Citation
The Arts & Our Youth: How Students Benefit from Art Education Programs

Material Information

Title:
The Arts & Our Youth: How Students Benefit from Art Education Programs
Creator:
Yegelwel, Tania
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Abstractionism ( jstor )
Art education ( jstor )
Arts ( jstor )
High school students ( jstor )
High schools ( jstor )
Learning ( jstor )
Mathematics ( jstor )
Music students ( jstor )
Schools ( jstor )
Theater ( jstor )
Art in education
Arts and youth
Drama in education
Music in education
Genre:
Undergraduate Honors Thesis

Notes

Abstract:
With today’s poor economy causing many families in the U.S. to re-evaluate their spending habits, sixty-nine percent of Americans are drastically cutting back on entertainment, citing it to be a non-essential item. This translates to less spending on theatre tickets, art exhibits, musical concerts, and countless other enjoyable artistic endeavors and productions. While negative effects to the arts snowball due to the economy, it should be stressed that one area in which the arts should continue to thrive is among the youth of America. The 1999-2000 school year showed that a dismal 46 hours in American public elementary schools and 44 hours in high schools were spent on arts education, according to the National Center for Education Statistics of the U.S. Dept. of Education. Oftentimes, even the required arts education is blurred due to the strictness or lenience of specific schools and teachers. Implementation and the procedure is only the beginning; ensuring that the quality is up to par is imperative. The importance of arts amongst youth precedes any studies performed today. In 1921, Franz Cizek – Austrian artist and reformer of art education – discussed that the lack of arts within child play and youngsters’ classrooms hindered their development, mental growth, and socialization processes. Through the arts, Cizek argued that children could be more expressive of their emotions and thoughts. Additionally, Cizek expressed theories that children are naturally capable of being artistic and that their creative predispositions should be encouraged and nurtured. Continuing the work of Cizek was British artist and educator Marion Richardson who began promoting arts education around the 1930s and 1940s. Child psychologists and child development theorists endorsed the aforementioned researchers’ ideas in the 1950s and 1960s by agreeing that arts education was an integral part of children’s lives. There are many benefits to experiencing art education as a child and adolescent, including learning and developmental advantages. One recently conducted research study showed the positive results of an 18-week program during which students participated in a twice-a-week arts program after school. The at-risk students involved had reports of behaving in a more positive manner and more eager to assist their classmates and faculty. Additionally, a solid forty-five percent even earned higher grades. Another study produced during 1997 found that arts integration programs within a variety of elementary, middle, and high schools in several different districts produced a higher number of positive outlooks from students regarding their academic lives and their sense of self-worth. Furthermore, students who previously had shown little initiative in school took on leadership roles while attendance rates among these students also increased. Each art discipline provides its own unique benefits as well. Many studies suggest that participating in musical activities can boost students’ understanding of mathematics. Early reports linking music education with learning math noted the parallels of sight-singing, pitch, and tonal relationships with arithmetic. Furthermore, it has been discovered that secondary school students who studied music had correlating math and music theory grades. One study showed that twice as many middle school students in low socioeconomic statuses who were involved in band or orchestras received higher math scores than did their peers who were uninvolved in music activities. While this trend only continues to grow, music is not the only art form that benefits learning processes in other areas. One longitudinal study showed that students who participated in theatre outshined groups who did not in reading proficiency tests, suggesting that language and literacy can be improved upon through stage work. Additionally, this research depicted the group heavily involved in theatre as having higher self-esteem overall throughout 5 years (g ( en )
General Note:
Awarded Bachelor of Arts; Graduated May 3, 2011 summa cum laude. Major: Theatre
General Note:
College/School: College of Fine Arts
General Note:
Advisor: Kevin Austin
General Note:
Abstract and Works Cited only

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Tania Yegelwel. Permission granted to the University of Florida to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EA5KX8B0B_5ZNGB5 INGEST_TIME 2017-06-01T19:16:34Z PACKAGE AA00057459_00001
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1

The Arts & Our Youth: How Students Benefit from Art Education Programs By Tania Yegelwel Abstract evaluate their spending habits, sixty nine percent of Americans are drastically cutting ba ck on entertainment, citing it to be a non essential item. This translates to less spending on theatre tickets, art exhibits, musical concerts, and countless other enjoyable artistic endeavors and productions. While negative effects to the arts snowball due to the economy, it should be stressed that one area in which the arts should continue to thrive is among the youth of America. The 1999 2000 school year showed that a dismal 46 hours in American public elementary schools and 44 hours in high schools w ere spent on arts education, according to the National Center for Education Statistics of the U.S. Dept. of Education. Oftentimes, even the required arts education is blurred due to the strictness or lenience of specific schools and teachers. Implementatio n and the procedure is only the beginning; ensuring that the quality is up to par is imperative. The importance of arts amongst youth precedes any studies performed today. In 1921, Franz Cizek Austrian artist and reformer of art education discussed tha t the lack growth, and socialization processes. Through the arts, Cizek argued that children could be more expressive of their emotions and thoughts. Additionally, Cize k expressed theories that children are naturally capable of being artistic and that their creative predispositions should be encouraged and nurtured. Continuing the work of Cizek was British artist and educator Marion Richardson who began promoting arts ed ucation around the 1930s and 1940s. Child psychologists and child development theorists There are many benefits to experiencing art education as a child and adolescent, including learning and developmental advantages. One recently conducted research study showed the positive results of an 18 week program during which students participated in a twice a week arts prog ram after school. The at risk students involved had reports of behaving in a more positive manner and more eager to assi st their classmates and faculty. Additionally, a solid forty five percent even earned higher grades. Another study produced during 1997 found that arts integration programs within a variety of elementary, middle, and high schools in several different districts produced a higher number of positive outlooks from students regarding their academic lives and their sense of self worth. Furtherm ore, students who previously had shown little initiative in school took on leadership roles while attendance rates among these students also increased. Each art discipline provides its own unique benefits as well Many studies suggest that p articipating in musical activities Early reports linking music education with learning math noted the parallels of sight singing, pitch, and tonal relationships with arithmetic. Furthermore, it has been discovered that se condary school students who studied music had correlating math and music theory grades. One study showed that twice as many middle school students in low

PAGE 2

socioeconomi c statuses who were involved in band or orchestras received high er math scores than did th eir peers who were uninvolved in music activities. While this trend only continues to grow, music is not the only art form that benefits learning processes in other areas. One longitudinal study showed that s tudents who participated in theatre outshined groups who did not in reading proficiency tests, suggesting that language and literacy can be improved upon through stage work Additionally, this research depicted the group heavily involved in theatre as having higher self esteem overall throughout 5 yea rs (grades 8 12). Interestingly, the same study portrayed the group involved in drama to have higher amounts of empathy for others as well as having more positive relationships with people of a variety of races. With this kind of information, it is imp ossible to ignore the positive effect that the arts have on individuals, starting at a very young age. It is imperative that schools, organizations, and parents realize the invaluable education and outlet that art programs provide and resolve to prohibit a poor economy from taking away this vital resource. Furthermore, with the knowledge that kids who experienced arts education will give back to the field either through creation or consumption, artistic endeavors literally lies w ithin our children.

PAGE 3

Works Cited Bamford, Anne. The Wow Factor: Global Research Compendium on the Impact of the Arts in Education Germany: Waxmann, 2006. Print. Bergonzi, Louis, and Julia Smith. "Effects of Arts Education On Participation in the Arts." Seven Locks Press (1996): 1 84. Print. Carey, John. What Good Are the Arts? Oxford: Oxford UP, 2006. Print. Fiske, Edward B. Champions of Change: The Impact of the Arts on Learning Publication. Print. Stone, Andrea. "Fine Arts Are In Survival Mode As Funds Dry Up." USA Today Gannet Co. Inc., 5 Mar. 2009. Web. Feb. Mar. 2011.