Citation
Establishing a Sense of Place through Reactivating the Urban Nexus

Material Information

Title:
Establishing a Sense of Place through Reactivating the Urban Nexus
Creator:
Maalindog, Adolfo
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Architectural design ( jstor )
Cities ( jstor )
City blocks ( jstor )
City squares ( jstor )
Death ( jstor )
Geographical perception ( jstor )
Public space ( jstor )
Retail stores ( jstor )
Urban design ( jstor )
Walking ( jstor )
City planning
Community development, Urban
Public spaces
Genre:
Undergraduate Honors Thesis

Notes

Abstract:
The sense of community is a quality that has been noticeably missing in most dense urban environments in the past years. In the city, greater occupancy levels, closely packed buildings, and widespread transportation capabilities would seem to close the gap between individuals; ironically they feel less connected to each other. The main purpose of my senior year D7 Project, and this thesis, was to ask the question: how can the sense of community be brought back to the city? The question had me closely examining the city’s public spaces. I believe that spaces such as sidewalks, plazas, streets, transport hubs, train stations, and even bus stops can be urban nexuses around which communities can come together once again. It is through the revitalization of these public spaces that we can achieve the sense of place that many cities are in need of. ( en )
General Note:
Awarded Bachelor of Design; Graduated May 7, 2013 summa cum laude. Major: Architecture
General Note:
College/School: College of Design, Construction and Planning
General Note:
Illustrated in collaboration with Jefrall Betancourt
General Note:
Advisor: John Maze
General Note:
Legacy honors title: Only abstract available from former Honors Program sponsored database.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Adolfo Maalindog. Permission granted to the University of Florida to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Full Text

PAGE 2

Adolfo V. Maalindog, Jr. Es tablishing a Sense of Place t hrough Reactivating the Urban Nexus 1 Establishing a Sense of Place t hrough Reactivating the Urban Nexus The sense of community is a quality that has been noticeably missing in most dense urban environments in the past years In the city, greater occupancy levels, closely packed buildings, and widespread transportation capabilities would seem to clo se the gap between individuals; ironically they fee l less connected to each other. The main purpose of my senior y ear D7 Project, and this thesis, was to ask the question: how can the sense of community be believe that spaces such as s idewalks plazas, streets, transport hubs, train stations, and even bus stops can be urban nexuses around which communiti es can come together once again. It is through the revitalization of these public spaces that we can achieve the sense of place that many cities are in need of. Great public spaces give cities a sense of identity Rome has the Piazza dela Rotunda (among many others), Venice the Piazza de San Marco, Paris the Champs Elysees, London has the Piccadilly Circus, and New York has Central Park. While many travel hundreds and thousands of miles to experience these city landmarks, one may only need to walk down t he block to experience a sense of place. A major key to enliven the community is to focus on the street level where most of the interaction in a neighborhood is expected to unfold Fred Kent, founder of Project for Public Spaces, explains how, New York City, the primary activities of a neighborhood took place in the streets on stoops and sidewalks, next to

PAGE 3

Adolfo V. Maalindog, Jr. Es tablishing a Sense of Place t hrough Reactivating the Urban Nexus 2 fire hydrants, and in empty lots 1 Thus was the scene that unfolded: children playing on the street; family run businesses that had their own unique characteristic s lined along the block; the local market vendors selling colorful fresh fruits and vegetables; a barber shop where the locals would tell each other stories; and people saying hello, seemingly as if everyone knew each other, as th ey passed by. However, this sense of community along with the distinct local feel of neighborhoods seems to have diminished as architecture changed C ities in America, and around the globe, have started to look very similar in recent years With the develop ment of industrialism, the adoption of mass production techniques, and the rise of modernism; architecture is experiencing a loss of a sense of locality. Universalism, which is really intended as a development for mankind is plagued by the void it is crea ting within the cultural context of a city. Rapid production, quantity, and widespread distribution (though very beneficial) have inadvertently overrun the landscape of design with monotony. This very phenomenon is described by Kenneth Frampton in Towards a Critical Regionalism : the possibility of maintaining some general control over the shape and significance of the urban fabric. The last two decades, howe ver, have radically transformed the metropolitan centers of the developed world. What were essentially 19 th century city fabrics in the early 1960s have since become progressively overlaid by the two symbiotic instruments of Megalopolitan development the freestanding high rise and the serpentine freeway. The former has finally come into its own as the prime device for realizing the increased land value brought into being by the latter. The typical downtown which up to twenty years ago, still presented a mixture of residential stock with tertiary and secondary industry has now become little more than a burolandschaft city 2 1 Project for Public Spaces H ow to Turn a Place Around: A Handboo k for Creating Successful Publi c Space s (New York: P roject for Public Spaces, Inc. 2000 ), 9 2 Kenn eth Frampton, Towards a Critical Regionalism: Six Points for an Architecture of Resistance in Postmodern Cultur e Edited by Hal Foster ( Trowbridge: The Cromwell Press, 1983), 17.

PAGE 4

Adolfo V. Maalindog, Jr. Es tablishing a Sense of Place t hrough Reactivating the Urban Nexus 3 It would seem that every aspect of life is now moving a t h igh speed. Just as much as the the main mode for people to get around making walking a lost art. And with the city n early becoming no longer walkable, we lose the colorful street level interactions that actually contributed to the neighborhood s sense of c ommunity. are stages for our public lives and according to influential urban planning author and activist 3 f individuals go about their lives constantly moving creating a vast matrix of lines, intersecting with others at various points, creating pockets of metaphysical space. Michel de Certeau poetically describes this matrix of interactio n explaining that the ordinary pra ctitioners of the city live down below below the thresholds at which visibility begins. They walk an elementary form of this experience of the ci ty; they are walke rs, Wandersm nner, whose bodies follow the thicks and thins of an urban text they write without being able to read it 4 Seeing how there lies an extensive web of activity that occurs at the street level, it would only b e logical to channel all th at energy to influence the design of the city. Jane Jacobs n otes that the look of th ings and the way they work are inextricably bound together, and in no place more so than cities. 5 T he design of urban spaces in the D7 New York Project must incorporate technological considerations and advancements in const ruction m e thods while acknowledging the wa y that the city and its occupants live and function first and foremost T he designer must be cognizant 3 Jane Jacobs The Death and Life of Great American Cities ( New York: Random House 1961 ) 29. 4 Michel de Certeau, Walking in the City in The Practice of Everyday Life ( Berkeley: University of Califor nia Press 1984), 158. 5 Jane Jacobs The Death and Life of Great American Cities ( New York: Random House 1961 ) 14.

PAGE 5

Adolfo V. Maalindog, Jr. Es tablishing a Sense of Place t hrough Reactivating the Urban Nexus 4 of the innumerable forces that work on the c ity as a determinant of design Only in doing so can the architecture allow for that inherent local quality that allows for the design to provide its users a sense of belonging. Space is a practiced place 6 according to de Cer t eau and by saying that he points out the important relationship between man and architecture and how one s experiences within a space gives architecture it s meaning to an individual. Block Design and Programming The design of the spaces that would comprise the city block was the result of many influences. One such influence that was introduced this sem ester that I have ne ver put into consideration in prior design projects was zoning. Zoning had a tremendous impact on the shape and form of the buildings as well as the configurations of open spaces around t hem. The block was divided into two zones with very different zoning regulations. The trick was to be able to come up with a massing solution that would follow the zoning guid e lines and delineat e the functions of each buildi ng w ithout disrupting the aspirations for a holistic design that maximized open space. To aid in m assing the block was subdivided into smaller module s to negotiate the extremely large site and to envision spaces at a more human scale. A fter a number of experiments, a massing strategy was devised that proposed a city block that was broken up to form a campus like configuration (Fig. 1) a llowing a clear separation for vario us program elements and more open space. The open space in turn was a rranged in a way as to provide a unifying element l inking the different buildings together while providing both 6 Michel de Certeau, S patial Stories in The Practice of Everyday Life ( Berkeley: University of Califor nia Press 1984), 1 17

PAGE 6

Adolfo V. Maalindog, Jr. Es tablishing a Sense of Place t hrough Reactivating the Urban Nexus 5 vehicular and pedestrian connections within the block and to the rest of the neighborhood (Fig. 2). Fig. 1

PAGE 7

Adolfo V. Maalindog, Jr. Es tablishing a Sense of Place t hrough Reactivating the Urban Nexus 6 Fig. 2 Jane Jacobs recounts how the neighborhood she once lived in had shorter blocks which the residents found advantageous. Accordin g to her, the usual long blocks were oppressive and boring 7 She also adds that long blocks also mean that neighborhood businesses are effectively limited to clients who live on the same street, since people prefer no t to retrace their steps to get to a fruit s tand or shoe repair shop in the middle of a long block on the ot her side. 8 (Fig. 3) The ground level is given a role of importance and its effect on adjacent public space is recognized as a nod to Jane Jacobs who is quoted saying that l owly, unpurposeful, and random as they may appear, sidewalk contacts are the small change from which a city's wealth 7 M ary Soderstrom The Walkable City: From Haussmann s Boulevards to Jane Jacobs Streets and Beyond ( Montreal : Vehicule Press 2008 ) 67 8 Ibid.

PAGE 8

Adolfo V. Maalindog, Jr. Es tablishing a Sense of Place t hrough Reactivating the Urban Nexus 7 of public life may grow." 9 Transparency and articulation at the ground level provide variations that welcome gathering and punctuated moments that invite interaction. Fig. 3 Diagrams depicting the adv antage of shorter blocks. (Taken from Jane Jacobs The Death and Life of Great American Cities ( New York: Random House 1961 ) 181 9 Jane Jacobs The Death and Life of Great American Cities ( New York: Random House 1961 ) 72

PAGE 9

Adolfo V. Maalindog, Jr. Es tablishing a Sense of Place t hrough Reactivating the Urban Nexus 8 The block is bounded by 10 th 11 th 44 th and 45 th Streets in the Chelsea/ Clinton area of Manhattan. The level of density and activity in these parts are noted to be at a higher level towards the east and decreases moving towards the water on the west. That same ene rgy is th Street side of the block housing the busier commercial establishments, transitioning into the semi public domain of the Arts and Sciences Academy, and finally settling down with the residential tower situated on the more peaceful 11 th Street boundary as shown in s ection and plan in Fig. 4 Fig. 4

PAGE 10

Adolfo V. Maalindog, Jr. Es tablishing a Sense of Place t hrough Reactivating the Urban Nexus 9 A commercial building opens up to the bustling 10 th Street welc oming pedestrian traffic into a 5 storey retail facility housing a number of shops and services catering to the functions at the bottom floors, with its restaurants and cafes drawing upon the communal act to stroll, linger, and socialize is extended out to the elevated plaza which features a mini amphitheat er where people may sit and watch the media wall off the retail building. In the evening families may gather here to watch movies. The ample space also allows for a variety of activities including performances, food festivals, and art walks among others (Fig. 5 ) A walking path dissects the block, connecting 44 th and 45 th The path lined with greenery and sitting areas pull people along it and a llow ing them to stop and relax. Fig. 5

PAGE 11

Adolfo V. Maalindog, Jr. Es tablishing a Sense of Place t hrough Reactivating the Urban Nexus 10 Promoting a walkable city but still recognizing the need for vehicular transportation, t he commercial building also houses a parking garage, transportation hub for taxis, and a train stop; bringing public transport ac cess closer to the neighborhood (Fig. 6 ). Fig. 6 Midway through the block, is an educational institution. The academy is divided into 2 wings: one for the arts which houses studios, workshops, classrooms, and a performance area; the other is for the sciences which has laboratories and various testing facilities and equipment. These two are connected by brid ges that house the schools common areas, administration functions, and faculty spaces. Additionally, the two areas of instruction look into a central courtyard that welcomes students and provides passersby with a glimpse of the activities

PAGE 12

Adolfo V. Maalindog, Jr. Es tablishing a Sense of Place t hrough Reactivating the Urban Nexus 11 shaping the mind s of the occupants within the school. The gymnasium and theater are strictly reserved for the academy during school hours but become accessible to the public afterwards allowing public activities to bleed through from the east end of the block moving to t he middle. A bus path and loading/unloading area is located at the west end of the school, moving the walking path also conveniently connects the residential t ower to the school for easy drop off by family members (Fig. 7 ) Fig. 7

PAGE 13

Adolfo V. Maalindog, Jr. Es tablishing a Sense of Place t hrough Reactivating the Urban Nexus 12 A 30 storey residential tower sits at the west end of the block on the quieter 11 th Avenue (Fig. 8 ) The idea was to provide a retreat from the hustle and bustle of the city complete with views of the water and a park and plaza. The main tower houses the residential units and other amenities such as a residence clubhouse, indoor pool, and private gym. The tower is connected to a secondary volume housing management functions on the upper l evels and a caf at the lower level. From the street level, individuals are greeted by an open green space serving as the tower courtyard. Row of trees provide an airy, shaded pathway leading to s to gather and trade stories while sipping a cup of coffee or sharing lunch. An open park is also provided where kids may meet new friends and safely play. Fig. 8

PAGE 14

Adolfo V. Maalindog, Jr. Es tablishing a Sense of Place t hrough Reactivating the Urban Nexus 13 Note: All Fi gures depicting project images within this thesis were produced in collaboration with Jefrall Betancourt. S ome excerpts f r om this document were used to also describe the project in Architrave 20. References D e Certeau Michel S patial Stories in The Practice of Everyday Life B erkeley : U niversity of California Press 19 84 D e Certeau Michel Walking in the City in The Practice of Everyday Life B erkeley : U niversity of California Press 19 84 F rampton, Kenneth Towards a Critical Regionalism: Six Points for an Architecture of Resistance in Postmodern Cultur e Edited by Hal Foster Trowbridge : The Cromwell Press 1983 J acobs, Jane The Death and Life of Great American Cities New York: Random House 1961 P roject for Public Spaces H ow to Turn a Place Around: A Handboo k for Creating Successful Publi c Space s New York: P roject for Public Spaces, Inc., 2000. S oderstrom M ary The Walkable City: From Haussmann s Boulevards to Jane Jacobs Streets and Beyond Montreal : Vehicule Press 2008



PAGE 1

Adolfo V. Maalindog, Jr. Es tablishing a Sense of Place t hrough Reactivating the Urban Nexus 1 Establishing a Sense of Place t hrough Reactivating the Urban Nexus The sense of community is a quality that has been noticeably missing in most dense urban environments in the past years In the city, greater occupancy levels, closely packed buildings, and widespread transportation capabilities would seem to clo se the gap between individuals; ironically they fee l less connected to each other. The main purpose of my senior y ear D7 Project, and this thesis, was to ask the question: how can the sense of community be believe that spaces such as s idewalks plazas, streets, transport hubs, train stations, and even bus stops can be urban nexuses around which communiti es can come together once again. It is through the revitalization of these public spaces that we can achieve the sense of place that many cities are in need of. Great public spaces give cities a sense of identity Rome has the Piazza dela Rotunda (among many others), Venice the Piazza de San Marco, Paris the Champs Elysees, London has the Piccadilly Circus, and New York has Central Park. While many travel hundreds and thousands of miles to experience these city landmarks, one may only need to walk down t he block to experience a sense of place. A major key to enliven the community is to focus on the street level where most of the interaction in a neighborhood is expected to unfold Fred Kent, founder of Project for Public Spaces, explains how, New York City, the primary activities of a neighborhood took place in the streets on stoops and sidewalks, next to

PAGE 2

Adolfo V. Maalindog, Jr. Es tablishing a Sense of Place t hrough Reactivating the Urban Nexus 2 fire hydrants, and in empty lots 1 Thus was the scene that unfolded: children playing on the street; family run businesses that had their own unique characteristic s lined along the block; the local market vendors selling colorful fresh fruits and vegetables; a barber shop where the locals would tell each other stories; and people saying hello, seemingly as if everyone knew each other, as th ey passed by. However, this sense of community along with the distinct local feel of neighborhoods seems to have diminished as architecture changed C ities in America, and around the globe, have started to look very similar in recent years With the develop ment of industrialism, the adoption of mass production techniques, and the rise of modernism; architecture is experiencing a loss of a sense of locality. Universalism, which is really intended as a development for mankind is plagued by the void it is crea ting within the cultural context of a city. Rapid production, quantity, and widespread distribution (though very beneficial) have inadvertently overrun the landscape of design with monotony. This very phenomenon is described by Kenneth Frampton in Towards a Critical Regionalism : the possibility of maintaining some general control over the shape and significance of the urban fabric. The last two decades, howe ver, have radically transformed the metropolitan centers of the developed world. What were essentially 19 th century city fabrics in the early 1960s have since become progressively overlaid by the two symbiotic instruments of Megalopolitan development the freestanding high rise and the serpentine freeway. The former has finally come into its own as the prime device for realizing the increased land value brought into being by the latter. The typical downtown which up to twenty years ago, still presented a mixture of residential stock with tertiary and secondary industry has now become little more than a burolandschaft city 2 1 Project for Public Spaces H ow to Turn a Place Around: A Handboo k for Creating Successful Publi c Space s (New York: P roject for Public Spaces, Inc. 2000 ), 9 2 Kenn eth Frampton, Towards a Critical Regionalism: Six Points for an Architecture of Resistance in Postmodern Cultur e Edited by Hal Foster ( Trowbridge: The Cromwell Press, 1983), 17.

PAGE 3

Adolfo V. Maalindog, Jr. Es tablishing a Sense of Place t hrough Reactivating the Urban Nexus 3 It would seem that every aspect of life is now moving a t h igh speed. Just as much as the the main mode for people to get around making walking a lost art. And with the city n early becoming no longer walkable, we lose the colorful street level interactions that actually contributed to the neighborhood s sense of c ommunity. are stages for our public lives and according to influential urban planning author and activist 3 f individuals go about their lives constantly moving creating a vast matrix of lines, intersecting with others at various points, creating pockets of metaphysical space. Michel de Certeau poetically describes this matrix of interactio n explaining that the ordinary pra ctitioners of the city live down below below the thresholds at which visibility begins. They walk an elementary form of this experience of the ci ty; they are walke rs, Wandersm nner, whose bodies follow the thicks and thins of an urban text they write without being able to read it 4 Seeing how there lies an extensive web of activity that occurs at the street level, it would only b e logical to channel all th at energy to influence the design of the city. Jane Jacobs n otes that the look of th ings and the way they work are inextricably bound together, and in no place more so than cities. 5 T he design of urban spaces in the D7 New York Project must incorporate technological considerations and advancements in const ruction m e thods while acknowledging the wa y that the city and its occupants live and function first and foremost T he designer must be cognizant 3 Jane Jacobs The Death and Life of Great American Cities ( New York: Random House 1961 ) 29. 4 Michel de Certeau, Walking in the City in The Practice of Everyday Life ( Berkeley: University of Califor nia Press 1984), 158. 5 Jane Jacobs The Death and Life of Great American Cities ( New York: Random House 1961 ) 14.

PAGE 4

Adolfo V. Maalindog, Jr. Es tablishing a Sense of Place t hrough Reactivating the Urban Nexus 4 of the innumerable forces that work on the c ity as a determinant of design Only in doing so can the architecture allow for that inherent local quality that allows for the design to provide its users a sense of belonging. Space is a practiced place 6 according to de Cer t eau and by saying that he points out the important relationship between man and architecture and how one s experiences within a space gives architecture it s meaning to an individual. Block Design and Programming The design of the spaces that would comprise the city block was the result of many influences. One such influence that was introduced this sem ester that I have ne ver put into consideration in prior design projects was zoning. Zoning had a tremendous impact on the shape and form of the buildings as well as the configurations of open spaces around t hem. The block was divided into two zones with very different zoning regulations. The trick was to be able to come up with a massing solution that would follow the zoning guid e lines and delineat e the functions of each buildi ng w ithout disrupting the aspirations for a holistic design that maximized open space. To aid in m assing the block was subdivided into smaller module s to negotiate the extremely large site and to envision spaces at a more human scale. A fter a number of experiments, a massing strategy was devised that proposed a city block that was broken up to form a campus like configuration (Fig. 1) a llowing a clear separation for vario us program elements and more open space. The open space in turn was a rranged in a way as to provide a unifying element l inking the different buildings together while providing both 6 Michel de Certeau, S patial Stories in The Practice of Everyday Life ( Berkeley: University of Califor nia Press 1984), 1 17

PAGE 5

Adolfo V. Maalindog, Jr. Es tablishing a Sense of Place t hrough Reactivating the Urban Nexus 5 vehicular and pedestrian connections within the block and to the rest of the neighborhood (Fig. 2). Fig. 1

PAGE 6

Adolfo V. Maalindog, Jr. Es tablishing a Sense of Place t hrough Reactivating the Urban Nexus 6 Fig. 2 Jane Jacobs recounts how the neighborhood she once lived in had shorter blocks which the residents found advantageous. Accordin g to her, the usual long blocks were oppressive and boring 7 She also adds that long blocks also mean that neighborhood businesses are effectively limited to clients who live on the same street, since people prefer no t to retrace their steps to get to a fruit s tand or shoe repair shop in the middle of a long block on the ot her side. 8 (Fig. 3) The ground level is given a role of importance and its effect on adjacent public space is recognized as a nod to Jane Jacobs who is quoted saying that l owly, unpurposeful, and random as they may appear, sidewalk contacts are the small change from which a city's wealth 7 M ary Soderstrom The Walkable City: From Haussmann s Boulevards to Jane Jacobs Streets and Beyond ( Montreal : Vehicule Press 2008 ) 67 8 Ibid.

PAGE 7

Adolfo V. Maalindog, Jr. Es tablishing a Sense of Place t hrough Reactivating the Urban Nexus 7 of public life may grow." 9 Transparency and articulation at the ground level provide variations that welcome gathering and punctuated moments that invite interaction. Fig. 3 Diagrams depicting the adv antage of shorter blocks. (Taken from Jane Jacobs The Death and Life of Great American Cities ( New York: Random House 1961 ) 181 9 Jane Jacobs The Death and Life of Great American Cities ( New York: Random House 1961 ) 72

PAGE 8

Adolfo V. Maalindog, Jr. Es tablishing a Sense of Place t hrough Reactivating the Urban Nexus 8 The block is bounded by 10 th 11 th 44 th and 45 th Streets in the Chelsea/ Clinton area of Manhattan. The level of density and activity in these parts are noted to be at a higher level towards the east and decreases moving towards the water on the west. That same ene rgy is th Street side of the block housing the busier commercial establishments, transitioning into the semi public domain of the Arts and Sciences Academy, and finally settling down with the residential tower situated on the more peaceful 11 th Street boundary as shown in s ection and plan in Fig. 4 Fig. 4

PAGE 9

Adolfo V. Maalindog, Jr. Es tablishing a Sense of Place t hrough Reactivating the Urban Nexus 9 A commercial building opens up to the bustling 10 th Street welc oming pedestrian traffic into a 5 storey retail facility housing a number of shops and services catering to the functions at the bottom floors, with its restaurants and cafes drawing upon the communal act to stroll, linger, and socialize is extended out to the elevated plaza which features a mini amphitheat er where people may sit and watch the media wall off the retail building. In the evening families may gather here to watch movies. The ample space also allows for a variety of activities including performances, food festivals, and art walks among others (Fig. 5 ) A walking path dissects the block, connecting 44 th and 45 th The path lined with greenery and sitting areas pull people along it and a llow ing them to stop and relax. Fig. 5

PAGE 10

Adolfo V. Maalindog, Jr. Es tablishing a Sense of Place t hrough Reactivating the Urban Nexus 10 Promoting a walkable city but still recognizing the need for vehicular transportation, t he commercial building also houses a parking garage, transportation hub for taxis, and a train stop; bringing public transport ac cess closer to the neighborhood (Fig. 6 ). Fig. 6 Midway through the block, is an educational institution. The academy is divided into 2 wings: one for the arts which houses studios, workshops, classrooms, and a performance area; the other is for the sciences which has laboratories and various testing facilities and equipment. These two are connected by brid ges that house the schools common areas, administration functions, and faculty spaces. Additionally, the two areas of instruction look into a central courtyard that welcomes students and provides passersby with a glimpse of the activities

PAGE 11

Adolfo V. Maalindog, Jr. Es tablishing a Sense of Place t hrough Reactivating the Urban Nexus 11 shaping the mind s of the occupants within the school. The gymnasium and theater are strictly reserved for the academy during school hours but become accessible to the public afterwards allowing public activities to bleed through from the east end of the block moving to t he middle. A bus path and loading/unloading area is located at the west end of the school, moving the walking path also conveniently connects the residential t ower to the school for easy drop off by family members (Fig. 7 ) Fig. 7

PAGE 12

Adolfo V. Maalindog, Jr. Es tablishing a Sense of Place t hrough Reactivating the Urban Nexus 12 A 30 storey residential tower sits at the west end of the block on the quieter 11 th Avenue (Fig. 8 ) The idea was to provide a retreat from the hustle and bustle of the city complete with views of the water and a park and plaza. The main tower houses the residential units and other amenities such as a residence clubhouse, indoor pool, and private gym. The tower is connected to a secondary volume housing management functions on the upper l evels and a caf at the lower level. From the street level, individuals are greeted by an open green space serving as the tower courtyard. Row of trees provide an airy, shaded pathway leading to s to gather and trade stories while sipping a cup of coffee or sharing lunch. An open park is also provided where kids may meet new friends and safely play. Fig. 8

PAGE 13

Adolfo V. Maalindog, Jr. Es tablishing a Sense of Place t hrough Reactivating the Urban Nexus 13 Note: All Fi gures depicting project images within this thesis were produced in collaboration with Jefrall Betancourt. S ome excerpts f r om this document were used to also describe the project in Architrave 20. References D e Certeau Michel S patial Stories in The Practice of Everyday Life B erkeley : U niversity of California Press 19 84 D e Certeau Michel Walking in the City in The Practice of Everyday Life B erkeley : U niversity of California Press 19 84 F rampton, Kenneth Towards a Critical Regionalism: Six Points for an Architecture of Resistance in Postmodern Cultur e Edited by Hal Foster Trowbridge : The Cromwell Press 1983 J acobs, Jane The Death and Life of Great American Cities New York: Random House 1961 P roject for Public Spaces H ow to Turn a Place Around: A Handboo k for Creating Successful Publi c Space s New York: P roject for Public Spaces, Inc., 2000. S oderstrom M ary The Walkable City: From Haussmann s Boulevards to Jane Jacobs Streets and Beyond Montreal : Vehicule Press 2008