Tuesday Cow Palace* Interstate Livestock Market"
Hog Auctions Every Wednesday Bill Hamilton, Mgr. Sale Every Sat. Auctions Every Tuesday
Mgrs., L. H. (Tommy) Thompson, Jr. Tampa 813/626-5164 e Lakeland 813/682-0117 W. T. (Bill) Wells, Mgr. Jay Mueller, Mgr.
and J. W. "Buddy" Clark TAMPA, 33609 and LAKELAND, 33802 Ph. 813/858-6253 813/689-2424, 689-5995
Ph. 904/372-3442 LAKELAND, 33802 SEFFNER, 33584
GAINESVILLE, 32601
Tinel ivstok arkt"Suwannee Valley Livestock Market" Monticello Stockyard, Inc.* Sumter County Farmers Market
TidlLvsokMre*Auctions Every Wednesday Auctions Every Monday Auctions Every Tuesday
Auctions Every Monday Cecil Moore Ph. 904/362-1702 J .Hwis g.*P.949751 aa al*P.947322
Clyde Crutchfield, Mgr. LIV OAK 32060n MONTCELO 3234 94/9751 WEBSTER 335P.90479322
Ph. 904/263-3224 LV A,300MNIEL,334WBTR 39
GRACEVILLE, 32440
Jay Livestock Auction Madison Stockyard Inc.* Okeechobee Livestock Market Jacksonville Livestock Auction Market*
Auctions Every Tuesday Hogs-Monday; Cattle-Tuesday Auctions Every Monday & Tuesday Auctions Every Monday
Horace McCurdy, Mgr. George Townsend, Mgr.; 904/973-4094 Pete Clemons, Mgr. e Ph. 813f763-3127 Thos. W. Waldrop, Owner 9040781-4677
Ph. 904/675-4795 929-4605 MADISON, 32340 OKEECHOBEE, 33472 WHITEHOUSE, 32095
Jay, Florida 32565
I. IilR *-Indicates Subscriber to Livestock Marketing Association
For Further Information about Florida Livestock Auction Markets, Contact
II',fl'4f ASSOCIATION OF LIVESTOCK MARKETS
P. 0. Box 1403, Kissimmee, IFL 32741
THE FLORIDA CATT'LEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 61




Mrs. Lucy Gunn
Estabished1946Mrs. Lucy Buckels Gunn of Kissimmee passed away on April 13. She was the widow of the late June Rawls Gunn, Osceola County Our Agent for almost 40 years before
passing away in 1965.
Post, W ie & atesJune Gunn served nearly 32 CostYou essyears as state secretary of the Florida Cattlemen's Association. Both he and Mrs. Gunn were active Ona.in Silver Spurs activities, he being
Please call before driving to O a charter member.
Our inventory is low on some sizes. Mrs. Gunn was active in the
Osceola Cattlemen's Association and CowBelle activities through the years and was a strong supporter of FLORIDA FENCE POST CO., INC. the state cattlemen's association.
i ~ Open 7 a.m.-5 p.m. In a resolution submitted to the
Monday thru Friday 4,Florida Senate in 1965 by the late
C Senator Irlo Bronson, Kissimmee,
PLANT and SALES OFFICE 4 14 and then Senators Ben Hill Griffin,
P. 0. Box 645-Ph: 813/735-1361 -4Frostproof, and Etter Usher, Chief0ONA, FLORIDA 33865 land, which was unanimously
adopted by the legislature, in recognition of Gunn's dedication to the industry, Mrs. Gunn was recog~a common eeaproach nde nized as ."his devoted widow,
An rwTent C.o. Inc., partner, and helpmate ...
dick kd leKENETH ANREWMrs. Gunn had been a resident KENneTH Sn OaDr of Kissimmee for many years.
ranch management constant Caterng, to the broader who requires the
4505 &w. kanner hwy. (brochures available) P. 0. Box 4400-Ph: 912/883-4400
stuart, fla. 33494 305/287-3046 .ALBANY, GEORGIA 317016____________tval Jennings Multi-Purpose Equipment
Hinge type hookup holds rear of fork to bucket. Take front and Long ribbon line of hay is shown for easy access by cattle for rear mounts off and on in 5 minutes. feeding in pasture or for baling old hay in square bales.
JENNINGS & SON MFG.
Member, Florida Cattlemen's Association
Route 1, Box 163
Phones 904/629-4127 & 732-3574
MORRISTON, FLORIDA 32668
62 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979




~pI jI CUSTOri
K. K 0~ A, FLORIIj4
1741975 1976-1977 cont.
" Branyguas Bu~ll' o Charolais Bull
" Branigus Heifer1 Clarolais HeTifer
" Bra gus Exhibitor 1 (harolais Exhibitor
" Oharolais~ Bull *Santa Gertrudis Bull
" Chai plais H~eifer19798 "< Charolaisxhibitor 9718
SAngsHeifer
1975497 Charolais Bull
" Angus Hifer~ e Charolais Heifer>
* Brangus Bull Chiarolais Exhibitor
" Brangus Exhbito~r Lim ousin Bull
" Charolais B~ull a Limousin Female
" Charojla Hifer Shlow Barn located on 1-75, exit484~ (Bell~view), 10Oil es sout o Ocla eLimousin Exhibitor
"*Ghari o hibtr '<1978-1979
17197For experienced preparation of your show catefor Angus Bull
" Angus Bull shows and sales contact RW B3AR Custom Fitters. Charolais Bull
" Angus Heifer F *Charolais Heifer
" Angus Exhibitor .0Limousint Bull
Now accepting cattle for the fall and winter show season. Limousin Heifer
Quiality Club Calves also available.
RICK WILLIAMS, owner
Ai* BV BAIR904/245-5290
16020 S.W. 20th Ave. Rd.
CUSTOM FI[TTER~S Ocala, Fla. 32873




- Beef Master
-~ 7Squeeze Chute
- 7' Beefrnaster Vet Chute Crowding Alley
Loading Chute
Complete Corral SystemsT
For Today's Cattleman
Complete corral systems are now available to you from W-W Manufacturing Company and A-Bar-B Ranch. These all metal
systems are economically superior to traditional wooden pens. Built to your specifications for your individual needs, these cor- Beef Master rals are easily installed. They are completely portable, or they Chute may be installed as a permanent system. The sturdiness of the system leads to lower maintenance costs.A
These pens are designed for abuse with no injury to cattle . and your cattle will handle better in these pens than in I
square wooden pens.Cafral
World's Finest Cattle Handling Equipment
BOX 728-DR DODGE CITY, KANSAS
SEE OUR COMPLETE LINE OF W-W EQUIPMENT
* Beef Master Chutes Portable Corrals
" Calf Cradles Farm and Ranch Scales Z
* Loading Chutes Pick-up Stake Racks
" FedBns*Badn*rnHaesBEEFMVASTER VET CHUE
FeedBuns raningIronHeaersAllows easy access for pregnancy testing and A. 1. work. Left or right hand gate Installation.
4 RANCHV
0 _4 00Office Phone: 904/629-5050 ,01 Nitos. Jack Cuilllacn-904/694-4322 or Fred Ouance-904/622-3561
4900 N.W. Bllchton Road
OCALA, FLORIDA 32671
(U.S. Highway 27, Just West of 1-75)
64 /THE FLORIDA CATfTLEMAN /JUNE 1979




Hearings on meat pricing held ~ J\%., SANTA J.
A series of public hearings on meat pricing have been held across the nation in GENTRUDIS J
recent weeks. The hearings have been conducted by a task force appointed byST ECO HRA H
Secretary of Agriculture Bob Bergland and chaired by P. R. Smith, assistantSTGCO HRA H
secretary of agriculture for marketing and transportation services. Mrs. JoAnn Dade City, Florid.
Smith, Wacahoota, chairman of NCA's beef promotion and consumer relations ROBERT SANDERS, Mgr.
committee, is one of 10 members serving on the force. P .Bx41 P:945831
At the hearing held in Amarillo, Texas, April 26, C. T. 'Tad' Sanders, general P.00Bx 421 5Ph:704/5831
manager of Livestock Marketing Association, Kansas City, Missouri, said that 945774
livestock and meat pricing information "is 'news' in capital letters," and should not be policed by the government in testimony before the task force.
Ross Brothers and Dietrich's
takes honors at Palatka 4 S-GC I
Winners in the open Santa Gertrudis Junior bull calf, calved 1/1 /78 thru 5/31/78 (5)-Raider
competition at the Putnam County Fair, 850, Rss; Tarzan 809, Thomas; Doubloon Stuff 13816, J~IIi~ Palatka, listed to the first three places, Senior bull calf, calfed 9/1/77 thru 12/31/77 (2)withthenumbr o enriesshon in Rino'sMasterpiece (reserve junior champion), Dietrich;
with ~ ~ ~ ~ aie th8ube2fenresoni Ross; Growabjility 0 Showability 0 Doability
parentheses, follow: Summer yearling ball, calved 5/1/77 tbru 8/31/77 (21- Quality Santa Gertrudis
No Name 747 (reserve grand champion, junior champion), raeTirOnDm d
Junior heifer calf, calved 1/ 1/78 thra 5/31/78 (4)-Miss Ross; Tarzan 765, Thomas; raeTerOnDmn
Raider 811 (reserve grand champion, reserve junior chain- Junior yearling ball, calved 1/1/77 thra 4/30/77 (3)-KD. AT O pion), Ross Brothers. Branford; Miss Raider 87, Ross; Miss Stuff Shirt 701 (grand champion, senior champion), Ross; K .E T O Thomas 816, D.L. Thomas, Lake City; Raider 728. Ross; Jake 728, Thomas; Santa Gertrudis Farms
Senior heifer calf, calved 9/1/77 throw 12/31/77 (3)- Senior yearling ball, calved 7/1/76 thra 12/31/76 (1)-MratFa303 Miss Doubloon Staff D850 (grand champion, junior chum- No Name 700, Ross; agtFa 36
pion), Dietrich's Flying D Ranch, Orlando; Miss Doubloon Two year old ball, calved 1/1/76 thru 6/30/76 (1)- 2922 N. State Rd. 7, Ph: 305/971-8880 Stuff 0855. Dietrich; No Name 8 1, Ross; Tarzan 631, Thomas; Charles Wolf, Gen. Mgr.
Junior yearling heifer, calved 5/1/77 throw 8/31/77 (2)- Aged bull, calved 7/l/75 thra 12/31/75 (1)-Tarzan. Delray Bench, Ph: 305/278-0913 Miss Doubloon Staff D773, Dietrich; Miss Stuff 771, Thonias; Thomas; Two bulls (4)-Ross; Ross; Thomas;
Junior yearling heifer, calved 1/1 /77 thin 4/30/77 (1)- Pair of yearlings (2)-Thomas; Thomas;Sa t
Miss Thomas 738, Thomas; Pair of calves (5)-Dietrich; Ross; Ross; Registered SnaGertrudis
Senior yearling heifer, calved 7/1/76 thra 12/31/76 (1)- Produce of dam (2)-Ross; Thomas;To
Miss Tarzan Stuff 0676 (reserve senior champion), Dietrich; Get of sire (31-Ross; Thomas; Dietrich; Pure Bred 9 o Bloodlines
Two year old heifer, calved 1/ 1/76 thru 6/30/76 (1)- Best Polled (5)-Ross.
Miss Tarzan 647 (senior champion), Thomas; Visitors Welcome
Two females (5)-Dietrich; Ross; Thomas; SUWANNEE POINT RANCH
Branford, Fiorida 32008
Carroll Hall Lloyd Thomas
Ph: 904/935-1303 Phi 904/935-1981
Sanfa Gertrudis
All Polled Herd Sires
D. L. Thomas Ranch
Dwight & Jackie Thomas, owners
Rt. 9, Box 203, Lake City, Fla. 32055
Telephone 904/752-6438
Located 'A mile W. of 1-75 on Hwy. 47
ROSS Brothers, Branford, showed the DIETRICH'S Flying D Ranch, Orlando, Advertise Regu ly
grand champion Santa Gertrudls bull at showed the grand champion Santa Gerthe Putnam County Fair. trudis female at Palatka.
A. Santa Gertrudis Cattie
FOR SALE
Classified "IS" Buiis
Poiied & Horned
Recently Classified""
and "IS-Bar" Hollers
P.O.
Box Since 1941 Charter
1666 Member
DADE 8101111
CITY FSGA
FLA
33525
LITTLE EVERGLADES RANCH
RESERVE Grand Champion Santa Ger- ROSS Brothers, exhibited the reserve
trudis bull at Palatka was owned by the grand champion Santa Gertrudis female Mrs. W.* M. Larkin 904/567-2292 Ray Battle
Ross Brothers, at Palatka, shown with Ty Ross.OweMagr
THE FLORIDA CATITLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 65




Range management economical production of livestock
products, better use of soil and water resociety active sources and habitat improvement for
wildlife. These are obtainable through
W hether You're in Florida grazing systems, palmetto control, fence.
ing, supplemental feeding and herd
by LEWIS L. YARLETT management. Deer, turkey, and esAdvertising Range Conservationist, IFAS pecially quail are a product of range and
Since 1960 members of the Society for grazeable woodland ecosystems, the Range Management have been active in management of which improves both Florida encouraging and providing quality and quantity of these species. technical expertise in the proper use and 4) To create a public appreciation of management of native grassland re- the economic, social and environmental Fe"d sources in Florida. Within the past three benefits to be obtained from the range
years the Florida Chapter of SRM has resource. The Society for Range sponsored a number of field tours and Management, through the Florida demonstrations. As many as 75-125 per- Chapter invites all persons to their tours sons have been in attendance on each of and meetings. These are held at least these tours. Those attending have seen twice a year on local ranches, research
first hand the application of sound stations and other areas where the in range management practices. They have results of applied range management
learned to recognize the most impor- may be seen. The Southern Section pubtant native grasses, how to control saw lishes a newsletter five or six times a year palmetto and apply planned grazing sys- to inform members of activities. teams. Membership in Florida in the
The Society of Range Management Society for Range Management doubled or other products was organized in Salt Lake City, Utah, the past two years due to local chapter
in 1948. It was logical that it was organ- activities. Membership includes ranchrelated to the ized in the west since that is where the ers, professionals in range, agronomy,
LivestockT I bulk of rangeland occurs. The organ- wildlife and resource planners. AcaLustry izers had the foresight and vision to demic members includes educators as
the most economy i- recognize the value of rangelands as an well as students in Range Ecosystem
important natural resource. It was not Management at the University of
cal way to reach long however that members of SRM Florida. Anyone engaged in or intersaw a need in other parts of the U. S. ested in the aspects, study or managethe whole Florida and the world. The Southern Section of ment and use of Florida's approximateSRM was organized in 1951 and inclu- ly ten million acres of native rangelands Cattle Industry is ded thesouthern states and Florida. The and grazeable woodlands is eligible for
need for a more local interest group has membership in the Society for Range through the pages led to the organization of a Florida Management.
Chapter of SRM formed in 1977. Further information on activities of
of The Florida The objectives of the Florida the Florida Chapter, Society for Range
Chapter of SRM has the same objectives Management may be obtained from Cattleman. Callus as the parent organization. These are: Max Hammond, president of the
1) Develop an understanding of Florida chapter, P. 0. Box 250, Barfor details. range ecosystems and the principles tow, 33830, or Sam Polston, secretary,
applicable to the management of these Soil Conservation Service, Sebring, native resources. In Florida this means 33870. Ask us about our the recognition, understanding and
special breed management of flatwoods, fresh
issues: September- marshes, and sand ponds, sloughs and Tedder wins
salt marshes. In addition, the most
Continental Breeds; desirable grasses associated with these carcass award
October-Herefords; sites have come to be recognized as im- John Tedder, a Lake County FFA'er,
portant in a livestock operation. These won the 1979 County Carcass Contests November-Angus; include creeping bluestem, maidencane, with a 1120 pound steer fitted for a show
December-Charo- chalky bluestem, little blue maidencane earlier this year.
and indiangrass. Tedder received recognition for win2) To assist all who work with range ning the honor at the 1979 Beef Cattle American Breeds; and grazeable woodlands to keep in- Short Course, held recently at Gainesformed of new findings and techniques ville. March-Brahmans. in the art and science of range move- The award, sponsored jointly by
ment. Two publications, the popular International Mineral and Chemical "Rangelands" and the technical "Jour- Company and Gainesville Stockman's nal of Range Management" keeps all Supply, was presented by John Hunt, members of SRM informed. A mini- Bartow, of IMC.
od mum of two tours a year provides Hunt said there were 303 carcasses in
Florida members with an opportunity to the 1979 contest that the Tedder steer lo "'ii observe range management practices. won.
3) To improve the effectiveness of
a t, rl-ei range management to obtain from range
AND LvESTOresources the products necessary for AND LIVESTOCK JOURNAL man's welfare. The Florida Chapter of
P. 0. Box 1403 Ph. 305/846-2800 SRM strives to seek management of Commercial red meat output in Florida
Florida's grazing resource to obtain the for March 1979 was 23.2 million KISSIMMEE, FLA. 32741 maximum production. This is reflected pounds, down 30 percent from March
I in a balanced forage program and 1978, according to USDA.
66 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979




40 to 50 of these
two year old
heifers, bred to
known sons of
King 55, will be
sold at this year's auction.
SThe
King Ranch Foundation Sale.
And what a sale it will be.
This year featuring 40 to 50 two year old heifers out of King Ranch's
foundation herd of Santa Gertrudis beef cattle. As well as the usual 20 or so bulls. All of them herd bull quality. The morning of the sale, approximately 30 colts and fillies will be sold at auction from King Ranch's foundation Old Sorrel Family of Quarterhorses. It's your chance to join King Ranch in its pursuit of perfection by introducing these foundation bloodlines into your herd or brood. Come. October 6, 1979. Horses at 10:00 AM. Cattle at 1:30 PM. Catalogue available on request.
The progeny of
three time world champion and all time open-cutting money winner,
Mr. San Peppy,
will be featured in the Quarter Horse section of the sale.
* KING RANCH
In pursuit of perfection
since 1853.
For catalogue write King Ranch, Kingsville, Texas 78363, or call (512) 592-6411.
III~iii0I




managed in a systematic way, competes University Station, Gainesville, Florida 'Ona' Star grass successfully with common Bermuda 32604 or Agricultural Research Center,
is razng ndgrass and Bahia grass. Heavy stocking Rt. 1, Box 62, Ona, Florida 33865.
is gazin andand continued close grazing will destroy
hay varietythe stand. Growth is excellent durn
October and November if the fertility Cellon gets honors EDITOR'S NOTE-The research on level is high, production at this time from USDA
Ona Star grass has been performed by E. being much higher than on Pangola and M. Hodges, L. S. Dunavin, A. Mislevy, Bahia grasses. Grazing or harvesting of Ralph W. Cellon, Jr., Alachua, chair0. C. Ruelke and R. L. Stanley, Jr., and Ona Star grass should be completed person of the Florida State Agricultural the following article was jointly furnished while forage is still in the green, growing Stabilization and Conservation Coinby them, stage. A heavy frost kills most top mittee (ASC), has been honored by
"On" Sar ras i beng elesedto growth and feeding value is lost rapidly. USDA in being selected to receive the "On" Sar ras i beng elesedto Hay crops should be harvested after Administrator's Award for service to growers as a grazing and hay variety for four to five weeks of growth. agriculture.
use in Florida southward from Brooks- Young leaves of heavily fertilized He was selected by Ray Fitzgerald,
ville and Orlando. This tall-growing, .n trgashv ahg yrcai administrator of the Agricultural Stabilfenaml is be suite o msuta well- acid potential (HCN-p) when tested in ization and Conservation Service damined ils ofs abvearaed fit uertly the laboratory but there has been no (ASCS). The award is recognized in dn araind sois raeele fertilitb" harmful effect of this high HCN-p on ASCS as the highest form of recogniOStar grass uesslighlyes fo~ae grazing animals during seven years of tion received by individuals. The award
form as buiso ofgeteyreiy Itrais grazing at the Agricultural Research recognizes outstanding achievements and frsasdograedest.Iis Center, Ona. As a matter of good and exceptional performance of
vegetatively planted by scattering 10 to management, extremely hungry animals employees and committee members in 15 bales per acre of freshly cut, stemmy should never be turned into heavily fer- their service to agriculture. Formal pregrass on a thoroughly prepared seed tilized Star grass in the early stages of sentation to Cellon and 15 other bed, followed by disking and rolling. got.national winners from across the nation
Fertilizer and lime treatments for got.were to be made May 22 in Washingestablishment are similar to those I ts ability to maintain a stand ton, D. C.
required for other grasses-300 pounds together with good yields and feeding Cellon was cited in receiving the per acre 16-8-8 fertilizer soon after quality give the grass special value in award for his outstanding leadership in planting and with lime applied accord- areas of south-central Florida where thefcivanprdtvedmis ing to soil test. Fertility needs for pro- Digit grasses have given way to less theeetiv and pouctive ofadmnsprduction purposes are relatively high. productive varieties. tratio anexcuti n fes AScro-se
Acreage planted to this grass should be Information on planting material for knowledge and participation in ASCS limited to an amount which can be well increase blocks of Ona Star grass can be programs. It was noted that he demonfertilized and intensively managed. obtained from: Florida Foundation strated an exemplary record of conOna Star grass, once established and Seed Producers, Inc., P. 0. Box 14006, scientious devotion to farmers and
C reep One of the good things about crossbreeding with purebred Santa
Gertrudis bull is that expensive and troublesome creep feeding is seldom
feedn g necessary. Your cows give more milk than ever before, and the calves are
9 whoppers by weaning time, right off mama and grass.
The cows rarely need help in calving either, even when bred at 15 to 16 w55o months. The calves aren't too large at birth, but after they're born just watch
em gain!
n eed s it? 'In fact that's about all you have to do. Santa Gertrudis were developed on
the range, and they know how to take care of themselves.
r




ASCS in his untiring efforts and determination to ensure all farmers' aware- Santa Gertrudis- Polled & Horned
ness of all ASCS programs and their 25 Breeding Age Bulls For Sale.
benefits.
Under his leadership, county office GEMINI SPRINGS FARMS
information activities have been
increased; there are now more news- Star Rt. 1 J. Charles Gray, owner
letters issued to farmers; more radio DeBary, Fl. 32713 Ph. (305) 668-6486
programs; better participation in county
fairs and public exhibitors, and better
relations with the news media. It was SANTA GER T R U D IS Home of Friday517
pointed out that because of better in- The kind that WEIGH and PAY on COVE BEND RANCH
formational efforts to ensure awareness good Florida pastures Registered Santa Gertrudis
of ASCS programs, there has not been aOwe:Drot&Muen'C nr
single appeal in which the appellant BLOUNT & HYDE OwnerDer HMaureenOConnor
stated he had not received adequate in- B. Blount Mgr., 904/726-1781
formation. Phone Lake Placid 813/465-4771 Rt. 1, Box 248, Floral City, Florida 32636
Rt. 4, Box 324, Lake Placid, Fla. 33852 Where State Road 48 crosses the Withlacoochee
River.
A merICa S Purebred Santa Gertrudis
First Winnstead
Beef Breed Plantation
SANTA
GERTRUDIS BREEDERS & CONSULTANTS
BREEDERS SANTA GERTRUDIS Philip G. Rust
INTERNATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP 0 HORNED 0 POLLED Route 3
BOX 1257 KINGSVILLE, TEXAS 78363 DIETRICH BROTHERS Phon912/ 2a. 172
Ph: 305/568-2351 Rt. 6, Box 921A Herd No. 255
ORLANDO, FLORIDA 32807 Albert Blankenship, Mgr. 226-6304
For more information on Santa Gertrudis ask the following breeders.
Roy F. Albritton Clarendon Plantation Mr. & Mrs. R. W. Johnson Brothers Robert B. Oxer Stage Coach Ranch
Bowling Green, FL Burton, SC Gaines, Jr. Pompano Beach, FL Lake Placid, FL Dade City, FL
John B. Armstrong Cove Bend Ranch Ocala, FL Jones & Moore Ed Partin Jr. James E. Stephenson
Kingsville, TX Floral City, FL River Oaks Ranch Jay, FL St. Cloud, FL Miami Lakes, FL
Avon Manor Park, Inc. George H. Culpepper Donalsonville, GA Wilton Jones Claude John Pellicer Jr. Gertrude & Mary Stevens
Naples, FL Longwood, FL Gemini Springs Farms Tifton, GA Bunnell, FL St. Cloud, FL
Big B Ranch D. Russell Daniel DeBary, FL L Gary Lamb Kenneth L Perkins Sugar Hill Plantation
Belle Glade, FL Okeechobee, FL Graco Farms Indiantown, FL South Belle Glade, FL Allendale, SC
Big Bear Ranches H. E. Danner Co. Inc. Orlando, FL Little Everglades Ranch Robert Ponder Farms Sunshine State Steers, Inc.
Loxahatchee, FL Glennville, GA Grey Rocks Ranch Dade City, FL Omega, FL Loxahatchee, FL
Zane C. Blanton Davis Double D. Farms Birmingham, AL Laurel Oak Farm G. E. Poucher Suwannee Point Ranch
Plant City, FL Smithville, TN Griffith Ranch, Inc. Wellbom, FL Live Oak, FL St. Petersburg, FL
Blount & Hyde Dietrich Brothers Okeechobee, FL Coley Lott Hingo Ranch T-3 Ranch
Lake Placid, FL Orlando, FL Gulf Coast Farms Dover, FL Immokalee, FL Miami Shores, FL
Blue Cypress Lake Ranch, Roy C. Dietrich Fort Myers, FL Arthur E. Lynn Charles A. Rivard Dwight L Thomas
Inc. Orlando, FL H & H Farms Callahan, FL DeFuniak Springs, FL Lake City, FL
Vero Beach, FL Santa Bar D Farm Santa Fe, FL M. J. Ranch Frank Robinson Diamond T Ranch
Bonnie Farms Haw River, NC Andy Haman Vero Beach, FL Atlanta, GA Huntsville, AL
Grand Bay, AL Double D Ranch Brunswick, GA E. A. Markham Ross Brothers Eric & Penny Wagner
Sidney Boswell Loxahatchee, FL Harley Watson Ranch Dunnellon, FL Branford, FL Ocala, FL
Brunswick, GA Double R. J. Farm Lake Harbor, FL Thomas R. McGehee Charles M. Rowe George & Dorothy Warga
Bransford Hills Farm Summerfield, FL Harwell & Harwell Jacksonville, FL Macclenny, Florida 32063 West Palm Beach, FL
Beth Page, TN H. C. Durr Lakeland, FL Laudle E. McHeny, M.D. Winnstead Plantation Frank N. Warren
Brownell Moger & Assoc. Independence, KY Hickory Hill Ranch, Inc. Melbourne, FL Thomasville, GA Morriston, FL
Ocala, FL K. D. Eatmon Ranches Anthony, FL Pete Miller Mountain Valley Farm Joe Wattleworth
Joe & Ruth Bryan Pompano Beach, FL Bob & Beverly Holdorff Attapulgus, GA Hartselle, Al Williston, FL
Coral Springs, FL El Rancho Grande Pompano Beach, FL Mille/Triple M Farms Joe H. Scott J. J. Wiggins
Troy Burrell Indiantown, FL Hooper Farms Atlanta, GA Ft. Lauderdale, FL Moore Haven, FL
Moniston, FL R. A. Feagle Ocala, FL W. D. Mizell & Sons J. K. Shirah Leland A. Withers
Troy E. Burrell, Jr. Lake City, FL Mr. & Mrs. Myles Hortman Callahan, FL Midland City, AL Austell, GA
Morriston, FL Riteco Ranch Ocholocknee, GA Tam Moody Siame Ranch Charles C. Wolf
C & S Ranch Vero Beach, FL David A. Johnson Vero Beach, FL Ft. Myers, FL Delray Beach, FL
Dunnellon, FL Blackwater Farms Maitland, FL S. L Nelson H. R. Snapp Paul E. Hatfield
Circle L Ranch Jasper, AL Live Oak, FL Plant City, FL Evansville, Ind.
Elba, AL Shelton Land & Cattle Co. Fla. Divisi
South Bay, Fla.
Eatrion & Johnson Cattle Co.
Horida Santa Gernis oPompano Beach, Florida
Flor~ _7=Asso kdonHugh E. and Outda W. Carr
2922 N. State Road 7, Margate, FL 33063 Donalsonville, Ga.
Fred Dietrich III, Pres. K. D. Eatmon, Sec.-Treas.
Member of Santa Gertrudis Breeders International, Kingsville, Texas
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 69




Ad valorem taxes a forgotten
beef cattle production expense
by BEN ABBITT, TIM HEWITT and FRANCIS MORITZ
EDITOR'S NOTE-A bbitt and Hewitt The property tax is fixed in the sense What purpose is served?
are area economists, Food and Resource that as long as you own pastureland and Economics Department, University of it is grazed or not stocked you will incur The ad valorem property tax, estabFlorida, IFAS, A REC, Lake Alfred, and such a tax. The tax levy will not neces- lished prior to 1880, has long been a part A RC, Marianna, respectively and Moritz sarily be the same dollar amount each of our history. This tax system replaced is field appraiser with Tucker and Bran- year. The property tax can be likened to the taxation methods brought from ham, Inc., Orlando. having your automobile insurance pre- Europe and used during the colonial
mium deducted from your checking period. In those early years the property
T he most common form of taxation account. A premium is deducted tax revenue supported local governon Florida agriculture is the ad regularly whether you drive the car or ments. Today ad valorem property tax
valorem tax. This tax is an annual let it sit. Property taxes on pastureland, revenue still funds local governments. in
charge assessed against the appraised like automobile insurance premiums, addition, ad valorem taxes now help fivalue of real properties. Land, build- are cash outlays that are paid annually. nance public school systems, hospitals, ings, and improvements to land, for in- This payment is oftentimes forgotten or sewage systems, and construction and stance, and a pasture irrigation system overlooked by beef cattle producers; maintenance of roads. Hence, the major
are all examples of real property. We'll particularly those whose books are kept reasons for ad valorem taxation today use permanent pastureland as our ex- by accountants. Payment of property are to raise revenue to fund local
ample of real property in this article, taxes cuts into profits just like other governments and to finance governProperty taxes are oftentimes a for- costs, such as outlays for fertilizer and mental public services.
gotten expense in beef cattle produc- m i n e r als. A d valorem taxes do not depend on
tion. Why are they forgotten? These Let's briefly review the purposes of current economic activity like sales
taxes are what economists call a fixed ad valorem taxes, what an agricultural taxes, hence they assure government cost. This cost is incurred whether land appraisal is, and how pastureland reasonable certainty and timeliness of
pastureland is kept in top condition or is appraised for ad valorem taxation collection. That is, by law they are let return to its native, ungrazed state, purposes in Florida. collected annually and budgeted yearly
Table 1.--Estimated Annual Revenue and Expenses, 100-cow Herd on 200 Acres of Permanent Pasture, Florida, 197W!
Item Description Unit Quantity Price Total
---- Dollars --I. Revenue
Cows Cull, 1000# @ $55 /cwt., sold in Sept. head 13 550.00 7,150.00
Heifers 2 yr. old, 893# @ $85/cwt., sold in Sept. head 4 759.05 3,036.20
Calves b85% calf crop
Hefe 400# @ $75/cwt., sold in Sept. head 23 300.00 6,900.00
Steers' 475# @ $82/cwt., sold in Sept. head 43 389.50 16 748.50
Total revenue 33,834.70
II. Cash expenses
Fertilizer 3 cwt./acre, 4-12-12, custom applied lbs. 200 14.90 2,980.00
.50 cwt./acre N lbs. 200 10.00 2,000.00
Supplemental feed.S/ 3i% Fortified molasses @ 2.5 lb/AU/day,
Hd/ fed 120 days ton 17.3 115.00 1,990.00
Ha-15#/AU/day, fed 120 days ton 103.5 35.00 3,623.00
Mineral 40#/AU/yr., average 136 AU ton 2.72 175.00 476.00
Vet, supplies Medicine, vaccine and insecticide 355.00
Semen test bulls head 4 15.00 60.00
Misc, practices Dragging and mowing pastures, feeding
hay, checking fences and cattle 700.00
Repairs Buildings and fences 200.00
Taxes Personal property on livestock cow 100 .50 50.00
Land taxes acre 200 3.00 600.00
Interest On operating capital, 7 mos. 0 9%
per annum dollars 13,034 .0525 684.00
Total cash expenses TT'7T-8'
III. Non-cash expenses
Hull depreciation bead 4 140.00 560.00
Buildings and machinery
depreciat ion' 596.00
Total non-cash expenses TIg
IV. Total expenses 14,874.00
V. Return to land, labor, 18,960,70
capital, and management
a8%calf crop; 17% cow cull rate with heifer calves saved as replacement., and 4 bulls.
111Choice grade.
V11l5 AU wintered.
A'Production cost $35.00/ton from surplus grass (including mowing, baling, and hauling).
70 / TH-E FLORIDA CATITLEMAN / JUNE 1979




Table 2.--Estimated Annual Revenue and Expenses, 100-Cow Herd on 200 Acres of Permanent Pasture, Florida, 171
Item Description Unit Quantity Price Total
- --- Do liars---
I. Revenue
Cows Cull, 1000# @ $22/cwt,, sold in Sept. head 13 220.00 2,860
Heifers 2 yr. old, 893# @ $29/cwt., sold in Sept. head 4 258.97 1,036
Calves b/ 85'. calf crop
Heiferp-, 400# (q $30/cwt,, sold in Sept. head 23 120.00 2,760
Steers- 475# @ $33/cevt,, sold in Sept. head 43 156.75 6, 740
Total revenue 3,6
I.Cash expenses
Fertilizer 3 cwt,/acre, 4-12-12, custom applied lbs. 200 15.90 3,180
.50 cwt./acre N lbs. 200 12.00 2,400
Supplemental feed-2/ 32K Fortified molasses @ 2.5 lb/AU/day,
d/fed 120 days ton 17.3 111.00 1,920
Hay-d 15 /AU/day, fed 120 days ton 10O3.5 25.00 2,588
Mineral 40z4/AU/yr., average 136 AU ton 2.72 170.00 462
Vet, supplies Medicine, vaccine and insecticide 350
Semen test bulls head 4 15.00 60
Misc, practices Dragging and mowing pastures, feeding
hay, checking fences and cattle 700
Repairs Buildings and fences 200
Taxes Personal property on livestock cow 100 .50 50
Land taxes acre 200 2.70 540
Interest On operating capital, 7 moe, @ 9%
per annum dollars 12,450 .0525 654
Total cash expenses 13-,104
III. Non-cash expenses
Bull depreciation head 4 140.00 560
Building and machinery
depreciation 596
Total non-cash expenses 1,156
IV. Total expenses 14,260
V. Return to land, labor,
capital, and management (864)
a 85% calf crop; 17% cow cull rate with heifer calves saved as replacement, and 4 bulls, b Choice grade.
c 115 AU wintered.
d Production coats $25.00/ton from surplus grass (including mowing, baling, and hauling).
Table 3.--Estimated Annual Revenue and Expenses, 100-Cow Herd on 200 acres of Permanent Pasture, Florida, 19780/
Item Description Unit Quantity Price Total
---- Dollars---I. Revenue
Cows Cull, 1000# 8 $35/cwt., sold in Sept. head 13 350.00 4,450
Heifers 2 yr. old, 893# @ $42/cwt., sold in Sept. head 4 375.00 1,500
Calves b/85% calf crop
Heifer b/400# @ $48/cwt., sold in Sept. head 23 192.00 4,416
Steerst7 475# @ $50/cwt., sold in Sept. head 43 232.50 1021
Total revenue 20,578
II. Cash expenses
Fertilizer 3 cwt./acre, 4-12-12, custom applied lbs. 200 15.00 3,000
.50 cwt./acre N lbs. 200 10.00 2,000
Supplemental feedS/ 32% Fortified molasses @ 2.5 lb/AU/day,
d/fed 120 days ton 17.3 111.00 1,920
Hay-d 15#/AU/day, fed 120 days ton 103.5 25.00 2,58
Mineral 40#/AU/yr., average 136 AU ton 2.72 170.00 462
Vet, supplies Medicine, vaccine and insecticide 350
Semen test bulls head 4 15.00 60
Misc, practices Dragging and mowing pastures, feeding
hay, checking fences and cattle 700
Repairs Buildings and fences 200
Taxes Personal property on livestock cow 100 .50 50
Land taxes acre 200 2.70 540
Interest On operating capital, 7 moe. 89%
per annum dollars 11,820 .0525 623
Total cash expenses 12,493
III. Non-cash expenses
Bull depreciation head 4 140.00 560
Buildings and machinery
depreciation 596
Total non-cash expenses T1N
IV. Total expenses 13,649
V. Return to land, labor,
capital, and management 6,929
a 85% calf crop; 17% cow cull rate with heifer calves saved as replacement, and 4 bulls. b Choice grade.
c 115 AU wintered.
d Production costs $25/ton from surplus grass (including mowing, baling and hauling).
THE FLORIDA CATlTLEMAN /JUNE 1979 / 71




to governmental units in the counties. quent sales of pastureland, the appraiser SSince ad valorem taxes are an impor- often has difficulty finding comparable
tant revenue source for government, the slsweetopreso atrln
HEREFORD potential burden on real property have similar characteristics and similar
ownersr, like cattlemen, is substantial. productivity. In addition, much pastureFOR ASSISTANCE IN land in Florida has a speculative comLOCATING HEREFORD What'is farmland appraisal? ponent in its market price. Therefore,
BULLS OR FEMALES Appraisal of farmland is a process of finding comparable sales where the
Oblgaton predicting the most probable selling pastureland changed hands strictly for
No Cost ... No Obiain price of property if offered for sale a rea- agricultural purposes is often difficult,
sonable legho ie h akt sometimes impossible. For these reasons
Conac yor merca vaueoffarmland is the estimated pre- te market approach is used sparingly in
Hereford Association diction of the highest price in dollars establishing classified use value for
Field Representative: which a buyer would pay and a seller pastureland.
RICK HICKENBOTTOM would accept provided both were fully th tapoc:Wenapasr s
220A Airport Rd. informed and acted intelligently and te cost approach, a value is placed on
the pastureland and then on the contriAthens, GA 30605 voluntarily. It is simply an appraiser's bution of improvements to the pasture.
(404) 543-0014 estimate of current value. Supply and The value of the improvements to the
demand actually determine the value of pastureland is normally the current estiHer fod Bllsfarmland on the open market. mated replacement cost of the improveHerfor BulsDevelopment and land speculation ments (at the time the appraisal is
Diamond C. Ranch, Inc. have been significant forces in driving made), minus the appraiser's observed
the market values of some farmland depreciation. The value of pastureland
Harry Cobb much higher than could be justified by (normally estimated by the market
Route 3, Box 93-C its earning ability in agricultural pro- method) is then added to the contribuDonalsonville, GA 31745 duction. That is, yields from the farm- tion of improvements to calculate the
912/524-2263 land and unstable markets may not total estimated classified use value.
generate sufficient income for the note Hence, this approach inherently holder to make his mortgage payments assumes that value and cost are the
Performance Tested over the length of the loan. The Florida same, which is not necessarily true in
HERFOR BULSlegislature has tried to relieve the tax many cases. For example, the value of a
HERFOR BULSburden on land maintained in "bona newly installed pasture irrigation sysFor Sale fide agricultural use" (good faith tem is more than the current cost of its
at commercial agricultural use of land is installation since the system is expected
C ORRIGAN RANCH based upon; length of time land has to improve the stand in the future and
P. 0. Box 3130, Beach Station been so utilized, continuous use, pur- subsequently increase pounds gained
Ph: 305/567 7141, 231-2442
Vero Beach, Florida 32960 chase price paid, size in relation to spe- and profits.
I cific agricultural use, care of the land via Often called the cost of reproducREGITERD HREFRDSaccepted commercial agricultural prac- tion approach, the cost approach, like
REGSTREDHEEFODStices, and terms of the leasing arrange- the market approach, is used sparingly SMOAK tT ment if applicable, etc.) by making in pastureland appraisal. Why? Because
~1~~j special provision for taxing farmland at most value accrues to pastureland
H H USE a 1=1 rates more in line with the land's earn- whose selling price is determined more
na BEing capacity. This provision, popularly by current use and income potential
RA CHreferred to as the "Green Belt Law," than on the current cost of improveRon & Martha Soakf. M. 3, Box 204-1 provides for assessing farmland on the ments. This approach is used primarily Madison. Fix. 32340 904/973-2304 basis of its present agricultural use and in condemnation (eminent domain) prothe income potential from that use. This ceedings. Here the government takes Registered Herefords agricultural use value is often called the (condemns) pastureland for a public use
PINE ACRE RANCH classified use value. The ad valorem tax (for example, widening a road) and the
Citr, Foria 3627is annually levied upon this classified owner is paid just compensation (usualCoplr, Floie262 use value and not the market value, ly in dollars) for what he loses. The
~CIfF~m~conedil46-JFund 114- commonly called the just use value. replacement cost of any improvement to
-CHFSamMc~nal H46-JFDuny 154-the pasture that is taken is appraised
-PA Mischief Aster 307 apoce n htvle de otevleo h
G. P. Leitner, Mgr. Appraisalaprahsadtavauadetohealefte
904/595-3806 904/591-2180 There are three basic approaches pastureland (by itself) can represent the
_Located 12 Mi. North of Ocala on US 301 property appraisers utilize to arrive at just compensation to the land owner for
____________________________ classified use values for farmland; the its loss. The owner's physical loss market approach, the cost approach, (pastureland and improvements), and the income approach. They normal- though he is compensated (money), ly use all three approaches when et- becomes the general public's gain (wider Eefordo mating classified use value for farm- ra)
HeefrdFamland. However, in Florida, the market In come approach: The main
and cost approaches are used sparingly appraisal method used to estimate Even with today's high commercial for reasons pointed out later. First, let's classified use values in Florida is the prices, we at El Dorado have kept briefly examine these three approaches income approach. The value of pastureprices on our registered cow/calf to classified use valuation, land is estimated by capitalizing expectpairs and heifers at reasonable levels Market approach: Evaluation by ed income from it under typical
to fit the needs of our purebred cus- market data is based on the assumption management and production practices tomers. Come by for a visit, that one tract of pastureland is valued found in the area. "Typical" refers to
Lorin & Gladys Anderson the same as recent sales of like tracts, those generally accepted management
Similar factors include such items-as ele- techniques performed on crops the land 4301 South 301 vation, soil type and productivity, grass is suited to growing. Capitalization is
Dade City, Florida 33525 variety, nearness to transportation the process of converting expected net
Telephone 904/567-3413 routes and markets, and improvements income into a land value. The classified
to the land. use value of the pastureland is estiIn areas where there are only infre- (Continued on page 94)
72 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979




Childs renamed/
president of
Hereford group
Tom Childs, Lake Placid, was reelected
- president of the Florida Hereford Asso* ciation at the group's annual meeting,
- held recently at Gainesville.
Ron Smoak, Madison, was named
vice president at the meeting, and Don Berry, Kissimmnee, will remain secre*tary-treasurer. rDirectors named to two year terms
at the meeting were Pat Corrigan, VeroBeach; Ed Gregory, Jacksonville; Lovet- .-
te Jackson, Gainesville; Curtiss Quar- .- *-
rier, Callahan; and Dan Childs, Lake 1 0
Polle HerfordPlacid, director ex-officio.
P le HeeodHoldover directors include Sid S*
Range Type Purebred Bulls Sumner, Bartow; Grover Walker,
DeFuniak Springs; Ralph Thompson, Using 2 sons of 13-212, also 1 son of WP (iolquitt, Georgia, and Tom Cochrane,
Victor H 125 V/497. Fort Meade. JO-su-L
J. L. Wetherington In other business, the group voted to
912/242-4721 revise index scores required for entry FARMS, INC.
2201 Newbern Dr., Valdosta, Ga. 31601 into the annual Southeastern Pen Bull Registered Hereford Cattle
Show and Sale at Bartow. A sale com- of Rgalph Thompon, Gen. Mar.
Manual Horned Hereford Bull Sale mittee headed by Dan Childs was 1ff 9158-3637 Res. 912/753-2230
Each October At Wauchula e appointed to study the changes. COLOUITT, GEORGIA 31737
Childs reported that the 1979 South _______________Stl H u eeastern Pen Bull Show and Sale will be Heretords are lust naturally better Ask us about
held on November 28-29 at Bartow. breeding Herefords and become an active breeder.
Hollow Farm Association president Tom Childs also FLORIDA
reported that the Florida Junior Here- HEREFORD
HUME, VIRGNIA 22639ford Association annual field day mayASO IT N
HUME, VIRGNIA 22639be held in conjunction with the BartowASO AT N
event this year. TOM CHILDS, President
Rt. 3, Box 710, Lake Placid, Fla. 33852
CROOKED LAKE RANCH Telephone 813/465-2020
Registered Polled Here fords Farm exports up!
Victor Dominos
Pat Wilson, Inc. 813/635-4804 Bus. U.S. farm exports to Hong Kong, which JOESle Herefrds.Owners 813/635-3787 Res. totaled $130.3 million in 1975, jumped
to $206.1 million in 1977 and then to Bul Fo aea- l ie
P. 0. Box 65, Frostproof, Florida 33843 $359.4 million last year.
Performance is our Business. Hong Kong is only about 400 square M. &-r.Evi oe
miles in size but it purchased $1.8 bil- Phn 40/4565
lion in agricultural products in 1976. ot o 1
M I C E LThe U.S. competes closely with Barvle a 01
M ITC ELLThailand frthe number two spot as a
HEREFORD FARM major supplier. The People's Republic
Performance Tested of China is the leader.
Polled Hereford Cattle Advertise Regularly
Lumber City, Ga. 31549
t 912/568-4236 or 586-3263
For Hereford Bulls Call RVRDVD AC
CK Ranch 1116 N. Edgewood Avenue
Sam Paylor 913/2254745 Jacksonville, Florida 32205
Office: 913/2254345
BROOKVILL, KS 7425Hord sires: RWJ Victor 212 114, HWJ BROOSVILE, S 6425Victor 330 HH25, Ind HWJ Victor 266
'The BMG Profit Breed DON BERRY, right, Kissimmee, was
Polled Herefords honored with a special award in recognition of his many years of service as secre- RDR (94 78-32 87f. 11a
tary-treasurer of the Florida Hereford 190 879-16530
P W K P" DAssociation during the organization's
AssocIpbon annual meeting in Gainesville. E. D.
Contact: Gregory, Jacksonville, made the pro- REGISTERED
LUCIAN WELTY / 14041 228.4445 sentation. (Photo courtesy American POLLED HEREFORDS
1203 Ethridge Mill Rd.,Griffin, Ga. 30223 Hereford Association.
THE FLORIDA CATITLEMAN / JUNE 1979 /73




SDOAe k?~lace W
AL~ACHA. FLORkIOA
32616
REGISTERED POLLED HEREFORDS
RIE PLE H. E *.R Registered
Herd' SiresBreeding Stock
.F VICTOR 7110; 561For Sale
-.R D .MIN At The Ranch
Fred ,,c ,'rs ager JEFF MOTES, Palatka, showed the grand
Rt. 1,lBo 1lachua, la. 32615 Mrs. Snead Davis, Owner Bill Snead, Mgr. champion steer at the Putnam County
Telephone: (9442220Phone (904) 462-1453 Fair, the steer was purchased by Publix
Markets.
Polled Herefords
CIRCLE (.) RANCH Malloy Hereford Ranch
Clermont, Florida 32711 Victor Dominos
RHF Victor 865-161 (Ranger) "With the Malloy Accent"
HERD SIRES CTR Victor C34
RWJ Victor J3-168 Al Home of: RWJ Victor J133 76
RWJ Victor J3-212 Al Al Certificates Available
Mr. & Mrs. T. F. Thompson, owner Mr. & Mrs. Dallas Malloy, Owners
Phone 904/394-3053 P. 0. Drawer G, Marianne, FL 32446
Raising Polled Herefords since 1956 (office) 904/526-2672 (res.) 482-5196
Herring Hereford Farm BAXLEY FARMS
Polled Hereford & Quarter Horses
Breeding Profituble Polled Built on economically important traits
Herefords Since 1955. Harold Baxley 205/886-2913
H. W. Herring, Jr. Howell Baxley 205/886-3088 RESERVE GRAND champion steer was
912/872-3316 Tommy Baxley 205/886-2855 exhibited by Donna Mullins, Palatka, the
Rt. 2, Whigham, Ga. 31797 Rt. 4, Graceville, FL 32440 1193 pound steer was purchased by Winn
_ __......_Dixie.
RWJ Victor Dominos REGISTERED POLLED HEREFORDS
"Trojan Style" Two youth steer
Foundation Source Quality Simrnmentals
Continuing to linebreed RWJ Practical Performing Polled Herefords. ECHO D E LL FARM shows covered
Two youth steer shows and sales held in RW FARMS Joe Harvey, Owner Jakin, Ga. 31761 Florida were covered recently by memMr. & Mrs. V. H. Jones Route 1, Box 157 Office: 912/524-2131 (Donalsonville) bers of The Florida Cattleman staff. 912/874-6105 LESLIE, GEORGIA 31764 Farm: 912/793-2081 Shows covered are Bradford-Union
County Youth Fair, Starke, and Young Acres Ranch .f Victor Dominos Putnam County Fair Steer Show and
New Trend Polled Herefords "That Pay Their Way and Sale, Palatka.
Performance Records Cattle Make A Profit" Winners and other key highlights of
Service Age Bulls Briar Farms the show follow.
Bred and Breeding Age Females Creek
For information on our Performance Cattle: E. D. and Pauline Raulerson 912/632-4492 Putnam County Dwight L. Raulerson 912/632-4785 Jeff Motes, Palatka, showed a Limousin H. Y. Tillman Route 3, Alma, Georgia 31510
1207 W. Park Ave. Valdosta, Ga. 31601 (Continued on page 79)
POLLED HEREFORD BULLS POLLED HEREFORDS
Bred for Beef-Polled for Profit
SAM SELLS Annual Bull Sale Oct. 27, 1979
& Sons Field Day June 2, 1979
& osFLORIDA POLLED / V,/,
P. 0. Box 1175 0 Farm 912/782-5281 FORD SS'N
HERE ORD SS'NLinebred Bulls for Commercial Cattlemen Moultrie, Georgia 31768 H R F R AS ,e. ulsJim Belisle,rdlCt!..
Rt. 4, Box 292 Route 5, Moultie, GA 31768
MEMBER, GEORGIA B.C.I.A. Quincy, Fla. 32351 912/324-2602
POLLED HORNED
REGISTERED POLLED HEREFORD BULLS HEREFORDS
SINGLETARY FARMS TheseBulls Are, Prresently Available A. J. and R. C. Singleta
BLAKELY, GEORGIA 3172
SOUTHW OOD FARM Ph: 912/723-3525 (Office) 723-3196 (Res.)
Ph: 904/877-1158 TALLAHASSEE, FLA. 32302 P.O. Box 191 2 Mi. NW OF BLAKELY ON HWY. 27
74 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979




EATON PARK, FLORIDA FEED PLANT
813/682-6144 MainOffice 813/688-8471 Delivery P.O. Box 116, Lakeland, Florida 33802
LAKELAIND
CASH
FEED
Where nutrition comes first.
FLORIDA CLUB CALF 4th ANNUAL
Florida Club Calf Breeders will award a $50 credit toward the next June 30, 1979 p urchase to anyone winning Grand
C ham p in honors, at the County or 12:00 Noon State level with a steer purchased
from here.
A 1979 Grand Champion Steers
65 Top at Central Florida Fair, Polk
County Youth Fair, North FlorQualty A gusida Fair and three carcass
Limo sinchampions.
Simmental and LOCATION-Faciliies located north of
New State Faigrounds on U.S. 92 at Chinia tersmedium of Intersat 4 and U.S. 92, east of Tam pa ( h mile west of U.S. 301 on
- U.S. 921.
,J. M. Fields
All calves have been preconditioned, implanted, fully vaccinated, and weigh over 450 pounds. These types of steers can do the job for you as they did last year in winning shows across the state. Nowhere in the Southeastern United States will you find a better group of calves with greater potential to win. Try to attend this momentous even!!Flri
MANY OFFSPRING OF BLACK JACK WILL BE SELLING! States
For nfomatin cll o wrte:Fair Grounds
SAM ROBINSON Fo nomto alo rt: HARVEY E
8205 Simpson Lane Route 3, Box 418-X t
Lakeland FL 33801 Valsico, FL 33594
Ph: 813/858-4373 Ph: 813/689.7401
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 75




FGrazing cool-season annual pastures with
growing, lightweight beef heifers vs. steers
N O W TO by J. E. BERTRAND the rates of II and nine pounds per acre,
ARC, Jay respectively. All pastures were planted
Cool-season annual pastures, c on October 17 and 18, 1977. A complete Coo-seso anualpatursconsist- fertilizer (8-24-24) was applied to all ing of a mixture of rye, Rye grass, and t planting-time at t ao
Crimson clover, have produced good pastures at planting time at the rate of
o m inoaoct gains with growing, lightweight beef 250 pounds per acre. Three applicaBeemaser reeersUniersl tees. ecase ighweihtbeef heifers tions of 100 pounds per acre each of l steers. Because lightweight beefhe ammonium nitrate were made during
G enrall can usually be purchased considerably the grazing season. Grazing began on
80g 0 Loop 410 cheaper (approximately $10.00 per December 13, 1977.
- it's350 hundredweight) than comparable lightweight beef steers in the fall in north- Performance and economic data for GPM South Tower west Florida, the use of heifers for graz- the 163-day grazing period are listed in
San AntoniTexa782ing these pastures needed to be Table 1. Steers gained (P<0.01) faster
evaluated, than heifers (1.95 versus 1.58 lb./head/(512) 341-1277 Thirty-two lightweight (average 413 day, respectively). The animal gain per
pounds) feeder heifers and steers of acre was 521 pounds with steers and 425 British breeding (Angus and Angus X pounds with heifers. The stocking rate Hereford crosses), grading U. S. Good per acre was very similar. Therefore, or better and each treated with a 36 mg because of the more rapid daily gain, ear implant of Ralgro (a protein steers had a larger gain per acre per day CARTER BEEFMASTERS anabolic agent), were weighed and allot- than heifers (3.20 versus 2.61 pounds,
ted at random from breed and sex respectively). "Quality with Quantity" groups to two experimental groups of The cost of gain was lower for steers
JMC Ranch eight steers and two experimental on pasture than that of heifers ($19.58
1053 Sunset Dr., Lake Wales, Fl. 33853 groups of eight heifers each. The four versus $24.00/hundredweight, respecJohn & Martha Carter groups, utilizing two groups (replicates) timely) (Table 1). The off grazing cost
Owners Mack Padgett, Mgr.
Ph: 813/676-1474 Ph: 813/638-1985
Ranch located 3 mi. west of US 27 on SR 640
Table 1. Performance and Economic Data of Growing Beef Heifers and Steers
TALLEY Grazing Cool-Season Annual Pastures (1977-78)-ARC, Jay(a).
Item Heifers Steers
Inc. Initial no. of animals 16(b) 16
Breeding Age Bulls & Heifers Length of grazing, days 163 163
For Sale At All Times Avg. initial wt., lb. 410 416
W. G. Talley Sr., Owner 904/787-3579 Avg. final wt., lb. 667 734
James C. Richardson, Mgr. 904/787-3401 Avg. gain/animal, lb. 257 318
P.O. Box 817, Leesburg, Fla. 32748 Avg. daily gain, lb. 1.58 1.95**
Animal days/acre(c) 269 267
Stocking rate/acre(c) 1.65 1.64
GENE THOMPSON'S Gain/acre, lb. 425 521
ROCKING Gain/acre/day, lb. 2.61 3.20
Pasture c6st/cwt gain(d) $ 24.00 $ 19.58
T Avg. cost/head of feeder(e) $147.60 $188.03
Pasture cost/head of feeder $ 61.82 $ 62.20
BEEFMASTERS Total cost/head of feeder(f) $209.42 $250.23
Commercial Bulls for sale Offgrazing cost/cwt(f) $ 31.40 $ 34.09
Mike Honeycutt, Mgr., P. 0. Box f
Mc Neil, MS 39457 AC 601/798-6502 (a) Rotational grazing of a mixture of 'Wrens abruzzi' rye, 'Gulf' Rye grass, and 'Dixie' crimson clover.
(b) Initially, two groups of eight calves each.
(c) Additional grazer animals of the same type, sex, and size were added and Promote BEEF removed as needed to keep the forage uniformly grazed.
(d) Pasture cost = $102.00/acre.
e very day... (e) Heifer calf cost = $36.00/cwt and steer calf cost = $45.20/cwt (includes cost
of animals, hauling, veterinary costs, feed, etc.). Support Your (0 Does not include labor and management.
** Significant at P<0.01.
Florida Beef Council
per treatment, were assigned to two per hundredweight, excluding labor and TIlE lEOME OF treatments (steers versus heifers) on management, was $34.09 for steers com"PROFIT LE BEEFMASTERS" pasture. pared with $31.40 for heifers.
The pastures consisted of a mixture Under the conditions of this study,
We always have a good selection of Breeding of 'Wrens abruzzi' rye, 'Gulf' Rye grass, the difference between the initial cost Bulls and Females available for your needs, and 'Dixie' Crimson clover. Each group between steers and heifers was $9.20 per
of eight initial animals grazed four 1.25 hundredweight; whereas the difference W wveI acre plots in a rotational system. between the cost per hundredweight
The rye was planted in row widths of between steers and heifers at the end of seven inches with a grain drill at the rate the grazing period was $2.69 (Table 1). of 80 pounds per acre. The Rye grass The steers had gained 61 pounds more P. 0. Box925 Gonzale, Texas 78629 and Crimson clover were top-seeded than the heifers and were 67 pounds
(512) 672-6504
__(512)_672_5____ over the rye with a cultipacker-seeder at heavier.
76 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979




Zipperer Beefmasters.
~I>1
Predictable Results.
"General Beauregard"
When you combine a top bull battery with one of the breed's largest, most carefully selected cowherds, the results are predictable.
Every calf crop gets better.
Every set of replacement heifers performs better, adds more class or eye appeal.
Every group of purebred and commercial bulls offers greater potential.
In short, constant improvement. Something you Zipperer
can always expect from Zipperer Beefmasters. Proven herd Beefmasters
sires like "Beauregard" help make it possible. (1) 97374/.O Bx 5
For Beefmasters you can rely on, look for the-&. (13 4-3663/O Bo 4
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 /77




BEEFMASTERS Rickards tops
Beefmaster sale
"The Hottest Breed Going" BBat Tifton
For your seed stock needs contact the
Florida-Georgia offices or the following Rickards Beefmasters of Kenansville
members was the top volume buyer at the fourth
annual Southeastern Beefmaster
1 Barfield Beefmasters 9 Galling Creek Beefmasters Breeders Association Sale, held April 13
P. 0. Box 356 Pavo Rd., Box 290 April
Immokalee, FL33934 Thomasville, GA31792 at Tifton, Georgia.
2Barrow's Farm Beefmasters 10 Royal Beefmasters The Florida rancher was listed as
Rt. 2, Box 696 1052 Barnhorst Rd. purchasing 12head for $26,9
Orlando, FL 32807 Bartow, FL 33830rchasing eight head for $26,900.
3 Carter Beetmasters Other Florida buyers at the sale were
1053 Sunset Dr.
Lake Wales, FL 3353 Charles Harmon, Arcadia; Zipperer
4 Circle RBeefmasters Beefmasters, Fort Myers; Tom Barfield,
a4675 Ro wellRd. N.E. Immokalee, and Gamble Creek BeefMarietta, GA 30060
5 Dry Creek Beefmasters masters, Parrish.
Fit 4, Box 318
Maranna, FL2446 Sale officials reported that 45 lots
6 GambleCree~ RanchBeefmasters 11 Seven Lazy Eleven Beefmasters grossed $113800 to average $2529. A
R. 1, Box 221 Star Rt., Box 76 r e d of t average showed 1
Parrlsh, FL 33564 Clewiston, FL 33440 13 breakdown of the averages showed 18
7 Banner Lee Jr. & Son Beefmsaters 12 J & S Beefmasters cow/calf pairs averaging $3181, four
Rt. 3 Fi. 2, Box 172-A tw-erodblsavrgd$45 he
Pavo, GA 31778 Adrian, GA 31002 13 W. Talley Beefmasters two-year-old bulls averaged $2425, three
8 Ron DonBeetfmasters P. 0. Box 817 yearling bulls averaged $2016; 10 bred
Rt.3 Box72 LeeburgFL3274 heifers averaged $1840; and 10 open
Chipley, FL 32428 14 Varner Beefmasters heifers averaged $240
P. 0. Box 31 heifers averaged $2240.
SAlturas, FL33820 The. top selling lot was a cow/calf
P. Boxsr 40 consignment from Dixie Beefmasters,
R. Myers, FL33902 Enigma, Georgia. The 1972 cows sold
Write or Call for more information with a three month old bull calf at side
by Showboy II for $7700. The buyer was
Kaffie Brothers, Corpus Christie, Texas.
FLORIDA-GEORGIA BEEFMASTER Top selling bull was a three year old
BREEDERS ASSOCIATION consigned by Bear Creek Farms,
Chapter of S.E.B.B.A. Franklin, Tennessee. Mountain View
4675 Roswell Rd., NofE Marietta GA 30060 Beefmasters, Edgeville, South Carolina,
Phone:404/3-8., r0 purchased the animal for $3650.
The sale included consignments
from nine Florida Beefmaster breeders.
Syler Sales Management, Inc.,
Advertising Aids Burton, Texas, handled the sale
Your Personal reek management duties, and Gerald Bowie,
Salesmanship Beefmasters West Point; Georgia, was auctioneer.
Rt. 4, Box 318
Contact any of our fieldmen Marianna, FL 32446 Harry Flint
for full details. (904) 579-4641 heads Lee cowmen
e RON DON Harry Flint, Lehigh Acres, was elected
DON president of the Lee County Cattle101 ff CATTLE COMPANY men's Association for the new year.
I Serving as vice president is Nick
t tle11m Beefmaster Cattle Armeda of Fort Myers, with Jim
AND LIVESTOCK JOURNAL RonnieHartzog Ph:904/638-7859 English, Alva, elected secretary.
P.O. Box 1030 Donnie H. Duce Ph: 904/638-4064 Treasurer is Manny Elint of Fort Myers.
e 30 1 Reelected as state director was Nat
Kissimmee, Fla. 32741 Rt. 3,Chipley, F.32428 Hunter, Fort Myers.
Directors serving at the local level,
REGISTERED POLLED SHORTHORNS all from Fort Myers, unless otherwise
Growthy-Rugged P mot BEEF indicated are: Curtis W. Skates; Dave
TB & Bang's Certified Herd Langford, Alva; Paul Flint; Ronnie
Fully Acclimated for Southern Conditions every day... Flint and Hilton Sapp.
PINEVIEW FARMS
Paul Ragans, owner. 5 Support Your
Route 2 Ph: 904/971-5417
Mdison, oas o. 2340 Florida Beef Council Zipperer renamed
an Beefmaster prexy
7 Jennie Lee Zipperer, Fort Myers, was
SMITH RANCH 7 LAZY 11 reelected president of the FloridaSHORTHORNS 7 Beefmasters 7 Georgia Beefmaster Breeders AssociaPolled and Horned .. Rogers Farms, Inc. = tion at a recent meeting held at Tifton,
Our herd is Federally Certified for Brucellosis (No. Georgia.
400) & Accredited for T.B. Ronnie Perkins, Mgr. 813/983-9701eorgia.
Pauline N. Smith-Owner Pete Marks, Herdsman 813/983-7039 Serving with Zipperer will be Bob
813/293-2930 Winter Haven, Fla. 33880 Star Route Box 76 Grebe, Bradenton, vice president, and
RanchoffSR542on BuckeyeRd. 3n miles N.E. Clewiston, Fla. 33440 Eddie Sheek, Marietta, Georgia,
secretary-treasurer.
78 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979




Owatonna's
Beltless
Wonder...
PAMELA MYRL CARTER, showed the grand champion steer at the Bradford- th al ne
Union County Steer Show. The steer sold to Publix for $3159.
Steer shows Roll
(Continuedftom page 79)
cross steer to grand championship DdIU[
honors in the Putnam County Youth Steer Show held April 18, in Palatka.
Publix purchased the 1193 pound steer for $2.60 per pound to net young Motes $3101.80.
Donna Mullins showed the reserve s Hard outer shell to resist weather, 0No expensive, troublesome belts
champion steer. The 1193 pound protect quality or chains used in bale formation
Limousin cross steer sold to Winn Dixie for $1.80 per pound to bring Miss 0% ton bales in hay or stover, 10 to 0 21-roll system makes uniform
Mullins a total of $2147.40. 15 tons per hour capacity density and size bales every time
The sale saw 21 steers sell to bring a total of $26,666.84. The total poundage of steers was 22,039 to bring the average Who says round balers have to be a tangle of belts and
price per pound to $1.21. chains that stretch or break? Not Owatonna. We've
Publix was the volume buyer pur- developed the 595 Roll Baler and if you appreciate
chasing seven head for $4998.74. Winn Dixie was the second high buyer taking simplicity, dependability and a better end product all
five steers for $2817.13. rolled into one, it's the baler for you. Now in stock
Bradford- Union at your Owatonna dealer:
Pamela MyrI Carter, a 4-H'er from Union County, showed the grand champion steer at the Bradford-Union T V Il,1 LJM kM.
County Youth Steer Show and Sale, held March 30, at Starke.
The 1053 pound Limousin cross steer sold to Publix Markets for $3 per pound to net Miss Carter $3159. Miss Buy Now-Limited Production
Carter received $930 in add-ons to bring FLORIDA DISTRIBUTOR:
the total sale price of her steer to $4089.
Jon Brown, a Union County Pounds Motor Company
FFA'er, took reserve grand champion- Winter Garden, FIL (305) 656-1352
ship honors with his 1145 pound Limousin cross steer. The steer sold to the Community State Bank of Starke for $2.49 per pound.
Thirty one steers sold in the sale to gross $48,158.04 and average $1553.48 per head. The gross sale weight came to 34,231 pounds for an average sale It's Your Future
weight of 1104. The average price per pound came to $1.40.
Sale officials reported that with add- You can help to insure it by joining and supporting your local county ons and ring sales the sale total came to cattlemen's association, an afliate of The Florida Cattlemen's Associa$69,240.71. This brought the average tion. We're all working towards a better future for all of us.
price per pound to $2.02 and the average per head to $2233.57.
Publix Markets was the volume C isw r ngf ry u
buyer purchasing six head for $11,134.55. The second high buyer was the Columbia County Livestock Market with three head for $5213.07. _________________________________THE FLORIDA CATITLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 79







He's one of our most consistent producers of top quality calves. He sired the exceptional bull calf at upper left that went with the record setting cow-calf package at our 1978 sale.
His heifer pairs have sold for premiums.
Better still, the performance of his calves has been remarkable. His 1978 bull calves averaged wi iu Nr
654 pounds at wean- lW -'!LIj) iUiIIM&SOS
ing; the heifers, 577 Pan
This year's calves are even better.W arPan
yArs1 A Colorful Route To Extraordinary
old, he's sound and aggressive-settling 30-40 cows in LeJ111a11'tv our 90 day single sire breeding program.
War Paint. One of our many proven herd sires. Another reason why Barfield-bred purebred Beefmnasters and commercial bulls lead the industry in performance and dependability Barfield Beefmasters. The Difference Between Good ... And Great!
Fred Barfield, Travis Wise P.O. Box 356/Immokalee, Florida 33934 (813) 657-3611




Plans set for Angus events
The board of directors of the Florida Angus Association met during the Beef Cattle Short Course at the University of Florida, Gainesville, and discussed plans forcoming events. The meeting was chaired by J. R. Thompson, Marianna, presiCharles R. Jenkins, Lakeland, chairman of the annual bull sale, reported the event would be held again this year at the Polk County Agriculture Center, Bartow. Sale date is December 8 with the bulls scheduled to be graded by a group of Registered Angus Cate commercial cattlemen and extension personnel on December 7. Jenkins said Tom
Gammon of Hurricane Mills, Tennessee, would cry the sale. ~ ~ Leroy Baldwin, chairman of the fourth annual Southeastern Futuristic Angus
Show and Sale, reported the dates would be February 13-16, 1980, at a site to be LAND & CATTLE CO., MNC. selected in central Florida. Baldwin said it was important for Florida breeders to
BERT MICKEL, Mgr.patcptbynmntncatefrhevn.
P.O. Box 308, Citrs, FL 32627patcptbynmnigctlefrhevn.
(between Ocala and Gainesville) Lisa Bozzuto of Lake City was selected as Angus Queen to represent Florida
at junction U.S. 301 and Fla. SR 318 at breed events in and out-of-state.
904/595-4761, 4771, 4491 In a preliminary meeting of Angus breeders, John Crouch, Mauldin, South
Carolina, regional manager for the American Angus Association, presented comLEMMON ments on Angus programs in general and showed slides on genetic defects.
CATTLE ENTERPRISES
Registered Angus Ca title
Nina, Harvey, 8, Donnie Lemmon C itR\ aT a u n
Herdsman: Floyd Berger C itR a ,T a u n
Ph: 404/553-5124 or 404/553-391 1
P. 0. Box 524 Winter take Angus honors
WOODBURY, GEORGIA 30293
______________________________________ Winners at the Putnam County Fair (reserve junior heifer calf champion), Calvin Winter, TallaAngus show, held recently at Palatka, hassee: Sport's Pride, Miller; listd b clss t th f hreeplaes, Early summer yearling heifers, calved 5/1/77 thru GL V R FARMS lsebycastthfirst trepas, 6/30/77 (1)-Gore Lady Northern 1627, (intermediate
with the number of entries in each class champion), Dale, Nancy, & James Bacon, Zephyrhills; Qualit~ngusJunior huil calves, calved 3/1/78 and after (2)-Dotsun's Quaty~gusshown in parentheses, follow: McHenry 328 (grand champion, junior hull calf champion),
Complete A. 1. Service, All Breeds Walter W. Teague, Aahurndale; Legend Battlestur (reserve
Junior heifer calves, calved 3/1/78 and after (2)-RW junior hull calf champion), Glen M. Farms, Plant City; Wade Glover, Owner, Ph: 813/737-2441; 752-3501. BAR's Cover Girl 36, RW BAR Custom Fitters, Ocala; Junior hall calves, calved 1/1/77 thn 2/28/78 (1)Eddie McMillan, 813/752-4608. Briarhill Blackhird 4768, George & Viola Miller, Zephyr- Cawjo Rita Trouhadour 9229, Winter;
Ri. 5, Box 319-C, Plant City, FL 33566. hills: Early summer yearling hulls, calved 5/1/77 thru 6/30/78
Junior heifter calves, calved I/I /78 thra 2/28/78 (3)- HI)-RW BAR'S Northern Sensation 104 (reserve grand Stardust Erica 650,grand champion,junior heifercalfcham- champion, intermediate champion), RW BAR. pion Jeanne Chitty, Micanopy; Macedon Blackbird SI I5.
REGISTERED ANGUS
Featuring
CYPRESS GAY JINGO CC PRESIDENT 345
CYPRESS CREEK RANCH
Box 2000, Johnston Rd., Dade Cit, Fla.
Bill & Melba Straigis, Owners 904/588-25714
Billy Sanders, Herdsman 904/588-2951
GilertJ.RobrtsAw
ANGUSFAR
Hom of IF RD S of WY 7p
Marana, FI 3246GRAND Champion Angus bull was STARDUST Angus Ranch, Micanopy
90448-252exhibited by Walter W. Teague, Auburn- showed the grand champion Angus
dale, at the show in Palatka. female at Palatka, shown by Jeanne ChitRegistered, Top Quality Angus
Bennett's Angus Ranch
P.O. Box 8, Phone 904/594-5202
GREENWOOD, FL 32443
THE BEST IN BREEDING STOCK
Brangus Bulls
as well as
100% Wye Bred Angus Bulls Saames Forms
Box 545 Balnbriige, Georgia 31717 CALVIN Winter, Tallahassee, owned the RW BAR Custom Fitters, Ocala, showed
Telephone (91;t) 246-5964 reserve grand champion Angus female at the reserve grand champion Angus bull at
the Putnam County Fair. the Putnam County Fair.
82 / THE FLORIDA CATITLEMAN / JUNE 1979




FROM'S MINERAL MIX WITH
ROLTURNSYOUR CATLE INTO
EFFECTIVE FLY FIGHTERS.
rate of gain, feed efficiency, carcass quality, or fertility.
In addition, ROL has no feedoff peXriod in beef cattle, and is the only registered larvicide labeled for use in lactating dairy cattle.
The ROL in FRM Mineral Mix is both highly effective and entirely compatible with the environment. Beneficial insects like dung beetles develop naturally and unharmed. Also, manure from treated animals may be used as fertilizer on crops grown for human consumption.
NOW VOUR CASTLE CAN HELPODU CONTROL ALL FOUR RuES OF MAJOR ECONOMIC IMFORFANC W ITHOUT S EIAL HANDLING OR FMENT
This summer, turn your cattle into tough, natural fighters against the four flies that constantly rob you of profits.
Free Choice FRM Mineral Mix with ROL@(RabonOral Larvicide) lets your cattle protect and treat themselves. Start feeding your cattle FRM Mineral
I Mix with ROL now, and continue through[4out the fly season. You'll be giving them an effective weapon against a real profitreducing enemy--flies. Horn Fly Face Fly House Fly Stable Fly See your local FRM dealer today.
Passing through the digestive tract, ROL is retained in the manure, where it remains to kill fly larvae shortly after they M IN ERAL hatch.MIE A
By stopping development at this vital R _1
stage, you can control fly problems be- M IXO fore they ever start to cut into your cattle
production. E2D
And FRM Mineral Mix with ROL will ',TR
not harm your cattle. There are no ad- Flint River Mills, Inc.
verse effects on health, weight gain, Bainbridge, Georgia
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 83




Continental Animal Seienee lfighlights
Breeds by JOHN E. MOORE
Willbe faturd inUniversity of Florida
the September issue Effect offorage maturity on hay quality
of T e FlridaMaking high-quality hay in Florida can tant factors to know when balancing
of he lordabe a challenge. When grass is growing rations, but voluntary intake of TDN is
Cattleman. well, it may be raining every day and a better estimate of quality because it is
this means that hay-cutting is put off for closely related to animal performance: Editorial content in another day, week or month. It is the higher the TDN intake, the higher
generally known that grasses decrease in the performance. this issue will focus quality as they grow and mature. Of
on some of the course, there is a trade-off between yield Florida research
and quality; as the time between cut- In cooperation with 0. C. Ruelke of the Continentals and tings is increased, yield increases but agronomy department, Suwannee Bertheir use in Florida. quality decreases. Proper timing and a muda grass and Pangola Digit grass
careful watch on the weather can help were grown in pure stands on Pine Acres If you are a b e d r produce the desired yield and quality. Ranch near Citra. Early in the season,
breeder"i i ha s ae uliy nitrogen was applied (100 lb./A) and the
of xotcs" t i Wha isforaeqaiy winter and spring growth of grasses and
aloa good way to The best way to describe forage quality weeds was removed (May 27 for Suwanalsois in terms of the performance of the nee, June 4 for Pangola). Nitrogen was
promote your herd to animals eating it. The highest quality again applied to Suwannee after the first
Florida Cattlemen. forage (e.g., alfalfa) may support daily cutting (50 lb./A). First regrowth was
gains of growing cattle equal to those harvested at two week intervals through achieved with grain. This level of 12 weeks of regrowth. After each cutClosing day for performance is not expected with Flor- ting, the cut areas received nitrogen (100
advertising space ida's summer perennial grasses, how- lb./A). Second regrowths were hariAu ut5. ever. In some cases, beef cattlemen may vested after four to 10 or 11I weeks
want their cows to only maintain regrowth in late August and September.
Write or call weight, and there is no need to have The cutting schedule is in Table 1.
for more information. highest-.quality hay for them. Hays and artificially dried, chopped
Crude protein and total digestible and fed free-choice to sheep in order to nutrients (TDN) content are often used determine voluntary intake and nutrient
loesd to indicate hay quality. These are impor- digestibility. Estimates were made of
de ____________at~itlem aff Table 1. Effect of maturity on hay quality
1( AND LIVESTOCK JOURNAL kPoen TDN' TDN2
Kissimmee, Fl.371of cut Regrowth M% M% (times M)
Suwannee Bermuda grass
First regrowth:
SZ-YEQAIY6/10 2 20 63 1.6
ABERDEEN-ANGUS 6/24 4 14 58 1.4
7/8 6 9 55 1.3
THOMPSON BROS. FARM 7/22 8 8 48 0.9
J. R. and Bruce Thompson, Owners 8/4 10 7 46 0.8
RL1, Box 6S1 Marianna 8/18 12 6 45 0.8
PH: 904/482-8522 Florida 32446 Second regrowth:
____________________ 8/31 4 18 57 1.8
9/1 6 13 50 1.4
9/2 8 10 44 1.2
9/3 10 7 42 0.9
Clark Angus Ranch Pangola Digit grass
First regrowth:
6/18 2 18 65 1.7
Registered Angus 7/2 4 12 62 1.5
7/17 6 10 62 1.3
Breeding quality cattle acclimated 7/30 8 10 59 0.9
to South Florida and the Gulf Coast 8/12 10 8 52 0.7
Performance Testing 9/25 12 7 53 0.8
Second regrowth:
9/8 4 18 63 1.7
J. P. and Marion Clark 9/15 8.5 6 52 0.8
P.O0. Box 308 9/711 7 50 0.8
Punta Gorda, Fla. 33950 9/17 tmte rmdgetbeogai atr
Phone 813/639..2146 2TNetmtdfo iesil rai atr
or 813/625-5390 2TDN intake expressed as a relative value where: 1I the maintenance requirement (e.g., a value of 1.4 is 140% of the maintenance requirement).
84 /THE FLORIDA CATT'LEMAN / JUNE 1979




Solid research proves, a
c rs confirm: Angus are the
ost profitable for feeding.
Do you have to feed your cattle too long to make the In a University of Illinois survey of 226 slaughter and USDA Choice Grade? processing plants, an amazing 65% reported that
Are you tired of being docked for over-fat, low- Angus, including crossbreds, provided the most yielding steers? useful and profitable product-the reason for
Then switch to Angus. Research proves today-, s market-topping prices. Angus and Angus crosses get out of the feedlot And today's modern Angus and most Angus fast-with both the quality and yield grade you crossbreds are big enough to gain 3 lbs. a day and need for top prices. still finish at 1,100 lbs. or less. They're efficient
Tests at the University of Wisconsin showed Angus converters of feed and economical to handle. grade Choice from 15 to 65 days sooner than other So why don't you feed Angus-for higher-quality breeds-saving you feed time and labor. and higher-yielding carcasses with less time in the
Kansas State University proved Angus have a feedlot-for more money? genetic advantage for marbling in less time, with- Remember, research proves, "They're worth more out putting on excessive outside fat as occurs in if they're black!" most other breeds. You get Choice grade plus high yield. American Angus Association
3201 Frederick Blvd., St. Joseph, MO 64501
U G
41
L




"WATCH THEM GROW" TDN content and TDN intake. TDN
PERFORMANCE TESTED BULLS intakes were divided by the maintenance TDN requirement to give an
GRAHAM ANGUS FARM estimate of overall quality. A value of
1.0 means the hay could maintain
Rot ,Box 587, Albany, Georgia 31701 weight when fed alone; below 1 .0 means
Rout 3,WtoMr r.FodWgeOfieMr im ols ateMr that supplement is needed. A value of
0.12 T. 02 Watson 43gr24 Mrs.) Fly4Wger9fic-gr7imyBwls 9CtleMr 1.8 indicates a "good" quality hay.
(912 43-022 (92) 42-949 (12)439-695Table I presents the results of our
study. With increasing maturity
Baldwn Anus ~(r egrowth interval) there were decreases Bald in A gusRanc ea~ mee a Y a *Wd in protein, TDN content and TDN
FEATU RES Modern Angus Performance by intake. In all cases, grasses cut at six
weeks regrowth or earlier had protein of
Emnulous Pride 135 MARSHALL PRIDE 408 nine percent or more, TDN of 50 per100% cent or more and TDN intake of 1.3 or
Golden Certified Meat Sire SWAINSBORO, GEORGIA 30401 more times the maintenance requireRanch 5 Miles North of Ocala off 1-75. Donald A Gerald Hooks, Bill Allbritton, Mgr.
904/62J-4574. Leroy Baldwin, owner. Owners-912/562-3SSS 912/562-3200o ment. In only one case did 8-week hay have a TDN intake above 1.0 (Suwannlee, second regrowth). The TDN conSYKES ANGUS RANCH tent of Suwannee was lower than that of
Pangola at comparable stages of
6342 Sykes Roed Ph: 305/633-5134 Sc e r r o regrowth. There was little difference
WEST PALM BEACH, FLA. 33406 Land & Livestock between them in TDN intake, however,
Featuring the breeding of Black Watch because the dry matter intake for
President 239 son of 1964 Grand Champion Ankonlan Preaident. And Hidden Gordon Johnson, Lake Worth, FL Suwannee was higher than for Pangola.
Hills 0B53, a grandson of famous Phone 305/965-1473 Second regrowths tended to be slightly
_______________________ 2.________________ higher in protein and TDN intake than
____________________________ first regrowths of the same number of weeks. Second regrowths may have been
BROOKS HILL FARM FLORIDA less mature because it took longer to
regenerate new growth from the crowns
Quality Angus atrheprevious cutting.
JonH yler werA gsis' In order to insure having Suwannee
Ph. 226-1675 adPnoahywt nuhqaiyt
Verlyn Denney, Mgllr.-Pertne 410 W. Verona St. adPnoahywt nuhqaiyt
Ph. 735-3350 Ph: 305/846-2800 maintain weight, they should be cut
Thomasville, Ga. 31792 KISSIMMEE, FLA. 32741 after no more than six weeks regrowth.
__________________________ ___________________________ If a longer interval between cuttings
can't be avoided, the resulting hay will
Black is Bountiful GR E 1Wneed to be supplemented with energy
Come see us for your needs. iBreeders of and possibly protein. It might be
Breeding performance Angus Cattle superior angus. desirable to make a cutting of hay
featuring the best of Big Elban and during mid-summer, even if it rains, in
Emulous bloodlines. PO Box 1240 order to make a higher quality hay in
Jenkins Angus Ranch Ocala, Florida 32670 late summer or early fall. Maturity,
7221 Old Polk City Rd., Lakeland, FL 33801 Day Phone (904) 732-4800 rather than date of harvest, is the factor
Visiors: Alw3/s5Welcom Night (904) 732-3363 which determines the quality of the
visiors lwas WecomeI PAsummer perennial grasses such as RerDon't Forget Our muda grasses, Digit-grasses, and Bahia
Dispereal Sale, June 2 Florida Headquarters For gass
MARSHALL PRIDES gass
HUGHES BLEED
Angus Ranch B LE E D
Curtis Hughes, Farms Angus business
Owner Rt. 2, Box 53B shows strength
Ph: 813/722-3168 Lake City, Fl. 32055
R. R. 1, Box 455 Palmetto, Fla. 33581 904/752-2541 Registrations of purebred Angus cattle
were up nearly 20 percent the first six
*** ** ** I*t months of the 1979 fiscal year reports C.
J Angus Farm s *Perbormaenc T.td* K. Allen, executive vice-president of the
U P Reg. Angus catt* American Angus Association. The
Angus Cattle For Sale ** increase, according to Allen, reflects a
at all times STARDUST RANCH strong beef market and record demand
Bill Graham, Owner fo*nu reigsok
Rt. 1, Box 435 Hen and Jeannette Chitt fReAgsrediong sortck. io
akka, FL 33551 ~Phne7Qalnesvlle) 904Reisraios2orth1prid O0
MyakF335 MICANOPY, FLORIDA 32667 tober through March) were 163,299
Ph: 813/322-1601 ** ***** ** ~ head compared with 136,637 head for
the same period in 1978. Transfers,
which reflect sales, were at 84,249 head,
REGISTERED ANGUS BULLS up nearly five percent from a year
Service Age and Ready to Work earlier.
Suitable for Commuercial or Purebred Herds The number of new Angus herds
being started, as reflected by new
SOUTH WOOD FARM members joining the Association, was
also up by more than five percent. Total
Pht: 904/877-1158 TALLAHASSEE FLA. 32302 P.O. Box 191 new Angus Association members for the
- I period was 1254.
86 /THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979




i~'L~sW VLNS
N. B. Hunt Ranches Largest Ever Production HEIFER SALE
Saturday, June 16, 1979-10 a.m.
Fort Worth Stockyard, Fort Worth, Texas
Offering 6000 choice heifers weighing between 650-750 pounds and ready for breeding. Sorted from 35,000 heifers. All are calfhood vaccinated; all open with the exception of 1000 head which have been pasture exposed to Brahman bulls.
TYPES IN THE OFFERING Brangus Charolais/Angus crosses
Braford (tiger striped) Charolais/Hereford crosses
Black Baldface Charbray
ALL LOT SIZES WILL BE OFFERED Available for inspection by appointment. Contact: N. B. Hunt Ranches
Office at Richardson, Texas Ph: 214/234-8191
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 87




Florida-Georgia
The Welcome Mat is Always Out Charolais sale
averages $1257
The Florida-Georgia Charolais Association Invitational Sale struck an average of $1273.50 on 54 lots, on May 12, at Tifton, Georgia. The sale grossed $68,770.
Five bulls sold to bring $7145 and average $1429 per head, while 49 females grossed $61,625 for an average of $1257.65 per head.
The top selling animal was a female with calf at side that was owned by Henry Douglas of K-Bar Ranch, Zephyrhills. The pair was purchased by Malcom Commer, Fairfield Plantation, Jonestown, Mississippi, for $3400.
The high selling bull was consigned
If you are looking for top polled Charolais females or top perform- by Barton Charolais Ranch, Tallaing polled Charolais bulls. CALL or COME BY. Chalais, anedfersonillto Geloryland
$3000.
Volume buyer was Commer who
Harlan & Dortheann Rogers purchased 12 head for $16,900. The
second high buyer was Sans Souci Farms, Ocala, with purchases of six lots ROGES BA HRfor $7750.
The sale was managed by the Florida-Georgia Charolais AssociaCollins, Mississippi tions and the auctioneer was Roy HerePhone: 601/765-8848, 765-8881 ford, Faunsdale, Alabama.
Hernando elects
Rivenbark for '79-80
CHAROLAIS Rocking K Ranch Bennie Rivenbark, Brooksville, was
and CHARBRAY CATTLE Establishedl951 named president of the Hernando
Charolais & Charbray County Cattlemen's Association during K RANCH Our Bulls are guaranteed the group's annual meeting held on
Henry Douglas HAL KEATS, President April 21.
Ph: 813 782-1571 Ph: 813 782-1936 Ft. Lauderdale 305/771-9010 Others elected, all from the BrooksZEPHYRHILLS, FLORIDA 33599 DON KELLY, Manager vile area, were Arlie Neal, vice presiu.swofzephyrhllsonMorrisBridgefld. Okeechoubee 813/7634981 dent; John F. Mason, treasurer, and Al
Dawson, secretary.
Directors are J. 0. Batten; Lanny DUNCAN CHAROLAIS FARM CSEcent J Ranch Fulmer and Bob Potter. State director is
For Sale Quality Charolais FOR SALE AT ALL TIMES Derrill S. McAteer.
Open and Bred Heifers Purebred Charolais bulls & heifers Continuing in unexpired terms as
Performance Tested Bulls 3/4 Chianina bulls & boilers directors are S. J. D'Andrea; Anthony
Wm. J. Broussard. Bob Porter, Foreman Roller and J. B. McMullen. Tum Jackon, Farm Mgr. Bob & Arlene Ducan, owners M.D. Owner Rnco w i. h Honorary state director is John L.
Rt. 1, Box 111 2307 S.E.l14th St. 1355 S. Hickory St. oftHolopaw, Hwy. 441 Hnrr tt ietri onL
Tgnall, Ga.30668 Ocal Fla32670 Melbourne, Fla. 32901 Ayers and Melvin Kelly is honorary
Ph. 404/285-2383 Ph: 129-2629 305/892-5010 (Ranch) 305/727-7632 (Office) county director.
BRANDIFF SUBSCRIBE NOW! Feed association
CHAROLAIS RANCH FEEDERS KNOW what sets meeting dates
Purebred Bulls for Sale CHAROLAIS can dol The Florida Feed Association will hold
Professional feeders know what Charolais its annual convention on July 12-13,
Ready for service sired steers and heifers will do In the 1979, at the Sand Piper Resort, Port St.
feedlot, and the kind of carcass they Lucie. LOR reedng roduce under today's new grading stanL Breedingards. The emphasis Is on fast gains, low Gene Spencer, Tampa, president of
feed costs and high quality, high cutting the association, said the featured carcasses. There's a Charolais breeder speaker at the event will be a special Owner-A.H. Brandiff near you ... let him show you how to sekra h vn ilb pca
Owner-A.H.Brandiff produce the mostfrom your cow herd, representative of the USDA.
Mgr.-A.H. Brandiff, Jr. Florida Charolais Ass'n Appearance is scheduled for July 13.
Ph. 813/322-1724 Jackie Brittain, Secretary In addition, Spencer said that
Rt. 1 B 34-D Route 4, Box 541 Deputy Secretary of Agriculture Jim
, ox Citra, Fla. 32627 Williams is expected to attend the event.
Myakka City, Fla. 33551 Phone: 904/591-2708
Affiliated with American Int'l Charolels Ass'n
88 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979




WHEN POUNDS
ARE MORE
IMPORTANT
THAN
PE NNIE S
PHENOTHIAZINE
Research indicates that fly and worm control contribute to heavier, healthier animals.
Horn and face flies and internal parasites often cause reduced feed efficiency,
slower gains, and reduced production in cattle which appear to be
perfectly healthy. Thus, it is up to you to protect them from
these pests. You can do so, efficiently and economically, by feeding them products containing phenothiazine.
Phenothiazine controls horn flies, face flies, and internal parasites and it reduces the contamination of pastures with their larvae. So when pounds are more important to you than pennies, feed products containing phenothiazine. You'll be dollars
ahead in the long run.
FOD WEST WEST AGRO-CHEMICAL, INC.
VYEAR ROUND PHE OT IAZBEAGo x86 Shawnee Mission, KS 66222
TW.Trm a PHENOTHIAZINE m tRO
I&CONTROL11 T.M Wnc- .1, -CeiAl.Ic




Puri na Introduces. o.. A New
Fly And Worm Control Block!
o .. For Less Than
W~ Per Head
Per Day!
It's Economical *GOOD PASTURE MANAGEMENT
It's Effective New Purina Check-Fly and Wormer Blocks help
reduce the contamination of pastures with manureIt's Purina's NEW Check-Fly' breeding flies and worm larvae.
and Wormer Block! Make new Purina Check-Fly and Wormer Blocks
*CONVENIENT AND ECONOMICAL part of your herd health program. Feeding your animals
New uria Ceck-ly nd orme Blcksjust 2 ounces per head per day at a cost of less than 3 is New uria Ceck-ly nd orme Blcksthe economical way to provide BOTH Fly and Worm provide you with an easy, inexpensive way to control control without handling the animals. the development of Horn Flies, Face Flies, and Worms at only 2 ounces per day consumption. See your local participating Purina Dealer. ..
*CONTAINS PHENOTHIAZINE
New Purina Check-Fly and Wormer Blocks 1F"_ ur7a.
contain high quantities of Phenothiazine. These blocks 1o u ia. are extremely effective in helping your animals combat Pan i o
BOTH Fly and Worm parasite infections, with research today.




Mole crickets.: IFAS research project bag ~jr
byP .KOEHLER, D.E. SHORT and C.S. Th e A eerhproject
by BARFIELDThne IASrsac
University of Florida During the spring and summer of 1977, jtarm o
18 entomologists in IFAS were working
Mole crickets caused in excess of $100 in some aspect of the mole cricket at Ocala, of course
million damage in Florida from 1976- problems. In the fall of 1977, the chair1978. Pasture, turf, vegetable, and field man of the department of entomology & Mr. and Mrs. John D. Corr, Owners crops were affected most severely. Mole nemnatology submitted a request for Outstanding Full
cricket damage to these commodities special funding on mole crickets in Flor- French and occurs throughout the southeastern ida. In 1978, this request remained Purebred
U.S. Approximately eight million acres unfunded; however, $9500 in emergency Charolais of pasture is grown in Florida, provid- funds was made available from the vice Located I mi. west FAK
ing forage for the livestock industry, president's IFAS account to be used for of 1-75 on U.S. 27 Bahia grass is a principal pasture grass, mole cricket research. Unfortunately, O A
and is a preferred host for mole crickets, this amount was well short of the 946252 Statewide, 30 percent of Bahia grass has estimated needed amount of $125,000 /6250
been damaged severely and four per- per year for five years to adequately cent completely destroyed by mole fund this serious research need. In early MADISON POLLED
crickets. In some locations, 100 percent 1978, the Florida Cattleman's Associa- CH-AROLAIS
of Bahia grass pastures have been tion backed the special funding request. SFSrRylSm5
destroyed. As a result, the Florida legislature has Ou r o300ls Herd S5r
Every year the mole cricket problem appropriated $60,500 per year to fund Su onsld Daughtes Her Sae
appears to get worse and complaints of mole cricket research.SosadDuhesFral poor control with recommended Thus, in the latter part of 1978, an GLENN D. VIRGO
chemicals continue to be heard. WFAS interdisciplinary effort was launched to Rt. 7, Bo910&T/877ase,7278 30 entomologists have been aware of the develop a usable Integrated Past49-,TlaseF.320 problem and have initiated a research Management Program (IPM) for mole I Polled French
project toward solution of the problem. crickets. This effort envisioned basic HRLI
and applied research toward first under-CHR AI
Historyof the rojectstanding the life system of mole crickets, W S I
Hitr fthpoetthen developing methods for control or HRLIRAC
Research on mole cricket control in management aimed at attacking Ed&DtWsi
Floid etedsbak o 94 wen vulnerable points within those life 196SayOk
information about the life cycle of mole systems. T .1hseFa 20
crickets was published by the Florida Department of Agriculture. IFAS 1978-79 Research 943599
researchers have worked on mole In the initial year of finding, emphasis
crickets to determine effective chemical has been placed on identification of long Join
control measures, periodically publish- and short-range goals, establishment of ing papers in the 1950's and 1960's. In initial experimental designs, and recruitthese studies, chlorinated hydrocarbons ment of an overall project coordinator. were found to provide the most success- A project coordinator (Dr. Carl Bar- YOUR
ful mole cricket control. Unfortunately, field) with a major time commitment to around 1970, most chlorinated hydro- this project was hired in November, carbons were prohibited for use on 1978. His responsibilities included pastures. Concurrently with the ban of disbursement of funds to cooperating Local
chlorinated hydrocarbons, the mole researchers, taking the lead role in cricket problem appeared to worsen, identifying and coordinating research
In the 1970's, mole crickets emerged activities, and drafting a state research COWVBELLES as a major pest in Florida and WFAS project on mole crickets. Despite these research was intensified. Studies were initial administrative activities, headway conducted on sound production, light was made in research areas. behavior, and basic habitats of mole I) Chemical control (Received 33.10 Association
crickets from 1973 to 1976. From 1970 percent of funding). A variety of baits to 1979, Field studies were conducted on and attractants were evaluated as carapproximately 75 insecticides. Every riers of mole cricket insecticides. Some insecticide registration for mole crickets chemicals currently cleared for use in Feed Florida Molasses in the U.S. has been backed by WFAS pastures were screened for effectiveness go
research, against mole crickets. . .a godsource of
Insecticidal control of mole crickets 2) Basic ecology (Received 30.14 mineral elements
has consisted mainly of soil treatments percent of funding). To understand the with granules, drenches, and baits. In biology and ecology of any organism, pastures, baits appear to be the only one must be able to sample that feasible method of control. Presently, organism in all its life stages. Sampling toxaphene five percent bait, trichlorfon mole crickets is a major problem (Dylox, Proxol) five percent bait, and because of their subterranean existence. malathion two percent bait are the only Studies were initiated toward designing mole cricket controls labeled for pasture trapping funnels and utilizing electronic use. Baits should be applied during sound devices emulating cricket calls June, July or August and preferably ("artificial crickets") to attract adult Florida Molasses Exchange, Inc. immediately after a rain. Moisture mole crickets. The ability of organisms Phone 305/996-7711, P.O. Box 507
encourages mole cricket feeding activity to find mates and disperse to suitable Belle Glade, Fla. 33430
on the soil surface. (Continued on page 99)
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 91




Gentle Red Brahmans Congress '79 set for Colorado
LiVestock Marketing Congress '79 is slated to be held at the Marriott Hotel in
Peace Valley Denver, Colorado, June 13-15. The event is being conducted by Livestock Merchandising Institute, one of LMA's allied organizations.
Ranch The theme is "Riding The Cycle: Are There Workable Alternatives for the
Industry and Consumer?" Congress General Chairman Robert Walker noted, "I can guarantee my fellow Trade Group subscribers a Congress they'll never We Invite you to inspect the largest forget."
Red Brahman Herd in the
Southeast.
E. D. Rogers, Owner
Route 1, Box 97
Zolfo r1prns, Fla.33890 Brahman breeders have strong
Ph: 813/735-5561 *
Gary Shiver, Manager showing at Putnam Fair
Located nm eatRoffod 6Springs Winners in the open Brahman show Females, calved 9/1/76 thru 12/31/76 ()-Sutra Kabar
_________________________ held at the Putnam County Fair, 1, Kabar;
Females, calved 3/1/76 thru 8/31/76 (l)-Berta Kabar Palatka, listed by class to the first three 1, Kabar; places, with the number of entries in Bulls, Calved 3/1/78 thru 4/30/78 (6)-WWT I Ula
1 -~ Sugar 23/28, Tilton; AEW Manso Bevo 39, Cresent0
Gentle, Gray Brahmans each class in parentheses, follow: Ranch, Kissimmee; 57 OLP ME Resoto, Mrs. 0. L. Partin;
thru 4/30/78 (6)-LMT Suzy Bulls, calved 1/1 /78 thru 2/28/78 (4)-HTP Powell's Big Females, calved 3/1/78 tr4/07 6-MSuy John 103/i, H. T. Powell, Winter Park; LMT Keno Sugarta
D. T. Davis Ranch Loxcrata 262/8 (reserve grand champion, junior cham- 257/8, L. M. Tucker; LMT Duke Sugarta 254/8, L. M.
pion), Santa Barbara Ranch, Clewiston, and L. M. Tucker, Tucker; Bulls, calved 11/1/77 thru 12/31/77 (2)-HTP Tifton, Georgia; WWT Gina Gem 86/68, W. W. Tilton, Powell's John 98/7 (grand champion, junior champion), Don and Darlene Davis, Owners Palatka; Miss JCC Mansopartee 241, James C. Chapman, Powell; JCC Emperor 230, Chapman;
Rt. 1, Box 256, Zolfo Springs, FL 33890 St. Cloud; Bulls, calved 3/1/77 thru 8/31/77 (2)-Elephante 730
Telephone 813/735-4774 MEFemales, calved I1//79 thru 2/28/78 (5)-62 OLP Miss (reservejunior champion), Santa Barbara; Loxey Kabar 195,
MEResoto, Mrs. 0. L. Partin, Kissimmee; Miss JCC Kahar; Mansopartee 232, Chapman; TA Lady Tuck Empress 902. Bulls, calved 3/1/77 thru 4/30/77 (2)-HPS Cordier L. M. Tucker; Mde Man 405, Heart Bar; Loxey Kabar 184, Kabar;
Females, calved 11/1/77 thru 12/31/77 (2)-DD Miss Bulls, calved 1/1/77 thru 2/28/77 (4)-HPS King
TUCK ER S :i HCB Ranc, T. ODara nfo Springs; HCB Lady Resoto Emperor 402 (eservOe senior champion), BHeart Bar; 42 OLP
Females, calved 3/1/77 thru 4/31/77 (3)-Miss Loxey man & Collier, Wachula; Kabar 170 (reserve junior champion). Kabar Ranch. Jack- Bulls, calved 3/1/76 thru 8/31/76 (1)-37 OLP ME souville; Miss Loxey Kabar 194, Kabar; LMT Jan T Sugarta Resoto (reserve grand champion, senior champion), Mrs. 0. 216/7, L. M. Tucker; L atn
Females, calved 3/1/77 thru 4/30/77 (5)-Miss Loxey L. Martin
Registered Brahmans Kabar 121, Kabar; Miss Loxey Kabar 193, Kabar; Miss Produce of dam ()-Mrs. 0. L. Partin;
L. M TUCER CC Ipertor 02,Chapan;Get of sire (3)-Mrs. 0. L. Partin; Kahar; W. W. Tilton.
L. M.TUCKER JCC Imperator 202, Chapman;
Route 5, Box 221 Telephone: Females, calved 1/1/77 thru 2/28/77 (6)-HPS Julian
Tifton, GA 32794 912/533-4881 Riley 594 (grand champion, senior champion), Heart Bar
Ranch, Kissimmee; LMT Lady Tuck 210/7, L. M. Tucker; Miss JCC Emperor 210, Chapman;
G. T. STACK & SONS
REGISTERED BRAHMANS
Suite 406-A 9225 Bay Plaza Blvd.
Tampa, Florida 33619
Telephones: Off. 813/621-2117
Home 813/689-3920 t
Red and Gray Brahmans
HALES FARMS, INC.
Richard and Freeman Hales, Owners
P. O. Box 1395 Ph. 813/763-7387
OKEECHOBEE, FLORIDA 33472 H. T. POWELL, Winter Park, owned the HEART BAR Ranch, showed the grand
grand champion Brahman bull at the Put- champion Brahman female at the Putnam
nam County Fair. County Fair.
Quality Brahmans
H. C1int Young, Jr.
P. 0. Box 345, Dade City, Fla. 33525
904/588-3713 (Home) 904/567-6767 (Office)
L/C BrahmansV
Brahmans Build Better Beet
Cattle available for sale
L Slant Bar C Ranch
E. L. Crews, Jr. (Lacy) Mail: Rt. 1, Box B158 RESERVE GRAND Champion Brahman RESERVE GRAND Champion Brahman
Res. Baxter, Florida Sanderson, FL 32087 bull at Palatka was exhibited by Mrs. 0. L. female was owned by Santa Barbara
Ph; 904/275-2377 Partin, Kissimmee. Ranch, CIdwiston, and L. M. Tucker.
92 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979




YOUR
CONTRIBUTIONS
ARE DEEPLY
APPRtECIATED
The list of names on the plaque at FGA headquarters showing contributors to the Magazine Fund is continuing to grow. To get your name on the list, a contribution of at least $10 is
needed.
The FCA board of directors approved the continuation of the fund drive through June.
With 60 percent of the members having contributed to date, the program is expected to be continued on into the new FCA year in order to give 100 percent of the membership the opportunity of participating in this program. Why don't you join with us and help make it
100 percent?
Mail check to:
THE FLORIDA CAT1TLEMAN MAGAZINE FUND
P. 0. Box 1929, Kissimmee Florida 32741
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 I93




taxesThe selection of the safe rate is an Taxesattempt to find the maximum yield, risk
(Continued from page 72) free, and most liquid alternative investmated by dividing the annual net nient for the operator. It is usually
*income expected from the land by the developed from interest paid on medium
CA MJ N S rate of return that the owner expects to denomination, short-term investments.
receive on capital invested in land. This These types of investments, like 13 week CAT LE ERV CE called the capitalization rate. Put because of their comparative safety and
FLORDA IVIIONanother way, the capitalization rate is liquid nature.
FL RIA IVSIN the current rate of return necessary to Illiquidity is a factor that takes into
entice capital to that type of invest- consideration that real estate transCarl& J Lyn Soryment, in this case pastureland. The for- actions, especially the large ones, often
Car &Jo yn Strymula for computing the classified use require months or years, and they are
value is: costly to "close." That is, farmland
Rt. 3, Box 192B Value = Annual Net Income +Capitalization Rate usually cannot be converted (sold) as
Lake City, FL 32055 To help arrive at a classified use sickly as, for eape akdpst
Phone: 904/755-3910 value, enterprise budgets can be ou stcs exape, bank iliu ditaeoitsa
developed and/or studied for the tpcl capitalization rate is compensation for crop grown on the property. A budget is the length of time needed to sell farmPOLLED HEREFORD BULLS an itemized list of expected costs, ln nteoe akt
BHRAA BULLS incomes, and resources necessary to There are financial risks on owning
ROLINSproduce a crop. An example of a 1979 farmland in Florida. The most imporROLISbudget for a 100 cow herd on 200 acres tant risks are the uncertainty of annual
AWRANCH of permanent pasture under top income and the hazard of investment
management is shown in Table I. The los.Ntrldatepiccyean
Rt.2, ox 250 Okechbee F~. 3472 estimated $18,960.70 return to land, s.Ntrldsses rc yls n
Rt 2 Bx120,OPehoee 81 3/72 labor, capital, and management was unstable markets can cause operating
___Phone:___ 813/763-2410______ derived by subtracting the $14,874 ex- losses, investment capital loss and even
pected expenses from $33,834.70 of anti- business failure. The 1947 south Florida 5. W TER & ONS cipated total revenue. Top management flood, the 1977 drought, and the recentS. AT RS S NS is defined as management decisions ly ended down price cycle and their
Registered Brahmans based on up-to-date production and negative effects on pastures, livestock
URNprice information with good cows and inventories, and business operations are
1WV RA N1 C H~1* land, and optimum timing of produc- recent examples cow-calf operators
8345 Alturas Rd., Bartow, FL 32830 tion practices. Annual return to land, would like to forget but are not likely to.
Ranch 813/533-4765 labor, capital, and management can These risks and others are taken into
Home 813/537-2147 vary widely. consideration when a risk rate is
Home 813/533-6415 1 For example, in 1977, estimated developed for capitalization.
return to land, labor, capital and Money management is necessary in
management was -$864 (Table 2). In any beef' cattle operation. A manageRegistered and Commercial Brahmans 1978, a $6929 return was estimated miert rate in a capitalization rate is com(Table 3). Why the large variations? In estofrmagighe onay
these instances, the main cause was pnesatment forh managingctesn nmoner C. H. Beville depressed beef prices at the end of the in vement l tthnreaing nuatmber
down price cycle and much higher prices prove out costly when adhered to and Telephone 904/793-2081 in the early stages of the up price cycle,. lcutn rftmris oe
BUSH NELLFLORIDA 33513 Sinceain agrculura yields,, pricseo
Sinc agicuturl yeld, pice of management is becoming more imporI products, and costs can vary widely tant in maintaining viable operations. It
from year to year, five-year moving should not be confused with the cost to
REGISTERED BRAHMANS averages of yields, prices, and costs rno aaetepoet tef
derived from past budgets and record run or maoe mlage thrprt isl summaries show a more accurate net A dvlrmmlaert sas
incoe pctue tan cstsandretrns included in a capitalization rate. EstabJam s W Scaboog h fro single year. A moving average lished by the county, this rate repreP. 0. Box 1373 simply "moves" over time in that each sents the annual tax dollars paid by
Wauchula, FL 33873 "new" year's figures take the place of property owners per $1000 of classified
813/735-0391 the now sixth year's figures when a five- use valuation per acre. For example, if
year average moving average total cost the county tax millage rate was 14 perfrom gross revenue, a net income can be cent and a permanent pasture's classiderived for the income approach for- fied use value was $200, the ad valorem Quality Brahmans mula. This net income then serves as a tax levy would be $2.80/acre (.014 x
D irno d Ra ch yardstick in projecting estimated in- $200). For inclusion in the capitalizaDia on T Ra ch come from the property in the future. tion rate, the millage rate is converted
Jim Nettles, Mgr. Longer term averages (over five years) into a percentage.
713/245-1621 for yields, prices, and costs can help pro- A percentage is given the safe, illiP. 0. Box 1182 vide even more definitive net income quidity, risk, and management compoBay City, Tex. 77414 pictures for land. nents of the capitalization rate by the
_________________________ In Florida, there is no set capitaliza- county property appraiser's office. ToQuality Registered Bra hmans tion rate or mandated method to deter- gether with the ad valorem millage permine one. The rates are developed by centage they are summed to derive a LIVE OAK PLANTATION various methods, including the capitalization rate. For example, an 8.5
Ocaa, lorda"summation method." In brief, a capitalization rate for permanent
Ocaa, lordacapitalization rate normally contains the pasture "summed" by the authors and
John King, herdsman 904/237-2863 following "summed components": a presented simply for illustrative puroffice 904/237-3401 safe rate, an illiquidity rate, a risk rate, a poses includes: a 5 percent safe rate, a .5
On SR 40, Five miles W. of 1-75 management rate, and an ad valorem percent illiquidity rate, a .5 percent risk
millage rate. (Continued on page 101)
94 / THE FLORIDA CATITLEMAN / JUNE 1979




Brahman sale
averages $1419 BRAHMANS WILL PAY
on 22 head IN EVERY WAY!
Tucker gets two year
term as EBA president Come To See At
An average of $1419.31 was struck on 22
head of registered Brahman heifers at
the Eastern Brahman Association
Quality Brahman Sale, held May 11, at INC.
Tampa. Sale gross was $31,225. INC.
At the annual meeting of EBA M. E. (Max) Hammond, President Tel: 813/533-3713 (Res.)
following the sale,-Andy Tucker, Cocoa,
was named to a two year term as presi- C. Lee Eggert, General Mgr. 813/294-9262 (Ranch)
dent of the organization. He succeeds P.O. Box 250 Bartow, Florida 33830
Byron Johnson of Ocala.
Top selling animal in the sale was
RSR Reloto's Queen 99, consigned by "Top Testing Brahmans" PUREBRED BRAHMANS
Marcus Shackelford, Wauchula. The G.A. TUCKER & SONS r ,
January, 1977, heifer sold bred to IB G T K & SONS
Bevo 74, and was purchased by Bentley You'll Be Satisfied .
Brahman Ranch, Crewsville, for $2300. With Tucker Brahmans LRoute 0 ocoa, Fa. 32922
Second high seller was LMT Tuck Rot. 1 Box 1370 134 osa -.322
Rt. 1, Box 1340 305/636,396
210/7, consigned by L. M. Tucker, Tif- Cocoa, Fla. 32922 featuring more flesh, stronger bone,
ton, Georgia. Selling safe in calf to Mr. 305/636-2390 305/636-6840 larger size, with gentle disposition
Sugarata 1 631, Hales Farms, Okeechobee, purchased the heifer for $2050. HEART BAR RANCH CHAPMAN & COLLIER
Top volume buyer at the event was
Ronald Lott, Seffner, who spent $6650 Still producing top quality Registered Brahman
onl Le h eiffer wand Commercial Cattle for five heifers. BR H A SManso & Imperator Breeding
G. T. Stack, Tampa, was sale chair- BRAHMANS etnss a Qaty Sresd
Gentleness and Quality Stressed
man for the event, and Greg Carlton, Henry 0. Partin & Sons through Selective Breeding
Clewiston, was in charge of screening
easo A. R. Chapman and Wayne Collier, owners
Cnewsto ins. chare C ofer, Screenig KISSIMMEE, FLORIDA 32741 Ph. 813/773-9528 or 813/773-3161
was auctioneer. Phone 305/846-2168 Route 2, Box 218 Wauchula, FI. 33873
In other action at the annual EBA
meeting, Wayner Collier, Wauchula,
was elected vice president, and Mike Registered Brahman Cattle
Partin, Kissimmee, was renamed
treasurer. Don Berry, Kissimmee, was 9.OK SkaAR1
renamed secretary. J. K.STUART
The membership also passed an Registered Brahmans
amendment to its bylaws so that all past BARTOW FLORIDA 33830 1245 Orn e Ave., Winter Park, Fl5. 32789
presidents of the association will Te. 305/644-8136, Home 896-2543
become permanent voting members of
the board of directors.
Mr. and Mrs. Herman Beville, Gentle, Quality BPAHMAN$
pioneer Brahman breeders of Bushnell, BRAHMAN CATTLE
were honored at the EBA banquet held
following the annual meeting. Newly Rocking I Ranch W walker Form s
elected president Andy Tucker cited the AndyWord 904/796-9767
Beville's for recently celebrating their Rt. 2, Box 385, Wauchula, Fl. 33873 Route 2, Box 28
55th wedding anniversary. Marcus Shackleford L. M. Shackelford Brooktlle, FL 33512
The sale was held in conjunction 813/773-4616 813/773-9359
with the Florida International Agricultural Trade Show at the Florida State Ranch
Fair and Expo Park. The meeting and Lazy Ranch
banquet was held at the Ramada Inn, R t WrEhmans
East, Tampa. Registered Brahmans0 0'1
East, ampa.and Quarter Horses
Directors named at the meeting tss 'Tito
were: Joe Barthle, San Antonio; Greg Joe & Jeanette Barthle fgv
Carlton; Jimmy Chapman, Kissimmee; P. 0. Box6 ,!;
Rhett Enzor, Milligan; J. Lewis Patter- San Antonio, Fla. 33576
son, Concord, North Carolina; Marcus START YOUR FUTURE
Shackelford; G. T. Stack, Jr., Tampa; BUY BRAHM ANS
W. W. Tilton, Jr., East Palatka; L. M. Quality BefBA H n AN o
Tuckr, iftn, Gorga; avidWilisMembers of EBA can offer the best in quality and blood. Tucker, Tifton, Georgia; David Willis, Registered Brahmans lines. For more information and list of affiliated breedCocoa; Ray Simms, Lithia; Carl Story, ers, contact:
Lake City; Don Davis, Zolfo Springs, Visitors Welcome By Appointment RAH-AN
Charles Reid, Clewiston, A. E. Whaley, call before 700 am B A N
Kissimmee. GLENN SUMNER RANCH A_ LOCATIONN
i 813/689-7421 D S
1507 So. Valrico Rd., Valrico FL 33594 KL
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 95




Gentle Qrey Brahmans Rodeos held
Double C Bar Ranch at Chiefland TeField day set
Registered & Commiercial TeEastern Brahman Association
Cattle an 0~1~Asummer field day will be held on
Jame C.Chaman nd akeandSaturday, June 23, at the Osceola
Jamsh Chapman644 PCRA approved rodeos were held County Agricultural Pavilion, on
Ph. 05/92-447recently in two cities. The Chiefland U. S. Highway's 441 and 192,
P. 0. Box 115 St. Cloud, Fl. 32769 Rodeo was held March 24-25, followed between Kissimmee and St. Cloud.
by the Lakeland Rodeo on April 2 1-22. Sponsors of the event will be
Registered Brahmans Results of the four rodeos, as corn- Crescent 0 Ranch, owned by A. E.
piled by Sparky Dent of Vero Beach, and Larry Whaley, and Heart Bar
1-2, and 3-year old Bulls listed to the first four places with times Ranch, owned by the Partin family
and Heifers For Sale or marks shown in parentheses and of Kissimmee.
monis wn lited folow:The program will get underway John C. Harrison moiswnlseflo:about 9:30 at the pavilion. Special
Rances hiefandtalks and demonstrations are
John & Trisha Harrison 813/322-1691 Barebacks-Jimbo Watford, Okeechobee (67) $380.24: J. ram.edfrth onigpo
Ri. 1, Box 406G. Myakk C ity, FL 33551 B. McLamh, Benson, North Carolina (64) $237.65: Bob grm
Logue, Cuniby. Texas (64) 3237.65: Glen Webb, Prairie- Following lunch at the pavilion, yulle. Louisiana (62) $95.06; a motorcade tour of area Brahman
Registered & Commercial Brahman Cattlo. Saddle broncs-Charlie Atwell, Huntersville, North ranches will be conducted under the
ACarolia (65) $192.08; Rick Whorton. Springdale, Arkansas
K DBAR RANCH (6)S144.06: Scott Fletcher, Winnsboro, Louisiana (61) direction of A. E. Whaley,
S96.4: Ray Phillips, Kissimmee (60) $24.01; Gary Williams,
H. Q. Kennedy & Sons Okeehobee (60) S24.01:
13503Ranc Rd.Ball riding-Roy Carter, Crockett, Texas (71) $309.68; 135c3snci Rda. 219Gary George, Bonifay (70) $232.26; Donald Chapman.
PH:snile 904/7573438 LaPorte, Tenas (66) 5154.84: Barry Brown, Opelika, rhra atvte
PH: 904/757-3643 Alabama (641538.71; Mike Cos. Cypress, Texas (64) $3871: a ma civte
Corner of 1-95 and entrance of Jacksonville Calf roping-Morgan Grainger, Hawthorne (10.5) ~ o nrae
Ineratonl iror.$576.24; Charlie Lowry. Sunmmerville, Georgia (11.3) sho iceae
Intenatinal irpot. 1 $432.18: Randy Barible, Dade City (11.4) $226.09: Steve
Chapnman, Lafayette, Georgia (11.4) $226.09; Brahman activities showed significant Steer urestling-Charlie Lowry (3.8) $552.72; Steve increases in all areas during the first Registered Hatrti. Avon Park (3.9) $414.54; Dan McClellan, Fort
Meade (4.0) $276.36: Robert Sanders, Dade City (5.4) quarter of 1979, according to the AmeriBRAH MANS and DEVONS $Barrel race-Layna Brown. Leesburg (15.51) $230.66:; a rha reesAscain
Aitita Beard, Morriston. (15.56) $171.01: Paula Fortner, H uston, Texas. RAY SIMMS FARM Platnt City (15.56) $171.01: Gina Brown, Leesbnrg (15.61) Eight major Brahman sales held
V. Ray Simms, Owner $ 111.36: during the period saw 299 animals gross
Ri. 1, Box 156 Ph: 813/689-3990 Lakeland $502,250 to average $1680.
Lithia, Florida 33547 Over 600 more registrations have
18 ml. SW of Plant City on Boyette Rd. Barehacks- Ellis Ballard, Sarasota (661 $196.00: George been recorded for the first quarter of Mesimer, Mocksville, North Carolina (64) $147.00; Johnny
Neal, St. Cloud (60) $49.00; Jim Watford, Okeechobee (60) 1979 than for the same period in 1978. A $49.00; Harry Wilfong, Brinson, Georgia (60) $49.00; total of' 11,216 registrations have been '-sf--i ~~~~~~~~~Saddle broncs-Ray Phillips, Kissimmee (63) $62.71: rcreln;99 n178 051wr
I~ lJuts Lashing, Okeechobee (52) $41.91: eoddi 99 I 98 051wr
RA CHBall riding-Ronnie Deweea, Dallas, Texas 173) $258.72: completed. This marks the fifth straight wwru Steve Elliott, Brinson, Georgia (72) $194.04; Bruce Zundel,
0RA CHBrinson, Georgia (71) $129.36: Richard Neels, West Point, year registrations have increased.
B\U rahma Canle Mississippi (63) $64.68: Transfer and pedigree figures have
Calf roping-Dan McClellan, Fort Meade (10.1) alocniudtofcas $395.92: Ed Fumier, Cartersville, Georgia (11.1) $296.94: locniudt improve,ofial Rt. 5, Mt. Pleasant, Texas 75455 Randy Brannon, Bartow (11.4) $197.96: Henry Rinchen, point out. Transfer totals are up more
Month Banks, Manager Plant City (12.2) $98.98:
21/572-7668 Steer wrestling- Bob Barthle, San Antonio (4.1)$38'4,16 than 100 per month. In 1978, 5161 trans____________________________ I Ed iFinter. (6.0) $288.12: Gary Dymmek. Tallahassee (6. 1) lers had been processed by the end of $192 08; Darrell Espey, Geismer, Lonisiana (6.4) $96.04: rh hsyatasesttld61 .a ~Barrel race-Paula Fortner, Plant City (16,65) $275.67; MarhTisyatnfesoald61
~5U~'m~ Linda Caninon, Plant City (16.90) $228.14: Angie Hobbs. during this same period, averaging 2171
RegIrD Red&ARy Lake~latnd (1,7.10) $180.61; Anita Beard. Morriston (17.24) mnhy nrae rm11
RAHMANre CATTL $ re109.i1: Judy O'Quinn, Ocala (17.24) $109.31. mo dineeshav
Certified Bruceflosis Free Herd in l978 to 1704, averaging 568 per
Frank Chaplin, owner __________month for 1979.
305/472-3334 ABBA officials say these figures
3333 S.W. 130th Ave. forecast a most promising year for all
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 33330 Brahman breeders.
Promote REEF National Beefalo
every day... show, sale set
The American Beefalo Association
Support Your (ABA) has announced plans for the
FlordaBeefCoucilKentucky National Beefalo Show and Floria Bef ConcilSale. The event is scheduled for November 12-13, at the Kentucky Fair and
Registered Brahmans Exposition Center, Louisville, KenWe Hve he enetc Rsoucestucky. To Imprve Any eef Rouceng ABA officials also reported that
ToI pro Am.BefPodcn HERB PEEL of Bonifay, left, was recently Jack Benedict, Newnan, Georgia, has
Progam.honored for two years of distingu -ished been named coordinator for a Beefalo
W. &Fra cesTilon service as president of the Association of Field Day to be held in Georgia this
W. &Fra cesTilon Florida Rodeos. Earl Cooper of Lakeland, summer. Officials said the date and
Rt. 2, Box 8 904/325-7684 an association director, presented a place of the field day will be announced
EAST PALATKA, FLA. 32031 plaque to Peel at a meeting in Lakeland. a ae ie
96 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979




Lowry keeps TRAIL-RITE
lead in Trailer Mfg. Co.
cowboy standings presents
Charles Lowry of Summerville,
Georgia, has kept his lead in the all- HAYKRADLE
around cowboy standings in Florida with earnings of $3430.98. S Completely Manual
George Mesimer, Mocksville, North e No Hydraulics 5 ROll with Gooseneck
Carolina, is the bareback leader with No Electricity
$1862.32 while Rick Whorton, Springdale, Arkansas, tops the saddle bronc Saves Labor
competition with earnings of $1837.94. Virtually
Bull riding leader is Roy Carter, Maintenance Free
Crockett, Texas, and Morgan Grainger, One Man Can Load,
Hawthorne, has the lead in calf roping Haul, and Unload
with $2168.72. Leading the steer wrestlers is Lowry with $1509.20.
Barrel race leader is Paula Fortner,
Plant City, with $2024.48 pocketed.
Winners in the various events listed
to five places, with earnings listed, f
follow:
All-around-Charles Lowry, Summerville, Georgia
$3430.98; Lyle Sankey, Augusta, Kansas $1634.29; Paul Tierney, Rapid City, South Dakota $1583.88; John Andrews, Onarga, Illinois $1070.95; Brian Claypool, SaskaLoon, Saskatchewan $1055.95;
Barebacks-George Mesimer, Mocksville, North S Me
Carolina $1862.32; Bob Logue, Cumby, Tenas $1809.35; Horse & Stock Trailers Manufactured in Florida Mickey Young, Perron, Utah $1332.60; J. C. Trujillo, Steamboat Springs, Colorado $1023.40; Steve Dunham, Horse Trailers-1, 2, 4, and 8 Horse All metal except wood flooring Calgary, Alberta, Canada $967.45; Stock Trailers-16-30 ft., even numbers New tires standard
Saddle broncs-Rick Whorton, Springdale, Arkansas Goose neck and bumper hitches Matched paint optional
S1837.94; Dave Fisher, Elkhart, Kansas $1339.09; Charlie Open and closed sides Also custom built to your specifications
Atwell, Huntersville, North Carolina $1289.26; Mel Coleman, Pierceland, Saskatchewan $1071.92; Don TRAIL-RITE TRAILER MFG. CO.
Simonton, Malta, Montana $1027.60; T.E. Hell. Owner
Bull riding-Roy Carter, Crockett, Texas $2270.19;
Monty Taylor, Allison, Texas $2061.55; Frank Blacksheer, Rt. 2, Box 1210A ST. CLOUD, FLORIDA 32769 Ph. 305/892-24U8
Castlerock, Colorado $1193.18; Ricky Bolin, Mesquite, Texas $1053.67; Jerome Robinson, Fort Collins, Colorado $823.39;
Calf roping-Morgan Grainger, Hawthorne $2168.72; Cirl R h WESTERN WEAR
Don Smith, Kiowa, Oklahoma $2016.84; Charles Lowry, and TACK
Summerville, Georgia $1921.78; Del Murphy, Avon Park $1106.91; Tom Epperson. Cherokee, Texas $984.90; AND WESTERN SHOP
Steer wrestling-Charles Lowry, Summerville, Georgia HORSE TRAILERS-CATTLE EQUIPMENTese $1509.20; Howard Klingemann, Bonifay $1163.74; Harold RODEO STOCK FOR LEASEMEN Staytun, Austin, Texas $1147.78; Paul Tierney, Rapid City, EVERYTHING FOR YOU AND YOUR HORSE G nh I
South Dakota $1127.20; John Andrews, Onarga, Illinois Route 4, Box 1000 Hwy 27 South
S1029.29;
Barrel race-Paula Fortner, Plant City $2024.48; Layna MARIANNA, FLA. 32446 Dundee, Fla. 33838 COME SEE
Brown, Leesburg $813.00; Anita Beard, Morriston $605.75; Ph: 904/352-4952 Ph: 813/439-1033 Ben
Margaret Ames, Zolfo Springs $552.34; Debbie Brannon, Harlow $507.74.
a 7 STETSON & BAILEY HATS
Welles' cutter SUNSHINE STATE STEERS, INC. RANCH & WESTERN WEAR
in top 10 Levis 0 Wranglers 0 Lee
in Tp o J Breeders of Registered Brahmans I
]Lonsum Tiger, owned by R. D. Welles of / J. Mike Leonard, Mgr. / G 0 O !- u D
Arcadia and ridden by Curly Tully is J Box157 Acre 0 aL x S
listed in eighth place in the NCHA's Loxa1t7hAcme W4n0gler Tex3 2 Boots
listing of championship cutting horses. Loxahatchee, Fla. 33470 a 305/793-2428 26 Broadway Klisslmee, Fla. 32741
Participating in 14 events, Lonsum
Tiger has won $5199.24 through April 12. HATS 0 BOOTS 0 WESTERN WEAR S u Flord a' Ol dest
In the non-pro category Bill Talley, HANDLING EQUIPMENT I VACCINES
Jr., Leesburg, has entered six shows with NECKOVER TRAILERS & [t C o'plet
Chickasha King with winnings of HEALTH PRODUCTS -.
$1777.18. Bubba Welles of Arcadia has SADDLERY W GUNS
competed in four shows with Brigand's KNIVES I AMMO
Breeze and winning $1532.09, while JACKETS .. i
Spencer Harden, Sanford, has three I i.S t I .J.
shows and $1232.78 on Doc's Wimpy. L H Em
In the top 15 $500 novice, Eagle 1 0 [ua ,g
Raider, owned by W. V. Hoecherl, Fort Lauderdale, and ridden by Speedy mc
Richards, has been in nine shows with I INC.
winnings of $895.67 and is in first place. "The South's Largest Western Store"
Commander Ray, owned by Ron 415[S.[Park[St.
Marlowe, West Palm Beach, and ridden 4821 NW 6th St Ph: 904/376-4595 cc ,
by Salty Langford, has been in three GAINESVILLE FLA. 32601
shows with $342 won and is in ninth place.
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 ] 97




Raising livestock and supporting
4H'ers and FFA 'ers keep
The Vanns
busy in Sarasota
by ETHEL HALES STANCHL ects. Indeed, it is hard to find a project in Venice Elementary School. Her grandI met Evalena (Mrs. Charles) Vann at which he has not participated locally, at mother, Mrs. Harvey (Donna Redd) the Orlando Fair back in March. She the district or state and one of these days Tatum was a native to Sarasota, born was sitting atop a bale of hay in the he's sure to be heading for the National there in 1915. Her mother, Velma Flye dairy cattle barn. She was there support- 4-H Congress in Chicago, Illinois. Tatum, taught school for 29 years in the ing her son Toby and other 4-H'ers and Evalena and Charles feel that his 4- same area before retiring. FFA'ers from her area as they exhi- H work has been a great help in his Hobbies of Evalena are cooking,
bited and sold outstanding animals, school work, in which he also excels. sewing, raising plants and collecting
The Vann's farm-Back Acres-is The couple helps the youth in the local antiques. She shares many of her plants
located about seven miles southeast of 4-H Milky Way Club-Maurice Hiett which she says are easy to kill with too Sarasota. Farm pastures are improved, and Doris Smith are club leaders, much kindness-overfeeding or overBahia grass being predominant. Charles' family has been native to watering. Two favorites are fades and
The farm raises Angus and dairy Florida for several generations, and he begonias.
(Jersey and Guernsey) cattle and White is actively associated with the livestock Pets are a Golden Retriever, Brandy, Yorkshire hogs. industry. He is on the board of direc- and a Dachshund, Herman.
Toby is only 14 but he has been in 4- tors of the Sarasota Livestock Associa- When the son isn't busy with 4-H H for six years. He went to Florida Con- tion and is also active in the state cattle- activities he may be playing with the gress in Gainesville last year and came men's association. His father, C. B. school band. Next year he will be one of in third in the state in food and nutri- Vann, 84, lives next door to them and the four bagpipers with the Riverview tion. Canning and freezing foods is assists in the large garden which the High School Band. He plays the saxoknown to him as well as sewing, crafts, family raises, phone and bagpipes. The bagpipers
horticulture and a host of other proj- Evalena teaches kindergarten at wear plaid kilts, of course, white spats
____________________________________________________________ and colorful jackets. They are well known for their performances and have
Some items and recipes been invited to the Rose Bowl game.
Daughters are Ivy and Holly. Holly,
The printing media is alive with new recipes and I am glad to see interesting ones 16, is a junior at Riverview High School, for vegetable dishes and salads. I tried a casserole made of mashed carrots and Sarasota, while Ivy is a junior at potatoes (twice the quantity of carrots), an onion sauteed in butter and grated Howard College and is working toward cheese. It can be mixed ahead and heated through. Tasty and pretty. a degree in English. She was also an outA raw carrot salad is also easy and keeps well. To four cups of shredded car- standing 4-H'er whose projects leaned
rots, add one-fourth cup salad oil, 1 / T. fresh lemon juice, 1/2 t. celery seed, I t. to dairy animals. She raised one heifer
dried parsley flakes, 1/2 t. salt, 2 t. sugar. Toss. To a bit of the leftover salad I which became the family milkcow.
added a diced apple, a few raisins and had a new salad. The family is active in the Bee Ridge
Do you buy articles of clothing for your husband that are not right and if Presbyterian Church.
kept are not worn? Ralph and I reached an agreement several years back that when we buy something for the other that fits this category we will
return it-and no hard feelings. Makes sense! Calf pie
And so I returned a Western hat I'd bought for him. It was the right pie
size, the right color but the shape wasn't quite acceptable. He plans to continue high
clean a couple of his old hats. A friend who operated a cleaning establish- Market operators around the state conment tells him this can be done by washing them in mineral spirits. Truly, tinue to report high prices for calves
there a few places fhese days which clean and block hats-at least in small being sold.
towns. Clyde Crutchfield of Tindel LiveWatch the checks you deposit and write. Computers are poor readers. We stock Auction Market, Graceville, deposited a check to the Internal Revenue Service in our account-which was in reported that at a recent weekly auction, turn accepted by the bank, a 295 pound calf brought $1.75 a pound
Also guard your blank checks. If stolen the finder may have no trouble at all to bring $516.25. George Townsend,
in cashing them, owner of Madison Stock Yard, Inc., at
A new waitress came to my favorite restaurant where I eat most lunches. I Madison, announced at the regular aucfelt she neglected her customers, Then one day her mother from out of tion on April 24 that the $2 per pound
town was there and sat next to me. We visited. ligure had been broken that day.
Now I ask the-waitress about her mother every few days and get super At Okeechobee Livestock Market,
attention! Okeechobee, Pete Clemons reports that
the week of April 9 their sale topper was
Grandson Jay, finished now at St. John's Community College, School of the at $2.05 and the week of April 16 saw Arts, Palatka, spent a week with us before leaving for home in Kentucky. He the market being topped at $2.25.
hopes to work during the summer and return to college in the fall. He is making Clemons also said that heavy bulls and strides in his chosen field-a real love of his. And to succeed we need to enjoy our steers were bringing up to 78 cents for
work-we spend so much time at it! slaughter.
We enjoyed another Hales reunion. Aunt Bessie, oldest member, in herlate 80's was there. I saw cousins I seldom see except at these get-to- Heifers and heifer calves on feed in the gethers. If your family is not holding such reunions why do you not begin U.S. on April I totaled 3.70 million, one? There is no better way to acquaint children with their kin-folks, down 14 percent from 1978, says
______________________________________ USDA.
98 / THE FLORIDA CAiTLEMAN / JUNE 1979




Florida team gets
fifth in beef COMUWED?
judging contest
The University of Florida Livestock
Judging Team placed fifth in the beef
judging division of the Southeastern
Conference Spring Livestock Judging
Contest, held recently at Carbondale,
Illinois.
The team also placed sixth in sheep
judging and ninth overall. Larry
Barthle, Dade City, was second high
individual in the beef judging division.
In the evaluation portion of the contest, the Florida team placed fourth
overall, including fourth in beef evaluation and second in sheep evaluation.
Doug Frazer, Lake City, took first
place high individual honors in the beef
evaluation contest, and Charlie Holton, A o tSo k a o kN e s
Land O'Lakes, was seventh place Aoe tekmOns Yo Needsow
overall high individual. O d rT e O e o e d N w
Teamn coach for the University of
Florida team is Professor D. L. Wakeman. Other team members are: Wayne 1 Beef Cattle Science 25 Dairy Cattle Breeds
Ensminger ....................26.00 Raymond B. Becker .............17.50
Simmons, Plant City; Derek Hall, 2 Handbook of Livestock 26 Beef Production in the
Bushnell; Laura Frye, Bradenton; Roxie Equipment, E. M. Juergenaon..14.00 South, Fowler ................. 22.35
3The Stockman's Handbook 27 Careers in AgriBusiness &
T[ownisend, Immokalee, Henry Knight, Enaminger (5th edition) .......... 26.00 I industry, Stone ................ 11.65
Si Nog, amic; han4 Feeds and Nutrition (Complete) 28 Cowboy Litigation,
Jaa;Sd Mogg, J a ic;S wnEnaminger ......... *..... *.....51.50 Oppenheimer ...................8.95
Casn aeCt.5 Livestock Judging & Evaluation 29 Mechanics in Agriculture,
CasnLk Ct.(2nd edition) Phippsa.......................16.65
Hundley, Beeson & Nordby...16.65 30 Profitable Pasture Management..13.95
6 Leadership for Action in 31 Animal Sanitation and Disease
Rural Communities, Kreitlow, Control, Dykastra ...............16.75
M ole crickets Alton, and Torrence ..............725 32 The Meat We Eat, Ziegler .......... 19.65
7 Feed and Nutrition (Abridged) 33 The Western Horse,
Enaminger ..................... 37.50 Gorman..................... 13.25
(Continued from page 91) 8 Factors Affecting Calf Crop 34 Beef Cattle (6th edition)
haitt pas ajrroeinte ucesCunha, Warnick, Koger .......... 12.50 Snapp ............... ....... 18.95
haitt pay mjo ol i hesucss 9The Farm Management Handbook 36 Exploring Agribusiness,
of the species. Mating behavior and dis- 10 Morfenson, and Luening 1972..15.65 B. P. Roy . .................. 13.00
1Horses and Horsemanship 37Cooperatives, Today and
persal studies have been initiated and Ensainger ....................21.25 Tomorrow, E. P. Roy ............ 11.95
stdigthese biological processes may 11 Soil Conservation 38 Manual for the Computer
stdigKohne & Bertrand .............14.50 Formulation of Livestock
provide clues as to how to disrupt the 12 Swine Science, Enaminger ......... 19.95 Feed Mistures, W. K.
life cycle of mole crickets. 13 Cowboy Arithmetic McPherson ....................4.00
Oppenheimer..............50 39 Approved Practices in
3) Biological control (Received 14 Contract Farming and EcnmcwnePouto
1197pecntoffndng. ntil fors 5 Integration, Roy ................11.95 Juergenson & Baker ............ 11.35
119 ecnto udng.Iiil fot 5Sheep and Wool Science 40 Veterinary Handbook for
have begun to gather information on the Enaminger ....................21.25 Cattlemen, 4th edition
16 Animal Nutrition, Maynard .......... 19.50 W. Belly .............. ....... 16.50
success of a parasitic wasp, Larra 17 Crossbreeding Beef Cattle 41 Beef Sire Directory
bicolor, against mole crickets in Puerto Series 2, Cunha, Koger, Warnick ... 17.50 Charles R. Koch ................ 9.50
Rio.On pobemin18 The Feedlot 43 How to Plan Your Estate
Rc.Oemajor prbe importing Dryer and O'Mary .............. 18.50 Robert Dunaway ................ 6.70
thi wspistht plntwhchisan 19 How to Make Money Feeding 44 An Introduction to Ag. Eng.
thi wspistht plntwhchisanCattle, Simeri and Russell ... ......2.50 McColly & Martin ................8.25
essential part of the parasite's life system 20 Animal Science, Enaminger ......... 26.00 45 Swine Production inFord.Inta ses 21 Approved Practices In Dairying Carroll & Kreider ..... ..........15.50
does not occur iFlrd.ItalsesJuergenson & Mortenson ......... 11.35 46 The King Ranch
have been taken to attempt to import 22 Approved Practices in Tom Lea (Volume 1) ............ 25.00
Pasture Management, 47 The King Ranch
this plant for experimental purposes. Mcvickar Tom Lea (Volume 2) ........ ....25.00
4) Physiology (Received 9.3 percent 23 3rd Edition ....................11.35 48 Feed Formulations
2Approved Practices in Tilden Wayne Perry ............. 12.35
of funding). Conflicting literature Feeds, Feeding, Cassard ......... 11.35 49 Producing Farm Crops
24 The Handbook of Feedafuffs Lester V. Boone ................12.75
reports that the mole cricket damages Prod. Seiden & Pfander .......... 17.95 50 Financial Planning
plants in one of two fashions, direct in Agriculture
feeding or physical damage. The simple Schneeberger & Osburn ......1.95
fact is that no one knows whether mole -USE THIS BLANK TO ORDER BY NUMBER ------crickets are phytophagous, predaceous, Enclosed is (check or money order) for $ Please
or omnivorous. Often, internal send me the books as indicated by fhe numbers I hove encircled:
morphology yields clues to the 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
ecological niche occupies. Thus, initial I11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
stde eeunetknt eaiegt21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
struietre ndertanto examiinagtl 31 32 33 34 36 37 38 39 40
requirements for artifica rerngo 41 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
structure andfu cin. Nutriti oa
mole crickets have begun to be ISend to
evaluated. IAddres_______________________5) Host Plant Resistance (received I
14.08 percent of funding). Studies to
identify turf grasses with resistance to IInclude 4% Sales Tax Clip out and mail to
mole crickets have begun. Close on.0 Floria fors TH
cooperation with plant breeders is being Iforeign orders. TH CA LE N PR S
BOX 1403, KISSIMMEE, FLORIDA
(Continued on page 101)--------------------THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 /9




as good
besthan Dairy scientist gives review
bet tandms of DHI record program
betrta otby DAN W. WEBB by-month production summary for the
All ingredients used are of the University of Florida last year.
finest quality and our prices are Dairy Herd Improvement is a program 3) Cow Page (DHI-203)-This form
very competitive, of information for management deci- is updated each time a cow completes a
sion on air fars. Iforatio is lactation and provides lifetime inforwhatve cla, ewllprv input into the computer each month. mation on production and breeding.
wha weclam.Printouts are mailed to the farm which Information given for each lactation
provide information for evaluating herd includes: calving date, age, days dry,
SOUTHEASTERNpefraccligcwbedn, 35dypoutopocinfr
performance culnag nt cowset breigl0- apodution, patrdeucinlfor
MOLASSES dryngand mangefioront cspompetulctation h mate aequaeant
CO P.provided? deviation from herdmates. Lifetime
& UPPLr C RP The "core" program consists of four total production, USDA cow index and
parts.estimated relative producting ability
For EXCELLENCE in liquid feeds and parts.regien
ENERGY without waste, we tailor our 1) Monthly Report (DHI-200)- (EP)aegvn
products to meet your needs. This printout contains one line of 4) Estimated Relative Producing
P. 0. BOX 1226, OKEECHOBEE, Fl, 33472 information on each cow. It gives iden- Ability (ERPA)-This listing provides a
PHONE: 813/763-3115 tity, pounds of milk per day for current ranking of all cows in the herd comand previous month, date fresh (or dry), pared to herdmates using all lifetime lactation to date, projected 305-day ME information. The ERPA list is printed lactation, breeding date, service sire, due twice per year. Airport Livestock Corporation date and other. Is other information available?
We have over 30 years experience In the Domestic and 2) Herd Summary (DHI-202)-This Yes. There are a number of optional foreign sales of purebred Hoisteins, Brown Swiss and sheet provides average performance for features which can be provided. The Jerseys. Our customers keep coming hack, We think the herd. Production averages are given most popular is the reproductive quality and service are the reason. Gall us for your dairy frtecretmnhadya.Ohr mngmn pca it hsoto
cafftle needs. frtecretmnhadya.Ohr mngmn pca it hsoto
Buck Gaiz P. 0. Box 52-4065 management information includes provides listings of four cow groups-a)
Howard Hansen Miami, Florida 33152 reproductive performance analysis, cows open, b) cows to preg. check, c)
Jery ickl h;305-871584 comparison of two year olds and older cows to dry and d) cows to calve. Many
305-814248 cows, inventory changes and a month- other "optional services" are available.
~7 we have tot sale an inventory
ot over 600 open and bred caithood vaccinated heiferssired by some of the better
bulls in the country.
Save money by buying direct from:
WISCONSIN
LIVESTOCK EXCHANGE, INC.__Ph: 813/689-1249 Tampa, FL
Coastal Bermuda
SILAGE & HAY
clean, highly fertilized, high protein
FESTUCA RANCH
7675 SW 38th St., Ocala, FL 32670 904/237-3300 or 904/236-3700
TUCKER'S FARM CENTER
Your One Stop FLORIDA'S DAIRY INDUSTRY was highlighted during Legislative Appreciation Day in
Farm Service Center Tallahassee when Governor Bob Graham, a dairy farmer from Miami Lakes, engaged in a
201 N Elm Box2313milking contest using a sawhorse cow fitted with a surgical rubber glove udder. The event
Sanford, Fla. 32771 was a part of the festivities sponsored by the Florida Department of AgricultureanDir
305/322-1235 Farmers, Inc.
100 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979




Full Text

PAGE 1

JUNE 1979 AND LIVESTOCK JOURNAL

PAGE 2

Would you like to grow a larger framed calf this year with 80 To 100 Pounds More Gain? Those are the results you can expect from Nutrena's Calf Kwik creep feed. This palatable ration is designed to make full use of your calves growth potential. Plus, your cows will benefit by going into the winter with better condition. Let's face it, creep feeding doesn't always pay. But this year Nutrena's Calf Kwik will put extra dollars in your pocket and doing this is the best way we know to earn your feed business. We want to earn your feed business. 4014-40th Street, Tampa, Florida 33601 Phone (813) 626-5171 im

PAGE 3

FLORIDA CATTLEMEN'S ASSOCIATION A Report from the Executive Vice President DOUGLAS DAHL MUMMEY WITH ONLY A LITTLE OVER TWO WEEKS REMAINING IN THE 1979 LEGISLAtive session, the major issue to be resolved is the amount and method of tax relief for the citizens of Florida. The Governor's plan has not found favor in either the Senate or the House and those two bodies are still far apart in their proposals on the subject. Unless a compromise is reached soon, it appears likely that either an extended session or a special session could be necessary. The matter of tax relief needs to be resolved in order to make final decisions on the state budget for the next two years and at this point, it does not seem that the chances are good that the legislature will come up with a program that will also satisfy the Governor. AS REPORTED IN A PRIOR ISSUE, THE LEGISLATURE SURPRISED MOST OBservers by coming to early agreement on the new Workers Compensation plan and passed the legislation which has been signed into law by the Governor. This was probably the single most important issue in the state and the elected officials responded to the concern by approving the new wage-loss concept. The law mandates at least a fifteen percent lowering of rates and many believe that the savings will exceed that amount. All those who were involved in the tremendous amount of work that resulted in the new plan have pointed out that there will be problems and that it will take time to make all the necessary adjustments. There is general agreement, however, that the new program will be a major improvement over the bad situation of the past years. FCA LEGISLATION HAS MOVED WELL TO THIS POINT IN THE SESSION. THE bill to remove the conflict between state law and federal regulations concerning payment for livestock at the auction markets passed both houses early and the Governor signed the bill the last week in April. Our bill to exempt cattle and hogs from the implied warranty sections of the Uniform Commercial Code has passed all committees in both houses and should be considered on the floor very soon. A bill we have supported along with other agriculture groups to help correct the major problem of dogs killing cattle has also passed the committees in both the Senate and House and will be heard shortly by the legislature. THE FINAL BILL OF MAJOR CONCERN TO FCA SPEAKS TO THE NEW PROgram for eradication of brucellosis in Florida. While the bill has moved through the necessary committees, we are having considerable problems obtaining the necessary appropriations commitment. This bill is predicated on approval by the USDA of the program and funding by Congress of the necessary funds to put it into effect. We are receiving fine cooperation in Washington from our Senators and Congressmen in this effort. Representatives of FCA will travel to Washin'gton for a committee hearing this month to plead the case. We are continuing to work to obtain the necessary state appropriations and appreciate the help from our members from all over the state who have called or written their state Senators and Representatives asking their support in obtaining the funds. Please continue the good work. AT THIS TIME IN THE SESSION, NO BILLS OF MAJOR PROBLEM FOR THE cattle industry or agriculture have been approved. However, the last few weeks of the session are always critical and we will be watching closely. PLEASE make your reservations for the annual convention now and also the group trip to Hawaii. Call the office if you have any questions on either. FLORIDA CATTLEMEN'S ASSOCIATION (305) 846-6221, Box 1929, Kissimmee 32741 Market News-30s,628-0412 President Henry Douglas. Zephyrhills 'lone 813/782-1571 off.) Phone i13/782-1936 (res.) First Vice President Harvey Dahl, Melbourne Second Vice Presidents W. G. Welles, Arcadia E. R. Felton, LaBelle Executive Vice President Jim Muniney, Kissimmee Secretary E, D. "BuddyNeel. Chipley -Treasurer Ralph Cellon, Jr. Alachua Executive Director, Fla. Beef Council Ron Stephens. Kissimmee Past Presidents 6A. H. P'rather (Deceased) .E. Whilliams, Da export Dave Turner, (Deceased) Irlo Bronson, (Deceased) Cashman S. Radebaugh, Orlando Ben ll Griffin, Jr., F-rostproof Jay B Starkey, St. Petersburg B. J. Alderman (Deceased) J. 0. 1earce, Jr. Okeechobee Alto Adams, Jr., Fort Pierce Louis Gilbreath, Ocala George Kempfer (Deceased) Ralph Celli, Sr., Alachua VW. 13. Roberts, Ititmokalee Latimer H. Turner, Sarasota Cha rIes Lykes, Tampa R. D. Bennett, Greenwood [hitnas J. Sloan, Fort P'iece 'lat Wilso, Frostproof G ilbert A. Tucker, Cocoa Cedrick M. Smith, Jr., Wacahoota State Directors Ralph Cellar, Sr., Alachua Ed Yarborough, Baker J. W. Lowrey, Bay Fred Mueller, Bradford Andy Tucker, Brevard Martin codward, Broward Gerald Cayson. Calhoun Bayard I oussaint. Charlotte MIike Van Ness. Citrus S. D. Saunders, Clay R. A. Roberts, Collier James 1. Ferry, Columbia John DuPuis, Jr., Dade Lloyd Ryals, DeSoto Ben H. Floyd, Dixie E. D. Gregory, Duval Thomas Lenssen, Flagler Alton NetSmith, Gilchrist Billy Peeples, Glades Robert Ray Smih, Hardee Wilson V.ard. Hendry D. S. McAleer, Hernando Dan Childs, Highlands Angelo Massaro, Hillsborough Ralph Neel, Holmes J. ('at Corrigant, Indian Ricer Doyle Stephens, Jackson Johnt C. Hatskins. Jefferson Donald Bronson, Lake Nat Hunter, Lee James Fogarty. Leon 3 P. Saitdlin, Levy "I B. Shuler. Liberty Ronnie Smoak, Madison Vick Blackstone, Manatee Cecil Perry, Marion Richard Kelley, Martin C. D. Gregitry, Nassau Jerry Hall, Northwest Marion Tidwrell, Northwest Jeff Adams Okaloosa J. C. Bass, Okeechobee Joe Walter, Orange (rio (Bud) Broson, Osceola Dave Yoiung, Palm Beach Joe Barthle, Pasco Al Bellotto, Polk W. W. Tilton, Jr., Putnam Allen Nease, St. Johns Wayne Carlton, St. Lucie B. T. Longino, Sarasota Wayne Jacobs, Semnole C. Aubrey Caruthers. Sumter F~raitk Garrard, Suwannee Robert Ezell, Laylor Ray C rawfitrd, U~nioit Ilier Mlc Donald, Volusia Jerry Spears, Wakulla Earl Brsgdon, Walton C. S. Harrison, Washington ---Jim Mummey, Executive Vice President--THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 3

PAGE 4

JUNE 1-2Kerrville Brangus Days ..Kerrville, TX 2Hughes Angus Dispersion .Ellenton 2-RW Bar Club Calf Sale .Ocala 3-Brinks Brangus Sale .Kerrville TX 4-Krueger Brangus Dispersal .San Antonio: TX 8-9-la. Santa (ertrudis Field Day .Lake City 9-Cinco s Angus Prod. Sale ..Munfordville, KY 9-Ponder Beefmaster Sale .Longview, TX IlCrane Hereford Sale .Demopolis, AL 11-14-ABS litsentinating Schoiol .Ocala 3-16-National SG Junior Heifer Showv. ..Brenthan, TX I5--Corn/Sorghum Field Day.Ona lb N. B3. Hunt Kanches Heifer Sale.Ft. Worth, TX I 6-Volliering Beefuraster Sale.Beeville TX 16-Ga. Brahman Field Day .Ray City, GA l6-Wiggins Brahman Dispersal .Ashburn, GA 23-Brahman Field Day ....Kissimmee 23Florida Limousin Sale .Lake City 27-29-FCA Convention .Lake Buena Vista 30-Florida Club Calf Sale .Tampa 30-Georgia Limousin Field Day .Edison, GA 30-American Brahmantal Sale .Nixon. TX 30-Moore/Miller Beefmaster .Three Rivers, TX JULY 7-Enfinger Ked Angus Sale.Chumuckla 7-Payne's Cove/Whits north Beefmaster Sale Pulaski, TN I 13-ASA Summer Simmental Conf. ..Black Hills, SID 12-14-Fla. Feed Ass'n. Convention .Port St. Lucie 21--Ga. Santa Gertrudis Field Day ..Athens, GA 28--Beefmaster Field Day .San Antonio, TX 30-31-American Angus Futurity .Louisville, KY AUGUST 4-Indian Summer Red Angus Sale .Fayetteville, TN 4-Confedlerate Valley Red Angus Sale ...Franklin. TN 4-Beefmaster Field Day .Comanche, OK 5-Confederate Valley Red Angus Sale .Franklin., TN 14-H ilsborough /Pasco Calf Sale .Seffner 29-30-Florida Forestry Ass'n. Meeting Tarpon Springs SEPTEMBER 7-8-Leo Jasik Beefmaster Sale .Pleasanton, TX 13-Canning's Coll, of Cow Knowledge Rougemont, NC I15-Southeastern Beefmaster Sale .Jackson, M S 22-Live ak County Beefmaster Sale Three Rivers, TX 29-Young Acres PH Sale .Valdosta, GA OCTOBER 3-5-National Hay Convention .Fort Walton Beach 4-Anhinga P' Hereford Sale. Tallahassee 6King Ranch Sale .Kingsville, TX 13-University of Florida Bull Sale .Gainesville i 9-Singletary PH Bull Sale ..Kissimmee 20-Barield Farms Beefmaster Sale .Immokalee 20-Still House Hereford Bull Sale .Wauchula 22-Cowman's Beefmaster Bull Sale .Bartow 24-25-BBU 19th Annual Convention Corpus Christi, TX 26-South Texas Beefmaster Saie ..Robstown, TX 27-Blue Denim Angus Sale .Scottsville, VA 23-Florida Polled Hereford Ball Sale .Arcadia 29-Briar Creek P' Hereford Sale .Alma, GA NOVEMBER 3-Three Rivers Brahman Breeders Sale .Dothan, AL 9-Rocking T Beefmaster Sale .McNeill, MS 12-13-Beefalo Kentucky National.Louisville, KY 19--Ga. Santa Gertrudis Sale. .Tifton, GA 28-29-Hereford Pen Bull Show & Sale .Bartow DECEMBER r-Fla. Angus Bull Sale. ...Bartow I -Corrigan Ranch Bull Sale ..Beach 14-Adams Ranch Braford Sale .Ft. Pierce Service Issues of The Florida Cattleman for 1979 January .American Breeds February. Horses and Rodeos M arch. Brahm ans M ay .Animal Health June .Florida Pastures July. Better Bulls August .M arketing September .Continental Breeds October .H&P Herefords November .Angus December.Charolais 4 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 JUNE, 1979 VOL. 43, NO. 9 AND LIVESTOCK JOURNAL Editor-James J. Flanagan, Associate Editor-Donald E. Berry, Field Representative-Holly Kemp, Advertising Coordinator-Mrs. Jan Linville. CirculationMrs. Kate Smith. Write Box 1403, Kissimmee, Florida 32741. Phone (Area 305) 8462800. Florida Toll Free (800) 432-9192. Owned and Published by the Florida Cattlemen's Association 4ohis li1nth's Contents Regular Departments .. FCA Reports .3 Editor's D esk .6 Latest Statistics .6 Now It's History .28 Livestock Roundup .40 Animal Science Highlights .84 Stories ByStancil .98 Diagnostic Lab Notes-Rubin ..104 Editorials .106 Convention Features Convention Program Listed .47 Meeting Highlights Announced ..48 FCA Special Page .50 President's By-Lines .52 Recipe Contest Winners Told .54 FCA Committees, Locals Listed .58 Ladies Invited to Attend Reception60 Lucy Gunn Passes Away .62 Pasture Features .. Armyworms Under Control .37 Range Group Active!Yarlett ..66 Ona 'Star' Grass Offered .68 Taxes and Production-A bbitt et a170 Grazing Comparisons-Bertrand .76 IFAS Research-Koehler et al ..91 Horse, Rodeo News Two Rodeos Reported .96 Cowboy Standings Announced ..97 Breed Information Limousin Breeders Meet ..30 Simmental Group Holds Field Day36 Tom Childs Reelected .73 Angus Plans Reviewed .82 EBA Field Day Scheduled .96 General News Chipley Field Day Covered .33 Short Course Highlights Given .34 "Hall of Fame" Kicked Off .42 Meat Price Hearings Held .65 Judging Team Gets Honors .99 Dairy News. Use DHI ProgramWebb .100 Shows and Sales Limousin Compete at Putnam .30 S'Gertrudis Show Strong .65 Two Steer Shows Reported .74 Beefmasters Average $2559 .78 Angus Exhibit at Palatka .82 Charolais Sale Averages $1257 ..88 Brahmans Show at Putnam Event92 Brahman Sale Averages $1419 .95 The Cover for June 1979 Our full color cover picture for this annual June pasture edition shows a group of cattlemen during a tour last fall at Bar G Bar Ranch, Fort Pierce, where owner Barney Greene, Jr., showed his plantings of "Florida" Carpon Desmodium, a perennial tropical forage legume which has provided quality pastures when grown in mixtures with the permanent grasses. OFFICIAL PUBLICATION Florida Cattlemen's Association, Henry Douglas, President, Zephyrhills a Eastern Brahman Association, Andy Tucker, President, Rockledge Florida Charolais Association, John Corr, President, Ocala 0 Southeastern Brangus Association, R A. (Pete) Griffin, President, Talledega, Alabama Florida Angus Association, J. R. Thompson, President, Marianna 6 Florida Santa Gertrudis Association, Fred Dietrich 1Il, President, Orlando Florida Shorthorn Breeders Association, Jack Hooker, President, Plant City 0 Florida Hereford Association, Tom Childs, President, Lake Placid a Florida Meat Packers Association, Joe Teijerio, President 0 Florida Beef Council, Bill Stark, Fort Pierce, Chairman Florida Cutting Horse Association, R. D. Welles, President, Arcadia Florida Association of Livestock Markets, Buddy Williams, President, Marianna a Florida Simmental Association, R. L. Davenport, President, Ocala 0 Association of Florida Rodeos, Herb Peel, President, Bonifay a Florida Polled Hereford Association, Robert F. Lee, President, Tallahassee a Florida Limousin Association, Mrs. Gladys Freeman, President, Okeechobee. The Florida Cattleman and Livestock Journal (ISSN 0015-3958); is published monthly for $5.00 for 2 years at Cody Publications, Inc., 410 West Verona Street, Kissimmee, Florida 32741. Second Class Postage paid at Kissimmee, Florida 32741. Postmaster: Send address changes to The Florida Cattleman and Livestock Journal, P. 0. Box 1403, Kissimmee, Florida 32741. Rate Card mailed on request. Closing date 5th of preceding month. In circulation 25th of preceding month. Member Agricultural Publishers Association, American Agricultural Editor's Association, Florida Magazine Association, Livestock Publications Council, Audit Bureau of Circulation. f hal~ J o SL 0n

PAGE 5

Increases Summer Weight Gains In Your Growing and Fattening Program For Weaned Steers and Heifers ThereforeFEED LII high in total solids and sugar produces these important profit making results when you feed USSC's Suga-Lik liquid feeds to: Weaned Steers I. Increased carrying capacity of pastures. 2. Increased weight gains and grade. 3. Increased resistance to diseases and increased general health. 4. Increased consumption and more efficient utilization of available roughage. Weaned Heifers 1. Increased rate of growth and development. 2. Increased heat cycling and increased conception rate. 3. Decreased calving problems on first calves. 4. Increased conception rate at second breeding period while suckling her first calf. If you have tried the rest, now try the best Suga-Lik Liquid Feeds are produced and distributed by the United States Sugar Corporation. Please call our sales department for more information. Telephones: 813/983-8121, 983-7946 CLEWISTON, FLORIDA 33440 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 5 2 .2 U>

PAGE 6

Grazing cattle? Are you protecting yours from horn flies which can cut gains up to 2 lb per head or daily milk flow as much as 20%? Check advantages of feeding MoorMan's IGR Minerals: T Insect growth regulator stops horn flies before they fly L!, Effective against horn flies resistant to conventional insecticides ~ Economical--only pennies per animal daily E1 Convenient--just feed and animals treat themselves E No spray or other horn-fly controls needed when used as directed E Minimum time and labor (if Only mineral feeders needed Provides base and trace minerals, vitamin D and 200,000 units per pound of vitamin A 1 Can be used in milking ration Of Proven by 6 universities' research plus ours E!1 Cattlemen bought enough in '76-'77-'78 for summerlong feeding to 4 million head. Get the details on IGR when the MoorMan Man stops to see you. ADVERTISE CATTLEMWEX'S UKONSTRUCTION OMPANV# INC. LIVESTOCK SYSTEMS cattle Feedlots Swine Facilities Dairy Facilities Turn-key Projects Nationwide Construction -*Retail Sales C/a C oay / JNE497 d,'u k~~gas 8135-42 6 /THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 "Editor's PDesk Range conservationist says thanks for coverage Gainesville .Thanks so much for the excellent writing on the last tour of (Society for Range Management) ..These reports in your magazine are much appreciated by the membership as well as those who are notified of these tours in advance. Lewis L. Yarlett IFA S entomologist sends in article on mole crickets Gainesville Enclosed is an article ...to consider publishing in The Florida Cattleman. As you know, mole crickets are a severe pest of pasture grass in Florida, and we would like to inform cattlemen of our new research project. P.G. Koehler V The article on this grass pest appears on page 91 of this issue of The Cattleman. Longtime reader comments on Cattleman St. Petersburg Please change mailing address for (The Cattleman) ...J. B., Jr., will continue to receive his copy at Odessa I have never missed a copy since the LAT TURNER, right, Sarasota, past FCA president and current chairman of NCA's taxation committee, received the support of Congressman Sam Gibbons, 7th District, on repeal of the carryover basis provisions of the Tax Reform Act of 1976 during a recent trip to Washington, D.C. first one issued. I believe the editor was the son of P. E. Williams. He worked hard in getting it started before Al and Bob Cody, who also did a great job in the early days. J. B. Starkey 7It was good hearing from Mr. Starkey. who is a past president of the Florida Cattlemen's Association: and past FCA president P. E. Williams' son, J. E., was the editor beginning in 1936 until the publication was acquired by the Kissimmee Gazette, Inc., in December 1940. Al Cody was managing editor and then purchased the magazine in July 1942 and I Latest Statistics Commercial Slaughter and Average Weight (USDA) Cattle Calves Swine M Head Wt. M Head Wt. M Head March 1979 (Fla.) 35.6 1009 6.8 475 8.9 March 1978 (Fla.) 46.5 960 15.7 447 31.1 March 1979 (U.S.) 2851.5 1057 271.6 233 7397.3 March 1978 (U.S.) 3470.1 1027 438.9 236 7069.8 Slaughter Under State Inspection, Head (AITC) Cattle April 1979 4367 April 1978 4787 Brucellosis Testing (AITC) Tested Beef Cattle, April 1979 39,183 Dairy Cattle, April 1979 38,643 Swine, April 1979 169 Livestock Prices Per Hundred (USDA) Cattle Cows Strs. Hfrs. Fla., April 15, 1979 $68.40 $56.00 $73.90 Fla., March 15, 1979 68.40 55.10 74.70 U.S., April 15, 1978 47.20 35.30 50.20 U.S., April 15, 1979 72.40 56.20 76.40 Field Crop Prices Per Bushel and Ton (USDA) U.S., April 15, 1979 U.S., April 15, 1978 Wt. 230 220 238 234 Calves 26 74 Sheep M Head Wt. .1 72 444.1 120 501.9 112 Swine 9770 6648 Reactors Vaccinated Calves Adults 1177 12,617 1311 502 4152 4775 2 -Calves $97.00 101.00 53.70 96.40 Corn (Bushel) $2.24 2.24 Swine $42.90 49.20 45.00 44.30 Chickens $27.50 28.50 27.80 28.20 Hay, Baled (Ton) $49.50 51.40

PAGE 7

Get the jump on fall bull buying season ", I P FEtOCd V4 doAN Better Bulls of all breeds are important to Florida's commercial cow/calf programs. The July issue of The Florida Cattleman will be the annual "Better Bulls" feature edition. Editorial content will focus partly on the role of proven bulls for increasing better production, along with research findings tailored to Florida, and current industry news. It will also be a timely issue for purebred cattle producers to advertise and promote herds and bloodlines. Get the jump on fall herd bull buying season. Advertise in the "Better Bulls" issue of The Florida Cattleman. Closing date for reserving space is June 5. Call us and we will help with layout and copy. Wloiida U~Itleman, ;AND LIESTC JURA P. 0. Box 1403, Kissimmee, Florida 32741 Phone Florida toll free 800/432-9192 Out-Of-State 305/846-2800 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 7

PAGE 8

FOR YEAR-ROUND WORM CONTROL Daily use of V.M.S. "PASTURE AID"with Phenothiazine on a continuous yearround basis means extra profit for you! HEAVIER COWS HEAVIER CALVES BETTER CONDITION MORE BLOOM BETTER CALVING PERCENTAGES V.M.S. "PASTURE AID" Available in block or grandular formMineral-vitamin nutrition plus phenothiazine to give you an all-in-one package for supplementation, fly control and a continuous worming program. 0N "THE ULTIMATE IN MINERAL -VITAMIN NUTRITION" TH LIAE MANUF1ACTURING Fm o~ 2vref became publisher editor until joined /Ihis brother Bob Codi, in 1946, when the latter took over the editor's position. Oni three others have held the title of editor through the years, the late Bill Gephart, Harri Haunnunond of Gatdinburg. Teqnessee. and the current editor. FCA purchased the publication in June 1978. Subscriber moved, but wants to get magazine Grand Turk Island I bought a two-year subscription to The Florida Cattleman and enjoyed reading it very much until I moved ...I have not received an issue since November ...I mailed a change of address notice ...Thank you ...I enjoy your magazine very much and look forward to receiving it again. Richard Lemmond Item on IFA S research furnished for publication Ona (The) summary ...(regards) a variety release from IFAS. You will observe from the text that we are making this available as a grass having potential to some, cattlemen in some situations. It will not displace other varieties nor answer a lot of questions-just provide one more practice that may fill some needs. Grass for increase plantings is expected to be available by mid-June, 1979. f The article is about Ona Star grass and appears on page 68 of this issue of The Cattleman. Reader sends picture of son receiving award Wauchula After seeing your cover for April, I thought you might be interested in this picture ...Steve (Durrance) has been a member of Florida Cattlemen's Association for several years, listed as 2-D Cattle Company. Of course, his father and I have been members for a number of years. Gloria R. (Mrs. Williard K.) Durrance / We appreciate receiving the photo and happy to learn about the beef production award received by young Durrance front Sperry New Holland. The picture appears on page 66 of the May issue. Advertiser wants to continue promoting product Lake Wales Attached is a rough outline of ad I'd like to start in the June issue ...It would appear it would be to our advantage to go on the 12-time rate We have been very pleased with the response we have had from the ads in The Cattleman .Keep up the good work. Mary L. Adsit Adsit Dura-Cast Products THE PATZ Model 350 manure spreader has corrosion resistant sides with wood bottom axle-connected hitch. 973-Patz spreader has control gear The Patz 350 bushel (220 cubic feet struck level) Manure Spreader with a worm gear apron drive, driven by a hydraulic motor, controls the spreading rate by varying the apron speed from 0 to 15 feet per minute. Spokesmen for the Pound, Wisconsin, based firm say combined hydraulic control of apron drive and optional end gate positioning lets the operator "fine tune" application in terms of rate and manure consistency. Other options include a choice of 540 or 1000 R.P.M. PTO and upper beater kit. The Patz Model 350 Manure Spreader features positive lock apron chain, 25 inch diameter beater, walking beam tandem axles, corrosion resistant sides with wood bottom and a hitch that pulls directly on the axles, not the box. For additional information check number 973 and return the form on page 8 of this issue. r----------Want More I Information? The Florida Cattleman Drawer 1403 Kissimmee, Florida 32741 Please get me information on the material below. (Check more than one box if you wish.) I Offer goodI until September 1, 1979 1 973. Patz Spreader 11 974. Round Bale Dispenser I3 975. Shoo-Fly Control l 976. Koopers Fence System El 977. Quonset Booklet I l 978. VMS Products 11 979. Cullor Sprayer-Feeder l 980. Butler Buildings N am e .I. ..I. | Address | C ity ........ I State .Z IP .I .---.-------8 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979

PAGE 9

Toughest won't rue Double-capacity Turtle Back U.S. Patents D-205655 M-3324833 You can't beat these Steel* Tuff feeders Their super-duty tubular steel and highethylene construction means they c toughest weather or animal abuse-yet k look longer. And without costly and tim maintenance. Innovative trough designs 100% clean-up every time. Count on P all your feeding needs. 12' or 8' Bunk Feeders U.S. Patent No> D234 607 UOLI ON OLI rTRON feeders in any pasture. It, rot or splinterever. -N. for durability. impact polyan take the eep their new e-consuming assure nearly oli-Tron-for Weather-beating Twister Poli-Tron, Inc. Bob Sharp Box 581-C Tower Products Co. 3001 Rouse Ave. 991 Packinghouse Road Pittsburg, Kansas 66762 Sarasota, Florida 33580 (316) 232-2400 (813) 371-0094 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 9

PAGE 10

Grove Fertilizer Division P. 0. Box 97, 904-567-5622, Dade City, Fl. 33525 For your pasture or grove materials call: 904-567-2420 904-567-3511 904-793-2527 904-567-7390 PAT CAIN SHERMAN YOUMANS CAESAR RINALDI MARK MAFFETT 904-567-3014 813-465-0337 904-588-3385 904-588-2367 WE STRIVE FOR REPEAT CUSTOMERS VII i C mltLieo DRIED MOLASSES Products Lightweight pigs should be sorted Jfr best results If given the proper attention, lightweight pigs, runts and tail-enders can perform as well as their heavier littermates. And at today's hog prices, they are worth the effort. "Depending on who you're talking to, a baby pig is worth from $15 to $27 the minute it hits the ground," says Dr. Steve Haye, swine research specialist for Central Soya, Fort Wayne, Indiana. Haye recently completed research study which demonstrates that light hirthweight pigs can not only survive, but perform economically, if they can be segregated so that they do not have to compete with larger pigs. In Haye's 13-month study, 431 light hirthweight and late farrowed pigs were used. The pig's performance was measured during a 33-day nursery period. Of the group, 426 pigs survived, or 98.8 percent. The average starting weight was 8.86 pounds and the final weight averaged 27.54 pounds. Daily gain averaged 0.58 pounds on 1.03 pounds of feed, or a 1.8 feed-to-gain ratio. "The post-weaning period is one of the most stressful periods in a pig's life. This stress is often compounded when lightweight weanling pigs are placed in nursery environments where they are allowed to compete with older, larger, pigs," says Haye. Feed Super-Mol Fly and Worm Control Blocks on a regular program Super-Mol BLOCK POWER Full 2% Phenothiazine 50'1S 0 50,000 Units-Vitamin A Rich in energy-sugars Highly palatable-cane molasses Minerals, salt added Costs just pennies a day! trd Y Write or Call: 'Tms HUCO, INC. 800/282-9149, 813/677-9181 Feed Ingredient Div. Route 1, Box 498 813/722-4523 Tampa, FL 33619 Palmetto, FL BROKERS & JOBBERS Pasture JOHN F. HARRIS RALPH GOODSON BOBBY HALL PAT HAMILTON 10 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979

PAGE 11

Ift ou bug eartags, this is the point you can't afford to miss. THE FIORIDA CALTTLEMiAN / JUNE 1979 / 11

PAGE 12

For Florida Cow-Calf Men: The Big Blue Management Tool Management is the key to a successful beef or dairy operation. And the Harvestore System is the key to good management. Use it to store any kind of forage for use when you need it. This is needed in Florida especially due to the extended periods of slow growth common during Winter cold and Spring Drouth. Harvestores are being used successfully on a sizable number of Florida dairies and ranches. Phone for an appointment at your ranch or farm, or write for our guide to Flarvestore processed forages. fij mith HARVESTORE PRODUCTS, INC. GEORGIA-FLORIDA HARVESTORE, INC. Tobacco Road Attapulgus, Ga. 31715 (912) 465-3987 12 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 Trojan Distributor W. C. Pigg Phone (405) 772-2801 Box 69A, Route 6 Weatherford, OK 73096 Hydraulic Chutes (3 sizes) Triple Duty Chutes 4 Calf Tilt Machine THE COW PREGNOSTICATOR a new approach to pregnancy testing SOON AVAILABLE "Our program calls for segregation f' small pigs according to size in pens where the have 2.5 sqIuare feet per pig," he said. "Mixing litters after weaning is not as important a consideration as is maintaining size uniformity." Central Soya research uses flat-deck cages to Pen the lightweight pigs. The flooring is either aluminum slats or perforated metal raised eight inches above the concrete floor. "The flat-deck cages help maintain a dry, clean environment that is also critical at weaning time," said Haye. Haye uses neo-terramycin in the water during the first five to 12 days after weaning for disease control. "The important thing to remember is that lightweight pigs can perform as well as other pigs if they are not put in a competitive environment," says Haye. "While some feeders will not take the trouble to segregate according to size because of the extra labor involved," he adds, "they are making a trade-off with increased hospital care and inefficient performance if the pigs are mixed with larger hogs." 974-Company has round bale dispenser Turnbow Manufacturing Company, Oilton, Oklahoma, has announced the development and production of the Round Bale Dispenser, an all-hydraulic hay feeding system that allows one man to feed 1,000 head of cattle per hour. Ranch tested for five years, the equipment can handle all standard bales (from 800-2,500 pounds) and now allows one person to do a job formerly accomplished by six men in an 8-hour shift. Ranch hands can be taught to use the dispenser in just 15 minutes. Bales are easily loaded onto the dispenser's tilt pallet, which has a revolving drum. The machine hauls the hay to the feeding area, and with the use of two reversible drums, distributes feed to the cattle in an even manner no matter which direction the. hay is wound. Side panels insure that all parts of the bale are guided into the dispenser drums and evenly distributed on the ground. The equipment features heavyduty materials, excellent workmanship and a low-maintenance design. For a free brochure check number 974 and return the form on page 8. Conner names O'Brien to investigative post Commissioner of Agriculture Doyle Conner has appointed John O'Brien, 33, as chief of the livestock theft investigative unit in the division of animal industry, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. O'Brien has been a deputy sheriff in Jackson County for the past two years and was shift supervisor and crime investigator there after six years as a Leon County deputy sheriff and almost three years with the Florida States University campus police.

PAGE 13

Proven through progeny Sugarland's "Superior-Meat-Type" Brahmans are the sires of one of the largest F1 crossbred herds in the Southeast. They exhibit their superior beef characteristics through the cow herds, into their calves, and in the feedlot. Sugar bulls are bred to produce a profit through performance. C

PAGE 14

Tranisol It pays off better because it works better. While other dewormers talk about what they don't do, we want you to know what TRAMISOL@ levamisole does best. Things like giving you greater gains and saving you more money than any other dewormer. That's the Tramisol Payoff. *Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station 3-year summary of average performance of steers given anthelmintics before winter grazing (198 days). 'Based on steer price of $39/cwt., less cost of anthelmintic. **Trademark of Merck & Co., Inc. Seffner 813/685-4333 Okeechobee 813/763-0225 813/763-3195 AD Jacksonville 800/342-5231 Ocala 904/7324078 1800 East North Park Street OKEECHOBEE, FLORIDA 33472 Repairs on all types of Farm and Ranch machinery. We can rebuild and remodel all your old equipment. P. L. Dabney WELDING and Machine Shop P. O. Box 10 Summerfield, Fl 32691 Phone 904/245-2700 We do all types of aluminum welding We build to suit specialized needs Located on Hwy. 301 at Summerfield Tramisol Tramisol') Control Injectable Drench Phenothiazine *TBZ-6 No. Seen 3 30 31 31 31 Initial wt. 11) 440 432 436 436 439 Total gain, lb 334 362 385 327 350 Averagedal 1.69 1.83 1.94 1.65 1.77 gain, l. Added value of gain 10.19 19.24 -2.99 5.47 above control, $ 14 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 O'Brien agraduated in 1963 from Daytona Beach Seabreeze High School, attended Daytona Beach Community College and took his associate arnd bachelor's degrees at FSU in criminology. le has completed course work for his master's degree in criminal justice at Eastern Kentucky University, R ichmiond, Kentucky, and has been a police standards instructor at Chipola Junior College, Marianna. O'Brien, who grew up in Ormond Beach, now is interviewing candidates for field investigator positions in south and central Florida. The two vacancies were a result of one retirement and a resignation for a higher-paid position in private investigation work. O'Brien says he hopes to fill the two field positions by May. The unit has four field investigator positions. The field investigators assist local law enforcement agencies in solving livestock and other farm theft and are of material assistance in some cases because they are not restricted by county political boundaries. 975-Product keeps flies and ticks off cattle Mike Wright, president of Livestock Fly Control Company of Arnold, Missouri, has announced the introduction of a new product that keeps flies and ticks off cattle. The product is called "ShooFly " and is designed for the prevention and control of pink-eye. The device is clipped to the animal's ear and a combination of controlled release insecticide and the flicking action of the two wick-like "tails," repels the insects, Wright said. One application lasts all season. The product is equally effective on beef and dairy cattle. Wright said, "This product began as the humanitarian dream of one man and has grown into the dedicated belief of a much larger group. It represents over 15 years of development and University and field testing on thousands of cattle. The product holds both U.S. and foreign patents." For more information check number 975 and return the form on page 8. Pasture management book available "Profitable Pasture Management" is a complete volume on the details of forage production and utilization, including soils preparation, varieties to be used, fertilizer treatments, management practices, and other information needed for a successful program. The book is authored by Roy A. Chessmore, vice president for agriculture, The Kerr Foundation, Inc. The book also covers the basic principles of livestock production and the economic information necessary to be successful in a livestock-forage program. Based on research from experiment stations and from experiences of leading cattlemen, the

PAGE 15

b' I am A6 ,-~ 111111 The Payoff Control Tramisol' Tramisol Pheno**TBZ-6 Injectable Drench thiazine No. Steers 30 30 31 31 31 Initial wt. lb 440 432 436 436 439 Total gain, lb 334 362 385 327 350 Average daily 1.69 1.83 1.94 1.65 1.77 gain, lb Added value of gain $10.19 $19.24 $-2.99 $5.47 above control1 While other dewormers talk about what they don't do, Trnamisolg levanisole wants you to know what it does best. Things like giving you greater gains and saving you more money than any other dewormer. That's the riamisol Payoff. 'Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station 3-year summary of average performance of steers given anthelmintics before winter grazing (198 days). 'Based on steer price of $39/rwt, less cost of anthelmintic. *'t-ademark of Merck & Co. Inc.

PAGE 16

{.L ~1 A LOT GOES iNTO ARIULTURE. A lot goes nto making your farm a success. Like a dependable source of credit. Farm Credt provides capital to more farmers and their cooperatives than any other lending institution In fact, that's the only reason we re in business. Let us provide the money you need when you need it with repayment plans to suit your situation. FARM CREDIT COVERS ITALL!NI Long-tern' Financing for Short and Intermediate-terrn Farm Credit Farmer Cooperatives Farm credit @ 0 ALL IN THE &MILY OF RRM CREDIT SErMCES Ready to Work for You 10 ft.-8000 lb. Rome Disc 13 ft.-7000 lb. Amco Disc 8 ft.-Howard Rotivator modified for sod fields Much more equipment not listed For Complete Farm and Ranch Maintenance/Improvements David Parks Land Clearing Phone 813/322-1269 Route 1, Box 80d Myakka City, Florida KOPPERS COMPANY has introduced a farm and ranch fence system using pressure-treated posts. book includes information that is howto-do-it oriented. For information on how to obtain a copy, which is listed at $13.95, write The Cattleman Press, P. 0. Box 1403, Kissimmee 32741. 976-Koppers introduces fari, ranch fence system A farm and ranch fence system which combines pressure-treated wood posts and high tensile wire to form a strong, long-lasting barrier, is being introduced in the U.S. by Koppers Company, Inc., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Called the High Tensile Wire Fence System, the fence consists of strands of smooth wkire held in tension along pressure-treated wood posts. Koppers can supply all components-posts, wire and hardware items. The system uses strained high tensile smooth wire for a fence that may be adapted to meet specific needs: offers simple maintenance and reduced handling problems: may be installed by one or tw o people; and minimizes animal hide damage. The pressure-impregnated posts and end assemblies will take heavier loads at a lower cost per mile than any commercially available alternative. The greater strength of the posts allows wider spacings along the fence line, spokesmen say. For excessively wvet conditions or soft soil, best results are obtained by increasing the standard embedding depth of the posts-an example of the flexibility of design allowed by the use of timber fence foundation. Standard preservative for the posts is creosote; however. they may be treated with other chemicals by Koppers. The wire recommended and distributed by Koppers is Max Ten@ 200, a galvanized wire produced by United States Steel Corporation. It has a 200,000 psi minimum tensile yield strength, meeting or exceeding the most demanding standards for animal control. Its high elastic limit eliminates most of the common stretch or sag problems that result when weight is 16 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN JU NE 1979

PAGE 17

-m& p-No Lixin your tanks; superior performance from your cows. a,. IpFtb.\ Cattlemen on test ranches across the country have said their cows "look better," "stay in better condition," "breed back faster," when given Sup-R-Lix* compared to cattle fed conventional liquid supplements. Performance improvements like those are built into Sup-R-Lix* It's homogenized, so the complete nutrition your cows need stays uniform from tank top to tank bottom. Your cows get a nutritionally complete supplement every time they lick the wheel. And you can get the performance complete nutrition delivers. Ask your Purina dealer to fill your tanks with Sup-R-LixkR. Get the performance supplement working for your cows today. XPurina. planning tomorrow with research today. TiE Fii.ORIDA (ATTILEMAN / JINE 1979 / 17

PAGE 18

FOR A VARIETY OF USES LRF-15 BUILDINGS THE FIRST ALL-METAL, LOW-PROFILE BUILDING DESIGNED FOR AGRICULTURE For building beauty and maximum usable space, check out Butler's LRF-15 agricultural buildings. Loaded with product features and customer benefits, LRF-15 is ideal for feed, grain and seed facilities; livestock housing; indoor horse arenas; and machinery storage. See us for details on the LRF15. Frank Anderson Sales & Service Inc. 1315-5th Ave., Tampa, FL 33605 Phone 813/247-5649 Frank Anderson 813/961-5048 Harold Still 813/949-7154 Head gates Squeeze Chutes Portable Corrals Palco Automatic Equipment Clay Equipment Conrad-American placed against conventional fence wire. [he fence may be built with various wire configurations based on the type and size of animals being restrained by the fence. Erection is simple and, for most fences, requires no unusual equipment. The durability of the pressuretreated posts and the tensile strength of the Max Ten r 200 wire help reduce maintenance. Initially, two major styles of High Tensile lence will be sold: A 10-wire and an 8-wire system. Post spacings are on 16 ft. centers. By using pressure-creosoted hard ood Droppers, which are engineered to maintain wire separation, post spacing for the 10and 8-wire systems can be extended to 60 ft. maximum for non-electric fence on relatively level terrain. Again, post spacing xill vary due to terrain and design. There are two types of Droppers. The MI ulti-groove Dropper is creosotetreated hardwood, with the fence wire being attached with a wire clip. The Dropper is grooved every inch for any wire spacing necessary. This Dropper is ideal for a six or ten wire, electric or non-electric system. The second type of Dropper is the Angle-groove Dropper. It is alternately groo ved at an angle so that when a 250 pound tension is pulled on the wires, the gripping-action of the pressure creosoted hardwood brings the wire straight and -locks" the Dropper to the wire. [his is principally for 8-wire fence (electric and non-electric) only, since there are eight grooves on the Dropper. For additional information check number 976 and return the form on page 8 of this issue. Noba offers beef sire directory A newly published Beef Sire Directory is just off the press and available from Noba. This 1979 book contains pictures, pedigrees and complete details on 63 bulls from 18 different breeds, including some of the nations most popular sirecs. The 1979 Noba Beef Bull Book can be obtained by contacting, Noba, Inc., P. 0. Box 607, Tiffin, OH 44883 or phone 419/447-6262. 977-Quonset has booklet for Jarmn building planners Anyone who owns a farm needs the new Farmer's Building Guide just issued by Quonset, Houston, Texas, the agricultural division of National Steel Products Company. Farm building planners will find help in things they might not have expected-like the five essential items a farm building has to have and 10 ways to avoid expensive mistakes in planning farm buildings. Quonset's guide shows how much space is needed in each part of hog building and feedlot operations-and how much difference there is in space 18 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 AgStar, Inc. P. 0. Box Q Statesboro, GA 30458 Phone: 912/764-9761 904/269-3677 Distributors for all types of Cattle and Hog Handling & Feeding Equipment
PAGE 19

WEST AGRO 9:JnoISO[lIIlI ME I FIA1

PAGE 20

SIGN ON STALEY FOR YEAR ROUND WORM & FLY CONTROL START YOUR YEAR-ROUND PROGRAM TODAY! FOR EORM PHENOTHIAZINE CONTROL.M Tad.mal,k .W.st Ag-oCh. Cal. Inc. Livestock Products 2200 Eldorado Street Decatur, Illinois 62525 FALL & WINTER FALL & WINTER Q SWEETLIXO All-In-One Block Medicated Delivers 2 grams of phenothiazine per day per animal for control of stomachworms, nodular worms, large-mouth bowelworms, and hookworms. Contains adequate amounts of Protein, Calcium, Phosphorus, Trace Minerals, and Vitamins to supplement normal feeding conditions. SPRING & SUMMER SPRING & SUMMER SWEETLIX@ Fly & Worm Control Block Medicated Delivers phenothiazine to the animal for control of stomachworms, nodular worms, large-mouth bowelworms, and hookworms. Aids in preventing the breeding of horn flies and face flies in the manure of treated cattle, Provides the added nutrition of cane blackstrap molasses, Vitamins A and D, salt, and trace minerals. YOUR CHOICE t2 Staley'Loose Mineral No. 10 Delivers 2 grams of phenothiazine per day per animal when fed free choice. For the control of stomachworms, nodular worms, large-mouth bowelworms, and hookworms. Prevents the breeding of horn flies and face flies in the manure of treated cattle. Contains 10% Phosphorus from highly available sources. Contains Vitamins A and D and trace minerals. pr

PAGE 21

FARM BUILDING planners will find help through the building guide published by Quonset of Houston, Texas. requirements in buildings for breeding stock, the farrowing house, and the growing and finishing areas. Dairy cattle need different facilities from beef animals, and the guide shows just what the differences are. There is sound advice on storing both grain and grain-harvesting equipment-all sorts of farm machinery, in fact. The guide also offers tips on how to make sure a fast-talking salesman doesn't disappear with farm improvement dollars, leving a second-rate building, or no building at all, behind him. For a copy check number 977 and return the form on page 8. Double-crop silage cuts weeds, boosts output A two-crop silage system can wallop your weeds and top any feed production system you've ever tried, says Sperry New Holland's Larry Fisher. It'll only work as far north as winter grain production, admits Fisher, who is product manager for forage equipment at New Holland. But it 's a winner from there south. For example, corn silage harvest in the fall gets fields cleared earlier, before most grassy weeds have dropped their seed. Mixed with the silage, the weed seed germination is destroyed and the grass and seed make some contribution to the feed in volume if not in quality. In any case, there's less weed seed lying out in the field to cut into next year's crop. The silage also comes off the field in time to seed winter wheat, barley or rye. This small grain crop makes good use of any leftover fertilizer from the corn crop. It also comes on strong in the spring. By corn planting time, you can take off a robust yield of silage-call it barlage, wheatlage, or ryelage, says Fisher. By any name, it's a headstart on the next year's forage need. With a wide-cutting mowerconditioner you can cut the crop in a hurry and get it wilted down to a Pasture Spreaders Available in Truck Bodies, 4 and 6 Ton Pull Types Conibear Equipment Company, Inc. P. 0. Box 376 0 Lakeland, Florida 33802 7 Miles North on U.S. 98 Ph: 813/858-4414 ~.OiO I.111 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 21 ~7 ~ LOW COST EL--I 'M ER B S 7m P.O. Box 3335 FOREST CITY TERMS AVAILABLE FR 37 FLORIDA 32751A d Z OH) AND oT a.

PAGE 22

DRAINIIIT BUCKET ELEVATORS Now 4 models to choose from. They Look Right .They Work Right Leg sections are continuous welded and assembled with precision jigs at the factory. Grainlift goes up fast, looks right, and works at whatever capacity you need from 800 to 8000 BPH. Let Us Give You a FREE ESTIMATE for Modernizing Your System Frank Anderson Sales & Service 1315-5th Avenue, Tampa, FL 33605 Phone 813/247-5649 -24 Hour ServiceFrank Anderson 813/961-5048 Harold Still 813/949-7154 AGRIGUARD "Ole Aggie" High Protein Liquid Supplement We fill the feeders The cows feed themselves \IQ C~pFEED 0~ LIKTH Telephone P. O. Box 923 813 Lakeland, FL W 688-3325 33802 ~ ~ "Visit our Feed Store now open at 3340 U. S. Hwy. 92, East. A COMPLETE LINE OF ANIMAL FEEDS MINERAL FEEDERS New Fiberglass Construction U U a U More Durable Maintenance Free Keeps Minerals Dry Helps prevent waste Keeps Minerals Cooler F ENTON EEDERS Ph. 813/494-2727. Route 1, Box 124 ARCADIA, FLORIDA SPERRY New Holland says double-crop silage is one way around weed problems. moisture content to make attractive feed in plenty of time to hustle in another corn silage crop, according to Fisher. This early spring silo fill is a nearly free ride in silo cost because your silos will have space for the small grain silage come spring. And the additional feed is very nice to have in the summer when pastures shrivel up. Come fall, you'll have the silo space available for corn again, Fisher points out. In addition to the high potential production from the double-threat 2-crop routine you get a very important bonus in weed control management. By harvesting everything from the ground up as silage twice a season, you largely prevent weeds from going to seed. Fisher points out weed seeds lie dormant a long time so you need a number of years without additional weed seed production before you can get on top of a problem. In the meantime, you can hold weeds down to prevent much competition for plant food and moisture. This will become a more important consideration as scarce oil pushes up herbicide cost. It's also one way around the "escapes" weed problems caused by continuous use of herbicides that only get "most" of your problem weeds. 978V. M. S., offers products for swine, horse use V.M.S., Inc., Montgomery, Alabama, has announced that its product En-ProAl Molasses-Mineral Block has been formulated for use by swine raisers and horse owners. The new swine block comes as a result of approximately two years of study and research by the animal nutrition experts at V.M.S. It combines all of the features of En-Pro-Al plus a combination of all major minerals, trace minerals and vitamins A, D and E in high levels. The blocks can be fed without special feeders or racks and come individually packaged in boxes weighing 40 pounds. The blocks are designed for all ages of swine. The En-Pro-Al supplement blocks for horses contains high energy along with a medium level of protein from five natural sources. All essential major minerals are included plus trace minerals and vitamins. 22 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979

PAGE 23

_1412~~ _f -Big yields are remembered longer than big fertilizer Don't compromise in discounts spring .when what you need is yield insurance come fall. These days, you can't afford not to get every nutrient needed in your fertilizer. After all, what's a pound of zinc -or a few ounces of manganese -really worth? With Rainbow, it can be the difference between bumper yields and the county average. Soil testing by folks with 50 years of experience. A premium program for premium profits. Rainbow, International Minerals & Chemical Corporation, Mundelein, IL 60060. RAIN BO V.V YOUR RAINBOW DEALER Good as his word. And his word is'premium'.

PAGE 24

BUILDINGS DESIGNED TO MEET YOUR REQUIREMENTS Strongpanel Roofing and siding in stock to 24 ft. Cannonball hardware Penta treated structural posts STRONGPOST STRUCTURES 1629 N. Ohio Ave. Live Oak, FL 32060 AGRICULTURAL 1. Cattle 2. Swine 3. Horse 4. Poultry .OE INDUSTRIAL COMMERCIAL TURNKEY or BUILDING PKGS. CUSTOM CATTLE FEEDING Feed Florida Cattle in Florida Davis Farms P.O. Box 97 Balm, Fla. 33503 We Buy Feeder Cattle Wayne Davis 610 Dali Drive Brandon., Fla. 33511 Phones Day 813/6534-3344 Night 813/689-5021 Call collect 904/362-2548 for building quotes in Gainesville call 904/375-2331 I I Billy H. Wells -Livestock Auctioneer -Ring Service Sale Consultant Sale Management 121 Aidean Dr. Sanford, FL 32771 Home: 305/323-2820 Office: 305/886-5400 WORLD'S FINEST LIVESTOCK TRAILERS Ien FEATURES -( -,n All Steel Construction '"i J Treated 2" x 8" Floor 6'4" or 7'8" Wide Divider, Escape and Slide/Swing Rear Doors Full Roof 8-Ply Tires Electric Brakes Many Options Available Call now for Buy Direct From The afctory lour Factory and Save: to see why E-Z (1) Delivery Charges Pull Trailers 1re the world's (2) Dealer Markup fint Itralern 31100 eltas s 71" laid. widt Goasnek. Hails 24 cons E-Z PULL TRAILERS Rt. 1, Box 1213 Q Tavares, Fl. 32778 1-904-343-1000 1-904-343-2438 1-305-859-5009 Call or WriteShown by Appointment Only 42-Foot Flatbed hauls up to 4 tractors or 500 bales of hay. THE UPJOHN Company's facilities were visited recently by a group of University of Florida veterinary students. During the two years of research on this product, periodic field trials were conducted which indicated that consumption of the new supplement would be from four to six ounces per day. The blocks may be fed with or without a covered feeder as weather and the elements have little or no effect on the locks. For more information on the EnPro-Al blocks for swine and horses check number 978 and return the form on page 8 of this issue of The Cattleian. Future veterinarians visit Upjohn facilities University of Florida veterinary students recently toured the Kalamazoo, Michigan, facilities of The Upjohn Company. Upjohn is one of the largest manufacturers of human and veterinary pharmaceuticals in the nation. The University of Florida veterinary students' visit featured a guided tour of Upjohn production facilities and the company's veterinary research farm. The university students also met with a panel of Upjohn agricultural research and marketing personnel for a question and answer session. The visit by future veterinarians from the University of Florida is part of The Upjohn Company's educational service to the veterinary profession. 979-Kansas company has sprayer-feeder line Cullor Enterprises, Inc., of Fort Scott, Kansas, has marketed a sprayer-feeder they claim can save users time and energy and is also a money-saver. How does the Cullor Sprayer-Feeder work? Quite simply, according to the company. It automatically sprays cattle with a fine mist of insecticide each time they get salt or mineral. Spokesmen point out unlike dust bags or chain oilers-which begin treatment only after infestation has taken place-the sprayer-feeder works continuously, automatically, to prevent parasite problems before they develop. 24 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 -f d i

PAGE 25

VARIOUS types of mailboxes are to be found in the newly published book entitled "Mailbox Mania" as shown in the photo above. They call this "revolutionary" and a major breakthrough in parasite control. Efficiency is also claimed because the sprayer-feeder enables stockmen to feed and spray cattle at the same time in one automatic operation. Also, says Cullor, it's economical because no other spraying method can do such a thorough, effective job for less money. Testing in initial marketing areas by university and private programs and customers shows, according to the company, that the Cullor method is "the best livestock spraying system ever." For more information check number 979 and return the form on page 8. Cosby-Hodges staff change announced C. L. Alsbrooks, Jr., president of Cosby-Hodges Milling Company, Birmingham, Alabama, has announced the appointment of Ted Reed to the position of vice president, purchasing and traffic. Reed was formerly the firm's director of purchasing. The company produces and markets livestock and poultry feeds, as well as dog food. Its general lines of dog food and feeds are marketed under the "Jazz" and "Field and Show" labels. Book offered on 'mailbox mania' Over 100 photos of one-of-a-kind country mailboxes created by rural families are featured in the newlyreleased "Mailbox Mania" book. The book, which also features a number of articles about the lives of rural mail carriers, curious historical mailboxes, and mailbox-decorating customs, is an offshoot of the successful "Mailbox of the Month" contest sponsored for a number of years by Farm Wife News magazine. The book Mania is divided into 18 chapters, with unique and interesting photos of mailboxes perched in tree DISTR SALE! HOOD TRACTOR COMPANY, Orlando, must liquidate this brand new FORD FW-30, 265 H.P. 4-wheel drive tractor IMMEDIATELY! Fully equipped, including 540 RPM P.T.O., Catagory III 3-point hitch, and all accessories. HOOD TRACTOR CO. will sell this unit at DEALER COST or below! No demo time on this unit ..immediate delivery to buyer anywhere in the Southeast. If you are in the market for this or any other large agricultural two or four wheel drive tractor, call Hood Tractor Co. today! We have other distressed merchandise in inventory. No wait, delivery immediately from stock at YOUR PRICE! HOO TRACTOR CO. H & S EQUIPMENT RENTAL, INC. Sales 422-4548 Parts 422-2752 Rentals 841-3592 2120 NORTH ORANGE BLOSSOM TRAIL ORLANDO, FLORIDA 32804 ( al O 9Gntmn Please contact me with information on the U following " Hay Storage Dairy Barns S IHorse Barns Hay Covers 0 Swine Buildings -Machine Sheds SEMINOLE STEEL BLDG., INC I Garages Warehouses P. 0. Box 3093-FC, Longwood, Florida 32750 Others PHO E: 30) 89-0 11Use 2 l~-lit you plan ts build soon. PHONE: (305) 869-011 NAME CITY FINANCING AVAILABLE Toll Free (800) 824-5120 Op. #60 STATE ZIP ACT NOW -MAIL TODAY The answer to every common shelter problem. HONE am t )_P.M.( -----oo oo --THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 25

PAGE 26

ST NAKER FARM & RANCH SUPPLY, INC. TAMPA, FLORIDA Phone collect (813) 248-6238 P.O. Box 172 Tampa, Fla. 33601 Come see us at 33rd st. and East 7th Ave., Tampa Largest Inventory of Fencing for Farm & Ranch in Florida FARM FENCING BARBED WIRE GAUCHO BARBED WIRE POULTRY NETTING FARM GATES Galvanized steel, wire GALVANIZED ROOFING 5-V-Crimp FENCE POSTS -Steel. STAPLES GATE HARDWARE ELECTRIC FENCE SYSTEMS AMERICAN POWER PULLS HI LIFT JACKS WELDED WIRE HARDWARE CLOTH NAILS -Bright or galvanized. WE DELIVEK PROVE IT LASTS For fence posts, corner posts, brace posts, barn poles U.S. Department of Agriculture reports show that only 8% of the posts treated with PENTAchlorophenol were lost, compared to a 39% loss with the .EM.E best creosote used. Coleman Evans uses South*j~ ern Yellow Pine cut from live, sound timber, machine peeled and straight bodied. It is treated in accordance with specifications of the American Wood Preservers' Assoc. WRITE FOR PRICES OR CALL COLLECT 0 TRUCK DELIVERY Coleman Evans WOOD PRESERVING COMPANY P.O. Box 1221 /Jacksonville, Florida 32201/904-356-6453 ( 26 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 DESIGNED especially for farmers and ranchers, Butler's latest building design is available in a choice of 11 colors. trunks, soldered from assorted farm tools and scrap metal, and even shaped like the old-time Pony Express ponies. The 100-page book sells for $2.95 and is filled with the first-hand stories of mailmen on horseback, motorcycles, railroads and foot, who delivered the mail to country homes "through snow and rain and gloom of night," from nostalgic days all the way to the present time. To order copies of "Mailbox Mania," write to Country Store, 611 E. Wells Street, Milwaukee, WI 53202. Include 50 for postage and handling. 980-Butler introduces added building line A newly developed line of all-steel farm buildings has been introduced by the Agri-Products Division of Butler Manufacturing Company. The new AgMaster 2:12 building is available in a broad range of sizes, designed to meet requirements in various parts of the nation. Designed especially for farmers and ranchers, the Ag-Master 2:12 building features a 2-in-12 roof pitch, attractive trim, and optional guttering and downspouts. The pre-engineered, clear-span building also features large, factorylocated doors in both the endwalls and the sidewalls. Other accessories include pre-finished walk-in doors, windows, roof ventilators and Lite*Panl skylights. The Ag-Master 2:12 building is available in a choice of 11I factoryapplied colors. According to the manufacturer, the building is designed for easy erection, and is suitable for many usesmachinery storage, grain storage, or a combination of the two; farm shop; animal housing; or general utility. The Ag-Master 2:12 building is marketed through a nationwide network of independent businessmen, known as Butler Agri-Builders. For more information check number 980 and return the form on page 8. YTex Corporation announces Florida distributors Y-Tex Corporation, Cody, Wyoming, has announced a list of Florida firms handling the company's All American "TEST and WEIGH TO MAKE BEEF CATTLE PAY" Ask about Joining-Contact BOB SAND C6 : -. r ' FBSCIA Secly Rolfe Hall, U. of la. A.Galnesville, Florida 32601 Lee & Sons Cattle Service Kn w R. C. Lee, owner Fitt.* 904/357-5068 Cattle Star Route Box 820 For Show Eustis, Fla. 32726 And Sale Barn-15 Mi. East of Eustis on S.R. 44

PAGE 27

"Snap-Lok" ear tag system. Florida firms listed included Aid Labs., Inc., Jacksonville, Okeechobee, Ocala, and Seffner; Imperial Livestock Supply, Seffner; International Cryo-Bio Services, Inc., Miami; M&M Supply, Thonotosassa, Graceville, and Okeechobee, and Poultry Health Supply, Jacksonville. Y-Tex says the tag is a two piece button type tag that gives positive straight-line "Snap-Lok" application plus much more. Florida Lime appoints Beamon vice president W. E. "Willie" Beamon, of Yalaha, has been appointed vice-president of ag products sales for Florida Lime and Dolomite Company in Ocala. Beamon comes to Florida Lime and Dolomite from Dixie Lime & Stone Company, where he was general marketing manager for their rock, ag-lime and chemical p rod -ucts divisions. Beamon was associated with Dixie Lime & Stone for 13 years. Beamon Willie and his wife, Erma, reside in Yalaha. Established in 1972, Florida Lime and Dolomite Company has become a leader in the agricultural limestone market in the southeast. Florida Lime distributes Dolomite, Hi-calcium Limestone, Aragonite, Fairfield Slag and Gypsum for the agricultural market. "Beamon's appointment is another reflection of our faith in the unlimited future of Florida agriculture. His experience will enable our growing firm to better serve our customers' needs," says Fred Montsdeoca, Florida Lime and Dolomite Company president. Weed control important for pasture improvement 'In a short-term price squeeze, or, specifically, in 1979, if I had to choose between weed control or fertilizer practices for pasture improvement, I'd pick weed control," said Dr. Vance Watson, research agronomist at Mississippi State University and guest speaker at a series of pasture weed control meetings held recently by Velsicol Chemical Corporation, Chicago, Illinois. Florida beef and dairy producers from the Okeechobee, Immokalee, Wauchula, Mango, Belle Glade and Kissimmee areas heard Watson say the best results in pasture weed control depend on a combination of weed control, fertilizer and good management, but that weed control offers the farmer the greatest single advantage when all three practices are not affordable. Bankruptcy ESTATE OF HAMPTON J. WALKER OVER 9,000 ACRES ALONG SAINT MARY'S RIVER AND 104 UNIT APARTMENT COMPLEX KNOWN AS EASTWOOD OAKS Nassau County-Hilliard, Florida WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20, 1979 10:00 A.M. Sale Site: North of Hilliard-4 Miles U.S.1 Only 30 miles from Jacksonville, Florida Bankruptcy No.# 77-599-BKJ Trustee-Lansing J. Roy, Gainesville, Florida Judge-Honorable George L. Protctor U.S. District Court Of Middle District Of Florida Jacksonville, Fla. Division LAND: Over 9,000 acres to sell in tracts and/or combinations. 8 miles of River Frontage on beautiful St. Mary's River Fantastic Home Sites on River 104 UNIT APARTMENT COMPLEX KNOWN AS Road Frontage Home Sites EASTWOOD OAKS TIMBER: eHAS OWN SEWAGE SYSTEM Over 6,000 acres of timber with approximately *LAUNDRY FACILITIES 60,000 cords of wood. *EXERCISE ROOM DEVELOPERS AND INVESTORS: :CLUB ROOM,W/KITCHEN & BAR (Selling in tracts and as a whole) *CHILDREN'S PLAYGROUND 1600 Acres around beautiful 48 acre Lake Hampton *SWIMMING POOL and 5 other lakes *TENNIS COURTS & VOLLEYBALL COURTS Already engineered for subdivision AND MANY OTHER ASSETS Frontage on U.S.Hwy. 1 and Lake Hampton Road FARM AND CATTLE RAISERS: Several small farms in various sizes to sell -OR INFORMATION fATAI Onri F RROCHtIRF OR APPOINTMENT CALL: FLORIDA FIELD OFFICE (904) 845-2612 CATTLE AND CORN FOR SALE DIcKs GRAIN & CATTLE LOW OR HIGH MOISTURE CORN -MOSTLY COMMERCIAL CATTLE LAKE CITY, FLORIDA BONDED F.J.DICKS J. L. DICKS HARRY DICKS LEONARD DICKS DAYTIME 752-0028 752-5620 752-0017 752-9456 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 27 A %

PAGE 28

SCntury Steel Buildings CALL COLLECT 1-904-387-2889 26 GAUGE STEEL 30x 48x12-$ 2.949 OPEN SPAN I-BEAM 40 x72 144,947 CONSTRUCTION 45 x96 x16$ 6,938 ALL STEEL -Other 27 x 30 x 15$ 2,795 Sizes Available 40 x 75 x 12-$ 5,990 Limited Quantities 60 x108 x15-$11,865 F.O.B. FACTORY 69 LOCA ZONN MA AFECT PRICES SENEPOL "The New Performance Breed" Fla. Distributor: Alvin Futch Plant City Ph: 813/752-8572 (home) 813/752-3181 (office) SOUTHEASTERN SENEPOL, LTD. Freeman Wingard' Rt 2 Montezuma, Ga. Ph: 91 2/433-6702 office ) 912P472-7885 (home) The Best in Beefalo Cattle 'Vfhite Oak Jlantation Beefalo Semen Available Contact Ken Woehrle Star Route 1, Box 1296 Yulee, Florida 32097 Phone: 904/225-5204 CIRCLE M Member Nat1. & Local ABA Half-Blood Cows Bred To Have Three-Quarter Calves BEEFALO SEMEN & A.L. Technician Available Also Sales for Slaughter l 0 Least Gristle, Bone 0 Highest Protein; & Fat Per Head Lowest Cholesterol 0 Easiest, Safest Calving 0 Tastiest, Tenderest, Most Healthful ll Proven Superior In Every Way Facts Sent Free When Requested On Your Ranch Letterhed 1001 Montgomery Lane, Leesburg, Fla. 32748 28 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 NOW IT'S HISTORY 1943: Jacksons entertained A lachua cowmen A feature article covered the Alachua County Cattlemen's Association meeting which was hosted by Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Jackson, Gainesville, and attended by 150 members, families and friends .Parkdale Farms near Largo reported a Guernsey-Jersey cow gave birth to twin heifer calves ...A field day was held at the Range Cattle Experiment Station, Ona. 1953: Pasture progress was noted An article by E. M. Hodges, D. W. Jones and W. G. Kirk of the experiment station at Ona pointed out pasture progress in Florida has been made as a result of research conducted at the station ...Five hundred cattlemen attended the University of Florida's Livestock Producers' Day ...Zibe Williams and E. P. Scarborough purchased the Okeechobee Livestock Market. 1963: Manatee County hosted convention The annual mid-year conference at Bradenton of the Florida Cattlemen's Association was hosted by the Manatee County Cattlemen's Association A feature of the annual Beef Cattle Short Course was a tour of the V. E. Whitehurst and Sons Ranch near Williston .A feature story covered the pasture program at the Brighton Seminole Indian Reservation. 1973: FCA sweetheart was featured on cover Debbie Floyd, Cross City, FCA's sweetheart, was featured on the June pasture edition cover of The Cattleman in a photo taken at the Beef Research Unit at the University of Florida ...M. E. "Max" Hammond, Bartow, was named "Man of the Year" by the Eastern Brahman Association ...C. M. Payne & Son, Inc., Sebring, seed harvesters and processors, were featured in a story which covered benefits available to cattlemen from harvesting grass seed ...A. Duda and Sons, Cocoa, announced plans for their first Brahman production sale. COWBOYS WORKING Fl CATTLE (in background) at Sugarland Ranch, Clewiston, around 181/2 years ago were from left, Wendy Batey, Henry Pelham and Donald Sutton. The picture was furnished by Jim Fielder, longtime employee at the ranch. The Cattleman needs old photos for this space and will return the picture undamaged after use.

PAGE 29

sof beefutof adrum of Wedmaster Herbicide? Spraying permanent pasture with WeedmasterR herbicide to increase carrying capacity can pay astonishing dividends. For example, university tests have shown crude protein production jumped 500 or 600 percent following Weedmaster applications. And when the quantity and quality of forage goes up, so does beef production. The value of Weedmaster in your pasture depends on a number of variables, of course. Grazing pressure, weather, type of cattle and other inputs can all affect bottom-line performance. But there's no doubt that suppression of noxious weeds with Weedmaster is the practical way to unlock a pasture's beef-making potential. Your Velsicol representative or distributor can help plan a Weedmaster program based on your specific weed problems and the kind of goals you want to set for brood cows or calves. Look over his costand-return figures. And don't be surprised if you see a projection for five tons of extra beef-or more -from a drum of Weedmaster. For assistance or information, contact Forrest Gregory 1310 Estate Wood Drive Brandon, Florida 33511 813-689-4952 Philip B. Couch Hersh Bldg. 5/2 W. Washington Street Newnan, GA 30262 404-253-6322 Before using any pesticide, read the label. Weedmaster Herbicide The easiest management decision you'll make this year. VELSICOL, o, Illinois 60611 vest Industries, Inc. THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 29 Velsicol Chemical Corporation e 341 East Ohio Street e Chicag Velsicol is a subsidiary of North

PAGE 30

Purebred & Percentage Cattle For Sale SUDBRINK Limousin Ranch Archie Bailey, mgr. Madison, Florida 32340 Phone 904/973-6963 "Carcass Quality Limousin" A & R Farms 1711 17th St. West Palmetto, FL 33561 813/722-9777 322-1120 Limousin Cattle Purebred & Percentage H. M. Shirley 400 S. 18th St. Palatka, Fla. 32077 Ph: 904/325-2525 12. mi. north of Palatka near Bostwick Greene's Limousin Percentage and Fullbloods Brahman Crosses Barney & Harlot Greene 4855-16th Street, Vero Beach, Fla. Phone 305/562-2817 Bar G Bar Ranch, St. Rd. 68 and Minute Maid Rd., Ft. Pierce "Quality made for the Tropical Trade" SIMMONS LIMOUSINS Jim & Orie Simmons, owners Rt. 4, Box 2865 904/629-6465 OCALA, FLORIDA 32670 EMERY LIMOUSIN Where performance counts Paul Emery Rt. 4, Box 255 F. Quincy, Fla. 32351 lc" 904/875-2529 '-Advertising Aids Your Personal Salesmanship Contact any of our fieldmen for full details. ;AND LIVESTOCK JOURNAL P.O. Box 1030 Kissimmee, Fla. 32741 30 / THE FLORIDA CATrLEMAN / JUNE 1979 A & R, Osborne,and Lasher take championship honors at Palatka Winners at the open Limousin cattle show held at the Putnam County Fair, Palatka, listed by class to the first three places, with the number of entries shown in parentheses, follow: Spring calves, calved 3 / 78 and after (3)-ADEWF 2K Miss Osceola (reserve junior champion), A. E. Whaley, Kissimmce: AEW 3K Miss Kissimmee, Whalev: Miss A & R 142, A & R I ,,rms, Bradenton: Senior caesi, calved 9/1 /77 thru 10/31/77 (1 )-Miss Simmons 504 (reserve grand champion, junior champion). A & R: Spring yerulings, calved 3 / 77 thru 4/3077 (I )-Lasss an (grand champion, senior charnpion), Osborne Cattle company, Davie: Iv feniailes (2)-A & R: Whaley: Spring calves, calved 311 78 and after (l)-Mr. Hanchaon (reserve calf champion), Osborne, A & R FARMS, Bradenton, showed the grand champion Limousin bull at the Putnam County Fair. LASHER Feed Limousin Ranch, Okahumpka, owned the reserve grand champion Limousin bull in Palatka. Senior lIves, calved 91 I77 th ru 10 3 1 77 (1)-TOPW H Machi I brcamrve grand charipion. calf champion), I a,hcr I cd -i iliousin Ranch. Okabmminpka; I itc Sommllier searlings, calved 7 I 77 thru 8/31/77 I)_ 'cure Eclair (grand champion, junior chamnpiion), A & R: T,, hull, (I )-A & R: Srofucc o damim (I )-A & R: Gair of sirn (I )-A & R Gti vei 'itc (l -A & R. I vc hcad (I )A & R. OSBORNE Cattle Company, Davie exhibited the grand champion Limousin female at the Putnam County Fair. RESERVE Grand Champion Limousin female was exhibited by A & R Farms, Bradenton, at Palatka. Limousin breeders meet Members of the Florida Limousin Breeders Association held a meeting in conjunction with the Beef Cattle Short Course, May 2-4, at Gainesville. Officers were elected at the meeting. They were: Gladys Freeman, Okeechobee, president; Maynard Osborne, Davie, vice-president: Jonell Webb, Maxville, secretary and George Adams, Jacksonville, treasurer. Four directors were re-elected, they were: Paul Emery, Quincy; Freeman; H. M. Shirley, Palatka; and Barney Greene, Vero Beach. Three new directors were appointed at large by the president. They include: Carl Petterson, Jacksonville: Lance Ham; and Jim Simmons, Ocala. Other directors are: W. E. Webb, Maxville; Art Schrader, San Antonio; and Rick Williams, Ocala. George Adams gave a report on the "Super Summer Limousin Sale" the association is planning for June 23, at 1:00 P.M., Lake City, at the Columbia County Fairgrounds. Adams also mentioned there would be a youth judging contest at 10:00 a.m. with $200 in prize money to be given to individual winners.

PAGE 32

/K I K -~ :~ For fly control that works fastthen lasts. Protect your cattle. Zap irritating disease-carryingl lice, ticks, and flies with Ravap. It provides the long lasting residual control you need. Ravap easily mixes with oil in backrubbers or with water for spraying And for ai cmplete fly control for ndfor a cme cnr program, start with Rabon Oral Larvicide to stop fly population buildup before they hatch into a problem. Always follow label directions. SHELL CHEMICAL COMPANY, Animal Health, One Shell Plaza, Houston, TX 77001 r Li I /

PAGE 33

Annual field day at Chipley draws crowd [he seventh annual field day at the Clhipley Beef Demonstration Unit, chipley, was held April 5 with around )00 in attendance. Thc program was opened by A. F. Jelik, area livestock specialist at the AR EC, Quincy. Special guests \Were introduced by Don IIargrove, assistant chairman, animal science department, University of lorida, Gainesville. He welcomed those present and presented a five year service pin to James A. Clemmons, tmarnager of the BDU. Speakers heard giving informative talks on various aspects of beef cattle prodULtioln were Hargrove on a new method of classil'ing Florida calves as to type, frame and physiological Iaturity scores: Jelik on selection of herd replacement heifers: F. S. Baker, Jr., animal scientist at Quincy, on growuit stockers on annual pastures; John C rel of C & L Farms: Jay, on winter razing in a double cropping system: h rla Vs althall. beel specialist from ( rvSt\ t~x\, Oil the importance of' cattle sctles in a bccf operation. Walthall also coiducted a contest so that all present could check their skill at weight estimation. Eight top Vinners in the weight csttiation contest were awarded prizes 1rota Ron-Don, Chiplev: Wells F.R.M. Store, Chiplcy, and Mineral Consultats of Mdalvern, Alabama. Thc Washington-lol mes Cattleien's Associatioti served lunch which w\as follow ed byl demonstrations on implanting growll stimulants: frame score classification, and winter plantings of rye, Rye grass and clover pasture. Georgia Limousin field day set [he Georgia Litnousin Association has scheduled a field day on June 30, 1979, at Rocking E Limousin Ranch, Edison, (jeorgia. Registration will start at 10:00 a.m., followed by a Limousin judging contest ]or juniors and adults. Prizes will be awarded to the first three places. As a special attraction, a Limousin steer or heifer will be awarded to the top junior judge. A "Limousin earthen roast" lunch will be served at 12:00 noon, compliments of Rocking E Ranch. Adams Limousin of North Florida Home of: Prince E. G. Jaudon 007-H George E. Adams and Family 6114 Ricker Rd. Ph: 904-771-8769 Jacksonville, Fl 32210 AM M M M M ~ ~ ~ ~ 4 E2T1LSHD16PA M M M STOCK-TOX M) to control M !l M LICE-TICKS HORNFLIES M -M SUPE STOCK tax M M'' M 259' 25%/ MORE FINISHED PRAY M STRONGER -MORE ECONOMICAL M) ONE GALLON WILL MAKE 200 GALLONS OF FINISHED SPRAY, AS COMPARED TO 150 GALLONS OF COMPETITIVE M SPRAY. Contains 62% HERCULES Toxaphene & 2.5% Lindane. STO I ALL PESTICIDES CAN BE HARMFULTO HEALTH AND THE ENVIRONMENT IF MISUSED. READ THE LABEL CAREFULLY AND USE ONLY AS DIRECTED.(M Dependable Slpce 1883 FOR 96 YEARS OSBORNE CATTLE COMPANY Lass's outstanding femininity and correctness led her to grand championship T, honors at every show in Florida this fall and winter. We are sorry to see her retire though her competitors may not be. We have more of her type at home and invite you to visit. LASS'S FAN 1978-1979 Premier Female This undefeated Limousin female will be featured in the Florida Limousin Association Sale, June 23, in Lake City. Maynard Osborne, owner Ph. 305/434-5065 4760 S.W. 82nd Ave. Davie, Florida 33328 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 33 GINGERI3RED FARM 1977 Premier Limousin Exhibitor Giant Bermuda Grass W. E. & Joenell Webb Box 278, Fit. 15 Maxville, Fl. 32265 904/289-2701 LIMOUSIN FOR SALE FREEMAN CATTLE CO. P. O. Box 636-813/763-3610 OKEECHOBEE. FL A. 33472

PAGE 34

Producers get word on genetic adaptation at Beef Short Course Genetic adaptation was the featured topic of discussion at the opening session of the 28th annual Beef Cattle Short Course, held May 2-4, at Gainesville. Beef producers, researchers and industry representatives from Florida and out-of-state appeared on the program at the three day event to discuss the latest findings. Marvin Koger of the University of Florida served as chairman of the Short Course, and Dr. H. D. Wallace, chairman of the animal science department at the University, presided at the opening session. Opening speaker was Henry Douglas, Zephyrhills, president of the Florida Cattlemen's Association. Douglas pointed out that the cattle industry is constantly changing and that producers must prepare now to meet future demands. He called for support of the proposed Beef Referendum. Douglas pointed out that Florida is still primarily a cow/calf producing state. He said consumers are turning more and more to lean beef and suggested that feeders consider feeding bulls, as an alternative to steers, to produce more lean beef at a faster rate. W. C. (Cal) Burns, director of the Beef Cattle Research Station at Brooksville, discussed genetic adaptation of cattle to local environments. He said his experience with purchasing cattle from many different areas and moving them to Brooksville over the years has revealed that no matter where cattle come from they undergo an environmental shock at Brooksville. Burns said results of studies at Brooksville and other places indicate genetic adaptation is important in commercial beef production. The importance of genetic adaptation to nutrition and management was discussed by Earle W. Klosterman of' the Ohio Agricultural Experiment Station at Wooster. le cited studies indicating that the most efficient cattle will produce the most carcass weight of desired grade at the youngest age. The performance of exotic breeds were discussed by Larry Cundiff of the Animal Research Center, Hastings, Nebraska. ie said he believed many of the exotic breeds would make an important contribution to the beef industry through crossbreeding. F. M. Peacock of the Agricultural Research Center, Ona, presented some information on the performance of Charolais. Studies have been conducted for a number of years at Ona. Performances of exotics in the Everglades was covered by Joe Crockett of the Agricultural Research and Education Center, Belle Glade. He gave results of studies involving several breeds which revealed no superior breed. A producer panel on adaptability and performance in Florida was next on the program. Appearing were cattle producers Alto Adams, Jr., Fort Pierce, Dick Kelley, Stuart, and Mike Milicevic, Clewiston. Adams outlined his selection program which is based on natural selection in the environment where cattle are being produced. Kelley covered his management program, including selecting bulls from within his commercial herd for breeding purposes. Milicevic outlined his systematic crossbreeding program which includes producing first cross Brahman-Hereford and Brahman-Angus cows in Mississippi and utilizing a terminal cross with Charolais for market calf production at Clewiston. Jim Flanagan, and Don Berry, Kissimmee, Cattleman editors, made the SPEAKERS FOR the opening session of the Beef Cattle Short Course included, from left, Dick Kelley, Aldo Adams, Jr., Mike Milicevic, and FCA President Henry Douglas. 34 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 annual Florida premier awards presentations. Receiving awards this year for accumulating the most points in show competition at the 1978-79 Florida livestock shows Were: RW Bar Custom Fitters, Ocala: Bellemeade Farms, Lake City: Bozzuto Angus Ranch, Lake CityPartin & Sons' Heart Bar Ranch, Kissimmee: L. M. Tucker, Tifton, Georgia Martin's Casa Grande, Lake City: Barton Charolais Ranch, Tallahassee Wasdin Charolais Ranch, Tallahassee; Sans Souci Farms, Ocala; Gingerbred Farms, Maxville; A & R Farms, Bradenton; Osborne Cattle Company, Davie; and D. L. Thomas Ranch, Lake City. John Hunt of International Mineral and Chemical Company, Bartow, presented the Florida Beef Carcass Value Award, jointly sponsored by Gainesville Stockman's Supply. John Tedder, a Lake County FFA'er, was the winner of this year's award. Joe Bertrand of the Agricultural Research Center, Jay, presided at the Thursday morning session. Don Hargrove and Don Wakeman, both of the University staff, appeared first with a presentation on the characteristics which contribute to the marketability of cattle. They cited type/grade, uniformity, breed composition, performance, good management, and salesmanship as major factors. Koger discussed genetic systems for commercial cow/calf operations. He outlined straight breeding and systematic crossbreeding systems. Mike Fields, of the University staff, made a presentation comparing Brahman and Angus bulls in semen traits and other fertility factors. Fields made suggestions for insuring fertile herd bulls. Jim Pace, extension animal husbandman at the University, gave some pointers on selecting sound bulls for breeding. Selecting and culling females was discussed by Tim Olson of the University staff. Olson said strict culling procedures should be a part of any sound management program. Olson teamed up with Bryan Melton for a presentation on the economics of culling open and poor producing cows. Bernardo Bauer of Bolivia gave a presentation on the genetic improvement of Criollo, Zebu and Crossbred cattle in the Bolivian tropics. He said production has been improved greatly in the humid tropics of Bolivia by improved methods of selection and breeding. The Florida Beef Cattle Improvement Association program and how it can be utilized by producers was discussed by Bob Sand of the Animal Science Department, University of Florida. Following Sand's presentation was a producer panel on the utilization of records. Appearing were Max Hammond, Bartow; Walter Richardson,

PAGE 35

'it 'I PREMIER BEEF cattle show winners for 1978-79 received awards at the Short Course from Jim Flanagan, far right, editor of The Florida Cattleman. Accepting awards this year were, from left, Mike Partin, Carl Story, L. M. Tucker, W. E. Webb, Calvin Bozzuto, Jackie Thomas. D. L. Thomas, Marlin Nicely, Larry Martin, Rick Williams, and Maynard Osborne. Evinston: Jeanette Chitty, (ainesville: and John Stitt, Clewiston. Herb Chapman, director of the ARC, Ona, presided at the Thursday afternoon session. Speakers included Clarence Ammerman of the University, on mineral and protein needs of cattle: Zane Palmer, meats specialist with the University, on problems and opportunities with forage finished beef: Sloan Baker, head of the AREC, QuinxCy, on finishing cattle in north Florida: Findlay Pate, A REC, Belle Glade, on finishing cattle in South Florida, John Holt, economist with the University, on hedging; Elder Sumner of the Production Credit Association, Okeechobee, on rancher financing; and Ted Gallo of the Southeastern National Bank, Bradenton, on agricultural lendine. Pate was in charge of the Friday morning session. Pastures were featured first, with Chales Ruelke, agronomist with the University, giving some background on the study of warm-season permanent pastures in Florida. Gordon Prine, of the University staff, covered legumes and minimizing nitrogen fertilization. Rob Kalmbacher of the ARC, Ona, discussed native H. C. WALLACE, head of the Animal Science Department at the University of Florida, is shown here listening intently to one of the speakers. range, and Bill Ocumpaugh of the University staff covered creep grazing for calves. The breeding season was discussed by Jim Hentges of the University staff. lentges said many producers could take advantage of yearly price fluctuations and get double use of bulls by observing two breeding seasons for fall and spring calves. Alvin Warnick discussed breeding and the management of first calf heifers. He said breeding heifers to calve at two years old was economical if proper management is applied. Demonstrations on minimizing death losses in calves was the last presentation on the Short Course procram. Veterinarians appearing were Marten Drost, DVM, University of' Florida: Bobby Anderson, DVM. Gainesville Aninial Hospital: and Ken Braun, DVM, University of Florida. Drost emphasized that natural birth is best, but demonstrated the proper methods of pulling a calf, and of delivering a dead calf. Anderson covered the care of the young beef calves, and Braun concluded the program with a presentation on vaccination programs for beef calves. D. L. WAKEMAN, left, and Jim Hentges, both of the University staff, appeared on the Beef Cattle Short Course Program at Gainesville. 3 to the Florida Limousin Sale June 23 Lake City Florida 3/4 Cow by Dandin C bred to Prince Pompadour 1/6/79 and examined safe. 7/8 Heifer Open, by Prarie Chief. Actual weaning weight 591. Ready to breed. 3/4 Heifer Open, by El Macho. One year old. Herd Sires: EL MACHO BOURBON CHARLEMAGNE WASHINGTON (he is polled) Top 0' The Hill Farm Rhodes Frost 912/263-7026 U.S. 84 Quitman, Ga. 31643 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 35

PAGE 36

00 .0= E oE =; Or 26 .C 0 E 2v cc z -, ILg C I. _E 0 0 cato CV to -0 010 Cr UJ *0.0 00 1 00 Z UDr Z0 Z 0 LU cto <; (ZO Cz C 0 '0 _J I LO 'JJc 0 U n C,0 00 n ; o C') 0-4 ** L-----.1 36 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 E E .0. 2. : S =00 A e E -g C m zc00 .u g _o C 1 .2 O E 0 5 5 E cc 0 V.! 05 =Zoo usE. 0 .ED E-. 1.CC F. S. BAKER, left, served as official judge for the Florida Simmental Association judging contest. Field day host Spencer Miller is shown at right discussing a class with Baker. BOB DAVENPORT, right, president of the Florida Simmental Association, handled the official ceremonies at the field day. He is visiting above with Simmental breeder Pat Corrigan of Vero Beach. A LARGE TURNOUT of FFA and 4-H youngsters participated in the activities at the Florida Simmental Association Field Day held at Millercrest Farm. Millcrest Farm site of Florida Simmental field day program "There is no single best breed of cattle." lowed by the Marion 4-H Club with 538 That's what Joe Crockett, animal points. geneticist from the Agricultural High point FFA individual at the Research and Education Center, Belle event was Cindy Alderman, Bradford, Glade, told the group of people attendscoring 216 points. The 4-H high indiing the Florida Simmental Association vidual was Lisa Hemmiger of the Field Day on April 20, at Bronson. Marion Chapter, tabulating 189 points. Crockett was featured speaker at the Fred Pace of Carnation Genetics, event and gave a report on research Ilughson, California, gave a slide preresults involving Simmentals and other sentation on embryo transplants. Pace exotic breeds at the Belle Glade Center. covered both surgical and non-surgical "Many of the breeds have desirable techniques. He said present surgical proand some undesirable traits," Crockett cedures produce about a 60 percent consaid. In order to have a brood cow ception rate, while about 40 percent sucadapted to Florida and produce a cess is obtained with the non-surgical desirable market calf the breeds must be method. blended, Crockett said, in a systematic A Ralgro ear implant demonstracrossbreeding program to suit indition was presented by Bob Sand, extenvidual environments, management sion beef specialist with the University systems, and market goals. of Florida. The field day was sponsored by the Emcees for the event were Bob Florida Simmental Association and Davenport, Ocala, president of the hosted by Millercrest Farm, Bronson. Florida Simmental Association, and Jeff Over 150 registered for the event. Miller of Millercrest Farm. The program got underway with a Door prizes for the event were sponSimmental judging contest. F. S. Baker, sored by American Breeders Service, director of the Agricultural Research Curtiss Breeding Service, Moorman's and Education Center at Quincy, served and Beachanip Hardware of Chiefland. as official judge. Lunch was prepared by Pete Asbell The Bradford FFA Chapter took and the Bronson FFA Chapter. first place honors in the judging contest, scoring 592 points. In second place was Commercial production of red meat in Bronson FFA Chapter with 569 points. the U.S. for March was 3093 million 4-H team competition was won by pounds, seven percent below March a the Gilchrist Club with 548 points, folyear ago, according to USDA. r

PAGE 37

Rancher combats armyworm invasion of pastures Two hundred brood cows live just south of the Jacksonville city lisjits. Their home is Sweetwater Farm, a ranch rich in improved Coastal Bermuda grass pastures surrounded by native timber. The cow-calf operation has been an active income producing source for J. E. Williams for nearly 40 years. He has built a top herd of Charolais-Angus-Hereford crossbred cows that regularly produce strong, healthy calves with heavy weaning weights. Williams sells the steer calves at local auction markets and keeps the heifers for replacement stock. Pastures on this operation are Coastal Bermuda grass and Bahia grass which are regularly fertilized and topdressed to produce quality forage high in protein and TDN. This pasture improvement program isn't without problems, however. More than cows enjoy the lush, tender blades of Bermuda grass, says Williams. Invasion Fall armyworms invaded the pastures in 1977 with an attack that quickly became a raging inferno. The armyworm is no stranger to the area. Williams starts checking pastures in late July and August for the tell-tale signs of infestation. When he sees it, he begins his insect control program. But 1977 was an unusual year. Insect pressure was unusually high. Climatologists now say that upper wind patterns brought on conditions that were highly favorable for insects. "When the armyworm was reported, we started our usual control program," says Williams. "But I could see that we weren't getting control. We'd find worms at the edge of a pasture and in no time they would be everywhere. I knew that something needed to be done." In about as much time as it takes to rope a calf, this rancher retired his 25year-old duster and purchased a new 300-gallon spray rig. He then mixed one-half pound "Lannate" insecticide and sprayed at the rate of 18-20 gallons water per acre. Cows were rotated to nontreated pastures for a week. 'Lannate' really did the job," says this Duval County rancher. "We got good control of armyworm and we held them back." "Lannate" gives excellent control of armyworm because it works two ways, he points out. Quick contact action gives fast knockdown while the product provides longer control for a period of time to get emerging worms. Production programs Williams starts a pasture producing by sprigging Coastal Bermuda grass. This is overseeded with rye in the winter or a hybrid millet in the summer and harTheWorld's Most Efficient Brood Cow. Nobrag Jst faict! For information concerning sales. breed literature and new educational film, contact: International Brangus Breeders Association 9500 Tioga Drive I San Antonio. Texas 78230 / (512) 696-8231 Any Country is Brangus Country. /An American Breed Since 1949. Summer-Feed Your Weaned Heifers Florida Molasses Florida Molasses Exchange, Inc. Phone 305/996-7711, P.O. Box 507 Belle Glade, Fla. 33430 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 37 T L

PAGE 38

Bruce Martin 904/755-0803 The Home of 4 Premier Winners 18/7 MCG Black Powder The 1979 Premier Brangus Bull is offered for sale at private treaty. Come by for a look at him and our other show prospects for next year. Miss MWF Rocky 20/7 This outstanding 1979 Premier Brangus Female will be featured in the Southeastern Brangus Sale this fall, though we have more like her at home. Rt. 2, Box 96 C3 Lake City, Fla. 32055 Circle R Ranch REG.ANGI S & BRANGI. S ARKY E. ROGERS, OWNER 904/752-2103 Rt. 6, Box 175 LAKE CITY, FLORIDA 32055 Located 7 miles south on U.S. 41 Bar-A-Brangus Bulls and Heifers Proven Crossbreed Since 1949 Box 1088, Wauchula, Fl. 33873 Russell Suggs Albert & Barbara Carlton Foreman Owners 813/322-1090 813/773-6867 Promote BEEF every day. Support Your Florida Beef Council ~ omplete A.l. INC. Services EEF-DAIRY Quality Semen Supplies, 904/383-3772 813/763-5822 Noba-Ga. 912/987-2171 38 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 Larry Martin 904/755-0816 REGISTERED BRANGUS "We're never too busy for you to visit" R. J. Mitchell Farms P.D. Box 187 Quitman, Georgia 31643 U.S. Highway 221 South-7 miles out Day Phone 912/263-4127 Night Phone 912/263-8306 Registered Brangus Lenholt Farms' Deep River Ranch Star Route 2, Box 20 DELAND, FLORIDA 32720 Ranch 8 miles west on Hwy. 44 Phone DeLand 904/734-2534 HAYMAN'S 711 BRAND Registered Red and Gray Brahman (indu-Brazill, Brangus,a raford and Commercial Cttle. P.O. BOX 117, KENANSVILLE, FLA. 32739 Paul Hayman, Owner Ph.: 305/436-1062 Southeast Brangus Association Rt. 5, Box 25 Bardstown K 40004 Phone: 502/348-3279 COASTAL Bermuda grass and Bahia grass on Sweetwater Farm is cut for hay and around two tons an acre per cutting is obtained. Owner Williams claims he has a sound program to combat armyworms by using "Lannate" insecticide. rowed in. He fertilizes and top-dresses on a regular program. Pasture fields for hay average two tons an acre per cutting. This grower usually cuts hay about three to four times with six to eight weeks between cuttings. His big round baler reduces the heavy labor requirement needed in conventional hay making. "This year (1978) the armyworm has not been as severe," he says. "In August we saw a few armyworms. I sprayed the pastures with one-quarter to threeeighths pound per acre of 'Lannate' and it did the job. We never had much of an infestation. The armyworm in Florida continues to be a problem for many ranchers, but Williams now feels he has corralled it on his ranch. He's now looking for ways to control fire ants and horn flies. Moratorium on nitrite use proposed The Carter administration has proposed the use of nitrite in food products be phased out. In legislation submitted to Congress, Secretary of Agriculture Bob Bergland and Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare Joseph A. Califano Jr. recommended the phase out be preceded by a one year moratorium during which no action would be taken to reduce or prohibit the use of nitrite as a preservative Bergland said the Department of Agriculture is taking this action today because the Justice Department has ruled the Federal Meat Inspection Act which governs the use of nitrite as a preservative in products, and the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act which regulates use of nitrite and other products do not permit a phase out of nitrite use. The Meat Inspection Act states that a product is adulterated and may not be approved for sale as wholesome if it contains a substance which may be injurious to health. Join your local county Cattlemen's Association. 1978-79 Premier Exhibitor

PAGE 39

DEALER INQUIRIES WANTED Join the Vermeer team-Contact nearest district office DISTRICT LOCATIONS: Willis Parts Depot U. S. 441, South by Columbia Livestock Mkt. P. 0. Box 1546 Lake City, FL 32055 904/755-2300 Billy Jo Williams Rt. 3, Box 195B Graceville, FL 32440 904/638-7146 904/638-7132 Crews Equipment P. 0. Box 1169 Avon Park, FL 33825 813/453-3142 / S~N~ New This Year: Financing Available Three "F" Model Baler sizes available 605F-6 ft./5 ft. bale, 1200-2000 lbs. 504F-5 ft./4 ft. bale, 800-1400 lbs. 403F-4 ft./3 ft. bale, 400-800 lbs. We have all your haying needs-feeder rings, mowers, rakes, tedders, hay mowing equipment. ASK US ABOUT THE 18 FEATURES OF THE "F" MODEL BALERS DEALER INQUIRIES WANTED Join the Vermeer team-Contact nearest district office.

PAGE 40

LORID ROUNDUP At FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 7 AND CONSUMER SERVICES FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE ECONOMICS, STATISTICS, & COOPERATIVES SERVICE, USDA Cattle prices have continued to increase during the first four months of 1979 in response to a declining availability of replacement cattle. The 14 percent reduction reported on April I in heifers on feed (steers were down 1 percent) is an indication that more heifers are being retained for breeding purposes. This factor, plus the sharp reduction in cull cow slaughter indicates strong entry into the expansion phase of the big cattle cycle. This phase can be expected to last about five years, which means that producers will have to expand herds this year to take full advantage of the cycle. (Note: See the article "Cattle Cycles: A Guide for Cattlemen" in the January, 1979 issue of The Florida Cattleman. Fed cattle prices jumped up $6 from February to March and another $4 to $74-75 in April. Prices should hold fairly steady at this level for the next 6 months unless there are adverse political announcements. Feeder cattle prices have also increased about $10-15 in the past two months. Continued strong demand is expected with additional strength likely in the summer and early fall. Slaughter cow prices will continue to increase with a $65 average for Utility cows by next fall. Hog prices for 200-220 lb. barrows and gilts averaged $42-43 in April, down about $12 from February. Continued low prices, possibly in the $40 areas are expected in the fall due to rapid expansion in the hog industry. PRICE RANGES-ACTUAL AND PROJECTED Omaha Florida 900-1100 400-500 lb. 600-700 lb. pound Steers Steers Year and Choice Utility Month Steers Choice Good Choice Good Cows 1978 Actual Dollars per cwt. Dec. 55-56 72-84 62-75 60-68 53-62 41-51 1979 Jan. 59-60 82-94 73-86 69-74 61-70 47-55 Feb. 64-65 89-102 78-91 73-81 65-75 50-59 Mar. 70-71 95-110 85-100 79-88 71-81 55-65 Apr. 74-75 99-114 88-104 78-87 73-83 56-66 Projected May 72-73 100-115 90-105 79-88 73-82 57-67 June-Jul. 74-75 100-115 90-105 78-87 72-81 58-68 Aug.-Sept. 73-75 105-120 95-110 80-88 74-83 59-69 SOURCE: Florida Cooperative Extension Service. Average Prices Received, Effective Parity and Percent of Parity for Livestock, U.S., April 1978 and 1979 Prices Parity Av. Prices Item Received Prices as % of Parity 197811979 197811979 197811979 Dols. per Cwt. Dols. per Cwt. Percent Beef Cattle 47.20 72.40 61.80 71.30 76 102 Calves 53.70 96.40 71.20 82.80 75 116 Hogs 45.00 44.30 60.40 70.70 75 63 Average Prices Received per cwt. for Slaughter and Stocker Cattle and Calves through 14 Florida Auctions, April 1978, 1979 Grade Cows Calves 1978 1979 1978 1979 SLAUGHTER: Over 250 Lbs. Choice ----58.39 97.82 Good ---50.68 90.06 Standard ----41.18 80.82 Utility 37.93 59.59 ----Cutter 32.88 55.39 --Canner 26.53 46.58 -All Grades 35.29 57.34 53.11 92.48 STOCKER Over 300 Lbs. Choice 37.14 66.86 59.05 118.54 Good 37.50 61.02 52.74 104.18 Standard 34.21 55.53 45.02 91.55 Utility 31.86 49.43 38.37 -Inferior 23.87 40.20 ---All Grades 34.91 58.91 52.75 104.09 SOURCE: FDA & CS, Division of Marketing, Market News Average Prices, Dollars per Cwt. Slaughter Steers, Omaha Week Choice Choice Good Ended (900-1100 Lbs.) (1100-1300 Lbs.) (900-1100 Lbs.) 1978 1979 1978 1979 1978T1979 Feb 24 45.75 65.22 46.20 65.32 41.25 61.58 Mar 31 49.94 71.35 50.38 71.58 45.56 67.05 Apr 28 52.98 75.95 53.35 76.05 48.25 70.95 Slaughter Cows, Omaha Week Com'l : ] Utility Cutter Ended 1978 1979 1978 1979 1978 979 Feb 24 32.85 52.35 31.65 51.50 29.75 49.75 Mar 31 34.44 55.70 33.62 54.55 30.75 53.10 April28 39.25 59.90 38.10 58.95 36.60 56.40 SOURCE: U.S.D.A.-AMS Imported Boneless Beef on Which Duty is Paid Fresh & Frozen, Florida and U.S., 1977-79 February Jan.-Feb. Change Change Year Quantity from Quantity from Calendar Rec'd. preY. year Rec'd. preY. year Year 1000 1000 1000 Pounds Percent Pounds Percent Pounds Florida: 1977 15,424 +94 47,612 +83 223,716 1978 16,731 + 8 34,133 -28 221,074 1979 25,993 +55 60,328 +77 U.S.: 1977 97,762 +38 184,478 -1 1,192,600 1978 101,467 + 4 193,869 + 5 1,392,568 1979 126,020 +24 264,507 +36 SOURCE: U.S. Department of Commerce 40 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979

PAGE 41

An Opportunity To Share In Our 9 Years Of Breeding Registered Red Angus With The Sale Of 24 Cow Calf Pairs *24 Heifers *6 Bulls AHE BERTHA 492 Born 1-2-78 Wn. Wgt. 563-Ratio 114-20 Contemporaries 365 Day Wgt. 792-Ratio 115-20 Contemporaries SIRE: SUPERCHARGER-A.l.'d UMPIRE 1000 COME TO WHERE SOME OF THE STARS IN THE RED ANGUS BREED ARE*GRAND CHAMPION PEN of FIVE Red Angus Bulls at All Breeds Bull Sale in Montgomery, Ala. 14 Breeds-415 Bulls. *Two HIGHEST SELLING Heifers and Cow-Calf Pair in the 1976 Southeastern Red Angus Association Sale. *GRAND CHAMPION BULL in 1976 & 1977 Tennessee-Kentucky Invitational Show and Sale. *The HIGHEST SELLING Cow-Calf Pair, Heifer and two Bulls in the 1977 Southeastern Red Angus Association Sale. AHE RED SOPHIE Born 12-22-74 Wn. Wgt. 510-Ratio 112-24 Contemporaries HAS LINEBRED HEIFER CALF AT SIDE SIRE: CPR ROYAL 034-Rebred McQueboy 109 Co-Owner & Exhibitor of Supercharger Sired 1977 National Grand Champion. *Supercharger Sired the 1978 American Royal Grand Champion Female. *A Full Brother to my McQueboy Bull Sired the 1975 National Grand Champion Female. *Grand Champion Female and Three Highest Selling Animals in 1978 Southeastern Sale, and Highest Selling in 1978 in Tennessee-Kentucky Sale. *ENFINGER Owned Sires: Gibbs Branic 8, Supercharger, and AHE McQueboy 109, each in successive years sired the Top Gaining Group of Bulls at IBIA Winter Test in Grundy Center, Iowa. ON JULY 7, 1979-6 P.M-At RANCH HEADQUARTERS CHUMUCKLA, FLA. (30 MILES N.E. OF PENSACOLA, FLA.) Doris and I will be looking forward to seeing each of you. Please make reservations early because of the 4th of July Holiday Weekend. We solicit phone-in bids-they will be honored at lowest possible purchase price. Write for a Catalogue. SALE HEADQUARTERS: RODEWAY INN WEST Interstate 10 (N.A.S. Exit) Pensacola, Fla. TOLL FREE 1-800-228-2000 AUCTIONEER: Gayle Ingram P. 0. Box 579 Quitman, Tx. 75783 214-878-2225 OWNERS: Al & Doris Enfinger Rt. 3, Box 683 Jay, Fla. 32565 Ph. 904-994-7033 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 41

PAGE 42

*The world's most efficient breed of cattle: YES, more live calves born unassisted. YES, they grow faster, finish faster, grade better. YES, the calves are always red when bred to other red cattle. YES, you should put performance tested Red Angus bulls to work in your cow herd. YES, save better heifers to improve mothering and milking ability. CURTISS BREEDING SERVICE "Breeding cattle for your next generation." Rodney Moore Jim Ziegler Bill Harris 912/244-4161 613/465-0166 904/783-2008 FLORIDA 6immenta1 ASSOCIATION 904/486-2797 Bronson, Fla. 32621 Red Angus Superiority Herd EML EMULATION 1-adj. 205 Sires: day wt. 665, ADG on test 3.61 CHEROKEE REBEL PV-weaning wt. 552, yearling wt. 1103 Chipola Red Angus Ranch Ken and Nell Williams Route 1, Box 295B-Altha, Florida 33421 Ph: 904/796-9955-762-8259 Helen & Charlie Martin RED ANGUS Registered C & H FARMS 904/547-3098 P. 0. BOX 52 BONIFAY, FL. 32425 Promote BEEF everyday. Support Your Florida Beef Council, olled immenta The Oavenports Rt. 1, Box 213-B 904/591-1156 Reddick, Fl. 32686 ON HAND for the Hall of Fame Federation dinner in Tampa were FCA President Henry Douglas, Zephyrhills, left, and Commissioner of Agriculture Doyle Conner. Kickoff dinner held for Agri project A few weeks ago the kickoff dinner for the Florida Agricultural Hall of Fame Federation was held in Tampa. Commissioner of Agriculture Doyle Conner said the job of the Federation will be to select individuals from a list of quality nominees for induction into the Florida Agricultural Hall of Fame. [he membership of the federation shall be as representative of the various facets of the agricultural industry as possible. This would include, but not be limited to: production, marketing, sales, promotion, research and education. This membership shall be comprised of the president, or his representative, of each member organization. A federation selection committee consisting of four members and a chairman will be appointed by the federation chairman. The purpose of this committee will be to make the final selection of candidates for induction into the Florida Agricultural Hall of Fame. The members of the Selection Committee will remain anonymous and receive appointments annually, said Conner. Flie first group of candidates to be inducted into the Florida Agricultural Hall of Fame will be honored at the 1980 Hall of Fame Federation dinner next spring. At that time a maximum of 10 Hall of Fame members will be inducted. After 1980, a maximum of five new members may be chosen annually. Members of the federation have until September 30 of this year to submit the names of their nominees for possible induction into the Hall of Fame. Names should be sent to: Mr. Bob Morris, chairman, Florida Agricultural Hall of Fame Federation, P. 0. Box 420, Tampa 33601. Said Conner, "I think everyone will agree that the time has come for us to begin officially recognizing those persons who have made significant contributions to Florida agriculture. Federation members should strive to make it a difficult task for the Selection Committee to choose the first group of inductees into the Hall of Fame. Give them plenty of quality nominees to choose from so that those individuals ultimately selected will be able to feel justifiably proud of the honor and acclaim they receive." 42 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 HIDDEN VALLEY RANCH Red Angus Cattle Born and Bred In Florida to Meet the Needs of Florida Cattlemen. Jack Sweger, owner Terry Martin, Mgr. 813/581-5638 904/796-5296 904/796-5868 Rt. 3, Box 170 Brooksville, Fla. 33512 RED ANGUS QUALITY RED ANGUS Haskell Pedigo 4162 Shorecrest Dr. Orlando, Fl. 32804 305/647-6283 Bus. 305/843-1270

PAGE 43

SATURDAY, JULY 21, 1979 Show 9:00 a.m.-Sale 1:00 p.m. at the Auburn University Agricultural Center AUBURN, ALABAMA 60 Lots Registered Red Angus All females under 8 years of age, bulls from 12 to 36 months of age, bred cows and bred heifers guaranteed safe in calf. Corral show consisting of 5 classes. All cattle in the show sell. Open heifers Cows and calves Bulls 12 to 20 months Come see this innovated way from the farm or ranch. For Information and Free Brochure Bred heifers Bred cows Bulls 21 to 36 months of showing cattle. Selected as if you were purchasing them Li P. 0. Box 579 P. 0. Box 579 Quitman, TX 75783 214/878-2225 or contact the sale committee: Al Enfinger Rt. 3, Box 683 Jay, Florida 32565 904/994-7033 Dr. Billy Powell Mobile, Alabama 205/344-8888 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 43

PAGE 44

Bond Simmental Ranch is dispersing their half blood Simmental herd. and is currently offering for sale 90 cows bred to proven, fullblood bulls. These top quality, fullbodied females include a limited selection of fine, breeding age heifers. For prices and additional information, contact: W BOND Simmentd Kinch Perry Bond Office: 912/498-4835, Home: 912/228-1381 Patty Fournier 912/498-7745 Route 1, Box 116 Boston, Georgia 31626 44 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979

PAGE 45

K -1~~] -\ N z I AND LIVESTOCK JOURNAL for June, 1979 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 45 Special Section of

PAGE 46

A' ALLIED MEMBERS Your continued support of the Florida Cattlemen's Association and Florida Beef Council, evidenced by your joining our association as an allied member is deeply appreciated. Particularly, we appreciate the fact that your dues help defray the expenses of putting on our annual convention. We will remember our indebtedness to you for your continued outstanding support. FLORIDA CATTLEMEN'S ASSOCIATION ALLIED MEMBERS Aid Laboratories, Ocala American Breeders Service, Jacksonville Anchor Laboratories, Inc., Kissimmee ACLI Int'l Commodity Svcs., Inc., Altamonte Springs Agri-Feed, Inc., Dunedin American Cyanamid Co., Casselberry Austin Fertilizer & Chemical Co., Sanford Cattlemen's Construction Co., Bartow Central Florida PCA, Orlando Central Molasses Company, Tampa Cody Publications, Kissimmee Cutter Laboratories, Brooksville DoLime Minerals Company, Bartow Elanco Products Company, Tampa Exchange Bank of Osceola, Kissimmee Farm Credit Service, Lakeland Federal Land Bank of Orlando Federal Land Bank of Tampa Federal Land Bank of Wauchula First National Bank of Kissimmee Florida Ass'n of Livestock Markets, Kissimmee Florida Favorite Fertilizer, Inc., Lakeland Florida Feed Mills, Jacksonville Florida Fence Post Co., Inc., Wauchula Florida Lime & Dolomite Co., Inc., Ocala Georgia-Florida Harvestore, Inc., Attapulgus, Ga. W. R. Grace Company, Fort Pierce Greater Jacksonville Fair, Jacksonville Griffin Fertilizer Company, Frostproof Haile-Dean Seed Company, Inc., Orlando I.M.C. Chemical Group, Inc., (Ral ro) Bartov I.M.C. Development Corp., Lake and i.M.C. Rainbow Div., Mulberry Kaplan Industries, Inc., Bartow Lakeland Cash Feed Company, Inc., Lakelanc Loeb Rhoades Hornblower, Winter Park Merck Chemical Division, Goldenrod Mixon Milling Company, Cairo, Georgia M&M Supply Co. of Fla.,lnc., Thonotosassa Okeechobee County Bank, Okeechobee The P.D.Q. Company, Lakeland Poultry Health Service, Jacksonville Ralston-Purina Company, Tampa Ranch Fertilizer Company, Okeechobee Riechold Chemical, Inc., Pensacola RICO Liquids, Inc., Aliceville, Alabama Riviana Foods, Inc., Houston, Texas Southeast First National Bank of Miami S.E. Molasses & Supply Co., Okeechobee Southern Culvert Company, Pinellas Park Sun Bank of St. Cloud, St. Cloud Sun City Center Bank, Sun City Center Syntex Agribusiness, Inc., Clearwater U.S. Sugar Corporation, Clewiston i~1 ~Iii li 2 -J j I, ~i Ii-i "Promoting the product of one of Florida's leading industries." P. 0. Box 1929, Kissimmee, Florida 32741 46 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 P11 U U

PAGE 47

1979 FCA Convention Program (Registration Desk Open Daily, 9:00 a.m.-Meeting Rooms Posted in Lobby) WEDNESDAY, JUNE 27, 1979 9:00 a.m.-Registration in Hotel Lobby 10:00 a.m.-FCA Executive Committee Meeting and Luncheon (Courtesy The First National Bank of Kissimmee) 12:00 noon-Cowbelles Executive Committee Luncheon Meeting 3:30 p.m.-FCA Committee Meetings 6:30 p.m.-Hospitality Hour (Courtesy Ben Hill Griffin, Inc., and Gri/in Fertilizer, Frostproof) THURSDAY, JUNE 28, 1979 Breakfast-No Planned Breakfast 7:30 a.m.-Exec. Comm: County Ass'n Presidents; State Directors: Sweethearts and Judges Breakfast (Courtesy Ralston-Purina Company, Don Plagge, Host) 9:00 a.m.-1979 Florida Cattlemen-Florida CowBelles Opening Session Call to Order: Henry C. Douglas, President Invocation, Pledge of Allegiance and Salute to the Flag Welcome: Mike Partin, President, Osceola Cattlemen's Ass'n Response: Harvey Dahl, First Vice President, FCA 9:15 a.m.-Florida CowBelles Ass'n Report: Mrs. Katharine Simms, President Address: National CowBelles President Mrs. Rose Harris 10:00 a.m.-Address: Doyle Conner, Fla. Comm. of Agriculture 10:30 a.m.-Address: NCA President Lauren Carlson 12:00 noon-Cowboy & CowBelle "Sweetheart" Luncheon Invocation: J. 0. Pearce, Jr., Okeechobee Presentation of Sweethearts by Mrs. Winkie LeFils, Chairman Introduction of new Allied Members; Chairman Herb Weimer Presentation of "Outstanding Cow Belle Nominees," Mrs. Jack Johnson, Chairman Golf & Tennis Tournaments (Information at Registration Desk) 2:30 p.m.-FCA Directors Meeting and Committee Reports Exec. Vice President's Report: James F. Mummey 2:30 p.m.-CowBelles General Membership Meeting 6:30 p.m.-Cocktail Hour-Reception for Registrants and Visiting Dignitaries (Courtesy U. S. Sugar Corporation, Clewiston) 7:30 p.m.-Fiesta Buffet 9:00 p.m.-Sweetheart Coronation by Commissioner Doyle Conner 9:30 p.m.-Dance, Country and Western Band FRIDAY, JUNE 29, 1979 Breakfast-No Planned Breakfast 7:00 a.m.-Cow Belles Breakfast (Courtesy The Clarence Cross Family, Colquitt, Georgia) 9:00 a.m.-FCA General Business Session Call to Order: President Henry Douglas Pledge of Allegiance and Salute to the Flag Budget & Finance Report: Ralph Cellon, Jr. AITC Report: R. D. Bennett President's Report: Henry Douglas 10:30 a.m.-Address: Lt. Governor Wayne Mixson Honorary Director Awards: Henry Douglas Election of FCA Officers for 1979-80 12:00 noon-No Planned Luncheon for Cattlemen 12:00 noon--CowBelles Luncheon, Past Presidents & Exec. Committee (Courtesy Federal Land Bank & Production Credit A ss'ns of Florida) 6:30 p.m.-Hospitality Hour (Courtesy Florida Lime & Dolomite Company, Inc., Ocala) 7:30 p.m.-Banquet-Master of Ceremonies Ralph Cellon, Jr. Address: Governor Robert Graham Presentation of 1979-80 President for Remarks 9:30 p.m.-Dance (Orange Juice during the convention, courtesy Ben Hill Griffin, Inc., Frostproof, Orchids for the Ladies, courtesy DoLime Minerals, Bartow; Registration Badges, courtesy Florida Lime & Dolomite Co., Inc., Ocala; Diamond Pendant for CowBelles drawing, courtesy Florida Association of Livestock Markets; Coffee during the convention, courtesy Florida Angus Association). LIQUID FEEDERS 3 or 4 Wheel Manufactured in Lake Wales, Fla. Fully assembled Delivery available SUMMER DISCOUNTS Call or Write for Brochure Adsit Dura-Cast Products P. O. Box 812 Lake Wales, FL 33853 Phones: 813/676-4116 813/285-8874 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 47 CITRUS CHEMICAL COMPANY, INC. d/b/a Peoples Fertilizer A complete line of Pasture and Grove Fertilizers to meet your needs. CUSTOM MIXING SUPERIOR SERVICE COMPETITIVE PRICES Telephone Lakeland 813/665-2332 P. 0. Box 1087 Eaton Park, Fla. 33840 Black To Last!

PAGE 48

ILI~ WALT DISNEY WORLD VILLAGE at Lake Buena Vista will be one of the feature attractions awaiting FCA conventioneers at the annual June event. Visiting the shops and restaurants such as the Empress Lilly shown above will occupy some of the leisure time of FCA members and their families during the four-day convention. Lake Buena Vista-convention site! The annual convention of the Florida Cattlemen's Association is slated for June 27-30 at the Dutch Inn Resort CowBelles plan active program Hotel, Lake Buena Vista. With a number of important issues to be Members of the Florida CowBelles Association have planned a full schedule of covered during the business sessions, meetings and social activities when they hold their annual meeting in conjuncFCA officials expect one of the largest tion with FCA's convention at the Dutch Inn Resort Hotel, Lake Buena Vista, crowds to be on hand in recent years. June 27-30. All meeting places will be posted in the hotel lobby. Registration will This year's program will include be at 9:00 a.m., daily. both business and social activities along The CowBelles program is as follows: with both golf and tennis tournaments. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 27 The registration desk will open at 9:00 a.m., Wednesday, June 27, and will 9:00 a.m.-Registration in Hotel Lobby be open daily from then on at the same 12:00 noon-Executive Committee Luncheon Meeting hour. Meeting rooms for committee and 6:30 p.m.-Hospitality Hour the main sessions will be posted in the hotel lobby. THURSDAY, JUNE 28 The first session presided over by Henry Douglas, Zephyrhills, president, 7:00 a.m.-Outstanding CowBelle Breakfast will be a joint one with the CowBelles 9:15 a.m.-President's Report to FCA which will officially open the convenAddress by Mrs. Rose Harris, ANCB President tion. Welcome to the area will be given 10:30-11:30 a.m.-Ladies Reception (Guest: Mrs. Ruth Ann Fowler) by Mike Partin, Kissimmee, president of 12:00 noon-Cowboy & CowBelle "Sweetheart" Luncheon the Osceola County Cattlemen's AssoPresentation of Sweethearts, Mrs. Winkie LeFils ciation. The response will be given by Presentation of "Outstanding CowBelle" Nominees, Harvey Dahl, Melbourne, First vice Mrs. Jack Johnson president of FCA. Golf and Ten s Tournaments (information at Mrs. Katharine Simms, Lithia, CowRegistration Desk) Belles president, will address the mem2:30 p.m.-General Membership Meeting bership and will then present Mrs. Rose Drawing for Diamond Pendant Harris, Waitsburg, Washington, presi(Courtesy Florida Association of Livestock Markets) dent of the American National Cow6:30 p.m.-Cocktail Hour and Reception Belles who will give a talk on CowBelle 7:30 p.m.-Fiesta Buffet accomplishments 9:00 p.m.-Sweetheart Coronation by Commissioner Doyle Conner Master of ceremonies for the annual 9:30 p.m.-Dance, Country and Western Band banquet will be Ralph Cellon, Jr., of FRIDAY, JUNE 29 Alachua. Principal speaker at the banquet on Friday evening, June 29, will be 7:00 a.m.-CowBelles Breakfast and General Membership Meeting Florida Governor Bob Graham. (Courtesy The Clarence Cross Fanmily, Colquitt, Georgia) FCA's 1979-80 Sweetheart will be Guest Speaker: Mrs. Rose Harris, ANCB President crowned by Commissioner of AgriculPresentation of Awards ture Doyle Conner at the Fiesta Buffet Election of Officers which is set for Thursday evening, June 12:00 noon-Executive Committee and Past Presidents Luncheon 28. A country and western dance will (Courtesy Federal Land Bank & Production Credit Ass'ns follow the sweetheart ceremonies and a of Florida) dance will also follow the annual ban6:30 p.m.-Hospitality Hour quet affair on Friday night. 7:30 p.m.-Annual Banquet and Dance Current industry topics and problems, committee reports and other 48 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979

PAGE 49

items will be covered during the business sessions. Election of officers for the new year will also be held and resolutions will be adopted by the membership. Honorary FCA directors will also be named. The Florida CowBelles Association under the leadership of Mrs. Katharine Simms will conduct its annual convention and hold committee meetings during the same period as the cattlemen. Lieutenant Governor Wayne Mixson, Commissioner of Agriculture Doyle Conner and NCA President Lauren Carlson, Chokio, Minnesota, will be program speakers during the general sessions. Registration fee for the convention will be 545.00 per person which includes a number of meals, hospitality hours and other entertainment. There will be no registration charge for children unless they desire to attend a particular function. Individual tickets will be sold at the registration desk for those functions. Opening day FCA President Henry Douglas has called an executive committee meeting at 10:00 a.m. June 27 to lead off the convention. A luncheon will follow the session at 12:00 noon courtesy of The First National Bank of Kissimmee. The CowBelles executive committee will also hold a luncheon meeting beginning at 12:00 noon. FCA committees will meet beginning at 3:30 p.m., Wednesday, June 27. Opening day's events will close with a hospitality hour hosted by Ben Hill Griffin, Inc., and Griffin Fertilizer, Frostproof, set for 6:30 p.m. Thursday There is no planned breakfast for registrants on Thursday, June 28, although the executive committee, county association presidents, state directors, sweetheart contestants and judges will be hosted at a 7:30 a.m. breakfast by Ralston-Purina Company, St. Louis, Missouri. Purina district manager Don Plagge, Tampa, will The cover The Dutch Inn Resort Hotel at Lake Buena Vista will be the headquarters hotel for the annual FCA convention. A photo of the facility appears on the cover of this annual convention section. FCA President Henry Douglas, Zephyrhills, and Mrs. Douglas, extend an invitation to all to attend the convention and enjoy the area of Lake Buena Vista and its facilities. A number of social activities are planned for FCA members and families during the period of the convention. The convention committee is chaired by C. Aubrey Caruthers of Oxford. PLAYGROUND FACILITIES are available at the Dutch Inn Resort Inn Hotel where the youngsters can gather. It's located adjacent to the swimming pool area. represent the firm. The joint session of FCA and the CowBelles will convene at 9:00 a.m., presided over by President Douglas. At 9:15 a.m., Mrs. Katharine Simms, CowBelles president, will give her report to the membership. A report will also be given by ANCB President Rose Harris. Commissioner Conner is scheduled to address the members at 10:00 a.m. At 12:00 noon the annual Cowboy and CowBelle "Sweetheart" luncheon will be served. The invocation will be given by J. 0. Pearce, Jr., of Okeechobee. The sweetheart contestants will be presented by Mrs. Winkie LeFils, Osteen, chairman of the sweetheart contest. Herb Weimer, Kissimmee, chairman of the allied members committee, will present new members, and Mrs. Jack Johnson, Immokalee, will present the "Outstanding CowBelle" nominees. At 2:30 p.m., Douglas will call the directors meeting to order and the annual meeting of the CowBelles is also scheduled for that hour. FCA Executive Vice President Jim Mummey, Kissimmee, will report on association and legislative matters at the directors meeting. Other committee reports will also be heard. A cocktail hour and reception honoring the registrants and visiting dignitaries will be hosted by U.S. Sugar Corporation, Clewiston, beginning at 6:30 p.m. Following the "Fiesta Buffet" at 7:30 p.m., Commissioner Conner will crown the 1979-80 cattlemen's sweetheart. A country-western dance will conclude the evening's social activities. Friday No breakfast is planned for the final day, June 29, and cattlemen will be on their own. The CowBelles will be hosted at a breakfast by the Clarence Cross Family, Colquitt, Georgia, at 7:00 a.m. The final FCA general business session will be convened by President Douglas at 9:00 a.m. A budget and finance report will be by Ralph Cellon, Jr., treasurer, followed by a report on Animal Industry Technical Council matters given by R. D. Bennett, Greenwood. Douglas will give his president's report for the year and then the members will hear from Lieutenant Governor Wayne Mixson. Following this talk, Douglas will present the honorary director plaques. Election of officers will follow. No formal luncheon is planned at noon for the cattlemen but the CowBelles' past president and executive committee luncheon hosted by Federal Land Bank and Production Credit Associations of Florida is set for 12:00 noon. A hospitality hour hosted by Florida Lime and Dolomite Company, Inc., Ocala, is slated for 6:30 p.m. The annual banquet is scheduled for 7:30 p.m., with Ralph Cellon, Jr., serving as emcee. Highlight of the evening will be an address by Governor Bob Graham. Prior to the dance, which is scheduled for 9:30 p.m., the FCA president for 1979-80 will be introduced for remarks. Orange juice during the convention will be furnished by Ben Hill Griffin. Inc., Frostproof. Orchids for the ladies will be provided by DoLime Minerals, Bartow. Registration badges are provided by Florida Lime and Dolomite Company, Inc., and morning coffee during the convention is courtesy of the Florida Angus Association. Other contributions, assistance and donors for various activities during the convention are acknowledged from Allied Members of FCA; Florida Association of Livestock Markets The First National Bank of Kissimmee; Florida Lime and Dolomite Company, Inc., Ocala; The Clarence Cross Family, Colquitt, Georgia: Ralston-Purina Company, St. Louis, Missouri Federal Land Bank Association of Florida; Production Credit Association of Florida: U.S. Sugar Corporation, Clewiston: sweetheart judges; Mrs. Winkie LeFils, sweetheart contest chairman, and Mrs. Katharine Simms, CowBelles president. THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 49

PAGE 50

FCA activities around the nation A variety of activities are participated in by FCA members, CowBelles, and industry supporters all around the country as shown by the accompanying photos. Top left, NCA President Lauren Carlson, Chokio, Minnesota, will be on the FCA convention program at Lake Buena Vista. He's shown checking some information on beef promotion with Mrs. JoAnn Smith, Wacahoota, chairman of NCA's beef promotion and consumer relations committee during an out-of-state meeting. Second from top, J. Charles and Saundra Gray of Gemini Springs Farms, DeBary, hosted the annual Block and Bridle field tour a short time ago and are shown greeting the group. Third row, left, Mrs. Jan Stephens, Kissimmee, first vice president of the Florida CowBelles, had some helpers during a beef promotion held in Starke. Third row, center, Mrs. Sarah Childs, Lake Placid, left foreground, second vice president of the Florida CowBelles, shows that CowBelles also join in working cows when called upon. Third row, right, Honorary members of the University of Florida Block & Bridle Club named this year were the late 0. L. "Slim" Partin, accepted by Mike Partin, Kissimmee, at left; J. E. Pace, longtime beef extension specialist at the University, center, and E. L. "Geech" Partin, of Kissimmee. Bottom row, left, Mrs. Katharine Simms, right center, president of the Florida CowBelles, has led the group on a number of beef promotions during the past year. Shown here is an event at the Fashion Square Mall, Orlando. Bottom right, FBC Executive Director Ron Stephens, left, conferred with Bob Morris, Tampa, during the recent Florida Agricultural Hall of Fame banquet at the State Fairgrounds, Tampa. 50 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979

PAGE 51

1UE DIE FEOFL J I '4 11 WINN-DIXIE COVERS FLORIDA Congratulations on FCA's first year of ownership of The EEF F 0" Florida Cattleman and Livestock Journal and best wishes for a most successful and fruitful convention. THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 51 I

PAGE 52

Beef cookoff termed PRESIDENT'S BY-LINES The Florida Beef Cook-Off was very suCcessfuli. Donna Pettit, chairman, planned and conducted an outstanding event. The cook-off was held in the Agricultural Center at Seffncr, April 20. We are most indebted to Ruth Ann -owkler, home extension economist and her staff for their invaluable assistance and use of their facilities. There was also good support from C owBelles. Travelng to H illshorough County were vicechairman of the cook-off, Jeannie Carpenter, Brevard County president Ruth Tucker and immediate past president Jeanette Barthle of Pasco County. Hillsborough County CowBelles helping were Louise Massaro, Jane Massaro, Ola Alderman and Claire Bryant. Our publicity chairman, Billie Jo Simmons, had arranged lor extensive press coverage. There were representatives from Brandon News, Plant Citt Courier, East lillshorough Tribune and Tampa Times. Both Channel 8 and Channel 13 taped portions of the cookolf and this was seen on noon and evening news in Tampa. The fact that the top three winners were men attracted a lot of attention. There were seven contestants and we appreciate each of them participating. First place winner was Avritt Grace, county cook-off winner from St. Lucie County with his fantastic recipe for Beef' Burgundy Fiesta. Other winners and recipes are in a separate article in this issue of The Florida (attleman. Grace will be attending the national beel cook-off in Omaha, Nebraska, September 27 and 28. Donna Pettit and Jeannie Carpenter are making plans to also attend and we wish much success and good luck to our State winner. Wouldn't it be exciting to have a Florida national winner! Midyear meetings and workshops will be held beginning July 17 at 8:00 a.m. and adjourning on July 18 at 4:00 p.m. As you probably read in the national newsletter, we are urged to make reservations for plane and hotel immediately as it is all first come, first served basis. Some flights for the summer are already completely booked due to the fuel shortage. Send your hotel reservations directly to the ANCB, P. 0. Box 569, Denver, Colorado 80201, care of Dottie Curtis. The Region II workshop in Jackson, Mississippi, was canceled because of the flood conditions. I know your prayers were for everyone involved in the tragic situation. I received a letter dated April 25 from Region 11 co-ordinator, Cynthia Curtiss, who said that even then the situation had not improved greatly. The Ramada Inn, where we would have met, had water up to the second story. The cattlemen's office with a CowBelle 52 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 room was completed inundated. The workshop is rescheduled for September 19 and 20. Since this will be after the Denver meeting, you will have the opportunity to hear the information and Luideline brought forth at that important workshop. We are happy to hear that Ralph and Gertie Cellon are much improved. (lertie sent a letter to the CowBelles in appreciation of the love and concern shown to them during this trying time. I lelt it would be good to pass along her words to you now rather than wait until next meeting time. They expressed thanks for all the phone calls, cards, visits and prayers as well as the planter given by the CowBelles. Our prayers are that they will recover speedily and again be with us. Brevard County reports that a class was given to 4-H members, ages nine through 14, on "The Basics of Beef" on March 12. This will be followed up by a test given to the group on April 12 with a beef Lift certificate awarded to the high scorer. The Brevard CowBelles have been requested to also give the 4-H group a class on the bones of the retail cuts of beef and the bones of the beef animal. Hope you have your "Beef For Father's Day" promotions well-planned by now. Brevard County is using the Beef Quiz from the placemat in the newsletter "The Orbit." This idea could be utilized in several ways. Most of your local newspapers would be glad to print the quiz. Restaurants are usually quite eager to use the place inats in their place of business and this is good beef advertising. Don't forget to cook beef for the special cattleman in your life on his day! Your scrapbook chairman, Georgiann Sumner, wishes to remind you to finish your scrapbooks in time for the convention and bring them to be judged. Her letter has already been mailed covering judging procedures. We are looking forward to seeing some outstanding scrapbooks in June. Audrey Johnson, Outstanding CowBelle chairman, asks that you be sure one person (the president or director) from your county is designated to vote at the Outstanding CowBelle breakfast for the candidate of your choice. The breakfast will be on Thursday morning of the convention at 7:00 a.m. Let's all work hard to sell the beef drawing tickets that provides the scholarship for our Cattlemen's Sweetheart. I have had a peek at a couple of the contestants already and they are sweetheart material if I've ever seen it. We'll have a treat in store when the new Sweetheart is chosen and it will encourage her with the nice prizes you help provide. Ladies if you are not a member of the Florida CowBelle Association, we urge you to join in time to be a part of the convention activities. There will be interesting programs, exciting work to talk about and lots of fun. A diamond pendant will be given away at the ThursCOMMISSIONER of Agriculture Doyle Conner and Mrs. Katharine Simms, CowBelles president, compare notes on beef promotion during a recent meeting. day afternoon general membership meeting to a lucky CowBelle. We are again most appreciative to the Florida Association of Livestock Markets for donating this generous gift. You wouldn't believe the beautiful prizes CowBelles bring from their counties to be given as door prizes at the annual CowBelle Breakfast on Friday, but you must have that membership card to be eligible. That would be very easy to obtain. Just send your 55.00 state dues and 55.00 national dues to Mildred Sherrod, P. 0. Box 875, Immokalee, 33934 if you are not in a county organization. We'd be so happy to have you! I'm looking forward to seeing many old friends at the convention looking forward to making new friends, having our national president, Rose Harris, in our midst and being part of the best convention that we've ever had. Hope that many of you are looking forward to the same thing!! -Katharine Simms, President Florida CowBelle's Association Florida CowBelles Association Affiliated with American National CowBelles Rt. 1, Box 56 Lithia, FL 33547 President Mrs. Ray Simms, Lithia 813/689-3990 First Vice President Mrs. Ron Stephens, Kissimmee Second Vice President Mrs. Toni Childs, Lake Placid Treasurer Mrs. Mildred Sherrod, Immokalee Recording Secretary Mrs. Jack Stokes, Williston Corresponding Secretary Mrs. Harvey Dahl, Melbourne

PAGE 53

WAREHOUSE HOURS 8 am, to 5 p.m. MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY TIFLEAF-1 MILLET JAPANESE MILLET BROWN TOP MILLET PROSO MILLET QUALITY .PRICE .SERVICE ..for 45 years to the Florida Cattlemen, Dairymen, Farmers and Citrus Growers BAHIA, ARGENTINE BAHIA, PARAGUAYAN STRAIN 22 BAHIA, PENSACOLA BERMUDAS AESCHYNOMENE ALYCE CLOVER HAIRY INDIGO GAME BIRD PLANTING MIX Nitragin Brand Inoculants .Scarifying & Hulling .Seed Broadcasters SHARE/HARVESTING AND SEED PROCESSING from our Arcadia plant-Call us ~N N N Cattleman's Choice is a Sorghum-Sudangrass Hybrid selected as the ideal spring and summer-planted multipurpose forage crop. Natural genetic hybrid vigor plus the sweet juicy, succulent, leafy plants offer luscious palatability for grazing, green chop, and high quality hay. Cattleman's Choice grows to a height of 8-10 feet under favorable conditions when not clipped or grazed. Cattleman's Choice has excellent drouth survival and remarkable regrowth ability. Plants have high leaf to stem ratio. Excellent tonnage yields, high feed value, and fast regrowth offer the grower maximum TDN per acre. For most digestive and high energy feed, utilize the crop from two feet to the bloom stage. Under favorable conditions, Cattleman's Choice often will produce up to four hay crops per growing season. Because of the fast regrowth, conditioning the hay crop speeds curing and facilitiates baling. When cut or grazed, six inches of stubble should be left to facilitate quick regrowth. Cattleman's Choice has been proven in Florida farmer, rancher, dairy-conducted field and grazing trials and has proved its adaptability under a wide range of conditions. POUNDS PER ACRE Plont-10 to 15 in 36 to 40 inch rows 15 to 25 in 20 to 24 inch rows 25 to 40 BROADCAST 0 Plant-20 to 25 in 36 to 40 inch rows 25 to 30 in 20 to 24 inch rows 30 to 50 BROADCAST Plant-20 to 25 in 36 to 40 inch rows 25 to 30 in 20 to 24 inch rows 30 to 40 BROADCAST Plont-15 to 20 in 36 to 40 inch rows 20 to 40 BROADCAST YOUR FLORIDA DISTRIBUTOR SEED GROWERS PROCESSORS JOBBERS MERCHANTS P. 0. Box 5517, Orlando, Florida 32855 BAG LOTS TRUCK LOTS RAILCAR LOTS 1333 W. Church Street 305/425-3426

PAGE 54

AG-BAGGER shown in operating position with conveyor attachment For free details on the Ag-Bag program, contact: aG-BaG CORPORaTIOf1 P.O. Box 418, ASTORIA, OREGON 97103 503/325-2488 Fort Pierce man wins beef cookoff Sponsored by the Florida CowBelles, the annual beef cookoff finals were held April 20 with first place going to Avritt Grace, Fort Pierce. The cookoff was held at the Hillsborough County Agriculture Business Center in Seffner. Chairman for this year's series of contests across the state was Donna Petitt of Brandon. The cookoff is held for the purpose of featuring beef recipes; understanding the various cuts of beef and their preparations; promoting the beef cattle industry, and selecting a state winner to represent Florida in the National Beef Cook-off Contest. The state finals at Seffner matched the seven best recipes submitted from county cookoffs held throughout the state. The beef dishes were judged in compliance with national beef cookoff criteria on taste, appearance, originality and ease of preparation. Winner of the first place recipe is maitre d'hotel at the Pelican Yacht Club in Fort Pierce. With his recipe, Grace received top prize of $225 and an expense paid trip to Omaha, Nebraska, in September to compete nationally. Winning second place for the second straight year was Lee Donin of Satellite Beach. His prize was 550. Third place went to Kurt Weil from Hillsborough County. Of the seven contestants in the finals, the first three winners were men, Mrs. Petitt noted. The winning recipe was named "Beef Burgundy Fiesta," second place was "Chili Colorado," and third was called "Beef Roulade with Mushroom Sauce." Fourth prize was won by Mrs. Bettye Galvin of St. Augustine, and fifth place was taken by Johanna Borg of Port Richey. Honorable mention went to Mrs. Blanche Scharf of Lakeland and Mrs. M. M. Sperranza of New Smyrna Beach. The winning recipe follows: Beef'Burgund Fiesta / cup salad oil; 4 pounds beef round, chuck, or tenderloin, cut in Iinch pieces; 2 tablespoons flour; 3 cloves FIRST PLACE winner in the state beef cookoff was Avritt Grace from St. Lucie County. B MAKE NCA TWICE AS STRONG %JJL upp.orL., 9embeipay uly 25,197979 54 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979

PAGE 55

It's time to and WEED With Austin Fluid Fertilizer Maximize available moisture levels by promoting strong root systems and high production levels on pastures and hay fields by FEEDIN and WEEDING now. Growing to meet tomorrow's Agribusiness needs Austin Fertilizer & Chemical Co., Inc. Plant and Office at Sanford, Florida 32771. 305/322-0443 Night: Spencer G. Douglass 305/834-6849 Dick Harvin 813/494-0306, Donnie Yoemans 813/983-6791 Jack Jones, Apopka 305/889-3597 Lake Placid Plant: 813/465-5203. Nites: 813/465-0572

PAGE 56

Home of the Adams Ranch Braford Alto Adams, Jr. Buddy Adams Lee Adams Ronald Harvey Mike Adams Bob Walker J. R. Skaggs P. 0. Bo Ft. Pie FL 33 Phon 305/461 x 1030 A rce, 450 e: -6321 IT TAKES A RORA-NT JUST A BULL The Adams Ranch Program produces those good Braford mother cows as well as the choice feeder steers and highly productive bulls. This is a "hurry-up" program. Heifers will breed early and calve unassisted. (Every animal on the Adams Ranches was born without assistance). Finished steers are produced in one year instead of two. Selection is based on muscling and maturity as well as weight for age. ,~ 2 FIRST PUBLIC SALE .DE CEMBER 14, 1979 to be held at the headquarters ranch on State Road #68, West of Ft. Pierce, Fla. Founder Member of International Braford Association i 56 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979

PAGE 57

PASCO COUNTY'S entry Johanna Borg, took fifth place with her beef recipe. HONORABLE MENTION was won by Blanche Scharf, representing Polk County in the state cookoff. garlic, minced; 3 cups dry Burgundy: 2 cups beef stock; 2 stalks celery: few sprigs parsley; 2 carrots, whole; butter; 30 small w hite onions, cooked; 30 fresh mushrooms, quartered; salt and white pepper. Heat oil in large pot. Add flour and cook until foamy. Stir in garlic, wine, broth and bring to a boil. Add celery, parsley and carrots. Cover and simmer about two hours or bake at 350 degrees until beer is tender. Discard celery, parsley and carrots. Saute mushrooms and onions in buttcr. Add to beef mixture and simmer until thoroughly hot: adjust seasonings. transfer to a shallow three quart casserole dish. Corn Bread Topping 2 eggs, well beaten; I / cups milk; 3/4 cup melted shortening; 2 tablespoons chopped green peppers, or chiles or jalapeno peppers; 2 tablespoons chopped onion; 2 tablespoons chopped pimiento: 3/4 cup grated American cheese; 2 1 cups flour; I teaspoon salt; 2 tablespoons baking powder; 2 tablespoons sugar; 4 tablespoons plus I teaspoon cornmeal. Mix egg, milk and shortening. Add green peppers, onions, pimento and cheese to the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar and cornmeal. Add milk mixture and stir only enough to mix. Mold foil to fit casserole. Add corn bread mixture Lnd bake on a greased cookie sheet at 450 degrees until crisp. Remove foil and slide cornbread mixture onto top of casserole. Garnish with watercress and slivered horseradish. Welcome Florida Cattlemen and CowBelles 'JA We are pleased that the Dutch Inn Resort Hotel was selected for your 1979 convention. We trust your stay will be a pleasant one and that you will enjoy our facilities and the attractions at Lake Buena Vista. zutcj 2~tn RESORT HOTEL P.O. BOX 22202, LAKE BUENA VISTA, FLORIDA 32830 HOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS for major Animal Health Products for Powder River Equipment Gainesville Stockman Supply 5001 N.W. 13th St. (Stockyards) Gainesville, Fla. 32601 904/372-8916 Stockman Supply Co. stores Hwy. 27 South, 3 miles that (Agri-Civic Center) Service Sebring, Fla. 33870 built 813/382-2526 "Your most dependable source of supply" THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 57

PAGE 58

FCA committees, local officers are listed for current ter AGRICU L-TURAL RESEARCHI COMMITFTEE-C rmin Sid Stmnner, Bartw: Vice Chinnman: Joh, M. Suit witn : m ..Benm ett. Greemnood: Gleni Bisseti. 5inter I ucn. k Williamn C a in Burns. Brooksville: R. V Sld ell, /ephyrhills. C mrol C halmliss., Bradenton, H. L ( .m.m. Ona: I onm C hilds, I Like Placid: John Daughary Del nd. E 41ar Dai, \ auchula:. P M IuIsseli lk C i5y: K mer Hnririmon. Arcadia: John Hiiut, Bartor; lack Jhnim on Jr., inun krice: Dame Jnies, Gancsville: T. I_ Mi k, I nn 'l: Irb lier, Lake Placid: Charices Patrick, Sned : (i .Pcr., Bellevien: John 1P, Plitt, Ona Dae Rossm J n mem n (idneslie: Rn Smoak, Madsn: Dln i I ice, Bartno: Doug liner. Orlando: W yne Wade, PL L itn Joe W .Iters C oleman Ward, Cincsille ALLIED MEMBERSHIP (OMMITTEE-Chirnman, lein Weinmer, Anichor I laboratories, Inc., Kissimmee: AC I n mernationil C mmodit y Srvices, Inc. Altanmonte Springs: \SL-m 1 ee1.in., DI nedin. 'id Laboratories, Inc., Ocala: \mricri-mm Breeders Service, ILake Placid: American ( manmi e. C( ,selberry: Austin Fertiier & Chemical t m. ind. C c'attlmenm'n C instruction C o. Bartow: (e ral I lori Productin C redo 'ss'n. Orlando: Central MVlres C m, Tmrepa, C od Publications, Kissiniice c I mhnramree Brooksville; limre Minerals Co., Brto,: IEn l Product Ci. I amrpu Exchange Bank of mi"'a, Kissimnmc' I an Credit Service, Lakeland: I cderil Iand Bnk A5s'n of Orlando Orlando: Federal Imnd Bank \S,'n oI Tmmpa, Tampa: Federal Land Bank SIn t Wuchnrchr WuchUla: First National Bank of Kisnimmrec, KIntimmee: I lorida Ass'n of Livestock Markets. Kissimmee, I lorida I norite IFertilizer, Inc., Lakelaind: I loridi lced Vills. lic Jackson ille: Florida Fence Post 1 o., inc , Wauchla: I lorida [-ine & Dolmirrte Co i c., OCdJ: Coian-l orida Iarvestore, ine., Attapulgus, Ga.: 5 I Cm rice C o., Ft Pierce: Greater Jacksonville I air, nkseinemille: Griffin I crinlizer Co. FrostprOOf: Haile-Dean Seed C mm. in. Orland : JLi C Chemical Group, Inc., Ralcro Di BartrN: ISC. Devevelopment Corp., Lakeland: I M ,C R ainbr Div. Mulberry: Kaplan Industries, Inc., liirtn. Lakeland Cash Feed Co, Inc., Lakeland Loeb Rhoade, HornblOer. W5ier Park; lerek Chernical Di., iol enrod. Vion Mili Co. C airo, Inc. C airo,Ga.: I & M Supply Cu. of I lorida, Ine., Thonotosassa: Ikeechohee Cmiv Bank, Okeechobe: P.D.Q. Company, I ikem id, PiUltry Health Service, Jacksonville: Ralston Purin.n Cm., inmpa: Ranc'l'erilier Co., Olkeechobee: kie~child C h'mical, Inc. Pensacola: RICO Liquid,, ine Sinehile., Sli Rivin a I oods, nc., HOUstOnr Tl: Southeas Iir t National Bank of Miari, Mi iaVii: Southeastern MOLVsnc & SUipyN Corpi. Okeechobee: Southern Culvert, Pin ll Park: Sun Bank of St. C loud, St. C load: Sun City enter Bank, Sunii City Center: Synex Agribusiness Inc. ear r nice.UI'.S. Suear Corp. Ceirt n. NATIONAl. CATTIrEMEN'S ASSOCIATION-Board oi Dire-tois Pat F Wilson, Frostproof. regional vice president: C edrick M. Smith, Jr. W'acahoota: 'leny C. Douglas, /ephyryhilic Members on comnirtte: Resolutions: C, Aulbre C aruithers. Olord: G C. Perry. Belleciew: Harvey A. Dahl, Melbourne: Animal IeIalth, Disease & Identiticaion: J l. Pearce, Jr. Okeechobee Gilbert A. Tucker, ( ocoa, hean B C hilds, Lake Placid. Beef Cattle Research & Iimproeimeti: Alto Adins, Jr., Fort Pierce: R. A. Roberts, I mmrorkalee: Gerald Ci.yson, Blountstowni Beef Promotion &i C Onsurner Relations: Mrs. C. M. (JoAnn) Smith, Vlicanopy, chairmuani: Pat Wilson, Frostproo; William H3. Pee pies, Moore liavcen Environmental Management: R. D0 BenneC, Greentood, Russ Kiser, irmokalee; Foreign I rade: Joe Duda. C ocoa: W. G. "Kayo" Welles, Arcadia: Laor-Agricultural & Industnial: Joe Martlin Hilliard, Cew istmi: Charles INkes, amrpa: Eliyn Bass, Okeechobe: Marketimg, Pete Clemons, Okeechobee; V. Eliott Whitehurst, Jr,, W'illiston C halres Lykes, Jr., Okeechobee: Membership & Revenue Decelopient: Ralph Cellon, Jr., Alachua: J. t. Sandlin, Wilstcn; Cedric Smith, Micanopy; private I hands & WAtter Usage: Alric Potiberg, Hudson: Derrill S. SicAteer, Brooksville: Jack Bam, Sebring: Product Standards. Labeling & Inspection: A. W. Lee, Wildwood: Bill Voss, Brooksville: Andy Tucker, Rockledge: Public Lands: E. R. Felton, LaBelle: Joe A. Hilliard, Clewiston: J. pt C orrigan. Vero Beach: Taxation: Latimer Turner, Sarasota, chairman: William hi. Stark li, Ft. Pierce; Henry Douglas. Zephyrhills; Transportation: E. ). Neel, Chipley: Ken Harper, Plant City. BRANDS COMMITTEE-Chairman: Earl Raulerson, Okeechobee: Vice Chairman: Joe Barthle, Dade City: Mabry Carlton, Jr., Arcadia; Warren Adamrs, Tallahassee: Elwyn Bass, Olkeechobee; James Buhl. Ocala; Dave Chasteen, Palm Beach; Andrew Chisholm, Melbourne; George M. Hancock, Aliurts: Billy Kerpfer, Melbourne: Manuel Lopez, Tampa; R '. Padgett, Jr., Lake Wales; I. P. Scroggins, Archer: Juian Wright, Arcadia: Albert Pruett, Hamnes City; William C I Delo, Brooksville Tommy Woodward, Palmdale: Robert I Nnhn, Ill Seville: Glenin Bisset, Winter Haven; Tom C hilds, Lake Placid: Oscar Crosby. Melbourne Tommy C rum. Okeechobee: John Hartigan, Ocala; Harold Price, Okeeclr.bee, RI DGET & FINANCE COMMITTEE-Chairmitan: Ralph Cellon, Jr., Alachua; Vice Chairman: J. P. Sandlin, W illiston. Bruce Blount, Lake Plucid, Bud Adams, Ft. Perne: John dicks, GaiCnesvilc: J C. Bass. Okeechobee Ieru Douglas, /ephy runhils, Charley Gaskin. Wewahitchka: Hioia, I Lenssen, Bunnell; Robert IH. Milton, Marianna: Robert Morris, Tampa: Earl W. Patterson, B1 rnksriie: GUy Thorrpson, Center Hill: Charles Wilson Ward, Sr., 1-I. Myers, Jenings Overstreet, Kissimmee; W. 58 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 R. Sellers. Btrookni rle: Jun C trier,. E I MVix) lammtnrnnd, lIi r. ngelo VMaI ar, Litha. INVENTION N COMIMI'TIE-Chairma: C, Aubrey Carriers, 0xird: Vice C chairman: Jin Muiey, Kissirice: Mr. leinry DLoulas, Zephyrlills: Mrs, Belle Jeffords, Ir1ih Sprriiin: M C'rOyn Kempier. Meilhouirie: Jay IHebier L. Orlndo: John A. Barker, Lakeland: Lerony Fortmer. Sarasota: (ir y Pate, St. (loud: H. Clyde Patterson, Brooksilie: Jim Hlanacan, Kissinnmmtt tr,. Julia Parrish,. Myakk r C iN': Mrs. Jeanette Barthle, San Antonio: Mrs. Sen i I eiter, Mican1y, Mrs. Jackie Bennett, Greeniood: aChck Don .Sarasota: Anita Radebaugh, Ft. Pierce, Ron Stelphens, Kisriie: Theresa Williams, Kis.imm.ec: Patricia Wi son, Frrotprool COUNCIL OF 100-Representative: Pat Wilson. Frostlrool DUES, ASSESSIENTS, MEMBERSHIP--Chairian: Ilhirey Dahl, Melbourne: Vice Chairman: LOuIs (ilbreath, Ocala: Ralph Ccon, Jr., Alachu: Henry Douglas, Zephyrhills: Jim Irijeuaan, Kissimmee: Jim Muminny, Kissimmee; linudd Ned, C hipley: Earl Raulerson. Okeechobee; Ron Stephrns. Kisnimee: Mike VanNess, In'erness: Pat 5W in., I rostiproo ENVIRONMENTAL & ECOLOGY COMMITTEEhirman: A .Lee. Wildwood; Vice Chairman: Reed Keipler, Melourne: Frite Stern. Belle Glade: Ken Brackein. Moore Haven: Bob Deriso, Land O'Lakes; Solan C. sills, LaBelle: Tommy Bronson, Moore Haven Dallas Dort, Sarasota: Wayne Mixson, Marianna; Marvin Tucker, ocoai: Slric Potberg, Hu dson Randy Barthle, Dade City. Tarry Davis. Sering: Albert Dawson, Brooksville; Randy Barthle. Dade C ire, Russ Kiser, liniiokalee. FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL COUNCILReprenentaride: Cedrick M. Smith, Jr., Micaropy. FLORIDA AGRICuLTURAL TAX COUNCILRepresentative: Latimer I. Turner, Sarasoia. FEEDLOT cOMMITTEE-Chairian: D. S. McAteer, Brooksille; Vice Chairman: Angelo Massaro, Lithia: Horace I Ulford, Ocala: Ralph Armrstrong, Graceville: Dr. Ktry Mathis. Gainesville: I. D. Neel. Chipley; Cary F. Carlion. Sebrirg J. A. Perry, Belleice : Elliot SVhitehurst, Wilision. Rayriond Tucker, Bunnell: Wi. Russell, Howevin-the-H ills: -Jim Glisson. Ocala; Pug Whitehurst. Williston: irue L. Stor, Brooksville; Doug inner, Orlando: Gene I .ton, LaBeIle: George Francis. Brooksville: Horace Fulord, Ocala. FIORIDA BEEF COUNCIL-Chairman: William D. Simrk. il., t. Pierce; Vice Chairra: B. J. Harris, Lake Placid Jim Flanagan, Kissirnmee Vick Blackstone, Parrish: Dr. Robert S. Sand, Gainesville: E. D. Gregory, Jacksonille. CharLes Williams, Avon Park: Bob Morris, Tamtpa: irs. J. W. Barthle, San Antonio: Mrs. Mary Caruthers, Oxford: Mrs. Nellie Lee, Wildwood; Clyde Crutchfield, Gracenille: iDon Kaplan, Bartow: H1. Barrow,. Gainesville: Harry Gibson. Brooksville Libert Shelton, Altha: A. Z. Palmer, Gainesille: Ron Stephens. Kissimmee: Ted Barelid, Tallahassee: Ralph Cellon, Jr., Alachua: Pat C ockrell, La Crosse; Jim Mumnitey, Kissimmee: Katherine Simms, Lithir FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL AGRICULTURAL TRADE COUNCIL-Representative: Max Hammond, Winter Haven. HISTORICAL COMMITTEE-Chairman: Seth Alderrman. Wimatuna: Vice Chairman: Fred Waldron, Wildrnod: G. E l. Barkoskie, Felisriere: Reuben W. Carlton, 'r. Pierce; Murray Harrison, Suit City Center Mrs. Carolyn Kemrpler, Vielbourrine: Miss Mary McFadden, Alachua; Horace Miley, Lithia: Cushman Radebaugh, Sr., Orlando; J. 13. Starke., Sr., St. Petersburg Ired Waldron, Wildwood: H. L. Willirris, Dover Cecil Whaley, Sr., St. Cloud. P. E. Williams, Davenport; Charlie Lykes, Tampa: Mrs. Vernon Hill, Alachua: John W. Mason, Brooksville: John DuPuis, Miamit; Doyle Conner, Tallahassee; Carl Van Landinghami, 11. Pierce, Joe Ackerman, Madison. IMPORTS COMMITTEE-Clhairman: Bayard Toussaint, Punta Gorda; Vice Chairman: Ralph Cellon, Sr., Gainesville 'rimy Clay, Grandin; Spencer Kirton, Okeechobee: Paul Emery, Quincy: B. F. Longino, Sr., Sarasota ElCter McDonald. Daytona Beach: W. Richardson, Evinston; Lee Radebaugh. Fort Pierce: Alex D. Sapp, Vernon Chas. Stephenson, Canpbellton S. J. D'Andrea, Brooksville; Bubba Mills, LaBelle. LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEE-Chairman: Henry Douglas, Zephyrhills; Vice Chairman: Harvey Dahl, Melbourne; W. G. Welles, Arcadia; E. R. Felton, LaBelle; Jim Munirey, Kissimmee: E. D. "Buddy" Neel, Chipley Ralph Cellon, Jr., Alachua; Charles Lykes, Tampa; William Stark ill, Ft. Pierce. LIVESTOCK DISEASE & TECHNICAL COMMITTEE-Chairman: Dan Childs, Lake Placid: Vice Chairman: Dr. Bobby Anderson, Gainesville; Bill Adkinson, Lake Wales; Bruce Blount, Lake Placid. Dr. Clarence Campbell, Tallahassee; Tom Christian; Whit Goolsby. Gainesville; 1. W. Gray, Ft. Pierce: Dr. Arthur E. Hall, Miami Springs; Dr. J. Arlin Hawkins, Sarasota; L. H. Buck H awikins. Sarasota; Jim Hendry; Joe Hilliard, Clewiston; Roy Hutchison: Dr. C. Bronson Lane, Orlando; Dr. George Meyerholz, Gainesville: F. G. Mueller, Orange Park. Ed Martin, Jr., St. Cloud: J. 0. Pearce, Jr., Okeechobee: Ray Raulerson, Okeechobee: Dr. Henry Ross; Dr. Harvey. L. Rubin. Kissimmee; Sam Saunders; Cecil Scott, Dunellon: Forrest Smith, Punta Gorda; Gilbert A. Tucker, Cocoa; Pierre Van Landiughant, Ft. Pierce: Bill Voss, Brooksville; Kayo Welles, Arcadia; Buddy Williams, Graceville; David Willis, Cocoa; Charles Lykes, Tampa. MiAR K ETI NG peVtI EE Cbimi 1C1 1oms (ikchheee Vice C brrnrmii Jenickins, Lakeland. iN Barley, Orlando C lirence Bissett, Orlando: RoN Itrinirier. trandn: LSCW Coebb, (rl.nrrsiili: im Caaiirei, IThomasvillie. Ga:.: F red Cimederi. Jacksonville; Md E. Hamiiond, Barto; Bull Little, Okeechobee; Tommy I ann, Palmdale, Gerald Mason. Canbellton; Bob MJcGarity, Daytoni Beach; Dr. Z. Palmer, Gainesville: Giflord Rhodes, Tallahassee. Robert Ray Smith, Wauchula John Stiles, Tallahassee; Robert A. Tucker, Cocoa; Martin Woodward, Ft. Lauderdale: Cecil Yates, KissimmeeRaymood Young, Goldenrod: James R. Simpson. Gainesville NATURAL RESOURCES COmMITrEE-Chairian: Joe Marlin Hilliard.C lerriston: Vice Chairman: Lloyd Ryals, I Ort Ogden: Dorald Bronson, ( lerniont : Tommy Clay. Grandin: Harvey Dal, Mielbourne: Edgar Davis Larr Dais. Sebring: 1 P. M. Fussell, Polk Citv; I. "Wes Hutchison, Haines City: Stanlo Johns, Okeechobee: Rilev Miles, Kisimmenice, Jack Price, Melrose: Alviaro Sanche. Jr Belle Glade: AI Waggoner. Okeechobee: David Willis' C coa. PUBLICATIONS COMM11 ITE-Chairrian: Cedrick Smith, Jr., Micanopy: Vice Chairnan: I red iontsdeoca, Ocala: Ralph Cellon, Jr., AVachua: I larvey Dahl, Mielbourn. I benr Douglas, Zephyrhills; Jim Flanagan, Kissitmmee, Charles Lykes, Tampta: Jin Mmiey, Kissimmee. RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE-Chairmn David lice, Barton: Vice Chairman: Jim Flanagan; Kissimmnee: Steve Brunson, Moore Haven; Waytie Carlton, Ft. Pierce; J. Pat k orrigan. Vetr Beach R. S. Dunaway, Felda: Donnie I und. Moore Haven: G. C. Perrn, Bellierc: Ai Robinson, Sarasota: Jim Tillirait. Sarasota, TAXATION & LAND USE CNOMMITTEE-Chairnan Pat (onrrigan, Verri Beach; Vice Chairman: Billy Peeples, Moore Haven: Buck Bird; Irlo Bronson, Jr., Kissimmee: Leo Charges, Lakeland: C harles Gr raN, Orlando Frank Kelle Baker: Jennings Overstreet, Kissimmee: Rudolph Parker, Perr* lerschell Parrish, St. Augustine: Glenn Stunner, Brandon: Latimer -Turner, Sarasota: Bill Wolfe, Jr. Dade tim: George Wright, Port Charlotte. THEFT COMMITTEE-Chairman: Andy Tucker, Rockledge. Vice Chairman: W F. VainNess, Inverness: Wendy Batey, Zolfo Springs: Donald Bronson, Clermont; Jack Burger i, Bunnell; Charlie Hammtrer, Ft. Pierce; CliFford Fetite, St. Cloud: Sanford hartt. Avon Park; Bill RoN Hutchinson: Carl A. Johns, Kissimmee: R. C. Lee, Eustir: Larry Lewis, Fellsmere: Archie Maynard, Jay: Richard McClelland, Okeechobee: Perry Nichols, Arcadia: Carlyle Platt, Mielbourne Alvin Sapp, Ft. Pierce: Ray Simms: Janies 1. lerry, Lake City: Claude A. Tindall, Belle Glade; Cecil Yates, Kissimmee: E. L. Yates, Sr., Orlando: John 1). Brown, Bushnell: Capt. Frank Fogleman, Belle Glade. UNITED STATES ANIMAL HEALTH ASSOCIATION-Representative: J. D. Pearce, Jr. Okeechobee. Presidents and Directors of Country A ssociations ALACHUA (Gainesvillef Pres: Bobby Anderson. Gain tsville Dir: Ralph ( clon, Sr., Gainesville. BAKER (Macclenny)--Pres E. L. Crews. Jr., Sander' son: Dir: Ed Yarborough, Geneva. BRADFORD-UNION (Lake Butleri-Pres Ray Norman, Starke: Dir: (Bradford) Fred Mueller, Starke: (Union) Ray Crawford, lake Butler. BREVARiD (Cocoa)-Pres: David Willis, Cocoa: Dir: Andy Tucker, Rockledge. BROWARD (Ft. Lauderdale)-Pres: Martin G. Woodward, Ft. Lauderdale: Dir: Martin G. Woodward, Ft, Lauderdale. CHARLOTTE (Punta Gorda)-Pres: Earl Schwori, Placida: Dir: F. Bayard Toussaint, Punta Gorda. ('lAY (Green Cove Springs)-Pres: Donald McKee, Middleburg: Dir: S. D. Saunders, Middleburg. CITRUS (Invernessi-Pres: John Thoias, inverness: Dir: W '. (Mike) Van Ness. Inverness. COLLIER (Imtmrokaleel-Pres: Fred BarField, Immrorkalee: Dir: R. A. Roberts, Immiokalee COLUMBIA (Lake City)-Pres: Bud Fraser, Lake City: Dir: James I. Terry, Lake C v. DADE (Miami-Pres: Donald G. Switzer, Hialeah: Dir: Joint G. DuPuis, Jr., Miani. DESOTO (Arcadia)-Pres: Ed Horton, Arcadia: Dir. Lloyd Ryals, Ft. Ogden. DUVAL (Jacksonville)-Pres: Dalton Dowdy, Jacksonville; Dir: E. D. Gregory, Jacksonville. DIXIE (Cross Cityi-Pres: L. B. King, Jr., Cross City: Dir: Ben H. Floyd, Cross City. FLAGLER (iunnell)-Pres: Rob Tucker, Bunnell: Dir: Thomas Lenssen, Bunnell. GILCHRIST (Trentoni-Pres: Larry Lindsey, Bell, Dir: Alton Nessmith, Bell. GLADES(Moore Haven)-Pres: Joe IH. Peeples liI, Lake Placid: Dir: W, I. (Billy) Peeples, Moore Haven. HARDEE (Wauchula)-Pres: Marcus Shackelford, Wauchula: Dir: Robert Ray Smith, Wauchula. HENDRY (Clewistonl-Pres: Herbert Harbin, Clewiston: Dir: Wilson Ward, Ft. Myers. HERNANDO (Brooksville)-Pres': Bennie Rivenbark, Brooksville: Dir: D. S. McAteer, Brooksville. HIGHLANDS (Lake Placid)-Pres: Dan Childs. Lake Placid; Dir: Dan Childs, Lake Placid. HILLSBOROUGH (Tampal-Pres: Louis Massaro, Lithia; Dir: Angelo Massaro, Riverview. INDIAN RIVER (Vero Beach)-Pres: Mark Tripson. Vero Beach; Dir: Pat Corrigan, Vero Beach. JACKSON (Marianna)-Pres: R. D. Bennett, Greenwood: Dir: Doyle Stephens, Grand Ridge. JEFFERSON (Monticello)-Pres: W. L. Rabon, Mon-

PAGE 59

We Are Ready To Buy Your Calves NOW! Or When You're Ready To Sell Give some thought to letting handle them for you until the us buy your cattle now best marketing time. Here are a few other ways you can go with your calf crop by following the Duda program: Grow them out at our LaBelle feedlot. Grow them out on our combination pasture/feeding program. We now have a representative in the High Plains area for direct contact to assure timely marketing and best price. The Duda program can provide a sound marketing plan at the right time for best profits. See us for additional options to go with your Florida calves. We also have feeder cattle for sale periodically. Bud Vadnais 305/678-3877 9 Van Lindsey 305/327-1030 Bob Nelson 405/338-5669 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 59 or

PAGE 60

Tramisol 'Tram" Cattle Worme OBLETS c Tamisol* IJCTABLE SOUVON soluble drench Powder a (And its the only wormer that does.) I n1v themI," conmmon ad destut o P'gt connro]l C-I IIen ith th thr all '",le itrms is tee i, small intnstinal el1 ktnown rmes, \ou ned Ihi m andard I irn miso l "lciamsiln is lie 1l1 aliiin d a. lits antt ier e 'l st t y-u tidl up dao rtha can'lain lcci enesisitimO pa min nre1 dgettiig lss.Ta itslisals-t l ren-A in all instancI s against C >>isia i th onlsws rmtiit uc an but ttat busr, llnint t tior one andord d .wtIn its ti ciet. t c y C A/ A .f/ Only Tramisol gets all the worms worth getting. and I SUPPLY COMPANY SFLORIDA INC. <0> 1300 N.W. 9th St. Fla Hwy. 579 & Main St. Okeechobee, FL Thonotosassa, Ph: 813/986-2491 Ph: 813/763-0261 CYPRESS LUMBER "The Wood Eternal" Rough Sawn Square Posts Slats Round Posts Mulch Pecky Cypress Standard or Special Cuts PRESSURE TREATING AVAILABLE 305 American WOo&VTrodidS, Iff. 339-4456 -200 Marvin Rd., Longwood, Fla. 32750 An invitation! The Florida CowBelles Association cordially invites all ladies attending the state conventions to a reception, Thursday morning, June 28, 1979, 10:15 'til 11:15 a.m. Mrs. Katharine Simms, president, says, "We would like you to meet our American National CowBelle president, Rose Harris, our state officers and many interesting people. "Mrs. Ruth Ann Fowler, home extension economist from Hillsborough County, will be our special guest. "Refreshments will be served. Please come and let's get better acquainted.'iello: Dir: John E. Hawkins. Monticello. ]LAKE (Taaresl-Pres: Stan Bainter, Eustis: Dir: Donald Bronson, Clermont. LEE (Ft. Myers)-Pres: Harry Flint. Ft. Myers: Dir: Nat 1I. Htuner, Ft. Myers. LEON (Tallahassee)-Pres: P. H. Roberts. Tallahassee: Dir: James Fogart, Tallahassee. L EVV ( Bronson)-Pres: Donald Quincey, Chiefland: Dir: J. P. Sandlin. Williston. MADISON fMadison)-Pres: Ron Smoak. Madison: Dir: Ron Smoak, Madison. MANATEE (Palmetto)-Pres: Ilenry Parrish, Myakka City; Dir: Vick Blackstone, Parrish. MARION fOcala)-Pres: Jack Cullison, Ocala: Dir: Cecil Perry, Bcleview. MARTIN (Start)-Pres: Paul McMillion, I ndiantown: Dir Dick Kellcc Stuart. NASSAU (Callahan)-Pres: Arthur Lynn, Hilliard; Dir: E. 1). Gregory, Jack,,)nville. NORTHWEST (Santa Rosa-Escambia)-Pres: Jerr I all, Mclavid: Dir: Jerry Hall, McDavid: Marion Tidwell. Niton. OKEECHOBEE (Okeechobee)-Pres: Pete Clemons, Okeechobee: Dir. J, C. Bass, Okeechobee. ORANGE (Orlando)-Pres: Laverne Yates, Orlando: Dir: Joe Walter. OSCEOLA (Kissiammee)-Pres: Andy Chisholm, St ICId: Dtr: Irlo (Bud) Bronson, Kissimmee. PAILM BEACH (Belle Gladel--Pres: Alvaro Sanchez, Belle Glade: Dir: Dave Young, Loxahatchee. PANHANDLE (Walton-Okaloosa)-Pres: Earl Brogden, Florala, Ala.: Dir: (Okaloosa) Jeff Adams, Baker: (Walton) Earl Brogden, DeFuniak Springs. PASCO (Dade City)-Pres: A. 0. "Pete" McKendree, Dade Cits: Dir: Joe Biarthle, Dade City. POLK (Bartoo)-Pres: IHarris W. Fussell. Polk Cits: [it: Al Bellotto, Lakeland. PITMAN i Palatka)-Pres: Hugh Byrd, Patmona Park; Dit: W. W. Tilton Jr., East Palatka. SARASOTA Sarasota Pros Arlit Haskins. Sarasota: Iir: R. T. Loninois~, Jr. Sarasota SEMINOLE (Sanford)-Pres Edward Yarborough, Geneva: Dir: Wayne Jacobs, Oviedo. ST. JOHNS (St. Augustine)Pres: Richard Pacetti, St. A sgUstine: I)ir: Allen Nease, St. Augustine. ST. LUCIE (Ft. Pierce)-Pres: Edgar Brown, Ft. Pierce: Dir: Wayne Carlton, Ft Pierce SUMTER (Bushnell)-Pres: A. W. Lee, Jr., Wildwood: Di r: Auce C. Caruthters, Oxford. SUFWANNEE Le Oak Pres: Hugh Mills, Live Oak: Dir: Frank Giarrard, Mayo. TAYLOR (Perry) -Pres: Rudolph Parker, Perry: Dir: Robert Ezell, Perry. VOLUSIA (DeLand)-Pres: Stanley Cowart, Seville: Dur: lmtter McDonald, Daytona Beach. WASHINGTON-HOLMES-Pres: E. D. Buddy" Neel, Chipley: Dir: (Holres) Ralph Neel, Bonifay: (Washingto n) U. S. Harrison, Chipley. WEST FLORIDA (Gulf, Bay, Franklin, Calhoun, Liberty, Wakulla)-Dir: (Bay) J. W. Lowrey: (Calhoun) (Gerald Cayson. Blountstown; (Liberty) 0. B. Shuler: (Wakulla) Jerry Spears, Crawfordville. Sale toppers! About the highest prices to date for calves were reportedby Pete Clemons, Okeechobee Livestock Market, Okeechobee, at the market sales of April 30-May 1. Clemons reports that Sunset Ranch, Kenansville, and Wayne Carlton, Fort Pierce, topped the market at $2.50. 60 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979

PAGE 61

F c C ILLLC L 0 .7K~ii~ 7 ~< When you sell your livestock? You'll get it at your local livestock auction market! The management from top to bottom is recognized for knowledge of the industry. In dealing with your marketman, you'll getthe benefit of his many years of experience. Why risk your investments-use the person with the knowhow to give full protection to your financial stake in marketing your stock! Sell and Buy at Your Local Livestock Auction Market The Auction Market Way is the Best Way! CONTACT ANY OF THESE MARKETS, ALL MEMBERS OF THE STATE ASSOCIATION Arcadia State Livestock Market* Auctions Every Wednesday Pat Kelly, Mgr., Ph. 813/494-3737 1808, 3250 ARCADIA, 33821 Chipley Livestock Company* Auctions Every Tuesday E. D. (Buddy) Neel, Mgr. Ph. 904/638-0267, 638-4498 CHIPLEY, 32428 Gainesville Livestock Company* Cattle Auctions Every Mon.-Wed. Hog Auctions Every Wednesday Mgrs., L. H. (Tommy) Thompson, Jr. and J. W. "Buddy" Clark Ph. 904/372-3442 GAINESVILLE, 32601 Tindel Livestock Market* Auctions Every Monday Clyde Crutchfield, Mgr. Ph. 904/263-3224 GRACEVILLE, 32440 Jay Livestock Auction Auctions Every Tuesday Horace McCurdy, Mgr. Ph. 904/675-4795 Jay, Florida 32565 Kissimmee Livestock Market Auctions Every Wednesday Kenneth Caldwell, Mgr. 305/847-3521 KISSIMMEE, 32741 Columbia Livestock Market* Hog Auctions Every Monday Cattle Auctions Every Thursday H. Tom Willis, Mgr. Ph. 904/755-2300 LAKE CITY, 32055 Cattlemen's Livestock Markets* Monday & Sales Tuesday Bill Hamilton, Mgr. Tampa 813/626-5164 & Lakeland 813/682-0117 TAMPA, 33609 and LAKELAND, 33802 Suwannee Valley Livestock Market* Auctions Every Wednesday Cecil Moore Ph. 904/362-1702 LIVE OAK, 32060 Madison Stockyard Inc.* Hogs-Monday; Cattle-Tuesday George Townsend, Mgr.; 904/973-4094 929-4605 MADISON, 32340 West Florida Livestock Market* Sale Every Thursday Buddy Williams, Mgr. -Ph. 904/482-2229 482-8684 MARIANNA, 32446 Mills Auction Market* Hog Auction Every Wednesday Cattle Auction Every Thursday Clarence & Dot Mills, Mgrs. Ph. 904/732-4454 OCALA, 32670 Cow Palace* Sale Every Sat. W. T. (Bill) Wells, Mgr. Ph. 813/858-6253 LAKELAND, 33802 Monticello Stockyard, Inc.* Auctions Every Monday J. E. Hawkins, Mgr. -Ph. 904/997-5711 MONTICELLO, 32344 Okeechobee Livestock Market Auctions Every Monday & Tuesday Pete Clemons, Mgr. e Ph. 813/763-3127 OKEECHOBEE, 33472 Edwards Livestock Company* Hog Auction Every Monday Cattle Auction Every Wednesday 0. W. Edwards, Jr., Mgr. 904/627-9584 QUINCY, 32351 Hardee Livestock Market, Inc. Auctions Every Monday Mgrs: Doyle Carlton, I1, Robert Ray Smith Phones 813/773-9747, 773-9560 WAUCHULA, 33873 Interstate Livestock Market* Auctions Every Tuesday Jay Mueller, Mgr. 813/689-2424, 689-5995 SEFFNER, 33584 Sumter County Farmers Market Auctions Every Tuesday Lamar Hall e Ph. 904/793-2021 WEBSTER, 33597 Jacksonville Livestock Auction Market* Auctions Every Monday Thos. W. Waldrop, Owner 904/781-4677 WHITEHOUSE, 32095 *-Indicates Subscriber to Livestock Marketing Association For Further Information about Florida Livestock Auction Markets, Contact AK1~K3C ]9L\j~j fri ~ C P. 0. Box 1403, Kissimmee, FL 32741 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 61

PAGE 62

r Established 1946 Our Posts, Wire & Gates Cost You Less Please call before driving to Ona. Our inventory is low on some sizes. FLORIDA FENCE POST CC Open 7 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday thru Friday L PLANT and SALES OFFICE 0. Box 645-Ph: 813/735-1361 ONA, FLORIDA 33865 "a common sense approach" dick kelley ranch management consultant 4505 sa. kanner hwy. (brochures available) stuart, fla. 33494 305/287-3046 SP. ., INC. Hinge type hookup holds rear rear mounts off and on in 5 n Jennings Multi-Purpose Equipment a of fork to bucket. Take front and Long ribbon line of hay is shown for easy access by cattle for minutes. feeding in pasture or for baling old hay in square bales. JENNINGS & SON MFG. Member, Florida Cattlemen's Association Route 1, Box 163 Phones 904/629-4127 & 732-3574 MORRISTON, FLORIDA 32668 62 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 Mrs. Lucy Gunn Mrs. Lucy Buckels Gunn of Kissimmee passed away on April 13. She was the widow of the late June Rawls Gunn, Osceola County Agent for almost 40 years before passing away in 1965. June Gunn served nearly 32 years as state secretary of the Florida Cattlemen's Association. Both he and Mrs. Gunn were active in Silver Spurs activities, he being a charter member. Mrs. Gunn was active in the Osceola Cattlemen's Association and CowBelle activities through the years and was a strong supporter of the state cattlemen's association. In a resolution submitted to the Florida Senate in 1965 by the late Senator Irlo Bronson, Kissimmee, and then Senators Ben Hill Griffin, Frostproof, and Etter Usher, Chiefland, which was unanimously adopted by the legislature, in recognition of Gunn's dedication to the industry, Mrs. Gunn was recognized as. his devoted widow, partner, and helpmate Mrs. Gunn had been a resident of Kissimmee for many years. Andrew Tent Co. Inc., KENNETH S. ANDREW Owner and Operator Catering to the breeder who requires the very best in Sale equipment. P. 0. Box 4400-Ph: 912/883-4400 ALBANY, GEORGIA 31706 11111*.as

PAGE 63

V CUSTOM p -OCALA, FL ORIID p Premier Winners 1974-1975 Brangus Bull Brangus Heifer Brangus Exhibitor Charolais Bull Charolais Heifer Charolais Exhibitor 1975-1976 Angus Heifer Brangus Bull Brangus Exhibitor Charolais Bull Charolais Heifer Charolais Exhibitor 1976-1977 Angus Bull .Angus Heifer Angus Exhibitor Premier Winners 0 0 0 0 0, 0 0 0 0 0 Show Barn located on 1-75, exit 484 (Belleview), 10 miles south of Ocala. For experienced preparation of your show cattle for shows and sales contact RW BAR Custom Fitters. Now accepting cattle for the fall and winter show season. Quality Club Calves also available. 1976-1977 cont. Charolais Bull Charolais Heifer Charolais Exhibitor Santa Gertrudis Bull 1977-1978 Angus Heifer Charolais Bull Charolais Heifer Charolais Exhibitor Limousin Bull Limousin Female Limousin Exhibitor 1978-1979 Angus Bull *Charolais Bull SCharolais Heifer Limousin Bull Limousin Heifer CSV1TM IT3T A CUSTOM FITTERS RICK WILLIAMS, owner 904/245-5290 16020 S.W. 20th Ave. Rd. Ocala, Fla. 32673

PAGE 64

~Beef Master ----~ Squeeze Chute A Beefmaster Vet Chute Crowding Alley Loading Chute iiEi '9 j
PAGE 65

Ross Brothers and Dietrich's takes honors at Palatka Winners in the open Santa Gertrudis competition at the Putnam County Fair, Palatka, listed to the first three places, with the number of entries shown in parentheses, follow: Junior heifer calf, calved l/l/78 thru 5/31/78 (4)-Miss Raider 811 (reserve grand champion, reserve junior champion), Ross Brothers, Branford; Miss Raider 87, Ross; Miss Thomas 816, D.L. Thomas, Lake City; Senior heifer calf, calved 9/1/77 thru 12/31/77 (3)Miss Doubloon Stuff D850 (grand champion, junior champion), Dietrich's Fyins 1) Ranch, Orlando; Miss Doubloon Stull D855, Dietrich: No Name 81. Ross; Junior yearling heifer, calved 5/l/77 thru 8/31/77 (2)Miss Doubloon Stuff D773, Dietrich: Miss Stuff 771, Thouas; Junior yearling heifer, calved 1/[ /77 thru 4/30/77 (1)Miss Thomas 738, -Thomas: Senior yearling heifer, calved 7/1/76 thru 12/31/76(1)Mliss Tarzan Stuff D676 (reserve senior chanipion), Dietrich: Two year old heifer, calved 1/l/76 thru 6/30/76 (I)Miss Tarzan 647 (senior champion), Thomas; Two lemnales (5)-Dietrich; Ross: Thomas: ROSS Brothers, Branford, showed the grand champion Santa Gertrudis bull at the Putnam County Fair. RESERVE Grand Champion Santa Gertrudis bull at Palatka was owned by the Ross Brothers, .Junior hull caIf calved I/1 78 thru 5/31,78 (5)-Raider 851, Ross Taran 809, Ttoias; Doubloon Stuff D816, seni r ball call, calfed 9//77 thru 12/31/77 (2)Riigo's M iserpie (reserve junior champion), Dietrich: Rasider 82, Ross: Summer vearing hull, calved 5/1/77 thru 8/31/77 (2)No Name 747 (reserve grand champion, junior champion), Ross: Tarzan 765, Thomas; Junior yeairling bull, calved I /1 177 thru 4/30/77 (3)Stuff Shirt 701 (grand champion, senior champion), Ross: Raider 728, Ross; Jake 728, Thomas: Senior yearling hull, calved 7/ 1/76 thru 12/31/76 (1)No Name 700, Ross: Twso year old bull. calved I/l /76 thru 6/30/76 (I)Tarzan 61, Thomas: Aged bull, calved 7//75 thru 12/31/75 (I1)-Tarzan, Thonas: Tao bulls (4)-Ross: Ross: Thomas; Pair of yearlings (2)-Thomas: Thomas: flair ol calves (5)-Dietrich: Ross; Ross; Produce of dam (2)-Ross: Thomas; Get of sire (3)-Ross; Thomas: Dietrich: Best Polled (5)-Ross. DIETRICH'S Flying D Ranch, Orlando, showed the grand champion Santa Gertrudis female at Palatka. ROSS Brothers, exhibited the reserve grand champion Santa Gertrudis female at Palatka, shown with Ty Ross. Hearings on meat pricing held A series of public hearings on meat pricing have been held across the nation in recent weeks. The hearings have been conducted by a task force appointed by Secretary of Agriculture Bob Bergland and chaired by P. R. Smith, assistant secretary of agriculture for marketing and transportation services. Mrs. JoAnn Smith, Wacahoota, chairman of NCA's beef promotion and consumer relations committee, is one of 10 members serving on the force. At the hearing held in Amarillo, Texas, April 26, C. T. 'Tad' Sanders. general manager of Livestock Marketing Association, Kansas City, Missouri, said that livestock and meat pricing information "is 'news' in capital letters," and should not be policed by the government in testimony before the task force. JVU SANTA Jfi GERTRUDIS STAGE COACH RANCH Dade City, Florida ROBERT SANDERS, Mgr. P. 0. Box 421 Ph: 904/588-3711 904/567-7040 S AGE C0 CH RIM I I JULIA M. PITTMAN Growability 1 Showability Doability Quality Santa Gertrudis Create Their Own Demand K. D. EATMON Santa Gertrudis Farms Margate, Fla. 33063 2922 N. State Rd. 7, Ph: 305/971-8880 Charles Wolf, Gen. Mgr. Delray Beach, Ph: 305/278-0913 Registered Santa Gertrudis Pure Bred 9 Top Bloodlines Visitors Welcome SUWANNEE POINT RANCH Branford, Florida 32008 Carroll Hall Lloyd Thomas Ph: 904/935-1303 Ph: 904/935-1981 Santa Gertrudis All Polled Herd Sires D. L. Thomas Ranch Dwight & Jackie Thomas, owners Rt. 9, Box 203, Lake City, Fla. 32055 Telephone 904/752-6438 Located 1/ mile W. of 1-75 on Hwy. 47 Advertise Regularly Santa Gertrudis Cattle FOR SALE Classified "S" Bulls Polled & Horned Recently Classified "S" and "S-Bar" Heifers P.O. Box Since 1941 Charter 1666 Member DADE SGBI FLAFSGA 33525 LITTLE EVERGLADES RANCH Mrs. W. M Larkin 904/567-2292 Ray Battle Owner Manager THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 65

PAGE 66

Whether You're Advertising Feed, Fertilizer, Equipment or other products related to the Livestock Industry the most economical way to reach the whole Florida Cattle Industry is through the pages of The Florida Cattleman. Call us for details. Ask us about our special breed issues: SeptemberContinental Breeds; October-Herefords; November-Angus; December-Charolais; JanuaryAmerican Breeds; March-Brahmans. aAND LIVESTOCK JOURNAL P. 0. Box 1403 Ph. 305/846-2800 KISSIMMEE, FLA. 32741 66 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 Range management society active in Florida by LEWIS L. YARLETT Range Conservationist, FA S Since 1960 members of the Society for Range Management have been active in Florida encouraging and providing technical expertise in the proper use and management of native grassland resources in Florida. Within the past three years the Florida Chapter of SRM has sponsored a number of field tours and demonstrations. As many as 75-125 persons have been in attendance on each of these tours. Those attending have seen first hand the application of sound range management practices. They have learned to recognize the most important native grasses, how to control saw palmetto and apply planned grazing systems. The Society of Range Management was organized in Salt Lake City, Utah, in 1948. It was logical that it was organized in the west since that is where the bulk of rangeland occurs. The organizers had the foresight and vision to recognize the value of rangelands as an important natural resource. It was not long however that members of SRM saw a need in other parts of the U. S. and the world. The Southern Section of SRM was organized in 1951 and included the southern states and Florida. The need for a more local interest group has led to the organization of a Florida Chapter of SRM formed in 1977. The objectives of the Florida Chapter of SRM has the same objectives as the parent organization. These are: I) Develop an understanding of range ecosystems and the principles applicable to the management of these native resources. In Florida this means the recognition, understanding and management of flatwoods, fresh marshes, and sand ponds, sloughs and salt marshes. In addition, the most desirable grasses associated with these sites have come to be recognized as important in a livestock operation. These include creeping bluestem, maidencane, chalky bluestem, little blue maidencane and indiangrass. 2) To assist all who work with range and grazeable woodlands to keep informed of new findings and techniques in the art and science of range movement. Two publications, the popular "Rangelands" and the technical "Journal of Range Management" keeps all members of SRM informed. A minimum of two tours a year provides Florida members with an opportunity to observe range management practices 3) To improve the effectiveness of range management to obtain from range resources the products necessary for man's welfare. The Florida Chapter of SRM strives to seek management of Florida's grazing resource to obtain the maximum production. This is reflected in a balanced forage program and economical production Of livestock products, better use of soil and water resources and habitat improvement for wildlife. These are obtainable through grazing systems, palmetto control, fencing, supplemental feeding and herd management. Deer, turkey, and especially quail are a product of range and grazeable woodland ecosystems, the management of which improves both quality and quantity of these species. 4) To create a public appreciation of the economic, social and environmental benefits to be obtained from the range resource. The Society for Range Management, through the Florida Chapter invites all persons to their tours and meetings. These are held at least twice a year on local ranches, research stations and other areas where the results of applied range management may be seen. The Southern Section publishes a newsletter five or six times a year to inform members of activities. Membership in Florida in the Society for Range Management doubled the past two years due to local chapter activities. Membership includes ranchers, professionals in range, agronomy, wildlife and resource planners. Academic members includes educators as well as students in Range Ecosystem Management at the University of Florida. Anyone engaged in or interested in the aspects, study or management and use of Florida's approximately ten million acres of native rangelands and grazeable woodlands is eligible for membership in the Society for Range Management. Further information on activities of the Florida Chapter, Society for Range Management may be obtained from Max Hammond, president of the Florida chapter, P. 0. Box 250, Bartow, 33830, or Sam Polston, secretary, Soil Conservation Service, Sebring, 33870. Tedder wins carcass award John Tedder, a Lake County FFA'er, won the 1979 County Carcass Contests with a 1120 pound steer fitted for a show earlier this year. Tedder received recognition for winning the honor at the 1979 Beef Cattle Short Course, held recently at Gainesville. The award, sponsored jointly by International Mineral and Chemical Company and Gainesville Stockman's Supply, was presented by John Hunt, Bartow, of IMC. Hunt said therewere 303 carcassesin the 1979 contest that the Tedder steer won. Commercial red meat output in Florida for March 1979 was 23.2 million pounds, down 30 percent from March 1978, according to USDA.

PAGE 67

40) to a() of thee tw>(o year old heifem, bred to known sons oj, Kitqg 55, 'uill be sold at this years King Ranch Foundation Sale. And what a sale it will be. This year featuring 40 to 50 two year old heifers out of King Ranch's foundation herd of Santa Gertrudis beef cattle. As well as the usual 20 or so bulls. All of them herd bull quality. The morning of the sale, approximately 30 colts and fillies will be sold at auction from King Ranch's foundation Old Sorrel Family of Quarterhorses. It's your chance to join King Ranch in its pursuit of perfection by introducing these foundation bloodlines into your herd or brood. Come. October 6, 1979. Horses at 10:00 AM. Cattle at 1:30 PM. Catalogue available on request. The progeny of three time world champion and all time open-cutting money winner, Mr. San Peppy, will be featured in the Quarter Horse section of the sale. In pursuit of perfection since 1853. For catalogue write King Ranch, Kingsville, Texas 78363, or call (512) 592-6411.

PAGE 68

'Ona' Star grass is grazing and hay variety EDITORS NOTE-The research on Ona Star grass has been performed bhi E. M. //odges, L. S. Dunavin, P. Mislev 0. C. Rue/ke and R. L. Stanley, Jr., and the /1/0owing article was joinili']rnished bY them. "Ona" Star grass is being released to growers as a grazing and hay variety for use in Florida southward from Brooksville and Orlando. This tall-growing, perennial member of the Bermuda grass family is best suited to moist but welldrained soils of above-average fertility. Ona Star grass resembles "McCaleb" Star grass but yields slightly more forage and forms a sod of greater density. It is vegetatively planted by scattering 10 to IS bales per acre of freshly cut, stemmy grass on a thoroughly prepared seed bed, followed by risking and rolling. Fertilizer and lime treatments for establishment are similar to those required for other grasses-300 pounds per acre 16-8-8 fertilizer soon after planting and with lime applied according to soil test. Fertility needs for production purposes are relatively high. Acreage planted to this grass should be limited to an amount which can be well fertilized and intensively managed. Ona Star grass, once established and managed in a systematic way, competes successfully with common Bermuda grass and Bahia grass. Ieavy stocking and continued close grazing will destroy the stand. Growth is excellent during October and November if the fertility level is high, production at this time being much higher than on Pangola and Bahia grasses. Grazing or harvesting of' Ona Star grass should be completed while forage is still in the green, growing stage. A heavy frost kills most top growth and feeding value is lost rapidly. Hay crops should be harvested after four to five weeks of growth. Young leaves of heavily fertilized Ona Star grass have a high hydrocyanic acid potential (HCN-p) when tested in the laboratory but there has been no harmful effect of this high HCN-p on grazing animals during seven years of' grazing at the Agricultural Research Center, Ona. As a matter of good management, extremely hungry animals should never be turned into heavily fertilized Star grass in the early stages of growth. Its ability to maintain a stand together with good yields and feeding quality give the grass special value in areas of south-central Florida where Digit grasses have given way to less productive varieties. Information on planting material for increase blocks of Ona Star grass can be obtained from: Florida Foundation Seed Producers, Inc., P. 0. Box 14006, University Station, Gainesville, Florida 32604 or Agricultural Research Center, Rt. 1, Box 62, Ona, Florida 33865. Cellon gets honors from USDA Ralph W. Cellon, Jr., Alachua, chairperson of the Florida State Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Committee (ASC), has been honored by USDA in being selected to receive the Administrator's Award for service to agriculture. He was selected by Ray Fitzgerald, administrator of the Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service (ASCS). The award is recognized in ASCS as the highest form of recognition received by individuals. The award recognizes outstanding achievements and exceptional performance of employees and committee members in their service to agriculture. Formal presentation to Cellon and 15 other national winners from across the nation were to be made May 22 in Washington, D. C. Cellon was cited in receiving the award for his outstanding leadership in the effective and productive administration and execution of ASCS prograis resulting in farmers' increased knowledge and participation in ASCS programs. It was noted that he demonstrated an exemplary record of conscientious devotion to farmers and Creep feeding -who needs it? One of the good things about crossbreeding with purebred Santa Gertrudis bull is that expensive and troublesome creep feeding is seldom necessary. Your cows give more milk than ever before, and the calves are whoppers by weaning time, right off mama and grass. The cows rarely need help in calving either, even when bred at 15 to 16 months. The calves aren't too large at birth, but after they're born just watch em gain! In fact that's about all you have to do. Santa Gertrudis were developed on the range, and they know how to take care of themselves.

PAGE 69

ASCS in his untiring efforts and determination to ensure all farmers' awareness of all ASCS programs and their benefits. Under his leadership, county office inform ation activities ha ve been increased: there are now more newsletters issued to farmers; more radio programs: better participation in county fairs and public exhibitors, and better relations with the news media. It was pointed out that because of better informational efforts to ensure awareness of ASCS programs, there has not been a single appeal in which the appellant stated he had not received adequate information. America s First Beef Breed SANTA GERTRUDIS BREEDERS INTERNATIONAL BOX 1257: KINGSVILLE, TEXAS 78363 SANTA GERTRUDIS The kind that WEIGH and PAY on good Florida pastures! BLOUNT & HYDE B. Blount, Mgr., Phone take Placid 813/465-4771 Rt. 4, Box 324, Lake Placid, Fla. 33852 For more information on Santa Gertrudis ask the following breeders. Roy F. Albritton Bowling Green, FL John B. Armstrong Kingsville, TX Avon Manor Park, Inc. Naples, FL Big B Ranch Belle Glade, FL Big Bear Ranches Loxahatchee, FL Zane C. Blanton Plant City, FL Blount & Hyde Lake Placid, FL Blue Cypress Lake Ranch, Inc. Vero Beach, FL Bonnie Farms Grand Bay, AL Sidney Boswell Bmnswick, GA Bransford Hills Farm Beth Page, TN Brownell Moger & Assoc. Ocala, FL Joe & Ruth Bryan Coral Springs, FL Troy Burrell Morriston, FL Troy E. Burrell, Jr. Morrston, FL C & S Ranch Dunnellon, FL Circle L Ranch Elba, AL Clarendon Plantation Burton, SC Cove Bend Ranch Floral City, FL George H. Culpepper Longwood, FL D. Russell Daniel Okeechobee, FL H. E. Danner Co. Inc. Glennville, GA Davis Double D. Farms Smithville, TN Dietrich Brothers, Orlando, FL Roy C. Dietrich Orlando, FL Santa Bar D Farm Haw River, NC Double D Ranch Loxahatchee, FL Double R. J. Farm Summerfield, FL R. C. Durr Independence, KY K. D. Eatmon Ranches Pompano Beach, FL El Rancho Grande Indiantown, FL R. A. Feagle Lake City, FL Riteco Ranch Vero Beach, FL Blackwater Farms Jasper, AL Mr. & Mrs. R. W. Gaines, Jr. Ocala, FL River Oaks Ranch Donalsonville, GA Gemini Springs Farms DeBary, FL Graco Farms Orlando, FL Grey Rocks Ranch Birmingham, AL Griffith Ranch, Inc. Okeechobee, FL Gulf Coast Farms Fort Myers, FL H & H Farms Santa Fe, FL Andy Haman Brnswick, GA Harley Watson Ranch Lake Harbor, FL Harwell & Harwell Lakeland, FL Hickory Hill Ranch, Inc. Anthony, FL Bob & Beverly Holdorff Pompano Beach, FL Hooper Farms Ocala, FL Mr. & Mrs. Myles Hortman Ocholocknee, GA David A. Johnson Mainland, FL Johnson Brothers Pompano Beach, FL Jones & Moore Jay, FL Wilton Jones Tifton, GA L Gary Lamb Indiantown, FL Little Everglades Ranch Dade City, FL Laurel Oak Farm Wellbom, FL Coley Lott Dover, FL Arthur E. Lynn Callahan, FL M. J. Ranch Vero Beach, FL E. A. Markham Dunnellon, FL Thomas R. McGehee Jacksonville, FL Laudie E. McHenry, M.D. Melboume, FL Pete Miller Attapulgus, GA Mills/Triple M Farms Atlanta, GA W. D. Mizell & Sons Callahan, FL Tam Moody Vero Beach, FL S. L Nelson Lave Oak. FL Robert B. Oxer Lake Placid, FL Ed Partin Jr. St. Cloud, FL Claude John Pellicer Jr. Bunnell, FL Kenneth L. Perkins South Belle Glade, FL Robert Ponder Farms Omega, FL G. E. Poucher Live Oak, FL Ringo Ranch Immokalee, FL Charles A. Rivard DeFuniak Springs, FL Frank Robinson Atlanta, GA Ross Brothers, Branford, FL Charles M. Rowe Macclenny, Florida 32063 Winnstead Plantation Thomasville, GA Mountain Valley Farm Hartselle, Al Joe H. Scott Ft. Lauderdale, FL J. K. Shirah Midland City, AL Slanro Ranch Ft. Myers, FL H. R. Snapp Plant City, FL 11orida Santa rrudis Associaion 2922 N. State Road 7, Margate, FL 33063 Fred Dietrich III, Pres. K. D. Eatmon, Sec.-Treas. Member of Santa Gertrudis Breeders International, Kingsville, Texas Stage Coach Ranch Dade City. FL James E. Stephenson Miami Lakes. FL Gertrude & Mary Stevens St. Cloud, FL Sugar Hill Plantation Allendale, SC Sunshine State Steers, Inc. Loxahatchee. FL Suwannee Point Ranch St. Petersburg, FL T-3 Ranch Miami Shores, FL Dwight L Thomas Lake City, FL Diamond T Ranch Huntsville, AL Eric & Penny Wagner Ocala, FL George & Dorothy Warga West Palm Beach, FL Frank N. Warren Morriston, FL Joe Wattleworth Williston, FL J. J. Wiggins Moore Haven, FL Leland A. Withers Austell, GA Charles C. Wolf Delray Beach. FL Paul E. Hatfield Evansville. Ind Shelton Land & Cattle Co. Fla. Divisi South Bar. Fla Eatroon & Johnson Cattle Co. Pompao Beach, Floida Hugh E. and Ouida W. Can lDonalsonille, Ga. THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 69 Santa Gertrudis-Polled & Horned 25 Breeding Age Bulls For Sale. GEMINI SPRINGS FARMS Star Rt. 1 J. Charles Gray, owner DeBary, Fl. 32713 Ph. (305) 668-6486 Home of Friday517 COVE BEND RANCH Registered Santa Gertrudis Owner: Dermont & Maureen O'Connor Manager: Hank Baggett 904/726-1781 Rt. 1, Box 248, Floral City, Florida 32636 Where State Road 48 crosses the Withiacoochee River. Purebred Santa Gertrudis Winnstead Plantation Philip G. Rust Route3 T To"asville,Ga. 3192 IPhone 912/226-1528 Herd No. 255 Albert Blankenship, Mgr. 226-6304 BREEDERS & CONSULTANTS SANTA GERTRUDIS CHAMPIONSHIP HORNED 0 POLLED DIETRICH BROTHERS Ph: 305/568-2351 Rt. 6, Box 921A ORLANDO. FLORIDA 32807

PAGE 70

Ad valorem taxes -a forgotten beef cattle production expense by BEN ABBITT, TIM HEWITT and FRANCIS MORITZ E:DITOR'S NOTL'-A bbiut and Hewitt are area economnists, Food and Resource Economics Departmen, Universiti of' florida, IFAS, A REC, Lake AI/red, and A RC, Marianna, respectively aid Morit: is fieldd appraiser with Tucker and Branham. Inc., Orlando. T he most common frm of taxation oil Florida agriculture is the ad valorem tax. This tax is an annual charge assessed against the appraised value of real properties. Land, buildings, and improvements to land, for instance, and a pasture irrigation system are all examples of real property. We'll use permanent pastureland as our example of real property in this article. Property taxes are oftentimes a forgotten expense in beef cattle production. Why are they forgotten? These taxes are what economists call a fixed cost. This cost is incurred whether pastureland is kept in top condition or let return to its native, ungrazed state. The property tax is fixed in the sense that as long as you own pastureland and it is grazed or not stocked you will incur such a tax. The tax levy will not necessarily be the same dollar amount each year. The property tax can be likened to having your automobile insurance premium deducted from your checking account. A premium is deducted regularly whether you drive the car or let it sit. Property taxes on pastureland, like automobile insurance premiums, are cash outlays that are paid annually. This payment is oftentimes forgotten or overlooked by beef cattle producers: particularly those whose books are kept by accountants. Payment of property taxes cuts into profits just like other costs, such as outlays for fertilizer and minerals. Let's briefly review the purposes of ad valorem taxes, what an agricultural land appraisal is, and how pastureland is appraised for ad valorem taxation purposes in Florida. What purpose is served? The ad valorem property tax, established prior to 1880, has long been a part of our history. This tax system replaced the taxation methods brought from Europe and used during the colonial period. In those early years the property tax revenue supported local governments. Today ad valorem property tax revenue still funds local governments. In addition, ad valorem taxes now help finance public school systems, hospitals, sewage systems, and construction and maintenance of roads. Hence, the major reasons for ad valorem taxation today are to raise revenue to fund local governments and to finance governmental public services. Ad valorem taxes do not depend on current economic activity like sales taxes, hence they assure government reasonable certainty and timeliness of collection. That is, by law they are collected annually and budgeted yearly Table l.--Estimated Annual Revenue and Expenses, 100-Cow Herd on 200 Acres of Permanent Pasture, Florida, 1979-! Item Description Unit Quantity Price Total ----Dollars --I. Revenue cows Cull, 1000# @ $55 /cwt., sold in Sept. head 13 550.00 7,150.00 Heifers 2 yr. old, 893# @ $85/cwt., sold in Sept. head 4 759.05 3,036.20 Calves b 85% calf crop Heifers 400# @ $75/cwt., sold in Sept. head 23 300,00 6,900.00 Steers 475# @ $82/cwt., sold in Sept. head 43 389,50 16,748.50 Total revenue 33,834.70 II. Cash expenses Fertilizer 3 cwt./acre, 4-12-12, custom applied lbs. 200 14.90 2,980.00 .50 cwt./acre N lbs. 200 10.00 2,000.00 Supplemental feed 32% Fortified molasses @ 2.5 lb/AU/day, d/ fed 120 days ton 17.3 115.00 1,990.00 15#/AU/day, fed 120 days ton 103.5 35.00 3,623.00 Mineral 40#/AU/yr., average 136 AU ton 2.72 175.00 476.00 Vet, supplies Medicine, vaccine and insecticide 355.00 Semen test bulls head 4 15.00 60.00 Misc. practices Dragging and mowing pastures, feeding hay, checking fences and cattle 700.00 Repairs Buildings and fences 200.00 Taxes Personal property on livestock cow 100 .50 50.00 Land taxes acre 200 3.00 600.00 Interest On operating capital, 7 mos. @ 9% per annum dollars 13,034 .0525 684.00 Total cash expenses 13718.00 III. Non-cash expenses Bull depreciation head 4 140.00 560.00 Buildings and machinery depreciation 596.00 Total non-cash expenses TT56.05 IV. Total expenses 14,874.00 V. Return to land, labor, 18,960,70 capital, and management -185% calf crop; 17% cow cull rate with heifer calves saved as replacement, and 4 bulls. 12Choice grade. /115 AU wintered. -Production cost $35.00/ton from surplus grass (including mowing, baling, and hauling). 70 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979

PAGE 71

Table 2.--Estimated Annual Revenue and Expenses, 100-Cow Herd on 200 Acres of Permanent Pasture, Jnit Quant tv Price Total ----Dollars--I. Revenue Cows [lei fers Calves b/ Hit' rsSt. rrs Total revenue II. Cash expenses Fertilizer Supplemental feed C Mineral Vet, supplies Semen test bulls Misc. practices Repairs Taxes Land taxes Interest Total cash expenses III. Non-cash expenses Bull depreciation Iluildiny and machinerv do preciation Total non-cash expenses IV. Total expenses V. Return to land, labor, capital, and management Cull, 1000= 0 $22/c't., sold in Sept. 2 yr, old, 893 $29/cwt., sold in Sept, 8oI cat cr, 00 = : 30 /wtsold in Sept 475i ', $33/cit., sold in Sept. 3 cwt./acre, 4-12-12, custom applied 50 cwf./acre N 32' Fortified molasses 0 2.5 lb/AU/day, fod 120 davs 15= '/AlU/day, fed 120 days 40=/'Al//yr, nverage 136 AU iiidicine, vaccine and insecticide Drawing and moving pastures, feeding har, checking t,:nces and cattle 0uildings and fen-es Persinil property on livestock On operating capital, 7 mos, 9', per annun head head head head lbs. lbs. ton ton ton head cow acre dollars head 13 220,00 2,S0 1 258,97 1,0 3 23 120,00 2,760 43 156.75 740 13, 6 200 15.90 3,180 200 12,00 2,400 17.3 111.00 1,920 103.5 25,00 2,588 2,72 170,00 162 30 4 15,00 Cr0 700 200 100 .50 30 200 2,70 540 12,450 .0525 654 4 140.00 560 596 14,260 (864) a 85% calf crop; 17% cow cull rate with heifer calves saved as replacement, and 4 bulls. b Choice grade. c 115 AU wintered. d Production costs 325.00/ton from surplus grass (including mowing, baling, and hauling). Table 3.--Estimated Annual Revenue and Expenses, 100-Cow Herd on 200 acres of Permanent Pasture, Florida, 197ea/ Item Description Unit Quantity Price Total ---Dollars---I. Revenue Cows Cull, 1000# @ $35/cwt., sold in Sept. head 13 350.00 4,450 Heifers 2 yr. old, 893# @ $42/cwt., sold in Sept. head 4 375.00 1,500 Calves 85% calf crop Heifer b/ 400# P $48/cwt., sold in Sept. head 23 192.00 4,416 Steerst7 475# @ $50/cwt., sold in Sept. head 43 232.50 10,212 Total revenue 20,578 II. Cash expenses Fertilizer 3 cwt./acre, 4-12-12, custom applied lbs. 200 15.00 3,000 .50 cwt./acre N lbs. 200 10.00 2,000 Supplemental feeds' 32% Fortified molasses @ 2.5 lb/AU/day, fed 120 days ton 17.3 111.00 1,920 Hay15#/AU/day, fed 120 days ton 103.5 25.00 2,588 Mineral 40#/AU/yr., average 136 AU ton 2.72 170.00 462 Vet. supplies Medicine, vaccine and insecticide 350 Semen test bulls head 4 15.00 60 Misc. practices Dragging and mowing pastures, feeding hay, checking fences and cattle 700 Repairs Buildings and fences 200 Taxes Personal property on livestock cow 100 .50 50 Land taxes acre 200 2.70 540 Interest On operating capital, 7 mos. @ 9% per annum dollars 11,820 .0525 623 Total cash expenses 12,493 III. Non-cash expenses Bull depreciation head 4 140.00 560 Buildings and machinery depreciation 596 Total non-cash expenses 1,156 IV. Total expenses 13,649 V. Return to land, labor, capital, and management 6,929 a 85% calf crop; 17% cow cull rate with heifer calves saved as replacement, and 4 bulls. b Choice grade. c 115 AU wintered. d Production costs $25/ton from surplus grass (including mowing, baling and hauling). THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 71 Item Descri t ion Florida, 1977-a

PAGE 72

All things coied HEREFORD FOR ASSISTANCE IN LOCATING HEREFORD BULLS OR FEMALES No Cost. No Obligation Contact your American Hereford Association Field Representative: RICK HICKENBOTTOM 220A Airport Rd. Athens, GA 30605 (404) 543-0014 Hereford Bulls Diamond C. Ranch, Inc. Harry Cobb Route 3, Box 93-C Donalsonville, GA 31745 912/524-2263 Performance Tested HEREFORD BULLS For Sale at CORRIGAN RANCH P. 0. Box 3130, Beach Station Ph: 305/567-7141, 231-2442 Vero Beach, Florida 32960 REGISTERED HEREFORDS SMAK H HUSE %. RANCH Ron & Martho Smoak, Rt. 3, Box 204-1 Madison, Fl. 32340 -904/973-2304 Registered Herefords PINE ACRE RANCH Citra, Florida 32627 Popular Bloodlines -CHF Sam McDonald H464-JF Dundy 1154-PA Mischief Aster 307G. P. Leitner, Mgr. 904/595-3806 904/591-2180 -Located 12 Mi. North of Ocala on US 301 El Dorado Hereford Farm Even with today's high commercial prices, we at El Dorado have kept prices on our registered cow/calf pairs and heifers at reasonable levels to fit the needs of our purebred customers. Come by for a visit. Lorin & Gladys Anderson 4301 South 301 Dade City, Florida 33525 Telephone 904/567-3413 72 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 to governmental units in the counties. Since ad valorem taxes are an important revenue source for government, the potential burden on real property owners, like cattlemen, is substantial. What isfarnland appraisal? Appraisal of farmland is a process of predicting the most probable selling price of property if offered for sale a reasonable length of time. The market value of farmland is the estimated prediction of the highest price in dollars which a buyer would pay and a seller would accept provided both were fully informed and acted intelligently and voluntarily. It is simply an appraiser s estimate of current value. Supply and demand actually determine the value of farmland on the open market. Development and land speculation have been significant forces in driving the market values of some farmland much higher than could be justified by its earning ability in agricultural production. That is, yields from the farmland and unstable markets may not generate sufficient income for the note holder to make his mortgage payments over the length of the loan. The Florida legislature has tried to relieve the tax burden on land maintained in "bona fide agricultural use" (good faith commercial agricultural use of land is based upon; length of time land has been so utilized, continuous use, purchase price paid, size in relation to specilic agricultural use, care of the land via accepted commercial agricultural practices, and terms of the leasing arrangement if applicable, etc.) by making special provision for taxing farmland at rates more in line with the land's earning capacity. This provision, popularly referred to as the "Green Belt Law," provides for assessing farmland on the basis of its present agricultural use and the income potential from that use. This agricultural use value is often called the classified use value. The ad valorem tax is annually levied upon this classified use value and not the market value, commonly called the just use value. Appraisal approaches There are three basic approaches property appraisers utilize to arrive at classified use values for farmland; the market approach, the cost approach, and the income approach. They normally use all three approaches when estimating classified use value for farmland. However, in Florida, the market and cost approaches are used sparingly for reasons pointed out later. First, let's briefly examine these three approaches to classified use valuation. Market approach: Evaluation by market data is based on the assumption that one tract of pastureland is valued the same as recent sales of like tracts. Similar factors include such items as elevation, soil type and productivity, grass variety, nearness to transportation routes and markets, and improvements to the land. In areas where there are only infrequent sales of pastureland, the appraiser often has difficulty finding comparable sales where two parcels of pastureland have similar characteristics and similar productivity. In addition, much pastureland in Florida has a speculative component in its market price. Therefore, finding comparable sales where the pastureland changed hands strictly for agricultural purposes is often difficult, sometimes impossible. For these reasons the market approach is used sparingly in establishing classified Use value for pastureland. Cost approach. When appraisers use the cost approach, a value is placed on the pastUreland and then on the contribution of improvements to the pasture. The value of the improvements to the pastureland is normally the current estimated replacement cost of the improvements (at the time the appraisal is made), minus the appraiser's observed depreciation. The value of pastureland (normally estimated by the market method) is then added to the contribution of improvements to calculate the total estimated classified use value. Hence, this approach inherently assumes that value and cost are the same, which is not necessarily true in many cases. For example, the value of a newly installed pasture irrigation system is more than the current cost of its installation since the system is expected to improve the stand in the future and subsequently increase pounds gained and profits. Often called the cost of reproduction approach, the cost approach, like the market approach, is used sparingly in pastureland appraisal. Why? Because most value accrues to pastureland whose selling price is determined more by current use and income potential than on the current cost of improvements. This approach is used primarily in condemnation (eminent domain) proceedings. Here the government takes (condemns) pastureland for a public use (for example, widening a road) and the owner is paid just compensation (usually in dollars) for what he loses. The replacement cost of any improvement to the pasture that is taken is appraised and that value added to the value of the pastureland (by itself) can represent the just compensation to the land owner for its loss. The owner's physical loss (pastureland and improvements), though he is compensated (money), becomes the general public's gain (wider road). Income approach: The main appraisal method used to estimate classified use values in Florida is the income approach. The value of pastureland is estimated by capitalizing expected income from it under typical management and production practices found in the area. "Typical" refers to those generally accepted management techniques performed on crops the land is suited to growing. Capitalization is the process of converting expected net income into a land value. The classified use value of the pastureland is esti(Continued on page 94)

PAGE 73

m Polled Hereford Range Type Purebred Bulls Using 2 sons of J3-212, also 1 son of WP Victor H 125 W497. J. L. Wetherington 912/242-4721 2201 Newbern Dr., valdosta, Ga. 31601 Annual Homed Hereford Bull Sale") Each October At Wauchula Still House Hollow Farm HUME, VIRGINIA 22639 CROOKED LAKE RANCH Registered Polled Herefords Victor Dominos Pat Wilson Inc. 813/635-4804 Bus. Owners 813/635-3787 Res. P, 0 Box 65. Frostproof, Florida 33843 Performance is our Business. MITCHELL HEREFORD FARM Performance Tested Polled Hereford Cattle Lumber City, Ga. 31549 912/568-4236 or 586-3263 For Hereford Bulls Call CK Ranch Sam Paylor 913/225-4745 Office: 913/225-4345 BROOKSVILLE, KS 67425 The BIG Profit Breed Polled Herefords KIME HEEORD ASSOGMton Contact LUCIAN WELTY / (404) 228-4445 1203 Ethridge Mill Rd.Griffin. Ga. 30223 Childs renamed president of Hereford group loin Childs, Lake Placid, was reelected president of the Florida Hereford Association at the group's annual mieeting, held recently at Gainesville. Ron Smoak, Madison, was named vice president at the meeting, and Don Berry, Kissimmee, will remain secretary-treasurer. Directors named to two year terms at the meeting were Pat Corrigan, Vero Beach; Ed Gregory, Jacksonville: Lovette Jackson, Gainesville; Curtiss Quarrier, Callahan; and Dan Childs, Lake Placid, director ex-officio. Holdover directors include Sid Sumner, Bartow: Grover Walker, Delutiak Springs; Ralph Thompson, Colquitt, Georgia, and Tom Cochrane, Fort Meade. III other business, the group voted to revise index scores required for entry into the annual Southeastern Pen Bull Show and Sale at Bartow. A sale comritittee headed by Dan Childs was appointed to study the changes. Childs reported that the 1979 Southeastern Pen Bull Show and Sale will he held on November 28-29 at Bartow. Association president Tom Childs also reported that the Florida Junior Hereford Association annual field day may be held in conjunction with the Bartow event this year. Farm exports up! U.S. farm exports to Hong Kong, which totaled S130.3 million in 1975, jumped to 5206.1 million in 1977 and then to S359.4 million last year. IHong Komng is only about 400 square miles in size but it purchased $1.8 billion in agricultural products in 1976. [le U.S. competes closely with Thailand for the number two spot as a major supplier. The People's Republic of China is the leader. DON BERRY, right, Kissimmee, was honored with a special award in recognition of his many years of service as secretary-treasurer of the Florida Hereford Association during the organization's annual meeting in Gainesville. E. D. Gregory, Jacksonville, made the presentation. (Photo courtesy American Hereford Association.) JO-su-LI FARMS, INC. Registered Hereford Cattle Ra lh Thompson, Gen. Mgr. Off. 912/58-3637 Res. 912/753-2230 COL UITT, GEORGIA 31737 Herefords are just naturally better! Ask us about breeding Herefords and become an active breeder. FLORIDA WEREFORD ASSOCIATION TOM CHILDS, President Rt. 3, Box 710, Lake Placid, Fla. 33852 Telephone 813/465-2020 Advertise Regularly RIVER DIVIDE RANCH 1116 N. Edgewood Avenue Jacksonville, Florida 32205 Herd sires: RWJ Victor 212 G4, RWJ Victor 330 HH25, and RWJ Victor 266 11128. BoR OoR. atur Bobb Baker Eqer ( 1 0I 4 879-1630 REGISTERED POLLED HEREFORDS THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 73

PAGE 74

CIRCLE RANCH Clermont, Florida 32711 RHF Victor 865-161 (Ranger) HERD SIRES CTR Victor C34 RWJ Victor J3-168 Al RWJ Victor J3-212 Al Mr. & Mrs. T. F. Thompson, owner Phone 904/394-3053 Raising Polled Herefords since 1956 Herring Hereford Farm Breeding Profitable Polled Herefords Since 1955. H. W. Herring, Jr. 912/872-3316 Rt. 2, Whigham, Ga. 31797 RWJ Victor Dominos Foundation Source Continuing to linebreed RWJ Practical Performing Polled Herefords. RWJ FARMS Mr. & Mrs, V. H. Jones Route 1, Box 157 912/874-6105 LESLIE, GEORGIA 31764 Young Acres Ranch New Trend Polled Herefords Performance Records Cattle Service Age Bulls Bred and Breeding Age Females For information on our Performance Cattle: H. Y. Tillman 1207 W. Park Ave. Valdosta, Ga. 31601 POLLED HEREFORD BULLS SAM SELLS & Sons P.O. Box 1175 0 Farm 912/782-5281 Moultrie, Georgia 31768 MEMBER, GEORGIA B.C.I.A. Sa&Je Ra ALOCHUA, FLORIDA 32616 REGISTERED POLLED HEREFORDS Registered Breeding Stock For Sale At The Ranch Mrs. Snead Davis, Owner Bill Snead, Mgr. Phone (904) 462-1453 Polled Herefords Malloy Hereford Ranch Victor Dominos "With the Malloy Accent" Home of: RWJ Victor J133 76 Al Certificates Available Mr. & Mrs. Dallas Malloy, Owners P. 0. Drawer G, Marianna, FL 32446 (office) 904/526-2672 (res.) 482-5196 BAXLEY FARMS Polled liereford & Quarter Iorses Built on economically important traits Harold Baxley 205/886-2913 Howell Baxley 205/886-3088 Tommy Baxley 205/886-2855 Rt. 4, Graceville, Fl, 32440 REGISTERED POLLED HEREFORDS "Trojan Style" Quality Simmentals ECHODELL FARM Joe Harvey, Owner Jakin, Ga. 31761 Office: 912/524-2131 (Donalsonville) Farm: 912/793-2081 Victor Dominos "That Pay Their Way and Make A Profit" Briar Creek Farms E. D. and Pauline Raulerson 912/632-4492 Dwight L. Raulerson 912/632-4785 Route 3, Alma, Georgia 31510 POLLED HEREFORDS Bred for Beef-Polled for Profit Annual Bull Sale Oct. 27, 1979 Field Day June 2, 1979 FLORIDA POLLED HEREFORD ASS'N ut 4 Box 292 Quincy, Fla. 32351 REGISTERED POLLED HEREFORD BULLS These Bulls Are Presently Available SOUTHWOOD FARM Ph: 904/877-1158 TALLAHASSEE, FLA. 32302 P.O. Box 191 JEFF MOTES, Palatka, showed the grand champion steer at the Putnam County Fair, the steer was purchased by Publix Markets. RESERVE GRAND champion steer was exhibited by Donna Mullins, Palatka, the 1193 pound steer was purchased by Winn Dixie. Two youth steer shows covered Two youth steer shows and sales held in Florida were covered recently by members of The Florida Cat tleman staff. Shows covered are Bradford-Union County Youth Fair, Starke, and Putnam County Fair Steer Show and Sale, Palatka. Winners and other key highlights of the show follow. Putnam County Jeff Motes, Palatka, showed a Limousin (Continued on page 79) Adlld A-,i"e binebred Bulls o Co ercial Cattlemen Route 5 Moulme GA 31768 912/324-2602 POLLED HORNED HEREFORDS SINGLETARY FARMS A. J. and R. C. Singletary BLAKELY, GEORGIA 31723 Ph: 912/723-3525 (Office) 723-3196 (Res.) 2 MI. NW OF BLAKELY ON HWY. 27 74 / T-HE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979

PAGE 75

I~ Al~ Eif I FLORIDA CLUB CALF 4th ANNUAL June 30, 1979 12:00 Noon 65 Top Quality Angus, Limousin, Simmental and Chianina steers All calves have been preconditioned, implanted, fully vaccinated, and weigh over 450 pounds. These types of steers can do the job for you as they did last year in winning shows across the state. Nowhere in the Southeastern United States will you find a better group of calves with greater potential to win. Try to attend this momentous eventfl! MANY OFFSPRING OF BLACK JACK WILL BE SELLING! For information call or wnte: SAM ROBINSON 8205 Simpson Lane Lakeland FL 33801 Ph: 813/858-4373 Florida Club Calf Breeders will award a $50 credit toward the next purchase to anyone winning Grand Champion honors at the County or State level with a steer purchased from here. 1979 Grand Champion Steers at Central Florida Fair, Polk County Youth Fair, North Florida Fair and three carcass champions. LOCATION-Facilities located north of New State Fairgrounds on U.S. 92 at medium of Interstate 4 and U.S. 92, east of Tampa (i mile west of U.S. 301 on U.S. 92). Florida Fair Grounds HARVEY RYALS Route 3, Box 418-X Valrico, FL 33594 Ph: 813/689-7401 J. M. Fields S N E THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 75 EATON PARK, FLORIDA FEED PLANT 813/682-6144 Main Office 813/688-8471 Delivery P.O. Box 116, Lakeland, Florida 33802 LAKELAND CASH FEED Where nutrition comes first. h.

PAGE 76

CARTER BEEFMASTERS "Quality with Quantity" JMC Ranch 1053 Sunset Dr., Lake Wales, Fl. 33853 John & Martha Carter Owners Mack Padgett, Mgr. Ph: 813/676-1474 Ph: 813/638-1985 Ranch located 3 mi. west of US 27 on SR 640 TALLEY Arinc. Breeding Age Bulls & Heifers For Sale At All Times W. G. Talley Sr., Owner 904/787-3579 James C. Richardson, Mgr. 904/787-3401 P.O. Box 817, Leesburg, Fla. 32748 GENE THOMPSON'S ROCKING T BEEFMASTERS Commercial Butls for sale Mike Honeycutt, Mgr., P. 0. Box 7 Mc Neil, MS 39457 AC 601/798-6502 Promote BEEF every ay. Support Your Florida Beef Council THE HOME OF "PROFITABLE BEEFMASTERS" We always have a good selection of Breeding Bulls and Females available for your needs. -ww P. 0. Box 925 -Gonzales, Texas 78629 (512) 672-6504 76 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 Grazing cool-season annual pastures with growing, lightweight by J. E. BERTRAND 4RC. ar Cool-season annual pastures, consisting of a mixture of rye, Rye grass, and Crimson clover, have produced good gaiis with growing, lightweight beef steers. Because lightweight beef heifers can usually be purchased considerably cheaper (approximately SIO.00 per hundredweight) than comparable lightweifiht beef steers in the fall in northwest Florida, the use of heifers for grazing these pastures needed to be evaluated. Thirty-two lightweight (average 413 pounds) feeder heifers and steers of' British breeding (Angus and Angus X I Hereford crosses), grading U. S. Good or better and each treated with a 36 mg car implant of Ralgro@ (a protein anabolic agent), were weighed and allotted at random from breed and sex groups to two experimental groups of eiht steers and two experimental groups of eight heifers each. The four groups, utilizing two groups (replicates) per treatment, were assigned to two treatments (steers versus heifers) on pasture. The pastures consisted of a mixture of 'Wrens abruzzi' rye, 'Gulf' Rye grass, and 'Dixie' Crimson clover. Each group of eight initial animals grazed four 1.25 acre plots in a rotational system. The rye was planted in row widths of seven inches with a grain drill at the rate of 80 pounds per acre. The Rye grass and Crimson clover were top-seeded over the rye with a cultipacker-seeder at beef heifers vs. steers the rates of I I and nine pounds per acre, respectively. All pastures were planted oil October 17 and 18, 1977. A complete fertilizer (8-24-24) was applied to all pastures at planting time at the rate of 250 pounds per acre. Three applications of 100 pounds per acre each of ammonium nitrate were made during the grazine season. Grazing began on December 13, 1977. Performance and economic data for the 163-day grazing period are listed in Table 1. Steers gained (P<0.01) faster than heifers (1.95 versus 1.58 lb./head/day, respectively). The animal gain per acre was 521 pounds with steers and 425 pounds with heifers. The stocking rate per acre was very similar. Therefore, because of the more rapid daily gain, steers had a larger gain per acre per day than heifers (3.20 versus 2.61 pounds, respectively). The cost of gain was lower for steers on pasture than that of heifers (S19.58 versus $24.00/hundredweight, respectively) (Table I ). The off grazing cost per hundredweight, excluding labor and management, was $34.09 for steers compared with $31.40 for heifers. Under the conditions of this study, the difference between the initial cost between steers and heifers was $9.20 per hundredweight; whereas the difference between the cost per hundredweight between steers and heifers at the end of the grazing period was $2.69 (Table 1). The steers had gained 61 pounds more than the heifers and were 67 pounds heavier. Fable 1. Performance and Economic Data of Growing Beef Heifers and Steers Grazing Cool-Season Annual Pastures (1977-78)-ARC, Jay(a). Item Heifers Steers Initial no. of animals 16(b) 16 Length of grazing, days 163 163 Avg. initial wt., lb. 410 416 A ve. final wt., lb. 667 734 Avg. gain/ anim al, lb. 257 318 Avg. daily gain, lb. 1.58 1.95** Animial days/acre(c) 269 267 Stocking rate/acre(c) 1.65 1.64 Gain /acre, lb. 425 521 Gain/acre/day, lb. 2.61 3.20 Pasture cost/cwt gain(d) S 24.00 1 l9.58 Avg. cost/head of feeder(e) 5147.60 S188.03 Pasture cost/head of feeder $ 61.82 S 62.20 Total cost/head of feeder(f) $209.42 $250.23 Off grazing cost/cwt(f) S 31.40 S 34.09 (a) Rotational grazing of a mixture of 'Wrens abruzzi' rye, 'Gulf' Rye grass, and 'Dixie' crimson clover. (b) Initially, two groups of eight calves each. (c) Additional grazer animals of the same type, sex, and size were added and removed as needed to keep the forage uniformly grazed. (d) Pasture cost = 5102.00/acre. (e) I leifer calf cost = $36.00/cwt and steer calf cost = S45.20/cwt (includes cost of animals, hauling, veterinary costs, feed, etc.). (f) Does not include labor and management. ** Significant at P<0.01.

PAGE 77

Zipperer Beefmasters. Predictable Results. "General Beauregard" When you combine a top bull battery with one of the breed's largest, most carefully selected cowherds, the results are predictable. Every calf crop gets better. Every set of replacement heifers performs better, adds more class or eye appeal. Every group of purebred and commercial bulls offers greater potential. In short, constant improvement. Something you Zipperer can always expect from Zipperer Beefmasters. Proven herd Beefmasters sires like "Beauregard" help make it possible. (918) Okh-h,,rnj Bx54 For Beefmasters you can rely on, look for the M.o THE FLORIDA CArLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 77

PAGE 78

BEEFMASTERS "The Hottest Breed Going" For your seed stock needs contact the Florida-Georgia offices or the following members A 1 Barfield Beefmasters P. 0. Box 356 Immokalee, FL 33934 2 Barrow's Farm Beefmasters R2. 2, Box 696 Orlando, FL 32807 3 Carter Beefmasters 1053 sunset Dr. Lake Wales, FL 33853 4 Circle R Beefmasters 4675 Roswell Rd. N.E. Marietta, GA 30060 5 Dry Creek Beefmasters RI. 4, Box 316 Marianna, FL 32446 6 Gamble Creek Ranch Beefmasti At. 1, Bax 221 Parrish, FL 33564 7 Banner Lee Jr. & Son Beefmsat Ri. 3 Pavo, GA 31778 8 Ron Don Beefmasters yt. 3, BFt 720 Chiploy, FL 32428 9 GatlinR Creek Beefmasters Past Rd., Baa 290 Thomasville, GA 31792 10 Rtal Beefmasters 1052Barnharat Rd. Bartow, FL 33830 12 7 8 5 11 Seven Lazy Eleven Beefmasters Star Rt., Box 78 Clewiston, FL 33440 12 J & S Beefmasters At. 2, Box 172-A Adrian, GA 31002 13 W. Talley Beefmasters P. 0. Box 817 Leesburg, Ft 32748 14 Varner Boot masters P0. Box 31 Alturas, FL 33820 15 Zierer Beetmasters P Box 640 Ft. Myers, FL 33902 13 2 10 14 15 6 11 Write or Call for more information FLORIDA-GEORGIA BEEFMASTER BREEDERS ASSOCIATION Chapter of S. E. B.B.A. 4675 Roswell Rd., N.E., Marietta, GA 30060 Phone: 404/993-8840 Advertising Aids Your Personal Salesmanship Contact any of our fieldmen for full details. /tI1loida Uttlemaq, AND LIVESTOCK JOURNAL P.O. Box 1030 Kissimmee, Fla. 32741 REGISTERED POLLED SHORTHORNS Growthy-Rugged TB & Bang's Certified Hord Fully Acclimated for Southern Conditions PINEVIEW FARMS Paul Ragans, owner Route 2 Ph: 904/971-5417 Madison, Florida 32340 SMITH RANCH SHORTHORNS Polled and Horned Our herd is Federally Certified for Brucellosis (No. 4010) & Accredited for T.B. Pauline N. Smith-Owner 813/293-2930 Winter Haven, Fla. 33880 Ranch off SR 542 on Buckeye Rd. 3 miles N.E. 78 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 DY Creek Beefimasters R t. 4, Box 318 Maranna, FL 32 (904) 579-4641 446 RON DON CATTLE COMPANY Beefmaster Cattle Ronnie Hartzog Ph: 904/638-7859 Donnie H. Duce Ph: 904/638-4064 Rt. 3, Chipley, Fl. 32428 Promote BEEF every day. Support Your Florida Beef Council 7 LAZY 11 7 Beefmasters 7 Rogers Farms, Inc. lo Ronnie Perkins, Mgr. 813/983-9701 Pete Marks, Herdsman 813/983-7039 Star Route Box 76 Clewiston, Fla. 33440 Rickards tops Beefmaster sale at Tifton Rickards Beefmasters of Kenansville was the top volume buyer at the fourth annual Southeastern Beefnaster Breeders Association Sale, held April 13 at Tilton, Georgia. The Florida rancher was listed as purchasing eight head for $26,900. Other Florida buyers at the sale were Charles Harmon, Arcadia: Zipperer Beeliasters, Fort Myers; Tom Barfield, Immokalee, and Gamble Creek Beefmasters, Parrish. Sale officials reported that 45 lots grossed $113,800 to average $2529. A breakdown of the averages showed 18 cow/calf pairs averaging $3181, four two-year-old bulls averaged $2425, three yearling bulls averaged $2016; 10 bred heifers averaged $1840; and 10 open heifers averaged $2240. The top selling lot was a cow/calf consignment from Dixie Beefmasters, Enigma, Georgia. The 1972 cows sold with a three month old bull calf at side by Showhoy I/ for $7700. The buyer was Kaffie Brothers, Corpus Christie, Texas. Top selling bull was a three year old consigned by Bear Creek Farms, Franklin, Tennessee. Mountain View Beefmasters, Edgeville, South Carolina, purchased the animal for $3650. The sale included consignments from nine Florida Beefniaster breeders. Syler Sales Management, Inc., Burton, Texas, handled the sale management duties, and Gerald Bowie, West Point, Georgia, was auctioneer. Harry Flint heads Lee cowmen Harry Flint, Lehigh Acres, was elected president of the Lee County Cattlemen's Association for the new year. Serving as vice president is Nick Armeda of Fort Myers, with Jim English, Alva, elected secretary. Treasurer is Manny Elint of Fort Myers. Reelected as state director was Nat Hunter, Fort Myers. Directors serving at the local level, all from Fort Myers, unless otherwise indicated are: Curtis W. Skates; Dave Langford, Alva; Paul Flint; Ronnie Flint and Hilton Sapp. Zipperer renamed Beefmaster prexy Jennie Lee Zipperer, Fort Myers, was reelected president of the FloridaGeorgia Beefmaster Breeders Association at a recent meeting held at Tifton, Georgia. Serving with Zipperer will be Bob Grebe, Bradenton, vice president, and Eddie Sheek, Marietta, Georgia, secretary-treasurer. c>

PAGE 79

PAMELA MYRL CARTER, showed the grand champion steer at the BradfordUnion County Steer Show. The steer sold to Publix for $3159. Steer shows (Continued from page 79) cross steer to grand championship honors in the Putnam County Youth Steer Show held April 18, in Palatka. Publix purchased the 1193 pound steer for $2.60 per pound to net young Motes $3101.80. Donna Mullins showed the reserve champion steer. The 1193 pound Limousin cross steer sold to Winn Dixie for $1.80 per pound to bring Miss Mullins a total of $2147.40. The sale saw 21 steers sell to bring a total of $26,666.84. The total poundage of steers was 22,039 to bring the average price per pound to $1.21. Publix was the volume buyer purchasing seven head for $4998.74. Winn Dixie was the second high buyer taking five steers for $2817.13. BradfordUnion Pamela Myrl Carter, a 4-H'er from Union County, showed the grand champion steer at the Bradford-Union County Youth Steer Show and Sale, held March 30, at Starke. The 1053 pound Limousin cross steer sold to Publix Markets for $3 per pound to net Miss Carter $3159. Miss Carter received $930 in add-ons to bring the total sale price of her steer to $4089. Jon Brown, a Union County FFA'er, took reserve grand championship honors with his 1145 pound Limousin cross steer. The steer sold to the Community State Bank of Starke for $2.49 per pound. Thirty one steers sold in the sale to gross $48,158.04 and average $1553.48 per head. The gross sale weight came to 34,231 pounds for an average sale weight of 1104. The average price per pound came to $1.40. Sale officials reported that with addons and ring sales the sale total came to $69,240.71. This brought the average price per pound to $2.02 and the average per head to $2233.57. Publix Markets was the volume buyer purchasing six head for $11,134.55. The second high buyer was the Columbia County Livestock Market with three head for $5213.07. Owatonna's Beltiess Wonder. the all new 595 Roll Baler m Hard outer shell to resist weather, protect quality 0 % ton bales in hay or stover, 10 to 15 tons per hour capacity No expensive, troublesome belts or chains used in bale formation 21-roll system makes uniform density and size bales every time Who says round balers have to be a tangle of belts and chains that stretch or break? Not Owatonna. We've developed the 595 Roll Baler and if you appreciate simplicity, dependability and a better end product all rolled into one, it's the baler for you. Now in stock at your Owatonna dealer: A~~~~I TIC RI'V1 IfI llfl Buy Now-Limited Production FLORIDA DISTRIBUTOR: Pounds Motor Company Winter Garden, FL e (305) 656-1352 It's Your Future You can help to insure it by joining and supporting your local county cattlemen's association, an affiliate of The Florida Cattlernen's Association. We're all working towards a better future for all of us. FCA is working for you! THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 79

PAGE 80

War Paint

PAGE 81

He's one of our most consistent producers of top quality calves. He sired the exceptional bull calf at upper left that went with the record setting cow-calf package at our 1978 sale. His heifer pairs have sold for premiums. Better still, the performance of his calves has been remarkable. His 1978 bull calves averaged 654 pounds at wean-A~1jJJJ_ E jL/Ij ing; the heifers, 577. P This year's calves are even better.War Paint yeAts" A Colorful Route To Extraordinary old, he's sound and aggressive-settling 30-40 cows in erIormanCe our 90 day single sire breeding program. War Paint. One of our many proven herd sires. Another reason why Barfield-bred purebred Beefmasters and commercial bulls lead the industry in performance and dependability. Barfield Beefmasters. The Difference Between Good. And Great! (BB Fred Barfield, Travis Wise P.O. Box 356/Immokalee, Florida 33934 (813) 657-3611

PAGE 82

LEMMON CATTLE ENTERPRISES Registered Angus Cattle Nina, Harvey, & Donnie Lemmon Herdsman: Floyd Berger Ph: 404/553-5124 or 404/553-3911 P. 0. Box 524 WOODBURY, GEORGIA 30293 GLOVER FARMS Quality Angus Complete A. I. Service, All Breeds Wade Glover, Owner, Ph: 813/737-2441; 752-3501. Eddie McMillan, 813/752-4608. Rt. 5, Box 319-C, Plant City, FL 33566. REGISTERED ANGUS Featuring CYPRESS GAY JINGO CC PRESIDENT 345 CYPRESS CREEK RANCH Box 2000, Johnston Rd., Dade City, Fla. Bill & Melba Straigis, Owners 904/588-2571 Billy Sanders, Herdsman 904/588-2951 Registered, Top Quality Angus Bennett's Angus Ranch P.O. Box 8, Phone 904/594-5202 GREENWOOD, FL 32443 THE BEST IN BREEDING STOCK Brangus Bulls as well as 100% Wye Bred Angus Bulls agamere Farms Box 545 Bainbridge, Georgia31717 Telephone (912) 246-5964 82 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 Plans set for A ngus events The board of directors of the Florida Angus Association met during the Beef Cattle Short Course at the University of Florida, Gainesville, and discussed plans for coming events. The meeting was chaired by J. R. Thompson, Marianna, president. Charles R. Jenkins, Lakeland, chairman of the annual bull sale, reported the event would be held again this year at the Polk County Agriculture Center, Bartow. Sale date is December 8 with the bulls scheduled to be graded by a group of commercial cattlemen and extension personnel on December 7. Jenkins said Toni Gammon of Hurricane Mills, Tennessee, would cry the sale. Leroy Baldwin, chairman of the fourth annual Southeastern Futuristic A ngus Show and Sale, reported the dates would be February 13-16, 1980, at a site to be selected in central Florida. Baldwin said it was important for Florida breeders to participate by nominating cattle for the event. Lisa Bozzuto of Lake City was selected as Angus Queen to represent Florida at breed events in and out-of-state. In a preliminary meeting of Angus breeders, John Crouch, Mauldin. South Carolina, regional manager for the American Angus Association, presented comments on Angus programs in general and showed slides on genetic defects. Chitty, RW Bar, Teague and Winter take Angus honors Winners at the Putnam County Fair Angus show, held recently at Palatka, listed by class to the first three places, with the number of entries in each class shown in parentheses, follow: Junior heifer cale, calved 3/1/78 and after (2)-Rw BAR' Cover Girl 30. RwV BAR Customn Fitters, Ocala: Briarhill Blackbird 4768. George & viola Miller, Zephyrlill junior heiler calves. calved 1 178 thru 2/28/78 (3)stIrdust I rica 650, grand champion,junior heifer calfchampion Jeanne ( hitty. Micanopy; Macedon Blackbird S115, GRAND Champion Angus bull was exhibited by Walter W. Teague, Auburndale, at the show in Palatka. CALVIN Winter, Tallahassee, owned the reserve grand champion Angus female at the Putnam County Fair. (reserve junior heifer calf champion), Calvin Winter, Tallaliassec: Sport's Pride. Mille11r: E"r" b sum er yearliug heifers, calved 5/1/77 thru 6 30 77' (II-Gore Lady Northern 1627, (intermediate championn, Dale, Nancy, & James Bacon, Zephyrhills; .utIor bull calves, calved 3/1 /78 and after (2)-Dotsun's M c ur% 328 (grand champion, junior bull calf chanipion), Waller W. league, Auburndale. Legend Battlestar (reserve Junior hull calf champion), Glen M. Farms, Plant City: Junior hull calves, calved I /1/77 thru 2/28/78 (l)Cajo Rito troubadour 9229, Winter: E arly Siuirier yearling bulls. calved S/ /77 thru 6/30/78 ()-Rwv BAR'S Northern Sensation 104 (reserve grand champion, intermediate champion), RW BAR. STARDUST Angus Ranch, Micanopy showed the grand champion Angus female at Palatka, shown by Jeanne ChitRW BAR Custom Fitters, Ocala, showed the reserve grand champion Angus bull at the Putnam County Fair. Registered Angus Cattle LAND & CATTLE CO., INC. BERT MICKEL, Mgr. P.O Box 308, Citra, FL 32627 (between Ocala and Gainesville) at junction US. 301 and Fla. SR 318 904/595-4761, 4771, 4491

PAGE 83

FRM NEURAL MIX WiTH ROLTURNS YOUR CAIT"LE INTOD EFFECTIVE FLY FIGHTERS. NOW YOUR CASTLE CAN HELPVYOU CONTROL ALL FOUR FIJES OF MAJOR ECONOMIC IMFORFANCE,WITHOUT SPECIAL HANDLING OR EQUIPMENT. This summer, turn your cattle into tough, natural fighters against the four flies that constantly rob you of profits. Free Choice FRM Mineral Mix with ROL (RabonOral Larvicide) lets your cattle protect and treat themselves. Passing through the digestive tract, ROL is retained in the manure, where it remains to kill fly larvae shortly after they hatch. By stopping development at this vital stage, you can control fly problems before they ever start to cut into your cattle production. And FRM Mineral Mix with ROL will not harm your cattle. There are no adverse effects on health, weight gain, rate of gain, feed efficiency, carcass quality, or fertility. In addition, OL has no feedoff period in beef cattle, and is the only registered larvicide labeled for use in lactating dairy cattle. The ROL in FRM Mineral Mix is both highly effective and entirely compatible with the environment. Beneficial insects like dung beetles develop naturally and unharmed. Also, manure from treated animals may be used as fertilizer on crops grown for human consumption. Start feeding your cattle FRM Mineral Mix with ROL now, and continue throughout the fly season. You'll be giving them an effective weapon against a real profitreducing enemy--fliles. See your local FRM dealer today. MINERAL AO MDI Flint River Mills, Inc. Bainbridge, Georgia THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 83

PAGE 84

Continental Breeds Will be featured in the September issue of The Florida Cattleman. Editorial content in this issue will focus on some of the Continentals and their use in Florida. If you are a breeder of "Exotics" it is also a good way to promote your herd to Florida Cattlemen. Closing day for advertising space is August 5. Write or call for more information. 0 / j VFloilda Utlfemaw~ ofAND LIVEsTocK JOURNAL P.O. Box 1403 Kissimmee, Fla. 32741 SIZE-TYPE-OUALITY ABERDEEN-ANGUS THOMPSON BROS. FARM J. R. and Bruce Thompson, Owners Rt. 1, Box 661 Marianna PH: 904/482-8522 Florida 32446 Clark Angus Ranch Registered Angus Breeding quality cattle acclimated to South Florida and the Gulf Coast Performance Testing J. P. and Marion Clark P. 0. Box 308 Punta Gorda, Fla. 33950 Phone 813/639-2146 or 813/625-5390 84 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 Animal science IIighight by JOHN E. MOORE UniversiLy 0 Florida Effect offorage maturity on hay qi Making high-quality hay in Florida can be a challenge. When grass is growing well, it may be raining every day and this means that hay-cutting is put off for another day, week or month. It is generally known that grasses decrease in quality as they grow and mature. Of course, there is a trade-off between yield and quality; as the time between cuttings is increased, yield increases but quality decreases. Proper timing and a careful watch on the weather can help produce the desired yield and quality. What isforage quality? The best way to describe forage quality is in terms of the performance of the animals eating it. The highest quality forage (e.g., alfalfa) may support daily gains of growing cattle equal to those achieved with grain. This level of performance is not expected with Florida's summer perennial grasses, however. In some cases, beef cattlemen may want their cows to only maintain weight, and there is no need to have highest-quality hay for them. Crude protein and total digestible nutrients (TDN) content are often used to indicate hay quality. These are imporTable 1. Effect of maturity on hay quality k Date of cut Suwannee Bermuda grass First regrowth: 6/10 6/24 7/8 7/22 8/4 8/18 Second regrowth: 8/31 9/1 9/2 9/3 Pangola Digit grass First regrowth: 6/18 7/2 7/17 7/30 8/12 9/25 Second regrowth: 9/8 9/10 9/15 9/17 'TDN estimated from di 'TDN intake expressed ment (e.g., a value of I 2 4 6 8 10 12 4 6 8 10 2 4 6 8 10 12 tant factors to know when balancing rations, but voluntary intake of TDN is a better estimate of quality because it is closely related to animal performance: the higher the TDN intake, the higher the performance. Florida research In cooperation with 0. C. Ruelke of the agronomy department, Suwannee Bermuda grass and Pangola Digit grass were grown in pure stands on Pine Acres Ranch near Citra. Early in the season, nitrogen was applied (100 lb./A) and the winter and spring growth of grasses and weeds was removed (May 27 for Suwannee, June 4 for Pangola). Nitrogen was again applied to Suwannee after the first cutting (50 lb./A). First regrowth was harvested at two week intervals through 12 weeks of regrowth. After each cutting, the cut areas received nitrogen (100 lb./A). Second regrowths were harvested after four to 10 or 11 weeks regrowth in late August and September. The cutting schedule is in Table 1. Hays and artificially dried, chopped and fed free-choice to sheep in order to determine voluntary intake and nutrient digestibility. Estimates were made of TDN' Content (%) 63 58 55 48 46 45 57 50 44 42 65 62 62 59 52 53 TDN2 Intake (times M) 1.6 1.4 1.3 0.9 0.8 0.8 1.8 1.4 1.2 0.9 1.7 1.5 1.3 0.9 0.7 0.8 1.7 1.5 0.8 0.8 e require20 14 9 8 7 6 18 13 10 7 18 12 10 10 8 7 4 18 63 6 14 63 8.5 6 52 11 7 50 gestible organic matter. as a relative value where: I = the maintenanc .4 is 140% of the maintenance requirement). Protein Weeks Content Regrowth (%)

PAGE 85

Solid research proves, and packers confirm: Angus are the most profitable for feeding. Do you have to feed your cattle too long to make the USDA Choice Grade? Are you tired of being docked for over-fat, lowyielding steers? Then switch to Angus. Research proves today's Angus and Angus crosses get out of the feedlot fast-with both the quality and yield grade you need for top prices. Tests at the University of Wisconsin showed Angus grade Choice from 15 to 65 days sooner than other breeds-saving you feed time and labor. Kansas State University proved Angus have a genetic advantage for marbling in less time, without putting on excessive outside fat as occurs in most other breeds. You get Choice grade plus high yield. In a University of Illinois survey of 226 slaughter and processing plants, an amazing 65% reported that Angus, including crossbreds, provided the most useful and profitable product-the reason for market-topping prices. And today's modern Angus and most Angus crossbreds are big enough to gain 3 lbs. a day and still finish at 1,100 lbs. or less. They're efficient converters of feed and economical to handle. So why don't you feed Angus-for higher-quality and higher-yielding carcasses with less time in the feedlot-for more money? Remember, research proves, "They're worth more if they're black!" American Angus Association 3201 Frederick Blvd., St. Joseph, MO 64501 ANrius

PAGE 86

"WATCH THEM GROW" PERFORMANCE TESTED BULLS GRAHAM ANGUS FARM Route 3, Box 587, Albany, Georgia 31701 0. T. Watson, Mgr. Mrs. Floyd Wagner, Office Mgr. Jimmy Bowles, Cattle Mgr. (912) 432-0229 (912) 432-9249 (912) 439-7695 Baldwin Angus Ranch FEATURES Emulous Pride 135 100% Golden Certified Meat Sire Ranch 5 Miles North of Ocala off 1-75. 904/629-4574. Leroy Baldwin, owner. SYKES ANGUS RANCH 6342 Sykes Road Ph: 305/683-5134 WEST PALM BEACH, FLA. 33406 Featuring the breeding of Black Watch President 239 son of 1964 Grand Champion Aoakonian President. And Hidden Hills 0B53, a grandson of famous Bardoliermere 2. BROOKS HILL FARM Quality Angus John H. Tyler, owner Ph. 226-1675 Verlyn Denney, Mr.-Partner Ph. 735-3350 Thomasville, Ga. 31792 Black is Bountiful Come see us for your needs. Breeding performance Angus Cattle featuring the best of Big Elban and Emulous bloodlines. Jenkins Angus Ranch 7221 Old Polk City Rd., Lakeland, FL 33801 Phone: 813/858-5037 Visitors Always Welcome Don't Forget Our Dispersal Sale, June 2 HUGHES Angus Ranch Curtis Hughes, Owner Ph: 813/722-3168 R. R. 1, Box 455 Palmetto, Fla. 33561 CJB Angus Farms Angus Cattle For Sale at all times Bill Graham, Owner Rt. 1, Box 435 Myakka, FL 33551 Ph: 813/322-1601 FLORIDA Angus Ass'n 410 W. Verona St. Ph: 305/846-2800 KISSIMMEE, FLA. 32741 GREEMY Breeders of superior angus. P.O. Box 1240 Ocala, Florida 32670 Day Phone (904) 732-4800 Night (904) 732-3363 Florida Headquarters For MARSHALL PRIDES BELLEMEADE Farms Rt. 2, Box 53B Lake City, Fl. 32055 904/752-2541 ** * * * * * * * Performance Tested Reg. Angus Cattle STARDUST RANCH Henry and Jeannette Chitty Phone (Gainesville) 904/372-1650 MICANOPY, FLORIDA 32667 * * * * * * * ****** ********* ** Semiema farmi Modern Angus Performance by MARSHALL PRIDE 408 SWAINSBORO, GEORGIA 30401 Donald & Gerald Hooks, Bill Albritton, Mgr. Owners-912/562-3538 912/562-3200 86 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 TDN content and TDN intake. TDN intakes were divided by the maintenance TDN requirement to give an estimate of' overall quality. A value of 1 .0 means the hay could maintain weight when fed alone; below 1.0 means that supplement is needed. A value of 1.8 indicates a "good" quality hay. Table I presents the results of our study. With increasing maturity (regrowth interval) there were decreases in protein, TDN content and TDN intake. In all cases, grasses cut at six weeks regrowth or earlier had protein of nine percent or more, TDN of 50 percent or more and TDN intake of 1.3 or more times the maintenance requirement. In only one case did 8-week hay have a TDN intake above 1.0 (Suwannee, second regrowth). The TDN content of Suwannee was lower than that of Pangola at comparable stages of regrowth. There was little difference between them in TDN intake, however, because the dry matter intake for Suwannee was higher than for Pangola. Second regrowths tended to be slightly higher in protein and TDN intake than first regrowths of the same number of weeks. Second regrowths may have been less mature because it took longer to regenerate new growth from the crowns after the previous cutting. In order to insure having Suwannee and Pangola hay with enough quality to maintain weight, they should be cut after no more than six weeks regrowth. If a longer interval between cuttings can't be avoided, the resulting hay will need to be supplemented with energy and possibly protein. It might be desirable to make a cutting of hay during mid-summer, even if it rains, in order to make a higher quality hay in late summer or early fall. Maturity, rather than date of harvest, is the factor which determines the quality of the summer perennial grasses such as Bermuda grasses, Digit-grasses, and Bahia grasses. Angus business shows strength Registrations of purebred Angus cattle were up nearly 20 percent the first six months of the 1979 fiscal year reports C. K. Allen, executive vice-president of the American Angus Association. The increase, according to Allen, reflects a strong beef market and record demand for Angus breeding stock. Registrations for the period (October through March) were 163,299 head compared with 136,637 head for the same period in 1978. Transfers, which reflect sales, were at 84,249 head, up nearly five percent from a year earlier. The number of new Angus herds being started, as reflected by new members joining the Association, was also up by more than five percent. Total new Angus Association members for the period was 1254. Schearbrook Land & Livestock Gordon Johnson, Lake Worth, FL Phone 305/965-1473 REGISTERED ANGUS BULLS Service Age and Ready to Work Suitable for Commercial or Purebred Herds SOUTHWOOD FARM Ph: 904/877-1158 TALLAHASSEE, FLA. 32302 P.0, Box 191

PAGE 87

l3LASX' Nyuk' N. B. Hunt Ranches Largest Ever Production HEIFER SALE Saturday, June 16,1979-10 a.m. Fort Worth Stockyard, Fort Worth, Texas Offering 6000 choice heifers weighing between 650-750 pounds and ready for breeding. Sorted from 35,000 heifers. All are calfhood vaccinated; all open with the exception of 1000 head which have been pasture exposed to Brahman bulls. TYPES IN THE OFFERING Brangus Braford (tiger striped) Black Baldface Charolais/Angus crosses Charolais/Hereford crosses Charbray ALL LOT SIZES WILL BE OFFERED Available for inspection by appointment. Contact: N. B. Hunt Ranches Office at Richardson, Texas Ph: 214/234-8191 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 87 low

PAGE 88

CHAROLAIS and CHARBRAY CATTLE K RANCH Henry Douglas Ph: 813 782-1571 Ph: 813 782-1936 ZEPHYRHILLS, FLORIDA 33599 8 MI. SW of Zephyrhills On Morris Bridge Rd. DUNCAN CHAROLAIS FARM For Sale Quality Charolais Open and Bred Heifers Performance Tested Bulls Tom Jackson, Farm Mgr. Rt. 1, Box 111 Tignuli, Ga. 30668 Ph: 404/285-2383 Bob & Arlene Duncan, owners 2307 S.E. 14th St. Ocala, Flu. 32670 Ph: 904/629-2629 BRANDIFF CHAROLAIS RANCH Purebred Bulls for Sale Ready for service LCR Breeding Owner-A.H. Brandiff Mgr.-A.H. Brandiff, Jr. Ph. 813/322-1724 Rt. 1, Box 34-D Myakka City, Fla. 33551 88 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 Rocking K Ranch Established 1951 Charolais & Charbray Our Bulls are guaranteed to do the Job S HAL KEATS, President Ft. Lauderdale 305/771-9010 DON KELLY, Manager Okeechobee 813/763-4981 Crescent J Ranch FOR SALE AT ALL TIMES Purebred Charolais bulls & heifers 3/4 Chianina bulls & heifers Wm. J. Broussard, Bob Porter, Foreman M.D. Owner Ranch 8 mi. south 1355S. Hickory St. of Holopaw, Hwy. 441 Melbourne, Fla. 32901 305/892-5010 Ranch) 305/727-7632 (Office) SUBSCRIBE NOW! FEEDERS KNOW what CHAROLAIS can do! Professional feeders know what Charolals sired steers and heifers will do In the feedlot, and the kind of carcass they produce under today's new grading standards, The emphasis Is on fast gains, low feed costs and high quality, high cutting carcasses. There's a Charolais breeder near you .let him show you how to produce the most from your cow herd. Florida Charolais Ass'n Jackie Brittain, Secretary Route 4, Box 541 Citra, Fla. 32627 Phone: 904/591-2708 Affiliated with American Int' Charolals Ass'n The Welcome Mat is Always Out Florida-Georgia Charolais sale averages $1257 The Florida-Georgia Charolais Association Invitational Sale struck an average of $1273.50 on 54 lots, on May 12, at Tifton, Georgia. The sale grossed $68,770. Five bulls sold to bring $7145 and average $1429 per head, while 49 females grossed $61,625 for an average of $1257.65 per head. The top selling animal was a female with calf at side that was owned by Henry Douglas of K-Bar Ranch, Zephyrhills. The pair was purchased by Malcom Commer, Fairfield Plantation, Jonestown, Mississippi, for $3400. The high selling bull was consigned by Barton Charolais Ranch, Tallahassee, and sold to Glorylanld Charolais, Jeffersonville, Georgia, for $3000. Volume buyer was Commer who purchased 12 head for $6,900. The second high buyer was Sans Souci Farms, Ocala, with purchases of six lots for $7750. The sale was managed by the Florida-Georgia Charolais Associations and the auctioneer was Roy Hereford, Faunsdale, Alabama. Hernando elects Rivenbark for '79-80 Bennie Rivenbark, Brooksville, was named president of the Hernando County Cattlemen's Association during the group's annual meeting held on April 21. Others elected, all from the Brooksville area, were Arlie Neal, vice president; John F. Mason, treasurer, and Al Dawson, secretary. Directors are J. 0. Batten; Lanny Fulmer and Bob Potter. State director is Derrill S. McAteer. Continuing in unexpired terms as directors are S. J. D'Andrea; Anthony Roller and J. B. McMullen. Honorary state director is John L. Ayers and Melvin Kelly is honorary county director. Feed association sets meeting dates The Florida Feed Association will hold its annual convention on July 12-13, 1979, at the Sand Piper Resort, Port St. Lucie. Gene Spencer, Tampa, president of the association, said the featured speaker at the event will be a special representative of the USDA. Appearance is scheduled for July 13. In addition, Spencer said that Deputy Secretary of Agriculture Jim Williams is expected to attend the event. If you are looking for top polled Charolais females or top performing polled Charolais bulls. CALL or COME BY. Harlan & Dortheann Rogers ROGERS BAR HR Collins, Mississippi Phone: 601/765-8848, 765-8881

PAGE 89

WHEN POUNDS ARE MORE IMPORTANT THAN PENNIES PHENOTHIAZINE Research indicates that fly and worm control contribute to heavier, healthier animals. Horn and face flies and internal parasites often cause reduced feed efficiency, slower gains, and. reduced production in cattle which appear to be perfectly healthy. Thus, it is up to you to protect them from these pests. You can do so, efficiently and economically, by feeding them products containing phenothiazine. Phenothiazine controls horn flies, face flies, and internal parasites and it reduces the contamination of pastures with their larvae. So when pounds are more important to you than pennies, feed products containing phenothiazine. You'll be dollars ahead in the long run. FOR WOVEAR-RUD PHENOTHIAZINE CONTROL .T, ,,-1, 1 W1 ,1 cg-C ,--, 1WEST WEST AGRO-CHEMICAL, INC. A GRPO 0, Box 1386 Shawnee Mission, KS 66222 AGIRO {913) 384-1660

PAGE 90

Purina Introduces .A New Fly And Worm Control Block! .For Less Than 3( Per Head Per Day! U It's Economical It's Effective It's Purina's NEW Check-Fly and Wormer Block! CONVENIENT AND ECONOMICAL New Purina Check-Fly and Wormer Blocks provide you with an easy, inexpensive way to control the development of Horn Flies, Face Flies, and Worms at only 2 ounces per day consumption. e CONTAINS PHENOTHIAZINE New Purina Check-Fly and Wormer Blocks contain high quantities of Phenothiazine. These blocks are extremely effective in helping your animals combat BOTH Fly and Worm parasite infections. o GOOD PASTURE MANAGEMENT New Purina Check-Fly and Wormer Blocks help reduce the contamination of pastures with manurebreeding flies and worm larvae. Make new Purina Check-Fly and Wormer Blocks part of your herd health program. Feeding your animals just 2 ounces per head per day at a cost of less than 3C is the economical way to provide BOTH Fly and Worm control without handling the animals. See your local participating Purina Dealer .. planning tomorrow with research today.

PAGE 91

Mole crickets: IFAS research project by P. G. KOEHLER, D.E. SHORT and C.S. BARFIELD niversiI o/ Florida Mole crickets caused in excess of S100 million damage in Florida from 19761978. Pasture, turf, vegetable, and field crops were affected most severely. Mole cricket damage to these commodities occurs throughout the southeastern U.S. Approximately eight million acres of pasture is grown in Florida, providing forage for the livestock industry. Bahia grass is a principal pasture grass, and is a preferred host for mole crickets. Statewide, 30 percent of Bahia grass has been damaged severely and four percent completely destroyed by mole crickets. In some locations, 100 percent of Bahia grass pastures have been destroyed. Every year the mole cricket problem appears to get worse and complaints of poor control with recommended chemicals continue to be heard. IFAS entomologists have been aware of the problem and have initiated a research project toward solution of the problem. History of the project Research on mole cricket control in Florida extends back to 1943 when information about the life cycle of mole crickets was published by the Florida Department of Agriculture. IFAS researchers have worked on mole crickets to determine effective chemical control measures, periodically publishing papers in the 1950's and 1960's. In these studies, chlorinated hydrocarbons were found to provide the most successful mole cricket control. Unfortunately, around 1970, most chlorinated hydrocarbons were prohibited for use on pastures. Concurrently with the ban of chlorinated hydrocarbons, the mole cricket problem appeared to worsen. In the 1970's, mole crickets emerged as a major pest in Florida and IFAS research was intensified. Studies were conducted on sound production, flight behavior, and basic habitats of mole crickets from 1973 to 1976. From 1970 to 1979, field studies were conducted on approximately 75 insecticides. Every insecticide registration for mole crickets in the U.S. has been backed by IFAS research. Insecticidal control of mole crickets has consisted mainly of soil treatments with granules, drenches, and baits. In pastures, baits appear to be the only feasible method of control. Presently, toxaphene five percent bait, trichlorfon (Dylox, Proxol) five percent bait, and nalathion two percent bait are the only mole cricket controls labeled for pasture use. Baits should be applied during June, July or August and preferably immediately after a rain. Moisture encourages mole cricket feeding activity on the soil surface. The nieiw IFAS research project During the spring and summer of 1977, IS entomologists in IFAS were working in some aspect of the mole cricket problems. In the fall of 1977, the chairmal of the department of entomology & nematology submitted a request for special funding on mole crickets in Florida. In 1978, this request remained unfunded; however, $9500 in emergency funds was made available from the vice president's IFAS account to be used for mole cricket research. Unfortunately, this amount was well short of the estimated needed amount of $125,000 per year for five years to adequately fund this serious research need. In early 1978, the Florida Cattleman's Association backed the special funding request. As a result, the Florida legislature has appropriated $60,500 per year to fund mole cricket research. Thus, in the latter part of 1978, an interdisciplinary effort was launched to develop a usable Integrated Past Management Program (IPM) for mole crickets. This effort envisioned basic and applied research toward first understanding the life system of mole crickets, then developing methods for control or management aimed at attacking vulnerable points within those life systems. 1978-79 Research In the initial year of finding, emphasis has been placed on identification of long and short-range goals, establishment of initial experimental designs, and recruitment of an overall project coordinator. A project coordinator (Dr. Carl Barfield) with a major time commitment to this project was hired in November, 1978. His responsibilities included disbursement of funds to cooperating researchers, taking the lead role in identifying and coordinating research activities, and drafting a state research project on mole crickets. Despite these initial administrative activities, headway was made in research areas. 1) Chemical control (Received 33.10 percent of funding). A variety of baits and attractants were evaluated as carriers of mole cricket insecticides. Some chemicals currently cleared for use in pastures were screened for effectiveness against mole crickets. 2) Basic ecology (Received 30.14 percent of funding). To understand the biology and ecology of any organism, one must be able to sample that organism in all its life stages. Sampling mole crickets is a major problem because of their subterranean existence. Studies were initiated toward designing trapping funnels and utilizing electronic sound devices emulating cricket calls ("artificial crickets") to attract adult mole crickets. The ability of organisms to find mates and disperse to suitable (Continued on page 99) banz $outi %arm.5 at Ocala, of course Mr. and Mrs. John D. Corr, Owners Outstanding Full French and f 7 Purebred Charolais Located I mi. west S S:n7* of 1-75 on U.S. 27 904/622-5520 MADISON POLLED CHAROLAIS SHF Sir Royal Sam 55 Our Polled 3000 lbs. Herd Sire Sons and Daughters For Sale GLENN D. VIRGO 904/877-7278 Rt 7, Box 491 A, Tallahassee, 1. 32308 Polled French CHAROLAIS W AS DIN o" CHAROLAIS RANCH Ed & Dot Wasdlin 1906 Shady Oaks Tallahassee, Fla. 32303 904/385-9393 Join YOUR Local COWBELLES Association Feed Florida Molasses .a good source of mineral elements Florida Molasses Exchange, Inc. Phone 305/996-7711, P.O. Box 507 Belle Giade, Ia 33430 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 91

PAGE 92

R entle Red Brahmans Peace Valley Ranch We invite you to inspect the largest Red Brahman Herd in the Southeast. E. D. Rogers, Owner Route 1, Box 97 Zolfo Springs, Fla. 33890 Ph: 813/735-5561 Gary Shiver, Manager Located 9 mi east of Zolfo Springs on State Road 66 Gentle, Gray Brahmans D. T. Davis Ranch Don and Darlene Davis, Owners Rt, 1, Box 256, Zolfo Springs, FL 33890 Telephone 813/735-4774 TUCKKER'S ) Registered Brahmans L M TUCKER Route 5, Box 221 Telephone: Tifton GA 32794 912/533-4681 G. T. STACK & SONS REGISTERED BRAHMANS Suite 406-A 9225 Bay Plaza Blvd. Tampa, Florida 33619 Telephones: Off. 813/621-2117 Home 813/689-3920 Red and Gray Brahmans HALES FARMS, INC. Richard and Freeman Hales, Owners P. 0. Box 1395 Ph. 813/763-7387 OKEECHOBEE, FLORIDA 33472 Quality Brahmans H. Clint Yong, Jr. P. 0. Box 345, Dade City, Fla. 33525 904/588-3713 (Home) 904/567-6767 (Office) L/C Brahmans Brahmans Build Better Beef Cattle available for sale L Slant Bar C Ranch E. L. Crews. Jr. (Lacy) Mail: Rt. 1, Box B158 Res. Baxter, Florida Sanderson, FL 32087 Ph: 904/275-2377 92 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 Brahman breeders have strong showing at Putnam Fair Winners in the open Brahman show held at the Putnam County Fair, Palatka, listed by class to the first three places, with the number of entries in each class in parentheses, follow: Femates, calved 3/1/78 thru 4/30/78 (6)-LMT Suzy Loxcrata 262/8 (reserve grand champion, junior champum), santa Barbara Ranch, Clewiston, and L. M. Tucker, Tilton, Georgia; WWT Gina Gem 86/68, W. W. Tilton, Palatka: Miss JCC Mansopartee 241, James C. Chapman, St. Cloud; Iicaaes. calved 1/ 1/79 thru 2 8/78 (5)-6' OLP Miss MEs Revrrtr, Mrs. 0. L. Partin. 'Kissininee; Miss JCC Mtansopartec 232, Chapman: TA Lady Tuck Empress 902. L. M. Tucker: Fenales, calved If/77 thru 1231/77 (2)-DD Miss Repucinho 59, I. T. Davis, Zolfo Springs: HCB Lady Resoto Li, I. HCB Ranch, Orlando; Females, calved 3/1/77 thru 4/31/77 (3)-Miss Loxey Kabr 170 (reserve anisor champion. Kabar Ranch. Jacksonville: Miss Loxey Kabar 194, Kabar; LMT Jan T Sugarta 216/7, L. M. Tucker: Females, calved 3/1/77 thru 4/30/77 (5)-Miss Loxey Kabar 121, Kabar: Miss Loxey Kabar 193, Kabar; Miss JCC Imperator 202, Chapman; ienalcs, calved ]I /77 thru 2/28/77 (-HPS Julian Riley 594 (grand champion, senior champion), Heart Bar Ranch, Kissimmee: LMT Lady Tuck 210/7, L. M. Tucker: Miss JCC Emperor 210, Chapman; H. T. POWELL, Winter Park, owned the grand champion Brahman bull at the Putnam County Fair. RESERVE GRAND Champion Brahman bull at Palatka was exhibited by Mrs. 0. L. Partin, Kissimmee. Females, calved 9/ 1/76 thru 12/31/76 (l)-Sutra Kabar 1Kahar: Fe males, calved 3/1/76 thr 8/31/76 (l)-Berta Kabar 1, Kahar: Bulls, Calved 3/1/78 thru 4/30/78 (6)-WWT I Ula Sugar 23/28, Tilton: AEW Manso Bevo 39, Cresent 0 Ranch, Kissimmee: 57 OLP ME Resoto, Mrs. 0. L. Partin; Bulls, calved I /1/78 thru 2/28/78 (4)-HTP Powell's Big John 103/8, H-. T. Powell, Winter Park; LMT Keno Sugarta 237/8, L. M. Tucker LMT Duke Sugarta 254/8, L. M. Tucker: Bulls, calved I 1/I /77 thru 12/31/77 (2)-HTP Poselrs John 98/7 (grand champion, junior champion), Poweli JCC Emperor 230, Chapman: Bulls, calved 3/1/77 thru 8/31/77 (2)-Elephante 730 Reserve junior champion), Santa Barbara: Loxey Kabar 195, BUlls, calved 3/1/77 thru 4/30/77 (2)-HPS Cordier Mde Man 405, Heart Bar: Loxey Kabar 184, Kabar: Bulls, calved l/ /77 thru 2/28/77 (4)-H1s King Eiperor 402 (reserve senior champion), Heart Bar; 42 OLP ME Resoto, Mrs. 0. .Partin; Bob's Bearcat 768, Chapman & Collier, Wachula: Bulls. calved 3/1/76 thru 8/31/76 (1)-37 OLP ME Resolo (reserve grand champion. senior champion), Mrs. 0. L.ParinProduce (r dar ()i ;. 0. L. PartiW: (iet srI sire (3)-MIrs. (3. L. Partin: Kahar; V. W. Tiitoa. HEART BAR Ranch, showed the grand champion Brahman female at the Putnam County Fair. RESERVE GRAND Champion Brahman female was owned by Santa Barbara Ranch, Cldwiston, and L. M. Tucker. Congress '79 set for Colorado Livestock Marketing Congress '79 is slated to be held at the Marriott Hotel in Denver, Colorado, June 13-15. The event is being conducted by Livestock Merchandising Institute, one of LMA's allied organizations. The theme is "Riding The Cycle: Are There Workable Alternatives for the Industry and Consumer?" Congress General Chairman Robert Walker noted, "I can guarantee my fellow Trade Group subscribers a Congress they'll never forget."

PAGE 93

YOUR CONTRIBUTIONS ARE DEEPLY APPRECIATED The list of names on the plaque at FCA headquarters showing contributors to the Magazine Fund is continuing to grow. To get your name on the list, a contribution of at least $10 is needed. The FCA board of directors approved the continuation of the fund drive through June. With 60 percent of the members having contributed to date, the program is expected to be continued on into the new FCA year in order to give 100 percent of the membership the opportunity of participating in this program. Why don't you join with us and help make it 100 percent? Mail check to: THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN MAGAZINE FUND P. 0. Box 1929, Kissimmee Florida 32741 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 93

PAGE 94

9;A CAJUNS' CATTLE SERVICE FLORIDA DIVISION Carl & Jo Lynn Story Rt. 3, Box 192B Lake City, FL 32055 Phone: 904/755-3910 POLLED HEREFORD BULLS BRAHMAN BULLS CHAROLAIS BULLS ROLLINS RANCH Rt. 2, Box 1250, Okeechobee, Fla. 33472 Phone: 813/763-2410 S. L. WATERS & SONS Registered Brahmans 1W RANCH 8345 Alturas Rd., Bartow, FL 32830 Ranch 813/533-4765 Home 813/537-2147 Home 813/533-6415 Registered and Commercial Brahmans C. H. Beville Telephone 904/793-2081 BUSHNELL,FLORIDA 33513 REGISTERED BRAHMANS James W. Scarborough P. 0. Box 1373 Wauchula, FL 33873 813/735-0391 Quality Brahmans Diamond T Ranch Jim Nettles, Mgr. 713/245-1621 P. 0. Box 1182 Bay City, Tex. 77414 Quality Registered Brahmans LIVE OAK PLANTATION Ocala, Florida John King, herdsman 904/237-2863 office 904/237-3401 On SR 40, Five miles W. of 1-75 94 / THE FLORIDA CATT.LEMAN / JUNE 197 o Taxes (Continuedptom page 72) mated by dividing the annual net income expected from the land by the rate of return that the owner expects to receive on capital invested in land. This expected rate of return is commonly called the capitalization rate. Put another way, the capitalization rate is the current rate of return necessary to entice capital to that type of investment, in this case pastureland. The formula for computing the classified use value is: Vale = Annuala Net Income Capitaization Rate To help arrive at a classified use value, enterprise budgets can be developed and/or studied for the typical crop grown on the property. A budget is an itemized list of expected costs, incomes, and resources necessary to produce a crop. An example of a 1979 budget for a 100 cow herd on 200 acres of permanent pasture under top management is shown in Table I. The estimated S18,960.70 return to land, labor, capital, and management was derived by subtracting the $14,874 expected expenses from S33,834.70 of anticipated total revenue. Top management is defined as management decisions based on up-to-date production and price information with good cows and land, and optimum timing of production practices. Annual return to land, labor, capital, and management can vary widely. For example, in 1977, estimated return to land, labor, capital and management was -5864 (Table 2). In 1978, a $6929 return was estimated (Table 3). Why the large variations? In these instances, the main cause was depressed beef prices at the end of the down price cycle and much higher prices in the early stages of the up price cycle. Since agricultural yields, prices of products, and costs can vary widely lrom year to year, five-year moving averages of yields, prices, and costs derived from past budgets and record summaries show a more accurate net income picture than costs and returns from a single year. A moving average simply "moves" over time in that each "new" year's figures take the place of the now sixth year's figures when a fiveyear average moving average total cost from gross revenue, a net income can be derived for the income approach formula. This net income then serves as a yardstick in projecting estimated income from the property in the future. Longer term averages (over five years) for yields, prices, and costs can help provide even more definitive net income pictures for land. In Florida, there is no set capitalization rate or mandated method to determine one. The rates are developed by various methods, including the ''summation method." In brief, a capitalization rate normally contains the following "summed components": a safe rate, an illiquidity rate, a risk rate, a management rate, and an ad valorem millage rate. Ihe selection of the safe rate is an attempt to find the maximum yield, risk free, and most liquid alternative investment for the operator. It is usually developed from interest paid on medium denomination, short-term investments. These types of investments, like 13 week U. S. Treasury Bills, are often used because of their comparative safety and liquid nature. Illiquidity is a factor that takes into consideration that real estate transactions, especially the large ones, often require months or years, and they are costly to "close." That is, farmland usually cannot be converted (sold) as quickly as, for example, bank deposits or stocks. Hence, the illiquidity rate in a capitalization rate is compensation for the length of time needed to sell farmland onl the open market. [here are financial risks on owning farm land in Florida. The most important risks are the uncertainty of annual income and the hazard of investment loss. Natural disasters, price cycles, and unstable markets can cause operating losses, investment capital loss and even business failure. The 1947 south Florida flood, the 1977 drought, and the recentlx ended down price cycle and their negative eflfects on pastures, livestock inventories, and business operations are recent examples cow-calf operators would like to forget but are not likely to. These risks and others are taken into consideration when a risk rate is developed for capitalization. Money management is necessary in any beef cattle operation. A managenient rate in a capitalization rate is compensation for managing the monetary investment. With the increasing number of governmental regulations that may prove out costly when adhered to and fluctuating profit margins, money management is becoming more important in maintaining viable operations. It should not be confused with the cost to run or manage the property itself'. An ad valorem millage rate is also included in a capitalization rate. Established by the county, this rate represents the annual tax dollars paid by property owners per $1000 of classified use valuation per acre. For example, if the county tax millage rate was 14 percent and a permanent pasture's classified use value was $200, the ad valorem tax levy would be S2.80/acre (.014 x $200). For inclusion in the capitalization rate, the millage rate is converted into a percentage. A percentage is given the safe, illiquidity, risk, and management components of the capitalization rate by the county property appraiser's office. Together with the ad valorem millage percentage they are summed to derive a capitalization rate. For example, an 8.5 capitalization rate for permanent pasture "summed" by the authors and presented simply for illustrative purposes includes: a 5 percent safe rate, a .5 percent illiquidity rate, a .5 percent risk (Continued on page 101)

PAGE 95

Brahman sale averages $1419 on 22 head Tucker gets two year term as EBA president An average of $1419.31 was struck on 22 head of registered Brahman heifers at the Eastern Brahman Association Quality Brahman Sale, held May I1, at Tampa. Sale gross was $31,225. At the annual meeting of EBA following the sale, Andy Tucker, Cocoa, was named to a two year term as president of the organization. He succeeds Byron Johnson of Ocala. Top selling animal in the sale was RSR Reloto's Queen 99, consigned by Marcus Shackelford, Wauchula. The January, 1977, heifer sold bred to IB Bevo 74, and was purchased by Bentley Brahman Ranch, Crewsville, for $2300. Second high seller was LMT Tuck 210/7, consigned by L. M. Tucker, Tifton, Georgia. Selling safe in calf to Mr. Sugarata 1 631, Hales Farms, Okeechobee, purchased the heifer for $2050. lop volume buyer at the event was Ronald Lott, Seffner, who spent $6650 for five heifers. G. T. Stack, Tampa, was sale chairman for the event, and Greg Carlton, Clewiston, was in charge of screening and facilities. Bob Cooper, Sarasota, was auctioneer. In other action at the annual EBA meeting, Wayner Collier, Wauchula, was elected vice president, and Mike Partin, Kissimmee, was renamed treasurer. Don Berry, Kissimmee, was renamed secretary. The membership also passed an amendment to its bylaws so that all past presidents of the association will become permanent voting members of the board of directors. Mr. and Mrs. Herman Beville, pioneer Brahman breeders of Bushnell, were honored at the EBA banquet held following the annual meeting. Newly elected president Andy Tucker cited the Beville's for recently celebrating their 55th wedding anniversary. The sale was held in conjunction with the Florida International Agricultural Trade Show at the Florida State Fair and Expo Park. The meeting and banquet was held at the Ramada Inn, East, Tampa. Directors named at the meeting were: Joe Barthle, San Antonio; Greg Carlton; Jimmy Chapman, Kissimmee; Rhett Enzor, Milligan; J. Lewis Patterson, Concord, North Carolina; Marcus Shackelford; G. T. Stack, Jr., Tampa; W. W. Tilton, Jr., East Palatka; L. M. Tucker, Tifton, Georgia; David Willis, Cocoa; Ray Simms, Lithia; Carl Story, Lake City; Don Davis, Zolfo Springs, Charles Reid, Clewiston, A. E. Whaley, Kissimmee. BRAHMANS WILL PAY IN EVERY WAY! Come To See At / O.A 4: INC. M. E. (Max) Hammond, President Tel: 813/533-3713 (Res.) C. Lee Eggert, General Mgr. 813/294-9262 (Ranch) P.O. Box 250 Bartow, Florida 33830 "Top Testing Brahmans" G.A. TUCKER & SONS You'll Be Satisfied With Tucker Brahmans Rt. 1, Box 1340 Cocoa, Fla. 32922 305/636-2390 -305/636-6840 HEART BAR RANCH Still producing top quality BRAHMANS Henry 0. Partin & Sons KISSIMMEE, FLORIDA 32741 Phone 305/846-2168 Registered Brahman Cattle J. K. STUART BARTOW FLORIDA 33830 Gentle, Quality BRAHMAN CATTLE Rocking Ranch Rt. 2, Box 385, WauChula, Fl. 33873 Marcus hackleford L M Shackelford 813/773-4616 813/773-9359 Lazy e Ranch Registered Brahmans and Quarter Horses Joe & Jeanette Barthle P. O.Box6 San Antonio, Fla. 33576 Phone 904/588-3716 Quality Registered Brahmans Visitors Welcome By Appointment calt before 7:00 a m. LENN SUMNER RANCH 813/689-7421 1507 So. Valrico Rd., Valrico FL 33594 PUREBRED BRAHMANS Route 1, Box 1370, Cocoa, Fla. 32922 305/636-3%6 featuring more flesh, stronger bone, larger size, with gentle disposition CHAPMAN & COLLIER Registered Brahman and Commercial Cattle Manso & Imperator Breeding Gentleness and Quality Stressed through Selective Breeding A. R. Chapman and Wayne Collier, owners Ph. 813/773-9528 or 813/773-3161 Route 2, Box 218 Wauchula, Fla. 33873 T&owe3 Tanch Registered Brahmans 1245 Orange Aye, Winter Park, Fla. 32789 Tel. 305/6448136, Home 896-2543 BRAHMANS Walker Forms Andy Ward 904/796-9767 Route 2, Box 28 Brooksville, FL 33512 START YOUR FUTURE.:. BUY BRAHMANS Members of EBA can offer the best in quality and bloodlines. For more information and list of affiliated breeders, contact: BRAHMAN r~aAfvr ASSOCIATION THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 95 ,icd DS DS

PAGE 96

Gentle Greyp Brahmans Double C Bar Ranch Registered& Commercial Cattle James C. Chapman Ph. 305/892-6447 P. 0. Box 115 St. Cloud, Fl. 32769 Registered Brahmans 1-2, and 3-year old Bulls and Heifers For Sale John C. Harrison Ranches J66) & Trisha Harriso 813/322-1691 Rt .1,Box 406G, Myakka City, FL 3355) Registered & Commercial Brahman Catti? KABAR RANCH H. 1. Kennedy & Sons 13503 Ranch Rd. Jacksonville. Fla. 32218 PH: 904/757-3643 Corner of 1-95 and entrance of Jacksonville International Airport. Registered BRAHMANS and DEVONS RAY SIMMS FARM v Ray Simms. Owner Rt. 1L Box 150 Ph 813/689-3990 Lom, Florida 33547 18 ml. SW of Plant city on Boyette Rd. 11 li 4 RANCH Rd Brahman Cotll, Rt. 5, Mt. Pleasant, Texas 75455 Monty Banks, Manager 21/572-7668 PLACID FARMS Registered Red & Grey BRAHMAN CATTLE Certified Bruce//osis Free Herd Frank Chaplin, owner 305/472-3334 3333 S.W. 130th Ave. Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 33330 Promote BEEF every day. Support Your Florida Beef Council Registered B rah mans We Have The Genetic Resources To Improve Any Beef Producing Program. W. W. & Frances Tilton Rt. 2, Box 8 904/325-7684 EAST PALATKA, FLA. 32031 96 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 Rodeos held at Chiefland and Lakeland PCRA approved rodeos were held recently in two cities. The Chielland Rodeo was held March 24-25 followed bv the Lakeland Rodeo on April 21-22. Results of the four rodeos, as compiled by Sparky Dent of Vero Beach, listed to the first four places with times or marks shown in parentheses and monies won listed, follow: Chiefland Brhack-J ibo \ wat tord. Okechohee(67) S3N.'4: J. BI Mcfmh, Benson. North Carolina (64) S237.65: Bob o. Iuh I (,Tea (64) S217.65: Gen w ebb, Pai11,. 1oui-ma (62) sui 0: Sddlc hronharlie Atwll, Huntersi1e, North aronlina (65) $19.(0K Rick W hor ton, Spr ingdale. Arkansas i s)44 06: S,o" I fher, Winnbo-r0. [Mlotisanzt (6) s%. 4: Ri Phillip, Kissim 1(60) S24.0: Gary Williams. Okeelho,e (6) s24.01: Bull ridic-Ro ( )ricr. (rockett, Texa (71) $309,6', (,r eoLr2. Botifa (70) S23126: Doald Chapman. tC Te\.o 66) 5)54. 4: .) Barry Brown. Opelika. A).a6)om.)64)5(0 .1 Mikeox.). pre0O.Tlxos 64) S38l. allI ropino.-Sorcett Gringer, Hatothorne ((0.6) 56, 4 ( h.i [j00 -. Sunono111roillo. (iCOrot (I1,) s0.7IS: Ritod Barth], Dade Cit, (1.4) 5226.09: Stec Ihapmn, Lda et ot Georgia (11.4) S226.09: st r -r Lo) -r (3.8) 0752.72: Steve hOr)) \tn PL,] (19) 5414i4 Dan McClellan. Fort Miode (40) s2706 6: Robt)t sanders, Dcdle ( it (5.4) s)), 6 Bairrl race-Laoa Br-tn, Lesburg (15.si) $230.6: Anit .I trd Moirriston, (I''6) 5171.01: Pat a I ortner, .N (i (L556) 171.01: (iona Brown, LcesbUrg 5.61) Lakeland iloro6.k.-Ell iBallard. Sarasota (66) 5196.f): George Mesntmer, Mocksville, North Carolina (64) 5147.00: Johnny Neal, S. Cloud (60) S49.00; Jim Watford, Okeechobee (60) 549.00: Harry Wilfong, Brinson, Georgia (60) $49.00: saddle ro0n.-Ra, Phillips, Kissimmne (63) 062.71: 0 I ohin). Okeechobee (52) 41.81: Bull riii,,-R oi De cea, Dallas. T1xa, (73)5258.72: Sto Elitot, Brinson. GOorgit (7) S194.04: Bruce /undel. Bring on, Gjoreia (71) 7129.36: Richard Nevels, West Point, MS .ppt (63) S64.6: ( al t roping-Dan MIc )tellan, Fort Meade (10.) S(696 i t): Ed I m, -r arteroville, Georgia ( 1.C.1) 5296.94: Ratdt B .oni, Bar-to ( 1.4) S197.96: Henr Kinchen Plamn C it, 22) s98. Si-r ,restlingBob Barlthle. san Antonio (4.1) S384.16: Id I irm (It, 528 12: Gary Dmi ek, Tallahassee (6,1t 192.))8: Darrell EspN y, Gi tismer, Louisiana (6.4) S96.04: Barrel racePaula I ortn r, Plant Ct ( 16.65) S275.67: Lin d' ( nnon, Plant (it( 16.90) S228.(4: Angte I hobbs. I akei nd t 17. 10) Sl)0.01: Anita Beard Morriton (17.24) s10.1l: jud o Quttnat ocit (17 24) S10931. HERB PEEL of Bonifay, left, was recently honored for two years of distinguished service as president of the Association of Florida Rodeos. Earl Cooper of Lakeland, an association director, presented a plaque to Peel at a meeting in Lakeland. Field day set h Eastern Brahman Association summer field day will be held on Saturday, June 23, at the Osceola County Agricultural Pavilion, on U. S. Highway's 441 and 192, between Kissimmee and St. Cloud. Sponsors of the event will be Crescent 0 Ranch, owned by A. E. and Larry Whaley, and Heart Bar Ranch, owned by the Partin family of Kissimmee. The program will get underway about 9:30 at the pavilion. Special talks and demonstrations are scheduled for the morning program. Following lunch at the pavilion, a motorcade tour of area Brahman ranches will be conducted under the direction of A. E. Whaley. Brahman activities show increases Brahman activities showed significant increases in all areas during the first quarter of 1979, according to the American Brahman Breeders Association, I ouston, rleXas. Eight major Brahman sales held during the period saw 299 animals gross S502,250 to average S1680. Over 600 more registrations have been recorded for the first quarter of 1979 than for the same period in 1978. A total of' 11,216 registrations have been recorded in 1979. In 1978, 10,531 were completed. This marks the fifth straight year re-istrations have increased. Transfer and pedigree Figures have also continued to improve, officials point out. Transfer totals are up more than l00 per month. In 1978, 5161 transfers had been processed by the end of MI arch. Ihis year, transfers totaled 6513 during this same period, averaging 2171 monthly. Pedigrees have increased from 1415 in 1978 to 1704, averaging 568 per month for 1979. ABBA officials say these figures forecast a most promising year for all Brahman breeders. National Beefalo show, sale set The American Beefalo Association (ABA) has announced plans for the Kentucky National Beefalo Show and Sale. [he event is scheduled for November 12-13, at the Kentucky Fair and Exposition Center, Louisville, Kentucky. ABA officials also reported that Jack Benedict, Newnan, Georgia, has been named coordinator for a Beefalo Field Day to be held in Georgia this summer. Officials said the date and place of the field day will be announced at a later time.

PAGE 97

Lowry keeps lead in cowboy standings Charles Lowry o Summerville, Georgia, has kept his lead in the allaround cowboy standings in Florida with earnings of $3430.98. George Mesimer, Mocksville, North Carolina, is the bareback leader with S1862.32 while Rick Whorton, Springdale, Arkansas, tops the saddle bronc competition with earnings of $1837.94. Bull riding leader is Roy Carter, Crockett, Texas, and Morgan Grainger, Hawthorne, has the lead in calf roping with $2168.72. Leading the steer wrestlers is Lowry with $1509.20. Barrel race leader is Paula Fortner, Plant City, with $2024.48 pocketed. Winners in the various events listed to live places, with earnings listed, follow: All-around-0harles Lory, Summerville, Georgia l3430.98: Lyle Sankey, Augusta, Kansas 51634.29; Paul Irney, Rapid City, South Dakota 51583.88; John Andrews, Onarga, Illinois S1070.95; Brian Claypool, Saskawon, Saskatchewan Si055.95: Barebacks--George Mesner. Mocksville, North Carolina S1862.32; Bob Logue, Cuimby, Texas S1809.35; Nitke Young Perron Utah SI332.60; J. C. Trujilo, Steamnboat Springs, Colorado S1023.40; Steve Ounharn, Laigary, Alberta, Canada S967.45; Saddle brones-Rick whorton, Springdale, Arkansas sls 1794 Dave Fisher, Elkhart, Kansas $1339.09; Charlie Alwll, flunuersville, North Carolina SI289.26; Mel Coleman, Pierceland, Saskatchewan $1071.92; Don Siionton, Malta, Montana 5027.60; Bull riding-Roy Carter, Crockett, Texas S2270.19; Moniu Tay lor Allison, Texas $2061.55; Frank Blacksheer, Calterock, Colorado $1193.18; Ricky Bolin, Mesquite, iTxas SI1053.67; Jerome Robinson. Fort Collins, Colorado S23.39; all roping-Morgan Grainger, Hawthorne $2168.72; Don Sith, Kiowa, Oklahoma S2016.84: Charles Lowry, Summerville, Georgia $1921.78: Del Murphy, Avon park SI6ll.91: 1 out Epperson, Cherokee, rexas 0984.90; Steer wrestling-Charles Lowry, Summerville, Georgia S1509.20; Howard Klingemann, Bonilay $1 163.74: Harold Stayton, Austin, lexas St 147.78; Paol Tierney, Rapid City. SoutLh Dakota $1127.20; John Andrews, Onarga, Illinois 109 .79; Barrel race-Paula Fortner, Plant City $2024.48; Layna Bron, Leesburg $813.00; Anita Beard, Morriston S605.75; Margaret Amtes, Zolfo Springs $552.34; Debbie Brannon, liii S5t7.74. Welles' cutter in top 10 Lonsun Tiger, owned by R. D. Welles of Arcadia and ridden by Curly Tully is listed in eighth place in the NCHA's listing of championship cutting horses. Participating in 14 events, Lonsun Tiger has won $5199.24 through April 12. In the non-pro category Bill Talley, Jr., Leesburg, has entered six shows with Chickasha King with winnings of $1777.18. Bubba Welles of Arcadia has competed in four shows with Brigand's Breeze and winning $1532.09, while Spencer Harden, Sanford, has three shows and $1232.78 on Doe's Wimp'. In the top 15 $500 novice, Eagle Raider, owned by W. V. Hoecherl, Fort Lauderdale, and ridden by Speedy Richards, has been in nine shows with killings of $895.67 and is in first place. Commander Ray, owned by Ron Marlowe, West Palm Beach, and ridden by Salty Langford, has been in three shows with $342 won and is in ninth place. 0 0 TRAIL-RITE Trailer Mfg. Co. presents HA YKRADLE Completely Manual No Hydraulics e No Electricity o Saves Labor Virtually Maintenance Free One Man Can Load, Haul, and Unload Horse Trailers-1, 2, Stock Trailers16-3 Goose neck and bum Open and closed side Rt. 2, Box 1210A 5 Roll with Gooseneck VAYk
PAGE 98

Raising livestock and supporting 4H'ers and FFA'ers keep The Vanns by ETHEL HALES STANCIL I met Evalena (Mrs. Charles) Vann at the Orlando Fair back in March. She was sitting atop a bale of hay in the dairy cattle barn. She was there supporting her son Toby and other 4-H'ers and FFA'ers from her area as they exhibited and sold outstanding animals. The Vann's farm-Back Acres-is located about seven miles southeast of Sarasota. Farm pastures are improved, Bahia grass being predominant. The farm raises Angus and dairy (Jersey and Guernsey) cattle and White Yorkshire hogs. Toby is only 14 but he has been in 4H for six years. He went to Florida Congress in Gainesville last year and came in third in the state in food and nutrition. Canning and freezing foods is known to him as well as sewing, crafts, horticulture and a host of other projects. Indeed, it is hard to find a project in which he has not participated locally, at the district or state and one of these days he's sure to he heading for the National 4-H Congress in Chicago, Illinois. Evalena and Charles feel that his 4H work has been a great help in his school work, in which he also excels. The couple helps the youth in the local 4-H Milky Way Club-Maurice Hiett and Doris Smith are club leaders. Charles' family has been native to Florida for several generations, and he is actively associated with the livestock industry. He is on the board of directors of the Sarasota Livestock Association and is also active in the state cattlemen's association. His father, C. B. Vann, 84, lives next door to them and assists in the large garden which the family raises. Evalena teaches kindergarten at busy' in Sarasota Venice Elementary School. Her grandmother, Mrs. Harvey (Donna Redd) Tatum was a native to Sarasota, born there in 1915. Her mother, Velma Flye Tatun, taught school for 29 years in the same area before retiring. Hobbies of Evalena are cooking, sewing, raising plants and collecting antiques. She shares many of her plants which she says are easy to kill with too much kindness-overfeeding or overwatering. Two favorites are fades and begonias. Pets are a Golden Retriever, Brandy. and a Dachshund, Herman. When the son isn't busy with 4-H activities he may be playing with the school band. Next year he will be one of the four bagpipers with the Riverview High School Band. He plays the saxophone and bagpipes. The bagpipers wear plaid kilts, of course, white spats and colorful jackets. They are well known for their performances and have been invited to the Rose Bowl game. Daughters are Ivy and Holly. Holly, 16, is a junior at Riverview High School, Sarasota, while Ivy is a junior at Howard College and is working toward a degree in English. She was also an outstanding 4-H'er whose projects leaned to dairy animals. She raised one heifer which became the family milkcow. The family is active in the Bee Ridge Presbyterian Church. Calf prices continue high Market operators around the state continue to report high prices for calves being sold. Clyde Crutchfield of Tindel Livestock Auction Market, Graceville, reported that at a recent weekly auction, a 295 pound calf brought $1.75 a pound to bring $516.25. George Townsend, owner of Madison Stock Yard, Inc., at Madison, announced at the regular auction on April 24 that the $2 per pound figure had been broken that day. At Okeechobee Livestock Market, Okeechobee, Pete Clemons reports that the week of April 9 their sale topper was at $2.05 and the week of April 16 saw the market being topped at $2.25. Clemons also said that heavy bulls and steers were bringing up to 78 cents for slaughter. Heifers and heifer calves on feed in the U.S. on April 1 totaled 3.70 million, down 14 percent from 1978, says USDA. 98 / THE FLORIDA CAYTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 Some items and recipes The printing media is alive with new recipes and I am glad to see interesting ones for vegetable dishes and salads. I tried a casserole made of mashed carrots and potatoes (twice the quantity of carrots), an onion sauteed in butter and grated cheese. It can be mixed ahead and heated through. Tasty and pretty. A raw carrot salad is also easy and keeps well. To four cups of shredded carrots, add one-fourth cup salad oil, 1 1/2 T. fresh lemon juice, '/2 t. celery seed, I t. dried parsley flakes, 2 t. salt, 2 t. sugar. Toss. To a bit of the leftover salad I added a diced apple, a few raisins and had a new salad. Do you buy articles of clothing for your husband that are not right and if kept are not worn? Ralph and I reached an agreement several years back that when we buy something for the other that fits this category we will return it-and no hard feelings. Makes sense! And so I returned a Western hat I'd bought for him. It was the right size, the right color but the shape wasn't quite acceptable. He plans to clean a couple of his old hats. A friend who operated a cleaning establishment tells him this can be done by washing them in mineral spirits. Truly, there a few places these days which clean and block hats-at least in small towns. Watch the checks you deposit and write. Computers are poor readers. We deposited a check to the Internal Revenue Service in our account-which was in turn accepted by the bank. Also guard your blank checks. If stolen the finder may have no trouble at all in cashing them. A new waitress came to my favorite restaurant where I eat most lunches. I felt she neglected her customers. Then one day her mother from out of town was there and sat next to me. We visited. Now I ask the waitress about her mother every few days and get super attention! Grandson Jay, finished now at St. John's Community College, School of the Arts, Palatka, spent a week with us before leaving for home in Kentucky. He hopes to work during the summer and return to college in the fall. He is making strides in his chosen field-a real love of his. And to succeed we need to enjoy our work-we spend so much time at it! We enjoyed another Hales reunion. Aunt Bessie, oldest member, in her late 80's was there. I saw cousins I seldom see except at these get-togethers. If your family is not holding such reunions why do you not begin one? There is no better way to acquaint children with their kin-folks.

PAGE 99

Florida team gets fifth in beef judging contest fhe University of Florida Livestock Judging Team placed fifth in the beef jUdging division of the Southeastern Conference Spring Livestock Judging Contest, held recently at Carbondale, Illinois. TIhe team also placed sixth in sheep judging and ninth overall. Larry Barthle, Dade City, was second high individual in the beef judging division. Ill the evaluation portion of the contest, the Florida team placed fourth overall, including fourth in beef evaluation and second in sheep evaluation. Doug Frazer, Lake City, took first place high individual honors in the beef evaluation contest, and Charlie Holton, Land O'Lakes, was seventh place overall high individual. Ieal coach for the University of Florida team is Professor D. L. Wakeman. Other tean members are: Wayne Simmons, Plant City; Derek Hall, Bushll;ll Laura Frye, Bradenton; Roxie fTownsend, lilmmokalee, Henry Knight, Jamaica; Sid Mogg, Jamnaica; Shawn Carson, Lake City. Mole crickets (Continuedfrom page 91) habitats plays a major role in the success of the species. Mating behavior and dispersal studies have been initiated and studying these biological processes may provide clues as to how to disrupt the life cycle of mole crickets. 3) Biological control (Received 11.97 percent of funding). Initial efforts have begun to gather information on the success of a parasitic wasp, Larra bicolor, against mole crickets in Puerto Rico. One major problem in importing this wasp is that a plant which is an essential part of the parasite's life system does not occur in Florida. Initial steps have been taken to attempt to import this plant for experimental purposes. 4) Physiology (Received 9.3 percent of funding). Conflicting literature reports that the mole cricket damages plants in one of two fashions, direct feeding or physical damage. The simple fact is that no one knows whether mole crickets are phytophagous, predaceous, or omnivorous. Often, internal morphology yields clues to the ecological niche occupies. Thus, initial studies were undertaken to examine gut structure and function. Nutritional requirements for artificial rearing of mole crickets have begun to be evaluated. 5) Host Plant Resistance (received 14.08 percent of funding). Studies to identify turf grasses with resistance to mole crickets have begun. Close cooperation with plant breeders is being (Continued on page 101) COflPUSED? About Stockman's Book Needs? Order The Ones You Need Now! 1 Beef Cattle Science Ensm inger ..26.00 2 Handbook of Livestock Equipment, E. M. Juergenson .14.00 3 The Stockman's Handbook Ensminger (5th edition) ..26.00 4 Feeds and Nutrition (Complete) Ensminger. 51.50 5 Livestock Judging & Evaluation (2nd edition) Hundley, Beeson & Nordby .16.65 6 Leadership for Action in Rural Communities, Kreitlow, Aiton. and Torrence .7.25 7 Feed and Nutrition (Abridged) Ensm inger .37.50 8 Factors Affecting Calf Crop Cunha, Warnick, Koger .12.50 9 The Farm Management Handbook Mortenson, and Luening 1972 .15.65 10 Horses and Horsemanship Ensm inger ..21.25 11 Soil Conservation Kohne & Bertrand .14.50 12 Swine Science, Ensminger ..19.95 13 Cowboy Arithmetic Oppenheimer ..8.50 14 Contract Farming and Economics Integration, Roy. 11.5 15 Sheep and Wool Science Ensminger .......21.25 16 Animal Nutrition, Maynard ....19.50 17 Crossbreeding Beef Cattle Series 2, Cunha, Koger, Warnick .17.50 18 The Feedlot Dryer and O'Mary .18.50 19 How to Make Money Feeding Cattle, Simerl and Russell ..2.50 20 Animal Science, Ensminger ..26.00 21 Approved Practices In Dairying Juergenson & Mortenson ..11.35 22 Approved Practices in Pasture Management, McVickar 3rd Edition .11.35 23 Approved Practices in Feeds, Feeding, Cassard ..11.35 24 The Handbook of Feedstuffs Prod. Seiden & Pfander .17.95 --------USE THIS BLANK 25 Dairy Cattle Breeds Raymond B. Becker 26 Beef Production in the South, Fowler 27 Careers in AgriBusiness & Industry, Stone. 28 Cowboy Litigation. Oppenheimer. 29 Mechanics in Agriculture, Phipps ... 30 Profitable Pasture Management 31 Animal Sanitation and Disease Control. Dykastra .... 32 The Meat We Eat, Ziegler 33 The Western Horse, Gorman 34 Beef Cattle (6th edition) Snapp 36 Exploring Agribusiness, E. P. Roy 37 Cooperatives. Today and Tomorrow, E. P. Roy 38 Manual for the Computer Formulation of Livestock Feed Mixtures, W. K. McPherson 39 Approved Practices in Swine Production Juergenson & Baker. 40 Veterinary Handbook for Cattlemen, 4th edition W. Baily 41 Beef Sire Directory Charles R. Koch 43 How to Plan Your Estate Robert Dunaway 44 An Introduction to Ag. Eng. McColly & Martin 45 Swine Production Carroll & Kreider 46 The King Ranch Tom Lea (Volume 1) 47 The King Ranch Tom Lea (Volume 2) 48 Feed Formulations Tilden Wayne Perry 49 Producing Farm Crops Lester V. Boone 50 Financial Planning in Agriculture Schneeberger & Osburn .17.50 .22.35 .11.65 ..8.95 .16.65 .13.95 .16.75 19.65 13.25 18.95 13.00 .11.95 .4.00 .11.35 16.50 .9.50 .6.70 ...8.25 .15.50 .25.00 .25.00 .12.35 .12.75 ....1.95 TO ORDER BY NUMBER -"-""-"" ----I I Enclosed is (check or money order) for $ .Please send me the books as indicated by the numbers I have encircled: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 36 37 36 39 40 41 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 Send to Address Include 4% Sales Tax Clip out and mail to on Florida orders, $1 00 extra for foreign orders. THE CATTLEMAN PRESS BOX 1403, KISSIMMEE, FLORIDA s. ---.-.--.--------------THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 99

PAGE 100

as good as the best and better than most All ingredients used are of finest quality and our prices very competitive. the are Give us a call and we will prove what we claim. SOUTHEASTERN MOLASSES & SUPPLY CORP. For EXCELLENCE in liquid feeds and ENERGY without waste, we tailor our products to meet your needs. P. 0. BOX 1226. OKEECHOBEE, FL 33472 PHONE: 813/763-3115 Airport Livestock Corporation We have over 30 years experience in the Domestic and foreign sales of purebred Hoisteins, Brown Swiss snd Jerseys. Our customers keep comin back. We think quality and service are the reason. Cal us for your dairy cattle n eeds. Buck Gaiz P. 0. Box 52-4065 Howard Hansen Miami, Florida 33152 Jerry Fickel Ph; 305-871-5804 305-87 1-4248 Save money by buying direct from: WISCONSIN LIVESTOCK EXCHANGE, INC. c/n William 0. Carey Ph: 813/689-1249 Tampa, FL Coastal Bermuda SILAGE & HAY clean, highly fertilized, high protein FESTUCA RANCH 7675 SW 38th St., Ocala, FL 32670 904/237-3300 or 904/236-3700 TUCKER'S FARM CENTER Your One Stop Farm Service Center 201 N. Elm, Box 2313 Sanford, Fla. 32771 305/322-1235 100 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 Dairy scientist gives rev of DHI record program by DAN W. WEBB L/nitersity ol/ Florida Dairy Herd Improvement is a program of information for management decisions on dairy farms. Information is input into the computer each month. Printouts are mailed to the farm which provide information for evaluating herd performance, culling cows, breeding, drying and management. What type of information is provided? The "core" program consists of four parts. 1) Monthly Report (DHI-200)This printout contains one line of information on each cow. It gives identity, pounds of milk per day for current and previous month, date fresh (or dry), lactation to date, projected 305-day ME lactation, breeding date, service sire, due date and other. 2) Herd Summary (DHI-202)-This sheet provides average performance for the herd. Production averages are given for the current month and year. Other management information includes reproductive performance analysis, comparison of two year olds and older cows, inventory changes and a monthby-month production summary for the last year. 3) Cow Page (DH I-203)-This form is updated each time a cow completes a lactation and provides lifetime information on production and breeding. Information given for each lactation includes: calving date, age, days dry, 305-day production, production for complete lactation, mature equivalent production, herdmate average and deviation from herdmates. Lifetime total production, USDA cow index and estimated relative producting ability (ERPA) are given. 4) Estimated Relative Producing Ability (ERPA)-This listing provides a ranking of all cows in the herd compared to herdmates using all lifetime information. The ERPA list is printed twice per year. Is other information available? Yes. There are a number of optional features which can be provided. The most popular is the reproductive management special list. This option provides listings of four cow groups-a) cows open, b) cows to preg. check, c) cows to dry and d) cows to calve. Many other "optional services" are available. FLORIDA'S DAIRY INDUSTRY was highlighted during Legislative Appreciation Day in Tallahassee when Governor Bob Graham, a dairy farmer from Miami Lakes, engaged in a milking contest using a sawhorse cow fitted with a surgical rubber glove udder. The event was a part of the festivities sponsored by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Dairy Farmers, Inc. We have for sale an inventory of over 600 open and bred calf hood vaccinated heiferssired by some of the better bulls in the country. Az 1;;Z7

PAGE 101

Taxes (Continued from page 94) rate, a one percent management rate, and a 1.5 percent millage rate. The expected rate of return is then divided into the projected net income from the land to determine a classified use value for the farmland. Summary Ad valorem property taxes have been with us for a long time and appraisal of farmland has changed in an urbanizing Florida. The property appraiser's job is made increasingly difficult due to the variability of farmland, interest in land as an investment that appreciates in value, and changing production and marketing practices. Production costs, yields, and prices from budgets and record summaries from the different enterprises can help provide more accurate classified use value appraisals for pastureland. These figures are invaluable when the income approach is used to estimate a classified use value. Mole crickets (Continuedfrom page 99) maintained to aid in incorporation of resistance characteristics in new turfgrasses. Pasture grass strains available from a major source in Tifton, Georgia, will be screened for resistance. The main interdisciplinary research team consists of Dr. C. S. Barfield (project coordinator; population ecology, .5 manyear); Dr. R. I. Sailer (biological control, .10 manyear); Dr. T. J. Walker (ecology and behavior, .10 manyear); Drs. S. L. Poe, D. E. Short, P. G. Koehler (economic entomology, chemical control, .10 manyear each); Dr. J. A. Reinert (host plant resistance, .10 manyear); Dr. J. L. Nation (physiology, .10 manyear); and Dr. E. L. Matheny (basic biology, .10 manyear). Several researchers in locations throughout Florida have been and will continue to be involved in cooperative research on mole crickets. In summary, the research team has identified major short and long-term project objectives. We are currently in the process of identifying specific experimentation needed to meet these objectives. Emphasis is being placed on establishing a cooperative research framework whereby individual efforts interface into an overall project. Calf weighed in at 112 pounds Charles R. Jenkins, Lakeland, of Jenkins Angus Ranch, reports that a heifer calf born on the ranch recently measured 46 inches and weighed 112 pounds. The measurement from the withers was 29 inches. Jenkins is vice president of the Florida Angus Association. FLORIDA CORN FOR YOUR CATTLE Save on those freight costs and order Florida-grown corn. We have top quality ground snapped corn and ground yellow corn meal available in bogs or bulk, and a good supply of bulk shelled corn. Delivered direct to your ranch in trailer loads lots. Check our prices before you buy. DAY FEED MILLS Wayne Day, Manager U.S. Highway 90, Greenville, Florida 32331 Telephone 904/948-2561 or 904/948-3611, nights Planning A Sale? Contact any of our fieldmen for full details. AND LIVESTOCK JOURNAL P. 0. Box 1403 QUl yourself together Kissimmee, Fla. 32741 HATS CLEANED & BLOCKED COMPLETE RENOVATION INCLUDES CLEANED, BLOCKED, NEW RIBBONS. LINERS, LEATHER SWEAT BAND. in our own shop Mail dirty hats to is Pack several in one bas We wi ship back to you ir indiaidual boxes (Allow 2 weeks). CLEANED & BLOCKED S 7 50 COMPLETE RENOVATION .S15 00 ADD POSTAGE & HANDLING ..300 NAME ADDRESS CITY -STATE -ZIP DEPOSIT -______ C. D D_____ BAC OR MC CHARGE .C._.D RUSSELL'S WESTERN STORE 6027 N. DALE MABRY, TAMPA, FLA. 33614 813/879-6620 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 101 MAKE _11s, NCA A TWICE AS IMC 4, STRONG 440 1 p V; ==V2 5 979

PAGE 102

Advertising AUCTIONEERING FT. SMITH AUCTION SCHOOL, Ft. Smith, Ark. 72901 Resident and home study. Veteran approved. BE AN AUCTIONEEROutstanding successful auctioneers are your instructors. Write for brochure today. Term soon. Mendenhall School of Auctioneering. U.S. Hwy. 29-70 (E-85) High Point, N.C. 27263. tf73c POSTELL & MARLEY AUCTIONEERS-Livestock Machinery Liquidations. Ph. 813/685-5755 or 813/949-5132. 679p DOGS BORDER COLLIES-work all livestock. Registered Pups, Claude Tindall 1600 NW Ave. N Belle Glade 305/996-7435. Quinn Tindall 305/581-6853, 6529 SW 47 St., Davie. 1173p TRAINED REGISTERED-Catahoula Leopard Cowhogdogs, Border Collies, Australians. Mosey bock guarantee, 30 day trial. Fops. Charles Whitener, Route 1, Paris, TX 75460. Phone 214/785-4724 or 214/785-4475. 876p AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERD PUPS -(ARF)-(IESR)-(ASCofA pending). Natural workers. Stud service. Marianne Curty, P. 0. Box 1025, Dunnellon, Florida 32630. 904/489-3937. LIVESTOCK WANTED: HORSES-Top prices paid. Registered or Grade. Broke or unbroke, good or bad. Call for prices. 904/793-4215. 579p RED BRANGUS For a free color brochure on the "BIG RED MULEYS" and a membership list, write to: AMERICAN RED BRANGUS ASSOCIATION Dept. P, P.O. Box 1326, Austin, Texas 78767 PHONE (5121 288-2840 FOR SALE-Purebred Red Angus breeding stock and Florida raised breeding age bulls. Holben Cattle Corp., Lake Wales, Florida. Phone 813/696-1536. 473Ht Sell your free boarders and increase your calving percentages, through annual pregnancy testing. Let us show you facts to prove we can help. P.O. Box 21 LARRY LEWIS Felsmere, Fla.32948 Ph: 305/571-1627 FOR LIST OF AREA BREEDERS-Contact Florida Red Angus Association-Al H. Enfinger, Route 3, Box 683, Jay, Florida 32565. CUSTOM FREEZING BULL SEMEN Semen Testing Modern Mobile Laboratory Units SOUTHEASTERN FROZEN Don Schlesier SEMEN SERVICE 904/757-133 JACKSONVILLE, 32218 Box 26080 300 TO 400 PAIR-Of cross-bred range cows and calves for sale. $325 per head. Will sell any amount from 10 head up. Single X Farms, Rt. 2, Box 90, Glee St. Mary, Fl. 32040. Ph. 904/2752294. Call anytime day or night. 679p 200 HEREFORD-Angus, and Black Baldy cows and calves for sale. Terrell Register, Sanderson, Fl 904/275-2292. 679p RED ANGUS PRODUCTION SALE Confederate Valley Ranch Franklin, Tenn. 37064 AUGUST 5-1 P.M. 40 Bred Heifers, 40 Open Helfers 6 Herd Bulls, 20 Cows & Calves Wrtte for catalogue. LET CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING SELL FOR YOU Rate 25o per word, minimum charge $5.00. Classified display $16.00 column inch. Deadline 5th of month. In circulation about 25th of month. Send copy and remittance to: THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN, BOX 1030, KISSIMMEE, FLORIDA CATTLE WANTED Brood cows, calves, yearlings. We also buy feeding cows and bulls to go into quarantined feedlots. No testing required. Bill Evans-813/682-0801 2120 Hawthorne Trail, Lakeland, Fla. 33803 REAL ESTATE CATTLE RANCHES & FARMS-Nation Wide. BRENNAN & BRENNAN, REALTORS, Accredited Farm & Land Brokers, Box 1809, Lakeland, Fla. 33802. 178c Small Working Cattle Ranch Near Kenansville-200A, Hunting Robert S. "Bob" Cody, Associate Residence: 305/847-4781 W. H. Morse Cor portion, Realtors P.O. Drawer A 305/847-3133 Kissimmee, FI 32741 WANT TO SELL-Your Cattle Ranch, Acreage or Citrus Grove? Contact BRENNAN & BRENNAN, REALTORS, Accredited Farm & Land Brokers, Box 1809, Lakeland, Fla. 33802 178c We Sell Ranches & Ranch Land STEPHEN L. MILLER REALTY 11913 U.S. 27 South Ste hen L. Miller Sebring, Florida 33870 Reg. Real Estate Broker (813) 655-2001 WANTED TO LEASE-Hunting Rights on approx. 2,000 acres south of Orlando. Call Mark Crews after 8:00 P.M. 305/9247611. 479c Holmes County Farm & Ranch 567 acres, 1 Mi. Frontage on U. S. Hwy. Feed Crusher, Mixer, Ingredient Scales. 10,000 Bu. Grain Storage and Conditioner. 60 X 80 Ft. equipment Shed, 10,000 Ton Silo with automatic unloader and auger type feed trough, Feed lot accommodates 3,000 head. 250 Acres Permanent pasture, 250 Acres grain land, Water holes, 2 wells, wooded plots for shade and shelter. 3 Bed Rm. Brick, with Living Rm., Den, 2 Bath. Good 3 Bed Rm. Wood frame with tennant or to rent. Total Price $650,000. Terms. Trout Realty, Inc. Broker Leonard D. Landres, Associate 904/547-3466 P. 0. Box 595, Bonifay, Fla. 32425 FOR SALE WORKING CATTLE RANCH St. Lucie County 2400 Acres-1200 Acres Improved Pasture Contact Ken Conrad or John Scott, Asc. Hoyt C. Murphy Inc., Realtors Fort Pierce, Fla. 305/461-3250 CONTIGUOUS RANCH ACREAGE WANTED Have client interested in large ranch in Florida. Contact Murray Smith at Major Marketing Corporation, 5750 Major Blvd., Orlando, Fl. 32805. (305) 351-1111. FOR SALE FLORIDA'S OLDEST WESTERN WEAR STORE Contact: The Fair Store 415 S. Park Street Okeechobee, Fla. 33472 Ph. 813/763-3819 Excellent Ranch and Groves Located in central Polk County. 2262 acres with 167 acre grove, 900 acres improved pasture; cattle and equipment included. Over 3 miles of lake front. Contiguous to this package is a 985 acre ranch with 1/4 mile lake frontage with 217 acres improved pasture. John W. Hunt, Reg. Real Estate Broker 905 Alturas Road, Bartow, FL 33830 813/537-1305 MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE Used tractor parts for most makes and models Farmers Surplus RI. 3, Minot. N.D 58701. 701/838-5318 or 838-6669. 476tf Disc Harrow Blades Fully cross rolled and heat treated blades to fit any disc harrow. Heavier gauges. Largest stock in the southeast. CHOPPER BLADES Chopper blades to fit any chopper. CALL COLLECT FREE DELIVERY ERB & ROBERTS, INC. Gainesville, Fla. 904/376-4888 Our 19th year selling direct to the farmer SUPER ATOM FENCE CHARGERS Rain or shine, effectively char es thru amazing amount of weeds-without starting fires? Nall wire to wood postsWITHOUT INSULATO $46.95 postpaid. 30 day refund If unsatisfied. Our experienced customers claim "Super Atom Is best charger availablel" Smith Fencer Corp., 2590-FC N.E. 5th Av., Pompano Beach, FL 330,54 305/785-0700, after 19 years In Owosso, Michigan. PLANTING MATERIAL Tifton 44 $5.00/bale Mississippi Giant Bermuda $2.00/bale Coast Cross Bermuda $2.00/bale Hemarthrta (Red Alta) $2.00/bale Quantity Discounts Clyde & Bill Walker Ph. 813/365-1239 1868 Boyce Street Sarasota, Fla. 33579 102 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 LIVESTOCK REAL ESTATE

PAGE 103

CATTLE BUYERS Al Kaplan-Lakeland 683-4836 MEAT PACKERS AND CATTLE FEEDERS P & Box 427 Bartow. Florida 33830 COMMODITY BUYER FEDERALLY INSPECTED Larry Umstadter-Bartow 533-0685 PLANT PHONE L. C. Hendrick-Ft. Meade 285-9875 FEEDLOT MANAGER Paul Sween-Bartow 533-0685 Tom McPhillips-Plant City 752-9237 Charles Smith-Moultrie, Ga. 985-1338 Lloyd Williamson-Ocala 622-4962 Buster Lamb-Ft. Meade 285-8860 Bartow 813-533-0685 RANCH MANAGER Russell Pearson -635-2439 MISCELLANEOUS WANTED TO BUY-Cypress Timber. Preferable 50 mile radius Wauchula or Haines City -fair prices. Please call United Services Wood Products, Wauchula 813/773-3111. 579c SEED HARVESTING C.M. Payne & Son, Inc. Licensed, Bonded Seed Dealer Seed Available: Argentine & Paraguayan 22 Bahia grass. Aeschynomene Common Hairy indigo; Jap Millet. Ph: 813/385-4642 or 385-8330 FOR SALE: HAWK-BILT-7/ ton fertilizer spreader. PLO. Drive. Never used; flail-type. $3000. Art Lewis 813/299-2106. 1979c CALLIE GIANT BERMUDA GRASS & Hemarthria planting material, $2.50 per bale. CRESCENT J RANCH 7.5 miles south of Holopaw. Fl. on U.S. 441 Bob Porter Ph. 305/892-5010 PANGOLA HAY-For Sale. Call between 5-9 P.M. Myakka City. 813/322-1214. 479p EMPLOYMENT HELP WANTED-General ranch experience required. Commercial & registered cattle. Position available immediately. 305/6921732. 1979c COLLEGE GRADUATE-Desires position in cattle industry at management level. Qualified in A. I., preg. testing and all phases of ranching operations. Also experience in managing large feedlot operation. Cnosiderable experience in marketing and market development on international level. Salary negotiable. Write Employment, Box 1403C, Kissimmee, Fl. 32741. 1979c We Can Sell Your Land Need Going Ranches Rawland-Groves SEE US FOR YOUR ACREAGE NEEDS James W. (Jimmy) Ringo Realtor-Rancher National Farm and Land Broker P.O. Box 1047 Immokalee, Fla. 33934 813/657-2332, 813/657-2322 "Established 1946" Shelled Yellow Corn Soy Bean Meal Cottonseed Meal Other Feed Ingredients. We can deliver by truck or rail. For current competitive prices call Mattox Ward or Bennie Williams. GRAINEX, Inc. P. 0. Box 2065 Lake City, FL 32055 Ph: 904/752-6063 Promote BEEF effvery day. RED-DAILY CASH MARKET Central Packing Co. Inc. P. 0. Box 138 CENTER HILL, FLORIDA 33514 Ph. these buyers at home or office Ed Reichert, 904/787-7072 Erwin Bryan, Jr., 904/793-4701 EST Tommy Bryan, 904/793-2781 496/ Office Phones: 0 904/793-3671 or 793-4681 LYKES markets more meat than any other Florida packer. We buy direct from producers in truckload or larger lots. Contact LYKES BROS., INC PHONE 813/229-6506, Tampa, Florida 33566 813/752-1102, Plant City, Florida Ask for: John McKay, Larry Ross, Kenneth Killingsworth, Kenny Salter, or E. G. Morgan Custom Feeding at its Modern Best All major packing plants in area plus good year-round climate make this location one of the most economical feeding areas in the nation. FULL CUSTOMER SERVICE FEEDING MARKETING I Feed financing available and we can help arrange for your cattle and hedge program. CLARENCE MARTIN President & Gen. Mgr. Res. (806) 247-3602 LARRY DODSON Yard Manager Res. (806) 364-0689 BILL BAILEY Assistant Manager Res. (806) 247-3854 WHILE YOU ARE AT THE FLORIDA CATTLEMEN'S CONVENTION, COME BY AND VISIT OUR HOSPITALITY SUITE. THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 103 BUYING Rt. 2, Box 29A Friona, Texas 79035 Ph: 1806) 295-3100

PAGE 104

Bujyr's Guide A & R Farms .. A Bar 1 ....... Adams Linoisin Adais Ranch .. A dsit .. Ag Ba g Corp. Agri-G uard AStar Aid Lab Airport Livestock Amierican Angus Ass'n Amer. Brahmiental Assin American Birender Service American Hereford Aierican Polled Hereford Amnrica Wood Products A tidrson Sales & Service A drew Tent Arciadi L S. Market Auc in W ay Austin lertilizer Bair, Dr, Roy A. Brldwin. Leroy Biar A liraiigLS ilir (; Bar Brrield Farms Bartlile Bros. Baxley Farms .I. Beefiaster Breeders Bellemeade Farms Bennirett. R.D Bes Ille. Hermain. Blouini & Hyde Bood Simnmental Brandilt ('harolis Briir (reek Farms B r.ks Hill Farm. ..30 .64 .33 *.56 .47 .54 .22 .18 .14 .too .85 .106 ..36 ...72 .73 .60 18, 22 .62 .61 ..27 .55 ..I ...10 5 ..86 ..-...38 .....30 .80-81 .95 .74 Universal .76 ..86 .......8 2 .....1 .94 .44 .88 .....74 ....86 (ajun Cattle Service .94 (APRI ..15 Carter, John E. ........76 (atileie 'ris L.S. M arket .61 Cattlemen's constructionn Co. .6 CJB Fams ....86 C K Ranch .73 C~l S li rni. .42 C enral Packing. 03 Century Steel Buildings ..29 Chandelle Ranch .42 Chapman and Collier .95 Chapman, James C. .97 Chiplny L.S. Market .61 Chipola Red Angus Ranch ..42 (hitt, IHM. .86 Chu s. lieldeibrand ...73 Circle I) Ranch .97 Circle R Ranch .38 Circen T Raitch .74 Citrus Chemical .47 Clairk Angus Ranch .84 ColeanEvans .26 Columbia Market .61 Conibear Equipment .21 Corrigan Ranch .72 Cove Bend .69 Coo Palace Market .61 Crescent J Ranch .88 C rew s .F. .Jr.92 Curtiss Breeding .42 Cypress Creek Ranch .82 Dabney W elding .14 Davis, D. T., Ranch .92 Davis Farms .24 Day Feed M ill .101 Deep River .38 Diamond C. Inc. .72 Diamond T Ranch .94 Dicks Grain & Cattle .27 Dietrich Brothers .69 Dry Creek .78 Duda. A. & Sons ..59. 95 Duncan Charolais Farm .88 D utch Inn .57 E .B .A ..95 Eatmon, K. D. .65 Echodell Ranch .74 Edwards Livestock .61 El Dorado Ranch .72 Emery, Paul .30 Enfinger Red Angus .41 E-Z Pull ...24 Fair Store.97 Fenton Feeders .22 Festuca Ranch. 00 Flint River Mills .83 Fla. Angus Association .86 Fla. Association L.S. M kts .61 F.B.C.I A. .26 Florida Beef Council .46 Florida Charolais Ass'n .,.88 Florida Club Calf .75 Florida Fence Post .62 Fa.-Ga. Beefmaster Ass'n .78 Florida Hereford Ass'n .73 Florida Limousin Association ...31 Florida Molasses Exchange .37, 91 Florida Polled Hereford .74 1Ia. Red Angus Ass'n .42 Florida Santa Gertrudis .68-69 1 lorida Sim mental .42 Lying M Ranch .28 1 reeman Cattle Co.33 Gainesville L.S. Market Gainesville Stockman Supply Gemini Springs Gingerbred Farms Glover F arn s G o ild 's Grahai Angus Farm Graham & Associates Greenwsay Angus .61 .57 .69 .33 .82 .97 .86 .105 1.86 Haile-Dean Seed Co .53 Hales Farm ...92 Hanlord, G. C.It Hlardee Market .61 Harrell Cattle Company .76 Harrison, John .96 Harvey. Joe .74 Haym an. Paul .38 Heart Bar Ranch ..95 Heldenbrand & Sons .73 "erring Polled Here words 74 Hidden Valley Ranch ..42 High Plains Feed Yard ..103 Hood Tractor Co .25 Hughes Angus .86 Hunt Ranches Heifer Sale .87 IB B A .37 l.M .C. Rainbo ..23 Interstate Livestock Market ....61 Jacksonville L.S. Market .61 Jay Livestock M kt .61 Jenkins Ranch .86 Jennings & Sons Mfg. 62 JMC Ranch .76 Jones Polled Herefords .73 Jo-Su-Li Farms .73 K Bar .88 Kabar Ranch ..96 Kaplan Industries .103 K elley. D ick .62 King Ranch .67 Kissimmee L.S. Market .61 Lakeland Cash Feed .75 Lee & Sons Fitting Service .26 Lemon Cattle Enterprises .82 Lewis, Larry.102 Little Everglades. .65 Live Oak Plantation .94 Lykes Brothers, Inc.103 Lykes Pasco Fertilizer Division .10 M & M Supply Madison Stockyards. M alloy, Dallas Martin Company, C .. Martin's Casa Grande Martins Red Angus McKellar Ranch M ills M arket M itchell Farms Mitchell Hereford Farm Monticello Stockyard, Inc. M oorman .60 .6 1 .74 .33 .39 ..42 ..96 .61 .38 .73 .6 1 .6 N O BA .38 N utrena .2 Odom Polled Herefords .74 Okeechobee L.S. Market.61 Osborne Cattle Co. .33 Parks Land Clearing Partin, Henry 0. P .D .Q ... Peace Valley Ranch Pedigo, Haskell Pigg, W .C .. Pine Acres Ranch Pineview Farms. Placid Farm s Poli-tron Pounds Motors Powell, H .T. .,. Production Credit Ragans, Paul Ralston Purina Co. The Rancher Ringo, Jimmy .16 .95 .107 .92 .42 .12 .72 .78 .96 .9 .79 .96 .16 ..78 .17, 90 .97 ..103 River Divide Ranch Roberts Angus Farm Rock Hlollow Far in Rocking K Ranch Rocking S Ranch Rocking T Ranch Rogers Bar HR Rollins Ranch Ron Don Cattle Co. Ross Bros. Rush Brothers. Russells Western Store RWA Bar Custon Fitters RVJ Farms Sagamore Farms Sans Souci Santa ie River Ranch S.G.B.I Scarborough, James Schearbrook Farms Scruggs Quail Feeders Select Sire,. Sells, Sam & Sons Seitienia Forums. Serinirle Steel Seminole Stores. Seven-Eleven Seven Lazy Eleven Beenasters Shell Animal Health Shirley, H. M. Simmons Ranch' Simus Fart, Ray Sirgletary Farmts. A. 0. Smith Harvestorn Sitith Ranch Smoak House Ranch S.E. Brangus Ass'n SE. Frozen Semen S.E. M olasses S E Red Angus S.E. Senepol, Ltd Southern Star Southwood Farm .7 Stack, G T ... Stage Coach Ranch Staley Livestock Products Stalnaker Brothers Stardust Ranch Steel-N-Timber Buildings Still House Hollow Stockman Supply Strong Post Structures Stuart, .K. Stuart, W.H. Sudbrink Sugarland Ranch Sumner, Glenn. Sumter County Market Sunshine State Steers Superior Fertilizer Super-Mol Suwannee Point Suwannee Valley Market Sykes Angus Ranch .. .. . .. . . .. ....... I alley Ranch .76 Thomas, Dwight .65 Thompson Brothers .84 Tilton, W .96 Tindel Livestock Market .61 ro OThe Hill. .35 Trail-Rite .97 Tuckers Farm Center .00 Tucker, Gilbert & Sons .95 Tucker L.M. 92 U.S. Sugar Corp. V M S VYN-AC, Inc. Velsicol Chemical Vermeer Equipment Virgo, Glenn. 5 .8 .106 .29 .91 Walker Farms .95 Wasdin Charolais .91 W aters, S. L. 94 Wells, Billy H., & Associates .24 West Agro-Chemical ..19 89 Western Gentleman .97 West Florida L.S. Mkt. 61 Wetherington, J.L. 73 White Oak Plantation .28 Williams, Rick ..63 W ilson, Pat .73 Winn-DiPie Stores, Inn. I Winnstead Plantation.69 Wisconsin Livestock. 100 Wise Seed Company .15 Young Acres Ranch .74 Young H. Clint .92 Zipperer Beefmasters .77 .73 .82 .74 .88 .95 .76 .88 .94 .78 .69 .72 .103 .63 .74 .82 .91 74 .69 94 .86 .74 .86 .25 .105 38 .78 .32 .30 .30 .6 .74 .12 .78 S.72 .38 .182 .to0 .43 .28 .82 4, 86 .92 .65 1.28 86 .1 .73 .57 .24 .95 .95 .30 .13 .95 .61 .97 .108 .6S .61 .86 104 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 Diagnosti(e id) by H. L. RUBIN. D.V.M. Florida Dept. of Agricu/tare From some of the comments that I heard at the open FCA animal disease and technical committee meeting which was held in Kissimmee in April to explain and discuss the proposed brucellosis programs, it was quite evident that many of those present lacked a basic understanding of vaccines and vaccinations. In view Of the proposed expansion of the Brucella vaccination program, I felt that this would be an opportune time to review some basic principles of vaccination and vaccines. When an animal becomes naturally exposed (infected) to an infectious bacteria or virus, the animal's body immediately responds to the infection by producing specific circulating substances which can neutralize the infectious agent. These circulating neutralizing substances are called antibodies. As a result of an infection, the body develops a natural defense against a subsequent similar infection. This natural defense is known as inmnunit. Immediately after an infection, the level of circulating antibody in the body may be quite highhowever, as time passes, the level of antibody decreases until it may be below that level needed to neutralize an infection. Fortunately, the body defenses have almost instantaneous recall and if a subsequent infection does occur, the body defenses are stimulated and in a very short span of time the animal's antibody level against that specific infectious agent will again rise to a protective level. Antibody development is a very selective process and for each type of agent that infects the animal, its body will produce specific antibodies against that specific infection. Thus, for example, if an animal has been exposed to 10 infectious diseases, its body will develop specific antibodies against those 10 diseases. Artificial methods of developing an animal's natural body defenses have been developed. This is done by exposing the animal's body to specific controlled infections. This process is known as vaccination and the agents used to produce the antibodies are known as vaccines. Vaccines are suspensions of microorganisms, either living or killed, which, when introduced into an animal's body, stimulate the animal's body defenses to produce antibodies against the specific microorganism. The microorganisms in a living vaccine have been weakened or modified so that when introduced into the animal's body

PAGE 105

Advertise Regularly Advertising Aids Your Personal Salesmanship Contact any of our fieldmen for full details. 7loida AND LIVESTOCK JOURNAL P.O. Box 1403 Kissimmee, Fla. 32741 Roy A. Bair, Ph. D. GRASSLAND AGRONOMIST 256 Alhambra Place WEST PALM BEACH, FLA. 33405 Phone (305) 582-2933 SE EDS CA L L WISE SEED COMPANY, INC. (813) 635-4473 Route 1, Box 7 Frostproof, Fla. 33843 Available for Spring Planting Sorghum-Sudan Hybrid Argentine Bahiagrass Paraguayan 22 Bahiagrass Pensacola Bahiagrass Aeschynomene Gahi Millet Alyceclover Brown Top Millet Japanese Millet Hairy Indigo SHARE HARVEST PROGRAM Supervised by owner and sons MODERN PROCESSING and Warehouse facilities SEEDS-Our Only Business (Registered, Licensed and Bonded) they cause a mild or modified infection without producing the actual disease. The immunity produced by these living vaccines is equal to and, in some cases, greater than that produced by a natural infection. Brucella Strain 19 is such a vaccine. Killed vaccines, in general, produce a lower level of immunity. Since the organisms cannot reproduce, the amount of antigen available for the body to neutralize is limited. In some instances, two separate injections of a killed vaccine are needed in order to produce an adequate antibody level. The first injection, which produces a very low level of antibody, sensitizes the body to the vaccine (antigen). The second injection, usually given a week or two later, stimulates the sensitized animal's body to produce protective levels of the antibody. Dosage varies with the type of vaccine used. For example, the dose for a killed vaccine is generally larger than an attenuated or modified vaccine. In the development and use of attenuated vaccines we have learned that, in many instances, a smaller dose can be just as effective as a larger dose. Such is the case with Brucella Strain 19 vaccine where research now indicates that smaller doses may be just as effective as the present standard 5-ml. dose. Immunity is a very complex problem and many questions regarding immunity and vaccination still remain unanswered. Researchers are constantly increasing our knowledge on antibody formation and the mechanism of immunity. Hopefully, some day research will be able to develop artificial vaccines which will, with a single injection, provide an animal with life-long immunity. Marketing act passed in Montana Officials of Livestock Marketing Association, Kansas City, Missouri, have praised the marketing act recently passed by Montana as a "breakthrough in establishing a sound basis of financial stability in marketing, and in equipping state authorities with the tools to deal with the swindlers who prey on producers and marketing businessmen alike." The comment caine from LMA General Manager C. T. 'Tad' Sanders. Montana State Representative Robert A. Ellerk, the bill's sponsor in the House, and also an LMA associate manager, noted that the purpose of the Montana bill "is to simplify, clarify and modernize the law governing livestock marketing, as well as to promote open, free and competitive factors in marketing. A major provision requires every livestock market, dealer and broker to maintain his total assets in excess of his total liabilities. The law also provides for livestock payment upon completion of the sales transaction by cash, check, draft, electronic funds transfer or other "bankable instrument." V-MESH FENCE Write for catalog sheet and prices. IFIED, SEED AND fRTILIZER P. 0. BOX 940-A OCALA, FLORIDA 32670 on your farm, ranch or hunting grounds THE SECRET IS SUPPLEMENTAL FEEDING WITH SCRUGGS QUAIL FEEDERS (The ORIGINAL-Patented) STOCK PROOF N WEATHER PROOF 6 VARMINT PROOF Tested and proven for over 20 years by the Florida Game & Fresh Water Fish Commission. Rugged metal construction. 2 gallon capacity. Over 250,000 now in use. $11.95 each' $17.95 2 gallon size 4 gallon size F.O.B. Tampa F.O.B. Tampa WILD TURKEY FEEDERS' 6 gallon capacity Freight paid on orders of 25 or more Excluding Alaska and Hawail THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979 / 105 Cattle Squeeze Holds 'em Safel Holds em Secure'

PAGE 106

BRA EIEUITAL THE BEEF BREED OF THE FUTURE A GREAT NEW BREED COMBINING THE BEST OF TWO GREAT BREEDS BRAHMAN -SIMMENTAL F LO.EOUS COM AN T VA E T S _VO Smore information on how to get started with THIS EXCITING NEW BREED, contact: American Brahmental'" Association Dr. J. 0. Brumlow, President P. 0. Box 956, Floresvjlle, Texas 78114 Phone: 512/393-6464 or 393-2781 Rawhide Tough 'HURRICANE ROOF' Ends Roofing Problems Now! It's "VYN-AC" Plastic Coating Imagine not having to nail shingles or rip off old roofing. Now, our exclusive "VYN-AC" can be applied to any old roof, homes, barns or commercial buildings, metal tile, asphalt, wood, etc. Stops leaks and renews the beauty of the roof. Hardens to a "Rawhide Tough" finish that contracts and expands and lasts for long wear. This Vinyl product is also used to recover siding and masonry. "ADDS MUCH ADDITIONAL INSULATION VALUE!" We think this is the latest and greatest improvement in roofing and coating. Factory to you! MAKE THIS YOUR LAST ROOF For more information or free estimate, call toll free 24 hours a day 1-800-824-7888, operator No .6 or write. VYN-AC, P.O. Box 788, Ormond Beach, FL 32073. IEditoflaIs') FCA had another soundyear "Get involved-don't let everyone else do it for you." These were the words of FCA President Henry Douglas when he took over the leadership of the organization a year ago. There has been strong support from all and much involvement by the membership in matters affecting the cattle industry in that period. The past year has had both good and bad sides, of course. Initially, the new FCA administration was confronted with President Carter's decision to increase meat imports by 200 million pounds. FCA took a strong stand in opposition to this action and assurance was later given that consultation with the cattle industry would be primary before any further action on imports would be taken. FCA's input was very relative in this instance. Efforts on the part of several members brought an increase in membership in the National Cattlemen's Association with FCA winning the membership drive in Region II which was headed by NCA Vice President Pat Wilson. A total of 275 new members were added from Florida for an increase of 65 percent. It should be pointed out here there are many advantages to being a member of NCA, as well as holding membership in FCA. In the past year FCA has gone on record as supporting the budgets of IFAS and the Veterinary College; opposing any reorganization of USDA, and opposing the retention of the carryover basis provision of the Tax Reform Act of 1976. These are areas where your FCA leadership has been active at various levels of government. This participation takes time and money. Which brings up the issue of a dues increase for FCA membership. The proposal which will be voted on at the June convention will result in only a $6 per member increase per year. When it is figured that it costs something over $10 annually to service each member of FCA, it is a small increase, indeed. In terms of inflation, it is very minute. Another area where FCA has taken a positive stand this past year concerns the brucellosis program. Efforts are now being made at the legislative level for funding to carry out the program in Florida for whole herd vaccination in those heavily infected parts of the state. Changes in the national brucellosis program to fit Florida's needs were effected through direct contact with federal and state authorities in meetings both in the state and in Washington, D. C. In retrospect, this has been another sound year for your Association, which incidentally, is in the forty-fifth of its existence. And President Douglas was correct in stressing the importance of being "involved." It's what keeps an organization strong. After all, it is your Association and your voice is important on every issue that confronts the industry. Your active participation is appreciated, currently and in the years to come. The national beef research program The 1976 Beef Research and Information Act authorizes a national program where cattle producers may assess themselves to finance activities to improve and develop markets for cattle, beef and beef products. The law compares with legislation authorizing check-off programs for commodities such as cotton, eggs and potatoes. Public hearings are now being held across the country on the Act to determine if an order permitting research and information activities should be issued. The order, if approved, would provide a self-financing program and it is estimated about $100 million per year would be generated to help the industry as outlined. Your favorable vote will help you in the long run. It's convention time again FCA's annual convention is set for June 27-30 at the Dutch Inn Resort Hotel, Lake Buena Vista. It's a very interesting place with a feature being Walt Disney World Village just down the hill from the hotel, where there are many things to do and see. Make your plans to attend! 106 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / JUNE 1979

PAGE 107

FEEDING RESULTS / P PROVE /J( 0 MINERAL-VITAMIN-PROTEIN-SUPPLEMENTS are the cattleman's answer to many of his everyday health and nutritional problems. Continuous research on Florida ranges over a 25 year period is your assurance of a tailor-made supplement to fill any condition of Florida weather, pasture and season. A specific feed supplement for poor, fair and good pastures. Make it easy for your calves to get mineral by keeping mineral feeders low. This is the first step in pre-conditioning your calves and a sure step for more weight at weaning and selling time. Don't Put A Limit On Your Profit By Holding Back On Nutrition (Member, Florida Cattlemen's Association) Ask Your Local Dealer to Stock It For You or Phone 813/682-6144, P.O. Box 116 I

PAGE 108

Familiarize yourself with the safety and loading instructions printed on each of Superior's bulk haulers. Accidents and mistakes are costly, and we want to keep all costs down as low as possible for you. Superior Fertilizer and Chemical Company is a Florida owned and operated company, so we not only ANNA MARIE Roger Hale 778-9433 CLERMONT Carlisle Byrd 394-2959 FORT MYERS David McCormick 936-3372 FORT PIERCE Wally Long 461-0636 Robert L. Williams 461-1392 JUPITER Sunny Smith 746-5557 LAKE ALFRED Wade Wiggins 956-1433 LAKELAND W. S. (Bill) Cribb, Jr. 646-8934 ODESSA C. S. Little 920-2922 have a day-to-day familiarity with the problems of the Florida cattle industry, we offer individualized, rather than computerized advice. When you deal with a Superior representative, you're dealing with a man who cares about you and your business. The man from Superior says now is the time to fertilize OKEECHOBEE Ben Dixon 763-3257 ORLANDO Max L. Brown 896-3621 PLANT CITY Fred 0. Johnson 752-1463 RUSKIN Edward 0. Green 645-6431 SARASOTA Leroy Fortner 371-4148 TAMARAC Ed Haithcock 739-2772 TAMPA Paul Bearss 961-0474 VERO BEACH G. Sidney Stinson 562-5439 WAUCHULA W. C. (Buck) Buchanan 773-6680 thin stands of improved grass pastures, but do not fertilize grass pastures that will be overseeded to clover this fall. For the best service and products call the man from Superior.


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EGZS5WU8D_5UUI1T INGEST_TIME 2018-07-25T19:25:06Z PACKAGE AA00062224_00449
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES