Citation
Horizontal and Bracketed Spaces

Material Information

Title:
Horizontal and Bracketed Spaces
Creator:
Betancourt, Jefrall
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Architectural design ( jstor )
City blocks ( jstor )
Hubs ( jstor )
Images ( jstor )
Multi story buildings ( jstor )
News content ( jstor )
Pedestrian flow ( jstor )
Pedestrian traffic ( jstor )
Rooms ( jstor )
Traffic flow ( jstor )
Architectural design
Architecture
Genre:
Undergraduate Honors Thesis

Notes

General Note:
Awarded Bachelor of Design; Graduated May 7, 2013 magna cum laude. Major: Architecture
General Note:
Advisor(s): John Maze
General Note:
College/School: College of Design, Construction and Planning

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Jefrall Betancourt. Permission granted to the University of Florida to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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PAGE 1

Horizontal and Vertical Bracketed Spaces

PAGE 2

Jefrall Betancourt Ayala 1 Horizontal and Vertical Bracketed Spaces Vertical Bracketed Spaces What is bracketed space? Can bracketed space influence vertical function and horizontal pedestrian flow? Prio r to Design 7, other projects had yet to ask this question. When dealing with a high rise st ructure, the idea of “bracket ed space” becomes extremely important. For the hotel project we needed to categorize spaces into primary, secondary, tertiary and so on. Out of all the spaces we categorized, the most important was the core of the building. Why is the core of the building important? The core in this project refers to the emergency stairs, elevators, mechanical rooms and service rooms that repeat over and over in a vertical fashion through the building. The core is primary for two re asons. The first reason is th e ease of travel for leisure and emergency needs. The second reason we chose this space as being primary is its ability to provide a structural core that aid s the overall structural support. (See images below for analytical precedent studies on ve rtical bracketed spaces). Our first project was the implementation of a hotel in an urban sett ing (New York City). Our second project was the infill of a school into a New York City block. Given the scale of both projects, there were many design challenges to overcome. One challenge was partnering with another student for both projects and the full leng th of the semester. This required open communication, shared responsibility and trust. I was fortunate to partner with another very organized and dedicated student but still lear ned a great deal about teamwork in the process. Our secondary space was the interact ive art gallery and its relationship to the hotel lobby.

PAGE 3

Jefrall Betancourt Ayala 2 Horizontal and Vertical Bracketed Spaces

PAGE 4

Jefrall Betancourt Ayala 3 Horizontal and Vertical Bracketed Spaces Our hotel project was placed in the Chelse a neighborhood of Manhattan. Chelsea is full of art lovers and other creative types, so we made it our goal to combine the culture of the city with the function of the hotel. In addition to the challenges of allocating functional spaces into the hotel project, a majo r consideration was the careful study of the site and its influences in relationship to the lobby and surrounding landmarks. (See image below). New York is a pedestrian oriented cit y, meaning that walking is the main method of experiencing the city and site. With this in mind our hotel entrance aims to attract passersby in two ways. The first way is the visual projections fr om our interactive gallery. These visual games allow passersby to interact with the bu ilding in a psychological way. The second way in which we aim to attrac t visitors is to open up the lobby area to maximize the entrance of the building. This shift in height allows visitors to feel welcome and relieves from the constant spatial compression that the city grid imposes on all New York City visitors. Working with a partner on this projec t provided me with an opportunity to learn about teamwork. My project partner was a gr eat team member. We both respected each other and learned to communicate and share resp onsibilities. Although for this project we were not quite synchronized at first, we d id manage to take our lessons and improve them for the city block project.

PAGE 5

Jefrall Betancourt Ayala 4 Horizontal and Vertical Bracketed Spaces

PAGE 6

Jefrall Betancourt Ayala 5 Horizontal and Vertical Bracketed Spaces Horizontal Bracketed Spaces The second project takes on the challenges of the first project but added new challenges as well. In addition to the attribution of bracketed space and prog rammatic function, the question of pedestrian interaction within ad jacent structures became important to our project. This projectÂ’s footprint is the size of a full city block. Therefore, we needed to ask a number of questions in relation to the site and its surrounding areas. As we started the project and visited the site in New York Ci ty, new questions emerged. What is the traffic flow in all corners of the block? What businesses are near the footprint of the block? What are the constraints provided by state and lo cal building codes? All these questions and more needed strategic solutions. Understanding traffic flow allowed us to open up the block for easy drop-off and pickup of students since our project was a school. Also, the recognition of a taxi mechanical service center allowed for the addition of extra park ing space below the new structure. These changes allowed for the narrow st reets on the east and west dir ection to be clutter free. A major learning experience was the ability to id entify general guidelines for zoning codes. Prior design courses had mentioned city zoni ng codes but never analyzed the impact of such codes. Our design aimed to accommodate city codes and understand the implications of such codes in our new design. (See images below).

PAGE 7

Jefrall Betancourt Ayala 6 Horizontal and Vertical Bracketed Spaces

PAGE 8

Jefrall Betancourt Ayala 7 Horizontal and Vertical Bracketed Spaces

PAGE 9

Jefrall Betancourt Ayala 8 Horizontal and Vertical Bracketed Spaces Given the scale of the project we were no t able to answer all of the questions, though we did answer most of them and learne d a great deal in the process. Therefore, we focused the majority of our energy on understanding the pedestrian interaction within the new structures of the block. We created an accessible axis from East to West. This axis served as a corridor that connects all pedestri an flow with each new structure. In addition to the pedestrian flow, we also integrated an Amtrak stop on the property. Our city block already had the Amtrak rails and, since part of our program was re tail, we decided to create a transportation hub. This transportati on hub integrates the pedestrian flow with other public areas of our school an d the underground Amtrak station.

PAGE 10

Jefrall Betancourt Ayala 9 Horizontal and Vertical Bracketed Spaces In conclusion, bracketed spaces play a ma jor role in structural function and programmatic use. Mega structures will alw ays have primary and secondary spaces that will require careful attention. The key to allo cating such spaces relies on the architectÂ’s ability to rationalize program, design and architectural needs. The lessons of the first project aided our process for designing and planning the second project. The challenges of the second project were harder than the fi rst project but we were prepared to meet them. We learned the responsibility of valuing each otherÂ’s schedules. We learned to trust each other with separate responsi bilities and to appreciate the effort we each put into the project. We also learned that we will not alway s agree on everything but can still reach a compromise that incorporates both of our ide as. Above all things we respected each other and trusted each otherÂ’s work, making this a rewarding and interesting experience.



PAGE 2

Horizontal and Vertical Bracketed Spaces

PAGE 3

Jefrall Betancourt Ayala 1 Horizontal and Vertical Bracketed Spaces Vertical Bracketed Spaces What is bracketed space? Can bracketed space influence vertical function and horizontal pedestrian flow? Prio r to Design 7, other projects had yet to ask this question. When dealing with a high rise st ructure, the idea of “bracket ed space” becomes extremely important. For the hotel project we needed to categorize spaces into primary, secondary, tertiary and so on. Out of all the spaces we categorized, the most important was the core of the building. Why is the core of the building important? The core in this project refers to the emergency stairs, elevators, mechanical rooms and service rooms that repeat over and over in a vertical fashion through the building. The core is primary for two re asons. The first reason is th e ease of travel for leisure and emergency needs. The second reason we chose this space as being primary is its ability to provide a structural core that aid s the overall structural support. (See images below for analytical precedent studies on ve rtical bracketed spaces). Our first project was the implementation of a hotel in an urban sett ing (New York City). Our second project was the infill of a school into a New York City block. Given the scale of both projects, there were many design challenges to overcome. One challenge was partnering with another student for both projects and the full leng th of the semester. This required open communication, shared responsibility and trust. I was fortunate to partner with another very organized and dedicated student but still lear ned a great deal about teamwork in the process. Our secondary space was the interact ive art gallery and its relationship to the hotel lobby.

PAGE 4

Jefrall Betancourt Ayala 2 Horizontal and Vertical Bracketed Spaces

PAGE 5

Jefrall Betancourt Ayala 3 Horizontal and Vertical Bracketed Spaces Our hotel project was placed in the Chelse a neighborhood of Manhattan. Chelsea is full of art lovers and other creative types, so we made it our goal to combine the culture of the city with the function of the hotel. In addition to the challenges of allocating functional spaces into the hotel project, a majo r consideration was the careful study of the site and its influences in relationship to the lobby and surrounding landmarks. (See image below). New York is a pedestrian oriented cit y, meaning that walking is the main method of experiencing the city and site. With this in mind our hotel entrance aims to attract passersby in two ways. The first way is the visual projections fr om our interactive gallery. These visual games allow passersby to interact with the bu ilding in a psychological way. The second way in which we aim to attrac t visitors is to open up the lobby area to maximize the entrance of the building. This shift in height allows visitors to feel welcome and relieves from the constant spatial compression that the city grid imposes on all New York City visitors. Working with a partner on this projec t provided me with an opportunity to learn about teamwork. My project partner was a gr eat team member. We both respected each other and learned to communicate and share resp onsibilities. Although for this project we were not quite synchronized at first, we d id manage to take our lessons and improve them for the city block project.

PAGE 6

Jefrall Betancourt Ayala 4 Horizontal and Vertical Bracketed Spaces

PAGE 7

Jefrall Betancourt Ayala 5 Horizontal and Vertical Bracketed Spaces Horizontal Bracketed Spaces The second project takes on the challenges of the first project but added new challenges as well. In addition to the attribution of bracketed space and prog rammatic function, the question of pedestrian interaction within ad jacent structures became important to our project. This projectÂ’s footprint is the size of a full city block. Therefore, we needed to ask a number of questions in relation to the site and its surrounding areas. As we started the project and visited the site in New York Ci ty, new questions emerged. What is the traffic flow in all corners of the block? What businesses are near the footprint of the block? What are the constraints provided by state and lo cal building codes? All these questions and more needed strategic solutions. Understanding traffic flow allowed us to open up the block for easy drop-off and pickup of students since our project was a school. Also, the recognition of a taxi mechanical service center allowed for the addition of extra park ing space below the new structure. These changes allowed for the narrow st reets on the east and west dir ection to be clutter free. A major learning experience was the ability to id entify general guidelines for zoning codes. Prior design courses had mentioned city zoni ng codes but never analyzed the impact of such codes. Our design aimed to accommodate city codes and understand the implications of such codes in our new design. (See images below).

PAGE 8

Jefrall Betancourt Ayala 6 Horizontal and Vertical Bracketed Spaces

PAGE 9

Jefrall Betancourt Ayala 7 Horizontal and Vertical Bracketed Spaces

PAGE 10

Jefrall Betancourt Ayala 8 Horizontal and Vertical Bracketed Spaces Given the scale of the project we were no t able to answer all of the questions, though we did answer most of them and learne d a great deal in the process. Therefore, we focused the majority of our energy on understanding the pedestrian interaction within the new structures of the block. We created an accessible axis from East to West. This axis served as a corridor that connects all pedestri an flow with each new structure. In addition to the pedestrian flow, we also integrated an Amtrak stop on the property. Our city block already had the Amtrak rails and, since part of our program was re tail, we decided to create a transportation hub. This transportati on hub integrates the pedestrian flow with other public areas of our school an d the underground Amtrak station.

PAGE 11

Jefrall Betancourt Ayala 9 Horizontal and Vertical Bracketed Spaces In conclusion, bracketed spaces play a ma jor role in structural function and programmatic use. Mega structures will alw ays have primary and secondary spaces that will require careful attention. The key to allo cating such spaces relies on the architectÂ’s ability to rationalize program, design and architectural needs. The lessons of the first project aided our process for designing and planning the second project. The challenges of the second project were harder than the fi rst project but we were prepared to meet them. We learned the responsibility of valuing each otherÂ’s schedules. We learned to trust each other with separate responsi bilities and to appreciate the effort we each put into the project. We also learned that we will not alway s agree on everything but can still reach a compromise that incorporates both of our ide as. Above all things we respected each other and trusted each otherÂ’s work, making this a rewarding and interesting experience.