Citation
Eating locally

Material Information

Title:
Eating locally designing a farm to improve food security within a community in Miami-Dade
Creator:
Collazos, Laura ( author )
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 online resource (25 pages) : illustrations ;

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
farm -- unincorporated -- food insecure -- system
Landscape Architecture capstone project, B.L.A

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
General Note:
landscape architecture capstone project
Statement of Responsibility:
by Laura Collazos.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright creator. Permission granted to the University of Florida to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
035647007 ( ALEPH )
Classification:
LD1780.1 2017 ( lcc )

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
University of Florida Theses & Dissertations

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

LAURA COLLAZOS UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA APRIL 21, 2017Eating Locally: Designing a Peri-Urban Farm to Improve Food Security Within a Community in Miami-Dade http://inhabitat.comban-farming

PAGE 2

TABLE OF CONTENTSGENERAL INFORMATION GIS ANALYSIS OVERALL ANALYSIS SITE DESIGN EXECUTIVE SUMMARY SCOPE OF WORK GIS METHODOLOGY ABOUT ITS PEOPLE MASTERPLAN PRIMARY ISSUES CASE STUDIES PRELIMINARY GOALS AND OBJECTIVES GIS SUITABAILITY ANALYSIS THE CHOSEN SITE ABOUT THE REGION GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

PAGE 3

GENERAL INFORMATION

PAGE 4

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY PRIMARY ISSUESMany low income communities in Miami-Dade are food insecure and lack access to healthy and affordable food. Research has shown that an increase in food availability may reduce deaths and illnesses related to diet related diseases. This project intends to improve food security within a Miami-Dade community by designing a peri-urban farm for that community. neighborhood-level resources, such as the average income of the neighborhood and the availability of public transportation. a suitability analysis will identify the most suitable sites for the implementation of a peri-urban farm and its complimentary programs. The objectives of the site analysis will be developed considering the list of sustainability indicators for peri-urban farms provided by the Once the most suitable site from the study area is selected, further analysis and research will help develop a design that ensures the success of the peri-urban farm. The project will consider low impact design, production, distribution, food education and celebration in the proposed design. A master plan composed of site suitability analyses, a conceptual landscape plan, elevations, diagrams and design development details will convey the proposed design. For the purpose of this project, it will be assumed that the development will be funded by County programs such as the Miami Dade Food Trust. It will be operated by the chosen community, but it will have the potential to feed other communities in the County. hold-level economic and social condition of limited or uncertain access to adequate food. The phenomenon occurs largely in peri-ur ban, low income areas in which residents cannot access a supermarket. The Department of Health and Human Services has concluded rates for diet related diseases. People in communities without supermarkets are more likely to eat less healthy and spend more money on their purchase. They often cope with the issue by shopping at convenience and corner stores that have higher prices and less items of nutritional quality. Additionally, a lack of farm presence distances people from their food and their surroundings. Many people fail to connect their food to their region and seasonality. They also fail to understand how production and waste may be depleting their natural resources.

PAGE 5

SCOPE OF WORK MAJOR ISSUES VALUE OF PROJECTThis project intends to provide a food insecure community access to healthy and affordable food through a farm located in a peri-urban area, also known as a peri-urban farm. This project will provide a masterplan composed of site suitability analyses, a conceptual landscape plan, elevations, diagrams and design development details to convey the proposed design. The project will consider production, distribution, waste management, food education and celebration in the proposed design. Furthermore, it will revitalize the community and simulate natural systems. The following will help ensure the models success: Research case studies and precedents of urban farms. allow the implementation of a peri-urban farm. Conduct a site suitability analysis of the food insecure communities to identify the site best suitable for the implementation of a peri-urban farm and complimentary programs. Analyze the selected sites opportunities and constraints. Explore connections to the surrounding community (residential homes, businesses, restaurants). Design a landscape plan for a peri-urban farm and its complimentary programs. Design for low impact design, community involvement and farm productivity. Most agricultural development in Miami Dade lies outside the Urban Development Boundary. Most farms supply the major ity of their food to distant supermarkets. Yet, there are many low income peri-urban communities that do not have access to supermarkets and rely on convenience stores as a much less healthy and expensive alternative. Fortunately, planning for a peri-urban farm begins to addresses the issue. The depletion of our natural resources is largely unregulated during agricutural production. Increased monitoring of agricultural production may lead to severe economic loss for farmers and also scarcity and higher prices for consumers. Nevertheless, new development in farming suggests that sites may be designed to protect natural resources while improving productivity and reducing costs. Designers have the moral responsibility to focus on the improvement of the social, economic and environmental issues in communities. It is especially important to address the issues of communities in need of access to life sustaining goods such as food. Research has shown that the addition of local farms and community programs designed for food blighted areas may greatly improve the health of communities. Thus, this project explores how designers can guide development in a food insecure community for the well being of all present and future generations. This project may greatly improve a low income communitys access to healthy and affordable food. It will also revitalize the community by providing jobs and enhancing the communitys character. Through a farm-to-table concept, the project will recognize the value of a central systerm that integrates a community into its context. Hence, it may serve as an urban model for greatly improving the conditions of low income communities in peri-urban areas. This project will explore more sustainable practices that intend to replicate some natural systems. The project will reduce the depletion of natural resources by minimizing the effects of waste and production on the nearby environment. Thus, the site may serve as a model for sustainable urban farming.

PAGE 6

GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM ANALYSIS

PAGE 7

GIS METHODOLOGY GOAL 1: IDENTIFY FOOD INSECURE TRACTSObjective 1.1: Identify food insecure tracts based on the USDAs Food Research Atlas.GOAL 2: FILTER FOR UNINCORPORATED MUNICIPAL ZONESObjective 2.1: Filter for PU lands GOAL 3: IDENTIFY BEST SUITABLE PARCELS FOR A COMMUNAL PU FARM Objective 3.1: Identify parcels that are most physically suitable for PU Agricultural Production Subobjective 3.1.1: Identify suitability based on existing land use Subobjective 3.1.2: I Objective 3.2: Identify lands that are most economically suitable for PU Agricultural Production Subobjective 3.2.1: Identify suitability based on existing land use Subobjective 3.2.1: Identify suitability based on population densityGIS FILTERING PROCESS FOOD INSECURE TRACTS UNINCORPORATED ZONES

PAGE 8

PHYSICAL SUITABILITYGIS SUITABILITY ANALYSISWeighted Summary Existing Land Use Fema Flood Zone Soil Farmland ______________________ Physical Suitability Existing Land Use .2 .4 .2 1 Fema Flood Zone Soil Farmland ECONOMIC SUITABILITYGIS SUITABILITY ANALYSISWeighted Summary Existing Land Use Population Density ______________________ Economic Suitability Existing Land Use .2 .4 1 Population Density

PAGE 9

GIS SUITABILITY ANALYSIS OVERALL SUITABILITY Weighted Summary Existing Land Use Fema Flood Zone Soil Farmland ______________________ Physical Suitability Physical Suitability Economic Suitability .2 .4 .2 1 HIGHLIGHTED AREA IN MOST NEED* *The GIS analysis suggested that the most suitable sites were located outside of the Urban Development Boundary. However, include the areas most in need of better access to adequate and affordable food, represented by the highlighted areas. This information was based on low sales low income and high deaths and was provided by the 2012 Miami-Dade Food Trust Report HIGHLIGHTED AREA IN MOST NEED*THE SELECTED SITE 15 acre parcel that is owned by the Miami-Dade Public Housing and Community Development Located directly north of a successful park facil ity, Gwen Cherry Park, which was downloaded by the NFL to protect at risk youths. Located near several low income housing devel opments Easiliy accessible to other communities via met rorail or buses. Existing Land Use: Vacant Land Located in FEMA Flood Zone Surounding Population Density:CONTEXTUAL SUITABILITY SITE GIS SUITABILITY

PAGE 10

REGIONAL AND SITE ANALYSIS

PAGE 11

ABOUT THE REGION STRUGGLESUNMARKETABLE, UNSAFE 1 MILE N SITE LEGEND COMMERCIAL / INDUSTRIAL LOTS MUNICIPAL ZONES COMMERCIAL / INDUSTRIAL LOTS Local residents struggle as they depend on the markets and shops spread within these industrial lots. Although their sales from local residents vary depending on their location, all these shops are off putting. They look like warehouses and offer limited products. LOW INCOME HOUSING Dense clusters of low income housing may deter outside communities from exploring the region and create an unsafe, environment. SNAP household recipients* 50% Children 34% Single Mom 10% Married 46% Disability 43% Over 60 Education* 15% adults higher degree 56% have a High School diploma*Data provided by Neighbor hoodReport.com2.5 MILE RADIUS / 15 MIN BIKE RIDE TO FARM MUNICIPAL ZONE: MIAMI SITE COMMERCIAL / INDUSTRIAL LOTRace 60% African American 25% Hispanic 10% White Health >33% obese adults >14% of adults diagnosed with diabetes >38% adults were physically inactive past 30 days*Data provided by NeighborhoodReport.comWORKING TOGETHERABOUT THE REGION PEOPLEI still get to see people I went to school with! Resident for 60 years Location to airport, bus station, train station -Resdient for 42 years I love to have my little house, always like to see people walking or going on their bikes up and down the street from my kitchen window. -Resident for 7 years*Survey by Its Better in BrownsvilleWHAT ARE SOME OF YOUR FAVORITE THINGS ABOUT YOUR COMMUNITY? LOCAL VOLUNTEERS AND DONATIONS VIBRANT, CULTRUAL ARCHITECTURE Some features, like government funded housing, have been revamped by locals to celebrate the communits history and culture. Ancestry Cuban, Puerto Rican Haitian, Jamaican, African

PAGE 12

LEGEND SITE COMMERCIAL PUBLIC SCHOOL / PARKS CULTURAL LAND USE HOUSING DENSITY MARKET LOCATIONSLEGEND SITE LEGEND SITE LESS DENSE MOST DENSE MARKET LOCATION 1 MILE RADIUS TRAILER HOMES / PUBLIC HOUSING ABOUT THE REGION INVENTORY 1. IMPROVE FOOD SECURITY Provide a community farm to be managed by the community and funded by Miami-Dade.INCENTIVIZE A MARKET 2. ENRICH THE LIVES OF THE LOCAL COMMUNITY Reduce food waste 3. PROMOTE SELF-EFFICIENCY THROUGH EDUCATION Welcome visitors by reaching out through public schools Teach residents how to grow their food 4. CELEBRATE THE COMMUNITY Design for artistic expression 5. EXTEND GREEN SPACE Connect site to Gwen Cherry Park LEGEND SITE COMMERCIAL/ INDUSTRIAL AREA FOR COMMERCIAL REDEVELOPMENT RESIDENTIAL AREA W/ SCHOOLS AND CULTURAL CENTERS RESIDENTIAL AREA GWEN CHERRY PARK N ABOUT THE REGION SYNTHESIS OPPORTUNITIESTRAILER HOMES / PUBLIC HOUSING

PAGE 13

ABOUT THE SITE EXISTING IMAGES DANGEROUS WALKWAY HIGHER INCOME RESIDENCES WIDE, OPEN SPACESABOUT THE SITE GWEN CHERRY PARK History Youth Educational Town Center was donated by the NFL to enhance the lives of at-risk youth in cities that host the Super Bowl. Community Programs Communities in School of Miami (Educational) Boys and Girls Club of Miami (Sports) Learn to Swim Active Adults 55+ Program Basketball courts Football Outdoor gym Track Playground Youth Education Town

PAGE 14

ABOUT THE SITE INVENTORY LAND USE BUS ROUTESLEGEND LEGEND SITE SITE BUS ROUTE COMMERCIAL BUS STOP PUBLIC SCHOOL / PARKS CULTURAL ABOUT THE SITE SYNTHESIS

PAGE 15

INCENTIVIZE A MARKET ENRICH THE LIVES OF INDIVIDUALS AND THE LOCAL COMMUNITY HEALTHY EATING CAFE + RESTAURANT SENSORY GARDEN COMMUNITY SHARED AGRICULTURE DELIVERY FAMILY GATHERINGS JOB CREATION YOUTH EMPOWERMENT

PAGE 16

insects by following permaculture principles. An innovative and sustainable agricultural practice will help ensure economic viability and sustain productivity for the farm; as it creates opportunities to form co-ops with nearby ifas extension and local packaging businesses. PROMOTE SELF EFFICIENCY THROUGH EDUCATIONTEACHING CENTER FREE SEED GERMINATION BAGS JOB SPECIALIZATIONhttp://permacultureprinciples.comSUSTAINABLY

PAGE 17

Orchard Park and FarmThe design opens to 22nd Avenue with a cafe that serves baked goods and and a nursery display. A promenade of painted murals from local artists then leads visistors into the teach ing center, and exhibition building. People can congregate in the open aired pavilion and then explore the sensory garden. This experience then introduces visitors to the two spectrums of agricultural production. One that allows for exploration of the growth of natural ecosys tems in a food forest; it also feautres rows of orchards and crop production. The west side of the site enhances the passive outdoor recreational experience while also housing livestock and producing feed for them. Visitors get to enjoy seeing the large mass of Although the site must be fenced at all times, the layout, art murals and large building centers will engage the nearby residents.22 nd Ave N

PAGE 18

and retention area Orchard and Nursery Barnhouse Equipment storage, hay production Chicken coop Compressed Gravel Rabbit shed Greenhouse area Goat shed with playground Food forest Clock Tower, Pavilion, Teaching Center, Art Exhibition Cafe and Nursery Display Event Center

PAGE 19

nearby residents. The goal is to show people that locally grown, organic food is very accessible to either buy or produce and to bring all members of the community together so that they can exchange resources and services.INTEGRATING ALL MEMBERS OF THE COMMUNITY TO IMPROVE FOOD SECURITYTHEIR FOOD STRUGGLE Unemployment Low income Accessibility FARM PROGRAMS Job Creation Local Farming Lessons and Tours Seasonal Crop Discounts CSA Food Delivery Prepackaged meals at cafe Time ........................................................ ........................................................ ........................................................

PAGE 20

TO FOOD FOREST 0 60 120180 240 B B 0 60 120180 240 Existing live oak trees Chicken coop Tractor Access Movable Planter with produce Picnic tables and grills Performance Stage facing open lawn Food Forest VIEW TO LIVESTOCK VIEW TO STAGE

PAGE 21

Swale market Cafe + nursery gar den display Clock Tower CANOPY LAYER -Coonut Palms -Southern Magnolia Tree Pecan Tree -Lychee SMALL TREES -Pear Tree -Apple Tree Banana Tree -Murlberry VINES -Passion Flower Jasmine ROOTS Watermelon Sweet Potatoe Recycled steel fence VIEW TO CAFE VIEW TO FOOD FORESTThe food forest will grow

PAGE 22

0 60 120 180 240 0 60 120 180 240 VIEW TO EVENT CENTER VIEW TO ORCHARD FARM SYSTEM The event center will be a venue for weddings, birthdays and parties. Each event will hire local cooks and aspiring chefs while also featuring carribean inspired foods. Visitors are invited to step out into the sensory garden where they can vegeatbles and herbs. The sensory garden will open to a view of the orchard with the food forest in the back. The orchard will contain fast yielding crops underneath until trees mature and sunlight becomes scarce underneath. Then, these can be replaced by shade tolerant plants in order to ensure that the nitrate uptake for the orchards. The plant diversity for the food forest will help the plans grow sustainably. By planting the right plants together, farmers can reduce the probability of production loss that could result from pests and diseases. The forest will introduce wildlife and use winds

PAGE 23

Self-Sustaining Community Farm Urban Communities Farms Interchanging ResourcesOffer resources to urban communities This design informs us what a good farm must consider. and practice sustainable techniques that will ensure its longevity and long term production. Its details and forms must be further developed with the guidance residents.

PAGE 24

Works CitedA Healthier Future. Nursing Standard 5.34 (1991): 17. Web. Colorado Aquaponics. Welcome to Colorado Aquaponics. Colorado Aquaponics, n.d. Web. 08 Oct. 2016. FAQ. Seattle Urban Farm Company. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Sept. 2016. Find Zoning within Unincorporated Miami-Dade County. Find Zoning within Unincorporated Miami-Dade County. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Sept. 2016. Freilich, Robert H. AGRICULTURE AND RURAL AREA (n.d.): n. pag. Web. 13 Sept. 2016. Georgia Institute of Technology. Urban Farming. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Sept. 2016. Meyer, Fred, and Melissa Sharapova. Agroforestry. SpringerReference (2015): n. pag. Backyardabundance.org. Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewards, Feb. 2015. Web. 02 Mar. 2017. Phillips, April. Designing Urban Agriculture. N.p.: John Wiley & Sons, 2013. Print. Vancouver, City Of. Community Garden Resources. City of Vancouver. RedDot CMS, n.d. Web. 13 Sept. 2016. Rome: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, 2007. Communication Division, 2007. Web. 31 Oct. 2016. Verde Gardens Community Farm and Market. Verde Gardens Community Farm and Market. Urban Oasis Project, n.d. Web. 13 Sept. 2016.

PAGE 25

THANK YOU