Citation
Echoing The City's Urban Composition: A Resonating Nodal Sequence Converging to an Urban Core

Material Information

Title:
Echoing The City's Urban Composition: A Resonating Nodal Sequence Converging to an Urban Core
Creator:
Shimajuko, Yoko
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Architectural design ( jstor )
Buildings ( jstor )
Cities ( jstor )
Graphic design ( jstor )
Housing ( jstor )
Paradoxes ( jstor )
Subways ( jstor )
Tectonics ( jstor )
Urban density ( jstor )
Urban design ( jstor )
Architecture
New York (State)--New York
Genre:
Undergraduate Honors Thesis

Notes

Abstract:
New York City, a global capital and one of the most populous urban areas in the world has influenced the way architects and designer think in relation to urban conditions. Its inverse relationship between what is built and what is void, forms a special interconnection between the differences in density in relation to the spatial correlations experienced by one. The range of densities within each spatial block holds its own experience of that space and time. The city's grid-like structure allows for the use and interpretation of a thread-like motion. A thread interpreted as a linkage between the city itself and the development of the current site. This creates a relationship between what is an actual architectural structure in relation to spatial voids. Which is in essence the notion of echoing the city's urban conditions; allowing for the relations of density, voids, movement, and experience within the city to be processed, analyzed, and reinterpreted into architecture . ( en )
General Note:
Awarded Bachelor of Design; Graduated May 4, 2010 magna cum laude. Major: Architecture
General Note:
College/School: College of Design, Construction and Planning
General Note:
Legacy honors title: Only abstract available from former Honors Program sponsored database.
General Note:
UF Honors Program sponosored database

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Yoko Shimajuko. Permission granted to the University of Florida to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires

Full Text

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Honors Thesis Submission Form Name Yoko Shimajuko UF ID 83932105 __________ Thesis Title Echoing The City's Urban Composition: A Resonating Nodal Sequence Converging to an Urban Core ________________________________________________________________ Date April 12, 2010 Length 14 pages Bibliography Yes No Illustrated Yes No College College of Design, Construction and Planning _________________________________ Thesis Advisor Professor Francesco Cap p ellari ________________________________________ Architecture ________________________________________________ Is your thesis or any part being submitted for pu blication? Yes No If any part has been submitted for publication, please indicate where: ______________________ Keywords (provide five key words) Thread, Echo, Density, Spatial Voids, Experience ______________________________________ Abstract (100 200 W ords) New York City, a global capital and one of the most populous urban areas in the world has influenced the way architects and designer think in relation to urban conditions. Its inverse relationship between what is built and what is void, forms a speci al interconnection between the differences in density in relation to the spatial correlations experienced by one. The range of densities within each spatial block holds its own experience of that space and time. The city's grid like structure allows for th e use and interpretation of a thread like motion. A thread interpreted as a linkage between the city itself and the development of the current site. This creates a relationship between what is an actual architectural structure in relation to spatial voids. Which is in essence the notion of echoing the city's urban conditions; allowing for the relations of density, voids, movement, and experience within the city to be processed, analyzed, and reinterpreted into architecture I authorize my department and/or college to share my thesis with interested parties. Yes No Student Signature __ ___________ ____________________________ Thesis Advisor Signature _________________________________________ Departmental Honors Coordinator Signature _________________________________________ (For Office Use Only) Major: _________________ Designation: ____________ Graduation Term: ________

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New York, an influential and impressive city has impacted the way architects th ink and design in urban conditions. Points of importance for this project were the public spaces, street edges, the accessibility and connection between building s the contemporary urban conditions and architectural public spaces As a result the analysis and design process were then studied in depth through this motion of a thread like structure throughout this site and its relation to spatial voids and transparent qualities of the relative programs of the city. This idea of echoing the city's urban composition is in essence the idea of embedding and connecting the architecture with the site itself, by allowing for the relations of density, void, movement, and experience within the city to be processed, analyzed, and reinterpreted into architec ture.

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This led to a study of diagrams and sketches which began this process of designing. These process images (fig. 1.1 1.3) were a series of studied form which were analyzed and then translated into an architectural structure placed within th is site. These sketches express the open possibilities of designing within an urban condition. When visiting such a changing and leading global city such as New York, few can come with out expectations; detachment from the city and their own personal ex periences. Therefore, it was necessary to come into New York City detached from all previous knowledge in order to grasp and fully understand all the details and design concepts from within the city.

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The idea of a horizontal line of continuity of space, represented by the idea of a thread, to such a vertical spatial experience is intriguing about this city. The fluctuation of constructed spaces, constructed voids, the notions of different scales of pac e in terms of movement, as well as viewing and becoming involved with the possibilities of a newer height were all crucial to the understanding of the process development. The motion of a thread transitioning to a vertical movement, both physically and visually began the thought process of designing a complex of different scales of buildings. This allowed for this idea of movement to influence the end result of this major scale project and also a llowed for the notion of the transportation system, the subways, to influence the thought process for the making of the architecture. It started by the idea of leaving the hectic movement of the city's core and expanding and dissipating towards the edges o f the city where the site is located, following the same notion of the subways represented by fig. 2.1, 2 .2 The subways gather in the core of the city and expand from the center to the outer cities. This direct comparison allowed for the connection of a co ntinuous flow in program and relationship between all the proposed buildings which is represented through fig. 2.3

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Unlike the center core of New York City, the outer edges, where the site is located near the water, the scales in relation to t he actual architectural spaces and perceived activities of individuals occupying the city, change and flux with the density and spatial relations of the surroundings. As the continuous directionality, moving thread, of the site moves towards the water, it s relation to the amount of density of the buildings decrease. This created this idea of an echo that was analyzed further in depth through a diagrammatic plan in fig. 3.1 An echo is described as a detail or characteristic that is suggestive of something else; a close parallel or repetition of an idea or feeling. This idea of an echo was then categorized under the words resonant, reverberate, and resound, which then developed into the ideas of embedding, repetition, and memory.

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This developed a structure embedded and connected with the entire city as a whole as well as society. In relation to repetition, moments of the project would repeat and mimic the notion of walking, gate, traffic, and social patterns as well as the shifts in scale from a fo ot, a body, a group to a city. The idea for memory, to be repeated after original source has stopped, would be translated into this idea of a shadow, a trace; in essence the idea of an echo. Given the already existent site and its relation to the city's residents, a communal active park would be designed near the west side of the site. Here the density of the architectural structures would then become less prominent and the idea of programmati cally filled urban voids would become the main focus.

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"The only 'solution' to the paradox produced in architecture theory thus far, is 'silence', a final nihilistic statement that might provide modern architectural history with its ultimate punch line, its self annihilation.' But Tschumi suggests a possible alternative to silence, one that might accelerate and which more than a concept of perception, is a process, a way of practicing space." 1 1 Tschumi, B. The Architectural Paradox. In Architecture Theory Since 1968. Cambridge and London: The MIT Press, 1975.

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Fig. 4.1,4.2 represent a spatial experience, a memory map, of this structural multi programmed complex. Entering the complex through the eastern side, one can immediately experience the spatial voids that are crucial to this project. These urban voids then translate t o more concrete architecture as one moves through the project and later dissipates into the idea of a programmatically filled void.

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The idea of silence interpreted through architectural concepts can be understood as spatial voids moments of contemplation. If this occurs then this void can become an experiential event to those who interact with this space. Although the voids within the city are not directly defined as buildings, known space to people, architects and designers can argue that these spaces are actual important elements in the construction of a city like New York. These urban voids allow for the observer to experience the emptiness and contradicting fulfillment of that space; therefore, learning to view spatial architectural rel ations in a different and insightful manner. This idea was an important factor in designing the public outdoor spaces. The ground surface is activated on these urban spaces in order to congregate people and to invite in the city. This creates a place of pa use, rest and contemplation and a useful tools in c onnecting the entire project. (fig. 6.1,6.2,6.3 )

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The proposal for the project suggests a horizontal movement across the site that unites the two blocks spatially and programmatically. This emphasized the movement from within the city blocks and allowed for a continuous connection between city and water. This concept of movement was translated into these crystalline boxes that contain the program of a bazaar ( fig. 7.1 ) This long and visual co ntinuous piece of architecture was designed with the idea of a transparent object. spatial locations. Space not only recedes but fluctuates in a continuous a or state, of being transparent is both a material condition that of being pervious to light and air and the result of an intellectual imperative, of our inherent demand for that which should be easily detected, perfectly evid 2 2 Rowe, C, and R Slutzky. Transperancy: Literal and Phenomenal. Perspecta 8: 45 54. 1963.

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The use of glass was incorporated into the structure in order to provide a clear view into the bazaar as well as a window for the occupants to view the movement and the constant changing of people on the outside of this building. 3 s architectural structure, as it is highly transparent in order to emphasize and juxtapose the concept of having a dynamic and flexible program within a static structure. 3 Frampton, K. Rappel a l'ordre, the Case for the Tectonic. In Theorizing a New Agenda for Architecture: An Anthology of Architectural Theory 1965 1995. New York: pr inceton Architectural Press, 1990.

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This multi function design programmatically focused on the needs and desires of the people of New York. The main set of buildings, primarily the tallest structure ( fig 8 ) houses the offices, studios, and rental conference halls. Being located across the street from a school, this complex also focused on student a ctivities, studies, and living. The two libraries were placed in perpendicular relation to the bazaar which juxtaposed the strong horizontality direction of the project as seen in fig. 9 This was designed in order to break up this continuous visual horiz ontal line but at the same time to continue the same idea but with the development of a set of delicate nodes (library structure) within the site.

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Programmatically relating to the bazaar, there are also seminar rooms available for food courses taught by the school, which are held within the main building. Fig. 10 also shows the housing of students as well as small private housing for the residents of New York. The placement of these housing areas were placed in relation to the analysis of the private an d public areas around the site. The private areas of the city were then connected directly to the residential aspect of the project, as well as the more public city areas to the more public and open activities within the site. In the central core of New York, for example Times Square, viewers and visitors are forced to look above onto the images projected on the screens all around them. This project allows for this idea of outdoor theater like atmosphere to take place in one of the main and m ost crucial spatial voids. The occupants congregated around and within this space are allowed and encouraged to look above into the transparent faades of the surrounding buildings and view the performers through these screens. These people being viewed ac t like a theater and performance for the spectators on the ground (fig. 11.1,11.2).

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The act of being and occupying the space between two high rise buildings creates its own experience of that space. By allowing for these moments of pause in these voids, one could notice the difference in scales in New York and the changing of densities wi thin the site. Therefore, reinforcing this thread like idea which holds the continuity of the project together. From this notion of an echo, the repetition of scales of New York were made evident within this architectural structure. This concept then allows for the act of experience to become more personal for each individual as each person experiences space differently. This is then interpreted into this concrete idea that t he way we form space will always depend on our experience of space and time an d what will then be significantly meaningful to one.

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Works Cited Frampton, K. Rappel a l'ordre, the Case for the Tectonic. In Theorizing a New Agenda for Architecture: An Anthology of Architectural Theory 1965 1995. New York: P rinceton Architectu ral Press, 1990. Rowe, C, and R Slutzky. Transpare ncy: Literal and Phenomenal. Perspecta 8: 45 54. 1963. Tschumi, B. The Architectural Paradox. In Architecture Theory Since 1968. Cambridge and London: The MIT Press, 1975. Work in collaboration with partner Christina Kull