Citation
The Florida state gazetteer and business directory

Material Information

Title:
The Florida state gazetteer and business directory
Alternate Title:
Florida gazetteer and business directory
Creator:
South Publishing Co
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, Fla
Publisher:
Cushing & Appleyard
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Annual
Language:
English
Edition:
1884-1885
Physical Description:
v. : ; 24 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce ( fast )
Florida ( fast )
Commerce -- Directories -- Florida ( lcsh )
Directories -- Florida ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Periodicals -- Florida ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Periodicals -- Southern States ( lcsh )
Southern States ( fast )
Savannas ( jstor )
Sawmills ( jstor )
Physicians ( jstor )
Genre:
Directories ( fast )
gazetteers (dictionaries) ( aat )
Periodicals ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
Gazetteers ( fast )
Directories ( fast )
Periodicals ( fast )
Spatial Coverage:
North America -- United States -- Florida

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: 1883/1884.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
P.K. Yonge Library of Florida History, UF
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
025703923 ( ALEPH )
33376475 ( OCLC )

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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA LIBRARIES



0


P KYONGELIBRARY
OF
FLORIDA
HISTORY























Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2016 with funding from
University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries
















https://archive.org/details/floridastategaze1884smit





















































































































































































s




























,






13. .o. AT,
ianufacturer and Wholesale Dealer in

Mo'uI.ingS, STEREOSCOPIC
lgll VI EWS,
Ho Phafta g hi 1 Frames, MATERIALS
j G CHROMOS mirrors, I Mirror Plates,
I -j B),Ij-mi--S ,

&c.

___SA~V.AIT rA TT, GA.


WILLIAM HONE & CO.,
WINES, LIQUORS AND SEARS.
152 ST. JULIAN AND 140 BRYAN STS.,
Established 1850. SAVANN AH, _GA.

GALLOLIVNA F U9K,
69 BROAD STREET,

In the healthiest part of the City, and especially convenient
to all public buildings, street cars and
places of interest.
TERMS REASONABLE TO TOURISTS.









S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON,

Wholesale Grocers,


FLOUR AND LIQUOR DEALERS

149 & 151 BAY STREET,
Flour Warehouse, 195 & 197 Bay Street,

SAVANNAH, GA.

A FEW OF OUR SPECIALTIES:



WHISKIES, WINES,

BRANDIES, GINS, RUMS,
And all descriptions of Imported and Domestic Liquors,


And a Full Line of Smokers' Supplies.

STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES,


Cannaed. GOOC1.s.
An assortment so large and varied has never been excelled in this market.

Gtickenheiner's Own Selection Flour.
Guckenheimer's Old Reserve Stock Whiskey.
Guckenheimer's Virgin Brand Baking Powder. G tikenheiner's Vienna Export Beer.
Guckenheimner's Standard Brands of Canned Goods.
Guckenheiner's Gem Brand Bi-Carb. Soda. Guckenheiner's Standard Brands of Soaps.
Guckenheinmer's Oriental Cigars.
Guckenheimer's Gilt Edge Durham Tobacco. WE ARE ALSO SOLE AGENTS FOR Levering's Roasted Coffee.
Niedt's Sea Foam Soap.
Holland's Martha Washington Tobacco.
Thistle Dew Whiskey. LaBELLE CREOLE WHISKEY.
Buffalo G. S. Co.'s Starch.
Reed's Gilt Edge Tonic.
Kaiser Natural Mineral Water. M-We invite the merchants visiting our city to call on us and carefully examine our stock, which is complete in all its departments, and comprises every article in our line of business. Prices and catalogues furnished upon application.
8

















FLORIDA







Gazetteer Bsiness Directory

-PUBLISHED BY THESOUTHERN DIRECTORY AND PUBLISHING COMPANY,

-FOR






CONTAINING THW NAMES, BUSINESS AND ADDRESS OF THE MEDCHANTS, MANUFACTURERS, PROFESSIONAL AND BUSINESS MEN,
AND THE PRINCIPAL PLANTERS AND FARMERS OF THE
STATE, TOGETHER WITH A BRIEF SKETCH OF
ALL CITIES, TOWNS AND VILLAGES, AND
HOW TO REACH THEM. ALSO





Price, $5.00.



Compiled by ROSS A. SMITH, Manager,
Office, 69 Broad Street, Charleston, S. C.




For Sale by ASHMEAD BROS., Jacksonville, Fla.



CHARLESTON, S. C.
LUCAS & RICHARDSON, BOOK AND JOB PRINTERS,
No, 62 EAST BAY STREET,
1884.


Entered according to Act of Congress in the year 1883, by ROSS A. SMITH, in the office
of the Librarian of Congress at Washington, D. C.







1" ok i Fou diry a e Ahi o Shc;S

W. F. & J. E. CREARY,
rnornxz:TonS.


-- A4



WATER MILL OUTFITS,
And all kinds of Iron and Brass Castings made to order.

L CAKTULES,9TRES AND RDLLERS
---. -A ]JE C T----!!61

--DEALERS INMILL AND STEAMBOAT SUPPLIES,
AND BUILDERS OF SMALL STEAM LAUNCHES.

-M ILTON9, ANTA'ROSA COUNTY, t

10






















PREFACE.



Ross A. S.MITH's first volume of the FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY is presented to the public, with the assurance that it will be found complete and comprehensive, and that it is the most important and valuable work of the kind ever issued in the State, as it is replete with valuable information that cannot fail to benefit the entire business community and form a valuable guide to all persons.
The general features of the work consist of a full description of each postoffice in the State, such as location, population, nearest shipping point, distance and geographical directions from the county seat, location of nearest bank, express and telegraph companies, hotel accommodation, sttge and other transportation facilities, and all other valuable statistics showing the great inducements offered to immigration.
In the preparation of this work the publishers have spared neither skill, labor or expense, and we are sure when it is compared with other works of the kind, our patrons will feel still more lenient towards us for being so late in presenting our book to them, which we guarantee to contain at least one-third moro names than any publication of the kind of the State. The classified directory will be found very complete, and arranged in a manner that will be comprehensive to all persons.
The publishers tender their thanks to those who have kindly rendered assistance in procuring information and stati tics, and especially to the postmasters throughout the State, who have in nearly all cases promptly responded to communications, and have given the desired information.
The past season has been a prosperous one, and we tender our congratulations to the entire community upon the substantial business outlook, and trust that the same state of commercial activity may meet us on the publication of our next volume in 1886, and hope that the regular biennial issues of this valuable work will be sustained by the business community. Respectfully,
ROSS A. SMITH,
3ranager Southern -Direclory and Publishing Cumjpany.














I11


















GENERAL INDEX.


PAGE.
ABBREVIATIONS USED IN DIRECTORY .................... .128
HISTORY OF FLORIDA ......................... ......... 39
C LIM ATE ............................................ 44
S O IL. ................................................. 46
STAPLE COMMODITIES.................................... 51
F R U IT S ............................................... 52
V EGETABLES ..... ............................. 62
TIMBER .................. ....................... ..... 65
STOCK R AISING ............. ......................... 67
F ISH .... ................ .... ........ ................. 7 1
M ANUFACTURING...................................... 73
S PRIN GS .............................................. 78
L A N D S ............ ................................... 79
R AILROADS......................................90 and 122
PUBLIC SCHOOLS......... ....................... 97
GOVERNMENT.....................................99 and io5
PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS................................. 102
FINANCIAL CONDITION.................................. 103
STATISTICS OF FLORIDA ................................. 104
C OU RTS .................................... .......... 113
COUNTY OFFICERS ...................................... I6
POPULATION ..... ................. .................. 121
NEWSPAPERS..... .. ................................... 127
GENERAL DIRECTORY OF TOWNS....................... 128
CLASSIFIED DIRECTORy ........................ 492











12

















INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS.




ATLANTA, GA. GREEN COVE SPRINGS.
PAGE. PAGE
Moore's Southern Business College. 160 Bemis C. C...................... 212

BALTIMORE, MD. Gerard C. A. Mrs.......... ....... 213

Brown Chemical Co........... front edge JACKSONXILLE.
Clark Win. Wirt & Son.......... 518-551
The Rasin Fertilizer Co..........25-28 Abbott W. S.. .................. 238
Anderson Church & Co............231
BOSTON, MASS. Artic Ice Co.................... 232

Forbes' Lithographing Co. .. .....29-30 Ashmead Bros.... ............... 225

CEDAR KEYS. Baratier Jules.................... 239
Barrs & Hunter............. back cover
Magnolia House............ ..... 160 Baya W in........................ 240
Rogers C. B. & Co................. 160 BerneW.J.&Co................23G
State Journal..... ............... 160 Berry Horace..................... 240
Suwanee House................... 160 Bessent J. 0...................... 236
CHARLESTON, S. C. Bradley Fertilizing Co...front fold of map
Carolina House Buckman E. H.........front fold of map
Burgert S. P...................... 239
Charles ton & Savannah Railway. .. 241 Cl hdnM.........4
Hacker Geu. S. & Son ........ front cover Call RJhydon M ................. 240
Krake Ja ssn ... ........3 3 7 Clark John, Son & Co. ... ..... .... 2' 0
Kracke & Janssen.....................Cockrell A. W. & Son.............. 239
Percival E. W. ............ fold on map Coy. Talbott & Co........back cover
South Carolina Railway.................Deans George W........ ... ..... 240

CHICAGO, ILL. DeBary-Baya Merchants' Line....... 33
Noyes N. I. & Co...............513 DeCottes George A................ 238
Dewhirst R...................... 239
FERNANDINA. Dobbins A. N. & Bro............... 228

Avery Gilbert F................... 192 Dodge H. D. W ....... ........... 235
Fernandina & Jacksonville R. R.. . .32 Dodillon Chas. & Co ............... 236
Florida Transit & Peninsula R, R.. .. 31 Drew, Hazeltine & Livingston....... 230
Hillyer Charles V................. 193 Dupont Charlton .................. 240
Hoyt Fred. W & Co............... 190 Dzialynski M. A.... ...... ....... 233
Mansion House.................. 190 Ellis & McClure. ................. 231
Noyes A. B....................... 190 Elmwood House...... ........... 236
Schuyler Geo. W .................. 190 Emery W N. & Co................ 230
GAINESVILLE. Fairlie James M.,
front and back cover and 227
Doig & Harris.................... 205 Fla. C. & W R. R................. 23
Rawlins & Wilson................. 206 Pla. Land and Improvement Co... 253










FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER

PAGE PAGE
Fla. Savings Bank and Real Estate Tremont House....... ........... 235
Exchange....... ... .... 232 Tysen & Smith.................... 234
Foster Fred E.................... 235 Walker W. & W.S ............... 226
Fries A. P. & Co., Ward N. L....................... 240
see Druggist in business directory Weller H. L ......... ......... 239
Grand View Hotel ............... 227 Wilson George ...... front fold of map
Griffin J. I. & Co.................. 238 KEY WEST.
Gumbinger J............... ..... 234
HatideM.L....~0~ 6..239 Alfonso Roman & Co. ..... .. .... .36
Hartridge M. L.......... ....
Henry & Heitz.., .........238 Brown J. B....................... 279
Hoefer & Forkert....... .......... 237 Cash W m. D...................... 35
H~oeer Georert......... ......... 237 - - -
Hover George A......, ...... 235 Castillo A. M. & CO................ 288
Industrial Machine Works ......... 238 Castillo N. F. & Co.... ........... 288
Jacksonville Hotel..... .... ........ 233 Coleman & Bartlum................ 37
Jacksonville Transfer Co........... 239 Curry B. S... ................... 37
J., St. A. & H. R. Railway.......... 32 Ferguson George W............... 34
Jones & Bowen ....... ........... 238 Filer Samuel...................... 281
Jones & Verill ................... 236 Forgarty & Johnson............... 464
Keene O.L............ .... ..... 239 Gato Edward H................... 36
Koerner P. W 0................. 232 Geraux Louis A................... 281
Livingston C. 0 ...............229 Gwynn Edward 0.......... ...... 282
McMurray P. E ..................239 Key West Democrat........ ..... .283
Mackey J.I.................... 259 Lowe H. Davis................. 37
Mattair House... .. ........ 235 Lowe Samuel S................... 37
Miller C. A. & Co............ ..... 231 Mallory Steamship Line. .... ...... 35
Moulie E......................... 238 Marrero Francisco................. 464
Mumby, Stockton & Knight......... 234 Merrill Charles T.................. 36
Nooney, Thomas & Son............ 261 Morgan Steamship Co.............. 35
Oak Byron ... ...... bick cover and 261 Philbrick John Jay ........ ....... 38
Peters C........ ............... 239 Pierce Lewis W ................... 34
Pillow W H ...................... 229 Roberts Joseph P. (estate).......... 285
Pond Frank R.................... 238 Russell House.................... 36
Post C. V. H................... 24 Scheurer John.................... 286
Puetz Arnold, Sweeny D. T. ................. 38
top line outside cover and 239 Tampa Steamship Co....... ..... ..35
Robinson H. & Co............... 239 The Florida News... ............ 284
St. Johns River Fast Day Line...... 24 The Key of the Gulf............... 280
St. Johns River R. R..... .back faster Tift A. T. ............. .. 35
St. Marks Hotel.................. 235 Williams & Warren................ 287
Shad Bros........................ 233 KNOXVILLE, TENN.
Sherlock & Getchell.............. 232
Slagr Jlius..............233 East Tenn., Va. & Ga. R. R......... 21
Slager Julius ..................... 233
Sledge C. A.................... 240 LAKE CITY.
Smith & DuBos................ 234 Harrison L..4........... ..a.. 293
Smith G. W ...................... 227 W ilson J, M ........,............. 295
Stockton & Stribbling., .......... 228
Stone J. & Co........ ........ 240 LEESBURG.
Stowe Walter W.. ............... 240 Lees J. W....... .......... 303
The Daily Florida Herald.. .back faster Vanlandingham J. B. & Co ... .....304






AN1) BUSINESS DRE 'I \ 1V

LIVERPOOL. I'iNSA COLA.
PAGE PA GE
Cross J......................... 3009 Advance (ltzette.................. 289

LOUISVILLE, KY. Bear Lewis & Co ................ ..39i
Horsler II. 11. & Co................ 289
Brinley, Miles & Hardy Co......... 491 Jacoby Ltz...................... 392

MACON, GA. Mchlugh James ................... 391
Schofield J. S. & Sons..............20 Matthews R. .... .............. 395
O'Connor & Co.............. ..... 391
MADISON. Pensacola Commercial............29 1

Hoges L. E..................... 316 Pensacola Compress and Warchouse. 400
Jordan & Moseley................. 316 Soto M P........................ 391
Peeler James P ...... ........... 316 Sexatuer E. J..................... .82
Stevens C. W ..................... 16 Thornton IH. 11........... ....... 398
Toal & Thomson .................. 91
Vankirk W J...................18-19
Blackwater Foundry... .back title page Vidal Vincent J .... ............. 399
Santa Rosa House. ............... 334 W hite Ifenry S................... 389
Santa Rosa News................. 336
ST. AUGUSTINE.
MOBILE, ALA.
Atkins George L. & Sons........... 41 5
Porter. Kirkbride & Son......back paster Cooper M. R.420

MONTGOMERY, ALA. Dowd J. H....................... 418
East Florida Land and Pioduce Co. 415 House L. M ................ .... 419
NEW YORK. Pinkham AV. S. M..... .. ........ 417

Butler W HI..............338, 339, '140 Reyers & Dillingham ............... 417
Adams Historical Chart ........ opp. 160 Sabin, Moulton & Co............... 415
V aill E. E....................... 417
OCALA. Valls S. B.................... ... 420
Carlisle James B................. .357 W hitney J. P..................... 421

ORLANDO. ST. LOUIS.

Bank of Orlando....... .......... 3G8 E t. Louis Medical & Surgical Journal, 570
Boone C. A. & Co......... .. ..... 369 SANFORD.
Dollins L. J ...................... 371
Peeler W. L.................... 371 Fla. Land and Colonization Co.. ..426-427
Poyntz Nat .68 Marks Richard II. ............... 429
W hite W .G...................... 371 Russell A.B..................... 429
Stafford Bros..................... 429
PALATKA. Steele & Bassinger................ 430
Devereux, Rogero & Co ...........383 Tuxbury & Fernald............. 431
Florida Southern R. R ............ .383
Graham S........................ 379
Hill D. Y. & Co................... 381 Alexander W E. & Son............ 6
Mangold & Son................... 381 Bendheim Bros. & Co.........back bone
Lente W im. K .................... 379 Boley M. & Son................... 7
Post E. C........................ 380 Cockshutt & Lord................. 7
Sulzner C F ................... ... 31 Cohen Salomon.............front pastor
Palatka Journal................... 381 Gardner J. . .see Seeds in Bus. Directory
Putnam Herald................... 381 Gilbert C. S. & Co............ .... 6









16 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER

PAGE PAGE
Guckenheimer S. & Son, Shay B. N...................... 454
page 8 and right hand bottom lines Weller J. F ..................... 449
Hanley Andrew ............. front cover West Florida Seminary............. 98
Hone W m. & Co.................. 3 W ilt & deMilt. ............... ... 455
Hull F. M .................. front cover
Kehoe Wm. & Co., TAMPA.
right hand top lines and front paster Benjamin H. R ............... ... 459
Lippmann Bros................... 6 Binkley T. C. Mrs................. 463
McDonough & Ballentyne.......... 5 Boykin & Ray ............ ....... 465
McMillan Bros........... .front pastor Carruth Thomas A ............... 469
Mell W B. & Co.................. 7 Clark F. A. & Co.................. 467
Parish George W .................. 4 Collins Phil. H.................... 469
Reedy J. B ....... .left hand bottom lines Ferris W. G., agt .................. 463
Rourke John .... right hand top lines Friebele C. L .................... 463
Ryan D. J............. ..... ..... 3 Hampton & Jones............... 460
S. F. & W. R. R.. right hand top lines Harrison C. E .................... .460
Savannah Morning News........... 17 Henderson & Spencer .............. 467
Smith & Berry ............. .front cover Hooper Mat ............ ......... 465
Tynan J. W ...................... 5 Jackson John............ ....... 463
Weed & Cornwell............back cover Jones S A. & Co.... ...........465
Krause J. H...................... 467
TALLAiASSEE. Leonardy S. B.................... 465
Bernard & Lee.. ................ 451 Seclor Fred P..................... 462
Torr & Bowen.................... 449 Spencer John B................... 469
Economisi ....................... 452 Spencer T. K ..................... 462
Florida University ................ 98 The Tampa Guardian .............. 461
Gilmore F. C..................... 452 W all & Branch.................... 464
Land of Flowers........... ..... 449
Leon Hotel......... ............. 449 WASHINGTON, D. C.
Lewis B. C. & Son................. 453 Bingham L....................... 569





THE LARCEST NEWSPAPER PUBLISHED IN THE
SOUTHERN STATES.

A Business, Family, Literary and Agricultural Journal.
Not a Local Paper, but one suitable to
any Locality.

IT ETI


SAVANNAH WEEKLY NEWS.
One Year and an Interesting Serial for $2.00.
This Mammoth Sheet contains 8 pages of reading matter, comprising all the news of the week, Telegraphic Dispatches up to the hour of going to press, Agricultural Items, Original Serials, etc. Special departments devoted to GEORGIA, FLORIDA and SOUTH CAROLINA NEWS.
To the farmer, mechanic or artisan, the business or professional man who has not the advantages of a daily mail, the SAVANNAH WEEKLY NEWS is the medium by which he can be informed of events transpiring in the busy world, whether in his own State or in the most distant parts of the globe.
In addition to a first-class newspaper at a moderate price, we offer to each yearly subscriber a copy of any of the published novels of the MORNING NEws LiBRARY free.
Subscription $2 a year in advance.




Savannah Morning News
The Great Daily of the Southeast.
Published at the principal seaport of the South Atlantic States, it gives prominence to all matters relative to COMMERCIAL, as well as to the AGRICULTURAL, MECHANICAL, and MANUFACTURING interests of the South.
Its STATE, GENERAL, LOCAL and MARKET departments are acknowledged to be the best in this section, while its TELEGRAPfHIC R E PORTS of the news of the day are full and comprehensive.
Price of Daily, Sio a year; 8- for six months.


J. H. STILL,
No. 3 Whitaker Street, SAVANNAH, GA.
17







W.Y.AKIR& C0.
I coocla lria



002 Ircn, Oringe inK line Linl,
AND ILL FROPE:RTY,
1N ~-ALA ALN]D FLORIDA..



-AGENT FOR SALE OFPensacola and Atlantic
-AL srDMIO3LE & MONTGOMERY R I. LADS,

PENSACOLA, FLORIDA. Publisher of the "GULF STREAM," a Quarterly Newspaper, for the dissemination of information on
Florida and Alabama, Published at
Birmingham and Pensacola.

2 CENTS PER YEAR.
COPY SENT FREE ON APPLICATION.
BRANCH OFFICE WITH SLOSS FURNACE CO.,

BIRMINGHAM, - ALA.
18






IF YOUJWANT To BUY


PINE LANDS, COAL LANDS OR IRON LANDS

IF YOU WANT TO BUY

Land in Florida suitable for Orange Culture or
Truck Farming,

IF YOU WANT TO BUY


A R RESIDENCE I FLORIDA OR ALABAMA

IF YOU WANT TO BUY

Saw Mfit, Grist Mill _r Gin Mi,1

-IN A DESIRABLE LOCALITY,Or if you want to engage in Sheep or Stock Raising,


Write fror a cpy of the "Glf Streai),"

Or for any particular information you may want, to


W. J. VANIERK & C00.,
PENSACOLA, FLA.


I B.-PINE LANDS A SPECIALTY.

We are also Agents for Stationary and Portable Engines, Saw Mills and all kinds of Mill Macbinery and Fixtures. Write to us before purchasing. Our large trade enables us to give lowest prices.
19




























SCHOFIEIDS IRON WORKS,
J. S. SCHOFIELD & SONS, Proprietors,

Manufacturers and Dealers in every variety of

GiRICULTUR1AL MCIE

Schofield's Patent Cotton Presses.
Steam Engines and Boilers.
Saw, Crist and Flour Mills.
Castings of every kind. Sorgho Mills and Kettles.
Mill Cearing and Machinery.
Shafting, Pulleys and Hangers.
-MANUFACTURERS OF THE CELEBRATED-GENERAL AGENTS FOR THE"QUEEN OF THE SOUTH CORN MILLS
-AND THE"JIPFIATT9IL' GC IIT'TZON GIN."
20










hai Tenneao:,0 vir 9ini a A o Ir Zia R. R.

PLORIDA SDORT LINE,


THE SHORTEST AND QUICKEST LINE
TO AND FROM ALL POINTS IN THE


NOET EWET AND -ODA,
The thousands of our patrons who traveled over this favorite and popular line, during the past season, will amply testify to the absolute safety, fast schedules, unprecedented time, and superb appointments and appliances of the route via JESUP.
This line wears the badges of superiority, and cannot be reached by competition.

PULLMAN PALACE CARS
Are run through between

CHATTANOOGA AND JACKSONVILLE WITHOUT CHANGE!
Only one change of Cars between Louisville
and Jacksonville, via Atlanta.
Only one change of Cars between all points North of
the Ohio River and Jacksonville, and vice versa.
The deserved popularity of this Great Through Line enables the management to maintain the highest standard of excellence, which must be tested by the traveling public in order to be properly appreciated.
DOUBLE DAILY SERVICE. NO DELAY ON SUNDAYS.
CONNECTIONS CLOSE, SURE AND PERFECT.
Passengers, by taking this reliable and first-class route from all Western Cities, arrive in Florida one train in advance of all competing linesJNO. F. O'BRIEN, D. POPE,
General Superintendent, Geni'l Pass'r Agent,
Knoxville, Tenn. Knoxville, Tenn.
J. J. GRIFFIN, SAM. H. HARDWICK,
Ass't Gen'l Pass'r Agent, Forwarding JPass'r Agent,
Atlantic, Ga. Jacksonville, Fla.
21







Pensacola and Atlantic Railroad.

THE GUL LINE
-IN CONNECTION WITHATLANTIC COAST LINE.
The Quickest and Best Route to New Orleans, Texas and California, points from the EAST, the DIRECT
line to and from FLORIDA, and ALL
POINTS North, North-West
and West.

44THROUG PULLMAN CARS+
-BETWEENSavannah aM New OrleaEEs
-AND

JACKSONVILLE AND NEW ORLEANS.

THROUGH CARS
-BETWEENLouisville, Ky., and Cedar Keys.

STEEL RAILS!
QUICK DESPATCH!!
PERFECT SAFETY!!
Beautiful Bay scenery. 15 miles along the breast of Pensacola Bay.
2,8oo,ooo acres of the best Florida land for sale.

W. D. CHIPLEY, F. C. SHEPARD,
Gen'l Supt., G. P. A.,

PENSACOLA, FLA.
22









THE FLORAL CITY ROUTE.

THE NEW FLORIDA:AND NEW ORLEANS SHORT LINE.



11crlia Central AWe:ien :ircai C0.

ARE YOU GOING TO FLORIDA THIS SEASON?

If so, be sure and purchase your tickets reading via the Pensacola & Atlantic and
Florida Central & Western Railroads, thus securing you a daylight ride through


The Famous Hill Country of Middle Florida.

The quickest, shortest and best route to Jacksonville, Florida ; to all points on the
St. John's River, and via the Florida Transit & Peninsular Railroad and its
connections to all points in the far-famed Peninsular State; Clear
Water, Tampa, Key West, Havana and all Gulf Ports.



RED CLAY HILLS, ELEGANT DRIVES,
RICH LANDS, SUPERB HUNTING AND FISHING,
PICTURESQUE SCENERY, BEAUTIFUL FLOWERS,
Are to be found and enjoyed in the Tallahassee Country.



Stop-Over Privileges can be secured on all Tickets.


Only Line with Solid.Through Tralis, Daily, Pensacola to Jacksonville without change.
Only Line with Pullman Palace Sleepers, Daily, New Orleans to Jacksonville without change.

Do not fail to embrace this opportunity to enjoy the extraordinary facilities offered by this New Short Line but recently opened to travel and reaching all points in Florida.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION APPLY TO

WM. M. DAVIDSON, WILLIAM 0. AMES,
General Manager. General F. & P. Agent.

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
tF-After December 1st, 1883, send for copy of our New Pamphlet. ._3 23







TIME TABLE
-OF

ST. JOHT'S RIVEa


FAST+BAY+LINE,

BEGINNING SEPT. 1st, 1883,
Will from this date run a Double Daily Service, leaving
JACKSONVILLE from Astor's Wharf
STEAMER STEAMER


Eliza Danox S __ Iao Glen

At9 A. M. At 2 P. M.
-FOR




St Augad1 PaLitka,

And usual Landings on Signal or Notice.
Steamer SYLVAN GLEN omits Saturday afternoon's trip, and leaves Jacksonville Sunday, at 12 o'clock, for PALATKA and usual landings.

Freight taken and Handled with Care.
Will make close connection at Tocoi for St. Augustine; at Palatka for all points on Florida Southern Railroad; and with all boats of De-Bary Baya Merchants Line and of People's Line for all up river points.
HANCOX leaves PALATKA at 2 P. M.
SYLVAN GLEN leaves at 7.30 A. M.
For Further Information and Tickets, apply to

C~V.. =- IPOST.,
Office on Wlharf. GENERAL AGENT.
24





+-*iOL UBLE'+





+3 0OJ1Phi1PP} HRVIiIZHR,+
MANUFACTURED BY

rhe Rasin E ertilizer ConI pany,

WiNFIELD S.DUNAN, Incorporated January 20, 1882. R. W. L RASIN,
Secretary and Treasurer. Cash Capital, $319,000. General Manager.

-5PROPRIETORS OF*_ j- --


"Ii -A L -~r /il,"i ,"






tuated at Sea..Wall, on the Patapsco River, Anne Arundel
County, near Baltimore.





AW-rLIBEnAL TERMS TO RESPONSIBLE AGENTS.-IOUl
you are in want of Fertilizers, order at once. If not in want, tell your friends who do. Write us. Will be glad to hear from you; want to know
you anyhow. We always take great pleasure in answering correspondents.
















FTER a careful examination of the soil of Florida, an
conversation with the owners of Orange Groves of thaI State, we find that to encourage rapid growth a FertiI izer containing all the elements of plant-food is a essential in an Orange Tree Fertilizer as in one for th growth of Cotton, Corn, Cabbage or Wheat. Tla considering the nature of the soil of Florida, whilst a the elements should be present in a good Fertilize they should be so combined in a concentrated form as not to be wash away by copious rains or percolate through the soil, to be lost to tl fiber-roots, that are the great feeders of the Orange Tree. In the fall of these facts, we offer our




A most concentrated Fertilizer in an available form, as will be seen the Analysis of PROF. P. B. WIsoN, assistant to the late BAR' JUSTIN VON LIEBIG, of Munich, Germany, who was the Father Concentrated Fertilizers, and did more to advance Agriculture through out the world than any other Chemist that has ever lived, and wh%, works are authority upon all Chemical subjects.

CHEMICAL LABORATORY OF PROF. P. B. WILSON, ANALYTICAL AND CONSULTING CHEMIST AND METALLULG No. 41 SECOND STREET, BALTIMORE The following is the result of the Analysis of your 8oluble Sea Isl Guano:





oisture (determined at 2120 F.) 15.97 per cent.
ganic Matter, 34.94
Containing Ammonia, 2.76 per cent.
,organic Matter, 49.09
Containing Soluble Phosphoric Acid, 3.68 per cent.
ecipitated Phosphoric Acid, - - 6.63 soluble Phosphoric Acid, 5.89 "
me, 9.13 "
Ptash and. Soda as Sulphates, 10.44 "
iphuric Acid, - - - 9.04 "
100.00 per cent.

In the above Analysis you have 10.30 per cent. of Soluble and Precipitated nosphoric Acid, representing 22.03 per cent. of Bone Phosphate of Lime, which s been decomposed and converted into immediately available food for crops. ie 5.89 per cent of undecomposed Phosphoric Acid is equal to 12.86 per cent. of ine Phosphate of Lime, which must not be considered in its chemical sense as ,ing insoluble, derived as it is from the animal, is gradually decomposed in the iL, and gives up its constituents to succeeding crops, and not like the Mineral iosphates, lay inert in the soil for years, if ever available.
The 9.04 per cent. of Anhydrous Sulphuric Acid, nearly one-fifth of the iole mixture in its dilute form as found to be most effective for agricultural irposes, is a controlling evidence of the solubility and the activity of the Guano. he percentage of this important constituent must, in a great measure, determine ie value of all Fertilizers, when, as in your case, it is only used to decompose the hosphate of Lime, and not added as salt cake.
I agree fully with Prof. Horsford, that beyond the Analysis of a Fertilizer, ie best, evidence of its value is the continued use of it in sections, and by the same rmers, through a number of years. This should be gratifying to you to know that .om year to year you have succeeded by close scrutiny of your works, and judicious sectionn of material, after a long experience to have been able to attain this emience.
Your Fertilizer has all the value you claim for it. It is perfect in every re)ect, an yon have kept the standard to what it has been in former years.
Respectfully, &c.
P. B. WILSON.
We offer this Guano, or Complete Fertilizer, advising its use in reference to the many so-called Orange Tree Fertilizers, which, upon examination, we find are composed, to say the least, of the most unreli,ble ingredients, and apparently without regard to any principle of Jheimistry, or any other principle, except to derive a large profit, an(d vhilst this is desirable to all maniffacturers and merchants, it is not possible to do so in this age of competition and education, and but a short life will attend all such attempts, as the results of the Fertilizer .pon tij soil can alone establish its worth and build up a business upon L correct and eating basis.





SOLUBLE SEA -ISLAND OUANOi':4,

Is as well adapted to the growth of Vegetables, and for Composting, which, after allI is only useful in making a more even distribution, and adding only the limited amount of fertilizing ingredients such material may contain, or acting as a mulch, which in all warmn climates is desirable, but in all cases it should be looked to that the proper quantity of Guano is at all times present in the Compost, and that 100 lbs. of Corn-, post made of 50 lbs. of Guano and 50 lbs. of Muck, Plaster or Kainit





~ ~0 r

4- (1)
E- ) 4 'F5,- .
_* ~~~R C.- 0.- k
~ ~ I 1%
w-~ ~ ~ ~ C-3 ~ N 0 ~ f




Eo V 1
V2~9
C,


nD b-0
t C

'-3 r .. ..



C-) -;w el ct t CI




is not equal to 100 lbs. of Guano, and whilst the quantity may be in,1 definitely increased to give proper results, a proportionate amount 01 this Compost must be applied.

We ask only a fair trial of this Guano, and rely upon results for ii remunerative business.

THME BASIN FERTILIZERB COO 20 ad am 60% BALTIMORE

011







w A/
IT ft/0(1r4+' It-$dq To




181 DEVONSHIRE STREET, BOSTON,


Lithographers, Block and Albertvpe



DRY GOODS TICKETS, BANDS AND TAGS,
lJ&OMMERCIAL ORK,

ilLBONDSCHECKS, DIPLOMAS, SHOW CARDS
AND
LABEL WORK
OF E VERY .DE SCRIPTION.

SOLE AGENTS IN THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA FOR
MAX CREMNITZ, PARIS, FRANCE, M2AZa. $uo CAmo.

~i { ~.AXIL-SO ..A..G-rIELITTS IPOTE? rV RAPHAEL TUCK & SONS,

Lonhan, Englanb.










AILBDENfTYPE$


The Albertype process, as now perfected, stands pre-eminent
amongst the numerous photo-mechanical methods for the


PERMANENOY, BEAUTY, AND UNIFORMITY

OF ITS R E-HFRODUCTIONS.


-Q6ciantffic, Historical Bnd Medical SociHties >
Will find it specially adapted to the illustration of their


exports, FaC-imiles of b jects of $cientificYalue

MANUSCRIPTS, DOCUMENTS, &c.


IT is EXTENSIVELY USED BY PUBLISHERS FOR THE ILLUSTRATION OF

GENEALOGIES, MAGAZINES,


COMMERCIAL CATALOGUES,

AND OTHER PUBLICATIONS.


In all cases, as when STEEL ENGRAVINGS, PAINTINGS, PHOTOGRAPHS &c., are re-produced, the prints will be found to combine all the finish of the original, in detail, with the permanency and equality of an ink impression.

Specimens and Estimates furnished on application.



FORBES COMPANY,

181 DEVONSHIRE ST,, BOSTON, 22 BOND ST., NEW YORK.

cr* *.








THE GOLDEN FRUIT ROUTE!
COMPRISINC THE

Florida, Transit & Peninsular
-AND-Florida, Central & Western Railroads,
-TO THE--GARDENS, GROVES, WINTER HOMES & RESORTS
OF


-CONN SECTIONS FROM T H EZC:ortI, Tlast aznc. West
AND FROM
POINTS ON THE GULF OF MEXICO, BY SEA AND RAILS

Double Daily Passenger Service!
Elegant Parlor Cars on Day Trains and Magnificent Sleeping
Cars on all Night Trains.

SSTHIORT_LIJ T-EI
TO
Fernandina, Waldo, Tampa, Key West,
Cainesville, Manatee, West Indies,
Cedar Key, Punta Rassa, Havana.

-:*SHORTEST AND 0NLY RAIL LINE
TO
Hawthorne, Ocala, Lake Panasoffkee.
Orange Lake, Lake'View, Leesburg,
Silver Springs, Wildwood, Lake Ocklawaha.
Connection at PANASOFFKEE for TAMPA, BROOKS]DIL ___________VILL_, SUMTERVILLE, FORT DADE. etc., etc.
Th~le J13est Line to Jacksonville !
-AND VIA JACKSONVILLE TO TIESt- 0oxins Pi-ver' Co0Untr-.
TIIO il TICOn sale at all Coupon Ticket Offices in the North
T OUGH K and East and West, and the Gulf States. and at
Levy & Alden's Tourists Offices; and BE C M RTAIN that your Transportation reads either via FERNNNDINA, CALLAHAN, BALDWIN, LIVE OAK, or RIVER JUNCTION and F. T. & P, or the F. C. & W., or both.
1). E. MAXWELL, Gen'1 Supt., A. 0. MacDONELL, G. P. & T. A.,
FERNANDINA, FLA. FERNANDINA, FLA.
WALTER G. COLEMAN, Cen'1 Tray. & Pass. Agt.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
(4) 31





T]hIT

ST. AUGUSTINE ROUTE


Jacksonville, St. Augustine & Halifax Rive
RAILW AY.






TRIPLE DAILY PASSENGER TRAINS. SHORTEST,
CHEAPEST,
QUICKEST
--A' T\-D--BETWEENJacksonville R St. Augustine
ONLY ONE HOUR AND TWENTY MINUTES
Fro'n, IV0 e tropolis aWA th Ailciet City.
First-Class Rolling Stock Equipped with all the, Model
Improvements.
W. L. CRAWFORD, C. D. ACKERLY,
H S. MINC Genera] Manager. General Passenger Agent,
Superintendent. JACKSONVILLE, FLORID
Suerntndnt JCSOVILE FORD







DeBARY-BAYA


Merchants' Line.






I 7--- tj
1 kST. JOHNS RIVER STEAMERS
ARRYING THE UNITED STATES MAIL.

STEAMERS
1Y OF JACKSONVILLE, FRED'K DEBARY, GEO. M. BIRD, ROSA, WELAKA, WATER LILY,
ANITA, SYLVAN GLEN, FANNIE DUGAN,
H. T. BAYA, MAGNOLIA, PASTIME.

Leavig Jacksonvie Foar Tnims Iily
-FOR
ceen Cove Springs, Tocoi, Palatka, Sanford, Enterprise,
And all Landings on the St. Johns River.

CLOSE CONNECTIONS
ade with all Rail, Steam and Stage Routes for Points
in the Interior, Indian and Halifax Rivers.
CLOSE CONNECTION
t Jacksonville with all Rail and Steamship Lines for Points
North, East and West.
CHAS. B. FEN WICK,
General Freight and Passenger Agent. B. WATSON, Gen'l Manager.
33






L. W. PiEfRilM,
-WHO1101 ESALEF DEALER INlVMen'sYouths'and Boys'Clothing

DRY GOODS AND NOTIONS,

HATS, CAPS, BOOTS, SHOES, &C.

FURNIT URE,
-AND A FULL LINE OFsIJVEOl T ON JSr TR E1T,
Near Front Street,




G. W. FERGUSON,
FRONT STREET,




HARDWARE, TOOLS,


GRAIN, HAY, CEMENT, LIMF
OILS, PAINT3, BTJ81-E8, Uk.,
WHOLESALE OR RETAIL.
Special attention given to the sale or shipments of VEGETABLES and
FRUITS in their season on commission.
Agent for WILKINSON & CO.'S FERTILIZERS, now extensively
used throughout the country.
Also, for BUFFALO SCALES of all kinds, and for PATAPSCC
BAKING POWDER.
Long' experience in this business assures a successful competition.
G. W. V2G= LSONM34







.I.. F. TIFP,

0sioe rHit a1( Sliipi Broker
KEY WEST, FLA.
-AGENT FORMallory's Steamship Line
Between NEW YORK, KEY WZ37S nd GALYV3TON1, Texas.
-ALSO, FOR THEMORN STEuMSII iN
Between New Orleans, Cedar Keys, Key West I Havana.
-HIAS CONSTANTLY ON HANDANTHRA CITE AND BITUMINOUS COALS,
ICE AND WATER,
Which can be delivered to Ships with dispatch. Also,

Fireproof Warehouses and Extensive Wharves,
Which will accommodate >hIips of the lzr:est class and draft of water.






Cc~i::in Merchant ani Acticneir,
COR. FRONT AND DUVAL STS.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN

C E EA ;4 L 1E AC HA fISL4
Receives by each steamer and sail from New York and New
Orleais a fresh supply of

Groceries, Provisions and Canned Goods,
Has alwayvs iM stock a large andi well selected assortment of
(SN IP (CHANDLERY,*ZCrockery, (dIass., Tri and rdliIware, Carpeniters' Tools, SIores, Paiits'
Oils and Variishes, Furiiittire and Stationery.
CABIN, MESS Find SHIP STORES a specialty.
4e- ONE OF TIlE OLI)EST BUSINESS HlOUSES OF TlE CITY.-"
t47 Personal a ttio ni to !alesaud ai i4action giara 11tCd. Goon d received by every
steamer from No.w Yn)rk. New leans, Tampa, Manatee an( (Jlerar Kecys,
and PICI UCE by all schooners from the Mainland.
35







RUSSELL HOUSE,
KEY WEST, MONROE COUNTY, FLORIDA.


-kDELIGHTFUL' WINTER RESORT
And the only City in the United States below the Frost Line,
with an average temperature of 700.
T E IR IMd S 1o (D 3D ED -R .A T :E

HUNTING, BOATING, FISHING AND FINE DRIVES.
Reached by Steamer direct from New York and New Orleans.
or by Cars and Steamer from Cedar Keys, Florida.
CHAS. T. MERRILL, - Manager. ROMAN ALFONSO. LUIS F. CORRAL. LAUREANO B. CONDE.


ROMAN ALFONSO & COO
-MANUFACTURERS OF" EL EJEMPLO DEL ARTE,"

FACTORY No. 21.

KEY WEST, FLORIDA.




-MANUFACTURER OF FINEHAVANACIGARS,


KEY WEST, FLORIDA.

BRANCI-I OFICE 2'73 MEARL ST, -y 7..
36







Estate of Henry Lowe,

H. DAVIS LOWE, Manager.

GROCERIES, DRY GOODS, HARDWARE,
AND GENERAL MERCHANDISE.
FAOKR AN 0 $lPPER OF FREUCT5 & VJEZTALM5
CORNER EATON AND WILLIAM STREETS,
KEY WEST, FLORIDA.


-WOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER INSDRY GOODS, GROCERIES, PROVISIONS
AND GENERAL MERCHANDISE.
Grower of Pineapples and other Tropical Fruits and Vegetables.
PACKER AND SHIPPER OF TOMATOES AND FRUITS AND VEGETABLES GENERALLY.
zrV WIEsT, -FLOTIDAJNO. H. COLEMAN. GEORGE L. BARTLUM.

COLEMAN & BARTLUM,
Cor. Front and Ann Sts., KEY WEST, FLA.
AUJCTIOINI E~ J2S

Aid General Commissiom MerchaZts.
WHOLESALE GRtOCERS.
DEALERS IN LUMBER, SHINGLES, &c.
FLOUR A SPECIALTY.


B. S. CURRY,


Aucicnlir an Cc1i::icn Mr chant


CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED.

10 Front St., KEY WEST, FLA.
3, 7





JOHN JAY PHILBRICK


And Commission Merchant
-WHOLESALE DEALER INICE, HAY, CRAIN AND CEMENT,

ANTHRAWTE AND ITUMVNOUS COALS
Charters made in West Indies and Gulf of Iexico.
AGENT FOR TAMPA STEAMSHIP COMPANY.
JOHN JAY PHILBRICK,
KEY WEST, FLORIDA.


i IL SWEENY,
-MANUFACTURER AND BOTTLER OFM fERAL WATERS,
LAGER BEER, &c.

(jfiue %timts, j!tvawdxt Jiqurvs, X
AND FUR-I KEy WEST lIVANA ARS.
AT WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.BILLIARD AND POOL TABLES.
KEY WEST, - FLORIDA.
38








South Carolina Railway.",


DOUBLE DAILY PASSENGER ROUTE
--1 A N) FROM AI AM 'OINTSNORTH AND SOUTH
Via Columbia and Charleston, or,
Via Augusta, Aiken and Charleston,
-TO AND FROM ALL POINTSVia Augusta and Charleston.

THIS IS THE ONLY ROUTE TO TRAVEL


Between CHARLESTON and WASHINGTON,
If rou wish to see the most prosperous portion of the South. The route )being via Columbia, Charlotte, (,reensboro, Danville, Lyrichburg and (1harlottesville, over the VIRGINIA MIDLAND ROUTE, with Pullman Sleeping Cars Columbia and Washington, without change, passing throUghl many of the most noteI Battle Fields in Virginia and the C arolinas. Also the great Piedmont Belt, celebrated for its beautiful scenery, thriving towns and vi laes, which can be seen via rio other route.

THIS IS THE ONLY ROUTE

Running Palace Sleeping Cars,

BETWEEN ATLANTA AND CHARLESTOn,
Via Aiken and Augusta without change, m akiing close comiectionis at Atlanta
Union stationn with Traims to and1 froni ll points West and South.

THIS IS THE ONLY ROUTE

Runnrinog Pullman Sleeping Cars

BETWEEN AIKEN AND NEW YORK,
Which 1i v\-[a Chatrleston and AC tlatic Coast Line. Sleepers running through in
b)Oth direction" without harige.

This is the 3est Ioute to Travel
Via Charlestorn to the Citios aund Summer Rt)rts in North id -outh ('arolina. Viro'ina and Tennessee, and the only route by which Aiken, the greatest Winter 1-esort in the South, can be reached.
By this Route you can buy Through Tickets to all points, and have your Baggage checked to destination. For Through Tickets and Time Tables to all points North, >uthl or West, apply to Agents at Charleston Hotel and Line Street Station, Charlestot. Agent at Corlumhia, Camden. Aiken and tin Depot, Augusta.

GENERAL OFFICE, CHARLESTON, S. C.

JOHN B. PECK. D. C. ALLEN,
General Kanager. General Pass. and Ticket Agt.



















X rr ne
;4iv 4F B \4n



















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H :AflO LIXA nALWAY

THE OLD RELIABLE


Great Sou Ithm FrLght Eou

-BETWEENBoston, New York, Providence,
Fall River, Philadelpbia, Baltimore,
-AND
Augusta, Macon, Athens, Atlanta,
And all points in Georgia, Tennessee, Alabama, and
the West and South-West,
-AND
Cu umb t3 Greevitte, sparta'dur& ckarloffi
And all points in North and South Carolina.

T-IlTS TS .A-LNT~D
The Best Route The Best Route
TO SHIP NORTH! TO SHIP SOUTH!
If you wish Prompt Delivery of Freights.

The Freight Accommodations
-OF THEreat l~Outheru Freigt Line
AR V N$RRA\S5)E.
Running regular and well organized lines of magnificent Steamships, this Line offers more advantages to Meechants and Shippers than any other route. All Freight should be marked "Care South Carolina Railway Co.," which will insure prompt delivery.

Claims for Loss, Damage or Overcharge Promptly Adjusted,
By addressing IE. P. WARING, Gen'l Claim Agent, CHARLESTON, S. C.
Patrons of this Line will save time and money by calling on the following Agents for Rates and Bills of Lading :
Boston.-A. D. W. SAMPSON, New England Aoent, 201 Washington Street. New York.-W. H. RHETT, General Agent, 317 Broadway. JAS. W. QUINTARD & CO., Agents, Pier 27, North River.
Philadelphia. -W. P. CLYDE & CO., Agents, No. 12 South Wharves. Baltimore.-A. L. HUGGINS, Agent Merchants' and Miners'. Steamship Co. Charleston.-JAS. ADGER & CO., Agts. N. Y. & C. S. S. Co. W. A. COURTE
NAY, Agent Clyde S. S. Co. C. D. BATEMAN, Agent S. C. Ry. Co. Columbia.-D. McQUEEN, Agent. Augusta.-P. R. SLEDGE, Avent. W. M. TIMBERLAKE, Soliciting Agent. Atlanta.-J. M. SELKIRK, Western Agent. Greenville.-lI. T. POE, Soliciting Agent GENERAL OFFICE, CHARLESTON, S. C.

& JOHN B. PECK, I. B. PICKENS,
General Manager. General Freight Agent.













THE STATE OF FLORIDA.



HISTORY.
FLORIDA, the southeastern State of the United States, lies between 25 degrees and 31 degrees north latitude, and between So degrees and 88 degrees west longitude from Greenwich.
Until recently the area has been estimated at 59,268 square miles, but according to the iSSo United States Census Report the State contains but ;8,68o square miles. In this latter document the coast waters, bays, gulfs, sounds, harbors, &c., are put down at 1,800 square miles of surface ; rivers and smaller streams at 390 square miles; lakes and ponds at 2,250 square miles-making the whole water surface 4,440 square miles, and leaving 54,240 square miles of land surface, or 34,713,600 acres.
Italy is said to resemble in shape a boot, with the foot turned southward. Florida has somewhat the same resemblance with the foot turned northward. The peninsula portion, measuring from the northern boundary, extends south about 400 miles, with an average width of about 100 miles. The northern part of the State extends from the Atlantic westward along the southern boundary of the States of Georgia and Alabama about 375 miles, with a width to the Gulf of from 40 to 90 miles.
North and South America, Africa and Asia, owing to some great natural causes which worked in their formation, are all pointed or narrowed in their breadth in their farthest extension south. Florida, probably from the operation of the same causes, is of similar shape in her southern extremity. Her territory is included in the same zone in which, according to the most ancient of books, the human race had its origin, and in which the Garden of Eden was said to be situated. This zone embraces the territory of the ancient civilizations of Egypt, Babylon, Greece and Rome.
The average altitude of Florida, as set forth in Toner's Dictionary of Elevations of the United States, is 6o feet above the level of the sea. This is a somewhat lower average level than that of any other of the States. Louisiana, the next lowest according to that authority, is 75 feet above the sea in its average. The larger portion of the territory of all the States on the Atlantic

T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is distilled from the choicest
qualities of Grain. S. GUCKENHE IMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga.
5







SF. & W. R1y. ]FIoidac~ Di31s-patcX.

40 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER
coast from Maine to Florida is less than 300 feet above the sea level by this authority.
There is an impression with some that high places are the most healthy, but this does not always follow, and is not the testimony of experience here in Florida. Sometimes the lower places in the same neighborhood have had quite the advantage in point of health. In the Old World, some healthful and fertile localities are below the level of the ocean, as the valley of the Jordan, more than 1,000 feet below the surface of the Mediterranean sea, the shores of the Caspian sea, and portions of Holland reclaimed from the ocean by its dykes.
The early history of Florida was not one of rapid and encouraging development. From 1565, the date of the settlement of St. Augustine, the oldest town in the Union, to the cession of 1819-21, the territory was claimed by Spain, except the 20 years under British authority from 1763 to 1783. In 1763 the Floridas, East and West, were ceded by Spain to Great Britain, but in 1783 Great Britain having lost the thirteen American Colonies,in the war of 1776 and succeeding years, receded the Floridas to Spain. Thus for more than 250 years the territory was in the grasp of a power far away, and of a monarch whose people regarded the territory too much inferior to the fatherland to invite immigration.
On the 22d of February, 1819, a treaty was made between John Q. Adams, Secretary of State of the United States, of the one part, and Luis de On is, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of the Kingdom of Spain, on the other part, each vested by their respective governments with power to act, ceding the Floridas to the United States. On the 24th of October, 1820, the treaty was ratified by the King of Spain, and by the United States February 19th, 1821. By one of the stipulations of the treaty the United States were to "satisfy all, just claims which the inhabitants and Spanish officers of the Floridas may have upon them in consequence of the damages they may have sustained by the operations and proceedings of the American army." In the war of 1812-15, between the United States and England the United States had stationed troops for a time on Spanish soil in Florida. Another stipulation, the eleventh article of the treaty, states the agreement of the United States to pay to her own citizens' claims against Spain for damages done to their commerce in Spanish waters to the extent of $5,000,000. But the correspondence in reference to the treaty, and a note by the Spanish Minister to this eleventh article, show that the $5,ooo,ooo was only a small item in the incentive to concluding the treaty. In this note to the eleventh article the Spanish Minister says, his

TH ONLY EXCLUSIVE FRUIT HOUSE J -n IEDY
IN SAVANNAH. GA., IS n Y






W X Hiaranitee out Prices. WM. K. k 110() & CO., Tron Sugar Mills and Pans, w Savnmiah, Gt. (See front paster.)
ANI) IUSINE;SS IRE(IT()RV. 41
government would not make the cession for $20,000,000 but for the desire to arrange and terminate all diFferences with the United States. The leading consi(eration which moved Spain to the cession, was the adjustment of the boundary between the two countries west of the Mississippi, and of the Louisiana purchase by the United States from France. The boundary agreed upon was to commence at the mouth of the Sabine river anld run along the western bank of said river to the 32d degree of north latituCe ; thence due north to Red river ; thence along said river to the one hundredth parallel of west longitude from London and 23 from Washington ; thence crossing the river due north to Arkansas river ; thence along the southern bank of said river to its source in latitude 42 degrees north ; thence "by the parallel of latitude to the South sea."
With a coast line of nearly 1,200 miles, accessible with small boats all along the shore, the long, narrow figure of Florida puts its whole surface in near approach to the commerce of the ocean. Some of the best harbors of the United States are on the coast of Florida. Only Portsmouth, N. H, has deeper water (42 feet) than Key West, where is found a draft of 35 feet. The next deepest water in any harbor on the Atlantic coast is at Boston, (28 feet,) which is one foot deeper than the water off Gasparilla key, in Charlotte harbor, which shows 27 feet within two rods of the shore. True, there is a narrow sand bar with only 18 2 feet of water at low tide to be passed in reaching it, but with far less cost than has been expended upon many of the ports along the Atlantic coast, the water on that bar can be made of any required depth. New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore and Pensacola are stated to be 24 feet ; but this is the depth after the expenditure of labor and cost upon most of them. Baltimore is said to have been deepened, fror 15 to 24 feet. Wilmington, N. C., and Charleston, S. C., register 21 feet, and Savannah, Ga., 22 feet. But as the bars at Charleston and Savannah were dredged or deepened from 16 feet to their present depth, so the waters at Fernandina, Charlotte Harbor, Manitee, Tampa and Rio Carrablie, with the same labor, may be made even more than that ; so that with an equitable expenditure upon her harbors Florida will have a larger number of ports accessible to ocean steamers than any of her sister States.
Nineteen of the rivers of Florida are already navigable by steamers, to the distance, in the aggregate, of over 1,000 miles. Their names, beginning on the east, are St. John's, Ocklawaha, Indian River, Kissimmee, Caloosahatchie, Peace River, Manatee, Alafia, Homosassa, Withlacoochee, Suwannee, St. Marks, Wakulla, T IE CELEBRATED T I ISTLE DEW WHISKEY is soft and mellow to the taste.
S. GUCKENI EIMER. & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.







S., F. & W. Ry.liefr'd o-e

42 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER
Ocklockonee, Apalachicola, Chipola, Choctawhatchie, Escambia and Perdido. These streams, flowing in some instances entirely across the State, make transportation available to extensive areas, and in almost every instance have at their mouths such harbor facilities as make coastwise navigation to vessels of moderate draft safe and active.
The railway system of the State embraces some sixty railroads, completed or projected; and half a dozen or more canal companies have also been chartered. There are fourteen railways already completed in whole or in part. The aggregate length of the railways now in use and of those chartered is more than 5,000 miles. Some of these roads may not, and probably will not be built, but the prospect is that a large proportion of them will be; the encouragement offered by the State assures this much. All these companies have the right-of-way through the State lands, and also the right to acquire alternate sections of land for six miles on each side of proposed routes, amounting to 3,840 acres per mile. The enhanced value of these lands, as soon as the roads are built through them, will at ready sale pay the cost of building a narrow-gauge road, and a number of them are of this class.
Some of these companies also have the same right-of-way, together with grant of alternate sections, through the United States lands. But the stronger incentive for the construction of these roads, or at least some of them, apart from their value when completed, is yet to be mentioned. The Legislature in chartering some of them offered, additionally to the right-of-way and to alternate sections, in the aggregate over 13,000,000 acres of land. To some of them this bonus is five, to some six, to some ten, and to some twenty thousand acres to the mile ; and some of them after building their roads and selling their lands will have the roads as clear profit. A further incentive to railroad building in Florida is the level surface over which most of the roads are to pass. Years ago railway statistics showed the roads in England to cost about $40,000 per mile, and in the United States about $20,000 per mile; but now, in Florida, the estimate is that a narrow-gauge road can be built and economically equipped at a cost of $5,ooo per mile.
As fast as these roads are completed, saw-mills are erected for converting the growing trees into timber, and thus furnishing a remunerative amount of way-freightage while the country is still but sparsely settled. The turpentine distilled from the pine and the rosin thus supplied, adds to this freightage ; and, before these

.ReedJ SAVANNAH, GA handles more FLORID I ORANGES
J. B. L9edyTHAN ANY HOUSE SOUTH. TRY HIM.








*welIP ALL UKNbS VTTRNTSiET) BY .joiN Sw HkI*1j r 1' 0o K E, 2 BAY ST.. SA-ANN\A1, GA.
AND JUS1NESS 1I( )kY. 43
are exhausted, vegetables and fruits, tropical and semi-tropical, for Northern markets will take their place. There are six charters for canals, with an aggregated length of over 700 miles. Some of these, like some of the chartered railways, will never be constructed, perhaps, but upon others the companies are already at work. The canals, like the railways, have the right-of-way, wih alternate sections of State lands they pass through, when constructed "in accordance with such plans and specifications of construction as may have been agreed upon between the Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund and the Board of Directors of such railroad or canal company."
Four of these canals propose passage through the peninsula, connecting the Atlantic with the waters of the Gulf. One of these, "The Atlantic and Gulf Coast Canal and Okeechobee Land Company," proposes to make a passage for vessels from the navigable waters of the Caloosahatchie through Lake Okeechobee to the Atlantic. The next one, further north, from Charlotte harbor through Manatee and Brevard counties to St. Lucie, on Indian river. The next, further north, commencing in Levy county, at the mouth of the Withlacoochee, runs through the counties of Levy, Marion and Volusia, to "New Britain on the Atlantic ;" and the one farthest north, "The Florida, Atlantic and Gulf Canal," from "Cumberland Sound in the harbor of Fernandina through the counties of Nassau, Duval, Clay, Bradford, Alachua and Levy, or the route surveyed by General Gilmore from the St. Mary's river to St. Marks."
Either one of these canals, when constructed, will be of great advantage to the State, and if either one be of such dimensions and depth as to admit the passage of large ships, then the whole civilized world will be interested in and accommodated by this shorter and safer and cheaper route of travel. The travel and freightage from San Francisco through the proposed ship canal at Panama, or over the ship railway contemplated through Tehaunteepec, would find the ship canal across the peninsula a passage of safety against the coral reefs and storms that are encountered in passing around Cape Florida. So the commerce of the Mississippi passing through this canal would avoid the same dangerous adventures, and would, moreover, shorten the distance to the Atlantic ports and to Europe by hundreds of miles. The importance and value of such a passage, even to foreign nations as well as to the American people, is clearly recognized. Through officials and well informed parties prepared to speak, the voice of England, Russia, Germany and France have been heard in favor of such a passage. As a further proof of the
H E LEBRATED THISTLE D1 PEW WHISKEY possesses an excellent bouquet.
S. GUCKENI1ELIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.







, F. & V Ry FREIGHT IN THROUGH CARS, IN PAST
-. 7- TRAINS, WITHOUT TRANSFER.

44 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER
material importance of this route, it may be stated that a bill has been introduced in the Senate of the United States calling that body to a grave consideration of the interests involved, and to give proper aid to the construction of such a canal.
By turning to the list of railways and canals in subsequent pages, and observing their courses, crossings and connections, it will be seen that they form a sort of net work all. over the State, and that only a small portion of the territory of the State will be more than twenty miles from lines of transportation, either by rail or water.
These facilities for transportation, for travel and commerce in Florida in the near future, are assurances of a prosperity highly encouraging. All along down the path of the ages commercial facilities and wealth have accompanied each other, and in modern times the rapid march of Europe on the line of progress, as compared with the more tardy steps of Asia, has been due mainly to her much larger proportion of coast line, its frequent indentations, its harbors and its covers, and its more numerous navigable streams. These have given more numerous and convenient commercial facilities, and her greater 'Wealth and progress have been the result. London, the largest city in the Old World, and New York, the largest in the New, sit beside the sea, where the world's commerce and wealth are conveniently poured into the lap of each. Now, Florida is favored above most of her sisters in having all her territory convenient to the commerce of the ocean, and in the greater number and depth of her harbors, where her products may be exchanged and the wealth of the commercial world received.
CLIMATE.
Since the climate of Florida is so well known through the civilized world, it is not necessary to go into detail; we will briefly give some facts from official tables, and the opinions of scientists. The climate is not a hot climate in summer, but mild, and not subject to great changes of temperature. The winters are not cold and frec:zng, but uniformly cool and bracing. Throughout the whole twelve months, the rainy, cloudy disagreeable days are the exception ; fair, bright, sunny days the rule. The thermometer seldom goes below 30 degrees in winter, and rarely above 90 degrees in summer. The official records show the average for summer, 78 degrees; for winter, 6o degrees. The daily constant ocean breezes in summer modify the heat; (the Gulf breeze, coming with the setting sun, cools the air at night ;) a warm or sultry night is almost unknown. Official sanitary reports, both of scienConsign your Oranges to J. B. REEDY, the largest Florida Oranges Dealer in FRUIT in Georgia at SAVANNAH.








Our Lns are Snmoth and Uniformin T11 'Iickicss. wM. KEIOE: Sugar Mll s and Pans. & GO., iron F under, savannah, (;a. (See front pster.)
AND BUSINESS D1IWCT()RV. 45

tific bodies and the army, show that Florida stands first in health, although in the reports are included the transient or recent population, many of whom take refuge here as invaliRs, sojmC in the lowest stages of disease. The summer is longer, but the heat less oppressive than midsummer at the North ; this results from its peculiar peninsula shape and the ever-recurringr breezes which pass over the State. For days together, New York, Boston and Chicago show, in suiimer, temperature as high as 100 degrees it is very rare that it reaches that degree in Fhorida for a single day, generally ranging below 9o degrees; not oppressive, modified by the ever-changing air ; not sultry, close or humid ; mornings and evenings always cool and bracing. Natives and older residents, if asked, would say they preferred the summer to the winter months for the climate. This climate is peculiarly adapted for vegetation. There are years when in some localities there is a drou gt h, and years when portions of the State have had excessive rains, but they do not extend far. In the early spring, when most of the planting season occurs, there are frequent showers from the first to the middle of July, the rainy season co'mmences, continuing till the middle of September ; the rain falls almost every day, commencing in the early afternoon, lasting from a few minutes to a few hours, rarely as long as the last period, often with heavy thunder and sharp lightning, then ceasing, leaving the air cool and swket, the sky clear and bright ; the porous soil quickly absorbs the water and leaves the footway dry. These rains fill up the low flat lands and ponds, and are injurious to crops when planted on such lands, underlaid by hard pan. 13ut on the high pine lands and high hammocks the rains are of advantage, making crops grow rank and heavy. The "rainy season" is not of regular annual occurrence.
We take from Dr. A. S. Baldwin's tables, kept for the Smithsonion Institute, as follows
Jacksonville, latitude 30 degrees, 15', longitude 82 degrees?nean of three daily observations for twenty years, 1844-1867. Thermometer.
January...........55 deg. I May..............7( deg. September.........78 deg.
February.........58 deg. June.............8t dog. October...,... .70 dg.
Matrch...........64 dew. July...............2 deg. November.... ....62 ag.
April .. .. ....... 70 deg August ... .... .. 2 deg. December ........52 deg.
1-he Army records show for twenty years, variation at St.
Augustine, Fla., 23 degrees.
Rainfall at Jacksonville, average for ten years, 54.5 inches ; the largest quantity in August and September, and the least in Nov ember.
T HJE CELEBRATED THL>TLE DEW WHISKEY IS ABSOLUTELY PURF.
S. GUCKENUEIMER & SON, SOLE AGENTS, SAVANNAH, GA.







S F. & W R PULLMAN SLEEPING CAR SERVICE between
ALL IMPORTANT POINTS.
46 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER
The above shows that for equality of temperature and consequent salubrity, Florida has no rival.
THE SOIL
Is exceedingly diversified, and in its varied character is suited not only to the crops of the other States generally, but because of its near approach to a tropical clime, to some products not grown elsewhere in the States.
The soil is generally classed as first, second and third rate pine lands, and as high and low hammock and swamp lands. The pine lands cover much the larger portion of the State, and the traveler in the trains, or over the highways through them, is not apt to be impressed in such casual inspection with their real worth.
The white sand on the immediate surface is taken as conclusive testimony against them: but that is not all sand which, in the careless glance, appears to be. In a large portion of the State this sand is mixed with finely comminuted bits of shells or carbonate of lime. Even the third class of pine lands produce abundantly the saw palmetto, and this plant is rich in potash, one of the most important elements of plant food, and generally furnished by nature to the various soils with a very rigid economy. One of the marks of the third class pine lands is the black-jack growth upon the more elevated spots, and the ash of the blackjack, like the ash of the palmetto root, makes fine soap, showing both of these plants to be rich in potash ; and this mineral is not derived through the leaves from the atmosphere, bUt through the roots from the soil. Even this poorest soil is not worthless. It does more than fill what would otherwise be an inconvenient chasm in the earth's surface. It furnishes more nr less pasturage, both upon the black jack elevations and the "gallberry flats." Cattle feed frequently upon the palmetto leaves, and hogs are very fond of the tender buds in the spring time, and fatten upon the berries in the season for their ripening. Then the spreading leaves are converted into cheap and convenient fans for cooling the face, and are now being converted into paper of the first quality.
The fibre of the palmetto leaf is being converted also into brushes, mattresses and other household conveniences. Factories for thus utilizing the palmetto upon a large scale are about being erected in several places. The root of the palmetto, when finely broken or ground up, is said to furnish fine material for tanning leather, because of the amount of tanic acid in the root. This seeming digression is still a plea for our poorest lands.

OCO ANUTS! .J. B REEDY IS THE ONLY IMPORTER CT IN SAVANNAH, GA.






Suga Mils ad Pns1A full Stock of all Sizes. WMH. REIIO E & CO., Iron Sugar Mills and Pans IFounders, Savannah, Ga. (See front pastor.)
AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 47
Of tillable plants the sisal hemp and the pine-apple are both air plants in a large degree, and do well with little tillage on very poor soil. Leibig, the German Agricultural Chemist, says that the poorest soils, even the Luncburgheath of this country, contain enough of mineral plant food for centuries of profitable tillage, but that it is "locked up" in such cheminal combination as to render it inaccessible to plants, except in a very slight degree. The plant has a power, which the chemists call catalysis, by which it disintegrates and dissolves the minerals containing plant food, when they are in contact with or near the roots. The temperature of the atmosphere and the soil have something to do with aiding or retarding this vital power of the plant to supply itself with needed nourishment. When soil and plant roots are frozen this catalytic power of the plant is suspended, thus in colder climes, where for months the surface and its contents are locked up in ice, in Florida this disintegration and dissolution of the minerals by the forces of the plant are continued without any such suspension. All the year round the plant has the key to this chest of supplies; therefore, with a soil of the very same constituents the plant will have access to the larger supply of food, taking the year round, in the warmer clime.
In the gallberry flats, while the pine trees are not so tall as on the better lands, noi so well suited for lumber, they have more sap-wood, and are better suited for supplying turpentine and rosin ; and the collection and preservation of these articles is a paying and a growing industry in Florida,
Turpentine and rosin are appreciating in value, as the sources of supply are becoming narrowed, and the commercial demand continually enlarging.
The second-class pine lands, which have been adjudged by competent authority to be in the largest proportion, are all productive. They are not hilly, but for the most part undulating in their surface. In some places, however, these elevations amount to hills. Some of the sand hills in Hernando county are regarded among the highest points in the State. Underlying the surface is clay, marl, lime rock and sand. These lands, from their accessibility and productiveness, the facility of fertilizing with cattle, and the impression of their heathfulness above hammock lands, have induced their enclosure and tillage, when the richer hammock lands were hard by, but more difficult to prepare for cultivation.
Some of these lands have no regular compact clay under them, or, at least, not in reach of plant roots. This fact is taken frequently as an evidence against them, since the popular prejudice T fE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY IS ABSOLUTELY PURE.
S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, SOLE AGENTS, SAVANNAH, GA.
6






S., F. & Wa Pty, WAY-CROSS SHORT LINE

48 FRORIDA STATE GAZETTEER
is decidedly in favor of a clay sub-soil. This objection, if it really be one, is taken for more than it is worth. for clay proper, or alluminum as the chemists call it, is not food for plants. It uses to the plant are mechanical. It serves to hold firmly the roots of the enlarging trunk, but not to subsist the hungry or thirsty plant. Sometimes it has been found in small quantities in the ash of woods, but this is because the rootlets take up more or less of whatever is insolution about them, and clay has been taken up in this way just as poisons may be taken up, for trees are sometimes killed by pouring poisonous liquids about their roots, but clay never makes any part of the organism of the plant, nor is it numbered among the element which contribute to their growth.
Another notion as to the value of a clay sub-soil is, that without its presence the applied fertilizers will leach through and be lost. The fertilizers used are generally lighter than the soils to which they are applied, or than the water coming down from the clouds. As the rains fall some of these fertilizers are carried down, after a time of drought; as the soil fills they are borne upward again by the waters to the surface, and both as they go down and come up, whether they be liquid or gaseous, the humus of soils has a strong absorbing affinity for them and readily appropriates and retains them for the uses of the plant, when the superabundance of water has passed away. But if the soil is not filled to the surface, so as to bring back directly any fertilizer in solution that was carried down, it is safer there in the sub-soil than on the steep hillsides of clay, where what is applied is frequently carried away into the floods, together with the soil, to the vales below. Whereas what has gone down in the porous soil is brought up by the capillary attraction of the surface soil, in time of drought, to the reach of the growing crop. One of the uses of drought is, that it thus brings up from the sub-soil any mineral food that may be there, to where it will be in reach of the growing crop.
But light, sandy soils, though they may produce freely at first, soon give away, and this fact, for frequently it is a fact, is regarded as conclusive as against loose and porous sub-soils, whereas it only proves that these light soils were not sufficiently supplied with humus, and the limited supply soon exhausted.
Some of the best and most enduring soils of Florida have a chocolate-colored, loose, porous sub-soils. The very tenacity and closeness which it is claimed prevents the applied fertilizer from sinking will of course be equally in the way of fertilizing matter rising, in the time of drought, from the sub-soil.

I AM HEADQUARTERS FOR CIDER. J. B. REEDY,
Grocer and Importer, Savannah, Ga.





Suga Aiad P; Mills run pVrfectly trw. W M. K I. I (E & C( ). Sgro Foaders. Savannah, Pa. (Se front pastor.)
AND 1,USINESS I)!RLWT()RY. 49
Of the first-class pine lands Mr. J. S. Adams, Conm issoner of Immigration, in his publication of 1869, says: It 1;S nothing analagous to it in any of the other States. Its surface is covered for several inches with a dark vegetal)le mould beneath which, to the depth of several feet, is a chocolate sand loam, mixed for the most part with limestone pebbles, resting on a substratum of marl, clay or limestone rock. The fertility and durability of this description of land may be estimated from the well-known fact that it has on the upper Suwannee, and several other districts, yielded, during fourteen years of successive cultivation, without the aid of manure, 400 pounds of Sea Island cotton to the acre, the lands are as productive as ever, so that the limit of their durability is still unknown."
In reference to the high hammock lands, we again quote from the pamphlet of Mr. Adams: There is one feature in the topography of Florida which no other country in the United States possesses, and which affords a great security to the health of its inhabitants, it is that the pine lands which form the basis of the country, and which are almost universally healthy, are nearly everywhere studded at intervals of a few miles with the rich hammock land. These hammocks are not, as is generally supposed, low, wet lands, they do not require ditching or draining. They vary in extent from twenty acres to forty thousand acres. Hence the inhabitants have it in their power to select residences in the pine lands, at such convenient distances from the hammock as will enable them to cultivate the latter without endangering their health, if it should so happen that any of the inhabitants prove to be less healthy than in the pine lands. Experience has shown that residences only half a mile distant from cultivated hammocks are exempt from malarial diseases, and the negroes who cultivate and retire at night to pine land residences maintain their health. Indeed, it is found that residence in the hammocks are generally healthy after they have been a few years cleared. This class of lands, under favorable circumstances, have produced as much as three hogsheads of sugar per acre."
These hammocks, high and low, are generally admixed with lime, and the streams running through them are impregnated with it, more or less.
The low hammocks are less elevated and less undulating, and generally require ditching to relieve them of a superabundance of water, especially during the rainy season. They have a deeper soil and are generally regarded as more lasting than the high hammock. They are especially fitted for the growth of the sugarcane, which is not so much affected by either dry weather or
THE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is distille(i from the choicest
qualities of Grain. S. GUCKENTHIMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga.





So F &FAST MAIL TRAINS THROUGII WITA 1t
1.& v. iY. FEW STOPPING POINTS.
50 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER
flood as most other crops. Sometimes in its growth the surface about it is covered with water for weeks, without seeming seriously to injure it, and then requiring a longer period for maturing than most of our field crop, it has in the autumn, when the rainy season is over, a mild and dry period, when it grows fastest, which is best adapted to the maturing of its juices.
Swamp lands are esteemed the most durably rich lands in Florida. They occupy depressed places, where they receive the drift from places more elevated. They are of more recent formation than the high hammocks, or even the pine lands, which are a formation subsequent to the hammocks. They are alluvial and still receiving deposits from the higher grounds. Some of what is called the Everglades, in the counties of Monroe and Dade, is soil of this character. These lands will be, in a large degree, reclaimed by the canal now in process of construction for that purpose, and for providing transportation for the world's commerce with that section. A portion of these Everglades will, without question, turn out to be very poor, but among them and in other portions of the State, there is estimated to be more than 1,000,000 acres of swamp land not yet appropriated to agricultural purposes. In several instances, and in different localities, this class of land has produced four hogsheads of sugar to the acre. Some suppose that eventually as much sugar will be raised in Florida as would supply the present demand of the United States with that article.
Some of the counties of Middle Florida, Gadsden, Leon, Madison and Jefferson, and Jackson county, of West Florida, have large areas of fine high hammock land, underlaid with a stiff clay. These are the best lands of the State for the growth of the short staple cotton, and are indeed the cream of the State for generally farming purposes. They are of the earliest formaiton of the Florida lands.
In East Florida, the counties of Alachua, Levy, Marion, Hernando and Sumter have most hammock lands.
Most of the swamp lands (proper) are in South Florida.
One peculiarity of the Florida soil is its easier culture than the stiffer soils. Another is that most of the farm labor and tillage can be performed in those months of the year when the grounds are frozen further north. Another peculiarity is that the fertilizers are applied with better effect, both because the applications are not carried away by the rain as frequently they are in hillier regions, and because the more porous soil lets in the atmosphere more readily to aid the fertilizers in the work of decomposing the When going home, stop in and order a box of J B) T l V Q Tin1 Im
the choicest FLORIDA ORANGES, at J 1Li1, SaVnLLnLh, Ga.







SugarAND PANS OF ALL SIZNS. MADE BY JOIIN 1, ROURKE, 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 51
minerals of the soil, and setting free the food elements they contain for the use of the crops grown.
STAPLE COMMODITIES.
The staple commodities of Florida for markets outside the State are enlarging in number. The long and short staple cotton, corn, rye, oats, rice, sugar, syrup, tobacco, vegetables of almost every variety, and fruits, tropical and semi-tropical, as well as most of those grown in temperate zones, fish, sponge, lumber, turpentine, rosin, &c., are the most prominent. The cereals grown in the United States generally do well also in Florida, with the exception, perhaps, of wheat, which is supposed to be more subject to rust in Florida than further north. For the want of proper mills for converting the grain into flour, but few experiments have been made in wheat ; but as it grows well in Egypt climate cannot be the difficulty.
In the census of i88o the average of the corn crop of the State of Georgia per acre is put down at 9.2 bushels ; South Carolina at 9.3 bushels, and Florida at 9.4 bushels. Florida, therefore, is not entirely in the rear. The average per acre of the oat crop in Alabama is put down at C.2 bushels, and Florida at 9.4 bushels.
A larger area in Florida is suited to the growth of Sea Island cotton than in any other one of the States. Indeed, about half the whole American supply is raised in this State.
At the Atlanta Exposition a bag of long-staple cotton, from Levy county, Florida, took the first premium.
As this staple brings double, and sometimes treble the price of the short staple, the localities best suited to its growth will be turned to its production.
The small grain cereals generally have been found to do well in Florida as far as they have been tried. Rice does finely, even on the poor pine lands when sufficiently fertilized. After cowpenning the grounds 6o bushels per acre have been produced. The reclaimed swamp lands will be eminently fitted for its production. While this grain feeds a majority of the world's people, the straw is excellent forage for horses and cattle. But the sugarcane will, perhaps, be the larger crop on the richer lands, whether swamp, low hammock or high. The world's demand for the product of the cane is enlarging, the price is enhancing, and no substitute has yet been found that will adequately supply its place. Another incentive to its production is the improved machinery brought into use in the last few years for converting its juice into sugar and syrup, and purifying its granulations up to the highest grades.
TF fE CELEBRATED TIItSTLE DEW WHISKEY is soft and mellow to the taste.
S. CLUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.





& W Ry Elegant Passenger Equipments; Westinghouse
-> ** Air Brakes; Miller Platforms; Janey Couplers.
52 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER
Jute is now meeting with experiment in this climate, and with every prospect of success. This is the proper soil and climate for it. Its growth will diversify our crops, and the manufacture of its fibre here will diversify our labor, and diversity of labor is one of the great wants of the South. There will be a home demand for the manufactured article. This will save expense of freightage from abroad and import duties upon arrival.
Another plant producing textile fibre is the Sisal hemp. This plant was introduced into Florida while yet a territory, from Yucatan, by one Dr. Perrine, who engaged with the United States Government to introduce and grow tropical plants, in consideration of a township of land south of the 26th degree of north latitude. His enterprise, for some cause, failed, and the grant failed with it; but some of the plants he introduced found in the locality a genial home, and live on, without attention and tillage.
In an enclosure at Manatee this one-Sisal hemp-has been somewhat troublesome. It feeds so largely upon the atmosphere as to be almost independent on the soil. This character of the plant will encourage its tillage, even upon the very poorest lands. Properly cared for it will yield a remunerative crop, and, like the jute, the article grown and manufactured here will find an extensive home demand.

TROPICAL AND SEMI-TROPICAL FRUITS.

The Pineapple is largely an air-plant, and in a suitable climate will do well, even in a poor soil. Very finelpineapples have been grown as far north as Tampa, about 28 degrees north latitude, and will do well up to 29 degrees. On the island between Key West and the main land it is a staple crop, as also in Dade county, Indeed, it may and will be grown profitably anywhere south of 29 degrees north. It is only awaiting convenient transportation.
The Cocoanut just at present is attracting great attention. There is a "boom" in its production in the counties of Monroe and Dade. There ate trees in prosperous and prolific bearing at Fort Myers, near the northern boundary of Monroe county. With a little protection to the plant for the first several years during the coldest nights it will do well as far north as the Manatee river.
The Date-palm, from which is obtained the date of commerce, is a somewhat hardier plant than the cocoa-nut, and will do well, therefore, something further north. Date trees, and very old ones, are bearing at St. Augustine, and in Franklin county, at Apalachicola. As yet this fruit has not attracted much attention

Candy, Crackers, etc. M-Send for Price List. _NJ." B Reedy,
savanniah, Ga.







ur Leading Spect1Ly, \ M. (K V H & (( f ron Si Foundes, Savannah, (n. (See front faster.)
AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 53

as an investment, as about twenty years are generally required to obtain fruit from the seed.
The Guava, a tree in its size and shape and manner of growth not unlike the peach tree, does about as well in the southern counties of Florida as it can anywhere. From its fruit is made the guava jelly of commerce, so widely and so favorably known over the world. The taste for the fruit, like the taste for most tropical fruits, is an acquired one, but when acquired is fully endorsed. Some persons like the fruit upon first tasting it, but the majority require frequent tasting before the flavor becomes decidedly agreeable. The full crop ripens in August and September, but the trees have blossoms and fruit all the year, and all the year the fruit is ripening. They grow with less attention than the peach, and sometimes bear the second year from the seed. The fruit is ordinarily about the size of the peach, and fully as varied in size and quality. So far experience has demonstrated no other means of utilizing this fruit for market than by canning, or as jelly or marmalade. As to its exact profitableness, even in one of these forms, we have no reliable data.
The Sugar-apple," in local nomenclature, the Spaniards put at or near the head of the fruit list for its excellency. In its flavor it is one of the most concentrated sweets known among fruits, but the first taste has a smack of something repulsive, soon lost in a few repetitions, and then the acquired taste is very agreeable. It grows upon a shrub but little, if any, larger than the pomegranate, and in size and shape is somewhat like the pine cone. It decays too soon after ripening for transportation, and as yet has established a use only at home. It thrives as far north as Tampa.
The Pomegranate, several varieties of sweet and sour, grows finely in every part of the State. It is not a marketable product, but when properly prepared makes a most delightful sub-acid summer drink-is a decided febrifuge much in vogue. The tree with its rich foliage and brilliant coral-like flowers is highly ornamented.
The Coffee-plant has attained maturity in the opnt air in but one county in the State, or even the United Statcs. It sometimes attains a height of ten or twelve feet. Mrs. Atzeroth, of Manatee county, has sent several pounds of the matured grain to Washington City, and received a premium for the same. She is engaged mainly, however, in raising the plants for sale. Whether it can be grown profitably on a large scale, and will figure among the available crops of Florida, is yet to be tested.

T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY possesses an excellent bouquet.
S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.






S, F. & W. Ry. H m

54 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER
The Mango is another tropical fruit of high flavor, and is now bearing abundantly as far north as the 28th degree of north lati tude. In size and shape it somewhat resembles a pear, and in flavor has been likened to the apricot. This is a marketable fruit
-finds ready sale in Texas and Louisiana markets.
'I he Sappadillo (after a little familiarity with it,) is a very luscious and desirable fruit. The tree attains about the dimensions of the orange, but will not stand the cold quite so well. A few trees are growing as far north as the Manatee river. They are not yet in bearing, but as they grow finely promise well.
The Alligator Pear, or Laurus Persea (Linnous,) is a tree somewhat larger than the orange, resembling in the general appearance of its foliage and growth the magnolia. The fruit, when matured, is about the shape and color (the only similarities) of the pear, is palatable, flavor peculiar to itself. Preferred by many to any other tropical fruit. Is marketable, bears transportation quite as well as the orange. Attains perfection as far north as 29 degrees north latitude. As yet has attracted little attention. In 1868 some of the trees in Tampa were killed to the ground, but have been equal to the the coldest weather since.
The Orange can be more extensively and profitably grown in Florida than in any other State of the Union. Louisiana, Texas and California will in time compete with us in the production of this popular fruit, but from advantages we enjoy in certain peculiarities of climate, soil and seasons, it is more than likely that Florida will ever retain a superiority over any other section of the country in its production.
The history of orange-growing in Florida as an industry is very recent. True it is that our primeval forests abound, in some localities, in native wild groves. With the first settlement of St. Augustine by the Spaniards it is probable that the orange was planted and cultivated with success. During the period of American occupation, from the cession of 1819-2i up to the close of the civil war in 1865, many Floridians had planted and matured extensive groves, prominent among which was the renowned Dummit Grove on Indian river, together with others of less size at St. Augustine and at several points along the St. John's river and at Tampa bay. Still these ante-bellum groves were merely among the embellishments of home surroundings with a few wealthy proprietors, as fish ponds or other ornamental features sometimes are upon the premises of Northern men of wealth but nowhere in Florida was orange-growing regarded as a business to be pursued solely for profit.

FRU IT When you want Strictly Choice Fruit, at bottom prices, send your orders
FRUITSto J. B. REEDY, SAVANNAH, GA.






Al 'RiJTJLTITI1 AL I Wk,)N A ND IJ ASS WORKS John Roure,BAY STRET, SAVNA, G.
AND BUSINESS DIRE'CTOR1V) 55
After the late war the winter climate of Florida was sought by hundreds of Northern people in pursuit of health. The beauty of the rich golden fruit, amid its dark, green foliage, attracted the eye, and, as many of these visitors bought and improved homes along the banks of the St. John's and other accessible points, they began the propagation of the orange. Gradually the facilities for its culture and the wonderful profitableness of the business became apparent, and induced investments in small tracts for the purpose. Year after year, as at various points additional trees and young plantings came. into bearing, the great superiority of the Florida fruit over any other made itself felt in the North. The demand for "Florida Oranges" began to grow, prices advanced, improved methods of propagating by budding, pruning and fertilizing obtained: year by year the demand and supply continued to increase. Soon choice locations adapted to the culture of the fruit began enhancing in value-lots that for fifty years had remained vacant at $1.25 per acre were found to command and readily bring $50 to $ioo per acre. And so the enormous profitableness of this industry became noised abroad, and the "Orange fever" was fairly established, and not without good cause ; for, however extravagantly the subject has in many instances been treated by some writers, not always without selfish purposes in inducing sale and settlement of lands, there is no shadow of doubt as to the really sure and safe ground for the investment of untold thousands of dollars in making orange groves.
One thousand dollars per acre per annum has time and again been realized from this business. Indeed, dloulle that amount per acre has been frequently made ; and with proper culture and fertilization, where the latter is needed, $i,ooo per acre is an available crop. Like all excellent things, orange culture has many and serious obstacles to its successful accomplishment. Being a new business there is not a vast amount of experience to govern and direct the beginner. Almost as many different theories exist as to the most approved methods of culture as there are men engaged in it.
The natural enemies of the tree and fruit are numerous, and not very well understood. An entomologist recently sent from the Bureau at Washington reports having discovered no less than 35 different insects that are in a greater or less degree damaging to the orange. Judicious selection of locality as well as location for groves are most important matters. The selection of stocks, buds, seeds, and the best methods of planting, protecting and cultivating, are material factors of success. Frosts, droughts, gales and other casualties are to be considered, and tiumc is largely of the essence of the undertaking. We believe, from experience TIHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is distilled from the choicest
qualities of Grain. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga.
7





PULLMAN SLEEPING CAR SERVICE between ALL IMPORTANT POINTS.
56 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER
thus far, that on an average it requires twelve or fifteen years to make an orange grove very profitable from the time of planting. True it is that in some, perhaps many instanccs, where the environment were in all respects most favorable, much better results have been obtained.
We believe, however, that orange growing, while it of course can be engaged in at a decided advantage by those who have means to conduct it on a cash basis, and be independent of support until such time as the grove is an assured success, does not, nevertheless, present any insurmountable features to poor men"
by which term we mean, in this instance, men without ready money and dependent upon their own labor for support. Indeed, in the knowledge of the writer, many of the most successful and to-day independent orange proprietors in Florida began the business with no other capital than their own labor.
But for fear of misleading minds prone to overlooking the details when so dazzling a prospect is offered them of converting in a few years acres of $1.25 land into bonanzas yielding princely incomes, we caution them that there is a long, hungry gap between raw pine woods and groves of bearing orange trees. It takes many hard licks, plenty of pluck, assured health, good luck and favorable auspices. To all of which a large family, bad health, indolence, inexperience or accident are possible drawbacks.
It has been urged that the profits of orange growing would directly attract so many to the business as to overstock the market and break it down, but a little reflection will dissipate such fears. Apples sell as readily now, and at as good prices, as they did forty years ago, and yet there are millions of acres suitable to growing apples where there are hundreds suitable to growing oranges, and there are millions of apples now on -the market where there used to be one. If the apple market cannot be so overstocked as to break it down, much less can the market for oranges. The consumption of the orange within the United States is put down at 6ooooo,ooo per annum. A little above 5o,oooooo of that supply is furnished at home; the remainder, as shown at the custom houses, is made up of receipts from abroad. We furnish about one-twelfth of the supply, while foreign sources furnish the other eleven-twelfths. The ease by which we can effectually occupy the market when our supply is sufficiently enlarged is shown in the fact that the foreign fruit is frequently sold in the market as Florida" fruit to procure for it a more ready sale. Ours is of a better quality and richer flavor, and the foreign article finds a market among us only because the home supply fails to meet the demand. And this demand is increasing almost as rapidly as orange trees in Florida are multiplying.

V E GF TGA 13 BL Always on hand a full supply of the best,
VBE J, B. REEDY, SAVANNAH, GA.








All our Mills are fully warrant icd. WAM. 1K E II (3 & (JO. Sugar Mills and Pans, Iron Founders, Savannfli, aI. (See front pastor.)

AND BUSINESS MIt1RECTOR. V.

The natural increase of American population, that is the nurnber of births over the number of deaths, is only about one-third of the real increase. More than half a million people from foreign lands will arrive upon our shores during the present year with the intention of permanent residence among us. Then
every railroad in the other American States, as well as every railroad and canal added in Florida, increases the facility and lessens the cost of putting this tropical fruit at every man's door.
The following statistics, obtained from Census Bulletin of 1880, will give some idea of the orange business in Florda at that date No. Bearing Yield in
Name in County. Trees. 188. Value.
Alachua........................... 13,111 2,25 0,)0 07375() 00
Baker. ......................... ..... 21 !0450 141 75
Bradford........................... 3,377 338,850 4,815 50
Brevard ........................... 10,8 4 1 ,250,1 00 18,750 0
Calhoun........................... 841 282,400 4,170 50
Clay............ .................. 7.738 165,500 2,522 25
Columbia............ .............. 4:'.. 4 G 157,850 2.741 00
Dade............ ............ ..... 500 500,000 7,500 00
Duval.................... ......... 10,111 3,000,000 45,000 00
Escam bia.......................... 11 10,000 ........
F ranklin .... .. .. ........ ..... ...... ....... ........
G adsden............................ ............. .... ..
H am ilton....... ............ ...... ...... ........ ........
Hernando.................. ........ 7.685 2,000,000 37,500
Hillsboro'.................... ..... 18,683 4,409,150 45,410 25
H olm es............ ......... ...... ...... ... ............
Jackson........................... 1,000 .. .... 3,500 00
Jefferson................. .......... ...... ....... ........
Lafayette............ ......... .... 1,157 43,800 662 00
Leon............................... 2,500 750,000 11,250 00
Levy............ ............... .. 460 500,000 7,500 00
Liberty... ...................................... ........
Madison........ ................... 594 512,900 7,G85 00
Manatee............ ....... ....... 17,291 2,000.000 30,000 00
Marion............................. 46.195 6,000,000 90,000 00
Monroe........................ .... 500 500,000 7,50( 00
N assau.................... ... .... ... .............
Orange.................... ........ 29,049 4,000,000 60,000 00
Polk............................... 2,283 1,500,000 22,500 00
Putniam ............ ... ....... .... 64,170 7,120,G31 108,414 80
Santa Rosa.......................... ...............
St. John's.... ...................... 12.006 2,000,000 30,000 00
Sumter............................. 13,029 2,250,000 33,750 00
Suwannee ........................... 157 120,700 2,060 00
Taylor.............................. 1,846 255,200 2,747 50
Volusia.............................. 24,638 4,000.000 60,000 00
W akulla............................. 83 70,493 ........
W alton............ .. .............. ............ ........
W ashington.................... .... ......................
Supplement... ..................... .. 11,53G 457,225 7,056 10

Total................... 292,324 46,097,856 $672,176G 5

T IIE CELEBRATED Tf t>TLE DEW WI1ISK EY IS ABSOLUTLY PURE.
S. GUCKENHETMEER & SON, SOLE AGENTS, SAVANNAH, GA.






S F & V Ry FREIGHT IN THROUGH CARS, IN FAST
SF. & W. TRAINS, WITHOUT TRANSFER.
58 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER
From want of reports from several of the counties in the above list, they are made to appear as non-productive of oranges. This we feel authorized to correct. There is not a county in Florida where bearing orange trees are not to be found ; and in Franklin and Liberty, two of the counties not reported in the above list, orange growing is quite an industry. Some very handsome and valuable groves are to be seen on the banks of the Apalachicola.
Other members of the citrus family, viz.: The lemon, lime, citron, grape fruit and shaddock can be successfully grown in at least a large portion of the State. The lime and lemon will be about as widely used as the orange, though not so abundantly, and as not a tithing of so many are engaged in growing them, they will, perhaps, be about as profitable.
The Grape-fruit is only a larger and coarser variety of the orange. The shaddock is yet a larger fruit-measuring some ten or twelve inches in diameter.
The Citron is a healthy, vigorous grower and prolific bearer, though less hardy than the lemon or orange. By a process, as yet not understood in Florida, from this fruit is prepared, in the East, the citron of commerce which art, when acquired here, will develop only another source of industry and revenue to the State.
The Banana is one of the most popular of tropical productions. It is generally relished from the first, but even this fruit requires a little practice to develop in full a palatable sense of its richness and delicacy. Moreover it belongs to the family-the plantain, which is claimed to be the richest of all the fruits in nutritious matter. It has a number of varieties. The hardest of these, and the one most widely scattered over the State, is the African. This variety needs to be quite ripe to be in its highest degree palatable. Most of the other varieties, as the French, Fig, Dwarf, Red, Cavendish, Lady-finger and Apple, are regarded as more delicate in their flavor.
Parties growing for the market are selecting some one or other of these finer varieties, even though of more delicate vitality. This plant sprouts or tillers from a single root or bulb, each sprout in its turn becoming the parent of another generation of sprouts, which attain their maturity in about fourteen months, when the pendant fruit is developed at the top, after the ripening of which the sprout dies and makes room for a younger one. One season, therefore, is not sufficient for the wants of the plant. The first white frost disposes of its leaves, and a freeze of the stem also.
With a little painstaking the fruit can be ripened all over

P Virginia North Carolina and Tennessee in large variety at J. B. REEDY'S,
PeanutsGrocer, and Importer of FrUit, SAVANNAfi, GA.







G4 IVEriN ON \LL KINDS OF MACIINERV ANRE REPAIR{, BY JOhN ROURKE, 2 BAY ST., SA VANNAh, A.
AND) BUSINESS DIICORY. 59
Florida, and even further north. Let the plant, when it comes up in the spring, have tillage and fertilization, (it requires a rich soil,) and at the commencement of cold weather take up and shelter from cold by embarking in earth, as in case of sugar-cane. The leaves will perish, but the stem will be preserved with more certainty than the eye of the sugar-cane. In the following spring if these items are reset and cultivated, ripened fruit during the summer will be assured. This precaution, however, is only necessary during some winters in the extreme northern counties of the State. It is very tenacious of life, and bears taking up and resetting almost like an onion. The plant belongs to the order of Musas, and is closely allied to the -1. Text i/is or Manilla hemp of the Phillipine Isles. It furnishes a fibre of extreme tenacity and durability, and may in time come to be extensively utilized as a fibre-producing plant. Another property of probable value possessed by this plant is it3 juice, which is very abundant in stem and leaf, trickling in quite a stream when fresh cut and makes an indellible dye, which can be varied in color by the addition of other matter, and this dye improves with age. The fruit is worth more than its cost for both food and ornamentation, and no Florida home is complete without its surrounding of the rich semi-tropical foliage of the banana.
The Japan Plum or Loquat, as well as the Japanese Persimmon, flourish throughout the State ; both are excellent fruit, with growing popularity, and promise to be profitable products for market beyond the State. The persimmon is as large as an apple, and in some of its varieties very much the same shape. Some specimens of the fruit are seedless. The flavor is rich and pleasant.
The Peach, though it grows about as well in the far south of the State as farther north, yet does not fruit as regularly. Sometimes, for several years together, the tree will cast every bloom. In the northern counties, while the orange tree grows as well, and even better than in the thinner lands of the southern counties, and for the last half a century have grown full crops for more than three-fourths of the years, yet are liable occasionally to be killed down by a freeze ; but the peach, in at least its earlier varieties, offers a high remuneration for its tillage. In North Florida it can be ready for the earliest market and command monopolizing prices. The Peen-to or Flat-Peach, of China, begins to ripen in the neighborhood of Tallahassee, in Leon county, in .the last week in April and continues for a month. These peaches brought most extravagant prices in New York the past spring.
Pears of very many varieties, but especially the Dwarfs, have f I I 1 LEBRATED TISTLE DEW WI-fISKEY is soft and mellow to the taste.
GUCKENHIEMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.







S., F* & w e R1y. ]IL"1rid 1is-patCeI.
6o FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER
been for many years favorite incumbents of the oi chards in the northern and middle portions of the State, and are found to succeed well. Standards have been extensively planted of late years. Among these the Bartlett has so far proven the most satisfactory. The introduction within the last five years in the northern courties, especially in Leon and Jefferson, of the celebrated LeConte variety, has given an impetus to the production of this fruit that amounts to a boom, and promises to rival in extent the orange industry. The LeConte is a most vigorous grower, comes into bearing the fourth year from the cutting, attains a growth of twenty-five or thirty feet, and is the most prolific and sure bearer of any character of fruit tree experimented with in Florida. The fruit is not, perhaps, as excellent in quality as some of the more choice varieties, but is nevertheless a very edible and readily marketable fruit. The rapidity of its growth, the small amount of capital, labor and time required to secure bearing orchards of any extent, its wonderful prolificness, excellent shzping properties and earliness of ripening, make the production of this pear deservedly one of the most popular investments in Florida. Prices in New York so far have been most satisfactory, and have stimulated the production of the LeConte so that in the two counties of Leon and Jefferson many thousands of these trees have been put out within the two years past. Parties in Tallahassee have recently refused $ioo per acre for land with twoyear old LeConte trees upon it. We think this industry is likely in a few years to assume very great proportions, and is calculated to effect settlementand prices of real estate in that section very much as the orange business has in sections lower down the peninsula.
Grapes of several varieties grow wild throughout Florida. They rarely if ever occur in the pine woods, but in hammock land trees are hung and festooned in every direction with the luxuriant growth of vines.
In many localities considerable attention has been given to the cultivation of domesticated varieties. The Concord, Catawba, Ives, Clinton and other American grapes of that family have been found to grow and fruit well wherever the proper attention has been given the pruning, &c. As to the cultivation of grapes of that character on a large scale for making wine, we know of no very extensive operations, and it is questionable whether our rainy season, which occurs during vintage in July, will not prove a serious draw-back, until experience and selection have induced a variation in the grape that will induce earlier ripening. The Delaware is a determined success in Middle Florida at any rate.
In large variety, at J. B. REEDY'S, Gracer
FD ii aand Importer of Fruit, SAVANNAH, GA.





Till 10V rL Stro011a(' ; ) nb W .M. ]\ Ell11 & C .
Sugar Mills and Pans. t.o Sa. fN front. istr )
ANI) BUSfN ESS f C()RY >
The Scuppernong has been more ext(:nsiveiy )wl)agat(l th1n any other grape.
Of the production of any varieties of i/tro/u'au wine eraup's we are unable to give any reliable information. Many experiments have been made, and none, we think, have so far been very favorable. This may be entirely owing to the want of proper knowledge of the best methods of pruning, &c. The sO-Called wines manufactured in Florida and other p;irts of the South are only cordials, made by the addition of sugar or spirits to the jmice of the grapes. They are sweet heavy drinks generally, with decided favors peculiar to themselves ; are palatable dIn ks when a taste is acquired for them, but are not wines in a commercial sense. Very considerable profit, however, attends their manufacture and sale.
Apples, so far as we know, have never been extensively or very satisfactorily grown in Florida. There are in some of the northern counties small orchards of considerable age that have borne fruit abundantly for years, but are not of choice varieties. By proper selection of suitable varieties, and the adoption of a system of culture that experience will prove to be adapted to our climate and season, there is little doubt that on the stiff, rolling lands of the hill country in the northern portion of the State, apples may yet become a prominent feature among the industries.
Figs of every known variety do well in Florida, but in the most southern counties are a little uncertain about fruiting. When it does bear in those sections the fruit is quite as good as that grown farther north, and it may be that painstaking in its tillage will discover a remedy for this irregularity. In the East it is an article of great commercial value, and when Florida becomes fully exercised in fruit growing, and has acquired skill in preparing her fruits for market, the fig will probably become prominent among the list. The tree attains great age, and continues to bear indefinitely. Every home has its fig trees of different varieties, and the fruit is among the most wholesome article of diet.
Plums o0 many wild varieties are found throughout the State. Little attention has been bestowed on them. Some of the early Southern varieties have been found profitable for shipment North. They ripen about the first of April, and can be put in the Northern market at a time when they have no other fruit to compete with.
The Pecan of the West grows finely all over the State. It requires no tillage and nursing. Comes into bearing from the plantinQ of the nuts in ten or twelve years. The fruit is abundant, falls when ripe, is easily and cheaply gathered, bears keepT HE CELEBRATED TH ISTLE) DEW WHISKEY possesses an excellent bouquet.
S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.





SF. & W. Ry. Thxe Prefrerredt li"xte

62 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER
ing and rough shipment any distance in any climate, and is quoted in the New Orleans market to-day at 16y7' cents per pound wholesale for the best quality of Texas nuts.
The Almond grows well in Florida. Little success has been had in maturing fruit of any other variety than the Hardshell which variety is not marketable. We know of no drawback to the successful production of other varieties, save the heretofore want of proper care and attention.

OF THE LIST OF SMALL FRUITS OR BERRIES
we think experience in Florida discards all except the blackberry and strawberry. Currants, gooseberries, raspberries, so far as we know, have never proven a success in Florida.
Blackberries grow wild all over the State in great profusion. Some attention has been given in Middle Florida, where labor is abundant and cheap, to drying the berries for shipment. The dried fruit commands 14 cents per pound nct, and is becoming the source of considerable revenue to those who have undertaken its preparation and shipment.
Strawberries are one of the prominent subjects of interest to the fruit growers and market gardeners. This delightful fruit, so eagerly sought after in every market, grows to great perfection throughout the State of Florida. The fruit comes into the market too early to find competition from any other section, and Florida strawberries enjoy a monopoly in the Eastern seaboard markets for many weeks during January, February and March. The production and shipment of the berries North is rapidly increasing, and has now assumed such proportions as to secure the provision by the transportation companies of suitable refrigerating cars for their proper preservation in transitu. As ar. evidence of the profitableness of the strawberry culture in Florida, we extract from an article by Mr. W. H. Haskell, in a pamphlet recently issued by the Leon County Farmers' Club, the following Proceeds of one shipment of berries from Jacksonville, of 1,052 quarts, shipped to New York, and sold for $2,63o, or $2.50 per quart; cost of packing and shipping, $283; leaving a neu profit of $2,346."
The production in Florida of

EARLY VEGETABLES
for shipment to Northern markets is rapidly assuming extensive proportions, and will, in all time to come, prove a most important and profitable feature of her industries.

LEMONS I handle more than any house B, REEDY, Savannah, Ga,






Mii X o OF All KINDS 17'VNJSIIED BY JOIN
Slaw Mill Work 0URIK, 'AY ST. SSAVANNAY,, GA.
AN]) BUSINESS 1)1 RE(ToRY. 63
During the past season cabbages have been shipped frm Tallahassee, in Leon county, and sold in New York at L tml profit of $500 per acre.
In South Florida tomatoes, cucumbers and beans thus far have been the leading articles for shipment. The tomato has been the most profitable. In that section of the State the fall and winter months are best suited for vegetable growing. Beans, peas, cucumbers, potatoes and cabbages can be grown at seasons which command for them monopolizing prices. Five, six and seven hundred dollars per acre have been realized, both from cabbages and tomatoes. Cucumbers have paid as much to the area in tillage, to the early grower, as any vegetable on the list. The great drawback, thus far, to the early market gardeners has been the want of ready and reliable transportation facilities. These, however, are rapidly multiplying and extending. And the vegetable and fruit trade will soon be so immense in this proportion as to command for their use all the commercial facilities that human skill and industry can supply. The State seems likely soon to become one vast orchard for fruits and garden for vegetables.
The Sweet Potato comes nearer being a universal crop in Florida than any other the soil produces. It is easily propagated, from the roots, sprouts or vine, and sometimes the seed, though the latter mode is rarely used. From its easy propagation and cultivation, its large yield, and the variety and excellence of the dishes prepared from it, it is one of the indispensable crops. I n the southern counties it may be planted at any season of the year, and generally is not taken from the ground until needed for use.
The Irish Potato, or White Potato," is accredited with being a native of Chili and Peru, and was introduced into North America by the Spaniards, from whence it was in 1586 carried by Sir Walter Raleigh to England, and perhaps acquired its name of Irish" from the extent to which it is grown in Ireland, and the excellence with which the Irish soil produces it. This tuber has within the last year or two taken a very prominent place among the very profitable early crops in Florida. On the best class of lands truckmen have been getting about an average of thirty barrels of first-class shipping potatoes per acre, which, getting into the Eastern markets about the time the old crop is exhausted, have been netliio, over cost of shipping and selling, about $4 per barrel, making say from $ioo to $120 per acre realized from land in a short period of generally ioo days, and leaving the ground ready for some other crop by first of May. These figures have been very much exceeded in many localities. On the excelT HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY IS ABSOLUTELY PURE.
S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, SOLE AGENTS, SAVANNAH, GA.
8






S. F. & W. Ry. 30r" ILN E!
64 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER
lent farm lands of Middle Florida some wonderful results have been attained. Mr. E. W. Gamble, of Tallahassee, for instance, has, during the past spring, taken from six acres of land, to which no commercial fertilizer had been applied, 288 barrels of potatoes, for which he realized the sum of $1,728 net. Some of his last shipments sold for $9 per barrel. Interesting statistical information, touching the cost and profitableness of the production of potatoes and cabbages for shipment North, can be obtained by the curious by application to the Secretary of the Leon County Farmers' Club, addressed at Tallahassee. There are in Florida many
PLANTS FROM WHICH STARCH
may be obtained, but there are three from which its preparation is the leading use. These are the Maranta Arundenacea, or Arrowroot of Commerce ;" Coontie, or Florida Arrowroot," and the Manihot Utilissima, or Cassava.
Arrowroot grows well on good land. It is not extensively grown for market, but frequently is grown and utilized for food purposes, as well as starch making.
Coontie is indigenous to the southern counties, where it grows most luxuriously. On the Miami river, in Dade county, parties have been engaged in manufacturing starch from this plant for the Key West market. It is there sometimes appropriated to the uses of the table. Doubtless tillage would improve it in its useful properties, just as other plants have been thus improved and developed.
Cassava.-Parties who have cultivated this plant pronounce it to be a most excellent food crop for fattening hogs ; that an acre of this crop will go further in feeding than an acre of potatoes. Like the potato, it may be propagated by cuttings of the stems. From this plant is prepared the Tapioca of commerce. Recently this plant has been utilized in the production of glucose, which it is found to yield in such quantities as to make its manufacture a leading purpose.
Tobacco has been found, from the earliest settlement of Florida, to be well adapted to both the climate and soil, and has been at different periods and in different localities extensively produced. Several varieties of marked difference in character and quality are commonly cultivated. Experience has taught that Florida tobacco possesses a fineness and toughness of leaf that admirably suits it to the use of wrappers for cigars. Before the war a wide reputation was established by the planters in the county of Gadsden for the production of what was termed the Florida Speckled

BAN ANAS. I am the only Importer of Red and Yellow Bananas in the
BA, State. J. B. REEDY, SAVANNAH, GA.






A. full Stock of all Sizes. WM. KEOE k CO., Tron s Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front pastor.)
AND BUSINESS DIRECTOR.
Leaf," which was pronounced the very best for wrappers grown anywhere, and commanded unusually high prices. The lands of that county were found to be peculiarly suited to its production. One thousand pounds was the average yield per acre, and several handsome fortunes were amassed by its culture. A highly flavored and fragrant article of tobacco is being extensively planted for home consumption in many portions of the State. This quite equals in the excellence of its flavor the Cuban weed ; is indeed grown from seed originally introduced from that island. What are known as shell hammocks in the county of \Vakulla, in Middie Florida, and indeed in many other parts of the State, are most admirably suited to the production of this Cuba variety, and are just now attracting renewed attention for that purpose.
Melons of every variety, from the classic pumpkin to the primitive gourd, abound in Florida, are of the very finest quality, and in the cantaloupe and watermelon furnish only an additional entry to the shipping list of the truckman, and are by no means one of his least profitable interests.
Silk might easily be made a most profitable industry in Florida. The Alorus Mlzticaulis and M. Alba-both grow most luxuriantly. Cuttings of either laid horizontally in furrows, and covered in early spring, put up a vigorous sprout at every joint, and grow in ten years to be hedges of stout canes. These kept cut back, so as to stool and multiply the number of sprouts, and not allowed to grow into trees, and thus elude the reach, will the third year, and thereafter, furnish heavy crops of foliage for feeding the worms. In many places careful experiment with choice varieties of European, American and Asiatic varieties of worms have proven very satisfactory.
Honey is rapidly becoming a staple product of Florida, whose climate and flora seem specially adapted to the propagation of bees. Even in the winter months, in South Florida, there are a supply of flowers quite sufficient to support the hives. This permits heavier tolls to be made on them, as less honey must be made to feed during winter. Bees work in South Florida all winter.
TIMBER.
Numerous inquiries have been addressed to the Commissioner from different quarters as to the supply and location of different commercial woods to be found in Florida. It is quite impossible, in the absence of authoritative data, for the writer, whose personal knowledge or facilities for obtaining information officially on this subject is most limited, to at all present the facts of the

T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is distilled from the choicest
qualities of Grain. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga.






S, F. & Wa Ry. WAY-CROSS SHORT LIN1
66 FRORIDA STATE GAZETTEER
case as they fully deserve. The establishment in Florida, as in other States, of an Agricultural Bureau will in time shed light on this, one of her richest resources.
Besides her boundless areas of yellow pine, whose timber is largely supplying the world's markets, there is in Florida, perhaps, a larger supply of cypress timber than in any other section of the United States. This timber for the manufacture of staves for syrup and sugar barrels and hogsheads is unsurpassed, is being extensively sawed and shipped to the prairie States as railroad cross-ties, and is rapidly coming in demand, especially in Germany, for ship-building. It is, too, the shingle timber of the South. Untold fortunes are still standing in this timber along the numerous rivers, lakes, lagoons and swamps.
The Live-oak, so durable and valuable for ship-knees, is still abundant along the coast and rivers, and of the most gigantic size.
Red Cedar, of the very best quality, abounds in all the low hammock lands along the coast and rivers. The cutting of this timber has for years been a prominent industry. Large supplies are consumed by cedar mills at Cedar Keys and Tampa, where quantities of this wood is sawed to supply the pencil factories of A. W. Faber & Co.
White-oak, suitable for stave timber, is to be found in very considerable quantities in many portions of the State-in the counties of Jackson, Calhoun, Gadsden, Jefferson and Wakulla, in Middle Florida. Especially in the great hammocks along St. Mark's and Wakulla rivers, in the latter county, are to be found rich supplies of this valuable timber, ready of access from the streams. So rapid is growth that upon large plantation tracts, cultivated up to the beginning of the late war, and since then left idle, forests of white-oak have sprung up, and in the short space of 22 years attained a growth that will square from ten to twelve inches. It is a curious sight to ride through a forest of stately trees and count the old corn ridges beneath them.
Red-oak is the principal timber growth over extensive areas of high hammock in the hill country of Middle Florida. This timber, while somewhat too porous and brash to be used in the manufacture of agricultural implements, answers admirably for staves for a certain class of barrels, and furnishes a most abundant supply of tan-bark, making the manufacture of leather a cheap and profitable industry in that section.
Many other varieties of oak abound throughout the State.
Hickory is abundant over extensive areas. The climate of Florida makes the second growth of this ordinarily slow growing

Raisins, I uts Etc I am the Largest Dealer in this line.
J. B. REEDY, SAVANNAH, GA.






mir11AND PANS OF All SIZEF. MABIE BY JJLX
Sugar ItlsO A1 ;
R(THS, I UKJE, 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH. (,A. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 67
tree rapid, and inexhaustible supplies of most excellent hickory can for years be drawn from the hammocks all over Florila. The same is true of the ash in many localities.
Poplar is a common growth along most of the rivers ; the supply is good.
Wild Cherry and Black Walnut are not so abundant, but are very rapid growers and attain rreat size. Several enterprising spirits propose the planting of extensive plantations of black walnut on the shell lands along the St. Mark's Railroad in Wakulla county. The cheapness of the lands, (Old Forbes' Purchase,) their wonderful fertility, the rapidity with which a wood of black walnut attains marketable growth, (about 15 years,) and the absence of any cost of culture and fencing, it is thought, makes such a scheme a safe and sure investment.
Stinking Cedar," (Torrcya Tazfolia Arnott,) is an evergreen, belonging to the yew tribe of conifers, peculiar to Florida, and confined to a rather limited locality near Aspalaga, on the Apalachicola river. The timber is possessed of the most remarkable durability, great lightness, is soft, splits straight, can be rived as thin as card board, has elasticity, receives a high polish, and ought to be valuable for any purposes requiring these qualities in a high degree. It is said that the dead trunks of the torrey~a are to be found imbedded in the alluvial drift of the Apalachicola river bottom in a perfect state of preservation, (as to the heart,) and that they must, from every indication, have been exposed to the decomposing influences of earth and water for centuries. The lamp posts in the Capitol grounds in Tallahassee are made of this remarkable wood.
Red Bay, (Laurens Carolincnszs,) is commonly termed Florida mahogany." It is very abundant throughout the hammocks and swamps of Florida. Its dark-colored, handsomely veined wood makes it valuable for cabinet work. It commands ready sale in the markets.
It would be quite an endless job to enumerate the long list of Florida woods that have been and could be utilized in the arts. As yet,,except in the case of pine, cypress, cedar and live-oak, very little has been done in manufacturing timber from the many valuable trees in the State. Vast forests of most valuable wood have been felled and burned. As transportation facilities are increased and manufacturing developed, more attention will be directed to the sawing of hard woods.
STOCK RAISING,
as applied in Florida, embraces so many purposes, methods, and degrees of profitable success, that it is quite difficult, in the limits TIfE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHItSKEY is soft and mellow to the taste.
S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAh, GA.






FAST MAIL TRAINS THROUGH WITH BUT ., & Y. FEW STOPPING POINTS.
68 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER
of a publication of this character to discuss it intelligibly to one totally unfamiliar with it,
Along the coast, in all the counties east of Escambia, are to be found larger or smaller herds of cattle. These run at large through the pine woods, swamps or salt marshes, and thrive on the coarse pasturage in a manner quite profitable and satisfactory to their owners, who round up" once a year, mark and brand the new calves and give little other attention. So little expense attends this sort of stock-raising that notwithstanding the paultry character of the scrubs produced, they prove valuable. Indeed, the hide and tallow in a five-year-old steer would return a good profit on the cost of his keep. These cattle are small, with thick heavy necks and foreparts and narrow loins, but when fat will clean, at four years old, about 500 to 600 pounds, which finds ready sale among Floridians at from 6 to 1o cents per pound. There are stock-men in all the coast counties west of the Suwannee, however, who realize very handsome results from the sale of these cattle. It is doubtful whether the rough pasturage they rely upon will admit of a very marked improvement in these cattle, even if crossed with improved breed.
In the northern counties of Middle Florida, on the red lands, where many varieties of excellent pasture grasses abound, and where stock are kept under fence, a very different tone of things exists. Thoroughbreds of the Durham, Devon, Jersey, Ayreshire, Hereford, ahd Alderney breeds, have for some years been introduced and liberally used, until a large percentage of the cattle in that section are grades of one or the other of these bloods. The Bermuda grass pasturages of these counties are naturally of a very fine quality, and of recent years are receiving a degree of attention tending very greatly to their rapid improvement. Stockraising of all kinds is being fostered by the farmers as most profitable adjuncts to their farming operations, not only in the growing of manures, but the ready sale at good prices, of the dairy products and increase. Near the towns of Madison, Monticello and Tallahassee are to be found several herds of thoroughbreds that do credit to their owners, and are fast winning a reputation for these places for excellent dairy products. Butter exhibited at the annual exhibition of the Middle Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Association, compares most favorably with the production of any dairy districts. This is a rapidly growing industry in these localities, and bids fair to take a prominent place.
In South Florida cattle raising is a leading industry. More capital has been employed in it than in the tillage of the soil, until within the last few years.
That this investment pays well has this practical proof: More J. B. REEDY, Grocer, and Importer of
Confectioners' Supplies. Fruit, SAVANNAH, GA..






Our Mills run perfectly true. WM. KlJlOE & CO. Iron Founders, Savainali, Ca. (See front p)aster.)
ANT) BUSINESS 1IKEWTORY. 69
money.has been made at that business than in any other, until quite recently, and a number have thus grown wealthy. The cattle are not so large as those grown in Texas. First, because the native grass of that part of Florida is less nutritious than that of Texas, and further, far less attention has been given here to improve the native breeds of stock. The buyers in the Cuban markets, to which shipments are made, are said to prefer the Florida to the Texas beef. If the South Florida grass be not so nutritious, it seems to impart a more ag-reeable flavor to the flesh.
As cattle-raising has been a paying enterprise in the past history of the State, so it is likely to be still, in some places, for years to come. Gradually, however, it will be forced to retire before the tread of a population too dense to leave it, as at present, the whole land surface for pasturage. These cattle-men have a large experience of their observing powers through what they see and what they hear, and the thinking each one does for himself. They are really better informed frequently than some who know far more than they about books. These men will see the trend of things, and will be ready to change their investments as soon as it will be best for them and best for the country.
As the inquiring immigrant must needs pass through the country, the better to see if it be suited to the supply of his wants, and as a thinly-settled country is, for that reason, less inviting to the traveler, it may be pertinent for his encouragement to mention one prominent feature in this population of the Southern counties. I mean the cordial hospitality which is met at their hearthstones. As in nature they are the same with other men, we suppose ready hospitality must result from their employments and surroundings. They need frequently the help of one another, in herding their stock ; then in the woods, and at the table of some one of their number, most of the men of a pretty wide circle frequently take their meals together. They are thus put in sympathy one with another. Another characteristic of the section is to add but little to their bill of fare because of the company. The dishes ordinarily provided for the family are set before the guests. And as it costs less trouble, so he is the more heartily welcome than in many places where there is more preparation and more pretension in the reception given. From whatever
source this trait of character may have originated, it is now the habit of the people, and will sometimes cheer the traveler as he journeys through a strange land.
Sheep have been found to do well in Florida wherever they have been given a fair trial. In many portions of the State where the land is very thin and sandy, the vegetation is correspondingly
THI-E CELEBRATED TH iSTLE DEW WHISKEY possesses an excellent bouquet.
S. GUCKENIHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.






S F & W Ry Elegant Passenger Equipments; Westinghouse
Air Brakes; Miller Platforms; Janey Couplers.
70 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER
sparce and coarse, and while sheep will live on it and increase at a fair rate, they, of course, under such circumstances produce an inferior quality of both wool and mutton, and tend very much to become bare of wool on the legs and bellies, but their continued presence has been found to gradually overcome these very drawbacks; and under their grazing, pine woods, originally very scant of vegetation, have in a few years become enriched ; new characters of weeds and grass have sprung up, and sheep and new crops prove of mutual benefit to one another. In some other portions of the State, especially in the counties west of the Apalachicola river, the rolling pine woods furnish pasturage of a much better character, and sheep have been found to do proportionately well. There are to be found in that part of the State some very fair flocks, and the profits therefrom, when compared with the cost of their keep, show a net perhaps beyond what is realized by breeders of a higher class with more expensive surroundings. Sheep, like goats, feed upon a greater variety of plants than cattle, and are susceptible of profitable handling on pastures that would not support a herd.
On the red lands of the middle and northern portions of the State sheep have always proven profitable. Heretofore the extensive culture of cotton and other agricultural crops has rather tended to keep all available lands in cultivation, but as the supply and quality of colored labor has decreased in that section, many broad acres have been turned out. On these old plantations the Bermuda grass, having no longer the plow and hoe to contend with, has asserted itself and extensive pasturages of this nutritious crop now invite the introduction of flocks.
In the southernmost counties of the State sheep, husbandry is rapidly increasing, and is thought to be more profitable than cattle.
Hogs can be raised as cheaply and of as fine quality as anywhere. In ante-bellum times all planters in Middle Florida were large producers of bacon. The difficulty of protecting them from theft in that region since the old plantation smoke-houses" ceased to be a certain source of supply, has done much to limit the business. Yet many small farmers in all the northern counties have introduced Berkshire, Poland China, Essex, and Chester White breeds, and besides their entire home supply have a surplus of bacon, hams, and lard to dispose of at good prices. In many other portions of the State this character of stock is allowed to run at large ; they gain a living in the woods, and in one and two years grow large enough to kill, having cost their owners nothing.

ES. I make a specialty of Fancy Apples. J. B. REEDY, Grocer, and Importer of Fruit, SAVANNAH, GA.






SAGRICULTURA L IRON ANI) WORKS,
John Rourke, 2 BAY STREET, SAVANNAHI, GA.
AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 71
Horses in some parts of the State are beingr bred profitably, and of a most excellent quality. The cow ponies" in use among the cattle-men of the South are a breed as peculiar to Florida as is the Mustang to Texas. They are admirably suited to the uses made of them. In Madison, jefferson, Marion, Alachua, Leon, Gadsden and Jackson counties, some thoroughbred stallions have for some years been made use of, and many very stylish youngsters are to be found in the stables of breeders in those localities. The presence of nutritious grasses in those counties, together with the firm, smooth roadways, gives advantage and attraction to the raising of horses and mules that is wanting elsewhere.
FISH.
The great variety and excellence of the fish in Florida is not one of the least attractions, whether to the sportsman or more practical housewife. The lakes and streams of the fresh waters abound in fish of the finest quality, prominent among which are the black bass, pike, jack, bream, and many varieties of the perch family. Along the coast the list of varieties is longer than the fishermen's list of names for them. Red snapper, black snapper or grouper, sheephead, red-fish, black-fish, pompano, Spanish mackerel, rock-fish, mullet, and a long list of small pan-fish" are chief among the marketable varieties. The pompano is regarded as the choice among epicures. The snapper and grouper are both deep water fish, and are taken in great numbers by smacks on the banks off shore for the Havana, New Orleans and Galveston markets. They can be kept for weeks in the wells" of the fishing smacks without injury to then. On both the Atlantic and Gulf coasts there are extensive fisheries, where, in the season of the run," mullet are taken in vast numbers on the seine-yards. Some of the strikes made by the fortunate seine-masters number hundreds of barrels. These fish take salt quite as well as the mackerel of the northern waters, and furnish an abundant supply of cheap and wholesome food to the inhabitants.
Along the Gulf coast west of the Suwannee, and especially on the coast line of Wakulla and Liberty counties, the revenue derived from this industry is considerable. The proximity to those points to the southern counties of Alabama and Georgia enables the small farmers of those sections to reach the Florida coast in their farm wagons. About the first of October, when the run" of the fish commences, the Georgia and Alabama farmer takes his wife and children in his wagon and journeys southward. A week of recreation is spent, after the year's work, on the beach, T HE CELEBIRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is soft and mellow to the taste.
S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.
9





.QF & W PULLMAN SLEEPING CAR SERVICE between
SF. & W, ALL IMPORTANT POINTS.

72 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER
where these up-country folk enjoy the salt air and water, and return home with several barrels of pickled fish to be eaten during the winter. Last fall it was estimated that more than three hundred Georgia wagons passed through Tallahassee alone, on their way to the fisheries. How many fisheries there are on the whole coast we are not advised, nor what quantities of fish are shipped to points beyond the State, but assuredly it is a growing and paying industry. Perhaps no waters abound in fish in greater quantity or of better quality than the waters of the coast of Florida. there was shipped from Cedar Keys in 188o, 1,701,000 pounds of barreled fish, of the value of $68,ooo, according to the authority of Col. W. H. Sebring, of Levy county. The Key West Democrat, of April 1st, 1882, states that about one dozen schooners of Key West, aggregating 750 tons, were then engaged in the taking of fish for the Havana market. Recently the catch of several fisheries along the coast have been utilized in the manufacture of a fish fertilizer, which is taking a high place among the farmers and promises to develop into an extensive industry.
Green Turtle may be mentioned as another commodity of the Florida coast. In Key West the beef and turtle markets adjoin. They are both supplied with about equal regularity, and very many prefer the turtle to the beef, particularly after the latter has been submitted to the hardships of a voyage from the mainland. Turtle are shipped alive to the Northern markets from Key West, and sometimes car loads of them pass over the Florida Transit and West India Railroad to Cedar Keys on their way North. One of the sports of persons living near the coast is walking the beach in April and May, watching for and "turning" the turtle that crawl out upon the shore in that season to lay. When they find the turtle making her nest or laying her eggs a sufficient number of persons lay hold and turn her upon her back. She is then helpless, unable to re-turn herself, so as to have the use of her feet. Parties are thus supplied with both the turtle and the eggs, and both are prized as savory food.
Oysters are so continuous around the coast, that when our railroad and canal system shall have been completed, a supply, at short notice, will reach any part of the interior of the State in a few hours, at the expense of gathering and short freightage. Cedar Keys has already commenced their shipment, and for all the distance that ice can make them safe freightage, fresh, canned, and in the shell, this commerce is likely to extend. The supply seems inexhaustible.
Sponge.-The gathering of sponge along the Gulf coast is rapidly becoming an industry of considerable dimensions. The prinCOCOANUTS J. RJ IEDY IS THE ONLY IMPORTER
IN SAVANNAi, GA,







S Our Leading Specialty, WM. KHI10E & CO., Iron
Founders, Savannah, (i. (See front faster.)
AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 73
cipal sponge reefs lie to the southeastward of the prt of St. Mark's, between that point and Cedar Keys. It has been (juite impossible to ascertain definitely the number of vessels engaged in this business, or the value of the aggregated catch. The Key West Democrat, of April 1st, 1882, gives the number of vessels from that port alone engaged in taking sponge at 150, and the value of the sponge shipped from that point during the past year as amounting to $250,000. Since Cedar Keys, St. Mark's, Rio Carabelle and Apalachicola are also extensively engaged in this business, it will be fair to estimate the number of additional craft on the reef at thribble the above number, and the value of the whole amount of sponge taken in the year at a little short, if any, of $750,000- Spongers report the growth of these fish on the reef to be increasing, and there is reason to expect the business to develop much greater proportions.
MANUFACTURING.
As elsewhere in the South, Florida has heretofore given but a limited attention to the manufacturing of her raw materials. Capital, prior to the war, was confined chiefly to investments in lands, slaves, stock and agricultural interest. More recently the gradual influx of money, skill and experience from the North and West have begun to recognize the many natural advantages accruing to investments in manufacturing. The result of such experiments have been most satisfactory. Judging, among other evidences, from the great amount of earnest inquiry being made at present from ontside sources, through the medium of this bureau, of the inducements offering for the investment of money in manufacturing, we are induced to regard the establishment, in the very near future, of many manufactories in different points in Florida as well assured.
Much difficulty has attended the acquisition of reliable and definite data on the subject of the interests of this character in the State.
There are two mills in the State where short cotton is being spun. One in Tallahassee, employing 33 hands and consuming about 360 bales of cotton per annum, and turning out weekly about 3,000 pounds of yarn, which is shipped to the Philadelphia market. Steam is used for driving the machinery. Another at Mount Pleasant, in the county of Gadsden, where the Clement Attachment" is used. By the use of this machine the cotton is taken in the seed," or as it comes from the fields before being ginned, and converted directly into yarns. This mill has invested in machinery about $6,ooo-in building and mill site, about
THE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY IS ABSOLUTELY PURE.
S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, SOLE AGENTS, SAVANNAH, GA.






Sol PO & we Ry TePfrre tt

74 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER
$2,000. About 230,000 pounds of seed cotton per annum is here converted into yarns. The Clement Attachment" can only be used for short staple cotton. One of the claims for this attachment is that it cuts the fibre less and makes a stronger thread than the old process. Neither of these factories convert the fibre into cloth, finding it more profitable to prepare yarns for Northern mills.
The Gadsden county mill is driven by water power. Both companies consider their investment profitable.
As at a number of points in Florida, there is water power which may be utilized, and will be, because cheaper than steam, and as a large part of the cotton crop of Florida i3 the long staple of the Sea Island variety, which, for the most part, is converted into thread, we shall probably soon have factories in Florida for its manufacture.
In the city of Jacksonville there is established a company engaged in manufacturing brushes, mattresses, mats and other household articles from the fibre of the cabbage palmetto, which abounds over so large a part of the State.
There is also in the city of Fernandina a company engaged in the manufacture of paper from parts of the leaf of the same plant.
The manufacture of cigars has already become quite extensive. In the City of Key West alone there are eighty-one factories, turning out during the year 1881, 26,732,460 cigars and consuming 700,945 pounds of tobacco.
The internal revenue tax upon these products for the year was $189,056. There are also many cigar factories in Jacksonville and other points inland. One factory has recently. been established in Tallahassee, and is now engaged in filling extensive orders for Chicago houses.
Wherever along the lines of railroad occur extensive pine forest there are distilleries for the manufacture of spirits of turpentine. This is a very extensive and profitable industry, employing many hands, and adding largely to the freightage of the transportation lines.
It so happens that the marsh pines, which grow on low, flat places, have more sap and larger taps, and produce a more abundant yield of crude turpentine. The price of turpentine, pitch, tar and rosin is steadily advancing, and the number of distilleries increasing. The Collector's office, at Customhouse in Fernandina, reports as shipments of these products from that port for 1881: Shipments of rosin, 27,363 pounds, and of turpentine, 275,540 barrels.

TH ONLY EXCLUSIVE FRUIT HOUSE
IN SAVANNAH. GA., IS B e






GIVEPN ON ALI, KflNDS) OFAMACI NERI4Y A'ND 1{lPA"I Estimates 1By-JOHN ROURKE, 2 BAY ST., SAV %ANNAl 1, .
ANI) BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 75
Lime is made generally in Florida for home consumption. Along the coast extensive shell banks occur, where the burning of lime is a matter of but small cost. Several Companies are engaged at different places in its manufacture for shipment with profitable results.
At such places in the State as investigation shall show the fossil lime stone to be richest in phosphoric properties, there will undoubtedly, at no distant day, be established mills suitable for grinding and putting the products of these rocks on the market for fertilizers.
In Middle Florida, and where else the red-oaktree abounds, the bark is abundant and cheap. and tanneries of some dimensions exist, from which excellent leather, in considerable quantities, is produced.
The leading manufactured product in Florida, and the only branch of that industry of really imposing proportions, is
SAWED YELLOW PINE
from extensive saw-mills. There are said, in official reports, to be more than 6,000,ooo,ooo of feet of timber standing in Florida that can be converted into lumber. As the country is settled up, and the lands cleared, a great deal of this timber must be thus utilized immediately or lost. Experimental test has already determined the timber from Florida to be the best upon the market, and the mills and shipments are increasing by a heavy percentage. Even Mexico and Central America are being supplied with cross-ties for their railroads from Florida pine.
The shipments of lumber from Jacksonville are stated to be forty per cent. greater during the present year than for the same period during last year. We have been utterly unable, after every effort, to obtain statistics of the amount of lumber handled at all the shipping points in the State, but suppose the average increase throughout the State to be quite as great as at Jacksonville.
By far the most important timber depot in Florida is the superb harbor of Pensacola. Here are to be- found, at all seasons of the year, fleets of foreign shipping awaiting cargoes from the many mammoth mills along the waters tributary to that port. By far the greatest portion of timber sent to other countries
from Florida is loaded at Pensacola. The completion of the line of the Pensacola and Atlantic Railroad from this great harbor to the Chattahoochee River, in
Jackson county, adds extensively to Pensacola's lumber supply. The great forest of pine, through which the new road

T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY possesses an excellent bouquet.
S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.







S, F. & W. R.1o a sat
3peeePzast 3PrejLi-ht 3La1ine.
76 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER
extends for 16o miles east of Pensacola, is, perhaps, the finest section of timber standing in the Southern States. Its inaccessibility heretofore has protect ed it from the inroads of the lumbermen. Along this great artery will flow, in 1884, a stream of freightage for foreign bottoms at Pensicola that will swell her shipping list to gigantic proportions. No section of the South is now offering more attractive fields to the lumbermen for investment. With Pensacola at the western terminus of this line of the Pensacola and Atlantic Railroad, and through connection at Chattahoochee to Jacksonville ard Fernandina over the Florida Central and Western Railroad system of Sir Edward Reed, together with cheap water transportation up the Chattahoochee and Flint rivers to points in Alabama and Georgia, and down the Apalachicola by raft or barge to deep water and foreign shipping at Apalachicola and Rio Carrabelle, it is difficult to estimate the extensive advantages to be enjoyed in that section by the mill men.
As to the quality of the lumber from Florida, we extract a quotation made by Commissioner Adams in his pamphlet of 1873, from the New York Mercantile Journal:
Yellow pine flooring and step plank from Florida are in fair demand at $30 per thousand feet, while inferior lumber, made in North and South Carolina, moves slowly at from $23 to $25 per thousand. The yellow pine, so-called, growing in the Carolinas, is objectionable for many reasons. In the first place the tree is of a different and less enduring species, and has a greater propertion of sap-wood and black-knot; and in the second place it is from those trees from which the manufacturers of pitch and turpentine get their material, thus depriving them of the ingredient upon which the durability and peculiar excellence of this kind of wood depends. Owners should always require in their specifications that the yellow pine to be used in first-class buildings should be of the growth of Florida."
The quality of the Florida pine explains the demand for the lumber made of it.
A statement, purporting to be from official sources at Washington, puts the amount of merchantable timber standing in the forests of Florida at a little over 6,ooo,ooo,ooo feet, board measure; Alabama, 21,000,000,000; Mississippi, 22,000,000,000, and Texas at 66,ooo,ooo,ooo. Whatever may be the truth of this conjecture as to the other States mentioned, it is, as we think, much too low an estimate for Florida. In an estimate recently published by the Census Bureau, the area of Florida is 58,680 square miles, or 37,555,200 acres. It is certainly a low estimate

B. SAVANNAH, GA handles more FLORIDA. ORANGES
J.B. e d THAN ANY HOUSE SOUTH. TRY HIM.






We Gariantee orPriti s. WVM.KEIOE & CO., Iron Sugar Mil. owners, ava a. front pastor.)
ANI) BUS[NESS )1RE(:T(RY. 77
to say that one-third of this area is covered with forest, which, if true, would amount to 12,518,400 acres in timber. At a rate of
1,ooo feet of lumber per acre, and sometimes a single tree will make more, the sum would be 12,518,400,000 feet-about double the estimate going the rounds of the papers. As good pine and
other timber are large items in the world's industries, Florida should not permit herself to be underestimated in this item of
her wealth.
The timber cut for the census year ending May 31st, 1881, amounted to 208,054,000 feet-a little over 3 per cent. of the sum accredited to Florida in the estimate referred to. At this rate, in about 30 years, Flurida would be cleared of her timber, but putting the true amount, as we suppose it to be, and it will supply the market at double the percentage for 30 years and more. This would be true even if there was no natural increase, but it is a fact familiar to lumbermen in Florida that less than 30 years is necessary to restore to land once cut over a new supply of mill stocks. Indeed, it has been authoritatively asserted by parties familiar with the premises that in the country tributary to Pensacola, even with her immense mill capacity, the timber grows faster than it can be cut off.
We append statistics of lumber shipments from the ports of Pensacola, Fernandina, Jacksonville and Cedar Keys for the terms designated in each case.
Pensacola, for year ending October 31st, 1881:

INT g wn Timber, Sawn Timber, Lumber,
Cubic Feet. Cubic Feet. Sup'I Feet.


Great Britain.............. 246 195,920 ),669,703 5,773,185 15.109,000
Continent of Europe ....... 97 55,33G 878,844 756,888 17.078,000 Java, Af rica and Canaries. 6 4,592 5,565 1 93, 595 395.000
W. Indies, S. America, &c... 85 33,083 39,908 19,342 21,663,000 Coastwise................. 130 50,251 29,')G6 34,073,000
Total .................. 564 39. 191 4. G23,386 G ,743,0 10 88,318,000

Fernandina, during year ISSi, shipped 40,424,000 superficial feet, and for the first four months of 1882: Coa Lwise. Foreign. Totol.
January............................. 2.954,000 1,414,000 4,368,000
Febrnary ...................... ..... 1.972,000 2,:1310,000 4.282,000
March................ .. .... .. .... 3,585,000 1,75:3,000 5,338,000
A pril......... ....................... 4,526.000 251,000 4,777 000
Total........ ................. .. 13,0 7,000 5,728,000 18,765,000

THE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is distilled from the choicest
qualities of Grain. S, GUCKEN1IE IMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga,





S, F. & Ry FREIGHT IN THROUGH CARS, IN FAST
F. & J TRAINS, WITHOUT TRANSFER.

78 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER
Jacksonville, for year ending June 30, 1881, shipped 46,666,000 superficial feet, and from same port for ten months succeeding, 46,034,908 feet.
Cedar Keys, for year 1881, shipped 30,000,000 feet.

SPRINGS.

Besides innumerable springs of ordinary character and dimensions, sources of creek and streams, as in other countries, Florida possesses a feature in spring formation as novel in character as they are surpassingly beautiful in appearance.
The bursting of great rivers at one bound from the earth is the remarkable feature of some of Florida's fountains.
Beneath the surface of limestone formation underlying the State numerous rivers course towards the sea. In many places no evidence of them are observable until they rise to the surface through great caverns or fissures in the limestone, often of wonderful depths. Most prominent among these is Silver Springs in Marion county, and the famous Wakulla Springs in the county of that name, fourteen miles south of Tallahassee. Thousands of visitors have seen the silver Spring, upon which steamboats enter. The Wakulla, being in a section heretofore less resorted to by winter visitors to Florida, is not so familiarly known. Both deserve descriptions our space will not admit of. Their great size, depth and transparency are their most striking features. Lying on the bottom of Wakulla Spring, i8o feet (so reported from actual measurement), below the surface, a dime piece can be as distinctly seen as through the atmosphere. Indeed, an object is even more plainly discernable than at the same distance through the air, as the boil of the water gives them the conformation of a lense, and thus they acquire magnifying properties.
Certainly no natural object can be more beautiful than the appearance of this great fountain, on a clear day, when no wind disturbs the face of its waters.
The Blue Springs of Volusia county, in South Florida, a little way east from St. Johns river, is thus described by a writer, in the Florida, of January, 1882:
"There is a basin 70 feet in diameter and about 40 feet in depth. A huge bowl, from the centre of which a column of bluetinted water passes upward with such force that the centre of the surface is convex to the extent of perhaps ten inches, and it is impossible to put or keep a boat on this summit, such is the force of the hydraultic pressure upward and latterally. This stream, which this gigantic spring feeds, is about 5o feet wide, and an
d OConsign your Oranges to J. B. REEDY, the largest Florida Oranges Dealer in FRUIT in Georgia at SAVANNAH.







SuaAND PANS OF A LL SIZS. MADI' BY 1JOIIN ROURKE, 2 BAY ST., SAVANNA11, (A. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 79
average depth of 10 feet, with a current of about five miles an hour. The scenery about this locality is beautiful and piCturesque in the the extreme, and worth a long journey to see."
There are many such springs to be found in different parts of Florida. They are all subterranean rivers up to the points where they break forth. They all obtain lime enough to precipitate any sediment or discoloring matter, leaving the water perfectly clear. Fish of many sorts and sizes are seen gamboling in their sports or gliding about through the waters seeking their food. The ripples on the surface refract the rays of the sun, when at the prober angle, and give the varied colors of the rainbow, and lend a sort of enchantment to the view.
There are also mineral springs in several parts of the State, whose waters, as tested in a large number of instances, have curative proprieties, and are the resort of invalids. Of this class are the Newport Springs of Taylor, the White Sulphur Springs of Hamilton, the Suwannee Springs of Suwannee, and the Green Cove Springs of Clay.
Persons afflicted with rheumatism, dyspepsia and diseases of the liver have met with very remarkable cures from drinking and bathing in the waters of these springs.
In the midst of the rich palm-grown forest surrounding the Wakulla Spring a prominent Cincinnati physician has recently purchased and is erecting a sanitarium for winter patients.
LANDS.
In an official publication from the Census Bureau, setting forth the area of the States and Territories, the gross area of the State of Florida is put down at 58,680 square miles. Coast waters, bays, gulfs and sounds, i,Soo square miles; rivers and smaller streams, 390 square miles; lakes and ponds, 2,250 square miles; whole water surface is 4,440 square miles, leaving of land surface 54,240 square miles, or 34,713,600 acres. In the report of the Commissioner of Lands and Immigration of the State of Florida, of January 1st, 1875, the amount of Prikatc land claims confirmed by the United States is stated to be 3,784,303, leaving as the amount of lands in the territory not disposed of to private parties at the time of the cession, 30,929,297.
By act of Congress of March 23, 1823, an entire township in each of the districts of East and West Florida, to be selected by the Secretary of the Treasury, were "reserved for the use of a seminary of learning."
By act of May 24, 1824, a quarter section of land was given for the Seat of Government.
T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE PEW WHISKEY is distilled from the choicest
qualities of Grain. S, GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga.
10







So) F & W. Ry. SO rm IN E!
8o FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER
By act of 3d of March, 1845, Florida was admitted as a State into the Union; and by the same act eight sections of land were given to the State for the purpose of "fixing the State Government." Also the sixteenth section of every township, or its equivalent, "for the use of the inhabitants of such township for public schools." Also two entire townships, in addition to the two already reserved, for two seminaries of learning, one east, the other west, of the Suwannee river, and five per cent. of the net proceeds of the sale of public lands for the purposes of education. Also by an act of the same date, 3d of March, 1845, 500,ooo acres were given for purposes of internal improvement.
By an act of 28th of September, 1850, "all the swamp lands and lands subject to overflow were given to the State."
By an act of July 2d, 1862, the several States were granted for colleges of agriculture and the mechanic arts, 30,000 acres for each Senator and Representative that the said States were respectively entitled to under the census of 186o.
The Commissioner 'of Lands and Immigration of Florida, in his report of January, 1881, thus states the whole amount of the swamp lands and lands subject to overflow, selected and patented to the State, to be:
Total patents received...................................... 14,442,464 acres
Quantity disposed of by the State up to tine of report............ 1,684,725 acres
Leaving at that time on hand ................ 12,757,739 acres
On the first day of June, 1881, the State Board of Internal Im provement effected a sale to Hamilton Disston, of Philadelphia, 4,000,000 acres of swamp and overflowed lands for the sum of $i,ooo,ooo, thus enabling the board to relieve these lands of liens, with which they had heretofore been embarrassed, and to stop an annual accruing interest of nearly $50,000. One-half of this 4,000,000 purchase was subsequently sold by the vendee to Sir Edward Reed, acting in the interest of British and Dutch capitalists.
These large landholders are busily engaged in arranging railroads and canals for making their lands accessible and for increasing their value. The sale of these State lands from the first of January, 1881, to May 1st, 1881, beside the sale to Disston, as shown by the books of the Commissioner of Lands, amount to 296,574 acres. This number of acres, and the 4,000,000 to Disston, subtracted from the 12,759,735 acres leaves 8,461,160 acres of the "swamp and overflowed" lands still belonging to the State at that date. The location of these State lands, as their name suggests, are confined to comparatively low sections of the State.

Candy, Crackers, etc, W- Seld for Price List. J. B. Reedy,
Savannah, Ga.






Our Pans are Smooth and Uniform in Thickness. WM. KEJIOL1 Sua l'ls and Pans. & CO., Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.)
AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 8f
They are largely confined to the southern portion of the peninsula, but are to be found in small bodies scattered in almost every township in Florida.
By an act of the State Legislature of January 6, 1855, the 500,ooo acres of land granted to the State by act of Congress of March 3d, 1845, then remaining unsold, also the swamp lands and lands subject to overflow, granted to the State by act of Congress of the 28th of September, 185o, were set apart as an internal improvement fund, and vested in the Governor of the State, the Comptroller of Public Accounts, the State Treasurer, the Attorney-General, and Register of State Lands, and their successors in office, as trustees of said fund. Under this act of the 6th of January, 1855, for "giving encouragement and aid for the building of railroads," the Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund were authorized to endorse the bonds of railroad companies of certain prescribed lines upon certain prescribed conditions, to the extent of $io,ooo per mile; for the sum of $8,000 per mile, (when the grading was completed and the cross-ties put down for twenty miles,) for the purchase of iron, spikes, &c., and when the iron rails were put down, then for the additional sum of $2,000 per mile for the purchase of necessary equipments. And after the first twenty miles shall be completed, then for every ten miles there shall be a like endorsement.
Under this Internal Improvement Act the bonds so issued and endorsed wei e a lien or mortgage upon the road bed, equipment, workshops and franchises for the payment of said bonds, as against said railroad companies, and was a lien upon the Internal Improvement Fund only for the annually accruing interest upon said bonds.
Upon the failure (as subsequently occurred) of the said several railroad companies to pay the accruing interest upon the said bonds semi-annually, and one per cent. upon them for a sinking fund, the Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund were authorized, after thirty days from said default, to take possession of the road of such defaulting company, to sell the same and apply the proceeds to the purchasing and cancelling of the bonds of the said defaulting company.
A number of the railroad companies which took the benefit of the Internal Improvement Act, and issued bonds with the endorsement of the said Trustees, failed to make their stipulated payments of interest and one per cent. for a sinking fund. Under the provision of the statute in such cases, the road was sold, but for prices not sufficient to pay the outstanding bonds of these several roads. The Commissioner of Lands, in his report of

T IE CELEBRATED ThISTLE DEW WHISKEY possesses an excellent bouquet.
S. GUCKENTEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.






S F & W. yWAY-CROSS SHORT LINE
-2 Yo & W* 11.T1Co 3P m.C X X .4-..
82 FRORIDA STATE GAZETTEER
January 1, I881, says: As well as can be ascertained the out.. standing bonds of said companies are as follows: Bonds of Pensacola and Georgia R. R. Co ............... ............ ...$387,700
Bonds of Tallahassee R. R Co........ ...................... ......... 52.900
Bonds of Florida R. R. Co................... ......................... 228,000
Bonds of F. A. and Gulf Central R. R. Co............ .................. 31,000
Total.................................................... ........ ............$699,600
The annually accruing interest on this amount is about $48,980. The whole amount of indebtedness which has already accrued against the Internal Improvement Fund for interest, as aforesaid, is not less than $6oo,ooo.
As before stated, this amount of indebtedness for accrued interest is a lien upon the lands of the Internal Improvement Fund, but both the bonds and the interest must be paid before these lands will be relieved of embarrassment, for while the bonds are outstanding the interest will continue to accrue.
On the first day of June, 1881, the State Board of Internal Improvement effected a sale to Hamilton Disston, of Philadelphia, of 4,000,000 of acres of swamp and overflowed lands for the sum of $i,ooo,ooo, thus enabling the board, in whole or in part, to relieve these lands of the lien with which they had been embarrassed, and to stop the annually accruing interest of nearly $50,000.
There is another fund which will come into the hands of the said trustees, which can be applied to the payment of these bonds and interest, if the receipts from the Disston purchase should not be sufficient. On the sale of the railroad from Lake City to Quincv, and its branches, the purchasers failed in payment of part of the purchase money to the amount of $463,I75,-and there is interest on this sum from the 20th of March, 1869, at 8 per cent. per annum, which interest up to the 20th of March, 1882, together with the principal, makes the sum of $944,877.
Under a decree of the 31st of May, 1879, of Justice Bradley, of the Circuit Court of the United States, before whom the question was brought, the Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund have a first lien for this unpaid purchase money, upon this road from Lake City to Quincy, and from Tallahassee to St. Mark's, and branch to Monticello, and if the money is not paid by or some time during the month of July, 1882, the United States Marshal is required to sell said road for the payment of said purchase for the satisfaction of said lien.
It appears from the books of the Commissioner of State Lands that the sale of the swamp and overflowed lands from the first When going home, stop in and order a boxof J. E. REDY Savanah Ga.
the choicest FLORIDA ORANGES, at R EDY, 0avallnal, Ua.






SII ALL KINDS FURNISI IPD 1 V JO V Sta Hill W ork 0oU RK BAY ST., SAVANNAHI, GA.
AND BUSINESS D)IRECTORY. 83
day of January, 1881, to the first day of May, 1882, to other purchasers than Disston, amount to 296,574 acres. This added to the 4,000,000 sold to Disston makes 4,296,574 acres, which amount taken from the 12,759,729 acres heretofore shown as belonging to the State January 1st, 1881, leaves 8,461,165 acres of the swamp and overflowed lands on May ist, 1882. There are in Florida other swamp and overflowed lands, not selected and patented to the State, but under the act of Congress have vested in the State Government. The probable amount of these, it is estimated, will be about 2,000,000 acres. Of the 500,000 acres granted to the State March 3, 1845, by Congress for Internal Improvements, about 183,000 acres remain unsold and subject to entry in the State Land Office.
Besides the right of way and the alternate sections within a six-mile limit that have been granted to railroad companies by the Legislature of the State, and withdrawn from market by the Board of Internal Improvement as the several roads have com plied with the conditions of their charters, there is a further bonus granted of other land per mile of finished road.
The names of the railroad companies, the length of their proposed roads, and the number of acres to be given additionally to the alternate sections within a six-mile limit are as follows:
Length of No. of Acres
Name of Corporation. Road. Per -ile. Total.
Orange Ridge and DeLand Railroad .... ........ 28 miles 5,000 140,000
Florida Southern Railroad and Branches .......... .370 miles 10,000 3,700,000
Jacksonville, Tampa and Key West Railroad..... 380 miles 10,000 3,800,000 Palatka and Indian River Railroad........ .... 75 miles 6, 000 450,000
Tropical Peninsula Railroad.................... 160 miles 10,000 1,600,000
Silver Spring and Ocala Railroad................ 40 miles 10,000 400,000
Pensacola and Atlantic Railroad ................ 160 miles 20,000 3,200,000
Florida Midland and Georgia ................... 50 miles 600 300,000
Total. ........ .......................1,263 miles ...... 13.590,000

In some of the above roads the distance is not stated in the charters granted by the Legislature, or in the articles of association filed under the general act of incorporation, but in those instances the distance is unler rather than overstated as above. The fact that the amount of the lands will be exhausted before all these premiums can be met will probably be a stimulus to industry in building, and, in the meantime, these lands are not pledged in such way as to prevent sales by the State to persons applying the purchase or homestead the same.
In the act of Congress granting swamp and overflowed lands to the several States of the Union in which they lie, it is stated that
T E CELEBRATED) THISTLE -DEW WIIISKEY is soft and mellow to the taste.
S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAh, GA.






Elegant Passenger Equipments; Westinghotise .F &V. &Rye Air Brakes; Miller Platforms; Janey Couplers.

84 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER
as much of them as may be necessary for draining and reclaiming them, is to be appropriated for that purpose. To carry out this express purpose of the grant, the Internal Improvement Board have contracted to give to the Atlantic and Gulf Coast Canal and Okeechobee Land Company, one-half the lands they reclaim in the section of the State lying south of township 26 in the several ranges, and east of Peace Creek. Of the four townships granted by Congress for the uses of the East and West Florida Seminaries, there remains to be sold about 34,000 acres, as shown by the the records of the Land Commissioner. There have been funded of the original grant $98,000, the interest arising from which is for the use of the said seminaries.
The lands granted by Congress to the several States by the act of July 2, 1862, for the establishment of colleges of agriculture, have been disposed of in Florida, and the proceeds funded amounting to $125,600.
By supplementary act of Congress of the 3d of March, 1845, every sixteenth section of land in each township, or its equivalent, is given to the State for the use of

PUBLIC SCHOOLS.

Taking the land surface of the State, as stated on a previous page, at 54,240 square miles, and adding the water surface of rivers and small streams, 390,000 square miles, and the surface of inland lakes and ponds, 2,250 square miles, we have 56,880 square miles, or 36,403,200 acres, from which take the sum of private land claims existing at the time of the cession to the United States, and since recognized, amounting to 3,784,600, and we have left 32,618,600 acres, one thirty-sixth part of which, amounting to 906,072 acres, accrues to the benefit of public schools.
But since the United States are allowing equivalents in other lands where a part or the whole of a 16th section is at the bottom of rivers or under the sea, the question whether a liberal construction of the law giving equivalents for deficient or missing 16th sections would not apply to lands to which parties had already acquired title before the cession to the United States may arise, as in the Forbes' Purchase" for instance. Thus far there has been no occasion which has brought this question before the proper department at Washington, nor before the courts; but since the question involves more than ioo,ooo acres of land for schools, a subject for which all in authority are now disposed to be liberal, the writer thinks it worthy of consideration.
The Land Commissioner estimates the amount of school land I When you want Strictly Choice Fruit, at bottom prices, send your orders
F ITwle to J. B. REEDY, SAVANNAH, GA.







Sg All our Mills are fully warranted. WM. K EHOE & CO.,
u i Iron Founders, Savanngh, Ga. (See front pastel.)
AND BUSINESS DIRECTORT.85
yet unsold at 570,000 acres-the amount of these for each county can be found under that head in the description of each county. It is proper to remark that the above amount includes no allowance for such 16th sections as lie in unsurveyed territory, ror for lands selected as equivalents for deficient 16th sections.
Of the school lands already sold, and the proceeds funded, the proceeds amount to $248,900, only the interest of which can be distributed among the counties.

HOW TO PROCURE LAND IN FLORIDA.

United States lands still vacant in Florida are subject to entry by land warrants, by purchase, and by homestead entry. Such lands are to be found in almost every township in the State. In the older settlements, where transportation facilities have been long enjoyed, and the lands are of good quality, very little, if any, vacant land can be found. All inquiries as to United States lands should be addressed to L. A. Barnes, Register United States Land Office, Gainesville, Florida.
The State Land Office, with Hon. P. W. White as Commissioner, is at Tallahassee. All inquiries as to vacant State lands should be made to him. Such a map as is so often asked for, showing the location of all vacant land in the State, was never published by any State, and would be quite impracticable, since daily entries would require a daily revision of the map to make it accurate. Indeed, we would advise intending purchasers to rely solely on their personal inspection of land in selecting locations. First fnd a piece of land that suits you, then ascertain to whom it belongs, and whether public or private land, secure it by purchase. The State land. are to be found scattered everywhere. Like the United States lands, few State lands of any value or desirable quality are left in sections of the country where land is good, settlements old, and agriculture has been pursued for any length of time.
PRICES OF STATE LANDS.

School lands and Seminary h(mids are subject to entry at their appraised value, not less than 1.25 per acre. The larger portion of these lands is held at '$ 1.25 per acre, but some tracts are valued as high as 7. Piymenit may be made in United States currency or State scrip.
Internal Improvement lands generally $1.25 per acre, none lt s : some as high as $6.50 per acre.

T HE CELEBRATE 'i THISTLE DEW WHIT SKEY IS ABSOLUTELY PURE.
S. GUCKENIHEIMER & SON, SOLE AGENTS, SAVANNAh, GA.






FAST MAIL TRAINS THROUGH WITH BUT S., F. & W Ry. FEW STOPPING POINTS.
86 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER
Swamp lands-for forty acres, $1 per acre ; for more than forty and not exceeding eighty acres, 90 cents per acre ; for more than eighty and not exceeding two hundred acres, 8o cents per acre ; for more than two hundred and not exceeding six hundred and forty acres, 75 cents per acre; for more than six hundred and forty acres, 70 cents per acre.
In case of entries of land at $i per acre, the land must not be detached in pieces, but must lie in a body.
For Internal Improvement and Swamp lands nothing is receivable in payment except United States currency.
Terms of sale in all cases cash.
Lands cannot be reserved from sale for the benefit of any applicant. An application not accompanied with the full amount of purchase money does not give any priority.
But by act of March 7, 1881, actual settlers upon any of the public lands of this State may enter the lands upon which they reside or have in cultivation, not to exceed 16o acres, to be taken in compact form according to the legal subdivisions, at the prices now or hereafter to be established for such lands, by paying onethird the purchase money at the time of the entry, one-third of the same within two years thereafter, and the remaining one-third within three years after the date of entry."
By Act of 16th February, 1872, the right of homestead is given on the overflowed and swamp lands.
Section 6. Any person who is the head of a family, or who has arrived at the age of twenty-one years, and is a citizen of the United States, or who shall have filed his declaration of an inten tion to become such, as required by the laws of the United States, shall, from and after the first day of April, be entitled to enter one quarter section, or a less quantity of the unsold- swamp and overflowed lands granted to the State of Florida by Act of Congress, approved 28th day of September, i85o. Any person owning or residing on land may, under the provisions of sections six to thirteen of this chapter, enter other lands contiguous to his or her said land, which shall not, with the lands so already owned and occupied, exceed in the aggregate 16o acres.
Section 7. The person applying for the benefit of section six shall file with the Commissioner of Lands his or her affidavit that he or she is the head of a family, or is twenty-one years or more of age, and that such application is made for his or her exclusive use and benefit, and that the said entry is made for the purpose of actual settlement and cultivation, and not directly or indirectly for the use and benefit of any other person or persons whatsoever, and upon filing said affidavit with the Commissioner of

CIDER I AM HEADQUARTERS FOR CIDER. J B. REEDY, SroIer and importer, Savannah, 0a,






GIVEN ON ALL KINDS OF MACWIINEIRY AND RIKPA iiS, EstimIIates BY JOHN RO URKIE, 2 BAY ST., SA VANNA 11, ( A.
AND BUSINESS DIRECTOR. 87
Lands, and upon payment of ten dollars where the entry is more than eighty acres, and of five dollars when the entry is not of more than eighty acres, he or she shall thereupon be permitted to enter amount of land specified ; P1rovidcd, however, that no deed shall issue therefor until the expiration of five years from the date of such entry; and if at the expiration of such time, or any time within two years thereafter the person making such entry, or, if he be dead, his widow, or, in case of her death, his heirs or devisees, or, in case of a widow making such entry, her heirs or devisees, in case of her death, shall prove by two credible witnesses that he, she or they have reclaimed said lands by means of levees and drains, and resided upon and cultivated the same for the term of five years immediately succeeding the time of filing the affidavit aforesaid, and shall make affidavit that no part of said land has been alienated ; then, in such case, he, she or they shall be entitled to a deed.
RAILROAD LANDS.
The lands of the Atlantic, Gulf and West India Transit Railroad Company have been heretofore estimated at 650,ooo acres. They are the alternate sections, within the six-mile limit, along the line of said road from Fernandina to Cedar Keys. They are offered by the company at $1.25 per acre, with free transportion over the road to purchasers xith their families and effects. The same authority puts clown the lands of the Jacksonville, Pensacola and Mobile Railroad Company at 200,000 acres.
The recent purchase of Sir Edward Reed and associates of these two roads, together with the line and franchises of the Florida Central Railroad Company from Jack-sonville to Lake City, and also the acquisition by the same syndicate of 2,000,000 acres from Mr. Hamilton Disston, has put into the hands of the proprietors an immense amount of land in Florida of almost every quality, and located in almost every part of the State. The management and disposition of this great landed interest is vested in the land department of the company under the direction of Hugh A. Corlev, late Commissioner of State lands, who can be addressed at Jacksonville, Florida. Mr. Corley's knowledge and experience in connection with lands in Florida peculiarly fit him for the conduct of the affairs of this great company, and the great diversity in quality and location of the lands under his control and at his disposition will enable him to meet the wants of almost any character of purchaser. Those desiring more detailed information of the whereabouts, character, prices, &c., of these land(s are respectfully referred to him.

T 11' CELEBRATED T ISTLE I)W WHISKEY Is distilled from the choicest
ijalities of Grain. S. GUCKENIIEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga.
11







S., F. & IV. l'or-ti~t Ex IMispat .
S8 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER

TE PENSACOLA AND ATL ANTIC RAILROAD COMPANY,

in their first report published in the Pensacola Commcrcial of the lands to be theirs upon the completion of their load, put them
()\\]Ii thuis

In alitirintt sectin- from tl stated.... ................................ 55000
II 1ila t e IaLC S "'t [rm l f l m ie Uc Ilitd Sl ates .. .. ................. ,0
III tihe bonus of 20,000 acres per mile from the State for 160 miles. . ... . .. .3.200.000
Making in the aggregate................. ............... .....3,888,G00

Of this amount the 688,6oo acres of alternate sections, State and United States, are, of course, exclusively west of the Apalachicola river, or along the line of the road. Of the 3,200,000 acres obtained by way of bonus from the State, much the larger portion have been taken in other parts of the State, since owing to the high and dry character of the country of West Florida the amount of swamp and overflowed lands in that section is limited. This road makes the connecting link in the great trunk line of communication from New Orleans in the most direct line to deep water on the Atlantic seaboard. The character of the railroad lands in that section is for a good part of a high order. We are not advised of the prices at which they are offered to settlers, but refer for such information to W. D. Chipley, Vice-President of the company, at Pensacola, Florida.

THE FLORIDA SOUTHERN RAILWAY

is entitled to goo,ooo acres of land by way of a bonus in addition to the alternate sections along their line from Gainesville to Palatka and from G inesville to Ocala. We are not advised as to what disposition is being immediately made of the lands of this company. Lying, as many of them will, in the heart of the Orange Belt" of the State, the demand for them is doubtless considerable. Dr. E. S. Francis, of Palatka, is Vice-President of the company, and C. A. Boardman, of the same place, is in charge of its land affairs. To these gentlemen we refer parties desiring information.

THE SOUTH FLORIDA RAILROAD

is another company, which, after completing the construction of its road, has under the charter, lands to be disposed of. The amount of these lands we are not familiar with; they will be
Virgiiia, North Carolina and Tennessee in large variety at J. B. REEDY'S, Grocer, and Importer of Fruit, SAVANNAH, GA,







Sugar Mills and Pans. -od(rs, Sav:Ln11.,, (. (See fromt pastr.)
ANI BUSINESS 1 IlIK( T( )RV.
comprised in the alternate sections, six-mile jimit, along the line of the road from Sanford, on Laike Monroe, to 1K issimmCc City, on Lake Tohopekaliga, at the head of navigation on 1K issimm rnce river. James E. I ngraham of Sanford, [horila, is the president of the company, and to him we refer inquiries of those lands.

THE FLORIDA LAND IMPROVkNIENT COMPANY.

The 4,000,000 of acres of land sold by the State to Mr. I familton Disston, of Philadelphia, were selected principally from the counties of Hernando, Sumter, Orange, Volusia, liii sborough, Polk and Manatee by parties familiar with this territory. They extend entirely across the middle portion of the peninsula, and from north to south some two hundred miles. They are intermixed in their location with State lands, United States lands, and those of private parties. In his sale to Sir Edward Reed, Mr. Disston reserved the privilege of selecting first 2,000,000 acres, and surrendering the remaining 2,000,000 to Sir Edward Reed. The portion reserved by Mr. Disston is now held by the Florida Land Improvement Company. This company is made up mainly of Philadelphia capitalists. The central office is located at Jacksonville, Florida. with A. P. K. Safford, ex-Governor of Arizona, as Land Commissioner. This company has also resident local agents in each of the before-named counties. Prices generally from $i to $2 per acre. These lands are well suited to orange culture and to the production of vegetables. They are furnished with transportation facilities on the east by the St. John's river, and the South Florida Railroad connecting that river with the navigable waters of the Kissimmee. The Jacksonville, Tampa and Key West Railroad runs through the centre, and the Grand Trunk Road, recently purchased by Sir Edwird Reed, from Fernandina and Jacksonville, down the peninsula, runs through the western portion. Additionally to this there is a lake communication. connecting with the St. John's river by the Lake Eustis and St. John's Railroad and the Ocklawaha river.

THE SAN ANTONIO COLONY.

Mr. Disston, after making his purchase of Florida lands, engaged the Hon. E. F. Dunne, ex-Chief Justice of Arizona, to visit Florida and supervise the taking out of his title deeds. Whereupon Judge Dunne made selection of 50,ooo acres of the Disston purchase in the neighborhood of Clear lake, near Fort Lade, in Hernando county, for the establishment of a Catholic Tff F, CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHIiSKEY possesses an excellent bouquet.
S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Solo Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.






Tlxe TsrefCervreal It mte
S., F. & W Ry. M mP femr II:3 ,a

90 F1()RII.DA STATE GAZETTEER
colony, with the approval of Dr. Moore, the Catholic Bishop of Florida, who has appointed a priest for the colony. Judge Dunne resides on these lands ; his address is Fort Dade, Florida. The 2,ooo,ooo-acre purchase of Sir Edward Reed of the Disston lands, being located among the Disston lands, have the same climatic and transportation facilities.

THE ATLANTIC AND GULF COAST CANAL AND OKEECIIOBEE LAND COMPANY

was chartered in iSSi. By the terms of a contract with the Board of Internal Improvement of the State, this company receives onehalf of all State lands reclaimed by draining in that part of the State south of 28 degrees, 15 minutes north, and east of Peace Creek. This area will cover about S,oooooo of acres, much the greater part of which has vested in the State under the swamp and overflowed land act, &c. This company are also chartered to construct canals and other lines of transportation. They own, by purchase, franchises for construction of 330 miles of steamboat canal along the east coast of Florida, connecting Matanzas, Halifax river, and Mosquito inlet with Indian river and Lake Worth, and also a franchise for connecting Lake Tohopekaligo with Kissimmee river. The company have already constructed dredge boats and steam tenders.
The permanent lowering of the surface of Lake Okeechobee will, it is estimated, reclaim several hundred thousand acres of land, and these lands, owing to their semi-tropical location, it is believed will be superior for the production of sugar to any land in the United States.

CATALOGUE OF RAILROADS CHARTERED.

Fcrnatndina and Jacksonville Railroad.-From a point on the Atlantic, Gulf and West India Transit Road to Jacksonville, through Nassau and Duval counties: length 21 miles; completed 21 miles.
East Florida Railzway.-From Jacksonville to Calico Hill, on St. Marys river, Nassau county; completed 42 miles. Now called the Waycross branch of the Savannah, Florida and Western.
7acksonville, St. Auguistine and Ia/zfax Rivcr Railroad.-Incorporated by act of Legislature, February 28, 1881 ; alternate sections of State lands; length, So miles.
St. -ohns Railroad.-By act of December 31st, 1858 ; from St. Johns river to St. Augustine ; right of way 400 feet on each side In large variety, at J. B. REEDY'S, Grocer
F orci ic nuand Importer of Fruit, SAVANNAH, GA.







John Rourke, STR', SAVANNA!, (,'A.
AND BUSINESS DIRECTIRV. 91
of track, with alternate sections of State lands; capital stock, $ioo1000; length, IS miles.
Atlantic, St. Johns and India, Riv'er ailroad.-From St. A ugustine to Palatka, thence to Indian river, through the counties of St. Johns, Putnam, VolusM and Brevard. Articles of incor.poration filed October 24th, 181 ; capital stock $2,000,000 length, 200 miles.
Seville and Halifax River Railroad.-From Seville, east side of Lake George, Volusia county, to Ormond on Halifax river. Articles filed January 7th, 1882 ; length of road and branches, 50 miles ; capital stock $5o,ooo.
Orange Ridge, DeLand and Atlan/ic Railroad. -Length, 28 miles; right of way with alternate sections of State lands, and bonus of 5,ooo acres per mile of finished road from DeLand landing on the St. Johns river to the Atlantic coast or to Daytona, New Smyrna or some navigable stream flowing into Mosquito inlet. By act of I881 ; capital stock $15o,ooo.
Palatka and Indian River Railroad.-Length, 7 5 miles; right of way 6o feet wide each side of road ; alternate sections and bonus of 6,ooo acres per mile; from Palatka to Ansantia, Volusia county, touching on Mosquito lagoon ; by act of 4th March, 1881.
Sanford and Indian River Rai/road.-Length, 30 miles ; filed February 6th, 1881 ; capital stock $15o,ooo ; from Sanford, Orange county, to Titusville, Brevard county.
Lake Jlonroe and Lake Jessup Railroad.-Length, 20 miles;
from Lake Monroe to Lake Jessup, Orange county; articles filed July 4th, 1881 ; capital stock $1oo,ooo.
St. Johns and Halzfax River Railrpad.-Length,45 miles ; from Rollestoun, in Putnam county, to New Brittain, Volusia county articles filed December 12th, iSSi ; capital stock $ioo,ooo.
Palatka and Sanford Railroad.-From Palatka through Marion county to Sanford; articles filed December 19th, iSi ; capital stock $20,000 ; length, So miles.
Indian River Central Railroad.-From Enterprise, Volusia county to Titusville, Brevard county; articles filed December 28th, 1881 ; length, 40 miles.
Jacksonville and Palatka Railroad.-From Jacksonville through Duval, Clay and Putnam, to Palatka ; articles filed February i ith, 1881 ; capital stock $2,000,000 ; length, 65 miles.
The Great Southern Railroad.-From Millen, Ga., through Nassau, Duval, St. Johns, Volusia, Brevard, Dade and Monroe, to Key West ; articles filed ioth of April, 1876; capital stock $14,ooo,ooo; consolidated length, 360 miles.
South Florida Razlroad.-From Sanford, on St. Johns River,
T HE CELEBRATED TIlfSTLE DEW WIIISKEY IS ABSOLUTELY PURE,
S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, SOLE AGENTS, SAVANNAH, GA.






S.F. & w. Ry. PULLMAN SLEEPING CAR SERVICE between S., ALL IMPORTANT POINTS.
92 1LORIIDA STATE GAZETTEER
Orange county, to Orlando, Tohopekaliga, thence to Bartow, Polk coutiltv, thence to Tampa, Hillsborough county ; length, 150 miles articles filed October 16th, 1881.
St. joHins and Lake, Eustis Railroad.-From St. Johns river, near Lake Gorge, to Lake Eustis, Orange county ; by act of 20th February, 1879, but articles filed February 21st, 1875 ; capital stock $100,000; right of way and alternate sections ; length, 25 im;il s.
Orange Bclt Railroad.-Articles filed 24th March, 1882 ; capital stock $1,300,ooo ; from Lake Eustis, Orange county, to a point at or near Apopka, thence to a point at or near Orlando, thence to a point at or near Tohopekaliga, thence to a point at or near Eau Gallie, in Brevard county ; length, 130 miles.
Gaincsc'ille, Ocala and Charlo/Ic Harbor Railroad.-Froin the Georgia line, Columbia county, to Charlotte Harbor, Manatee county ; with branch from an available point in Polk county to Tampa, Hillsborough county, through Columbia, Alachua, Marion, Sumter, Polk, Hillsborough and Manatee ; filed June 8th, 1876 capital stock $ ; length, 325 miles.
Gainesvil/e, Ocala avid Ciarlote Harbor Railroad -Changed to
Florida Southern by articles filed April 7th, 1881. From Lake City, Columbia county, to Gainesville, Alachua; Ocala, Marion; Leesburg, Sumter county ; Brooksville, Hernando county ; with branch from Gainesville to Palatka finished, 6o miles, and from Gainesville to Ocala finished 30 miles; length, 370 miles.
_jacksonvillc, Tampa and Kcy Wcst Railroad.-First by act of March 4th, 1879, as Tampa, Peace Creek and St. Johns, then by articles filed July 5th, 1881, to name first above ; right of way and alternate sections with right to choose any convenient gauge, and bonus of io,ooo acres per mile of finished road; work commenced ; length, 380 miles.
Sanford, Lake Eustis and Ocala Railroad.-From Sanford, Orange county, by Lake Eustis, to Ocala, Marion County; alternate sections and right of way; articles filed 5th of March, 1881, then by act March 8th, 1881 ; length, 70 miles.
Tavarcs, Orlando and Atlantic Railroad.-From Tavares, near Lake Dora, Orange county, to Apopka City, thence to Orlando, thence to St. Johns river, near Lake Harney, thence to Titusville, Brevard county; articles filed October 1oth, 188 1; capital stock $20,000 ; length, 95 miles.
LcesburAg and Indian River Railroad.-From a point on the Florida Tropical Railroad, due west from Leesburg, thence east to Leesburg, thence to Lakes Eustis and Dora, with branches to Apopka and Tohopekaliga, through Orange and Brevard to a
hEndle. oro1e than any house JB Y,Savannah, Ga. LEM0NS. anl in the State. REEDY aanal a







S ugar M ills and Pans "mir"de"" "uvaro
FOundireis, Savannah I. ( 1rn a tr AND IUISINESS DIRECTORY. 93
point on Indian river ; articles filed September 23, 1881 ; capital stock $750,ooo ; length, So miles.
Tavarcs and(1 Lak Moilnroc Railroad.--- From Tavares to San f ord, Orange county ; articles filed October 10th, 1881 ; capital stock, $20,ooo : length, 35 miles.
Apop/ka Drauic/ of South F/orida Rairoad.--From J ackson, on South Florida Railroad, in Orange county, to the Wit hlacoochee river, Sumter county ; articles filed Octob-r I oth, 1881; capital stock $i 5,ooo ; length, 56 miles.
At/anlic, Gulf and Wst [nd/a Transit Railroa. I n1cor p rated first as Florida Railroad, Janary 8th, 1853, then changed to name first as above. From Fernandina, Nassau county, to Tampa Bay, H illsborough county, and Charlotte Harbor, Man atee cou ut with branch to Cedar Keys ; right of way and alternate sections of State lands, and by act of Congress i7th of March, 1856, to alternate sections of United States lands from Fernandina to Cedar Keys; c ompleted ; length, 155 miles.
Floida 1/id/and and Gcorg ia Railroad.-From Dcad man's Bay, Taylor c:)uity, to the Georgia line, between Madison and Quitmnan or Valdosta; alternate sections and bonus of 6,ooo acre per mile of completed road ; incorporated by act of iSS ; length, 70 miles.
LIv' Oak, Tcfani and C/harl/tc Harbor Railroad.-By act of 25th of February, i88t, as Live Oak, Tampa and Rowland's BILIfF, then by articles filed 23d July, 1881, to name first above ; finished to Rowland's Bluff, 23 miles ; capital stock $5,000,000 ; length, 260 miles.
Ificanopy and Brooksvillc Railroad.-From the Transit road, between Gainesville and Arredondo, through Micanopy to BrooksyIle, through Alachua, Marion and Hernando counties ; length, So miles.
jacksonville and 1alalka Rairoad.-From J acksonville through Duval, Clay and Putnam, to Palatka ; articles filed February iith, 1882 ; capital stock $2,200,000; length, 65 miles.
Scasidc RaicuaJ'. From Brooksville, Hern indo county, through Hillsborotgh to Point IPineflas; length, 75 miles.
YIonticcl/o an( Gorga Raiiroad.-From Monticce l t, Georgia line, to connect with a Geo' gia road there ; by act of 7th March, 1881 ; capital stock $50,000; length, 12 miles.
Florida Railroad an( Lunlibcr ComfPany.-From Bronson, Levy county, west to Suwa- nee river ; articles filed April 4th, I 8S2 capital stock $1ioo,ooo ; length, 20 miles.
Gcor-gia adl(/ Flor ida !IldA'1(nd Railroad.--From a point on Georgia line in Gadclsden county to a point on the St. Johns river, T IIE CELEBRATED THISTLE D1EW WHIISKKEY is soft and mellow to the taste.
S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAh, GA.






FlEIGIT IN TIIROUGH CARS, IN FAST S., F. & w. Rye TRAINS, WIThOUT TRANSFER.
94 FLoRIDA STATE GAZETTEER
1 )uva county, through Gadsden, Leon, Jefferson, Madison, Taylor, Lafayette, Alachua, Bradford, Clay and Duval ; articles sled April 1th, 1'882; capital stock $5,000,000; length, 225 miles.
C(jatta,oocce and East Pass Railroad.- From Chattahoochee in Gadsden county to Gulf of Mexico, on southern boundary of Franklin county, through Gadsden, Liberty and Franklin ; articles fled December 26th, 1881 ; length, 65 miles.
Florida Ccitral and Uestern Railroad.-First Florida, Atlantic and Gulf Central, then Florida Central and Western ; from Jacksonville to Chattahoochee, with branches to Monticello and from Tallahassee to St. Marks; all completed ; length, 228 miles.
Savannah, Florida and e1'cstern Branch Railroad.- From Dupont, Ga., to Live Oak, Fla.; thence to New Branford and on to Gainesville; all completed.
Iensacola and A tlantic Railroad.-Right of way 200 feet wide alternate sections from State, and by act of Congress May 17th, 1856, from United States; from Apalachicola river at terminus of Florida Central and Western, by most direct route to Pensacola; completed ; length, 16o miles.
Pensacola and mobile Railroad Manufacturing Coipany.-Completcd; from Alabama and Florida Railroad to Perdido river; by act of 1861 ; length, 21 miles.
Pensacola and Pcrdido Railroad.-Completed ; by act of February 27th, 1872 ; capital stock, $ioo,ooo ; length, 9 miles.
Florida Peninsula Railroad.-From Waldo, Alachua county, to Ocala, Marion county; completed ; length, 42 miles.
JPcnsacola and Louisville Railroad.-Fro rn Pensacola to Alabama line; completed ; length, 36 miles.
Tropical Pcninsula Railroad.-From Ocala to Leesburg, Sumtersville, Sumter county, Brooksville, Hernando county, thence to Tampa, Hillsborough county, with a branch from Leesburg to Orlando, Orange county ; right of way 120 feet wide; alternate sections and a bonus of io,ooo acres per mile of finished road; length, 130 miles.
Green Cove Sprangs and iielrose Railroad.-Progressing; by act of February 28th, 1881 ; right of way 120 feet wide and alternate sections; length, 30 miles.
Okec/zha mkee and Panasoffkee Railroad.-From Okeehumkee to Panasoffkee, Sumter county; by act of March 8th, 1881 ; length, 12 miles.
Silver Springs, Ocala and Gulf Railroad.-Completed 6 miles; from Silver Springs, Marion county, to Ocala, thence to the waters of the Gulf in Levy or Hernando county ; by act of February 27th, 1872, then by articles filed January 21st, 1872 ; capiU'E 3 Always on hand a full supply of the best,
VEGE TABLES, J. B. REEDY, SAVANNAH, GA.







S*11 ANI) PANS OF ALL SIZES, MADE BY. JON
ugar Y.tils, OfUFRIE, 2 I3XY ST., SAVANNA HI. (,A.
AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 95
tal stock $100,000; alternate sections; right of way and io,ooo acres per mile; length, 40 miles.
Florida and Pacific Raulroad.-From Chattahoochec river to Mobile, Ala., through the counties of Jackson, Washington, Holmes, Walton, Santa Rosa and Escarmbia; length, i5o miles.
Iomoka Railroa.-From the mouth of Withlacoochee river, Levy county, to Ormond, throui the counties of Levy, Marion, Orange and Volusia ; articles filed May 6th, 188 ; capital stock $400,000; length, i5o miles.
St. John's andl Suwcanuce River Rai/road.-From navigable head waters of Black Creek, Clay county, to Suwannee river, through the counties of Clay and Bradford, via Starke, Alachua county; capital stock $150,000; articles filed 12th July, 1881; length, 70 miles.
Tavarcs, Brooksvillc and Gulf Railroad. -Articles filed October 12th, 1881 ; from Tavares, Orange county, to Brooksville, Hernando county, thence to Gulf of Mexico ; capital stock $20,ooo; length, 90 miles.
Bartozv and Tampa Railroad.-From Bartow, Polk county, to Tampa, Hillsborough county ; articles filed October ioth, iS8i capital stock $250,000 : length, 45 miles.
Florida Western Railroad.-From Louisville and Nashville road in Escambia county, northwest to Alabama line ; capital stock $500,ooo ; length, 15 miles.
St. Jon's and Suwanun'c River Railroad.-From Melrose, Alachua county, to Fort Fanning, on Suwannee river, Levy county; capital stock $300,000 ; length, 6o niles.
Indian River and Northwestern Railroa.-From a point in Suwannee or Alachua county, through Alachua, Marion, Sumter, Orange and Brevard, to Indian river; articles filed December 12th, 1881 ; capital stock $3,oooooo ; length, 3oo miles.
Palatka and SanfordRailroad.-From Palatka, through Marion, to Sanford, Orange county ; articles filed December i9th, 1881 capital stock $20,000; length, 80 miles.
Indian River Central Railroad.-From Enterprise, Volusia county, to Titusville, Brevard county ; articles filed December 28th, 1881 ; capital stock $ioo,ooo ; length, 40 miles.
In(lian River and Manatee Railroad.-Froin Titusville, Brevard county, to the mouth of Manatee river, Manatee county, via Bartow and Fort Meade, Polk county ; articles filed January 27th, 1882 ; capital stock $ioo,ooo; length, 150 miles.
Bartozv and Gulf Railroad.-Articles not filed ; from Bartow, Polk county, through the southeastern portion of Hillsborough to a point at or near the mouth of the Manatee river.

THE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is soft and mellow to the taste.
S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.
12






Elegant Passenger Equipments; Westinghouse S., F. & W Ry. _RY Air Brakes: Miller Platforins; Jancy Couplers.
96 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER
Florida Tropical Railroad.-From Ocala to Charlotte Harbor, via Tampa; length, 150 miles.
St. John's Tcrinallailroad.-From a point on the Fernandina and Jacksonville Railroad, three miles from the Jacksonville terminus, to a point on the Florida Central and Western, three miles from the Jacksonville terminus ; articles filed April 4th, 1882; length, 5 miles.
Thomasville, Tallaassee and Rio Carabc/le Railroad.-Incorp orated June, 1882 ; from Thomasville, via Tallahassee, to deep water on the Gulf at St. George Sound; length, 95 miles.

LIST OF CANALS CHARTERED IN FLORIDA.

Florida Canal.-From Chattahoochee river or bay to St. Andrew's bay, thence to Dead Lake, thence t-o Chipola river; length, 23 miles.
Florida, Atlantic and Gulf Ship Canal.-Filed March 30th, 1881 ; from Cumberland sound and the Harbor of Fernandina on the Atlantic, across to the Gulf through the counties of Nassau, Duval, Clay, Bradford, Alachua and Levy, or the tier of counties further south: St. John's, Putnam, Marion and Levy ; or, if found more practicable, the canal may be located on the route surveyed by General Gilmore from the mouth of St. Mary's river to the Gulf of Mexico, at St. Mark's river and bay passing through the counties of Nassau, Baker, Columbia, Hamilton, Suwannee, Madison, Taylor and Jefferson. The whole distance from St. Mary's to St. Mark's, 170 miles ; right of way, 200 feet wide and 1,000 feet additional on either side ; also a ship railway through the counties aforesaid, similar to the ship railway to be constructed across the isthmus of Tehauntepec in construction and operation; capital stock, $40,000,000; articles filed again August 22d, 1881.
Florida Ship Canal.-From Charlotte Harbor to St. Lucie, Indian river; articles filed April 7th, 1881 ; capital stock $30,000,ooo ; length, 130 miles.
Florida Canal.-From the mouth of the Withlacoochee, Levy county, to New Britain on the Atlantic, through Levy, Marion, Orange and Volusia ; articles filed June 23d, 1881 ; capital stock $ioo,ooo; length, i0o miles.
Florida Coast Line and Canal Transportation Company.-From
Matanzas river, St. John's county, through Smith's Creek to the head of Halifax river; also from Mosquito lagoon within four miles of Haulover, southwardly to Indian river in Volusia county;

Raisins N-uts Etc, I am the I argest Dealer in this line.
J. B. REEDY, SAVANNAH, GA.






Our Pans are Suooth and Umform in ThicniwsH. WM. h E 10E a & CO., Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front poster.)
AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 97
capital stock $ioo,ooo ; length completed, 40 miles ; total length, 339 miles; will be completed by June, 1884.
Alantic Coast, St'amboat Canal an(d Imnifrovcm('n1 Com any'.
Articles filed December, iS8o ; capital stock $1,ooo,ooo; length, 330 miles.
A lantic and Gulf Coast Canal and Okec/obce Land Company.By act of March 8th, iSSi ; from the navigable waters of Caloosahatchie to Lake Okeechobee, and through the same to the Atlantic ; length, So miles.

PUBLIC SCHOOLS AND THEIR PROGRESS.

The free school system in this State was provided for in the constitution adopted in i868, and were put in operation in accordance with said provision in 1869, and since the adoption of a public free school system the educational advantages of the State has from year to year grown gradually, adding to its few schools, many, and to its small attendance, many new pupils. This branch of industry has kept pace with the growth and increase in population of the country, and to-day our facilities and advantages in this particular are not to be excelled by any other State that has had to labor under the same disadvantages. We append below the statistics giving the number of schools in the State from year to year, with the number of students in annual attendance for each.

HOW THEY ARE CONDUCTED.

The State Superintendent of Public Instruction is the head of the department, and is one of the seven Cabinet officers and Constitutional Advisers of the Governor, and is also the President of the Board of Education, which Board acts on all questions, and appeals from the County or District Boards. Each county constititutes under the law a school district, and this county or school district has a county superintendent, a board of public instruction, and local school trustees. The county superintendent is the secretary of that Board, and its executive officer. His duties are to visit the schools in his county at least once each three months when they are in session ; to organize and conduct teachers' institutes, and look after the general welfare of the public free schools of his county. The Board of Public Instruction have the management and disposition of all school finances of their county, and locate and appoint local school trustees. The schools are supported from the interest on the common school fund, which fund has been accrued from the sales of school

T[E CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WhISKEY is distilled from the choicest
qualities of Grain. S. GUCKENU [1ElMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga.




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Digitized by the Internet Archive in 2016 with funding from University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries https://archive.org/details/floridastategaze1884smit

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m STEREOSCOPIC VIEWS, 118 33. J. E£3T.£k.3Kr 9 Manufacturer and Wholesale Dealer in Mouldings, Frames, Mirrors, Pictures, MATERIALS, CHROMOS Mirror Plates, IiBITMS, Fancy Goods, &c. a-^ jAgetct* fy jg J ) S' J J WILLIAM HONE & CO. WINES, LIQUORS AND SEGARS. 152 ST. JULIAN AND 149 BKYAN STS., Established 1850. SAVANN AH, GA. 69 BROAD STREET, HI* O In the healthiest part of the City, and especially convenient to all public buildings, street cars and places of interest. TERMS REASONABLE TO TOURISTS.

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S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Wholesale Grocers, FLOUR AUD LIQUOR DEALERS 149 & 151 BAY STREET, Flour Warehouse, 195 & 197 Bay Street, SAVANNAH, GA. A FEW OF OUR SPECIALTIES: WHISKIES, WINES, BRANDIES, GINS, RUMS, And all descriptions of Imported and Domestic Liquors. And a Full Line of Smokers’ Supplies. STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES, An assortment so large and varied has never been excelled in this market. Guckenheimer’s “Own Selection” Flour. Guckenheimer’s Old Reserve Stock Whiskey. Guckenheimer’s Virgin Brand Baking Powder. Guckenheimer’s Vienna Export Beer. Guckenheimer’s Standard Brands of Canned Goods. Guckenheimer’s Gem Brand Bi-Carh. Soda. Guckenheimer’s Standard Brands of Soaps. Guckenheimer’s Oriental Cigars. GUickenheimer’s Gilt Edge Durham Tobacco. WE ARE ALSO SOLE AGENTS FOR Levering’s Roasted Coffee. Niedt’s Sea Foam Soap. Holland’s Martha Washington Tobacco. Thistle Dew Whiskey. LaBELLE CREOLE WHISKEY. Buffalo G. S. Co.’s Starch. Reed’s Gilt Edge Tonic. Kaiser Natural Mineral Water. "We invite the merchants visiting our city to call on us and carefully examine our stock, which is complete in all its departments, and comprises every article in our line of business. Prices and catalogues furnished upon application. 8

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HP P -THE 11 y -T FLORIDA Gazetteer i Business Directory —PUBLISHED BY THE— SOUTHERN DIRECTORY AND PUBLISHING COMPANY, —FOR— Containing the Names, Business and Address of the Merchants, Manufacturers, Professional and Business Men, and the Principal Planters and Farmers of the State, together with a Brief Sketch of all Cities, Towns and Villages, and how to reach them. Also NEW HVC-A.HP OF FLORIDA, Price, $5.00. Compiled by ROSS A. SMITH, Manager, Office, 09 ISroad Street, Charleston, S. C. For Sale by ASHMEAO BROS., Jacksonville, Ffa. CHARLESTON, S. C. Lucas & Richardson, Book and Job Printers, No. 62 East Bay Street, 1884. Entered according to Act of Congress in the year 1883, by ROSS A. SMITH, in the office of the Librarian of Congress at Washington, D. C.

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PU2> 1 W. F. & J. E. CREARY, PROPEIETOES. WATER MILL OUTLITS, And all kinds of Iron and Brass Castings made to order, J&. SPECIALTY. DEALERS IN MILL AND STEAMBOAT SUPPLIES, AND BUILDERS OF SMALL STEAM LAUNCHES. -f MIlTOi, SANTA ROSA COUNTY, f10

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PREFACE. Ross A. SmithÂ’s first volume of the Florida State Gazetteer and Business Directory is presented to the public, with the assurance that it will be found complete and comprehensive, and that it is the most important and valuable work of the kind ever issued in the State, as it is replete with valuable information that cannot fail to benefit the entire business community and form a valuable guide to all persons. The general features of the work consist of a full description of each postoffice in the State, such as location, population, nearest shipping point, distance and geographical directions from the county seat, location of nearest bank, express and telegraph companies, hotel accommodation, stage and other transportation facilities, and all other valuable statistics showing the great inducements offered to immigration. In the preparation of this work the publishers have spared neither skill, labor or expense, and we are sure when it is compared with other works of the kind, our patrons will feel still more lenient towards us for being so late in presenting our book to them, which we guarantee to contain at least one-third more names than any publication of the kind of the State. The classified directory will be found very complete, and arranged in a manner that will be comprehensive to all persons. The publishers tender their thanks to those who have kindly rendered assistance in procuring information and statistics, and especially to the postmasters throughout the State, who have in nearly all cases promptly responded to communications, and have given the desired information. The past season has been a prosperous one, and we tender our congratulations to the entire community upon the substantial business outlook, and trust that the same state of commercial activity may meet us on the publication of our next volume in 1886 and hope that the regular biennial issues of this valuable work will be sustained by the business community. Respectfully, ROSS A. SMITH, Manager Southern Directory and Publishing Company. 11

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GENERAL INDEX. Page. Abbreviations used in Directory 128 History of Florida 39 Climate 44 Soil 46 Staple Commodities 51 Fruits 52 Vegetables 62 Timber 65 Stock Raising 67 Fish 71 Manufacturing 73 Springs 78 Lands 79 Railroads 90 and 122 Public Schools 97 Government .99 and 105 Public Institutions 102 Financial Condition 103 Statistics of Florida 104 Courts 113 County Officers 116 Population i2! Newspapers 127 General Directory of Towns 128 Classified Directory 492 n

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INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS. ATLANTA, GA. PAGE. MooreÂ’s Southern Business College. 160 BALTIMORE, MD. Brown Chemical Co front edge Clark fm. Wirt & Son 518-551 The Rasin Fertilizer Co 25-28 BOSTON, MASS. ForbesÂ’ Lithographing Co. 29-30 CEDAR KEYS. Magnolia House 160 Rogers C. B. & Co 160 State Journal 160 Suwanee House 160 CHARLESTON, S. C. Carolina House 400 Charleston & Savannah Railway. ... 241 Hacker Geo. S. & Son front cover Kracke & Janssen 337 Percival E. W fold on map South Carolina Railway 39 CHICAGO, ILL. Noyes N. W. & Co 513 FERNANDINA. Avery Gilbert F 192 Fernandina & Jacksonville R. R 32 Florida Transit & Peninsula R. R. 31 Hilly er Charles Y 193 Hoyt Fred. W. & Co 190 Mansion House 190 Noyes A. B 190 Schuyler Geo. W 190 GAINESVILLE. Doig & Harris 205 Rawlins & Wilson 206 GREEN COVE SPRINGS. PAGE Bemis C. C 212 Gerard C. A. Mrs 213 JACKSONVILLE. Abbott W. S 238 Anderson Church & Co 231 Artie Ice Co 232 Ashmead Bros 225 Baratier Jules 239 Barrs & Hunter back cover Baya Wm 240 Berne W. J. & Co 236 Berry Horace 240 Bessent J. 0 236 Bradley Fertilizing Co., .front fold of map Buckman E. H front fold of map Burgert S. P 239 Call Rhydon M 240 Clark John, Son & Co. 230 Cockrell A. W. & Son 239 Colony, Talbott & Co back cover Deans George W 240 DeBary-Baya MerchantsÂ’ Line 33 DeCottes George A 238 DewhirstR 239 Dobbins A. N. & Bro 228 Dodge H. D. W 235 Dodillon Chas. & Co 236 Drew, Hazeltine & Livingston 230 Dupont Charlton 240 Dzialynski M. A 233 Ellis & McClure 231 Elmwood House. 235 Emery W. N. & Co 230 Fairlie James M., front and back cover and 227 Fla. C. & W. R. R 23 Fla. Land and Improvement Co. 253

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FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER *4 PAGE Fla. Savings Bank and Real Estate Exchange. .... 232 Foster Fred E. 235 Fries A. P. & Co., see Druggist in business directory Grand View Hotel 227 Griffin J. I. & Co 238 Gumbinger J 234 Hartridge M. L 239 llenry & Heitz. 238 Hoefer & Forkert 237 Hover George A. ................ 235 Industrial Machine Works 238 Jacksonville Hotel 233 Jacksonville Transfer Co 239 J., St. A. & H. R. Railway 32 Jones & Bowen 238 Jones & Verill, 236 Keene 0. L 239 Koerner P. W. 0 232 Livingston C. 0 229 McMurray P. E 239 Mackey J. I 259 Mattair House 235 Miller C. A. & Co. 231 Moulie E 238 Mumby, Stockton & Knight 234 Nooney, Thomas & Son 261 Oak Byron back cover and 261 Peters C... 239 Pillow W H 229 Pond Frank R 238 PostC. V. H 24 Puetz Arnold, top line outside cover and 239 Robinson H. & Co 239 St. Johns River Fast Day Line 24 St. Johns River R. R back paster St. Marks Hotel.. 235 Shad Bros.. 233 Sherlock & Getchell 232 Slager Julius 233 Sledge C. A 240 Smith & DuBos. 234 Smith G. W. 227 Stockton & Stribbling 228 Stone J. & Co. 240 Stowe Walter W 240 The Daily Florida Herald. .... back paster Tremont House 235 Tysen & Smith 234 Walker W. & W. S. 226 Ward N. L. 240 Weller H. L 239 Wilson George front fold of map KEY WEST. Alfonso Roman & Co 36 Brown J. B.. 279 Cash Wm. D 35 Castillo A. M. & Co 288 Castillo N. F. & Co 288 Coleman & Bartlum 37 Curry B. S 37 Ferguson George W. 34 Filer Samuel 281 Forgarty & Johnson 464 Gato Edward H 36 Geraux Louis A 281 Gwynn Edward O 282 Key West Democrat.. 283 Lowe H. Davis 37 Lowe SamuelS 37 Mallory Steamship Line 35 Marrero Francisco 464 Merrill Charles T 36 Morgan Steamship Co '. 35 Philbrick John Jay 38 Pierce Lewis W 34 Roberts Joseph P. (estate) 285 Russell House 36 Scheurer John 286 Sweeny D. T. 38 Tampa Steamship Co 35 The Florida News 284 The Key of the Gulf 280 Tift A. T: 35 Williams & W arren 287 KNOXVILLE, TENN. East Tenn., Va. & Ga. R. R ..... 21 LAKE CITY. Harrison L. 293 Wilson J. M 295 LEESBURG. Lees J. W 303 Vanlandingham J. B. & Co 304

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AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY LIVERPOOL. PAGE Cross J 309 LOUISVILLE, KY. Brinley, Miles & Hardy Co 491 MACON, GA. Schofield J. S. & Sons 20 MADISON. Hodges L. E 316 Jordan & Moseley 316 Peeler James P 316 Stevens C. W 316 MILTON. Blackwater Foundry back title page Santa Rosa House 334 Santa Rosa News 336 MOBILE, ALA. Porter. Kirkbride & Son back paster MONTGOMERY, ALA. Vankirk W. J. & Co 18-19 NEW YORK. Butler W. H 338, 339, 340 Adams Historical Chart opp. 160 OCALA. Carlisle James B 357 ORLANDO. Bank of Orlando 368 Boone C. A. & Co 369 Dollins L. J 371 Peeler W. L 371 Poyntz Nat.. 368 White W. G 371 PALATKA. Devereux, Rogero & Co 383 Florida Southern R. R 383 GrahamS 379 Hill D. Y. & Co. 381 Mangold & Son 381 Lente Wm. K 379 Post E. C 380 Sulzner C F 381 Palatka Journal 381 Putnam Herald 381 i5 PENSACOLA. PAGE AdvanceGazette 389 Bear Lewis & Co 391 Horsier H. H. & Co 389 Jacoby Laz 392 McHugh James 391 Matthews R. H 395 OÂ’Connor & Co 391 Pensacola Commercial 391 Pensacola Compress and Warehouse. 400 Soto M. P 391 Sexauer E. J 382 Thornton H. H 398 Toal & Thomson 391 Vankirk W. J 18-19 Vidal Vincent J 399 White Henry S 389 ST. AUGUSTINE. Atkins George L. & Sons 415 Cooper M. R 420 Dowd J. H 418 East Florida Land and Pioduce Co. 415 House L. M .... 419 Pinkham W. S. M 417 Reyers & Dillingham 417 Sabin, Moulton & Co 415 Vaill E. E 417 Vails S.B 420 Whitney J. P 421 ST. LOUIS. St. Louis Medical & Surgical Journal, 570 SANFORD. Fla. Land and Colonization Co.. .426-427 Marks Richard H 429 Russell A. B 429 Stafford Bros 429 Steele & Bassinger 430 Tuxbury & Fernald 431 SAVANNAH, GA. Alexander W. E. & Son 6 Bendheim Bros. & Co back bone Boley M. & Son 7 Cockshutt & Lord 7 Cohen Salomon front paster Gardner J. .see Seeds in Bus. Directory Gilbert C. S. & Co .... 6

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1 6 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER PAGE Guckenheimer S. & Son, page 8 and right hand bottom lines Hanley Andrew front coyer Hone Wm. & Co 3 Hull F. M front cover Kehoe Wm. & Co., right hand top lines and front paster Lippmann Bros 6 McDonough & Ballentyne 5 McMillan Bros front paster Mell W. B. & Co 7 Parish George W 4 Reedy J. B left hand bottom lines Rourke John. .right hand top lines Ryan D. J 3 S. F. & W. R. R. right hand top lines Savannah Morning News 17 Smith & Berry front cover Tynan J. W. 5 Weed & Cornwell back cover TALLAHASSEE. Bernard & Lee 451 Dorr & Bowen 449 Economist 452 Florida University 98 Gilmore F. C 452 Land of Flowers 449 Leon Hotel 449 Lewis B. C. & Son 453 PAGE Shay B. N 454 Weller J. F 449 West Florida Seminary 98 Wilt & deMilt 455 TAMPA. Benjamin H. R 459 Binkley T. C. Mrs 463 Boykin & Ray 465 Carruth Thomas A 469 Clark E. A. & Co 467 Collins Phil. H 469 Ferris W. G., agt 463 Friebele C. L. 463 Hampton & Jones 460 Harrison C. E 460 Henderson & Spencer 467 Hooper Mat 465 Jackson John 463 Jones S A. & Co 465 Krause J. H 467 Leonardy S. B 465 Seclor Fred P 462 Spencer John B 469 Spencer T. K 462 The Tampa Guardian 461 Wall & Branch 464 WASHINGTON, D. C. Bingham L 569

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THE LARGEST NEWSPAPER PUBLISHED IN THE SOUTHERN STATES. A Business, Family, Literary and Agricultural Journal. Not a Local Paper, but one suitable to any Locality. SAVANNAH WEEKLY NEWS. One Year and an Interesting Serial for $2.00. This Mammoth Sheet contains 8 pages of reading matter, comprising all the news of the week, Telegraphic Dispatches up to the hour of going to press, Agricultural Items, Original Serials, etc. Special departments devoted to GEORGIA, FLORIDA and SOUTH CAROLINA NEWS. To the farmer, mechanic or artisan, the business or professional man who has not the advantages of a daily mail, the Savannah Weekly News is the medium by Avhich he can be informed of events transpiring in the busy world, whether in his own State or in the most distant parts of the globe. In addition to a first-class newspaper at a moderate price, we offer to each yearly subscriber a copy of any of the published novels of the Morning News Library free Subscription $2 a year in advance. THE! Savannah Morning News The Great Daily of the Southeast. Published at the principal seaport of the South Atlantic States, it gives prominence to all matters relative to COMMERCIAL, as well as to the AGRICULTURAL, MECHANICAL, and MANUFACTURING interests of the South. Its STATE, GENERAL, LOCAL and MARKET departments are acknowledged to be the best in this section, while its TELEGRAPHIC REPORTS of the news of the day are full and comprehensive. Price of Daily, $10 a year; $5 for six months. J. H. ESTILL, No. 3 Whitaker Street, SAVANNAH. GA. J 17

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Coal Iron, Orange anil Fine lands, A2TD MILL PROPERTY, XUST ^ZEsHD FLORIDA. AGENT FOR SALE OF Pensacola and Atlantic — — PENSACOLA, FLORIDA. Publisher of the “GULF STREAM,” a Quarterly Newspaper, for the dissemination of information on Florida and Alabama, Published at Birmingham and Pensacola. SB CENTS PER YEAR. COPY SENT FREE ON APPLICATION. BRANCH OFFICE WITH SLOSS FURNACE CO., BIRMINGHAM, 18 ALA,

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IP YOU|WANT TO BUY PINE LANDS, COAL LANDS OR IRON LANDS IP YOU WANT TO BUY Land in Florida suitable for Orange Culture or Truck Farming, IP YOU WANT TO BUY IF YOU WANT TO BUY law Miiij Christ Mill r CM Milt, IN A DESIRABLE LOCALITY, Or if you want to engage in Sheep or Stock Raising, Or for any particular information you may want, to W. J. VAUKIRK A CO., PENSACOLA, FLA. N. B.— PINE LANBU SPECIALTY. We are also Agents for Stationary and Portable Engines, Saw Mills and all kinds of Mill Machinery and Fixtures. Write to us before purchasing. Our large trade enables us to give lowest prices. 19

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SCHOFIELD'S IRON WORKS, J. S. SCHOFIELD & SONS, Proprietors, wrn, :pr & a. Manufacturers and Dealers in every variety of Schofield’s Patent Cotton Presses. Steam Engines and Boilers. Saw, Crist and Flour Mills. Sorgho Mills and Kettles. Castings of every kind. Mill Gearing and Machinery. Shafting, Pulleys and Hangers. MANUFACTURERS OF THE CELEBRATED Davis Patented Turbine Hater lee ii GENERAL AGENTS FOR THE — “QUEEN OF THE SOUTH” CORN MILLS AND THE “PRATT COTTON OITV.” 20

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SAFE, RELIABLE AND TESTED. THE SHORTEST AND DUICKEST LINE TO AND FROM ALL POINTS IN THE The thousands of our patrons who traveled over this favorite and popular line, during the past season, will amply testify to the absolute safety, fast schedules, unprecedented time, and superb appointments and appliances of the route via JESUP. This line wears the badges of superiority, and cannot be reached by competition. Are run through between CHATtAKOOGA AND JACKSONVILLE WITHOUT CHANGE Only one change of Cars between Louisville and Jacksonville, via Atlanta. Only one change of Cars between all points North of the Ohio River and Jacksonville, and vice versa. The deserved popularity of this Great Through Line enables the management to maintain the highest standard of excellence, which must be tested by the traveling public in order to be properly appreciated. DOUBLE DAILY SERVICE. NO DELAY ON SUNDAYS. CONNECTIONS CLOSE, SURE AND PERFECT. Passengers, by taking this reliable and first-class route from all Western Cities, arrive in Florida one train in advance of all competing linesJNO. F. OÂ’BRIEN, General Superintendent Knoxville, Tenn. J. J. GRIFFIN, AssÂ’t Gen'l Pass'r Agent Atlantic, Ga. I). POPE, Gen'l Pass'r Agent Knoxville, Tenn. SAM. H. HARDWICK, Forwarding Pass'r Agent Jacksonville, Fla. 21

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Pensacola and AtlanticRailroad. THE TOP HNIo IN CONNECTION WITH ATLANTIC COAST LINE. The Quickest and Best Route to New Orleans, Texas and California, points from the EAST, the DIRECT line to and from FLORIDA, and ALL POINTS North, North-West and West. ^through pcEman gars* BETWEEN Savannah and New Orleans, — AND — JACKSONVILLE AND NEW ORLEANS. THROUGH CARS BETWEEN Louisville, Ky., and Cedar Keys. STEEL RAILS! QUICK DESPATCH PERFECT SAFETY!!! Beautiful Bay scenery. 15 miles along the breast of Pensacola Bay. 2,800,000 acres of the best Florida land for sale. W. D. Chipley, F. C. Shepard, Gen’l Supt., G. P. A., PENSACOLA, ELA. 22

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THE FLORAL CITY ROUTE. THE HEW FLORIDA'AND HEW ORLEAHS SHORT LIKE. ARE YOfJ U0IN& TO FLORIDA THIS SEASON ? If so, be sure and purchase your tickets reading via the Pensacola & Atlantic and Florida Central & Western Railroads, thus securing you a daylight ride through The Famons Hill Country of Middle Florida. The quickest, shortest and best route to Jacksonville, Florida ; to all points on the St. JohnÂ’s River, and via the Florida Transit & Peninsular Railroad and its connections to all points in the far-famed Peninsular State ; Clear Water, Tampa, Key West, Havana and all Gulf Ports. RED CLAY HILLS, ELEGANT DRIVES, RICH LANDS, SUPERB HUNTING AND FISHING, PICTURESQUE SCENERY, BEAUTIFUL FLOWERS, Are to be found and enjoyed in the Tallahassee Country. Stop-Over Privileges can be secured on all Tickets. Only Line with Soli(L Through Trains, Daily, Pensacola to Jacksonville without change. Only Line with Pullman Palace Sleepers, Daily, New Orleans to Jacksonville without change. Do not fail to embrace this opportunity to enjoy the extraordinary facilities offered by this New Short Line but recently opened to travel and reaching all points in Florida. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION APPLY TO WM. M. DAVIDSON, WILLIAM O. AMES, General Manager. General F. & P. Agent JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA. Alter December 1st, 18 83, send tor copy of our New Pamphlet. 23

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TIME TABLE —OF— St. John’s River BEGINNING SEPT. 1st, 1883, Will from this date run a Double Daily Service, leaving JACKSONVILLE from Astor’s Wharf. And usual Landings on Signal or Notice. Steamer SYLVAN GLEN omits Saturday afternoon’s trip, and leaves Jacksonville Sunday, at 12 o’clock, for PALATKA and usual landings. Freight taken and Handled with Care. Will make close connection at Tocoi for St. Augustine; at Palatka for all points on Florida Southern Railroad; and with all boats of De-Bary Baya Merchants Line and of People’s Line for all up river points. HANCOX leaves PALATKA at 2 P. M. SYLVAN GLEN leaves at 7.30 A. M. For Further Information and Tickets, apply to C.AT. ZEE, POST, Office on Wharf. GENERAL A GENT 24

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-M SOLUBL E#-^MANUFACTURED BY fte Siiil i'@Btiliz^ WINFIELD S. DUNAN, Incorporated January 20, 1882. R. W. L. RASIN, Secretary and Treasurer. Cash Capital, $319,000. General Manager. r -^PROPRIETORS OP#-* "MA+WAM CUAW WO$ ,} Situated at Sea-Wall, on the Patapsco River, Anne Arundel County, near Baltimore. ^LIBERAL TERMS TO RESPONSIBLE AGENTS.^ you are in want of Fertilizers, order at once. If not in want, tell your friends who do. Write us. Will be glad to hear from you; want to know you anyhow. We always take great pleasure in answering correspondents.

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Hi ^ FTER a careful examination of the soil of Florida, an conversation with the owners of Orange Groves of thaj State, we find that to encourage rapid growth a Fertil 1 izer containing all the elements of plant-food is aji essential in an Orange Tree Fertilizer as in one for thi growth of Cotton, Corn, Cabbage or Wheat. Tha considering the nature of the soil of Florida, whilst a| the elements should be present in a good Fertilize? they should be so combined in a concentrated form as not to be washes away by copious rains or percolate through the soil, to be lost to tl fiber-roots, that are the great feeders of the Orange Tree. In the fa of these facts, we offer our j3ozuszs ILiSS jSuJLlfO, A most concentrated Fertilizer in an available form, as will be seen the Analysis of Prof. P. B. Wilson, assistant to the late Bar Justin Yon Liebig, of Munich, Germany, who was the Father Concentrated Fertilizers, and did more to advance Agriculture throug out the world than any other Chemist that has ever lived, and who works are authority upon all Chemical subjects. 11 Chemical Laboratory of Prof. P. B. Wilson, Analytical and Consulting Chemist and Metallurgy! No. 41 Second Street, Baltimore! The following is the result of the Analysis of your Soluble Sea I si 4 Guano:

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oisture (determined at 212 F.) • 15.97 per cent. pganic Matter, 34.94 “ Containing Ammonia, 2.76 per cent. organic Matter, : 49.09 “ Containing Soluble Phosphoric Acid, 3.68 per cent, recipitated Phosphoric Acid, 6.63 “ [soluble Phosphoric Acid, 5.89 “ me, 9.13 “ btash and Soda as Sulphates, 10.44 “ alphuric Acid, 9.04 “ — 100.00 per cent. In the above Analysis you have 10.30 per cent, of Soluble and Precipitated nosphoric Acid, representing 22.03 per cent, of Bone Phosphate of Lime, which as been decomposed and converted into immediately available food for crops, flie 5.89 per cent of undecomposed Phosphoric Acid is equal to 12.86 per cent, of pne Phosphate of Lime, which must not be considered in its chemical sense as king insoluble, derived as it is from the animal, is gradually decomposed in the il, and gives up its constituents to succeeding crops, and not like the Mineral posphates, lay inert in the soil for years, if ever available. The 9.04 per cent, of Anhydrous Sulphuric Acid, nearly one-fifth of the hole mixture in its dilute form as found to be most effective for agricultural irposes, is a controlling evidence of the solubility and the activity of the Guano, he percentage of this important constituent must, in a great measure, determine ie value of all Fertilizers, when, as in your case, it is only used to decompose the nosphate of Lime, and not added as salt cake. I agree fully with Prof. Horsford, that beyond the Analysis of a Fertilizer, le best evidence of its value is the continued use of it in sections, and by the same j-mers, through a number of years. This should be gratifying to you to know that •om year to year you have succeeded by close scrutiny of your works, and judicious election of material, after a long experience to have been able to attain this emience. Your Fertilizer has all the value you claim for it. It is perfect in every repect, and you have kept the standard to what it has been in former years. Respectfully, &c. P. B. WILSON. We offer this Guano, or Complete Fertilizer, advising its use in •reference to the many so-called Orange Tree Fertilizers, which, upon xamination, we find are composed, to say the least, of the most unreliable ingredients, and apparently without regard to any principle of Uhemistry, or any other principle, except to derive a large profit, and Whilst this is desirable to all manufacturers and merchants, it is not possible to do so in this age of competition and education, and but a hort life will attend all such attempts, as the results of the Fertilizer lpon the soil can alone establish its worth and build up a business upon v Correct and lasting basis.

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^SOLUBLE SEA ISLAND GUANOS Is as well adapted to the growth of Vegetables, and for Composting, which, after all, is only useful in making a more even distribution, and adding only the limited amount of fertilizing ingredients such material may contain, or acting as a mulch, which in all warm climates is desirable, but in all cases it should be looked to that the proper quantity of Guano is at all times present in the Compost, and that 100 lbs. of Compost made of 50 lbs. of Guano and 50 lbs. of Muck, Plaster or Kainit is not equal to 100 lbs. of Guano, and whilst the quantity may be in definitely increased to give proper results, a proportionate amount o-j this Compost must be applied. We ask only a fair trial of this Guano, and rely upon results for £!j remunerative business. THE BASIN FERTILIZER CO. BALTIMORE H O M. ^ S' a ff T3 5 *8 ‘3 rj lai si A & o .•S M a a O n 8 >> a a

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4j 2Iitlurgvaph fTlT g Co. 181 DEVONSHIRE STREET, BOSTON, Lithographers, Block and Albertype 4 PEIITTEES# DRY GOODS TICKETS, BANDS AND TAGS, jOoM/WERCI AL jA/oRK, j BONDS, CHECKS, DIPLOMAS, SHOWCARDS AND LABEL WORK OF E VERT DESCRIPTION. SOLE AGENTS IN THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA FOR MAX CREMNITZ, Paris, France, IftSTAS. $SOW CABt>£L ALSO AG-E1TTS FOR RAPHAEL TUCK & SONS.f fas mmt Fiiassins, 3Lonfoan, iEnglanti.

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w jtlxBERTYPE. The Albertype process, as now perfected, stands pre-eminent amongst the numerous photo-mechanical methods for the RMANENCY, BEAUTY, AND UNIFORMITY OF ITS RE-PRODUCTIONS. -fSSciEntific, Histnrical and MEdical BnciEtiEB^Will find it specially adapted to the illustration of their [Reports, R >f 0bjects of ^cientificV ac-^L)imiies o MANUSCRIPTS, DOCUMENTS, &c. alue, a It is Extensively used by PUBLISHERS for the Illustration of GENEALOGIES, MAGAZINES, Commercial Catalogues, AND OTHER PUBLICATIONS. In all cases, as when Steel Engravings, Paintings, Photographs, &c., are re-produced, the prints will be found to combine all the finish of the original, in detail, with the permanency and equality of an ink impression. Specimens and Estimates furnished on application. Forbes Company, 181 DEVONSHIRE ST., BOSTON, 22 BOND ST., NEW YORK

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THE GOLDEN FRDIT ROUTE COMPRISING THE Florida, Transit & Peninsular -ANDFlorida, Central & Western Railroads, -TO THEGARDENS, GROVES, WINTER HOMES & RESORTS OF — —CONNECTIONS FROMTHE— ZtSTox'titL., East and 'West AND FROM POINTS ON THE GULF OF MEXICO, BY SEA AND RAIL. Double Daily Passenger Service Elegant Parlor Cars on Day Trains and Magnificent Sleeping Cars on all Night Trains. SHORT JLIZUTIE Fernandina, Waldo, Tampa, Key West, Gainesville, Manatee, West Indies, Cedar Key, Punta Passa, Havana. ^SHORTEST AND ONLY RAIL LINE TO -r Hawthorne, Ocala, Lake Panasoffkee. Orange Lake, Lake View, Leesburg, Silver Springs, Wildwood, Lake Ocklawaha. Pi ATT V QT A CT? Connection at PANASOFFKEE for TAMPA, BROOKSI OlAlin YILLE, SUMTERYILLE, FORT DADE, etc., etc. Tlie Best IMLne to Jacksonville! AND VIA JACKSONVILLE TO THE Sij_ 0“ oZb_xvs CovLntr^r. TIT PHTTCU TTPITET^ 0n sale at a11 Coupon Ticket Offices in the North I nriU U vJ Li i ivjiv iJ i hJ and East and West, and the Gulf States, and at Levy & Alden’s Tourists Offices ; and BE CERTAIN that your Transportation reads either via FERNANDINA, CALLAHAN, BALDWIN, LIVE OAK, or RIVER JUNCTION and F. T. & P or the F. C. & W., or both. 1). E. MAXWELL, GenT Supt., A. 0. MacDONELL, G. P. & T. A., FERNANDINA, FLA. FERNANDINA, FLA. WALTER G. COLEMAN, Gen’l Tray. & Pass. Agt., JACKSONVILLE, FLA. ( 4 ) 31

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TIEEIEC ST. AUGUSTINE ROUTE TRIPLE DULY PASSENGER TRAINS. SHORTEST, CHEAPEST, QUICKEST BETWEEN Jacksonville m St. Augustine ONLY ONE HOUR AND TWENTY MINUTES From t'e Metropolis and tie Ancient City. First-Class Rolling Stock Equipped with all the. Model Improvements. W. L. CRAWFORD, General Manager. H. S. MING, Superintendent. G. D. ACKERLY, General Passenger Agent, JACKSONVILLE, FLORID Jacksonville, St. Augustine & Halifax Rive AY. 32

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DeBARY-BAYA Merchants’ Line. ST. JOHNS RIVER STEAMERS ARRYING THE UNITED STATES MAIL. STEAMERS ?Y OF JACKSONVILLE, FRED’K DeBARY, GEO. M. BIRD, ROSA, W EL AKA, WATER LILY, ANITA, SYLVAN GLEN, FANNIE DUGAN, H. T. BAYA, MAGNOLIA, PASTIME. — FORTeen Cove Springs, Tocoi, Palatka, Sanford, Enterprise, And all Landings on the St. Johns River. CLOSE CONNECTIONS i ade with all Rail, Steam and Stage Routes for Points in the Interior, Indian and Halifax Rivers. CLOSE CONNECTION ,..i Jacksonville with all Rail and Steamship Lines for Points North, East and West. CHAS. B. FENWICK General Freight and Passenger Agent. Y B. WATSON, Gen’l Manager. 33

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— WHOLESALE DEALER IN — DRY GOODS AND NOTIONS, HATS, CAPS, BOOTS, SHOES, &c. I FURNITURE, — AND A FULL LINE OF — SIIMIOITTTOTSr STREET, Near Front Street, Ilf Wilt FIORIDI. J G. W. FERGUSON, FRONT STREET, WEST, FLORIDA. HARDWARE, TOOLS, Grain, Hay, Cement, Lime, OILS, FAI2TTS, BP-HSHES, dfec., WHOLESALE OR RETAIL. Special attention given to the sale or shipments of VEGETABLES and! FRUITS in their season on commission. Agent for WILKINSON & CO.’S FERTILIZERS, now extensively used throughout the country. Also, for BUFFALO SCALES of all kinds, and for PATAPSOO; BAKING POWDER. Long* experience in this business assures a successful competition. w. wmmmmm&m*, j 34

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KEY WEST, FLA — AGENT FOR — Mallory’s Steamship Line Between NEW YORK, KEY WEST and GALVESTON, Texas. — ALSO, FOR THE — Between New Orleans, Cedar Keys, Key West ^Havana. — HAS CONSTANTLY ON HAND — ANTHRACITE AND BITUMINOUS COALS, ICE AND WATER, Which can be delivered to Ships with dispatch. Also, Fireproof Warehouses and Extensive Wharves, Which will accommodate Ships of the largest class and draft of water. COR. FRONT AND DUVAL STS. WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN Receives by each steamer and sail from New York and New Orleans a fresh supply of Groceries, Provisions and Canned Goods, Has always in stock a large and well selected assortment of -i 3 SHIP CHANDLERY,*#Crockery, Class, Tin and Hardware, Carpenters’ Tools, Stores, Paints’ Oils and Varnishes, Furniture and Stationery. CABIN, MESS and SHIP STORES a specialty. ONE OF THE OLDEST BUSINESS HOUSES OF THE CITY.** Personal attention given to sales and satisfaction guaranteed. Goods received by every learner from New Y’ork. New Orleans, Tampa, Manatee and Cedar Keys, and PRODUCE by all schooners from the Mainland. 35

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RUSSELL HOUSE, KEY WEST, MONROE COUISTV, FLORIDA. HK+ DELIGHTFUI>INTER + RESORT KAnd the only City in the United States below the Frost Line, with an average temperature of 70. TEEM S MODE BATE. HUNTING, BOATING. FISHING AND FINE DRIVES. Reached by Steamer direct from New York and New Orleans, or by Cars and Steamer from Cedar Keys, Florida. CHAS. T. MERRILL, ----Manager. ROMAN ALFONSO. LUIS F. CORRAL. LAUREANO B. CONDE. ROM M ALFONSO & CO.' -MANUFACTURERS OI "EL EJEMPLO DEL ARTE,” FACTORY No. 21. KEY WEST, .... FLORIDA. BRANCH OFFICE 273 PEARL ST, FT "5T_ 36

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Estate of Henry Lowe, H. DAVIS LOWE, Manager. GROCERIES, DRY GOODS, HARDWIRE, AND GENERAL MERCHANDISE. PAOKiR AM SHIPPER OF FAUSTS 8 l VE^ETAILES CORNER EATON AND WILLIAM STREETS, KEY WEST, FLORIDA. WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN DRY GOODS, GROCERIES, PROVISIONS g AND GENERAL MERCHANDISE. Grower of Pineapples and other Tropical Fruits and Vegetables. PACKER AND SHIPPER OF TOMATOES AND FRUITS AND VEGETABLES GENERALLY. KEW WEST, FLORIDAJNO. H. COLEMAN. GEORGE L. BARTLUM. COLEMAN & BARTIUM, Cor. Front and Ann Sts„ KEY WEST, FLA. AUCTIONI3ERS And General Commission Merchants. WHOLESALE GROCERS* DEALERS IN LUMBER, SHINGLES, &e. FLOUR A SPECIALTY. B. S. CURRY, Auctioneer and Commission Merchant. CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED. 10 Front St., KEY WEST, FLA. 37

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JOHN JAY PHILBRICK X3SST r And Commission Merchant WHOLESALE DEALER IN ICE, HAY, GRAIN AND CEMENT, Charters made in West Indies and Gulf of Mexico. AGENT FOR TAMPA STEAMSHIP COMPANY. JOHN JAY PHILBRICK, KEY WEST, FLORIDA. LAGER BEER, &c. ^ jfm-g Mtincs, Jitvaight | mi phi hi iisf lifiii mmi AT WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. BILLIARD AND POOL TABLES. KEY WEST, 38 FLORIDA.

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South Carolina Railway. THE! (3El E3 -A. T Double Daily Passenger Route -TO AND FROM ALL POINTSNORTH AND SOUTH Via Columbia and Charleston, or, Via Augusta, Aiken and Charleston, — TO AND FROM ALL POINTS — TEsb 1i§ ^JT 1 Si) UC Via Augusta and Charleston. THIS IS THE O^LY ROUTE TO TRAVEL Between CHARLESTON and WASHINGTON, If you wish to see the most prosperous portion of the South. The route being via Columbia, Charlotte, Greensboro, Danville, Lynchburg and Charlottesville, over the VIRGINIA MIDLAND ROUTE, with Pullman Sleeping Cars Columbia and Washington, without change, passing through many of the most noted Battle Fields in Virginia and. the Carolinas. Also the great Piedmont Belt, celebrated for its beautiful scenery, thriving towns and vi lages, which can be seen via no other route. THIS IS THE ONLY ROUTE Running Palace Sleeping Cars BETWEEN ATLANTA AND CHARLESTON, Via Aiken and Augusta without change, making close connections at Atlanta Union Station with Trains to and from all points West and South. THIS IS THE ONLY ROUTE Running Pullman Sleeping Cars BETWEEN AIKEN AND NEW YORK, Which is via Charleston and Atlantic Coast Line. Sleepers running through in I both directions without change. This is the Best Bouts to Travel Via Charleston to the Cities and Summer Resorts in North and South Carolina, Virginia and Tennessee, and the only route by which Aiken, the greatest Winter Resort in the South, can be reached. By this Route you can buy Through Tickets to all points, and have your Baggage checked to destination. For Through Tickets and Time Tables to all points North, South or West, apply to Agents at Charleston Hotel and Line Street Station, Charleston, Agent at Columbia, Camden, Aiken and Union Depot, Augusta. GENERAL OFFICE, CHARLESTON, S. C. JOHN B. PECK. D.C. ALLEN, General Manager. General Pass, and Ticket Agt. J l

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V 1 ^ ^Ap OF TH£SOUIH CAROLINA RAILWAY ^ flS CONN£Cr/ % RAND, MCNALLY Si CO. ENCRAVERS, CHICACO.

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FOLDOUT BLANK

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RAILWAY, THE OLD RELIABLE -BETWEENBoston, New York, Providence, Fall River, Philadelphia, Baltimore, — ANDAugusta, Macon, Athens, Atlanta, And all points in Georgia, Tennessee, Alabama, and the West and South-West, — AND— And all points in North and South Carolina. THIS IS AHD The Best Route Jt The Best Route TO SHIP NORTH | TO SHIP SOUTH If you wish Prompt Delivery of Freights. The Freight Accommodations —OF THE— ffirest SMthtra Vnlckf Mi Ai es y n§u rpasse. Running regular and well organized lines of magnificent Steamships, this Line offers more advantages to Merchants and Shippers than any other route. All Freight should be marked “ Care South Carolina Railway Co.,” which will insure prompt delivery. Claims for Loss, Damage or Overcharge Promptly Adjusted. j By addressing E. P. WARING, Gen’l Claim Agent, CHARLESTON, S. C. Patrons of this Line will save time and money by calling on the following Agents for Rates and Bills of Lading : Boston. — A. D. W. SAMPSON, New England Agent, 201 Washington Street. New York.— W. H. RHETT, General Agent, 317 Broadway. JAS. W. QUINTARD & CO., Agents, Pier 27, North River. Philadelphia. — W. P. CLYDE & CO., Agents, No. 12 South Wharves. Baltimore. — A. L. HUGGINS, Agent Merchants’ and Miners*. Steamship Co. Charleston.— JAS. ADGER & CO., Agts. N. Y. & C. S. S. Co. W. A. COURTE. NAY, Agent Clyde S. S. Co. C. D. BATEMAN, Agent S. C. Ry. Co. Columbia. — D. McQUEEN, Agent. Augusta. — P. R. SLEDGE, Agent. W. M. TIMBERLAKE, Soliciting Agent. Atlanta. — J. M. SELKIRK, AYestern Agent. Greenville. — H. T. POE, Soliciting Agent GENERAL OFFICE, CHARLESTON, S. C. k JOHN B. PECK, S. B. PICKENS, ^ Bfev General Manager. General Freight Agent. yj B

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THE STATE OF FLORIDA. HISTORY. Florida, the southeastern State of the United States, lies between 25 degrees and 31 degrees north latitude, and between 80 degrees and 88 degrees west longitude from Greenwich. Until recently the area has been estimated at 59,268 square miles, but according to the 1880 United States Census Report the State contains but 58,680 square miles. In this latter document the coast waters, bays, gulfs, sounds, harbors, &c., are put down at 1,800 square miles of surface ; rivers and smaller streams at 390 square miles; lakes and ponds at 2,250 square miles — making the whole water surface 4,440 square miles, and leaving 54,240 square miles of land surface, or 34,713,600 acres. Italy is said to resemble in shape a boot, with the foot turned southward. Florida has somewhat the same resemblance with the foot turned northward. The peninsula portion, measuring from the northern boundary, extends south about 400 miles, with an average width of about 100 miles. The northern part of the State extends from the Atlantic westward along the southern boundary of the States of Georgia and Alabama about 375 miles, with a width to the Gulf of from 40 to 90 miles. North and South America, Africa and Asia, owing to some great natural causes which worked in their formation, are all pointed or narrowed in their breadth in their farthest extension south. Florida, probably from the operation of the same causes, is of similar shape in her southern extremity. Her territorjf is included in the same zone in which, according to the most ancient of books, the human race had its origin, and in which the Garden of Eden was said to be situated. This zone embraces the territory of the ancient civilizations of Egypt, Babylon, Greece and Rome. The average altitude of Florida, as set forth in Toner’s Dictionary of Elevations of the United States, is 60 feet above the level of the sea. This is a somewhat lower average level than that of any other of the States. Louisiana, the next lowest according to that authority, is 75 feet above the sea in its average. The larger portion of the territory of all the States on the Atlantic T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is distilled from the choicest qualities of Grain. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga.

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40 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER coast from Maine to Florida is less than 300 feet above the sea level by this authority. There is an impression with some that high places are the most healthy, but this does not always follow, and is not the testimony of experience here in Florida. Sometimes the lower places in the same neighborhood have had quite the advantage in point of health. In the Old World, some healthful and fertile localities are below the level of the ocean, as the valley of the Jordan, more than 1,000 feet below the surface of the Mediterranean sea, the shores of the Caspian sea, and portions of Holland reclaimed from the ocean by its dykes. The early history of Florida was not one of rapid and encouraging development. From 1565, the date of the settlement of St. Augustine, the oldest town in the Union, to the cession of 1819-21, the territory was claimed by Spain, except the 20 years under British authority from 1763 to 1783. In 1763 the Floridas, East and West, were ceded by Spain to Great Britain, but in 1783 Great Britain having lost the thirteen American Colonies, in the war of 1776 and succeeding years, receded the Floridas to Spain. Thus for more than 250 years the territory was in the grasp of a power far away, and of a monarch whose people regarded the territory too much inferior to the fatherland to invite immigration. On the 22d of February, 1819, a treaty was made between John Q. Adams, Secretary of State of the United States, of the one part, and Luis de Onis, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of the Kingdom of Spain, on the other part, each vested by their respective governments with power to act, ceding the Floridas to the United States. On the 24th of October, 1820, the treaty was ratified by the King of Spain, and by the United States February 19th, 1821. By one of the stipulations of the treaty the United States were to “satisfy alF just claims which the inhabitants and Spanish officers of the Floridas may have upon them in consequence of the damages they may have sustained by the operations and proceedings of the American army.” In the war of 1812-15, between the United States and England the United States had stationed troops for a time on Spanish soil in Florida. Another stipulation, the eleventh article of the treaty, states the agreement of the United States to pay to her own citizens’ claims against Spain for damages done to their commerce in Spanish waters to the extent of $5,000,000. But the correspondence in reference to the treaty, and a note by the Spanish Minister to this eleventh article, show that the $5,000,OOO was only a small item in the incentive to concluding the treaty. In this note to the eleventh article the Spanish Minister says, his miTE ONLY EXCLUSIVE FRUIT HOUSE J 1) WJ? Y\\ T AIlllj IN SAVANNAH. GA ; IS • MJ. JL

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Sugar Mills and Pans. We Guarantee ouf Prices. M. KEHOE & CO., Iron Pounders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 41 government would not make the cession for $20,000,000 but for the desire to arrange and terminate all differences with the United States. The leading consideration which moved Spain to the cession, was the adjustment of the boundary between the two countries west of the Mississippi, and of the Louisiana purchase by the United States from France. The boundary agreed upon was to commence at the mouth of the Sabine river and run along the western bank of said river to the 32d degree of north latitude ; thence due north to Red river ; thence along said river to the one hundredth parallel of west 'longitude from London and 23 from Washington ; thence crossing the river due north to Arkansas river ; thence along the southern bank of said river to its source in latitude 42 degrees north ; thence “by the parallel of latitude to the South sea.” With a coast line of nearly 1,200 miles, accessible with small boats all along the shore, the long, narrow figure of Florida puts its whole surface in near approach to the commerce of the ocean. Some of the best harbors of the United States are on the coast of Florida. Only Portsmouth, N. H, has deeper water (42 feet) than Key West, where is found a draft of 35 feet. The next deepest water in any harbor on the Atlantic coast is at Boston, (28 feet,) which is one foot deeper than the water off Gasparilla key, in Charlotte harbor, which shows 27 feet within two rods of the shore. True, there is a narrow sand bar with only 18^2 feet of water at low tide to be passed in reaching it, but with far less cost than has been expended upon many of the ports along the Atlantic coast, the water on that bar can be made of any required depth. New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore and Pensacola are stated to be 24 feet ; but this is the depth after the expenditure of labor and cost upon most of them. Baltimore is said to have been deepened* *from 15 to 24 feet. Wilmington, N. C., and Charleston, S. C., register 21 feet, and Savannah, Ga., 22 feet. But as the bars at .Charleston and Savannah were dredged or deepened from 16 feet to their present depth, so the waters at Fernandina, Charlotte Harbor, Manitee, Tampa and Rio Carrablle, with the same labor, may be made even more than that ; so that with an equitable expenditure upon her harbors Florida will have a larger number of ports accessible to ocean steamers than any of her sister States. Nineteen of the rivers of Florida are already navigable by steamers, to the distance, in the aggregate, of over 1,000 miles. Their names, beginning on the east, are : St. John’s, Ocklawaha, Indian River, Kissimmee, Caloosahatchie, Peace River, Manatee, Alafia, Homosassa, Withlacoochee, Suwannee, St. Marks, Wakulla, mHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is soft and mellow to the taste. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.

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S 1J 1 Rj W "Pv T3ie Preferred Honte •? A • 00 VV # J • m ~ B PO l n IjOPlID^L.„/^! 42 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Ocklockonee, Apalachicola, Chipola, Choctawhatchie, Escambia and Perdido. These streams, flowing in some instances entirely across the State, make transportation available to extensive areas, and in almost every instance have at their mouths such harbor facilities as make coastwise navigation to vessels of moderate draft safe and active. The railway system of the State embraces some sixty railroads, completed or projected ; and half a dozen or more canal companies have also been chartered. There are fourteen railways already completed in whole or in part. The aggregate length of the railways now in use and of those chartered is more than 5,000 miles. Some of these roads may not, and probably will not be built, but the prospect is that a large proportion of them will be ; the encouragement offered by the State assures this much. All these companies have the right-of-way through the State lands, and also the right to acquire alternate sections of land for six miles on each side of proposed routes, amounting to 3,840 acres per mile. The enhanced value of these lands, as soon as the roads are built through them, will at ready sale pay the cost of building a narrow-gauge road, and a number of them are of this class. Some of these companies also have the same right-of-way, together with grant of alternate sections, through the United States lands. But the stronger incentive for the construction of these roads, or at least some of them, apart from their value when completed, is yet to be mentioned. The Legislature in chartering some of them offered, additionally to the right-of-way and to alternate sections, in the aggregate over 13,000,000 acres of land. To some of them this bonus is five, to some six, to some ten, and to some twenty thousand acres to the mile ; and some of them after building their roads and selling their lands will have the roads as clear profit. A further incentive to railroad building in Florida is the level surface over which most of the roads are to pass. Years ago railway statistics showed the roads in England to cost about $40,000 per mile, and in the United States about $20,000 per mile ; but now, in Florida, the estimate is that a narrow-gauge road can be built and economically equipped at a cost of $5,000 per mile. As fast as these roads are completed, saw-mills are erected for converting the growing trees into timber, and thus furnishing a remunerative amount of way-freightage while the country is still but sparsely settled. The turpentine distilled from the pine and the rosin thus supplied, adds to this freightage ; and, before these J T> T> SAVANNAH, GA, handles more FLORIDA ORANGES • _0. iltJCUy, THAN ANY HOUSE SOUTH. TRY HIM.

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Saw Mill Worli OP ALL KINDS FURNISHED BY JOITtf BOURKE, 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 43 are exhausted, vegetables and fruits, tropical and semi-tropical, for Northern markets will take their place. There are six charters for canals, with an aggregated length of over 700 miles. Some of these, like some of the chartered railways, will never be constructed, perhaps, but upon others the companies are already at work. The canals, like the railways, have the right-of-way, with alternate sections of State lands they pass through, when constructed “in accordance with such plans and specifications of construction as may have been agreed upon between the Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund and the Board of Directors of such railroad or canal company/’ Four of these canals propose passage through the peninsula, connecting the Atlantic with the waters of the Gulf. One of these, “The Atlantic and Gulf Coast Canal and Okeechobee Land Company,” proposes to make a passage for vessels from the navigable waters of the Caloosahatchie through Lake Okeechobee to the Atlantic. The next one, further north, from Charlotte harbor through Manatee and Brevard counties to St. Lucie, on Indian I river. The next, further north, commencing in Levy county, at the mouth of the Withlacoochee, runs through the counties of Levy, Marion and Volusia, to “New Britain on the Atlantic;” I and the one farthest north, “The Florida, Atlantic and Gulf Canal,” from “Cumberland Sound in the harbor of Fernandina through the counties of Nassau, Duval, Clay, Bradford, Alachua and Levy, or the route surveyed by General Gilmore from the St. Mary’s river to St. Marks.” Either one of these canals, when constructed, will be of great advantage to the State, and if either one be of such dimensions and depth as to admit the passage of large ships, then the whole civilized world will be interested in and accommodated by this shorter and safer and cheaper route of travel. The travel and freightage from San Francisco through the proposed ship canal at Panama, or over the ship railway contemplated through Tehaunteepec, would find the ship canal across the peninsula a passage of safety against the coral reefs and storms that are encountered in passing around Cape Florida. So the commerce of the Mississippi passing through this canal would avoid the same dangerous adventures, and would, moreover, shorten the distance to the Atlantic ports and to Europe by hundreds of miles. The importance and value of such a passage, even to foreign nations as well as to the American people, is clearly recognized. Through officials and well informed parties prepared to speak, the voice of England, Russia, Germany and France have been heard in favor of such a passage. As a further proof of the milE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY possesses an excellent bouquet. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.

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S TP Rl VIT T?T7 ere ™T THROUGH CARS, IN FAS? ^ VV TRAINS, WITHOUT TRANSFER. 44 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER material importance of this route, it may be stated that a bill has been introduced in the Senate of the United States calling that body to a grave consideration of the interests involved, and to give proper aid to the construction of such a canal. By turning to the list of railways and canals in subsequent pages, and observing their courses, crossings and connections, it will be seen that they form a sort of net work all. over the State, and that only a small portion of the territory of the State will be more than twenty miles from lines of transportation, either by rail or water. These facilities for transportation, for travel and commerce in Florida in the near future, are assurances of a prosperity highly encouraging. All along down the path of the ages commercial facilities and wealth have accompanied each other, and in modern times the rapid march of Europe on the line of progress, as compared with the more tardy steps of Asia, has been due mainly to her much larger proportion of coast line, its frequent indentations, its harbors and its covers, and its more numerous navigable streams. These have given more numerous and convenient commercial facilities, and her greater wealth and progress have been the result. London, the largest city in the Old World, and New York, the largest in the New, sit beside the sea, where the world’s commerce and wealth are conveniently poured into the lap of each. Now, Florida is favored above most of her sisters in having all her territory convenient to the commerce of the ocean, and in the greater number and depth of her harbors, where her products may be exchanged and the wealth of the commercial world received. CLIMATE. Since the climate of Florida is so well known through the civilized world, it is not necessary to go into detail ; we will briefly give some facts from official tables, and the opinions of scientists. The climate is not a hot climate in summer, but mild, and not subject to great changes of temperature. The winters are not cold and freezing, but uniformly cool and bracing. Throughout the whole twelve months, the rainy, cloudy disagreeable days are the exception ; fair, bright, sunny days the rule. The thermometer seldom goes below 30 degrees in winter, and rarely above 90 degrees in summer. The official records show the average for summer, 78 degrees; for winter, 60 degrees. The daily constant ocean breezes in summer modify the heat ; (the Gulf breeze, coming with the setting sun, cools the air at night ;) a warm or sultry night is almost unknown. Official sanitary reports, both of scienPlAPlflo oo-ACf Consign your Oranges to J. B. REEDY, the largest X 1UI lUll V/ 1 clllgOb Dealer in FRUIT in Georgia at SAVANNAH.

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Sugar Mills and Pans, Oar Pans are Smooth and Uniform in Thickness. WM. KEIIOE & CO., Iron Founders, Savannah, Gla. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 45 tific bodies and the army, show that Florida stands first in health, although in the reports are included the transient or recent population, many of whom take refuge here as invalids, some in the lowest stages of disease. The summer is longer, but the heat less oppressive than midsummer at the North ; this results from its peculiar peninsula shape and the ever-recurring breezes which pass over the State. For days together, New York, Boston and Chicago show, in summer, temperature as high as ioo degrees ; it is very rare that it reaches that degree in Florida for a single day, generally ranging below 90 degrees; not oppressive, modified by the ever-changing air ; not sultry, close or humid ; mornings and evenings always cool and bracing. Natives and older residents, if asked, would say they preferred the summer to the winter months for the climate. This climate is peculiarly adapted for vegetation. There are years when in some localities there is a drougth, and years when portions of the State have had excessive rains, but they do not extend far. In the early spring, when most of the planting season occurs, there are frequent showers : from the first to the middle of July, the rainy season commences, continuing till the middle of September ; the rain falls almost every day, commencing in the early afternoon, lasting from a few minutes to a few hours, rarely as long as the last period, often with heavy thunder and sharp lightning, then ceasing, leaving the air cool and sweet, the sky clear and bright ; the porous soil quickly absorbs the water and leaves the footway dry. These rains fill up the low flat lands and ponds, and are injurious to crops when planted on such lands, underlaid by hard pan. But on the high pine lands and high hammocks the rains are of advantage, making crops grow rank and heavy. The “rainy season” is not of regular annual occurrence. We take from Dr. A. S. Baldwin’s tables, kept for the Smithsonion Institute, as follows : Jacksonville, latitude 30 degrees, 15', longitude 82 degrees — ihean of three daily observations for twenty years, 1844 — 1867. Thermometer. January 55 deg. 1 May 76 deg. February 58 deg. I June 80 deg. March 64 deg. | July 82 deg. April 70 deg | August 82 deg. September 78 deg. October 70 deg. November 62 deg. December 52 deg. The Army records show for twenty years, variation at St. Augustine, Fla., 23 degrees. Rainfall at Jacksonville, average for ten years, 54.5 inches ; the largest quantity in August and September, and the least in November. T he celebrated thistle dew whiskey is absolutely pure. S, GUCKENHEIMER & SON, SOLE AGENTS, SAVANNAH, GA.

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PULLMAN SLEEPING CAR SERVICE between ALL IMPORTANT POINTS. S., F. & W. Ry. 4 6 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER The above shows that for equality of temperature and consequent salubrity, Florida has no rival. THE SOIL Is exceedingly diversified, and in its varied character is suited not only to the crops of the other States generally, but because of its near approach to a tropical clime, to some products not grown elsewhere in the States. The soil is generally classed as first, second and third rate pine lands, and as high and low hammock and swamp lands. The pine lands cover much the larger portion of the State, and the traveler in the trains, or over the highways through them, is not apt to be impressed in such casual inspection with their real worth. The white sand on the immediate surface is taken as conclusive testimony against them : but that is not all sand which, in the careless glance, appears to be. In a large portion of the State this sand is mixed with finely comminuted bits of shells or carbonate of lime. Even the third class of pine lands produce abundantly the saw palmetto, and this plant is rich in potash, one of the most important elements of plant food, and generally furnished by nature to the various soils with a very rigid economy. One of the marks of the third class pine lands is the black-jack growth upon the more elevated spots, and the ash of the blackjack, like the ash of the palmetto root, makes fine soap, showing both of these plants to be rich in potash ; and this mineral is not derived through the leaves from the atmosphere, but through the roots from the soil. Even this poorest soil is not worthless. It does more than fill what would otherwise be an inconvenient chasm in the earth’s surface. It furnishes more nr less pasturage, both upon the black jack elevations and the “gallberry flats.” Cattle feed frequently upon the palmetto leaves, and hogs are very fond of the tender buds in the spring time, and fatten upon the berries in the season for their ripening. Then the spreading leaves are converted into cheap and convenient fans for cooling the face, and are now being converted into paper of the first quality. The fibre of the palmetto leaf is being converted also into brushes, mattresses and other household conveniences. Factories for thus utilizing the palmetto upon a large scale are about being erected in several places. The root of the palmetto, when finely broken or ground up, is said to furnish fine material for tanning leather, because of the amount of tame acid in the root. This seeming digression is still a plea for our poorest lands. COCOANUTS J. B REEDY IS THE ONLY IMPORTER IN SAVANNAH, GA.

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Sugar Mills and Pans. A full Stock of all Sizes. WM. KEHOE & CO., Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 47 Of tillable plants the sisal hemp and the pine-apple are both air plants in a large degree, and do well with little tillage on very poor soil. Leibig, the German Agricultural Chemist, says that the poorest soils, even the Luneburg heath of this country, contain enough of mineral plant food for centuries of profitable tillage, but that it is “locked up” in such cheminal combination as to render it inaccessible to plants, except in a very slight degree. The plant has a power, which the chemists call catalysis by which it disintegrates and dissolves the minerals containing plant food, when they 'are in contact with or near the roots. The temperature of the atmosphere and the soil have something to do with aiding or retarding this vital power of the plant to supply itself with needed nourishment. When soil and plant roots are frozen this catalytic power of the plant is suspended, thus in colder climes, where for months the surface and its contents are locked up in ice, in Florida this disintegration and dissolution of the minerals by the forces of the plant are continued without any such suspension. All the year round the plant has the key to this chest of supplies.; therefore, with a soil of the very same constituents the plant will have access to the larger supply of food, taking the year round, in the warmer clime. In the gallberry flats, while the pine trees are not so tall as on the better lands, noi so Well suited for lumber, they have more sap-wood, and are better suited for supplying turpentine and rosin ; and the collection and preservation of these articles is a paying and a growing industry in Florida, Turpentine and rosin are appreciating in value, as the sources of supply are becoming narrowed, and the commercial demand continually enlarging. The second-class pine lands, which have been adjudged by competent authority to be in the largest proportion, are all productive. They are not hilly, but for the most part undulating in their surface. In some places, however, these elevations amount to hills. Some of the sand hills in Hernando county are regarded among the highest points in the State. Underlying the surface is clay, marl, lime rock and sand. These lands, from their accessibility and productiveness, the facility of fertilizing with cattle, and the impression of their heathfulness above hammock lands, have induced their enclosure and tillage, when the richer hammock lands were hard by, but more difficult to prepare for cultivation. Some of these lands have no regular compact clay under them, or, at least, not in reach of plant roots. This fact is taken frequently as an evidence against them, since the popular prejudice T he celebrated thistle dew whiskey is absolutely pure. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, SOLE AGENTS, SAVANNAH, GA. 6

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48 FRORIDA STATE GAZETTEER is decidedly in favor of a clay sub-soil. This objection, if it really be one, is taken for more than it is worth, for clay proper, or alluminum as the chemists call it, is not food for plants. It uses to the plant are mechanical. It serves to hold firmly the roots of the enlarging trunk, but not to subsist the hungry or thirsty plant. Sometimes it has been found in small quantities in the ash of woods, but this is because the rootlets take up more or less of whatever is insolution about them, and clay has been taken up in this way just as poisons may be taken up, for trees are sometimes killed by pouring poisonous liquids about their roots, but clay never makes any part of the organism of the plant, nor is it numbered among the dement which contribute to their growth. Another notion as to the value of a clay sub-soil is, that without its presence the applied fertilizers will leach through and be lost. The fertilizers used are generally lighter than the soils to which they are applied, or than the water coming down from the clouds. As the rains fall some of these fertilizers are carried down, after a time of drought; as the soil fills they are borne upward again by the waters to the surface, and both as they go down and come up, whether they be liquid or gaseous, the humus of soils has a strong absorbing affinity for them and readily appropriates and retains them for the uses of the plant, when the superabundance of water has passed away. But if the soil is not filled to the surface, so as to bring back directly any fertilizer in solution that was carried down, it is safer there in the sub-soil than on the steep hillsides of clay, where what is applied is frequently carried away into the floods, together with the soil, to the vales below. Whereas what has gone down in the porous soil is brought up by the capillary attraction of the surface soil, in time of drought, to the reach of the growing crop. One of the uses of drought is, that it thus brings up from the sub-soil any mineral food that may be there, to where it will be in reach of the growing crop. But light, sandy soils, though they may produce freely at first, soon give away, and this fact, for frequently it is a fact, is regarded as conclusive as against loose and porous sub-soils, whereas it only proves that these light soils were not sufficiently supplied with humus, and the limited supply soon exhausted. Some of the best and most enduring soils of Florida have a chocolate-colored, loose, porous sub-soils. The very tenacity and closeness which it is claimed prevents the applied fertilizer from sinking will of course be equally in the way of fertilizing matter rising, in the time of drought, from the sub-soil. CIDER. I AM HEADQUARTERS FOR CIDER. Grocer and Importer, Savannah, Ga. J. B. REEDY,

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Sugar Mills and Pans. Our Mills run perfectly true. WM. KEIIOE & CO., Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 49 Of the first-class pine lands Mr. J. S. Adams, Commissioner of Immigration, in his publication of 1869, says: “It has nothing analagous to it in any of the other States. Its surface is covered for several inches with a dark vegetable mould, beneath which, to the depth of several feet, is a chocolate sand loam, mixed for the most part with limestone pebbles, resting on a substratum of marl, clay or limestone rock. The fertility and durability of this description of land may be estimated from the well-known fact that it has on the upper Suwannee, and several other districts, yielded, during fourteen years of successive cultivation, without the aid of manure, 400 pounds of Sea Island cotton to the acre, the lands are as productive as ever, so that the limit of their durability is still unknown.” In reference to the high hammock lands, we again quote from the pamphlet of Mr. Adams : “ There is one feature in the topography of Florida which no other country in the United States possesses, and which affords a great security to the health of its inhabitants, it is that the pine lands which form the basis of the country, and which are almost universally healthy, are nearly everywhere studded at intervals of a few miles with the rich hammock land. These hammocks are not, as is generally supposed, low, wet lands, they do not require ditching or draining. They vary in extent from twenty acres to forty thousand acres. Hence the inhabitants have it in their power to select residences in the pine lands, at such convenient distances from the hammock as will enable them to cultivate the latter without endangering their health, if it should so happen that any of the inhabitants prove to be less healthy than in the pine lands. Experience has shown that residences only half a mile distant from cultivated hammocks are exempt from malarial diseases, and the negroes who cultivate and retire at night to pine land residences maintain their health. Indeed, it is found that residence in the hammocks are generally healthy after they have been a few years cleared. This class of lands, under favorable circumstances, have produced as much as three hogsheads of sugar per acre.” These hammocks, high and low, are generally admixed with lime, and the streams running through them are impregnated with it, more or less. The low hammocks are less elevated and less undulating, and generally require ditching to relieve them of a superabundance of water, especially during the rainy season. They have a deeper soil and are generally regarded as more lasting than the high hammock. They are especially fitted for the growth of the sugarcane, which is not so much affected by either dry weather or T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is distilled from the choicest qualities of Grain. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga.

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FAST MAIL TRAINS THROUGH WITH BUT FEW STOPPING POINTS. S., F. & W. Ey. 50 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER flood as most other crops. Sometimes in its growth the surface about it is covered with water for weeks, without seeming seriously to injure it, and then requiring a longer period for maturing than most of our field crop, it has in the autumn, when the rainy season is over, a mild and dry period, when it grows fastest, which is best adapted to the maturing of its juices. Swamp lands are esteemed the most durably rich lands in Florida. They occupy depressed places, where they receive the drift from places more elevated. They are of more recent formation than the high hammocks, or even the pine lands, which are a formation subsequent to the hammocks. They are alluvial and still receiving deposits from the higher grounds. Some of what is called the Everglades, in the counties of Monroe and Dade, is soil of this character. These lands will be, in a large degree, reclaimed by the canal now in process of construction for that purpose, and for providing transportation for the worldÂ’s commerce with that section. A portion of these Everglades will, without question, turn out to be very poor, but among them and in other portions of the State, there is estimated to be more than 1,000,000 acres of swamp land not yet appropriated to agricultural purposes. In several instances, and in different localities, this class of land has produced four hogsheads of sugar to the acre. Some suppose that eventually as much sugar will be raised in Florida as would supply the present demand of the United States with that article. Some of the counties of Middle Florida, Gadsden, Leon, Madison and Jefferson, and Jackson county, of West Florida, have large areas of fine high hammock land, underlaid with a stiff clay. These are the best lands of the State for the growth of the short staple cotton, and are indeed the cream of the State for generally farming purposes. They are of the earliest formaiton of the Florida lands. In East Florida, the counties of Alachua, Levy, Marion, Hernando and Sumter have most hammock lands. Most of the swamp lands (proper) are in South Florida. One peculiarity of the Florida soil is its easier culture than the stiffer soils. Another is that most of the farm labor and tillage can be performed in those months of the year when the grounds are frozen further north. Another peculiarity is that the fertilizers are applied with better effect, both because the applications are not carried away by the rains, as frequently they are in hillier regions, and because the more porous soil lets in the atmosphere more readily to aid the fertilizers in the work of decomposing the When going home, stop in and order a box of T T) DFPTiV QoIIQTUIQIi P 1 Q the choicest FLORIDA ORANGES, at J D. ilMiJ I DO. V dllUdll, UR.

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Sugar Mills, AND PANS OF ALL SIZFS. MADE BY JOltN KOURKE, 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 51 minerals of the soil, and setting free the food elements they contain for the use of the crops grown. STAPLE COMMODITIES. The staple commodities of Florida for markets outside the State are enlarging in number. The long and short staple cotton, corn, rye, oats, rice, sugar, syrup, tobacco, vegetables of almost every variety, and fruits, tropical and semi-tropical, as well as most of those grown in temperate zones, fish, sponge, lumber, turpentine, rosin, &c., are the most prominent. The cereals grown in the United States generally do well also in Florida, with the exception, perhaps, of wheat, which is supposed to be more subject to rust in Florida than further north. For the want of proper mills for converting the grain into flour, but few experiments have been made in wheat ; but as it grows well in Egypt climate cannot be the difficulty. In the census of 1880 the average of the corn crop of the State of Georgia per acre is put down at 9.2 bushels ; South Carolina at 9.3 bushels, and Florida at 9.4 bushels. Florida, therefore, is not entirely in the rear. The average per acre of the oat crop in Alabama is put down at 9.2 bushels, and Florida at 9.4 bushels. A larger area in Florida is suited to the growth of Sea Island cotton than in any other one of the States. Indeed, about half the whole American supply is raised in this State. At the Atlanta Exposition a bag of long-staple cotton, from Levy county, Florida, took the first premium. As this staple brings double, and sometimes treble the price of the short staple, the localities best suited to its growth will be turned to its production. The small grain cereals generally have been found to do well in Florida as far as they have been tried. Rice does finely, even on the poor pine lands when sufficiently fertilized. After cowpenning the grounds 60 bushels per acre have been produced. The reclaimed swamp lands will be eminently fitted for its production. While this grain feeds a majority of the worldÂ’s people, the straw is excellent forage for horses and cattle. But the sugarcane will, perhaps, be the larger crop on the richer lands, whether swamp, low hammock or high. The worldÂ’s demand for the product of the cane is enlarging, the price is enhancing, and no substitute has yet been found that will adequately supply its place. Another incentive to its production is the improved machinery brought into use in the last few years for converting its juice into sugar and syrup, and purifying its granulations up to the highest grades. mHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is soft and mellow to the taste. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.

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S, F. & W. Ry. Elegant Passenger Equipments; Westinghouse Air Brakes; Miller Platforms ; Janey Couplers. 52 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Jute is now meeting with experiment in this climate, and with every prospect of success. This is the proper soil and climate for it. Its growth will diversify our crops, and the manufacture of its fibre here will diversify our labor, and diversity of labor is one of the great wants of the South. There will be a home demand for the manufactured article. This will save expense of freightage from abroad and import duties upon arrival. Another plant producing textile fibre is the Sisal hemp. This plant was introduced into Florida while yet a territory, from Yucatan, by one Dr. Perrine, who engaged with the United States Government to introduce and grow tropical plants, in consideration of a township of land south of the 26th degree of north latitude. His enterprise, for some cause, failed, and the grant failed with it ; but some of the plants he introduced found in the locality a genial home, and live on, without attention and tillage. In an enclosure at Manatee this one — Sisal hemp — has been somewhat troublesome. It feeds so largely upon the atmosphere as to be almost independent on the soil. This character of the plant will encourage its tillage, even upon the very poorest lands. Properly cared for it will yield a remunerative crop, and, like the jute, the article grown and manufactured here will find an extensive home demand. TROPICAL AND SEMI-TROPICAL FRUITS. The Pineapple is largely an air-plant, and in a suitable climate will do well, even in a poor soil. Very fine*pineapples have been grown as far north as Tampa, about 28 degrees north latitude, and will do well up to 29 degrees. On the island between Key West and the main land it is a staple crop, as also in Dade county, Indeed, it may and will be grown profitably anywhere south of 29 degrees north. It is only awaiting convenient transportation. The Cocoanut just at present is attracting great attention. There is a “boom” in its production in the counties of Monroe and Dade. There aie trees in prosperous and prolific bearing at Fort Myers, near the northern boundary of Monroe county. With a little protection to the plant for the first several years during the coldest nights it will do tvell as far north as the Manatee river. The Date-palm, from which is obtained the date of commerce, is a somewhat hardier plant than the cocoa-nut, and will do well, therefore, something further north. Date trees, and very old ones, are bearing at St. Augustine, and in Franklin county, at Apalachicola. As yet this fruit has not attracted much attention Candy, Crackers, etc. w Send for PriceLi5t J Savannah, Ga.^

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Sugar Mills and Pans. Our Leading Specialty. WM. KEHOE & CO., Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 53 as an investment, as about twenty years are generally required to obtain fruit from the seed. The Guava, a tree in its size and shape and manner of growth not unlike the peach tree, does about as well i/i the southern counties of Florida as it can anywhere. From Its fruit is made the guava jelly of commerce, so widely and so favorably known over the world. The taste for the fruit, like the taste for most tropical fruits, is an acquired one, but when acquired is fully endorsed. Some persons like the fruit upon first tasting it, but the majority require frequent tasting before the flavor becomes decidedfy agreeable. The full crop ripens in August and September, but the trees have blossoms and fruit all the year, and all the year the fruit is ripening. They grow with less attention than the peach, and sometimes bear the second year from the seed. The fruit is ordinarily about the size of the peach, and fully as varied in size and quality. So far experience has demonstrated no other means of utilizing this fruit for market than by canning, or as jelly or marmalade. As to its exact profitableness, even in one of these forms, we have no reliable data. The “ Sugar-apple,” in local nomenclature, the Spaniards put at or near the head of the fruit list lor its excellency. In its flavor it is one of the most concentrated sweets known among fruits, but the first taste has a smack of something repulsive, soon lost in a few repetitions, and then the acquired taste is very agreeable. It grows upon a shrub but little, if any, larger than the pomegranate, and in size and shape is somewhat like the pine cone. It decays too soon after ripening for transportation, and as yet has established a use only at home. It thrives as far north as Tampa. The Pomegranate, several varieties of sweet and sour, grows finely in every part of the State. It is not a marketable product, but when properly prepared makes a most delightful sub-acid summer drink — is a decided febrifuge much in vogue. The tree with its rich foliage and brilliant coral-like flowers is highly ornamented. The Coffee-plant has attained maturity in the open air in but one county in the State, or even the United States. It sometimes attains a height of ten or twelve feet. Mrs. Atzeroth, of Manatee county, has sent several pounds of the matured grain to Washington City, and received a premium for the same. She is engaged mainly, however, in raising the plants for sale. Whether it can be grown profitably on a large scale, and will figure among the available crops of Florida, is yet to be tested. T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY possesses an excellent bouquet. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.

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S., F. & W. Ry SHORT 1INE! c^tjio3esi "rinvcDEs. 54 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER The Mango is another tropical fruit of high flavor, and is now bearing abundantly as far north as the 28th degree of north lati tude. In size and shape it somewhat resembles a pear, and in flavor has been likened to the apricot. This is a marketable fruit — finds ready sale in Texas and Louisiana markets. Ihe Sappadillo (after a little familiarity with it,) is a very luscious and desirable fruit. The tree attains about the dimensions of the orange, but will not stand the cold quite so well. A few trees are growing as far north as the Manatee river. They are not yet in bearing, but as they grow finely promise well. The Alligator Pear, or Laurus Persca (Linnczus,) is a tree somewhat larger than the orange, resembling in the general appearance of its foliage and growth the magnolia. The fruit, when matured, is about the shape and color (the only similarities) of the pear, is palatable, flavor peculiar to itself. Preferred by many to any other tropical fruit. Is marketable, bears transportation quite as well as the orange. Attains perfection as far north as 29 degrees north latitude. As yet has attracted little attention. In 1868 some of the trees in Tampa were killed to the ground, but have been equal to the the coldest weather since. The Orange can be more extensively and profitably grown in Florida than in any other State of the Union. Louisiana, Texas and California will in time compete with us in the production of this popular fruit, but from advantages we enjoy in certain peculiarities of climate, soil and seasons, it is more than likely that Florida will ever retain a superiority over any other section of the country in its production. The history of orange-growing in Florida as an industry is very recent. True it is that our primeval forests abound, in some localities, in native wild groves. With the first settlement of St. Augustine by the Spaniards it is probable that the orange was planted and cultivated with success. During the period of American occupation, from the cession of 1819-21 up to the close of the civil war in 1865, many Floridians had planted and matured extensive groves, prominent among which was the renowned Dummit Grove on Indian river, together with others of less size at St. Augustine and at several points along the St. John’s river and at Tampa bay. Still these ante-bellum groves were merely among the embellishments of home surroundings with a few wealthy proprietors, as fish ponds or other ornamental features sometimes are upon the premises of Northern men of wealth; but nowhere in Florida was orange-growing regarded as a business to be pursued solely for profit. HD I fl IT you want Strictly Choice Fruit, at bottom prices, send your orders r n U I I to J. B. REEDY, Savannah, Ga.

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John Rourke, AGRICULTURAL IRON AND BRASS WORKS, 2 BAT STREET, SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 55 After the late war the winter climate of Florida was sought byhundreds of Northern people in pursuit of health. The beauty of the rich golden fruit, amid its dark, green foliage, attracted the eye, and, as many of these visitors bought and improved homes along the banks of the St. John’s and other accessible points, they began the propagation of the orange. Gradually the facilities for its culture and the wonderful profitableness of the business became apparent, and induced investments in small tracts for the purpose. Year after year, as at various points additional trees and young plantings came into bearing, the great superiority of the Florida fruit over any other made itself felt in the North. The demand for “Florida Oranges” began to grow, prices advanced, improved methods of propagating by budding, pruning and fertilizing obtained : year by year the demand and supply continued to increase. Soon choice locations adapted to the culture of the fruit began enhancing in value — lots that for fifty years had remained vacant at $1.25 per acre were found to command and readily bring $50 to $ioo per acre. And so the enormous profitableness of this industry became noised abroad, and the “Orange fever” was fairly established, and not without good cause ; for, however extravagantly the subject has in many instances been treated by some writers, not always without selfish purposes in inducingsale and settlement of lands, there is no shadow of doubt as to the really sure and safe ground for the investment of untold thousands of dollars in making orange groves. One thousand dollars per acre per annum has time and again been realized from this business. Indeed, double that amount per acre has been frequently made ; and with proper culture and fertilization, where the latter is needed, $1,000 per acre is an available crop. Like all excellent things, orange culture has many and serious obstacles to its successful accomplishment. Being a new business there is not a vast amount of experience to govern and direct the beginner. Almost as many different theories exist as to the most approved methods of culture as there are men engaged in it. The natural enemies of the tree and fruit are numerous, and not very well understood. An entomologist recently sent from the Bureau at Washington reports having discovered no less than 35 different insects that are in a greater or less degree damaging to the orange. Judicious selection of locality as well as location for groves are most important matters. The selection of stocks, buds, seeds, and the best methods of planting, protecting and cultivating, are material factors of success. Frosts, droughts, gales and other casualties are to be considered, and time is largely of the essence of the undertaking. We believe, from experience T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is distilled from the choicest qualities of Grain. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga. 7

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S, F. & W. Ry. PULLMAN SLEEPING CAR SERVICE between ALL IMPORTANT POINTS. 56 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER thus far, that on an average it requires twelve or fifteen years to make an orange grove very profitable from the time of planting. True it is that in some, perhaps many instances, where the environment were in all respects most favorable, much better results have been obtained. We believe, however, that orange growing, while it of course can be engaged in at a decided advantage by those who have means to conduct it on a cash basis, and be independent of support until such time as the grove is an assured success, does not, nevertheless, present any insurmountable features to “ poor men” — by which term we mean, in this instance, men without ready money and dependent upon their own labor for support. Indeed, in the knowledge of the writer, many of the most successful and to-day independent orange proprietors in Florida began the business with no other capital than their own labor. But for fear of misleading minds prone to overlooking the details when so dazzling a prospect is offered them of converting in a few years acres of $1.25 land into bonanzas yielding princely incomes, we caution them that there is a long, hungry gap between raw pine woods and groves of bearing orange trees. It takes many hard licks, plenty of pluck, assured health, good luck and favorable auspices. To all of which a large family, bad health, indolence, inexperience or accident are possible drawbacks. It has been urged that the profits of orange growing would directly attract so many to the business as to overstock the market and break it down, but a little reflection will dissipate such fears. Apples sell as readily now, and at as good prices, as they did forty years ago, and yet there are millions of acres suitable to growing apples where there are hundreds suitable to growing oranges, and there are millions of apples how on the market where there used to be one. If the apple market cannot be so overstocked as to break it down, much less can the market for oranges. The consumption of the orange within the United States is put down at 600,000,000 per annum. A little above 50,000,000 of that supply is furnished at home ; the remainder, as shown at the custom houses, is made up of receipts from abroad. We furnish about one-twelfth of the supply, while foreign sources furnish the other eleven-twelfths. The ease by which we can effectually occupy the market when our supply is sufficiently enlarged is shown in the fact that the foreign fruit is frequently sold in the market as “ Florida” fruit to procure for it a more ready sale. Ours is of a better quality and richer flavor, and the foreign article finds a market among us only because the home supply fails to meet the demand. And this demand is increasing almost as rapidly as orange trees in Florida are multiplying. VEGETABLES. Alw&y /. on hand a full supply of the best, B. REEDY, Savannah, Ga.

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QndflT 1 IHillc nnH PfUlQ our ^ ills are hdty warranted. WM. KEHOE & CO., Oligdl lillllu (Hill iuilui Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 57 The natural increase of American population, that is the number of births over the number of deaths, is only about one-third of the real increase. More than half a million people from foreign lands will arrive upon our shores during the present year with the intention of permanent residence among us. Then every railroad in the other American States, as well as every railroad and canal added in Florida, increases the facility and lessens the cost of putting this tropical fruit at every manÂ’s door. The following statistics, obtained from Census Bulletin of 1880, will give some idea of the orange business in Florida at that date : Name in County. Alachua Baker Bradford Brevard Calhoun Clay Columbia Dade Duval .... Escambia Franklin Gadsden Hamilton Hernando HillsboroÂ’ Holmes Jackson Jefferson Lafayette Leon Levy Liberty. Madison Manatee Marion Monroe Nassau Orange. Polk Putnam Santa Rosa St. JohnÂ’s Sumter Suwannee Taylor Volusia Wakulla Walton Washington Supplement No. Bearing Trees. 13,111 21 3,317 10,884 841 738 436 500 10,131 11 7.685 18,683 1,000 1,157 2.500 460 594 17,291 46.195 500 29,049 2 283 64,170 12.006 13,029 157 1,846 24,638 83 11,536 Yield in 1880. 2 250,900 9,450 338.850 1 250,000 282,400 165,500 157.850 500,000 3 000,000 10,000 2,000,000 4 409,150 43,800 750.000 500.000 512,900 2,000,000 6,000,000 500,000 4 000,000 1 500,000 7 120,631 2,000,000 2 250,000 120,700 255,200 4 000.000 70,493 457,225 Value. $ 33,750 00 141 75 4,815 50 18,750 00 4,170 50 2,522 25 2,741 00 7,500 00 45,000 00 37,500 00 45,410 25 3,500 00 662 00 11,250 00 7,500 00 7,685 00 30.000 00 90.000 00 7,500 00 60,000 00 22,500 00 108,414 80 30.000 00 33,750 00 2,060 00 2,747 50 60.000 00 7,056 10 Total 292,324 46 097,856 $ 672,176 65 T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY IS ABSOLUTELY PURE. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, SOLE AGENTS, SAVANNAH, GA.

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FREIGHT IN THROUGH OARS, IN FAST TRAINS, WITHOUT TRANSFER. 58 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER From want of reports from several of the counties in the above list, they are made to appear as non-productive of oranges. This we feel authorized to correct. There is not a county in Florida where bearing orange trees are not to be found ; and in Franklin and Liberty, two of the counties not reported in the above list, orange growing is quite an industry. Some very handsome and valuable groves are to be seen on the banks of the Apalachicola. Other members of the citrus family, viz. : The lemon, lime, citron, grape fruit and shaddock can be successfully grown in at least a large portion of the State. The lime and lemon will be about as widely used as the orange, though not so abundantly, and as not a tithing of so many are engaged in growing them, they will, perhaps, be about as profitable. The Grape-fruit is only a larger and coarser variety of the orange. The shaddock is yet a larger fruit — measuring some ten or twelve inches in diameter. The Citron is a healthy, vigorous grower and prolific bearer, though less hardy than the lemon or orange. By a process, as yet not understood in Florida, from this fruit is prepared, in the East, the citron of commerce which art, when acquired here, will develop only another source of industry and revenue to the State. The Banana is one of the most popular of tropical productions. It is generally relished from the first, but even this fruit requires a little practice to develop in full a palatable sense of its richness and delicacy. Moreover it belongs to the family — -the plantain, which is claimed to be the richest of all the fruits in nutritious matter. It has a number of varieties. The hardest of these, and the one most widely scattered over the State, is the African. This variety needs to be quite ripe to be in its highest degree palatable. Most of the other varieties, as the French, Fig, Dwarf, Red, Cavendish, Lady-finger and Apple, are regarded as more delicate in their flavor. Parties growing for the market are selecting some one or other of these finer varieties, even though of more delicate vitality. This plant sprouts or tillers from a single root or bulb, each sprout in its turn becoming the parent of another generation of sprouts, which attain their maturity in about fourteen months, when the pendant fruit is developed at the top, after the ripening of which the sprout dies and makes room for a younger one. One season, therefore, is not sufficient for the wants of the plant. The first white frost disposes of its leaves, and a freeze of the stem also. With a little painstaking the fruit can be ripened all over Peanuts. Virs 'ginia, North Carolina and Tennessee in large variety at J. B. REEDY’S, Grocer, and Importer of Fruit, Savannah, Ga.

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1? GIVEN ON ALL KINDS OP MACHINERY AND REPAIRS, liSllllllllCS BY JOHN liOURKE 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 59 Florida, and even further north. Let the plant, when it comes up in the spring, have tillage and fertilization, (it requires a rich soil,) and at the commencement of cold weather take up and shelter from cold by embanking in earth, as in case of sugar-cane. The leaves will perish, but the stem will be preserved with more certainty than the eye of the sugar-cane. In the following spring if these items are reset and cultivated, ripened fruit during the summer will be assured. This precaution, however, is only necessary during some winters in the extreme northern counties of the State. It is very tenacious of life, and bears taking up and resetting almost like an onion. The plant belongs to the order of Musas and is closely allied to the M. Textiliis or Manilla hemp of the Phillipine Isles. It furnishes a fibre of extreme tenacity and durability, and may in time come to be extensively utilized as a fibre-producing plant. Another property of probable value possessed by this plant is its juice, which is very abundant in stem and leaf, trickling in quite a stream when fresh cut ; and makes an indellible dye, which can be varied in color by the addition of other matter, and this dye improves with age. The fruit is worth more than its cost for both food and ornamentation, and no Florida home is complete without its surrounding of the rich semi-tropical foliage of the banana. The Japan Plum or Loquat, as well as the Japanese Persimmon, flourish throughout the State ; both are excellent fruit, with growing popularity, and promise to be profitable products for market beyond the State. The persimmon is as large as an apple, and in some of its varieties very mucji the same shape. Some specimens of the fruit are seedless. The flavor is rich and pleasant. The Peach, though it grows about as well in the far south of the State as farther north, yet does not fruit as regularly. Sometimes, for several years together, the tree will cast every bloom. In the northern counties, while the orange tree grows as well, and even better than in the thinner lands of the southern counties, and for the last half a century have grown full crops for more than three-fourths of the years, yet are liable occasionally to be killed down by a freeze ; but the peach, in at least its earlier varieties, offers a high remuneration for its tillage. In North Florida it can be ready for the earliest market and command monopolizing prices. The Peen-to or Flat-Peach, of China, begins to ripen in the neighborhood of Tallahassee, in Leon county, in .the last week in April and continues for a month. These peaches brought most extravagant prices in New York the past spring. Pears of very many varieties, but especially the Dwarfs, have f jlHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is soft and mellow to the taste. S. GrUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.

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6o FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER been for many years favorite incumbents of the oichards in the northern and middle portions of the State, and are found to succeed well. Standards have been extensively planted of late years. Among these the Bartlett has so far proven the most satisfactory. The introduction within the last five years in the northern counties, especially in Leon and Jefferson, of the celebrated LeConte variety, has given an impetus to the production of this fruit that amounts to a boom, and promises to rival in extent the orange industry. The LeConte is a most vigorous grower, comes into bearing the fourth year from the cutting attains a growth of twenty-five or thirty feet, and is the most prolific and sure bearer of any character of fruit tree experimented with in Florida. The fruit is not, perhaps, as excellent in quality as some of the more choice varieties, but is nevertheless a very edible and readily marketable fruit. The rapidity of its growth, the small amount of capital, labor and time required to secure bearing orchards of any extent, its wonderful prolificness, excellent shipping properties and earliness of ripening, make the production of this pear deservedly one of the most popular investments in Florida. Prices in New York so far have been most satisfactory, and have stimulated the production of the LeConte so that in the two counties of Leon and Jefferson many thousands of these trees have been put out within the two years past. Parties in Tallahassee have recently refused $100 per acre for land with twoyear old LeConte trees upon it. We think this industry is likely in a few years to assume very great proportions, and is calculated to effect settlement^and prices of real estate in that section very much as the orange business has in sections lower down the peninsula. Grapes of several varieties grow wild throughout Florida. They rarely if ever occur in the pine woods, but in hammock land trees are hung and festooned in every direction with the luxuriant growth of vines. In many localities considerable attention has been given to the cultivation of domesticated varieties. The Concord, Catawba, Ives, Clinton and other American grapes of that family have been found to grow and fruit well wherever the proper attention has been given the pruning, &c. As to the cultivation of grapes of that character on a large scale for making wine, we know of no very extensive operations, and it is questionable whether our rainy season, which occurs during vintage in July, will not prove a serious draw-back, until experience and selection have induced a variation in the grape that will induce earlier ripening. The Delaware is a determined success in Middle Florida at any rate. Foreign Dried and Green Frnit In large variety, at J. B. REEDYÂ’S, Grocer, and Importer of Fruit, Savannah, Ga.

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Sugar Mills and Pans. They are Strong and Durable. WM. KEHOE & CO., Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front pastor.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY 6l The Scuppernong has been more extensively propagated than any other grape. Of the production of any varieties, of European wine grapes we are unable to give any reliable information. Many experiments have been made, and none, we think, have so far been very favorable. This may be entirely owing to the want of proper knowledge of the best methods of pruning, &c. The so-called wines manufactured in Florida and other parts of the South are only cordials, made by the addition of sugar or spirits to the juice of the grapes. They are sweet, heavy drinks generally, with decided flavors peculiar to themselves ; are palatable drinks when a taste is acquired for them, but are not wines in a commercial sense. Very considerable profit, however, attends their manufacture and sale. Apples, so far as we know, have never been extensively or very satisfactorily grown in Florida. There are in some of the northern counties small orchards of considerable age that have borne fruit abundantly for years, but are not of choice varieties. By proper selection of suitable varieties, and the adoption of a system of culture that experience will prove to be adapted to our climate and seasons, there is little doubt that on the stiff, rolling lands of the hill country in the northern portion of the State, apples may yet become a prominent feature among the industries. Figs of every known variety do well in Florida, but in the most southern counties are a little uncertain about fruiting. When it does bear in those sections the fruit is quite as good as that grown farther north, and it may be that painstaking in its tillage will discover a remedy for this irregularity. In the East it is an article of great commercial value, and when Florida becomes fully exercised in fruit growing, and has acquired skill in preparing her fruits for market, the fig will probably become prominent among the list. The tree attains great age, and continues to bear indefinitely. Every home has its fig trees of different varieties, and the fruit is among the most wholesome article of diet. Plums ol many wild varieties are found throughout the State. Little attention has been bestowed on them. Some of the early Southern varieties have been found profitable for shipment North. They ripen about the first of April, and can be put in the Northern market at a time when they have no other fruit to compete with. The Pecan of the West grows finely all over the State. It requires no tillage and nursing. Comes into bearing from the planting of the nuts in ten or twelve years. The fruit is abundant, falls when ripe, is easily and cheaply gathered, bears keep1 1HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY possesses an excellent bouquet, S. G-U CKENUEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAYANNAH, GA.

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s PX/ W “Ptt TIxe Preferred Route 62 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER ing and rough shipment any distance in any climate, and is quoted in the New Orleans market to-day at i6j^ cents per pound wholesale for the best quality of Texas nuts. The Almond grows well in Florida. Little success has been had in maturing fruit of any other variety than the Hardshell — which variety is not marketable. We know of no drawback to the successful production of other varieties, save the heretofore want of proper care and attention. OF THE LIST OF SMALL FRUITS OR BERRIES we think experience in Florida discards all except the blackberry and strawberry. Currants, gooseberries, raspberries, so far as we know, have never proven a success in Florida. Blackberries grow wild all over the State in great profusion. Some attention has been given in Middle Florida, where labor is abundant and cheap, to drying the berries for shipment. The dried fruit commands 14 cents per pound net, and is becoming the source of considerable revenue to those who have undertaken its preparation and shipment. Strawberries are one of the prominent subjects of interest to the fruit growers and market gardeners. This delightfnl fruit, so eagerly sought after in every market, grows to great perfection throughout the State of Florida. The fruit comes into the market too early to find competition from any other section, and Florida strawberries enjoy a monopoly in the Eastern seaboard markets for many weeks during January, February and March. The production and shipment of the berries North is rapidly increasing, and has now assumed such proportions as to secure the provision by the transportation companies of suitable refrigerating cars for their proper preservation in transitu.' As ar. evidence of the profitableness of the strawberry culture in Florida, we extract from an article by Mr. W. H. Haskell, in a pamphlet recently issued by the Leon County Farmers’ Club, the following : “ Proceeds of one shipment of berries from Jacksonville, of 1,052 quarts, shipped to New York, and sold for $2,630, or $2.50 per quart ; cost of packing and shipping, $283 ; leaving a net profit of $2,346.” The production in Florida of EARLY VEGETABLES for shipment to Northern markets is rapidly assuming extensive proportions, and will, in all time to come, prove a most important and profitable feature of her industries. LTmONS 1 handie h0U8e l B. REEDY, Savannah, Ga.

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Saw Mill Work OF ALL KINDS FURNISHED BY JOHN ROURKE, 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH. GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY, 63 During the past season cabbages have been shipped from Tallahassee, in Leon county, and sold in New York at a net profit of $500 per acre. In South Florida tomatoes, cucumbers and beans thus far have been the leading articles for shipment. The tomato has been the most profitable. In that section of the State the fall and winter months are best suited for vegetable growing. Leans, peas, cucumbers, potatoes and cabbages can be grown at seasons which command for them monopolizing prices. Five, six and seven hundred dollars per acre have been realized, both from cabbages and tomatoes. Cucumbers have paid as much to the area in tillage, to the early grower, as any vegetable on the list. The great drawback, thus far, to the early market gardeners has been the want of ready and reliable transportation facilities. These, however, are rapidly multiplying and extending. And the vegetable and fruit trade will soon be so immense in this proportion as to command for their use all the commercial facilities that human skill and industry can supply. The State seems likely soon to become one vast orchard for fruits and garden for vegetables. The Sweet Potato comes nearer being a universal crop in Florida than any other the soil produces. It is easily propagated, from the roots, sprouts or vine, and sometimes the seed, though the latter mode is rarely used. From its easy propagation and cultivation, its large yield, and the variety and excellence of the dishes prepared from it, it is one of the indispensable crops. In the southern counties it may be planted at any season of the year, and generally is not taken from the ground until needed for use. The Irish Potato, or “ White Potato,” is accredited with being a native of Chili and Peru, and was introduced into North America by the Spaniards, from whence it was in 1586 carried by Sir Walter Raleigh to England, and perhaps acquired its name of “ Irish” from the extent to which it is grown in Ireland, and the excellence with which the Irish soil produces it. This tuber has within the last year or two taken a very prominent place among the very profitable early crops in Florida. On the best class of lands truckmen have been getting about an average of thirty barrels of first-class shipping potatoes per acre, which, getting into the Eastern markets about the time the old crop is exhausted, have been netting over cost of shipping and selling, about $4 per barrel, making say from $100 to $120 per acre realized from land in a short period of generally 100 days, and leaving the ground ready for some other crop by first of May. These figures have been very much exceeded in many localities. On the excelT HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY IS ABSOLUTELY PURE. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, SOLE AGENTS, SAVANNAH, GA. 8

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SHOBT LINE! QUICK TIME. S, F. & W. Ry. 64 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER lent farm lands of Middle Florida some wonderful results have been attained. Mr. E. W. Gamble, of Tallahassee, for instance, has, during the past spring, taken from six acres of land, to which no commercial fertilizer had been applied, 288 barrels of potatoes, for which he realized the sum of $1,728 net. Some of his last shipments sold for $9 per barrel. Interesting statistical information, touching the cost and profitableness of the production of potatoes and cabbages for shipment North, can be obtained by the curious by application to the Secretary of the Leon County Farmers’ Club, addressed at Tallahassee. There are in Florida many PLANTS FROM WHICH STARCH may be obtained, but there are three from which its preparation is the leading use. These are the Maranta Anmdenacea, or “Arrowroot of Commerce Coontie, or “ Florida Arrowroot,” and the Manihot Utilissima or Cassava. Arrowroot grows well on good land. It is not extensively grown for market, but frequently is grown and utilized for food purposes, as well as starch making. Coontie is indigenous to the southern counties, where it grows most luxuriously. On the Miami river, in Dade county, parties have been engaged in manufacturing starch from this plant for the Key West market. It is there sometimes appropriated to the uses of the table. Doubtless tillage would improve it in its useful properties, just as other plants have been thus improved and developed. Cassava. — Parties who have cultivated this plant pronounce it to be a most excellent food crop for fattening hogs ; that an acre of this crop will go further in feeding than an acre of potatoes. Like the potato, it may be propagated by cuttings of the stems. From this plant is prepared the Tapioca of commerce. Recently this plant has been utilized in the production of glucose, which it is found to yield in such quantities as to make its manufacture a leading purpose. Tobacco has been found, from the earliest settlement of Florida, to be well adapted to both the climate and soil, and has been at different periods and in different localities extensively produced. Several varieties of marked difference in character and quality are commonly cultivated. Experience has taught that Florida tobacco possesses a fineness and toughness of leaf that admirably suits it to the use of wrappers for cigars. Before the war a wide reputation was established by the planters in the county of Gadsden for the production of what was termed the “ Florida Speckled BANANAS. I am the only Importer of Red and Yellow Bananas in the State. J. B. REEDY, Savannah, Ga.

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Sugar Miils and Pans. A full Stock of all Sizes. WM. KEHOE & CO., iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 65 Leaf/’ which was pronounced the very best for wrappers grown anywhere, and commanded unusually high prices. The lands of that county were found to be peculiarly suited to its production. One thousand pounds was the average yield per acre, and several handsome fortunes were amassed by its culture. A highly flavored and fragrant article of tobacco is being extensively planted for home consumption in many portions of the State. This quite equals in the excellence of its flavor the Cuban weed ; is indeed grown from seed originally introduced from that island. What are known as shell hammocks in the county of Wakulla, in Middle Florida, and indeed in many other parts of the State, are most admirably suited to the production of this Cuba variety, and are just now attracting renewed attention for that purpose. Melons of every variety, from the classic pumpkin to the primitive gourd, abound in Florida, are of the very finest quality, and in the cantaloupe and watermelon furnish only an additional entry to the shipping list of the truckman, and are by no means one of his least profitable interests. Silk might easily be made a most profitable industry in Florida. The Mortis Multicaulis and M. Alba — both grow most luxuriantly. Cuttings of either laid horizontally in furrows, and covered in early spring, put up a vigorous sprout at every joint, and grow in ten years to be hedges of stout canes. These kept cut back, so as to stool and multiply the number of sprouts, and not allowed to grow into trees, and thus elude the reach, will the third year, and thereafter, furnish heavy crops of foliage for feeding the worms. In many places careful experiment with choice varieties of European, American and Asiatic varieties of worms have proven very satisfactory. Honey is rapidly becoming a staple product of Florida, whose climate and flora seem specially adapted to the propagation of bees. Even in the winter months, in South Florida, there are a supply of flowers quite sufficient to support the hives. This permits heavier tolls to be made on them, as less honey must be made to feed during winter. Bees work in South Florida all winter. TIMBER. Numerous inquiries have been addressed to the Commissioner from different quarters as to the supply and location of different commercial woods to be found in Florida. It is quite impossible, in the absence of authoritative data, for the writer, whose personal knowledge or facilities for obtaining information officially on this subject is most limited, to at all present the facts of the T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is distilled from the choicest qualities of Grain. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga.

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£ V & W WAY CROSS SHORT LlNfi 1 • tV M TO FLORIDA. 66 FRORIDA STATE GAZETTEER case as they fully deserve. The establishment in Florida, as in other States, of an Agricultural Bureau will in time shed light on this, one of her richest resources. Besides her boundless areas of yellow pine, whose timber is largely supplying the world’s markets, there is in Florida, perhaps, a larger supply of cypress timber than in any other section of the United States. This timber for the manufacture of staves for syrup and sugar barrels and hogsheads is unsurpassed, is being extensively sawed and shipped to the prairie States as railroad cross-ties, and is rapidly coming in demand, especially in Germany, for ship-building. It is, too, the shingle timber of the South. Untold fortunes are still standing in this timber along the numerous rivers, lakes, lagoons and swamps. The Live-oak, so durable and valuable for ship-knees, is still abundant along the coast and rivers, and of the most gigantic size. Red Cedar, of the very best quality, abounds in all the low hammock lands along the coast and rivers. The cutting of this timber has for years been a prominent industry. Large supplies are consumed by cedar mills at Cedar Keys and Tampa, where quantities of this wood is sawed to supply the pencil factories of A. W. Faber & Co. White-oak, suitable for stave timber, is to be found in very considerable quantities in many portions of the State — in the counties of Jackson, Calhoun, Gadsden, Jefferson and Wakulla, in Middle Florida. Especially in the great hammocks along St. Mark’s and Wakulla rivers, in the latter county, are to be found rich supplies of this valuable timber, ready of access from the streams. So rapid is growth that upon large plantation tracts, cultivated up to the beginning of the late war, and since then left idle, forests of white-oak have sprung up, and in the short space of 22 years attained a growth that will square from ten to twelve inches. It is a curious sight to ride through a forest of stately trees and count the old corn ridges beneath them. Red-oak is the principal timber growth over extensive areas of high hammock in the hill country of Middle Florida. This timber, while somewhat too porous and brash to be used in the manufacture of agricultural implements, answers admirably for staves for a certain class of barrels, and furnishes a most abundant supply of tan-bark, making the manufacture of leather a cheap and profitable industry in that section. Many other varieties of oak abound throughout the State. Hickory is abundant over extensive areas. The climate of Florida makes the second growth of this ordinarily slow growing "D q -j Q-j q JNTi -i T q Ufp I am the largest Dealer in this line. XVcFlbl-LLb, _1_N U.Ub ? UL. J. B. REEDY, Savannah, Ga.

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Sugar Mills, AND PANS OF ALL SIZES. MADE BY .TOXIN ROZJRKE 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH. GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY, 67 tree rapid, and inexhaustible supplies of most excellent hickory can for years be drawn from the hammocks all over Florida. The same is true of the ash in many localities. Poplar is a common growth along most of the rivers ; the supply is good. Wild Cherry and Black Walnut are not so abundant, but are very rapid growers and attain great size. Several enterprising spirits propose the planting of extensive plantations of black walnut on the shell lands along the St. Mark’s Railroad in Wakulla county. The cheapness of the lands, (Old Forbes’ Purchase,) their wonderful fertility, the rapidity with which a wood of black walnut attains marketable growth, (about 15 years,) and the absence of any cost of culture and fencing, it is thought, makes such a scheme a safe and sure investment. “Stinking Cedar,” ( Torreya Taxifolia Arnott ,) is an evergreen, belonging to the yew tribe of conifers, peculiar to Florida, and confined to a rather limited locality near Aspalaga, on the Apalachicola river. The timber is possessed of the most remarkable durability, great lightness, is soft, splits straight, can be rived as thin as card board, has elasticity, receives a high polish, and ought to be valuable for any purposes requiring these qualities in a high degree. It is said that the dead trunks of the torreya are to be found imbedded in the alluvial drift of the Apalachicola river bottom in a perfect state of preservation, (as to the heart,) and that they must, from every indication, have been exposed to the decomposing influences of earth and water for centuries. The lamp posts in the Capitol grounds in Tallahassee are made of this remarkable wood. Red Bay, ( Laurens Carolinensisyis commonly termed “ Florida mahogany.” It is very abundant throughout the hammocks and swamps of Florida. Its dark-colored, handsomely veined wood makes it valuable for cabinet work. It commands ready sale in the markets. It would be quite an endless job to enumerate the long list of Florida woods that have been and could be utilized in the arts. As yet^except in the case of pine, cypress, cedar and live-oak, very little has been done in manufacturing timber from the many valuable trees in the State. Vast forests of most valuable wood have been felled and burned. As transportation facilities are increased and manufacturing developed, more attention will be directed to the sawing of hard woods. as applied in Florida, embraces so many purposes, methods, and degrees of profitable success, that it is quite difficult, in the limits JTVHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is soft and mellow to the taste. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAYANNAH, GA. STOCK RAISING.

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FAST MAIL TRAINS THROUGH WITH RUT FEW STOPPING POINTS. 68 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER of a publication of this character to discuss it intelligibly to one totally unfamiliar with it, Along the coast, in all the counties east of Escambia, are to be found larger or smaller herds of cattle. These run at large through the pine woods, swamps or salt marshes, and thrive on the coarse pasturage in a manner quite profitable and satisfactory to their owners, who “ round up” once a year, mark and brand the new calves and give little other attention. So little expense attends this sort of stock-raising that notwithstanding the paultry character of the scrubs produced, they prove valuable. Indeed, the hide and tallow in a five-year-old steer would return a good profit on the cost of his keep. These cattle are small, with thick heavy necks and foreparts and narrow loins, but when fat will clean, at four years old, about 500 to 600 pounds, which finds ready sale among Floridians at from 6 to 10 cents per pound. There are stock-men in all the coast counties west of the Suwannee, however, who realize very handsome results from the sale of these cattle. It is doubtful whether the rough pasturage they rely upon will admit of a very marked improvement in these cattle, even if crossed with improved breed. In the northern counties of Middle Florida, on the red lands, where many varieties of excellent pasture grasses abound, and where stock are kept under fence, a very different tone of things exists. Thoroughbreds of the Durham, Devon, Jersey, Ayreshire, Hereford, ahd Alderney breeds, have for some years been introduced and liberally used, until a large percentage of the cattle in that section are grades of one or the other of these bloods. The Bermuda grass pasturages of these counties are naturally of a very fine quality, and of recent years are receiving a degree of attention tending very greatly to their rapid improvement. Stockraising of all kinds is being fostered by the farmers as most profitable adjuncts to their farming operations, not only in the growing of manures, but the ready sale at good prices, of the dairy products and increase. Near the towns of Madison, Monticello and Tallahassee are to be found several herds of thoroughbreds that do credit to their owners, and are fast winning a reputation for these places for excellent dairy products. Butter exhibited at the annual exhibition of the Middle Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Association, compares most favorably with the production of any dairy districts. This is a rapidly growing industry in these localities, and bids fair to take a prominent place. In South Florida cattle raising is a leading industry. More capital has been employed in it than in the tillage of the soil, until within the last few years. That this investment pays well has this practical proof : More Confectioners’ Supplies. J. B. REEDY, Grocer, and Importer of Fruit, Savannah, Gi..

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Sugar Mills and Pans. Our Mills run perfectly true. WM. KEHOE & CO. Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 69 money has been made at that business than in any other, until quite recently, and a number have thus grown wealthy. The cattle are not so large as those grown in Texas. First, because the native grass of that part of Florida is less nutritious than that of Texas, and further, far less attention has been given here to improve the native breeds of stock. The buyers in the Cuban markets, to which shipments are made, are said to prefer the Florida to the Texas beef. If the South Florida grass be not so nutritious, it seems to impart a more agreeable flavor to the flesh. As cattle-raising has been a paying enterprise in the past history of the State, so it is likely to be still, in some places, for years to come. Gradually, however, it will be forced to retire before the tread of a population too dense to leave it, as at present, the whole land surface for pasturage. These cattle-men have a large experience of their observing powers through what they see and what they hear, and the thinking each one does for himself. They are really better informed frequently than some who know far more than they about books. These men will see the trend of things, and will be ready to change their investments as soon as it will be best for them and best for the country. As the inquiring immigrant must needs pass through the country, the better to see if it be suited to the supply of his wants, and as a thinly-settled country is, for that reason, less inviting to the traveler, it may be pertinent for his encouragement to mention one prominent feature in this population of the Southern counties. I mean the cordial hospitality which is met at their hearthstones. As in nature they are the same with other men, we suppose ready hospitality must result from their employments and surroundings. They need frequently the help of one another, in herding their stock ; then in the woods, and at the table of some one of their number, most of the men of a pretty wide circle frequently take their meals together. They are thus put in sympathy one with another. Another characteristic of the section is to add but little to their bill of fare because of the company. The dishes ordinarily provided for the family are set before the guests. And as it costs less trouble, so he is the more heartily welcome than in many places where there is more preparation and more pretension in the reception given. From whatever source this trait of character may have originated, it is now the habit of the people, and will sometimes cheer the traveler as he journeys through a strange land. Sheep have been found to do well in Florida wherever they have been given a fair trial. In many portions of the State where the land is very thin and sandy, the vegetation is correspondingly fllHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY possesses an excellent bouquet. A S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.

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S., F. & W. Ry. Elegant Passenger Equipments ; Westinghouse Air Brakes; Miller Platforms; Janey Couplers. 70 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER sparce and coarse, and while sheep will live on it and increase at a fair rate, they, of course, under such circumstances produce an inferior quality of both wool and mutton, and tend very much to become bare of wool on the legs and bellies, but their continued presence has been found to gradually overcome these very drawbacks ; and under their grazing, pine woods, originally very scant of vegetation, have in a few years become enriched ; new characters of weeds and grass have sprung up, and sheep and new crops prove of mutual benefit to one another. In some other portions of the State, especially in the counties west of the Apalachicola river, the rolling pine woods furnish pasturage of a much better character, and sheep have been found to do proportionately well. There are to be found in that part of the State some very fair flocks, and the profits therefrom, when compared with the cost of their keep, show a net perhaps beyond what is realized by breeders of a higher class with more expensive surroundings. Sheep, like goats, feed upon a greater variety of plants than cattle, and are susceptible of profitable handling on pastures that would not support a herd. On the red lands of the middle and northern portions of the State sheep have always proven profitable. Heretofore the extensive culture of cotton and other agricultural crops has rather tended to keep all available lands in cultivation, but as the supply and quality of colored labor has decreased in that section, many broad acres have been turned out. On these old plantations the Bermuda grass, having no longer the plow and hoe to contend with, has asserted itself and extensive pasturages of this nutritious crop now invite the introduction of flocks. In the southernmost counties of the State sheep husbandry is rapidly increasing, and is thought to be more profitable than cattle. Hogs can be raised as cheaply and of as fine quality as anywhere. In ante-bellum times all planters in Middle Florida were large producers of bacon. The difficulty of protecting them from theft in that region since the “ old plantation smoke-houses” ceased to be a certain source of supply, has done much to limit the business. Yet many small farmers in all the northern counties have introduced Berkshire, Poland China, Essex, and Chester White breeds, and besides their entire home supply have a surplus of bacon, hams, and lard to dispose of at good prices. In many other portions of the State this character of stock is allowed to run at large ; they gain a living in the woods, and in one and two years grow large enough to kill, having cost their owners nothing. APPLES. I make a specialty of Fancy Apples. J. B. REEDY, Grocer, and Importer of Fruit, Savannah, Ga.

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T ] AGRICULTURAL IRON AND BRASS WORKS, fJOlill lXOIIi JtC, 2 BAY STREET, SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 7 1 Horses in some parts of the State are being bred profitably, and of a most excellent quality. The “ cow ponies” in use among the cattle-men of the South are a breed as peculiar to Florida as is the Mustang to Texas. They are admirably suited to the uses made of them. In Madison, Jefferson, Marion, Alachua, Leon, Gadsden and Jackson counties, some thoroughbred stallions have for some years been made use of, and many very stylish youngsters are to be found in the stables of breeders in those localities. The presence of nutritious grasses in those counties, together with the firm, smooth roadways, gives advantage and attraction to the raising of horses and mules that is wanting elsewhere. FISH. The great variety and excellence of the fish in Florida is not one of the least attractions, whether to the sportsman or more practical housewife. The lakes and streams of the fresh waters abound in fish of the finest quality, prominent among which are the black bass, pike, jack, bream, and many varieties of the perch family. Along the coast the list of varieties is longer than the fishermen’s list of names for them. Red snapper, black snapper or grouper, sheephead, red-fish, black-fish, pompano, Spanish mackerel, rock-fish, mullet, and a long list of small “ pan-fish” are chief among the marketable varieties. The pompano is regarded as the choice among epicures. The snapper and grouper are both deep water fish, and are taken in great numbers by smacks on the banks off shore for the Havana, New Orleans and Galveston markets. They can be kept for weeks in the “ wells” of the fishing smacks without injury to them. On both the Atlantic and Gulf coasts there are extensive fisheries, where, in the season of the “ run,” mullet are taken in vast numbers on the seine-yards. Some of the strikes made by the fortunate seine-masters number hundreds of barrels. These fish take salt quite as well as the mackerel of the northern waters, and furnish an abundant supply of cheap and wholesome food to the inhabitants. Along the Gulf coast west of the Suwannee, and especially on the coast line of Wakulla and Liberty counties, the revenue derived from this industry is considerable. The proximity to those points to the southern counties of Alabama and Georgia enables the small farmers of those sections to reach the Florida coast in their farm wagons. About the first of October, when the “ run” of the fish commences, the Georgia and Alabama farmer takes his wife and children in his wagon and journeys southward. A week of recreation is spent, after the year’s work, on the beach, rflHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is soft and mellow to the taste, S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA. 9

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S., F. & W. Ry, PULLMAN SLEEPING CAR SERVICE between ALL IMPORTANT POINTS. 72 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER where these “ up-country folk enjoy the salt air and water, and return home with several barrels of pickled fish to be eaten during the winter. Last fall it was estimated that more than three hundred Georgia wagons passed through Tallahassee alone, on their way to the fisheries. How many fisheries there are on the whole coast we are not advised, nor what quantities of fish are shipped to points beyond the State, but assuredly it is a growing and paying industry. Perhaps no waters abound in fish in greater quantity or of better quality than the waters of the coast of Florida, there was shipped from Cedar Keys in 1880, 1,701,000 pounds of barreled fish, of the value of $68,000, according to the authority of Col. W. H. Sebring, of Levy county. The Key West Democrat of April 1st, 1882, states that about one dozen schooners of Key West, aggregating 750 tons, were then engaged in the taking of fish for the Havana market. Recently the catch of several fisheries along the coast have been utilized in the manufacture of a fish fertilizer, which is taking a high place among the farmers and promises to develop into an extensive industry. Green Turtle may be mentioned as another commodity of the Florida coast. In Key West the beef and turtle markets adjoin. They are both supplied with about equal regularity, and very many prefer the turtle to the beef, particularly after the latter has been submitted to the hardships of a voyage from the mainland. Turtle are shipped alive to the Northern markets from Key West, and sometimes car loads of them pass over the Florida Transit and West India Railroad to Cedar Keys on their way North. One of the sports of persons living near the coast is walking the beach in April and May, watching for and ‘‘turning” the turtle that crawl out upon the shore in that season to lay. When they find the turtle making her nest or laying her eggs a sufficient number of persons lay hold and turn her upon her back. She is then helpless, unable to re-turn herself, so as to have the use of her feet. Parties are thus supplied with both the turtle and the eggs, and both are prized as savory food. Oysters are so continuous around the coast, that when our railroad and canal system shall have been completed, a supply, at short notice, will reach any part of the interior of the State in a few hours, at the expense of gathering and short freightage. Cedar Keys has already commenced their shipment, and for all the distance that ice can make them safe freightage, fresh, canned, and in the shell, this commerce is liktdy to extend. The supply seems inexhaustible. Sponge. — The gathering of sponge along the Gulf coast is rapidly becoming an industry of considerable dimensions. The prinA WTTnry t J. b reedy is the only importer U 1 JN SAVANNAH, GEA

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Sugar Mills and Pans. Our Leading Specialty. WM. KEHOE & CO., Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 73 cipal sponge reefs lie to the southeastward of the port of St. Mark’s, between that point and Cedar Keys. It has been quite impossible to ascertain definitely the number of vessels engaged in this business, or the value of the aggregated catch. The Key West Democrat of April 1st, 1882, gives the number of vessels from that port alone engaged in taking sponge at 150, and the value of the sponge shipped from that point during the past year as amounting to $250,000. Since Cedar Keys, St. Mark’s, Rio Carabelle and Apalachicola are also extensively engaged in this business, it will be fair to estimate the number of additional craft on the reef at thribble the above number, and the value of the whole amount of sponge taken in the year at a little short, if any, of $750,000. Spongers report the growth of these fish on the reef to be increasing, and there is reason to expect the business to develop much greater proportions. As elsewhere in the South, Florida has heretofore given but a limited attention to the manufacturing of her raw materials. Capital, prior to the war, was confined chiefly to investments in lands, slaves, stock and agricultural interest. More recently the gradual influx of money, skill and experience from the North and West have begun to recognize the many natural advantages accruing to investments in manufacturing. The result of such experiments have been most satisfactory. Judging, among other evidences, from the great amount of earnest inquiry being made at present from ontside sources, through the medium of this bureau, of the inducements offering for the investment of money in manufacturing, we are induced to regard the establishment, in the very near future, of many manufactories in different points in Florida as well assured. Much difficulty has attended the acquisition of reliable and definite data on the subject of the interests of this character in the State. There are two mills in the State where short cotton is being spun. One in Tallahassee, employing 33 hands and consuming about 360 bales of cotton per annum, and turning out weekly about 3,000 pounds of yarn, which is shipped to the Philadelphia market. Steam is used for driving the machinery. Another at Mount Pleasant, in the county of Gadsden, where the “ Clement Attachment” is used. By the use of this machine the cotton is taken “ in the seed,” or as it comes from the fields before being ginned, and converted directly into yarns. This mill has invested in machinery about $6,000 — in building and mill site, about T he celebrated thistle dew whiskey is absolutely pure. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, SOLE agents, savannah, ga. MANUFACTURING.

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S P £r W 1P V TlieFreferredMout^ -C Co VV ixy. ^ TO> FLORIDA.^ 74 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER $2,000. About 230,000 pounds of seed cotton per annum is here converted into yarns. The “Clement Attachment” can only be used for short staple cotton. One of the claims for this attachment is that it cuts the fibre less and makes a stronger thread than the old process. Neither of these factories convert the fibre into cloth, finding it more profitable to prepare yarns for Northern mills. The Gadsden county mill is driven by water power. Both companies consider their investment profitable. As at a number of points in Florida, there is water power which may be utilized, and will be, because cheaper than steam, and as a large part of the cotton crop of Florida is the long staple of the Sea Island variety, which, for the most part, is converted into thread, we shall probably soon have factories in Florida for its manufacture. In the city of Jacksonville there is established a company engaged in manufacturing brushes, mattresses, mats and other household articles from the fibre of the cabbage palmetto, which abounds over so large a part of the State. There is also in the city of Fernandina a company engaged in the manufacture of paper from parts of the leaf of the same plant. The manufacture of cigars has already become quite extensive. In the City of Key West alone there are eighty-one factories, turning out during the year 1881, 26,732,460 cigars and consum T ing 700,945 pounds of tobacco. The internal revenue tax upon these products for the year was $189,056. There are also many cigar factories in Jacksonville and other points inland. One factory has recently, been established in Tallahassee, and is now engaged in filling extensive orders for Chicago houses. Wherever along the lines of railroad occur extensive pine forest there are distilleries for the manufacture of spirits of turpentine. This is a very extensive and profitable industry, employing many hands, and adding largely to the freightage of the transportation lines. It so happens that the marsh pines, which grow on low, flat places, have more sap and larger taps, and produce a more abundant yield of crude turpentine. The price of turpentine, pitch, tar and rosin is steadily advancing, and the number of distilleries increasing. The Collector’s office, at Customhouse in Fernandina, reports as shipments of these products from that port for 1881: Shipments of rosin, 27,363 pounds, and of turpentine, 275,540 barrels. miTp ONLY EXCLUSIVE FRUIT HOUSE T jy V AXlJCj IN SAVANNAH. GA., IS M3. MX Hi JPj JL

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Ini j • J GlYi2N ON ALL KlttDS OF MACHINERY AND REPAIRS, JliSIllllcll)0S by JOHN HOUHKE, 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 75 Lime is made generally in Florida for home consumption. Along the coast extensive shell banks occur, where the burning of lime is a matter of but small cost. Several companies are engaged at different places in its manufacture for shipment with profitable results. At such places in the State as investigation shall show the fossil lime stone to be richest in phosphoric properties, there will undoubtedly, at no distant day, be established mills suitable for grinding and putting the products of these rocks on the market for fertilizers. In Middle Florida, and where else the red-oaktree abounds, the bark is abundant and cheap, and tanneries of some dimensions exist, from which excellent leather, in considerable quantities, is produced. The leading manufactured product in Florida, and the only branch of that industry of really imposing proportions, is SAWED YELLOW PINE from extensive saw-mills. There are said, in official reports, to be more than 6,000,000,000 of feet of timber standing in Florida that can be converted into lumber. As the country is settled up, and the lands cleared, a great deal of this timber must be thus utilized immediately or lost. Experimental test has already determined the timber from Florida to be the best upon the market, and the mills and shipments are increasing by a heavy percentage. Even Mexico and Central America are being supplied with cross-ties for their railroads from Florida pine. The shipments of lumber from Jacksonville are stated to be forty per cent, greater during the present year than for the same period during last year. We have been utterly unable, after every effort, to obtain statistics of the amount of lumber handled at all the shipping points in the State, but suppose the average increase throughout the State to be quite as great as at Jacksonville. By far the most important timber depot in Florida is the superb harbor of Pensacola. Here are to be found, at all seasons of the year, fleets of foreign shipping awaiting cargoes from the many mammoth mills along the waters tributary to that port. By far the greatest portion of timber sent to other countries from Florida is loaded at Pensacola. The completion of the line of the Pensacola and Atlantic Railroad from this great harbor to the Chattahoochee River, in Jackson county, adds extensively to Pensacola’s lumber supply. The great forest of pine, through which the new road T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY possesses an excellent bouquet. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.

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j6 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER extends for 160 miles east of Pensacola, is, perhaps, the finest section of timber standing in the Southern States. Its inaccessibility heretofore has protected it from the inroads of the lumbermen. Along this great artery will flow, in 1884, a stream of freightage for foreign bottoms at Pensacola that will swell her shipping list to gigantic proportions. No section of the South is now offering more attractive fields to the lumbermen for investment. With Pensacola at the western terminus of this line of the Pensacola and Atlantic Railroad, and through connection at Chattahoochee to Jacksonville and Fernandina over the Florida Central and Western Railroad system of Sir Edward Reed, together with cheap water transportation up the Chattahoochee and Flint rivers to points in Alabama and Georgia, and down the Apalachicola by raft or barge to deep water and foreign shipping at Apalachicola and Rio Carrabelle, it is difficult to estimate the extensive advantages to be enjoyed in that section by the mill men. As to the quality of the lumber from Florida, we extract a quotation made by Commissioner Adams in his pamphlet of 1873, from the New York Mercantile Journal: “Yellow pine flooring and step plank from Florida are in fair demand at $30 per thousand feet, while inferior lumber, made in North and South Carolina, moves slowly at from $23 to $25 per thousand. The yellow pine, so-called, growing in the Carolinas, is objectionable for many reasons. In the first place the tree is of a different and less enduring species, and has a greater propertion of sap-wood and black-knot ; and in the second place it is from those trees from which the manufacturers of pitch and turpentine get their material, thus depriving them of the ingredient upon which the durability and peculiar excellence of this kind of wood depends. Owners should always require in their specifications that the yellow pine to be used in first-class buildings should be of the growth of Florida.” The quality of the Florida pine explains the demand for the lumber made of it. A statement, purporting to be from official sources at Washington, puts the amount of merchantable timber standing in the forests of Florida at a little over 6, 000,000,000 feet, board measure; Alabama, 21,000,000,000; Mississippi, 22,000,000,000, and Texas at 66,000,000,000. Whatever may be the truth of this conjecture as to the other States mentioned, it is, as we think, much too low an estimate for Florida. In an estimate recently published by the Census Bureau, the area of Florida is 58,680 square miles, or 37,555,200 acres. It is certainly a low estimate J T> T> T7 SAVANNAH, G-A handles more FLORIDA ORANGES • J3. THAN ANY HOUSE SOUTH. TRY HIM.

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Sugar Mills and Pans. We Guarantee our Prices. WM. KEHOE k CO., Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front pasier.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 77 tosay that one-third of this area is covered with forest, which, if true, would amount to 12 518,400 acres in timber. At a rate of 1,000 feet of lumber per acre, and sometimes a single tree will make more, the sum would be 12 518 400,000 feet — about double the estimate going the rounds of the papers. As good pine and other timber are large items in the world’s industries, Florida should not permit herself to be underestimated in this item of her wealth. The timber cut for the census year ending May 31 st, 1881 amounted to 208 054,000 feet — a little over 3 per cent, of the sum accredited to Florida in the estimate referred to. At this rate, in about 30 years, Florida would be cleared of her timber, but putting the true amount, as we suppose it to be, and it will supply the market at double the percentage for 30 years and more. This would be true even if there was no natural increase, but it is a fact familiar to lumbermen in Florida that less than 30 years is necessary to restore to land once cut over a new supply of mill stocks. Indeed, it has been authoritatively asserted by parties familiar with the premises that in the country tributary to Pensacola, even with her immense mill capacity, the timber grows faster than it can be cut off. We append statistics of lumber shipments from the ports of Pensacola, Fernandina, Jacksonville and Cedar Keys for the terms designated in each case. Pensacola, for year ending October 31 st, 1 88 1 : DESTINATION. Vessels. Tonnage. Hewn Timber, Cubic Feet. Sawn Timber, Cubic Feet. Lumber, Sup 1 ] Feet. Great Britain 246 195,920 3,669,703 5,773,185 15,109,000 Continent of Europe 97 55,336 878,844 756,888 17,078,000 Java, Africa and Canaries. 6 4,592 5,565 193,595 395.000 W. Indies, S. America, &c. 85 33,083 39,908 19,342 21,663,000 Coastwise 130 50,251 29,366 34,073,000 Total 564 339,191 1 4.623,386 6,743,010 88,318,000 Fernandina, during year 1881 shipped 40 424,000 superficial feet, and for the first four month s of 1882 : Coastwise. Foreign. Totol. January 2.954,000 1,414,000 4,368,000 February 1.972,000 2,310,000 4,282,000 March 3,585,000 1,753,000 5,338,000 April 4,526.000 251,000 4,777 000 Total 13,037,000 5,728,000 18,765,000 T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is distilled from the choicest qualities of Grain. S, GIJCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga.

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FREIGHT IN THROUGH CARS, IN FAST TRAINS, WITHOUT TRANSFER. 78 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Jacksonville, for year ending June 30, 1881, shipped 46,666,000 superficial feet, and from same port for ten months succeeding, 46.034,908 feet. Cedar Keys, for year 1881, shipped 30,000,000 feet. Besides innumerable springs of ordinary character and dimensions, sources of creek and streams, as in other countries, Florida possesses a feature in spring formation as novel in character as they are surpassingly beautiful in appearance. The bursting of great rivers at one bound from the earth is the remarkable feature of some of Florida’s fountains. Beneath the surface of limestone formation underlying the State numerous rivers course towards the sea. In many places no evidence of them are observable until they rise to the surface through great caverns or fissures in the limestone, often of wonderful depths. Most prominent among these is Silver Springs in Marion county, and the famous Wakulla Springs in the county of that name, fourteen miles south of Tallahassee. Thousands of visitors have seen the silver Spring, upon which steamboats enter. The Wakulla, being in a section heretofore less resorted to by winter visitors to Florida, is not so familiarly known. Both deserve descriptions our space will not admit of. Their great size, depth and transparency are their most striking features. Lying on the bottom of Wakulla Spring, j8o feet (so reported from actual measurement), below the surface, a dime piece can be as distinctly seen as through the atmosphere. Indeed, an object is even more plainly discernable than at the same distance through the air, as the boil of the water gives them the conformation of a lense, and thus they acquire magnifying properties. Certainly no natural object can be more beautiful than the appearance of this great fountain, on a clear day, when no wind disturbs the face of its waters. The Blue Springs of Volusia county, in South Florida, a little way east from St. Johns river, is thus described by a writer, in the Florida of January, 1882: “ There is a basin 70 feet in diameter and about 40 feet in depth. A huge bowl, from the centre of which a column of bluetinted water passes upward with such force that the centre of the surface is convex to the extent of perhaps ten inches, and it is impossible to put or keep a boat on this summit, such is the force of the hydraultic pressure upward and latterally. This stream, which this gigantic spring feeds, is about 50 feet wide, and an SPRINGS. Florida Oranges Consign your Oranges to J. B. REEDY, the largest Dealer in FRUIT in Georgia at SAYANNAH.

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ci M'll AND PANS OP ALL SIZES. MADE BY JOHN FHlgill ROURKE, 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 79 average depth of io feet, with a current of about five miles an hour. The scenery about this locality is beautiful and picturesque in the the extreme, and worth a long journey to see.” There are many such springs to be found in different parts of Florida. They are all subterranean rivers up to the points where they break forth. They all obtain lime enough to precipitate any sediment or discoloring matter, leaving the water perfectly clear. Fish of many sorts and sizes are seen gamboling in their sports or gliding about through the waters seeking their food. The ripples on the surface refract the rays of the sun, when at the prober angle, and give the varied colors of the rainbow, and lend a sort of enchantment to the view. There are also mineral springs in several parts of the State, whose waters, as tested in a large number of instances, have curative proprieties, and are the resort of invalids. Of this class are the Newport Springs of Taylor, the White Sulphur Springs of Hamilton, the Suwannee Springs of Suwannee, and the Green Cove Springs of Clay. Persons afflicted with rheumatism, dyspepsia and diseases of the liver have met with very remarkable cures from drinking and bathing in the waters of these springs. In the midst of the rich palm-grown forest surrounding the Wakulla Spring a prominent Cincinnati physician has recently purchased and is erecting a sanitarium for winter patients. LANDS. In an official publication from the Census Bureau, setting forth the area of the States and Territories, the gross area of the State of Florida is put down at 58,680 square miles. Coast waters, bays, gulfs and sounds, 1,800 square miles; rivers and smaller streams, 390 square miles; lakes and ponds, 2,250 square miles; whole water surface is 4,440 square miles, leaving of land surface 54,240 square miles, or 34,713,600 acres. In the report of the Commissioner of Lands and Immigration of the State of Florida, of January 1st, 1875, the amount of private land claims confirmed by the United States is stated to be 3,784,303, leaving as the amount of lands in the territory not disposed of to private parties at the time of the cession, 30,929,297. By act of Congress of March 23, 1823, an entire township in each of the districts of East and West Florida, to be selected by the Secretary of the Treasury, were “reserved for the use of a seminary of learning.” By act of May 24, 1824, a quarter section of land was given for the Seat of Government. T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is distilled from the choicest qualities of Grain. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga. IQ

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SHOBT LINE! QUICK TIME. S., F. & W. Ry. 80 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER By act of 3d of March, 1845, Florida was admitted as a State into the Union; and by the same act eight sections of land were given to the State for the purpose of “fixing the State Government.” Also the sixteenth section of every township, or its equivalent, “for the use of the inhabitants of such township for public schools.” Also two entire townships, in addition to the two already reserved, for two seminaries of learning, one east, the other west, of the Suwannee river, and five per cent, of the net proceeds of the sale of public lands for the purposes of education. Also by an act of the same date, 3d of March, 1845, 500,000 acres were given for purposes of internal improvement. By an act of 28th of September, 1850, “all the swamp lands and lands subject to overflow were given to the State.” By an act of July 2d, 1862, the several States were granted for colleges of agriculture and the mechanic arts, 30,000 acres for each Senator and Representative that the said States were respectively entitled to under the census of i860. The Commissioner of Lands and Immigration of Florida, in his report of January, 1881, thus states the whole amount of the swamp lands and lands subject to overflow, selected and patented to the State, to be: Total patents received 14,442,464 acres Quantity disposed of by the State up to time of report 1,684,725 acres Leaving at that time on hand 12,757,739 acres On the first day of June, 1881, the State Board of Internal Im provement effected a sale to Hamilton Disston, of Philadelphia, 4,000,000 acres of swamp and overflowed lands for the sum of $1,000,000, thus enabling the board to relieve these lands of liens, with which they had heretofore been embarrassed, and to stop an annual accruing interest of nearly $50,000. One-half of this 4,000,000 purchase was subsequently sold by the vendee to Sir Edward Reed, acting in the interest of British and Dutch capitalists. These large landholders are busily engaged in arranging railroads and canals for making their lands accessible and for increasing their value. The sale of these State lands from the first of January, 1881, to May 1st, 1881, beside the sale to Disston, as shown by the books of the Commissioner of Lands, amount to 296,574 acres. This number of acres, and the 4,000,000 to Disston, subtracted from the 12,759,735 acres leaves 8,461,160 acres of the “swamp and overflowed” lands still belonging to the State at that date. The location of these State lands, as their name suggests, are confined to comparatively low sections of the State. Candy, Crackers, etc, sr Send (or PriceList LLK. 7,

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Sugar Mills and Pans. Our Pans are Smooth and Uniform in Thickness. WM. KEIIOE & CO., Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 8l They are largely confined to the southern portion of the peninsula, but are to be found in small bodies scattered in almost every township in Florida. By an act of the State Legislature of January 6, 1855, the 500,000 acres of land granted to the State by act of Congress of March 3d, 1845, then remaining unsold, also the swamp lands and lands subject to overflow, granted to the State by act of Congress of the 28th of September, 1850, were set apart as an internal improvement fund, and vested in the Governor of the State, the Comptroller of Public Accounts, the State Treasurer, the Attorney-General, and Register of State Lands, and their successors in office, as trustees of said fund. Under this act of the 6th of January, 1855, for “giving encouragement and aid for the building of railroads,” the Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund were authorized to endorse the bonds of railroad companies of certain prescribed lines upon certain prescribed conditions, to the extent of $10,000 per mile; for the sum of $8,000 per mile, (when the grading was completed and the cross-ties put down for twenty miles,) for the purchase of iron, spikes, &c., and when the iron rails were put down, then for the additional sum of $2,000 per mile for the purchase of necessary equipments. And after the first twenty miles shall be completed, then for every ten miles there shall be a like endorsement. Under this Internal Improvement Act the bonds so issued and endorsed weie a lienor mortgage upon the road bed, equipments, workshops and franchises for the payment of said bonds, as against said railroad companies, and was a lien upon the Internal Improvement Fund only for the annually accruing interest upon said bonds. Upon the failure (as subsequently occurred) of the said several railroad companies to pay the accruing interest upon the said bonds semi-annually, and one per cent, upon them for a sinking fund, the Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund were authorized, after thirty days from said default, to take possession of the road of such defaulting company, to sell the same and apply the proceeds to the purchasing and cancelling of the bonds of the said defaulting company. A number of the railroad companies which took the benefit of the Internal Improvement Act, and issued bonds with the endorsement of the said Trustees, failed to make their stipulated payments of interest and one per cent, for a sinking fund. Under the provision of the statute in such cases, the road was sold, but for prices not sufficient to pay the outstanding bonds of these several roads. The Commissioner of Lands, in his report of mHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY possesses an excellent bouquet. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.

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Q P ArW l?v WAY-CROSS SHORT LINE 1 “ n 1I J • TO FXjORIIDA.. 82 FRORIDA STATE GAZETTEER January I, 1881, says: As well as can be ascertained the outstanding bonds of said companies are as follows : Bonds of Pensacola and Georgia R. R. Co Bonds of Tallahassee R. R Co 52.900 Bonds of Florida R. R. Co 228,000 Bonds of F. A. and Gulf Central R. R. Co 31,000 Total $699,600 The annually accruing interest on this amount is about $48,980. The whole amount of indebtedness which has already accrued against the Internal Improvement Fund for interest, as aforesaid, is not less than $600,000. As before stated, this amount of indebtedness for accrued interest is a lien upon the lands of the Internal Improvement Fund, but both the bonds and the interest must be paid before these lands will be relieved of embarrassment, for while the bonds are outstanding the interest will continue to accrue. On the first day of June, 1881, the State Board of Internal Improvement effected a sale to Hamilton Disston, of Philadelphia, of 4,000,000 of acres of swamp and overflowed lands for the sum of $1,000,000, thus enabling the board, in whole or in part, to relieve these lands of the lien with which they had been embarrassed, and to stop the annnally accruing interest of nearly $50,000. There is another fund which will come into the hands of the said trustees, which can be applied to the payment of these bonds and interest, if the receipts from the Disston purchase should not be sufficient. On the sale of the railroad from Lake City to Quincv, and its branches, the purchasers failed in payment of part of the purchase money to the amount of $463, 175, and there is interest on this sum from the 20th of March, 1869, at 8 per cent, per annum, which interest up to the 20th of March, 1882, together with the principal, makes the sum of $944,877. Under a decree of the 31st of May, 1879, f Justice Bradley, of the Circuit Court of the United States, before whom the question was brought, the Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund have a first lien for this unpaid purchase money, upon this road from Lake City to Quincy, and from Tallahassee to St. Mark’s, and branch to Monticello, and if the money is not paid by or some time during the month of July, 1882, the United States Marshal is required to sell said road for the payment of said purchase for the satisfaction of said lien. It appears from the books of the Commissioner of State Lands that the sale of the swamp and overflowed lands from the first When going home, stop in and order a box of the choicest FLORIDA ORANGES, at J. B. REEDY, Savannah, Ga.

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Saw Mill Work OF ALL KINDS FURNISHED BY JOJtti ROURKE, 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 83 day of January, 1881, to the first day of May, 1882, to other purchasers than Disston, amount to 296,574 acres. This added to the 4,000,000 sold to Disston makes 4,296,574 acres, which amount taken from the 12,759,729 acres heretofore shown as belonging to the State January 1st, 1881, leaves 8,461,165 acres of the swamp and overflowed lands on May 1st, 1882. There are in Florida other swamp and overflowed lands, not selected and patented to the State, but under the act of Congress have vested in the State Government. The probable amount of these, it is estimated, will be about 2,000,000 acres. Of the 500,000 acres granted to the State March 3, 1845, by Congress for Internal Improvements, about 183,000 acres remain unsold and subject to entry in the State Land Office. Besides the right of way and the alternate sections within a six-mile limit that have been granted to railroad companies by the Legislature of the State, and withdrawn from market by the Board of Internal Improvement as the several roads have com plied with the conditions of their charters, there is a further bonus granted of other land per mile of finished road. The names of the railroad companies, the length of their proposed roads, and the number of acres to be given additionally to the alternate sections within a six-mile limit are as follows : Name of Corporation. Orange Ridge and DeLand Railroad. ... Florida Southern Railroad and Branches Jacksonville, Tampa and Key West Railroad Palatka and Indian River Railroad Tropical Peninsula Railroad Silver Spring and Ocala Railroad Pensacola and Atlantic Railroad Florida Midland and Georgia Total Length of Road. 28 miles 370 miles 380 miles 75 miles 160 miles 40 miles 160 miles 50 miles 1,263 miles Total. 140.000 3.700.000 3.800.000 450.000 1.600.000 400.000 3,200,000 300.000 13.590,000 No. of Acres Per Mile. 5.000 10,000 10,000 6.000 10,000 10,000 20,000 600 In some of the above roads the distance is not stated in the charters granted by the Legislature, or in the articles of association filed under the general act of incorporation, but in those instances the distance is under rather than overstated as above. The fact that the amount of the lands will be exhausted before all these premiums can be met will probably be a stimulus to industry in building, and, in the meantime, these lands are not pledged in such way as to prevent sales by the State to persons applying the purchase or homestead the same. In the act of Congress granting swamp and overflowed lands to the several States of the Union in which they lie, it is stated that mHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is soft and mellow to the taste. -1S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.

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S, F. & w. Ry. Elegant Passenger Equipmehts; WestinglioitSd Air Brakes; Miller Platforms; Janey Couplers. 84 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER as much of them as may be necessary for draining and reclaiming them, is to be appropriated for that purpose. To carry out this express purpose of the grant, the Internal Improvement Board have contracted to give to the Atlantic and Gulf Coast Canal and Okeechobee Land Company, one-half the lands they reclaim in the section of the State lying south of township 26 in the several ranges, and east of Peace Creek. Of the four townships granted j by Congress for the uses of the East and West Florida Seminaj ries there remains to be sold about 34,000 acres, as shown by the | theVecords of the Land Commissioner. There have been funded of the original grant $98,000, the interest arising from which is j for the use of the said seminaries. The lands granted by Congress to the several States by the act of July 2, 1862, for the establishment of colleges of agriculture, have been disposed of in Florida, and the proceeds funded amounting to $125,600. By supplementary act of Congress of the 3d of March, 1845, every sixteenth section of land in each township, or its equivalent, is given to the State for the use of PUBLIC SCHOOLS. Taking the land surface of the State, as stated on a previous page, at 54,240 square miles, and adding the water surface of rivers and small streams, 390,000 square miles, and the surface of inland lakes and ponds, 2,250 square miles, we have 56,880 square miles, or 36,403,200 acres, from which take the sum of private land claims existing at the time of the cession to the United States, and since recognized, amounting to 3,784,600, and we have left 32,618,600 acres, one thirty-sixth part of which, amounting to 906,072 acres, accrues to the benefit of public schools. But since the United States are allowing equivalents in other lands where a part or the whole of a 16th section is at the bottom of rivers or under the sea, the question whether a liberal construction of the law giving equivalents for deficient or missing 16th sections would not apply to lands to which parties had already acquired title before the cession to the United States may arise, as in the “ Forbes’ Purchase” for instance. Thus far there has been no occasion which has brought this question before the proper department at Washington, nor before the courts; but since the question involves more than 100,000 acres of land for schools, a subject for which all in authority are now disposed to be liberal, the writer thinks it worthy of consideration. The Land Commissioner estimates the amount of school land When you want Strictly Choice Fruit, at bottom prices, send your orders to J. B. REEDY, Savannah, Ga.

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Qllrfar Millo Q n ri Dane ^ our Mills are fully warranted. WM. KEHOE & CO., OUgdI iYllllo allU I alio, Iron Pounders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 85 yet unsold at 570,000 acres — the amount of these for each county can be found under that head in the description of each county. It is proper to remark that the above amount includes no allowance for such 16th sections as lie in unsurveyed territory, r.or for lands selected as equivalents for deficient 16th sections. Of the school lands already sold, and the proceeds funded, the proceeds amount to $248,900, only the interest of which can be distributed among the counties. HOW TO PROCURE LAND IN FLORIDA. United States lands still vacant in Florida are subject to entry by land warrants, by purchase, and by homestead entry. Such lands are to be found in almost every township in the State. In the older settlements, where transportation facilities have been long enjoyed, and the lands are of good quality, very little, if any. vacant land can be found. All inquiries as to United States lands should be addressed to L. A. Barnes, Register United States Land Office, Gainesville, Florida. The State Land Office, with Hon. P. W. White as Commissioner, is at Tallahassee. All inquiries as to vacant State lands should be made to him. Such a map as is so often asked for, showing the location of all vacant land in the State, was never published by any State, and would be quite impracticable, since daily entries would require a daily revision of the map to make it accurate. Indeed, we would advise intending purchasers to rely solely on their personal inspection of land in selecting locations. First find a piece of land that suits you, then ascertain to whom it belongs, and whether public or private land, secure it by purchase. The State lands are to be found scattered everywhere. Like the United States lands, few State lands of any value or desirable quality are left in sections of the country where land is good, settlements old, and agriculture has been pursued for any length of time. PRICES OF STATE LANDS. School lands and Seminary lands are subject to entry at their appraised value, not less than $1.25 per acre. The larger portion of these lands is held at $1.25 per acre, but some tracts are valued as high as $7. Payment maybe made in United States currency or State scrip. Internal Improvement lands generally $1.25 per acre, none less ; some as high as $6.50 per acre. T he cei d thistle dew whiskey is absolutely pure, S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, SOLE AGENTS, SAVANNAH, GA.

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FAST MAIL TRAINS THROUGH WITH BUT FEW STOPPING POINTS. S., F. & w. Ry. 86 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Swamp lands— for forty acres, $i per acre ; for more than forty and not exceeding eighty acres, 90 cents per acre ; for more than eighty and not exceeding two hundred acres, 80 cents per acre ; for more than two hundred and not exceeding six hundred and forty acres, 75 cents per acre ; for more than six hundred and forty acres, 70 cents per acre. In case of entries of land at $1 per acre, the land must not be detached in pieces, but must lie in a body. For Internal Improvement and Swamp lands nothing is receivable in payment except United States currency. Terms of sale in all cases cash. Lands cannot be reserved from sale for the benefit of any applicant. An application not accompanied with the full amount of purchase money does not give any priority. But by act of March 7, 1881, “ actual settlers upon any of the public lands of this State may enter the lands upon which they reside or have in cultivation, not to exceed 160 acres, to be taken in compact form according to the legal subdivisions, at the prices now or hereafter to be established for such lands, by paying onethird the purchase money at the time of the entry, one-third of the same within two years thereafter, and the remaining one-third within three years after the date of entry.” By Act of 16th February, 1872, the right of homestead is given on the overflowed and swamp lands. “ Section 6. Any person who is the head of a family, or who has arrived at the age of twenty-one years, and is a citizen of the United States, or who shall have filed his declaration of an inten tion to become such, as required by the laws of the United States, shall, from and after the first day of April, be entitled to enter one quarter section, or a less quantity of the unsoldswamp and overflowed lands granted to the State of Florida by Act of Congress, approved 28th day of September, 1850. Any person owning or residing on land may, under the provisions of sections six to thirteen of this chapter, enter other lands contiguous to his or her said land, which shall not, with the lands so already owned and occupied, exceed in the aggregate 160 acres. “ Section 7. The person applying for the benefit of section six shall file with the Commissioner of Lands his or her affidavit that he or she is the head of a family, or is twenty-one years or more of age, and that such application is made for his or her exclusive use and benefit, and that the said entry is made for the purpose of actual settlement and cultivation, and not directly or indirectly for the use and benefit of any other person or persons whatsoever, and upon filing said affidavit with the Commissioner of HlflFR I AM HEADQUARTERS FOR CIDER. W 8 fca I S a Grocer and Importer, Savannah, Ga,

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1? if linn GIVEN 0N ALL kinds of machinery and repairs, by JOHN ROURKE, 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH. GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 87 Lands, and upon payment of ten dollars where the entry is more than eighty acres, and of five dollars when the entry is not of more than eighty acres, he or she shall thereupon be permitted to enter amount of land specified ; Provided, however that no deed shall issue therefor until the expiration of five years from the date of such entry; and if at the expiration of such time, or any time within two years thereafter the person making such entry, or, if he be dead, his widow, or, in case of her death, his heirs or devisees, or, in case of a widow making such entry, her heirs or devisees, in case of her death, shall prove by two credible witnesses that he, she or they have reclaimed said lands by means of levees and drains, and resided upon and cultivated the same for the term of five years immediately succeeding the time of filing the affidavit aforesaid, and shall make affidavit that no part of said land has been alienated ; then, in such case, he, she or they shall be entitled to a deed. RAILROAD LANDS. The lands of the Atlantic, Gulf and West India Transit Railroad Company have been heretofore estimated at 650,000 acres. They are the alternate sections, within the six-mile limit, along the line of said road from Fernandina to Cedar Keys. They are offered by the company at $1.25 per acre, with free transportion over the road to purchasers with their families and effects. The same authority puts down the lands of the Jacksonville, Pensacola and Mobile Railroad Company at 200,000 acres. The recent purchase of Sir Edward Reed and associates of these two roads, together with the line and franchises of the Florida Central Railroad Company from Jacksonville to Lake City, and also the acquisition by the same syndicate of 2,000,000 acres from Mr. Hamilton Disston, has put into the hands of the proprietors an immense amount of land in Florida of almost every quality, and located in almost every part of the State. The management and disposition of this great landed interest is vested in the land department of the company under the direction of Hugh A. Corley, late Commissioner of State lands, who can be addressed at Jacksonville, Florida. Mr. CorleyÂ’s knowledge and experience in connection with lands in Florida peculiarly fit him for the conduct of the affairs of this great company, and the great diversity in quality and location of the lands under his control and at his disposition will enable him to meet the wants of almost any character of purchaser. Those desiring more detailed information of the whereabouts, character, prices, &c., of these lands are respectfully referred to him. mHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is distilled from the choicest qualities of Grain. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga. 11

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S in { r T \r I Florida Dispatcli. • • I iV M • IV) • Fast FrciglLt Xjino. 88 FLORIDA' STATE GAZETTEER THE PENSACOLA AND ATLANTIC RAILROAD COMPANY, in their first report published in th.e Pensacola Commercial of the lands to be theirs upon the completion of their road, put them down thus : In alternate sections from the State 55.000 In alternate sections from the United States 633,000 In the bonus of 20,000 acres per mile from the State for 160 miles 3.200,000 Making in the aggregate 3,888,600 Of this amount the 688,600 acres of alternate sections, State and United States, are, of course, exclusively west of the Apalachicola river, or along the line of the road. Of the 3,200,000 acres obtained by way of bonus from the State, much the larger portion have been taken in other parts of the State, since owing to the high and dry character of the country of West Florida the amount of swamp and overflowed lands in that section is limited. This road makes the connecting link in the great trunkline of communication from New Orleans in the most direct line to deep water on the Atlantic seaboard. The character of the railroad lands in that section is for a good part of a high order. We are not advised of the prices at which they are offered to settlers, but refer for such information to W. D. Chipley, Vice-President of the company, at Pensacola, Florida. THE FLORIDA SOUTHERN RAILWAY is entitled to 900,000 acres of land by way of a bonus in addition to the alternate sections along their line from Gainesville to Palatka and from Gunesville to Ocala. We are not advised as to what disposition is being immediately made of the lands of this company. Lying, as many of them will, in the heart of the “ Orange Belt” of the State, the demand for them is doubtless considerable. Dr. E. S. Francis, of Palatka, is Vice-President of the company, and C. A. Boardman, of the same place, is in charge of its land affairs. To these gentlemen we refer parties desiring information. THE SOUTH FLORIDA RAILROAD is another company, which, after completing the construction of its road, has under the charter, lands to be disposed of. The amount of these lands we are not familiar with; they will be Dponiifn ^ r S ir a a ) North Carolina and Tennessee in large variety at J. B. REEDY’S, rcaiimo. Grocer, and Importer of Fruit, Savannah, Ga,

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Sugar Mills and Pans. We Guarantee our Prices. WM. KEHOE & OO., iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 89 comprised in the alternate sections, six-mile limit, along the line of the road from Sanford, on Lake Monroe, to Kissimmee City, on Lake Tohopekaliga, at the head of navigation on Kissimmee river. James E. Ingraham, of Sanford, Florida, is the President of the company, and to him we refer inquiries of those lands. THE FLORIDA LAND IMPROVEMENT COMPANY. The 4,000,000 of acres of land sold by the State to Mr. Hamilton Disston, of Philadelphia, were selected principally from the counties of Hernando, Sumter, Orange, Volusia, Hillsborough, Polk and Manatee by parties familiar with this territory. They extend entirely across the middle portion of the peninsula, and from north to south some two hundred miles. They are intermixed in their location with State lands, United States lands, and those of private parties. In his sale to Sir Edward Reed, Mr. Disston reserved the privilege of selecting first 2,000,000 acres, and surrendering the remaining 2,000,000 to Sir Edward Reed. The portion reserved by Mr. Disston is now held by the Florida Land Improvement Company. This company is made up mainly of Philadelphia capitalists. The central office is located at Jacksonville, Florida, with A. P. K. Safford, ex-Governor of Arizona, as Land Commissioner. This company has also resident local agents in each of the before-named counties. Prices generally from $1 to $2 per acre. These lands are well suited to orange culture and to the production of vegetables. They are furnished with transportation facilities on the east by the St. JohnÂ’s river, and the South Florida Railroad connecting that river with the navigable waters of the Kissimmee. The Jacksonville, Tampa and Key West Railroad runs through the centre, and the Grand Trunk Road, recently purchased by Sir Edward Reed, lrom Fernandina and Jacksonville, down the peninsula, runs through the western portion. Additionally to this there is a lake communication, connecting with the St. JohnÂ’s river by the Lake Eustis and St. JohnÂ’s Railroad and the Ocklawaha river. THE SAN ANTONIO COLONY. Mr. Disston, after making his purchase of Florida lands, engaged the Hon. E. F. Dunne, ex-Chief Justice of Arizona, to visit Florida and supervise the taking out of his title deeds. Whereupon Judge Dunne made selection of 50,000 acres of the Disston purchase in the neighborhood of Clear lake, near Fort Lade, in Hernando county, for the establishment of a Catholic milE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY possesses an excellent bouquet, A S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.

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S.,F.& W.Ry. Tlie Preferred Konte ^”TO FLORIDA.^ QO FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER colony, with the approval of Dr. Moore, the Catholic Bishop of Florida, who has appointed a priest for the colony. Judge Dunne resides on these lands ; his address is Fort Dade, Florida. The 2,000,000-acre purchase of Sir Edward Reed of the Disston lands, being located among the Disston lands, have the same climatic and transportation facilities. THE ATLANTIC AND GULF COAST CANAL AND OKEECHOBEE LAND COMPANY was chartered in 1881. By the terms of a contract with the Board of Internal Improvement of the State, this company receives onehalf of all State lands reclaimed by draining in that part of the State south of 28 degrees, 15 minutes north, and east of Peace Creek. This area will cover about 8,000,000 of acres, much the Greater part of which has vested in the State under the swamp and overflowed land act, &c. This company are also chartered to construct canals and other lines of transportation. They own, by purchase, franchises for construction of 330 miles of steamboat canal along the east coast of Florida, connecting Matanzas, Halifax river, and Mosquito inlet with Indian river and Lake Worth, and also a franchise for connecting Lake Tohopekaligo with Kissimmee river. The company have already constructed dredge boats and steam tenders. The permanent lowering of the surface of Lake Okeechobee will, it is estimated, reclaim several hundred thousand acres of land, and these lands, owing' to their semi-tropical location, it is believed will be superior for the production of sugar to any land in the United States. CATALOGUE OF RAILROADS CHARTERED. Fernandina and J acksonville Railroad — From a point on the Atlantic, Gulf and West India Transit Road to Jacksonville, through Nassau and Duval counties ; length 21 miles ; completed 21 miles. East Florida Railway — From Jacksonville to Calico Hill, on St. Marys river, Nassau county ; completed 42 miles. Now called the Waycross branch of the Savannah, Florida and Western. Jacksonville, St. Augustine and Halifax River Railroad. — Incorporated by act of Legislature, February 28, 1881 ; alternate sections of State lands; length, 80 miles. St. Johns Railroad.— By act of December 31st, 1858 ; from St. Johns river to St. Augustine ; right of way 400 feet on each side Foreign Dried and Green Fruit and Importer of Fruit, Savannah, Ga.

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PmivlrA AGRICULTURAL IRON AND BRASS WORKS, fJOlill liOUI Kl ? 2 BAY STREET, SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 91 of track, with alternate sections of State lands ; capital stock, $100,000; length, 18 miles. Atlantic St. Johns and Indian River Railroad. — From St. Augustine to Palatka, thence to Indian river, through the counties of St. Johns, Putnam, Volusia and Brevard. Articles of incorporation filed October 24th, 1 88 r ; capital stock $2,000,000; length, 200 miles. Seville and Halifax River Railroad. — From Seville, east side of Lake George, Volusia county, to Ormond on Plalifax river. Articles filed January 7th, 1882 ; length of road and branches, 50 miles; capital stock $50,000. Orange Ridge DeLand and Atlantic Railroad. — Length, 28 miles ; right of way with alternate sections of State lands, and bonus of 5,000 acres per mile of finished road from DeLand landing on the St. Johns river to the Atlantic coast or to Daytona, New Smyrna or some navigable stream flowing into Mosquito inlet. By act of 1881 ; capital stock $150,000. Palatka and Indian River Railroad. — Length, 75 miles; right of way 60 feet wide each side of road ; alternate sections and bonus of 6,000 acres per mile; from Palatka to Ansantia, Volusia county, touching on Mosquito lagoon ; by act of 4th March, 1881. Sanford and Indian River Railroad. — Length, 30 miles; filed February 6th, 1881; capital stock $150,000; from Sanford, Orange county, to Titusville, Brevard county. Lake Monroe and Lake Jessup Railroad. — Length, 20 miles; from Lake Monroe to Lake Jessup, Orange county; articles filed July 4th, 1881 ; capital stock $100,000. St. Johns and Halifax River RailrQad. — Length, 45 miles ; from Rollestoun, in Putnam county, to New Brittain, Volusia county ; articles filed December 12th, 1881 ; capital stock $100,000. Palatka and Sanford Railroad. — From Palatka through Marion county to Sanford; articles filed December 19th, 1881 ; capital stock $20,000 ; length, 80 miles. Indian River Central Railroad. — From Enterprise, Volusia county to Titusville, Brevard county; articles filed December 28th, 1881 ; length, 40 miles. Jacksonville and Palatka Railroad. — From Jacksonville through Duval, Clay and Putnam, to Palatka ; articles filed February nth, 1881 ; capital stock $2,000,000 ; length, 65 miles. The Great Southern Railroad. — From Millen, Ga., through Nassau, Duval, St. Johns, Volusia, Brevard, Dade and Monroe, to Key West ; articles filed 10th of April, 1876; capital stock $14,000,000; consolidated length, 360 miles. South Florida Railroad. — From Sanford, on St. Johns River, rjVIE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY IS ABSOLUTELY PURE. A S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, SOLE AGENTS, SAVANNAH, GA.

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S, F. & W. Ry. PULLMAN SLEEPING CAP SERVICE between ALL IMPORTANT POINTS. FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Orange county, to Orlando, Tohopekaliga, thence to Bartow, Polk county, thence to Tampa, Hillsborough county ; length, 1 50 miles ; articles filed October 16th, 1881. St. Johns and Lake Eustis Railroad — From St. Johns river, near Lake Gorge, to Lake Eustis, Orange county; by act of 20th February, 1879, but articles filed February 21st, 1875; capital stock $100,000; right of way and alternate sections; length, 25 miles. Orange Belt Railroad. — Articles filed 24th March, 1882 ; capital stock $1,300,000 ; from Lake Eustis, Orange county, to a point at or near Apopka, thence to a point at or near Orlando, thence to a point at or near Tohopekaliga, thence to a point at or near Eau Gallie, in Brevard county ; length, 130 miles. Gainesville, Ocala and Charlotte Harbor Railroad. — From the Georgia line, Columbia county, to Charlotte Harbor, Manatee county ; with branch from an available point in Polk county to Tampa, Hillsborough county, through Columbia, Alachua, Marion, Sumter, Polk, Hillsborough and Manatee ; filed June 8th, 1876; capital stock $ ; length, 325 miles. Gainesville Ocala and Charlotte Harbor Railroad. — Changed to Florida Southern by articles filed April 7th, 1881. From Lake City, Columbia county, to Gainesville, Alachua ; Ocala, Marion ; Leesburg, Sumter county ; Brooksville, Hernando county ; with branch from Gainesville to Palatka finished, 60 miles, and from Gainesville to Ocala finished 30 miles ; length, 370 miles. Jacksonville Tampa and Key West Railroad. — First by act of March 4th, 1879, as Tampa, Peace Creek and St. Johns, then by articles filed July 5th, 1881, to name first above; right of way and alternate sections with right to choose any convenient gauge, and bonus of 10,000 acres per mile of finished road -; work commenced ; length, 380 miles. Sanford Lake Eustis and Ocala Railroad — From Sanford, Orange county, by Lake Eustis, to Ocala, Marion County ; alternate sections and right of way; articles filed 5th of March, 1881, then by act March 8th, 1881 ; length, 70 miles. Tavares Orlando and Atlantic Railroad. — -From Tavares, near Lake Dora, Orange county, to Apopka City, thence to Orlando, thence to St. Johns river, near Lake Harney, thence to Titusville, Brevard county ; articles filed October 10th, 1881; capital stock $20,000 ; length, 95 miles. Leesburg and Indian River Railroad— From a point on the Florida Tropical Railroad, due west from Leesburg, thence east to Leesburg, thence to Lakes Eustis and Dora, with branches to Apopka and Tohopekaliga, through Orange and Brevard to a

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Sugar Mills and Pans. 0u r Leading Specialty. WM. KEHOE & CO Tron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY 93 point on Indian river; articles filed September 23, 1881 ; capital stock $750,000 ; length, 80 miles. Tavares and Lake Monroe Railroad. — From Tavares to Sanford, Orange county; articles filed October 10th, 1881; capital stock, $20,000 ; length, 35 miles. Apopka Branch of South Florida Railroad.—From Jackson, on South Florida Railroad, in Orange county, to the Withlacoochee river, Sumter county ; articles filed October 10th, 1881 ; capital stock $15,000 ; length, 56 miles. Atlantic, Gidf and West India Transit Railroad. — Incorporated first as Florida Railroad, January 8th, 1853, then changed to name first as above. From Fernandina, Nassau county, to Tampa Bay, Hillsborough county, and Charlotte Harbor, Manatee county, with branch to Cedar Keys ; right of way and alternate sections of State lands, and by act of Congress 17th of March, 1856, to alternate sections of United States lands from Fernandina to Cedar Keys; completed; length, 155 miles. Florida Midland and Georgia Railroad. — From Deadman’s Bay, Taylor county, to the Georgia line, between Madison and Quitman or Valdosta; alternate sections and bonus of 6,ooo acres per mile of completed road; incorporated by act of 1881 ; length, 70 miles. Live Oak Tampa and Charlotte Harbor Railroad. — By act of 25th of February, 1881, as Live Oak, Tampa and Rowland’s Bluff, then by articles filed 23d July, 1881, to name first above; finished to Rowland’s Bluff, 23 miles; capital stock $5,000,000; len gth, 260 miles. Micanopy and Brooksville Railroad. — From the Transit road, between Gainesville and Arredondo, through Micanopy to Brooksville, through Alachua, Marion and Hernando counties ; length, 80 miles. Jacksonville and Palatka Railroad. — From Jacksonville through Duval, Clay and Putnam, to Palatka ; articles filed February nth, 1882 ; capital stock $2,200,000; length, 65 miles. Seaside Railway. — From Brooksville, Hernando county, through Hillsborough to Point Pinellas; length, 75 miles. Monticello and Georgia Railroad. — From Monticello to Georgia line, to connect with a Georgia road there ; by act of 7th March, 1881 ; capital stock $50,000; length, 12 miles. Florida Railroad and Lumber Company — From Bronson, Levy county, west to Suwa-nee river; articles filed April 4th, 1882; capital stock $100,000 ; length, 20 miles. Georgia and Florida Midland Railroad. — From a point on Georgia line in Gadsden county to a point on the St. Johns river, riUIE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is soft and mellow to the taste. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.

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S., F. & W. Ry. FREIGHT IN THROUGH CARS, IN FAST TRAINS, WITHOUT TRANSFER. 94 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Duval county, through Gadsden, Leon, Jefferson, Madison, Taylor, Lafayette, Alachua, Bradford, Clay and Duval; articles filed April 15th, 1882; capital stock $5,000,000; length, 225 miles. Chattahoochee and East Pass Railroad. — From Chattahoochee in Gadsden county to Gulf of Mexico, on southern boundary of Franklin county, through Gadsden, Liberty and Franklin ; articles filed December 26th, 1881 ; length, 65 miles. Florida Central and Western Railroad. — First Florida, Atlantic and Gulf Central, then Florida Central and Western ; from Jacksonville to Chattahoochee, with branches to Monticello and from Tallahassee to St. Marks; all completed; length, 228 miles. Savannah Florida and Western Branch Railroad. — From Dupont, Ga., to Live Oak, Fla. ; thence to New Branford and on to Gainesville; all completed. Pensacola and Atlantic Railroad. — Right of way 200 feet wide ; alternate sections from State, and by act of Congress May 17th, 1856, from United States; from Apalachicola river at terminus of Florida Central and Western, by most direct route to Pensacola ; completed ; length, 160 miles. Pensacola and Mobile Railroad Manufacturing Company. — Completed ; from Alabama and Florida Railroad to Perdido river; by act of 1861 ; length, 21 miles. Pensacola and Perdido Railroad. — Completed ; by act of February 27th, 1872 ; capital stock, $100,000 ; length, 9 miles. Florida Peninsula Railroad. — From Waldo, Alachua county, to Ocala, Marion county ; completed ; length, 42 miles. Pensacola and Louisville Railroad. — -From Pensacola to Alabama line ; completed ; length, 36 miles. Tropical Peninsula Railroad. — From Ocala to Leesburg, Sumtersville, Sumter county, Brooksville, Hernando county, thence to Tampa, Hillsborough county, with a branch from Leesburg to Orlando, Orange county; right of way 120 feet wide; alternate sections and a bonus of 10,000 acres per mile of finished road; length, 130 miles. Green Cove Springs and Melrose Railroad. — Progressing ; by act of February 28th, 1881 ; right of way 120 feet wide and alternate sections; length, 30 miles. Okeehumkee and Panasoffkee Railroad. — From Okeehumkee to Panasoffkee, Sumter county; by act of March 8th, 1881 ; length, 12 miles. Silver Springs, Ocala, and Gidf Railroad. — Completed 6 miles ; from Silver Springs, Marion county, to Ocala, thence to the waters of the Gulf in Levy or Hernando county ; by act of February 27th, 1872, then by articles filed January 21st, 1872 ; capi\T T? C\ 17 A T) T T? O Always on hand a full supply of the best. V H/br Ji/ 1 A JjLii/O, J. B. REEDY, Savannah, Ga.

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O Wll AND PANS OF ALL SIZES, MADE BY t JOHN ROUJRKE 2 BAY ST., SAVANNA II. GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 95 tal stock $100,000 ; alternate sections; right of way and 10,000 acres per mile ; length, 40 miles. Florida and Pacific Railroad. — From Chattahoochee river to Mobile, Ala., through the counties of Jackson, Washington, Holmes, Walton, Santa Rosa and Escambia; length, 150 miles. Iomoka Railroad. — From the mouth of Withlacoochee river, Levy county, to Ormond, through the counties of Levy, Marion, Orange and Volusia ; articles filed May 6th, 1881; capital stock $400,000; length, 150 miles. St. Johns and Suwannee River Railroad. — From navigable head waters of Black Creek, Clay county, to Suwannee river, through the counties of Clay and Bradford, via Starke, Alachua county; capital stock $150,000; articles filed 12th July, 1881; length, 70 miles. Tavares Brooksville and Gulf Railroad. — Articles filed October 12th, 1881 ; from Tavares, Orange county, to Brooksville, Hernando county, thence to Gulf of Mexico ; capital stock $20,000; length, 90 miles. Bartow and Tampa Railroad. — From Bartow, Polk county, to Tampa, Hillsborough county ; articles filed October 10th, 1881 ; capital stock $250,000 ; length, 45 miles. Florida Western Railroad. — From Louisville and Nashville road in Escambia county, northwest to Alabama line ; capital stock $500,000 ; length, 15 miles. St.Johns and Suwannee River Railroad. — From Melrose, Alachua county, to Fort Fanning, on Suwannee river, Levy county ; capital stock $300,000 ; length, 60 miles. Indian River and Northwestern Railroad.— -F rom a point in Suwannee or Alachua county, through Alachua, Marion, Sumter, Orange and Brevard, to Indian river; articles filed December 12th, 1881 ; capital stock $3,000,000; length, 300 miles. Palatka and Sanford Railroad. — From Palatka, through Marion, to Sanford, Orange county ; articles filed December 19th, 1881 ; capital stock $20,000 ; length, 80 miles. Indian River Central Railroad. — From Enterprise, Volusia county, to Titusville, Brevard county ; articles filed December 28th, 1881 ; capital stock $100,000 ; length, 40 miles. Indian River and Manatee Railroad. — From Titusville, Brevard county, to the mouth of Manatee river, Manatee county, via Bartow and Fort Meade, Polk county ; articles filed January 27th, 1882; capital stock $100,000 ; length, 150 miles. Bartow and Gulf Railroad — Articles not filed ; from Bartow, Polk county, through the southeastern portion of Hillsborough to a point at or near the mouth of the Manatee river. T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is soft and mellow to the taste. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA. 12

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S., F. & W. Ry. Elegant Passenger Equipments; Westinghouse Air Brakes; Miller Platforms; Janey Couplers. q6 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Florida Tropical Railroad.— From Ocala to Charlotte Harbor, via Tampa; length, 150 miles. St. Johns Terminal Railroad. — From a point on the Fernandina and Jacksonville Railroad, three miles from the Jacksonville terminus, to a point on the Florida Central and Western, three miles from the Jacksonville terminus; articles filed April 4th, 1882; length, 5 miles. Thomasville, Tallahassee and Rio Carabelle Railroad. — Incorporated June, 1882 ; from Thomasville, via Tallahassee, to deep water on the Gulf at St. George Sound ; length, 95 miles. LIST OF CANALS CHARTERED IN FLORIDA. Florida Canal. — From Chattahoochee river or bay to St. Andrew’s bay, thence to Dead Lake, thence to Chipola river; length, 23 miles. Florida Atlantic and Gulf Ship Canal — Filed March 30th, 1881 ; from Cumberland sound and the Harbor of Fernandina on the Atlantic, across to the Gulf through the counties of Nassau, Duval, Clay, Bradford, Alachua and Levy, or the tier of counties further south: St. John’s, Putnam, Marion and Levy; or, if found more practicable, the canal may be located on the route surveyed by General Gilmore from the mouth of St. Mary’s river to the Gulf of Mexico, at St. Mark’s river and bay passing through the counties of Nassau, Baker, Columbia, Hamilton, Suwannee, Madison, Taylor and Jefferson. The whole distance from St. Mary’s to St. Mark’s, 170 miles ; right of way, 200 feet wide and 1,000 feet additional on either side ; also a ship railway through the counties aforesaid, similar to the ship railway to be constructed across the isthmus of Tehauntepec in construction and operation ; capital stock, $40,000,000 ; articles filed again August 22d, 1881. Florida Ship Canal. — P'rom Charlotte Harbor to St. Lucie, Indian river; articles filed April 7th, 1881 ; capital stock $30,000,000 ; length, 130 miles. Florida Canal. — From the mouth of the Withlacoochee, Levy county, to New Britain on the Atlantic, through Levy, Marion, Orange and Volusia ; articles filed June 23d, 1881 ; capital stock $100,000; length, 100 miles. Florida Coast Line and Canal Transportation Company. — From Matanzas river, St. John’s county, through Smith’s Creek to the head of Halifax river ; also from Mosquito lagoon within four miles of Haulover, southwardly to Indian river in Volusia county ; T-=? Q C!"i O 1\Tn4-ci I am the largest Dealer in this line. 4AdlblHb ? .IN Ubb ? JjjIU, J. B. REEDY, Savannah, Ga.

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Sugar Mills and Pans. Our Pans are Smooth and Uniform in Thickness. WM. KEHOE & CO., Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 97 capital stock $100,000 ; length completed, 40 miles ; total length, 339 miles; will be completed by June, 1884. Atlantic Coast Steamboat Canal and Improvement Company — Articles filed December, 1880; capital stock $1,000,000 ; length, 330 miles. Atlantic and Gulf Coast Canal and Okeechobee Land Company — By act of March 8th, 1881 ; from the navigable waters of Caloosahatchie to Lake Okeechobee, and through the same to the Atlantic ; length, 80 miles. PUBLIC SCHOOLS AND THEIR PROGRESS. The free school system in this State was provided for in the constitution adopted in 1868, and were put in operation in accordance with said provision in 1869, and since the adoption of a public free school system the educational advantages of the State has from year to year grown gradually, adding to its few schools, many, and to its small attendance, many new pupils. This branch of industry has kept pace with the growth and increase in population of the country, and to-day our facilities and advantages in this particular are not to be excelled by any other State that has had to labor under the same disadvantages. We append below the statistics giving the number of schools in the State from year to year, with the number of students in annual attendance for each. HOW THEY ARE CONDUCTED. The State Superintendent of Public Instruction is the head of the department, and is one of the seven Cabinet officers and Constitutional Advisers of the Governor, and is also the President of the Board of Education, which Board acts on all questions, and appeals from the County or District Boards. Each county constititutes under the law a school district, and this county or school district has a county superintendent, a board of public instruction, and local school trustees. The county superintendent is the secretary of that Board, and its executive officer. His duties are to visit the schools in his county at least once each three months when they are in session ; to organize and conduct teachers’ institutes, and look after the general welfare of the public free schools of his county. The Board of Public Instruction have the management and disposition of all school finances of their county, and locate and appoint local school trustees. The schools are supported from the interest on the common school fund, which fund has been accrued from the sales of school mtlE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is distilled from the choicest qualities of Grain. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga.

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F. & W. Ry. WAY-CROSS SHORT tlNE TO PIjOR-IDA. gS FRORIDA STATE GAZETTEER lands; the constitutional tax, which constitutional tax is one mill on the assessed property valuation of the State ; the county tax, which tax is provided for by the Statute, and is assessed by f the county commissioners, the rate being not less than two and a half, and not more than four mills on the assessed property valuation of the county. The General Government granted every sixteenth section for school purposes, and the interest on the funds arising from the sales of these lands is about $18,000 annually, and this amount is apportioned among the several counties each year, on a pro-rata basis of their school population. Among the leading institutions in the State devoted to the higher branches, are the East Florida Seminary, which is located at Gainesville, and the West Florida Seminary, located at Tallahassee, the State Capital. The above schools have an annual endowment fund secured to the State from the sale of seminary lands. They are regularly chartered institutions, and have the authority to confer degrees and grant diplomas, and they are both in a flourishing condition, and each succeeding year adds to their efficiency and influence. Number of Number of StuYear Schools. dents Attending. 1876 656 21,000 1877 887 31.133 1878 .. 992 36,961 1879 1,050 37,034 1880 M3i 39,315 1882 i,239 51,945 1883 FLORIDA UNIVERSITY, TALLAHASSEE, FLA. Regents — Ex-Gov. D. S. Walker, Chancellor, Tallahassee; Gov. W. D. Bloxham, Tallahassee; Comptroller of State, Gen. W. D. Barnes, Tallahassee ; Judge J. T. Bernard, Tallahassee ; Judge W. P. Byrd, Tallahassee; Rev. J. Kost, A. M., M. D., LL* D.; Rev. Chas. Beecher, A. M., D. D. Medical Department : — Fully equal in all departments; has nine Professors, and separate building; Term of 1884-5 begins Nov. 19, 1884, continues 4 months ; Tickets for all chairs, $60 ; Matriculation, $5; Examination, $25 ; Graduation, free ; Clinics twice a week), free; Board, $15 to $20 per month. For particulars or catalogue, address Prof. J. Kost, Dean, Tallahassee, Fla. I am the on ly Importer of Red and Yellow Bananaa in ihe DMIlftSlHO* State. J. B. REEDY, Savannah, Ga.

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Saw Mill Work OF ALL KINDS FURNISHED BY JOHN ROURKE 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 99 Literary Department — Fully equipped in all departments ; full faculty, separate building; first session begins on 1st Monday of Oct., 1884; 2nd session begins on 2nd Wednesday of Feb.; commencement 2nd Wednesday of June, 1885. For particulars and catalogue, address Judge J. T. Bernard, Tallahassee, Fla. The powers of the government of the State of Florida, like those of the sister States, are divided into the three departments of Legislative, Executive and Judicial. Legislative powers, vested in Senate and Assembly, is designated the Legislature of the State of Florida. The Legislature meets on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in January, every two years, and may hold its sessions not longer than sixty days. The members of the Assembly are chosen biennially on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November. Senators are chosen for the term of four years at the same time and places as members of the Assembly, in such a way that one-half of the whole number are elected biennially. The Legislature fixes the ratio of representation, but the Constitution provides that each county shall have at least one representative, and one additionally for every one thousand registered voters, but no county shall have more than four. The Legislature also fixes the number of Senators, which, however, under the Constitution, shall never be less than one-fourth nor more than one-half of the whole number of the Assembly. At present the number of Assemblymen is 76, and the number of Senators, 34. The pay of members of the Legislature is a per diem fixed by law for each day’s actual attendance, and in addition thereto ten cents mileage. is vested in a Governor, who is elected for four years. To be eligible, he must have been for nine years a citizen of the United States and three years a citizen of Florida. A Lieutenant-Governor is elected at the same time and places as the Governor, and is President of the Senate, but has only a casting vote. He becomes Acting Governor upon the removal from office by death, inability or resignation of the Governor. The Governor has a Cabinet of Administrative officers, consistGOVERNMENT OF FLORIDA. THE EXECUTIVE POWER IHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY IS ABSOLUTELY PURE. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, SOLE AGENTS, SAYANNAH, GA.

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S., F. & W. 100 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER in g of Secretary of State, Attorney-General, Comptroller, Treasurer, Superintendent of Public Instruction, Adjutant-General, and Commissioner of Lands. They are appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. of the State are vested in a Supreme Court, Circuit Courts, County Courts and Justices of the Peace. The Supreme Court consists of the Chief Justice and two Associate Justices. They are appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate and hold their offices for life or during good behavior. The Supreme Court appoints its own clerk. There are, as the Constitution requires, seven Circuit Judges appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate, who hold their offices for eight years. The Executive appoints a County Judge for each county, who is confirmed by the Senate and holds his office for four years. The Governor appoints as many Justices of the Peace as he may deem necessary, who hold office for four years, but are subject to removal by the Governor for reasons satisfactory to him. The Governor, by and with the consent of the Senate, appoints in each county a Sheriff and Clerk of the Circuit Court, who is also Clerk of the County Court and of the Board of County Commissioners, Recorder and ex-officio Auditor of the county. He holds his office for four years. The Governor appoints, by and with the consent of the Senate, in each county an Assessor of Taxes and Collector of Revenue, who hold office for two years, subject to removal upon recommendation of Governor and consent of Senate. The Governor appoints in each county a County Treasurer, County Surveyor, Superintendent of Common Schools, and five County Commissioners, each of whom shall hold his office for two years, subject to removal by the Governor when, in his judgment, the public good will benefit thereby. A Constable may be elected by the registered voters of each county, one Constable for every two hundred voters; but, under the Constitution, every county is entitled to at least two, and no county shall have more than twelve. The Salary of the Governor is $3,500; that of the Justices of THE JUDICIAL POWERS ConfectionersÂ’ Supplies. J. B. REEDY, Grocer, and Importer of Fruit, Savannah, Ga.

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8., F. & W. %. FAST MAIL TRAINS THROUGH WITH BUT FEW STOPPING POINTS. 102 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS. The Constitution provides that institutions for the insane, blind and deaf, and such other benevolent institutions as the public good may require shall be fostered by the State. An asylum for the insane has been founded, where the idiotic are also received. This institution is located upon a high hill on the eastern side of the Apalachicola river, in Gadsden county. A part of the buildings were erected originally by the United States Government for an arsenal and subsequently turned over to the State, and then fitted by erection of new buildings and proper alterations for present uses. The inmates are comfortably provided for. The males and females of both colors have compartments for themselves and then in these their separate rooms. These apartments and enclosed grounds, at the date of a casual visit were found in a neat and comfortable condition. The unfortunate inmates, numbering about 125, seemed all to be on the best of terms with Dr. Randolph, the intelligent and humane gentleman having them in charge. They evidently enjoyed his presence as he passed among them in showing us around. The water at the asylum is pure free-stone and of the best quality. The locality is thought one of the healthiest in Florida. There is connected with the asylum about 1,800 acres of land for such uses as the institution may have for it. No institution has as yet been provided for either the blind or the deaf. The policy adopted by the State of Florida in the care of convicts for penal crime is to lease them for terms to contractors, who employ them upon railroad construction and .other public works, instead of confining them within the walls of a State Prison. The number under sentence of imprisonment is about 200. Experience has demonstrated that the plan of hiring the convicts to labor in the open air is both humane and healthful, and more agreeable to the prisoners themselves than close confinement. It is, moreover, less expensive to the State. Indeed, they are hired out at present at $15 each per annum, with such obligations to provide for their safe-keeping as was thought necessary to require. The population of Florida, under the census returns of 1880, was 269,493. The increase in population in Florida during the decade from 1870 to 1880 was something over 30 per cent., and APPLES. I make a specialty of Fancy Apples. J. B. REEDY, Grocer, and Importer of Fruit, Savannah, Ga.

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|71 J_ ; i GIVEN ON ALL KINDS OF MACHINERY AND REPAIRS, BY JOHN llOUUKE, 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. IO3 for the years 1879 an ^ 1880 there was an increase at the rate of 60 per cent. As this tide of immigration has been largely increased during the last four years, it is fair to estimate that the annual rate of increase in her population is now not far from 20 per cent. FINANCIAL CONDITION. The bonded debt is as follows : $350,000 00 925.000 00 1,500 00— $1,276,500 00 285,600 00 87,400 00 134,200 00 59.500 00 100.000 00— 666,700 00 Leaving in hands of individuals $609,800 00 Showing a decrease of amount in hands of individuals during the past two years 62,500 00 Decrease of public debt during past two years : Bought Sinking Fund Bonds 1871 $8,800 00 For Sinking Fund Bonds 1873, $17,550.00 U. S. 4 per cent, bonds equivalent to 6 per cent. Florida Bonds at $1.10. 19,100 00 — $27,900 00 Seven per cent, bonds 1871 Six per cent, bonds 1873 Eight per cent Convention bonds Of these bonds there are in School Funds Seminary Fund Agricultural College Fund Sinking Fund Bond 1871 .. Sinking Fund Bond 1873. 69 BROAD STREET, In the healthiest part of the City, and especially convenient to all public buildings, street cars and places of interest. TERMS REASONABLE TO TOURISTS. T he celebrated thistle dew whiskey is absolutely pure. S. GUCKENUEIMER & SON, SOLE AGENTS, SAVANNAH, GA, 13

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104 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER <11 fli (S i 0* hj "rt hi 0§ E! i % a> >3 tx a2 II •gait?q ‘uo??oo qsuq ‘s^o qsnq ‘ujoq •sqi ‘0OiH Hg •auiMS ‘o^ M J H | b % •91W?0 o^j & OIF i80, sho' etc., etc •satnjvt Tg sasjoH '0]s[ OBs H [T 1 C Qj H s .t suoiionp -OJtl UU'B.J fflgi ail •anpRA, qoois 9 ait; <1 c-S EH 1§ •santn^ xnau,! z, $£ P^IUX puuT; saaoy OJOO T? CO ^ c o> o oi o* 0*0 in odaooT •CWN o: Oi co lO rf CO OCCN C(MrCO *— < iO OJON 0*00 0 0 ^100010 1 05 o o NCOOJ l Tt< O T£ 05 rf N r ^ 05 of oi yf of o Oi co cc Oi r-i t — 0 *-• co o o c MOCCNvD! 00 *> of *0 of < co !>: r-T of io *o of Oi CD wc f *d i-CN'fCOCCCCNXCCCCt^CJC QGCOOiOOCOOC^CO XTf cOr-< O^Oi OJTJM ldiOoTirTcoocn^ *o o • o o C O •(Nt? 00 O -COCO CO co" rH f OOCOO-rHOOCo CO co O D (M O CO 05 co cr o CO O f rco CO CO rf< CD ado N WSO*COiDOD cd Ci c? oo ci CO COT^ COCOlO N *d r 1 r-f CO *> co coo cq ori> CO cT CO in l> I “ ^ CO COnaiDOO' 82888S8 Tt< in O OO Ol rf 05 ro • c nc_ -f -f 05 O O -CIO 05 i • O^CO *o go ; o 1 co O co ’ O^f N! J> H in^T-^ of r-T O SCQ0NO5N WOCSN ^ co ot cj o 05 co co rao O 05 o' co in o' CDH icocoir-irH^co-ct< O O 2>0 o O C CO f 05 i>o_coih w in cf ^ in cf *n 05 o : r-' i ci rf 05 XNCOO*OCNWX)'^‘OincOO'fCO'i rH O0505C00>^mC0C005O inOrHQOOOOCO NlO^OWCNC^CCOOCOCOCO'T-fN^CDI i co co m tp i c^ -^iq t> o rH r r O_'t ci^hc in o co^-os in co in i> co of t-T 05 o"co of of of ci Th of *cf cd i> oo cT co cd co cd'T^'ni'cd i> co t-T cd ^ co o r-( Oi Oi TH T-t r-H 1-t cr 05 05 05 CO < co co co oi r1 rCO GO CO 05 Oi 05 Oi CD CO ^ c co' rf H ^ cT -h JnTcO Oi of CO 1> JO cd : ) C ^ Oi -| r1HOr-C0C00iC0C0C005t-O tOinQO^N>DOQOCCCOCD05co-HNCOQO^CD^O(NCCCOCOQOr-CD Tf OO CO 05 CO Oi 04^0 05^05 T-H C^T^Oi^ TH COCO CO *OOi T^O GO coco ^ CO of r-f CO of of CO CO-HOf r-? rH n o o c o o (MCOO^ODO rH o in rco o co' rH o' 05 o' LH lO C CO H O ro o O 05 *o o O COCO CO co" co co cd i> co Oi ^ CO Oi rH 100 CO co *n CO c cd cd of in h rc(N CO Tf CO 1 CCONCOCOtOOiO ?— m^*CHH00 Oi CO rH cc CO o oiooooioomomo' NinTfOHHOCHOxmcoccxc CC0r-C0COC005*Cl0O05C‘ CCOCOr-CNCONCO NNNinCOODJOi^OCOCOCC rn of o" r-" co" cd co' of co" o" of cd ao '^.'•QQQ^oojvc o *n < mco ~ NTPCOO< N CO d CO rf d rH^ o' r-' o N d N CO rH co' CO 05 OD rH rH CO GO C *C in th h C X m Ci 1 O5C0rHHi— iCOTH-rH t^nrHi w co O CO (M 05 3 ^s§ N-fOt'0~o)f'MnccrtoiMtDoooo)3Wio-i coa;-fo OllN'N-tl-t(OMOO'!) 'M!OrHOC:CCD!DC£^'rcOi-ltCOM^) 4 C oiqNro'J o: <= iq go os co 03 iciHr-i^oa)-iNcOr-io ^o’^i-rt^'coaitC-^H’u^eo.-Tco'or -rfcQccmoiciocScocoaia^o a> be J • • r< O S : .5 d o-’s cl O O c jr-H r CvHw r D^; r >5 • T w 3 rr 3? £ ill’ll sglil mill gsl Si g I i= c3 b£ WJ djaj te 03^ to 0 (S ce r ss^a si— S 3 £ 5 52 ) — MJ si ci e 3 Total 863,515' $22,128,013 $.5,088,744! $8,129,801 1 39.593' 1 516,986' 297.198 1 1.450,699 3.040, 6o7J 306,766| 57,202 1 922 ,3351 89.028 1 1.752,909'$1()1.353| 210,357 The product of oranges for the year 1879 is estimated at 45,000,000 (not returned). Lemons, limes, guavas and pineapples are quite extensively cultivated.

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Sugar Mills and Pans. Our Leading Specialty. WM. REHOE & CO iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 105 GOVERNMENT. Tallahassee, the seat of Government ; State Officers elected Tuesday after the first Monday in November for four years. Chief Executive. Governor — William D. Bloxham ; salary, $3,500. Ormand Chairs, private secretary ; salary, $500. Lieutenant-Governor — L. W. Bethel ; salary, $500, and a mileage of 10 cents each way from Cedar Keys. Department Officers. Adjutant-General — J. E. Yonge; salary, $2,000. Attorney-General — George P. Raney; salary, $2,000. Comptroller — William D. Barnes ; salary, $2,000. Comptroller s Clerk — William M. McIntosh ; salary, $1,200. Secretary of State — John L. Crawford; salary, $2,000. Superintendent of Public Instruction — E. K. Foster ; salary, $2,500. Treasurer — H. A. L’Engle ; salary, $2,000. Treasurer s Clerk — W. N. Baker; salary, $1,200. Auditor — The Comptroller is ex-off cio Auditor of the State, and the duties of this office are conducted by him. Commissioner of Lands and Immigration — P. W. White ; salary, $2,000. R. C. Long, Clerk. Cabinet Officers. Secretary of State, Attorney-General, Comptroller, State Treasurer, Superintendent of Public Instruction, Adjutant-General and Commissioner of Lands and Immigration. Board of Commissioners of State Institutions. The Governor, Secretary of State, Attorney-General, Comptroller, State Treasurer, Superintendent of Public Instruction, Adjutant-General, and Commissioner of Lands and Immigration. rilHB CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is soft and mellow to the taste. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.

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S., F. & W. Ry. PULLMAN SLEEPING}CAR SERVICE betWeeti ALL IMPORTANT POINTS. 106 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Board of Education. The Superintendent of Public Instruction, Secretary of State and Attorney-General. Board of Pardons. The Governor, Justices of the Supreme Court, and AttorneyGeneral. Bureau of Immigration. The Governor, Comptroller, and Commissioner of Lands and Immigration. Board of State Canvassers. The Secretary of State, Comptroller, and Attorney-General. Board Trustees InternaB Improvement Fund. The Governor, Comptroller, Treasurer, Attorney-General, and Commissioner of Lands and Immigration. State Engineer — H. S. Duval, Chattahoochee. Surveyor-General — M. Martin, Tallahassee. Register Land Office — Louis A. Barnes, Gainesville. Receiver Land Office — John F. Rollins, Gainesville. State Timber Agent — B. M. Burroughs, Tallahassee. Collector Internal Revenue. D. Eagan, Jacksonville. State Printer. Charles E. Dyke, Tallahassee. Senate. President, L. W Bethel, Key West Monroe George W. Allen, Key West Monroe H. C. Baker, King’s Ferry Nassau William Bryson, Live Oak.. Suwanee H. W. Chandler, Ocala Marion J. D. Cole, Monticello .Jefferson A. D. Cone, Lake Butler Bradford J. L. F. Cottrell, Cedar Keys .7 .V .7. '. 7. . Levy VEGETABLES. Alway j s B n reedy, “VSS VA be8t

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AdMotriiTtiitAL Iron Asrb Brass wor£s, *JOilll 110 III 2 BAY STREET, SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 107 E. S. Crill, Palatka Putnam Charles DeLano, Spring Garden Centre Volusia J. B. Dell, Gainesville Alachua H. H. Duncan, Yalaha Sumter M. G. Fortner, Keysville Polk J. C. Greeley, Jacksonville Duval W. D. Hankins, Steinhatchie Lafayette H. H. Ffatcher, Freeport Walton S. M. Hendricks, Green Cove Springs Clay J. M. Landrum, Wilton Santa Rosa J. T. Lesley, Tampa Hillsborough S. R. Mallory, Pensacola Escambia A, S. Mann, Crystal River Hernando Miles Mountien, Vernon Washington J. H. McClellan, Chipola Calhoun J. H. McKinne, Marianna Jackson A. J. Polhill, Bellville Hamilton F. W. Pope, Madison Madison George C. Powers, Florence St. John’s J. E. Proctor, Tallahassee .Leon H. L. R. Roberts, Lake City Columbia William H. Sharpe, City Point Brevard J. N. Sheppard, Chattahoochee Gadsden J. G. Speer, Oakland Orange T. F. Swearingen, Crawfordville Wakula Officers and Attachees. Secretary — W. H. Babcock, Jacksonville Duval Assistant Secretary — W. I. Vason, Tallahassee. Leon Sergeant-at-Arms — I. M. Auld, Orlando Orange Engrossing Clerk — -T. D. West, Marianna Jackson Enrolling Clerk — L. B. Wombwell, Tallahassee. ... Leon Recording Clerk — B. L. Blackburn, Fort Dade .Hernando Messenger — William Thomas, Crawfordville Wakula Page Clerk — W. K. Beard, Tallahassee .Leon Doorkeeper — M. D. Colson, Joppa Janitor — Richard Edwards, Tallahassee Leon House of Representatives. Speaker — Chasles Dougherty, Port Orange. Alachua — L. G. Dennis, M. M. Lewey, Benjamin Rush, William Trapp, Gainesville. Baker — George P. Canova, Sanderson. T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is distilled from the choicest qualities of Grain. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga.

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S>.,F.& W. Ry. Tiie Preferred Route ^"TO FXjORIDA.jeJ 108 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Bradford — W. H. Edwards, Lake Butler ; J. L. Gaskins, Starke. Brevard — Francis M. Platt, Rock Ledge. Calhotin— Lawrence Baker, Blount’s Town. Clay — L. W. Kickliter, Starke. Columbia — Thomas W. Getzen, John W. Tompkins, Lake City; Walter R. Moore, Welborn, Dade — John H. Brelsford, Lake Worth. Duval — R. L. Brown, W. H. McCormick, G. W. Whetmore, Jacksonville ; L. W. Thompson, Mandarin. Escambia — S. C. Cobb, M. S. White, Pensacola ; Royal Putnam, Molino. Franklin— John E. Grady, Apalachicola. Gadsden— G. A. Hendry, Concord ; Clayburn Munroe, Midway ; T. L. Ward, Quincy. Hamilton — Robert J. Beville, B. B. Blackwell, Jasper. Hernando — C. C. Keathly, F. M. Townsend, Brooksville. Hillsborough — J. J. McMullen, ClearWater; C. L. Wilder, Cork. Holmes — James S. Calk, Cerro Gordo. Jackson — James F. McClellan, William H. Milton, Marianna ; James A. Robinson, Greenwood. Jefferson — W. A. Boyd, G. W. Proctor, G. W. Witherspoon, Monticello ; M. W. C. McCardy, Beasley’s. Lafayette — Thomas S. Goodbread, Esteinhatchee. Leon — Mack Davis, Bradfordville ; Isaac Jenkins, Charles Rollins, W. S. Weeks, Tallahassee. Levy — Newton A. Blitch, Williston ; William W. Clyatt, Levyville. Liberty— William H Neal, Orange. Madison — Thomas A. Hall, A. B. Osgood, J. N. Stripling, Madison. Manatee — John W. Whildden, Davidson. Marion — H. E. Miller, Ocala; W. A. Wilkerson, Flemington. Monroe — William Bethel, Key West ; James P. Perkins, Myers. Nassau — R. E. Robinson, John Wilkinson, Fernandina. Orange — John M. Bryan, Fort Mason ; J. J. Harris, Sanford. Polk — John W. Bryant, Medulla. Putnam — C. A. Cowgill, Penn; G. W. Lyle, San Mateo. St. Johns — James L. Colee, St. Augustine; H. H. Floyd, Racy Point. Santa Rosa — John McClellan, Milton ; H. W. Sindorf, Blackwater. Sumter — Wilson W. Cassady, Sumterviile ; Milton H. Mabry, Leesburg. Suwannee — Robert F. Allison, Andrew J. McLeod, Live Oak. Peanuts. Virgi nia, North Carolina and Tennessee in large variety at J. B. REEDY’S, Grocer, and Importer of Fruit, Savannah, Ga.

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Sugar Mills and Pans. We Guarantee our Prices. WM. KKHOE
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S., F. & W. Ry. FREIGHT IN THROUGH CARS, IN FAST TRAINS, WITHOUT TRANSFER. IIO FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER struction,) Tallahassee ; George P. Raney, (Attorney-General,) Tallahassee; John L. Crawford, (Secretary of State,) Tallahassee. Secretary — H. N. Felkel, Tallahassee. State Superintendent of Public Instruction. E. K. Foster, Tallahassee. Superintendents of Public Schools. Alachua — W. N. Sheats, Gainesville. Baker — Jas. D. Chalker, Sanderson. Bradford — L. B. Rhodes, Lake Butler. Brevard — A. Brady, LaGrange. Calhoun — C. W. Coxwell, Iola. Clay — R. W. Davis, Green Cove Springs. Columbia — Julius Potsdamer, Lake City. Dade — Duval — A. J. Russell, Jacksonville. Escambia — T. M. Scarritt, Pensacola. Franklin — H. C. Hicks, Apalachicola. Gadsden — C. E. L. Allison, Quincy. Hamilton — J. N. Reid, White Springs. Hernando — A. M. C. Russell, Brooksville. Hillsborough — W. P. Henderson, Tampa. Holmes — Whitmill Curry, Izagora. Jackson — S. J. Erwin, Marianna. Jefferson — W. R, Taylor, Waukeena. Lafayette — J. C. Ramsey, Luraville. Leon — H. N. Felkel, Tallahassee. Levy — Syd. L. Carter, Bronson. Liberty — T. H. Jackson, Rock Bluff. Madison — S. J. Perry, Madison. Manatee — Felix J. Seward, Pine Level. Marion — M. L. Payne, Fleminton. Monroe — J. V. Harris, Key West. Nassau — L. W. Higginbotham, Callahan. Orange— John T. Beaks, Lake Irma. Polk — John Snoddy, Fort Meade. Putnam — J. W. Strickland. Putnam Hall. Santa Rosa — David Turner, Milton. St. John s — C. F. Perpall, St. Augustine. Sumter — A. H. Helvenston, Sumterville. Suwannee — J. O. C. Jones, Live Oak. Taylor — T. J. Faulkner, Perry. LEMONS. 1 i:ir,d,e ::LLr' h0U3C l B. REEDY, Savannah, Gil

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AND PANS OP ALL SIZES, MADE BY JOHN > ROUliKE, 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. I I I Volusia — L. D. Huston, Daytona. Wakulla — Crawfordville. Walton — Jno. C. Douglass, Euchee Anna. Washington — D. H. Horn, Orange Hill. County School Commissioners Alachua — B. J. Early, Waldo; H. C. Parker, Gainesville; B. W. Powell, Micanopy ; W. H. Robinson, Gainesville. Baker — John R. Henderson, Darbyville ; John Jones, Darbyville ; William Lesesne, Sanderson; William Williams, Darbyville. Bradford — D. L. Alvarez, Starke ; W. G. Ball, Lake Butler ; P. S. Crews, ; C. Waterman Douglass, ; J. W. Smiley, ; Henry Fouts. Brevard — John M. Dixon, Titusville; M. E. English, Titusville; B. R. Wilson, Titusville. Calhoun — I. M. Bush, ; A. J. Wood, Jr. Clay — W. D. Colmar, ; Marion Geiger, Middleburg; G. W. Hall, Middleburg ; T. M. Joiner, ; M. W. Ordway. Columbia — Jacob Ellis, Welbourn ; Green H. Hunter, Lake City ; Daniel Talbott. Dade — Octavius Aimer, Miama ; William H. Gleason, Miama ; William H. Hunt, Miama. Duval — Louis I. Fleming, Jacksonville ; Richard Kinloch, Jacksoville ; T. N. McCormick. Escambia — John C. Avery, Pensacola ; W. K. Hyer, Pensacola ; E. Whitmore, ; J. Dennis Wolf, Pensacola; P. K. Yonge, Pensacola. Franklin — D. W. Case, ; Edward Smith, ; W. T. Gadsden — James A. McDonald, Quincy ; W. B. Malone, Quincy ; N. P. Quarterman, Quincy. Hamilton — W. H. Brown, Jasper ; Matthew M. Dees, Jennings ; Thomas J. Law, Jasper; B. F. Ulmstead. Hernando — J. E. Burnside, Fort Dade ; Jacob Clements, Brooksville ; J. L. Colding, Fort Dade ; George W. Geiger, Brooksville ; D. G. Hennis, Brooksville; J. R. Obery, Fort Dade. Hillsboro — Dr. F. A. Bush, Tampa ; W. P. Henderson, Tampa ; A. V. Smith, Alafia. Holmes — James S. Calk, Cerro Gordo; Joseph N. Harris, Izagora ; Edmund Majors, Izagora ; Lovell Moore, Ponce De Leon ; John Skinner, Ponce De Leon ; W. W. Stott, Lookout. Jackson — Robert Kidd, — ; George McNealy, Marianna; Theodore West, Marianna; John White, Marianna. rTIHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY possesses an excellent bouquet. A S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA. 14 Turner.

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£ V & W T?v WAY-CROSS SHORT LINE ^•5 A “ T T TO FLORIDA. I T 2 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Jefferson — S. C. Bott, Monticello ; John A. Patton, Monticello ; J. H. Tucker, Monticello; J. J. Urille, Bailey’s Mill; Albert Walker, Williamsburg. LaFayette — William G. Brown, Lamb ; David R. Townsend, New Troy ; Thomas C. Townsend, New Troy; Norman Weaver, New Troy. Levy — W. H. Anderson, Cedar Key ; N. A. Blitch, ; Ira J. Carter. Liberty — W. J. Farrell, Coe’s Mill. Madison — E. J. Alexander, Madison; T. A. Hall, Madison; C. Lassiter, ; T. W. Mays, ; S. B. Thomas. Manatee — E. J. Gates, Manatee ; J. W. Kendy, ; W. H. Simons. Marion— P L. Dorin, Ocala ; G. M. Grummels, Ocala ; T. D. McConnell, Ocala; James A. McDavid, Ocala; W. S. Moser, Ocala. Monroe — J. A. Delgordo, Key West ; E. O. Gwynn, Key West ; Cornelius F. Kemp, Key West ; E. O. Lake, Key West; E. B. Ransom, Key West. Nassau — J. D. Buford, Callahan ; Henry Davis, Callahan; L. W Higgenbothan, Callahan; W. Naylor Thompson, Fernandina. Orange — J. I. Combs, Apopka; William H. Holden, Orlando; W. Killimer, Altamonte ; J. N. Whitner, Jr., Fort Reid; E. A. Wilson, Fort Mason. Polk — J. W. Brandon, ; W. T. Carpenter, Bartow; J. M. Hayman, Bartow ; P. R. McCrary, Bartow. Putnam — B. P. Calhoun, Palatka ; J. T. Cauthern, Putnam Hall ; W. R. De Witt, San Mateo ; C. D. Williams, Cresent City. St. Johns — P. Capshaw, Picolata ; A. E. Lopez, St. Augustine ; T. W. Moore, Fruit Cove ; E. Root, St. Augustine; M. S. Usina, j St. Augustine. Santa Rosa — Louis Crane, Milton ; William Diamond, Milton ; Richard Duval, Milton ; William Judge, Milton ; Z. Swift, Milton. Sumter — A. H. Helvingston, ; D. C. Hull, Webster; J. A. Kimmons, ; Henry Martin, Wildwood ; A. P. Roberts, Leesburgh. Suwannee — W. F. Bynum, Live Oak ; J. W. Gamble, Clayland ; W. W. Hawkins, Live Oak ; J. O. C. Jones, Live Oak. Taylor — A. J. Faulkner, Perry; John Kelly, Perry; S. A. Wilcox, Perry. Volusia — J. H. Bodine, ; B. F. Harris, Enterprise; John Sauls, Enterprise. Wakulla — W. J. Coleman, Crawfordville ; Edgar Nims, Tallahassee ; John L. Thomas, Tallahassee ; E. J. Watts, Crawfordville. Unroifril Tlriofl QTIfl Proon TPpilit iar g e variety, at J. B. REEDY’S, Grocer, I U1 KIP U1 lull dllll III Gull I 1 1 (111 and Importer of Fruit, Savannah, Ga.

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Sugar Mills and Pans. They are Strong and Durable. WM. itEHOE & C6., Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 1 1 3 Walton — Preston Darby, ; L. D. McCullom, ; Duncan G. McLeod, ; Alexander McSwainWashington — C. M. Hooper, Orange Hill ; W. Miller, ; Joseph W. Roche, ; J. M. Simmons, ; John E. White. Judicial Department. SUPREME COURT. Meets semi-annually second Tuesday in January and June, in the Supreme Court Room in the State Capitol at Tallahassee. Chief Justice — E. M. Randall, Jacksonville. Associate Justices — R. B. VanValkenburgh, St. Nicholas; J. D. Westcott, Jr., Tallahassee. Clerk — Charles H. Foster, Tallahassee. Marshal — Alexander Mosely, Tallahassee. United States Circuit Courts. FIFTH JUDICIAL COURT. Comprising the States of Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas. William B. Woods, Atlanta, Ga., Supreme Court Justice, assigned ; Don A. Pardee, New Orleans, La., Circuit Judge. NORTHERN DISTRICT. Terms — Tallahassee, first Monday in February; Pensacola, first Monday in March; Jacksonville, first Monday in December. U. S. Attorney — E. M. Cheney, Jacksonville. Marshal — James H. Durkee, Jacksonville. Clerks — Philip Walter, Jacksonville; W. W. Whorton, Pensacola; Charles H. Foster, Tallahassee. SOUTHERN DISTRICT. Terms — Tampa, first Monday in March ; Key West, first Mondays in May and November. U. S. Attorney — G. B. Patterson, Key West. Marshal— Peter Williams, Key West. Clerk — E. O. Locke, Key West. United States District Courts. NORTHERN DISTRICT. Counties comprising Alachua, Baker, Bradford, Brevard, Calhoun, Clay, Columbia, Dade, Duval, Escambia, Franklin, Gadsden, rilHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is distilled from the choicest Jqualities of Grain. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga.

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S F & W Ev ^ = Ij IZNT E o., j• CX W -LVJ. QUICK TIME. 1 14 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Hamilton, Holmes, Jackson, Jefferson, LaFayette, Leon Levy, Liberty, Madison, Marion, Nassau, Orange, Putnam, St. John, Santa Rosa, Sumpter, Suwannee, Taylor, Volusia, Wakulla, Walton and Washington. Terms — Middle Division — Tallahassee, first Monday in February. Eastern Division — Jacksonville, first Monday in December. Western Division — Pensacola, first Monday in March. District Judge — Thomas Settle, Jacksonville. U. S. Attorney — E. M. Cheney, Jacksonville. Marshal — James H. Durkee, Jacksonville. Clerks — Philip Walter, Jacksonville ; Charles H. Foster, Tallahassee, Middle Division ; W. W. Whorton, Pensacola, Western Division. SOUTHERN DISTRICT. Counties comprising Hernando, Hillsborough, Polk, Manatee, and Monroe. Terms — Tampa, first Monday in March ; Key West, first Monday in May. District Judge — James W. Locke, Key West. U. S. Attorney — G. B. Patterson, Key West. Marshal — Peter Williams, Key West. Clerk — E. O. Locke, Key West. Collectors of U. S. Customs. Apalachicola — Seth M. Sawyer. Cedar Key — Fernandina — John W. Howell. Jacksonville — Edward Higgins. Key West — F. N. Wicker. Pensacola— J. M. Tarble. St. Augustine— F E. Witzell. United States Land Office. Located at Gainesville, Alachua county. L. A. Barnes, Register ; John F. Rollins, Receiver. State Land Office. Located at Tallahassee, Leon County. P. W. White, Land Commissioner, January 1st, 1883. Total acres on hand, 8,781,5 l TT0‘ COCOANUTS B REEDY IS THE ONLY IMPORTER IN SAVANNAH, GA.

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Counties comCircuit Judges State Attorneys TIMES OF HOLDINGCOURT. prising theJuand and I County Seat. dicial Circuits. Residences. Residences. Spring Term. Fall Term. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 1$ P'P |S • g O a a oS2o2.2 ^ g O o § |s Slflll o 'O o o a C w r-Cfl'C b O o U O h 3 o O ^ .-M O Q) *N m fa fci w in H a §5 ^ s s ISigaag oZ=.S.Ss a -5 t b b >> — £ >>a3=3 oj >, £33 oi -c 'O T3 5 -o 5 a a T3 a to C^lS o g|*,gSSs 3 o O *3 ej ._ .2 45 a> ai O t-1 fa fa £-t i/3 7} fa *j js r^'O £ £ § 3 £ .2 .2 a! o .tJ 43 faCfltflfafaH x w j 03 vi “ S' 0 1 2 Hi s 5 3 H Eh'C Eh£! 73 •ds>a (/ O r/ S £ W £ £ 6 *h CD •— O CL, EHfasGfafaax I-l — t 03^ gs o 3 O s^r-s* |l^s ^OhOPO §S Og S a ^ ca 3 t; o i o i n 22 o u 33 g wcofacoEBfa 4 0 'gS_: .•C'S^ C43>£.5 fl >>— .S 'o £ E 3 ^ s gleg's* ggl§s>s§ .ag^g-a^g p-'S-S'S*5 QD .w 9 2 ; 03 O .2 43 .2 g 43 h fa fa Eh Em Q) E-t fa •g ft *< e £ a <3 r* ^ ^ faH Jgd -^2 ft rt 43 ftac h< 1 < cogcofi sSi&sl 'S'§?'S o o • a ^43 g £ -? 10 -> ? 3 to .13 .2 8 o £ 43 fa go GO Em fa EH & &; o*-c g 5 J* 5 5-2 s "" £ £.5 £ >> >>. =3 S 3 oi fl 3 >>13 >.0-0 rrt TO tfl d CO Cfi Wi T3 t 3 0? "" t. c lipj sesl| 45 43 43 E -1 ^ ’* J -^ 73 ^ > u s oi n<5 5 >> >>— 1 — < ££ >>> ££ 03 S oca oog^ og s o JO g O 43 cC oi ’2 o ^3 -a oi >> c a’O a o O S33 ’ ’ O C ro 'd 1 S C3 S .h --h w ^ .. w w OOOXS^h Oj 0 — wS fe 1 H *2 3 i (h o a> 5 I* .*-5 CQ &> os r* o • e3 <<*-3 o M O s• to Oi 03 l^ 41 J M |s w a s a 4 3 ^ e3 — PQ > 2 s 1 3 o > o *f 0 oi“d >.^ r S S 01 os ^ a O ” 5 ueiilsroicD^ oioi^aiso S c3 u 33 *4 w?:d faQ^^CJiJt-j hJSWajO ^Opqeqow S.s S 3 X) §§ &33 a o y)Q .aJ • ^ • : o 2 o > S'S ^ 03 : rj / a c S s< > z s a | ^2 a a bo

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County Officers, 116 FRORIDA STATE GAZETTEER — < S-i o 10 to a a •" P a S3 o to bC .9 ’a p, m 5 £ 5— o ^ p > a o s £ jjj ^ o o c$2 o§ 33 a a ca § 5 rt 5! fo O A 8-O ^ 2o,fHa4fi-.so^ ^ rr> fO d — !S ^p-s: cj ^ -ko hO L '^S^S pp SC^.Sp a a SI?<6S2hco bfl IJcnfg'jSg^ 0 6 !0 1 “* T S 53? so^ co Q-| k. -~*~j a83B Vfc ££ tii.7 fl O g 3 3 3 I §2 3* fi fi oh jKMr'vS-iGj;^ o 3 J ft o o J to Ph — P co o cub |^5^|lSsfg^§Sj„ u aP rjh'y i p-, T .rp£j c ^.22^ G ^ : a „P £ a >9 -P Pm t3 h o-.PS a a CD 5 3 S £ §flo ft -c?S§ ?S5^5H§sl| r '. -g o telfl fe|0 CC-O^^ d w ~£ w 0,99; H.h n 53 r^ c'O to ^ ‘I'Jsj Db* ? c s! 2 o zs o h'S73 o oj c/o g £d — c £> ^3^7 3St:d8!rtfeoO(uofaw-Ofjt r i. s Lu.. p o^. Oh m rt (0 xn < d ^ h-3 H "! o t '2s’c sS t>. a feo ft::,0 hl'23:^ •-T ^ _Q •“! d rk < ^!>OjH,H"Ci0.rtt >n nai,wx H 'U Cj r ^(3ifi5i|^o^2g^e^gg£S*g^|8g!S^! “W Op.c^rBk 0 w t"fcHPHpq^ Ph gpSga, T gWfc&^OiE I I 03 >* §£o| P 3 O ^ 2 O a O oj +3.n a ^ b P p *9 5 o e5 C p *> §2 3^2 Mh a p -oc’ c fi'oSo b .ro2, .. S ~ s ^9^kPoaO' e £^N23 9.9 = T .> g c 7 $Pm a ’£ 3 3 a! fe 3 2.2 O^ 2H 2 ,£ 02 a p *’ u 0)gt-5 a G „ *2 w ra !_ ^ 0 ^ 7 S -a £>s r-i u y-> QJ ^ O OP 5 ^ d ?5 2 a? T55 0 ^3 ^ 300 ESr1 vig9 oj-^o§ 9E = a i n m u goiis ig-,=_„uo „ l!!.*l ,sa .^tMl^ aiSaS8flso ^i | w 5 a o ce^ a 9, Sr-| “ a, 3 ?? a O’? Scb :>s s -s'= ^ a -gH;.||se gs a^|S| 1 Sfl is l^llll s| 6 gl£s| ggSWegMg S 1 i-aPW-^li-iM^PHPh-aW^-sh-a^Hp^^iDh^^i-iPHWPi-akco to -Ifi 3 +-TP 3 3 g a -h a M ft> 9 b2^ O ^ -2 ^ a) alw| gea^K'igSsfe L a n 3 5 J & be •S'gol o a op 0) jq.o ^ j-hlj d)U u w •. d 9 0; ^ -Tj ^ ^ | O r/j Or ^ ^ ^ -rH C .— ^ 'a-a ^S^.O .r.^-g .2 a^ g^o e3 fl si .a pp rn uin^ ^3 aw >,53 1oa S w o.2 5 sOigMj^ oPg.So.2 B S c i-atf i-ai-a^ g 29 ? te o go 3 ^^ll^NsoSS^^sia^g rap2^ 3 ^ 2 rt Sooi? 2 S ) a fl ^0QW^ w oMMgS ag M fS 0 g ,p2^oap^5>pWp w $= fe w)^ N .ia l-S’gg.S^S §2jSiS‘Csa a t. W a m ^ >S,a •-'o„-2-: H 2 ( J S3 ca ^ G 2 a p a ^ o -,2 jn 7 ^ 2 2^ S 3 Pui o B p t! -9 rr> t: ? j S 3 o.P r ^ H 0 n s kcS d 9-w j^ bc^i'e g-a raall3 g^-l' OS k-S Cfl ^ H-; M hO d O OP^g f ^Sl^S C-S a a o^k S^S'BS.f ga^O 3 ”g 2 a ^ p ^ 3 § ^Wa p o^a a 3 p g arq.BxJ^j G w S MO SSa w 5 w 2^s 'John Roche,

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Sugar Mills and Pans. A full Stock of all Sizes. WM. KEHOE & CO., Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. ii 7 United States Commissioners A. R. Meek, Philip Walter and C. L. Robinson, Jacksonville; D. U. Fletcher and C. B. Buckner, Enterprise; Hugh E. Miller, Ocala; Jesse D. Cole, Monticello ; LeRoy D. Ball and Charles A. Choate, Tallahassee ; Walter Tate and W. W. Whorton, Pensacola ; Charles W. Lewis, Fernandina; E. J. Cotteloh, Cedar Key ; Calvin Gillis, Gainesville ; B. F. Oliveross, St. Augustine ; George F. Baltzell, Marianna. AND THE DATES OF TIIE EXPIRATION OF THEIR TERM OF OFFICE. Alachua — J. E. W. Markey, La Grosse, March 16, 1885 ; William H. Robertson, Gainesville, May 21, 1885 ; W. W. Scott, Gainsville, August 1, 1885 ; Lewis R. Thomas, Franklin, May 2, 1885. Baker — M. G. Perry, Sanderson, May 8, 1885 ; James Combs, Sanderson, May 14, 1885 ; William E. Home, Darby ville, July 23, 1884; C. B. McClenny, June 2, 1885. Bradford — M. R. Beesley, Santa Fee, March 31, 1885 ; A. C. Odam, Providence, March 22. 1885 ; John G. Rimes, Lake Butler, April 6, 1885; Jacob G. Roberts, Lake Butler, July 16, 1885; Edward A. Todd, Lawtey, March 20, 1885. Brevard — A. Brady, LaGrange, June 19, 1885; W. H. Frier, Kissimmee, July 5, 1885 1 G. S. Hardee, Rock Ledge, July 4, 1885 ; Robert Morrow, Titusville, June 19, 1885 ; P. D. Wesson, Titusville, July 5, 1885. Calhoun — Alfred Bailey, Chipola, April 16, 1885 W. B. Clark, Maysville, January 9, 1886 ; N. L. Connell, Wewahichka, April 24, 1885 ; W. G. Mumford, West Wynnton, April 5, 1 885 ; Jasper Musgrove, Chipola, April 4, 1885. Clay — Christian Black, Green Cove Springs, March 26, 1885 ; George W. Broer, Greencove Springs, March 20, 1885 ’ A. W. Fowler, Middleburg, March 26, 1885 ; E. N. Perry, Kingsley, Ma*rch 26, 1885 ; Lewis Wilson, Green Cove Springs, March 24, 1885. Columbia-— W.T. Bacon, Lake City, June 29, 1885 ; J. V. Brown, Suwannee Shoals, June 11, 1885 ; George C. Mattox, Lake City, April 26, 1885 George E. Whetstone, Mikesville, May 7, 1885 ; James E. Young, Lake City, April 17, 1885. Dade — Henry Filer, Key West, December 18, 1885; H. F. Mammon, Lake Worth, May 15, 1884; Samuel Rhodes, Miama, July 17, 1885 ; William Wagner, Miama, July 23, 1884. Duval — Francis F. L. Engle, Jacksonville, March 18, 1884; rflHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY IS ABSOLUTELY PURE. A S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, SOLE AGENTS, SAVANNAH, GA. County Commissioners

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S, F. & W. Ry. Elegant Passenger Equipments; Westinghouse Air Brakes; Miller Platforms; Janey Couplers. 1 1 8 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Miles Price, Jacksonville, March 22, 1885 ; H. Robinson, Jacksonville, March 16, 1885 i Harrison Starratt, Tisonia, April 25, 1885. Escambia — S. S, Harvey, Pensacola, March 17, 1885 5 Thomas W. Hutchinson, Pensacola, September 13, 1885 1 JMcCrary, Bluff Springs, January 14, 1885 I FE. Richardson, Molina, December 16, 1885 ; Albert Riera, Pensacola, January 18, 1885. Franklin — John J. Berry, Carrabella, September 8, 1884; J. C. Brayton, Apalachicola, April 5, 1885 5 E. F. Labatur, Apalachicola, November 22, 1885 ; John Partridge, Apalachicola, February 15, 1884; John G. Ruge, Apalachicola, April 21, 1885. Gadsden — John T. Dismukes, Quincy, October, 22, 1885 5 D. A. McDonald, Quincy, October 22, 1885 ; William Munroe, Jr., Quincy, July 6, 1885; G. W. Shelfer, Concord, July 7, 1885; A. W. Snider, Glen Julia, February 12, 1885. Hamilton — C. F. Cone, Mute Springs, March 26, 1885 ; Sampson Farell, Jasper, March 14, 1885 5 William Stone, Jennings, August 24, 1884; J. D. Tuton, Jasper, March 23, 1885. Hernando — S. B. Colding, Barksville, March 23, 1885 ; Marshall Morton, Crystal River, July 4, 1884; E. C. Peterson, Barksville, March 20, 1885; William Priest, Crystal River, July 28, 1884; A. C. Summers, Ft. Dade, March 16, 1885. Hillsborough — R. J. Booth, Bay View, December 4. 1885 ; W. B. Henderson, Tampa, March 27, 1885 ; W. S. Knight, Cork, April 28, 1885 ; James A. Moody, Keysville, April 28, 1885 ; Simeon E. Sparkman, Cork, May iq. 1885. Holmes — N. M. Carroll, Fair Play, April 12, 1885 ; James W. Hathaway, Cerro Gordo, April 10, 1885 ; Charles R. Kelley, Argyle, July 16, 1885 ; W. W. Scott, Geneva, Alabama, March 29, 1884. Jackson — W. J. Daniel, Marianna, April 23, 1885 ; Henry Green, Dellwood, March 22, 1885 ; Adam McNealy, Marianna, January 30, 1885 ; C. B. Pledger, Marianna, March 8, 1885 ; J. H. Stephens, Greenwood, April 23, 1885. Jefferson — C. T. Carroll, Monticello, October 25, 1885 ; D. H. Bryan, Monticello, November 8, 1885 5 J* B. Roach, Waukeenah, December 4, 1885 ; George W. Taylor, Monticello, October 29, 1885. LaFayette — Thomas J. Ginto, Hatch Bend, March 27, 1885 ; J. F. Hart, Steinhatchie, April 19, 1885 ; Paul Hatch, Hatch Bend, April 14, 1885; Moses N. McCall, Bula, April 13, 1885. Leon — John Bradford, Tallahassee, September 25, 1885 ; John McDougald, Tallahassee, September 12, 1885 ; John N. Maige, Tallahassee, September 12, 1885 ; Junius S. Taylor, Centreville, October 1, 1885 ; W. R. Wilson, Tallahassee, September 27, 1885. Consi g n y ur Oranges to J. B. REEDY, the largest X 1UI lUtl Vfl Clllgtj Dealer in FRUIT in Georgia at SAVANNAH.

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m W A I OF ALL KINDS FURNISHED BY JOHN tv 01. 11 liOURKE, 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. I IQ Levy — William Batty, Cedar Keys, May io, 1885 ; W. P. Edwards, Williston, June 19, 1885 ; William Gomm, Bronson, May 9, 1885 ; William B. Medlin, Otter Creek, November 9, 1885 ’> Samuel Quincy, Bronson, May 9, 1885. Liberty — C. S. Coe, Coe’s Mill, May 22, 1884 ; W. H. Gunn, Jr., Rock Bluff, June 7, 1884; S. J. Revell, Bristol, March 28, 1885. Madison — A. J. Coffee, Madison, March 8, 1885 1 A. Livingston, Madison, March 8, 1885 ; James M. Martin, Hamburg, March 8, 1885 ; Chandler H. Smith, Madison, March 8, 1885 ; JJWalker, Ancilla, March 14, 1885. Manatee — Peter Brown, P'ort Green, April 10, 1885 ; W. Carlton, Pine Level, April 10, 1885 ; R. C. Hendry, Davidson, January 25, 1885; H. H. Norris, Pine Level, April 10, 1885 ; John J. Wimbish, Palmetto, March 28, 1885. Marion — John L. Carney, Lake Weir, June 19, 1885 ; Louis Fox, Ocala, March 28, 1885 : J. C. Matthews, F'lemington, May 3, 1885 ; Thomas F. Winston, Camp Izard, March 28, 1883. Monroe — George H. Curry, Key West, September 13, 1885; Lawrence Higgs, Key West, September 13, 1885 1 M. Pinder, Key West, March 14, 1885; J. Fogarty, Key West, March 27, 1885; John W. Sawyer, Key West, May 21, 1885. Nassau — Jefferson Higginbotham, Kings Ferry, June 26, 1885 ; W. O. Jeffreys, Fernandina, March 14, 1884; William Johnson, Callahan, June 28, 1885 ; J. H. Jones, Callahan, March 13, 1885. Orange — A. S. Campbell, Kissimmee, — ; John H. Campbell, Acron, March 21, 1885 ; George E. Sawyer, Sanford, April 2, 1885; David B. Stewart, Apopka, March 21, 1885; Dr. King Wylly, Sanford, March 28, 1885. Polk — W. H. Hancock, Cook, April 4, 1885 ; John Harris, Bartow, April 9, 1885 ; John Hooker, Ft. Meade, April 9, 1885 ; D. Hughes, Bartow, June 25, 1885 ; D. W. Proctor, Keysville, April 21, 1885. Putnam — A. J. Beach, Palatka, August 1, 1885 ; W. A. Evans, Federal Point, September 26, 1884 ; J. E. Marshall, July 17, 1885 ; Clark Stephens, Welaka, March 12, 1885 ; J. J. Wimberly, Palatka, May 2, 1885. St.Johns — Otto Gudemath, Florence, February 28, 1885 ; Joseph E. Masters, Racy Point, April 1, 1885 J Wm. C. Middleton, St. Augustine, February 25, 1885 I Alexander Wedman, St. Augustine, February 10, 1885. Santa Rosa — W. E. Anderson, Blackwater, June 14, 1885 5 James M. Cable, Chaffin, March 30, 1885 ; Lewis Crane, Milton, March 31, 1885; Berry Dixon, Milton, April 2, 1885; Wm. B. Gaines, Milton, March 31, 1885. T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is soft and mellow to the taste. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA. 15

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S., F. & W. By FAST MAIL TRAINS THROUGH WITH BUT FEW STOPPING POINTS. 120 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Sumter — R. L. Camthers, Wild Wood, January 17, 1885 ; M. W. D. Chapman, Wild Wood, March 26, 1885 ; David Collins, Webster, July 14, 1885 ; A. F. Williams, Sumterville, July 14, 1885 ; G. M. T. Wilson, Okeehumkee, March 36, 1885. Suwannee — W. R. Fulford, Live Oak, March 27, 1885 5 William P. Moseley, Live Oak, March 21, 1885 ; Robert F. Rogers, Little River, March 27, 1885 ; John O. Ross, Live Oak, February 26, 1885 ; J. C. Small, Luraville, March 24, 1885. Taylor — J. H. Courtney, Perry, March 28, 1885 ; C. A. Kelley, Spring Worries, March 28, 1885 5 James H. Pappell, Shady Grove, March 30, 1885 5 Samuel H. Peacock, Perry, May 19, 1 885 ; Moses Simmons, Perry, May 24, 1885. Volusia — J. H. Bodine, Enterprise, April 23, 1885 ; G. G. Bryan, Glencoe, November 4, 1884; T. F. Drudy, Emporia, April 27, 1885 ; J. C. Seiser, Ormond, April 27, 1885; C. P. Wilcox, DeLand, April 17, 1885. Wakulla — R. W. Ashmore, Sopchoppy, July 6, 1885 ; R. M. Lawton, Crawfordville, July 4, 1885; H. C. Rehwinkel, Crawfordville, July 4, 1885; J. H. Ezell, Crawfordville, July 26, 1885. Walton — Angus L. Anderson, Sterling, November 1, 1885 ; A. L. M. Caskill, Euchee Anna, April 3, 1885 ; Obediah Edge, Crestview, August 26, 1885 ; Michael King, Freeport, September 6, 1885 ; J. J. Ward, Freeport, June 19, 1885. Washington — Edward Everett, Chipley, January 4, 1886; S. H. Gainer, Orange Hill, May 31, 1884; J. E. Galloway, Mills Ferry, April 17, 1884 ; James Yates, Jr., Vernon, May 8, 1885. SAVANNAH, GA handles more FLORIDA ORANGES THAN ANY HOUSE SOUTH. TRY HIM.

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Sugar Mills and Pans. Our Mills run perfectly true. WM. KEHOE & CO., Iron Founders, Savannah, G-a. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 1 2 I Counties and County Seats. A comparative population, showing the growth and increase of Counties by the official returns of 1870-1880, their area in square miles and number acres of land contained in each. Counties. Population 1870. Population 1880. Sq. Miles No. of Acres. County Seats. Alachua 17,328 16,462 1,260 806,400 Gainesville. Baker 1,325 2,303 500 320,000 Sanderson. Bradford..* 3,671 6,112 550 352,000 Lake Butler. Brevard 1,216 1,478 4,390 2,809,600 Titusville. Calhoun 998 1,580 1,160 742,400 Blounts town. Clay. 2,098 2,838 640 409,600 Green Cove Springs. Columbia .... .... 7,335 9,589 860 551,400 Lake City. Dade 85 275 7,200! 4,608,000 Miami. Duval 11,921 19,432 900 576,000 Jacksonville. Escambia 7,817 12,156 720 460,800 Pensacola. Franklin 1,256 1,791 690 541,600 Apalachicola. Gadsden 9,802 12,169 540 345,600 Quincy. Hamilton 5,749 6 790 540 345,600 Jasper. Hernando 2,938 4 248 1,700 1,088,000 B rooks ville. Hillsborough 3,216 5,814 1,300 832,000 Tampa. Holmes 1,572 2.170 540 345,600 Cerro Gordo. Jackson 9,528 14'372 100 640,000 Marianna. Jefferson 13,398 16,065 560 358,400 Monti cello. LaFayette 1,783 2,441 940 601,600 New Troy. Leon 15,236 19,662 900 576,000 Tallahassee. Levy 2,018 5,767 940 601,600 Bronson. Liberty 1,050 1,362 800 512,000 Bristol. Madison 11,121 14,798 850 544,000 Madison. Manatee 1,932 3,544 4,680 2,995,200 Pine Level. Marion 10,804 13,046 1,680 1,075,200 Ocala. Monroe 5,657 10,940 2,600 1,664,000 Key West. Nassau 4,247 6,635 640 499.600 Fernandina. Orange 2,195 6,618 2,250 1,440,000 Orlando. Polk 3,169 3,181 2,060 1,388,400 Bartow. Putnam 3,821 6,261 860 550,400 Palatka. St. John’s 2,618 4,535 1,000 640,000 St. Augustine. Santa Rosa 3,312 6,645 1,260 806,500 Milton. Sumter 2,952 4,686 1,380 883,200 Sumterville. Suwannee 3,556 7,161 660 422,400 Live Oak. Taylor 1,453 2 279 1,080 691,200 Perry. Volusia 1,723 3*294 1.340 857,600 Enterprise. Wakulla 2,506 2 723 580 371,200 Crawfordville. Walton 3,041 4*201 1.360 870,400 Euchee Anna. Washington 2,301 4,089 1,330 211,200 Vernon. Total 187,748 269,493 54,240 34,713,600 Male. Female Native. Foreign Population of State— 1880. 136,444 133,049 259,584 .9,909 White Colored No. of voters Total number of inhabitants 142,605 126,690 61,699 269,493 T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY possesses an excellent bouquet. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAYANNAH, GA.

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8., F. & W. Ey. Florida Hispatcli. Past Proiglit Line. 122 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER RAILROADS. Florida Transit Railroad Company. B. S. Henning, President, N. Y. ; C. D. Willard, Vice-President, N. Y. ; M. M. Lawson, Treasurer, N. Y. ; D. E. Maxwell, General Superintendent ; A. O. MacDonell, General Passenger and Ticket Agent and Auditor ; F. B. Papy, General Freight Agent; W. G. Coleman, Trav. Passenger Agent, Jacksonville, Fla. ; General Office, Fernandina, Florida. CONNECTIONS. — Fernandina, with New York & Fernandina Steamship Company’s Line to and from Nassau, with Steamer “ Florence,” for Brunswick ; with Steamers “ Palatka ” and “ City Point,” for Savannah and Charleston ; with Steamer “ Flora,” daily to and from St. Mary’s, Georgia ; and semi-weekly to and from St. Mary’s River Landings. Baldwin, with Florida Central Railroad. Waldo, with Peninsula Railroad. Lochloosa, with Steamer “ Alpha,” for all points and landings on Orange Lake. Gainesville, with stage line for Tampa. Cedar Key, with Tampa Steamship Company Line for Tampa, Manatee and Key West ; with Steamer “ Admiral,” for Havana and Cuba ; with Steamer “ Enterprise,” for points on Suwannee River. Jacksonville, St. Augustine and Halifax River Railway Company. W. Jerome Green, Utica, N. Y., President ; J. N. Hayes, Utica, N. Y., Secretary; W. D. Crawford, St. Augustine, Fla., Treasurer and General Manager; H. S. Ming, Jacksonville, Superintendent; G. D. Ackerly, Jacksonville, General Freight and Passenger Agent; 36 miles in operation from Jacksonville to St. Augustine ; over 800 miles will be completed by January, 1885, which will be in operation from Jacksonville to Halifax River. Florida Central & Western Railroad. Benjamin S. Henning, New York, President ; C. D. Willard, New York, Vice-President ; L. M. Lawton, New York, Treasurer; William O. Ames, Jacksonville, Fla., General Freight and PassenTHE ONLY EXCLUSIVE FRUIT HOUSE IN SAVANNAH. GA., IS J. B. REEDY.

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t i H J AGRICULTURAL IRON AND' BRASS WOR^S, #101111 HOlllllO^ 2 BAY STREET, SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 1 23 ger Agent ; William M. Davidson, Jacksonville, General Manager ; Thomas W. Roby, Jacksonville, Cashier; Walter G. Coleman, General Traveling Agent. General office Astor Building, Jacksonville, Florida. Length of road, including its branches from Drifton to Monticello and Tallahassee to St. Marks, is miles. Its connections, going west, with other roads, is the Florida Transit at Baldwin ; Savannah, Florida & Western at Live Oak, and Pensacola & Atlantic at Chattahoochee. It also has connections with steamboats on the Suwannee and Chattahoochee Rivers. Jacksonville,, Tampa & Key West Railway. Wm. Van Fleet, New York, President ; Deming, New York, Secretary and Treasurer; G. W. Bently, Jacksonville, General Manager; M. R. Moran, Jacksonville, General Freight and Passenger Agent ; S. B. Carter, Jacksonville, Chief Engineer. Astor Building, Jacksonville, Fla. Fernandina & Jacksonville Railroad. Same officers as that of Florida Transit and Peninsula Railroad, and is operated by that company. Length of road from Fernandina to Jacksonville 33 miles. It has no other connections except with lines from Jacksonville and Fernandina, and the latter place is its general offices. Florida Southern Railway. John W. Chandler, President, Boston, Mass. ; Sherman Conant, General Manager, Palatka, Fla. ; J. R. Hall, Vice-President, Boston, Mass. ; J. D. Hillister, Superintendent, Palatka, Fla. ; J. C. Telfer, Cashier and Traf. Audr., Palatka, Fla. CONNECTIONS — At Palatka with fast River Steamers for all points in South Florida. St. Augustine, Green Cove Springs, Jacksonville, and all points East, West and North. At Waits’ Crossing with Peninsula Railroad for Waldo. At Perry Junction with Ocala Division for Micanopy, Orange Lake, Ocala and intermediate points. At Gainesville with Transit Railroad for Cedar Keys, Pensacola and New Orleans. At Ocala with Peninsula Railway for all interior points in South Florida, Tampa and Charlotte’s Plarbor and hacks for Silver Springs. Green Cove Springs & Melrose Railroad. Shreve Ackley, President ; A. F. Voglbach, General Superintendent ; R. B. Canova, Secretary and Treasurer; Robert W. T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is soft and mellow to the taste. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.

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124 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Davis, Attorney. Runs from Green Cove Springs southwest to Melrose. Pensacola & Atlantic Railroad. M. H. Smith, President, Louisville, Ky. ; W. D. Chipley, VicePresident and General Superintendent, Pensacola ; F. C. Shepard, General Pass, and Ticket Agent. Connects at Pensacola with the Pensacola branch of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad, the Pensacola and Perdido, the Pensacola and Mobile Railroad and Manufacturing Company, and the steamships to New Orleans, Cedar Keys, Key West and Nassau, at Chattahoochee Landing with the Florida Central and Western Railroad for all points in the central and eastern part of the State and the North and East. Savannah, Florida & Western Railway. H. B. Plant, President ; W. S. Chisolm, Vice-President; H. B. Smith, Secretary; R. G. Fleming, Superintendent ; H. S. Haines, General Manager, Savannah, Ga. ; Wm. P. Hardee. Treasurer, Savannah, Ga. ; Jas. L. Taylor, General Freight and Passenger Agent, Savannah, Ga. ; J. H. Griffin, Passenger Agent. Savannah, Ga. ; C. D. Owens, General Agent, 271 Broadway, N. Y. ; Jonah H. White, Eastern Passenger Agent, 315 Broadway, N. Y. ; J. S. Tyson, Master of Transportation, Savannah, Ga. ; Wm. B. McKee, Comptroller ; J. B. Andrews, Agent, 43 German street, Baltimore, Md. ; J. M. Clement, Agent, Pier 41, S. Wharves, Philadelphia, Pa. General Offices, Savannah, Ga, CONNECTIONS. — Through cars, Savannah to Bainbridge, make semi-weekly connections with steamers for all points on the Flint, Chattahoochee and Apalachicola rivers. Through cars, Savannah to Albany, connecting with the Central Railroad system to all points in Georgia and the West, Southwest and Northwest, via Eufaula and Montgomery, or via Macon and Atlanta. Through trains with double daily passenger service connect at Callahan with the Florida Transit and Peninsula Railroads for all points in South Florida and the Gulf Coast, Key West and the West Indies. At Jacksonville with steamers for St. John’s river landings, St. Augustine and stations on the Florida Southern, the St. John’s and Lake Eustis and the South Florida Railways. At Jacksonville connection is also made with the Florida Central Railroad for interior points. At Live Oak connection is made with the Florida Central and Western Railroad for Madison, Monticello, Tallahassee, Quincy, etc. At New Branford, Candy, Crackers, etc. w Send for PriceList j -JL5m£ 7,

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Sugar Mills and Pans. Our Pans are Smooth and Uniform in Thickness. WM. KEHOE & CO., Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 1 25 (RowlandÂ’s Bluff) connection is made with steamboats for Suwannee river landings and Eastern and Southern Gulf Coast points. At Chattahoochee connection with the Pensacola and Atlantic Railroad for Pensacola, Mobile, New Orleans, Texas and Pacific Coast points and interior Mexico and California. At Jessup, with the Georgia Division of the East Tennessee, Virginia, and Georgia Railroad for Brunswick, Eastman, Hawkinsville, M aeon, Atlanta, Rome, Dalton, Chattanooga and points West and Northwest. At Waycross this line crosses the Brunswick and Albany Railroad, which reaches into a section of the State, famous for its lumber and naval stores and rapidly assuming importance as a wool-producing section. Sanford & Indian River Railway. James E. Ingraham, President ; R. M. Pulsifer, Boston, Mass., Vice-President; H. S. Haines, Chief Engineer; F. H. Rand, Secretary and General Freight and Ticket Agent ; C. C. Haskell, Treasurer; B. R. Swoop, Superintendent; W. McCoy, Auditor; J. E. Brown, Orlando, Resident Engineer. Runs from Sanford to Lake Jessup, and connects with steamboats navigating that lake. Its eastern terminus is Rock Ledge on the Indian river, and is now being constructed to that point. It is only in actual operation from Sanford to Lake Jessup, a distance of seven miles. The general offices and headquarters are in Sanford. South Florida Railway. James E. Ingraham, President ; R. M. Pulsifer, Boston, Mass., Vice-President ; H. S. Haines, Chief Engineer; B. R. Swoop, Superintendent and Manager; F. H. Rand, Secietary and General Freight and Ticket Agent; C. C. Haskell, Treasurer ; W. McCoy, Auditor; J. E. Brown, Orlando, Resident Engineer. Completed from Sanford to Tampa, a distance of 150 miles. Its general offices and headquarters are at Sanford. St. Johns & Lake Eustis Railway. A. J. Lane, President; W. H. Treadwell, Greneral Freight and Passenger Agent ; W. J. Jarvis, Superintendent, Fort Mason, Fla. General Office, Fort Mason, Fla. From Astor to Fort Mason, where it connects with the lake steamers. T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is distilled from the choicest qualities of Grain. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga.

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S, F. & W. Ry. FREIGHT IN THROUGH CARS, IN FAST TRAINS, WITHOUT TRANSFER. 126 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Pensacola & Mobile Railroad and Manufacturing Co. W. F. McCormick, President ; P. K. Young, Secretary, Pensacola, Fla. STATIONS. — Muscogee Wharf, o; Pensacola, 1 mile; Muscogee Mills, 1 6 miles. Pensacola & Perdido Railway. B. F. Simmons President and Superintendent, Pensacola, Fla.; H. W. Simmons, Secretary and Treasurer, Pensacola, Fla. Pensacola for Millview, 10 miles. St. John’s Railway. Richard McLaughlin, Jacksonville, President ; F. M. Clark, Tocoi, General Freight and Passenger Agent ; J. N. C. Stockton, St. Augustine, Treasurer ; John Wescott, St. Augustine, Secretary. General offices Astor Building, Jacksonville, Fla. Length of road 15 miles from Tocoi to St. Augustine, and connects with all steamers on the St. John’s River for North and South. CIDER. I AM HEADQUARTERS FOR CIDER. J. B. REEDY, Grocer and Importer, Savannah, Ga,

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17 i' Mrt i AO GIVEN ON ALL KINDS OF MACHINERY AND REPAIRS, JliSIllllilljGS by JOHN liOUKKE ‘2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 1 27 Newspapers and FeriodicaSs. Names of Papers. Names of Publishers. Where Published. County. Period. Advance-Gazette Advance-Gaz. Pub. Co. Pensacola. Escambia. Weekly. John B. Johnston. Waldo. Alachua. Weekly. H. II. McCreary. Gainesville. Alachua. Weekly. Agriculturist C. Codrington & Co. Leland. Volusia. Weekly. C. A. Wilson & Co. Altoona. Orange. Weekly. Banner-Lacon Banner-Lacon Pub. Co. Ocala. Marion. Weekly. Bee C. L. Fields. Gainesville. Alachua. Daily & Weekly Bulletin 1) M. McAlpin. Live Oak. Suwannee. Weekly. Churchman Episcopal Church. Jacksonville. Duval. Monthly. Citizen F. A. Taylor. Apopka. Orange. Weekly. Commercial Pub. Co. Pensacola. Escambia. Weekly. F.R. Fields. Monticello. Jefferson. Weekly. L. C. Vaughn. Marianna. Jackson. Weekly. Robertson & Russell. Brooksville. Hernando. Weekly. Democrat C. B. Pendleton. Key West. Monroe. Weekly. Ash mead Bros. Jacksonville. Duval. Weekly. Economist R. B. Hilton. Tallahassee. Leon. Weekly. Enterprise R. B. Mitchell. Bronson. Levy Weekly. L. W. Bowley. Pensacola. Escambia. Weekly. Floridian Dorr & Bowen. Tallahassee. Leon. Weekly. Gainesville Southern Gainesville. Alachua. Weekly. .T. B. & J. A. Matthews. Hawthorne. Alachua. Weekly. Guardian J. T. Magbee. Tampa. Hillsborough Weekly. Gulf Coast Progress O. J. Andrew. Biaidentown. Manatee. Weekly. Herald Clark & Graves. Jacksonville. Duval. Daily &Weekly Herald Dawson Bros. Enterprise. Volusia. Weekly. Herald G. W. Pratt. Palatka. Putnam. Weekly. Herald W. W. Keep. Quincy. Gadsden. Weekly. Herald Herald Pub. Co. Tavares. Orange. Weekly. Informant D. W. Boully. Bartow. Polk. Weekly. Intelligencer Whitfield Bros. Live Oak. Suwannee. Weekly. Journal Halifax Printing Co. Daytonia. Volusia. Weekly. Journal Putnam Co. Journal As. Palatka. Putnam. Weekly. ’ Journal J. J. Harris. Sanford. Orange, Weekly. Journal (State). .. J. Ira Gore. Cedar Keysti-, Levy. Weekly. Key of the Gulf H. A. Crane. Key West. Tallahassee. Monroe. Weekly. Land of Flowers — R. Don McLeod. Leon. Weekly. La Opportunidad ... Key West. Monroe. Weekly. Messenger D. H. Moseley. Fort Dade. Hernando. Weekly. Mirror Mirror Pub. Co. Fernandina. Nassau. Weekly. New Era New Era Pub Co. Madison. Madison. Weekly. News. Wiley & Pooser. Manatee. Manatee. Weekly. News Sheppard & Howell. Milton. Santa Rosa. Weekly. News M. S. Jones. Rockledge. Brevard. Weekly. News Menard & Son. Key West. Monroe. Weekly. News-Advance Colley & Protois. Leesburgh. Sumter. Weekly. Orange Growers Gz. L. C. Martin, Micanopy. Alachua. Weekly. Orange Leaf (The).. Jordan & Sheehan. Wildwood, Sumter. Weekly. Orange Ridge Echo. Johnson & Co. DeLand. Volusia. Weekly. Pilot J. A. Matthews. Melrose. Clay. Weekly. John P. Whitney. W. & W. S. Walker. St. Augustine. Jacksonville. St,, John’s. Weekly. Weekly. Real Estate Exch’ng Duval. Recorder E. D. Beggs. Madison. Madison. Weekly. Reporter C. A. Finlay. Lake City. Columbia. Weekly. Reporter Mahlon Gore. Orlando. Orange. Weekly. St. John’s Weekly.. Semi-Tropical M. C. Cooper. George F. Miner. St. Augustine. St. John’s. Weekly. Lake Eustis. Orange. Weekly. Signal L. L. Charles. Lake-de-Funiak. Walton. Weekly. Spring (The) H. E. Bemis. Green Cove Springs. Ciay. Weekly. Star E. B. Wager. Titusville. Brevard. Weekly. Telegraph W. W. Moore. Starke. Bradford. Weekly. Times J. H. Ancrum. Jasper. Pine Level. Hamilton. Weekly. Times Elam B. Carlton. Manatee. Weekly. Times Gardner & Gardner. Marianna. Jackson Weekly. Times Jones. Varnum & Co. Jacksonville. Duval Weekly. Times B. E. Prevatt. Orange City. Volusia. Weekly. Times ... John F. Shecut. Sumterville. Sumter. Weekly. Ti m es -TTn i rvn Jones, Varnum & Co. Jacksonville. Panasoffkee. Duval. Daily. Weekly. Tomahawk B. L. S. Gladden. Sumter. Tribune H. W. Johnston. Apalachicola. Franklin. Weekly. Tribune T. K. Spencer. Tampa. Hillsborough Weekly. T he celebrated thistle dew whiskey is absolutely pure. S. GU CKENHEIMER & SON, SOLE AGENTS, SAVANNAH, GA. 16

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FLORIDA -ANDBUSINESS DIRECTORY FOR 1884-85. Embracing a Complete List of all Cities, Towns, and Villages, Alphabetically Arranged, Giving a Brief Description of each, and following with an Alphabetical List of Business and Professional Citizens. Abbreviations used in the Directory. advt. advertisment. agrl, agricultural, agt, agent, atty, attorney, cashr, cashier. com mer, commission merchant. comr, commissioner. Co, County or Company, confec, confectionery, e, east, expr, express. Fla C & W Ry, Florida Central & Western Railway. Fla S Ry, Florida Southern Railway. Fla T ny, Florida Transit Railway. F & J Ry, Fernandina & Jacksonville Railway. Gr C S & Melrose Ry, Green Cove Spring & Melrose Railway. genl mdse, general merchandise. J St A & H R Ry, Jacksonville, St. Augustine & Halifax River Railway. JT&K W Ry, Jacksonville, Tampa & Key West Railway. mangr, manager. mnfg, manufacturing. mkr, maker. n, north. P & A R R, Pensacola & Atlantic Railroad. P & M Ry, Pensacola & Mobile Railway. P & P R R Pensacola & Perdido Railroad. pres, president, prof, professor, propr, proprietor. Rev, Reverend. R R, railroad. Ry, Railway, sec, secretary, s, south, St. J. Ry, St. Johns Railway. St J & L E Ry, St. John's & Lake Eustis Railway. S F & W Ry, Savannah, Florida & Western Railway. S & I R Ry, Sanford & Indian River Railway. S F Ry, South Florida Railway. snpt, superintendent, tel, telegraph, treas, treasurer, w, west. ABE’S SPRING. Calhoun county. County seat ; a very small place of no importance more than being the seat of justice. Clarke William, judge Calhoun county. Stone James R, grist mill Land Owners —John F Barfield, J W Bailey, Taylor Bennett, William Clark, W M Clark, Mrs E Doles, L M Griffin, Wm. Linton, J H Linton, Sol Rippin, Mrs Sarah Wood, Wm Wood. FRUIT. When you want Strictly Choice Fruit, at bottom prices, send your orders to J. B. REEDY, Savannah, Ga.

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(jn/tnji Milk and PaTIQ our ^ ls are warranted. WM. KEHOE &C0., uli^ul ill illu dllll Iftlloi Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 129 ACRON. Orange county. A small settlement, situated in a healthy location 6 miles from Altoona, a station on the St John’s & Lake Eustis R R ; has two churches in the vicinity, a public school, and a large steam saw mill ; mails tri-weekly by private conveyance, in connection with DeBarry’s line of steamers on the St John’s river, two miles distant. J H Campbell, P M Barnes C H, contractor and builder Benjamin George, shoemaker Campbell J H, saw and grist mill and notary public Campbell J R, contractor and builder Clark C J Rev, Methodist Dugger Jacob, justice of the peace Henry J E A, mail contractor Lever George, jeweler Roger J P, carpenter Turner f W, shingle mnfr Land Owners — E B Baker, G M Benjamin, John H Campbell, James H Campbell, A M Hazlitt, Mrs S H Hazlitt, J W Henry, George Lever, R A Palmer, D F Proudman, Frank Phillips, O N Perkins, O S Perkins, R W Stokes. ALAFiA. Hillsborough county. Distant from Tampa, the county seat, twenty-three miles, with which it is connected by a tri-weekly stage line. There are several good schools and churches in and near the settlement, also two saw and grist mills. The population is 300. Alafia Academy Blue D M, saw and grist mill and cotton gin Evers J, R, genl mdse, saw and grist mill, cotton gin, and justice of the peace Johnson W F, blacksmith Matched J W, justice of peace Strickling J S, genl mdse Thompson J J, constable Wells G W, genl mdse Wells R M, physician Wiggins M, dentist WiseJ A, druggist Wise L A, genl mdse Land Owners — J H Aycock, John Brittle, W S Bugg, D M Brown, F M Bryant, Wm H Bispham, Bacheus Clyatt, Wm Clemmons, T C Brown, Wm Brown, W F Burts, Thos S Evers, J R Evers, Jasper Evers, W L Frierson, J J E Frierson, E H Giles, William Glover, Wm A Goff, W H Harman, J L Head, M M Head, Eliza Hawkins, C R Howell, T J Plowed, Edwin Hays, J W Hawkins, W E Horn, W P Head, J W Johnson, Enoch Johnson, S E Johnson, W T Johnson, L DS Johnson, James McCoy, C H Merigold, J H Weeks, J S McCoy, A V Smith, J B Simmons, Clay Stephens, Abe Sicenger, Robert Story, J B Tucker, N Tatum, James Tomberlin, Peter Turner, L A Wise, M M Wiggins, A Wordenhoff, R M Weds. T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is distilled from the choicest qualities of Grain. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga.

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S, F. & W. Ky. PULLMAN SLEEPING CAP SERYiCE between ALL IMPORTANT POINTS. 130 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER ALAMO. Gadsden county. Southwest of Quincy, the county seat and nearest railroad point, 12 miles. Samuel H Strom, P M Campbell John E G Rev, Baptist Clark David N, cotton gin Dean Thomas W, cotton gin Goza William W, justice of the peace Green Pleasant F, saw, grist and rice mill and cotton gin Green Richard P Rev, Baptist Strom Samuel H, agt carriages, wagons, hardware, pianos, organs and newsdealer. Vanlandingham Jno Rev, Methodist Land Owners — J E G Campbell, T W Dean, H H Dean, Mrs Ann Fletcher, G W Fletcher, P F Green, R A Green, Mrs Ann E Hare, Mrs M Lawrence, Nancy Mclver, Mrs S A McKeown, O F McKeown, Mrs Ann Richards, Ansel Richards, W N Richards, Mrs Sarah Strom, Mrs Susan Taylor, Fred Withington. ALFORD’S MILL. Walton county. Twentyseven miles north of Euchee Anna, the seat ol justice, and 22 from Argyle, the nearest railroad point on the P & A R R ; mail daily. A Ramsey, P M Bozeman William, blacksmith Davis J F, wheelwright Henderson John, physician Scott George, justice of the peace Ramsey A, genl mdse, saw and grist mill and cotton gin Land Ozvners — A A Padgett, J Miller, Wm Miles, Wm Clark, L M Alford, J F Alford, J C Alford, W D Danley, J Danley, T Barker, D Barker, A Barker, J Henderson, Jose Thompson, Thomas Shufield, F J Davis, G W Pittman, T Powell, T Troope, Wm Crews, J Russell, T Holt, Frank Bell, Geo Bell. ALT^MOUTE. Orange county. Located 10 miles north of Orlando, 13 southwest of Sandford, and west of Snow’s station on the South Florida Railroad, on beautiful, high, rolling pine land, with now and then a little rich hammock. It has for special attractions the famous Hoosier and Shepherd Springs and charming Lake Brantley. The climate, like that of all other high lands in Florida, is perfectly healthy the year round, and many persons who are abundantly able to choose their places of residence live here summer and winter in preference to other countries. Many of the best people of Michigan, Ohio and Massachusetts have been attracted to Altamonte by its favorable location for health and successful orange raising, and the thrift and intelligence of its inhabitants, who are almost entirely Northern people. When going home, stop in and order a box of I T) Omrnnnoli P n the choicest FLORIDA ORANGES, at J Jj. liJiJlsJJ I M V dlllldll, lli

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Sugar Mills, ANb PANS OP ALL SIZES, MADE BY JOHN ROURKE 9 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. I 3 1 The permanent inhabitants of Altamonte will number 200, besides the great rush of Northern visitors who stay there only through the winter. A daily stage line connects Altamonte with Snow’s station, where there is an express and telegraph office. George E Wilson, P M Altamonte Hotel, W E Wood, manager Baldwin F C, notary public Collamer Eva G Mrs, boarding Heron William, physician FI ill D C, butcher Hoegquist Peter, blacksmith and wheelwright Katline J M, justice of the peace Moyers George W, saw and planing mill Wilson George E, genlmdse and real estate and fertilizer agent Wilson Alonzo A, job printer and Florida curiosities Land Owners — David Balentine, W I Brower, Mrs H E Brower, F G Baldwin, Bragg & Cram, Henry Burke, Charles J Bouche, John S Ball, George E Barnes, P C and J K Coiner, Edmund L Clark, Ingraham Fletcher, R D Fuller, Robert Freeman, Kasmer Farago, J M Hower Jr, Clara A Hower, Rebecca j. Hower, John G. Hower, James M Hunt, W W Hunt, Mary H Hunt, Dr P G C Hunt Dr W Heron, W Killmer, Killmer, Balentine & Co, John M Katline, D F Kagey, G W Lewton, Anna A Mace, George McSween, George W Mowyers, G W and S E Mowyers, Merritt & Co, J A Merritt, James O Merritt, John W Miller, Alex McLeod, H A Scompe, Win Scompe, S P Shepherd, Henry Snyder, P and M Tenney, M & M Ter.ney, M Tenney, J E Welch, trust, J C Walton, Mrs W Wheatley, S L Wadsworth, L D Whitney, Annie Wheedin, W H Wheedin, J A Wood, J P Wood, Miss L Wilkins. ALTOONA. Orange county. Altoona is located on the St. John’s & Lake Eustis Railroad, 18 miles from Astor on the St. John’s, and 8 miles from Lake Eustis. The town is built upon rolling land but recently covered with a heavy growth of pine. It is 1 10 feet above the St. John’s River, and 60 feet above Lake Eustis. The streets are laid off parallel with the railroad on both sides, and the corporate limits are marked by the waters of Lakes Minneola, King, Pearl, Daisy, Ouida, and Linn, all beautiful clear water lakes, well stocked with fish. Two years ago there was not more than half a dozen families in the neighborhood, and a pine forest grew where now stands a thriving little town, which contains three general stores, one drug store, one jewelry store, one wagon and blacksmith shop, one saw and planing mill, one hotel and several boarding T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY IS ABSOLUTELY PURE. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, SOLE AGENTS, SAVANNAH, GA.

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P Oj TTT T? T7 FREIGHT itf THROUGH OARS, IN RAST • OC VV JXy trains, without transfer. 132 FRORIDA STATE GAZETTEER houses, one church, one livery stable, and one weekly newspaper — “The Altoona Argus.” Neat and tasteful residences are being built, the streets and fronts cleared up, and in many ways the cross-roads settlement is beginning to assume city airs. Alexander J C, surveyor Alsabrook & Co, saloon Altoona Argus (The), C A Wilson & Co publishers Altoona House, J P. Miller proprietor Bigelow & Smith, saw and plaining mill Berry & Harris, druggists Berry S L, physician Bennett & Hopgood, contractors and builders Davis J C, contractor Davis R G, contractor and builder Gitch E C, livery stable Harris W H, physician Higton W C, real estate Hinson F J, real estate Jackson J H, proprietor Jackson House Jameson S A, justice of the peace Longrin J T, carriage maker Miller G W, genl mdse Miller J A & EC, livery stable Nettles W M, genl mdse Shelton W T, physician White J T, lawyer Wilson C A & Co, real estate agents Land Owners — -Peter Alsabrook, W D Anderson, D L Alexander, Samuel Alexander, John H Brantley, A A Betts, R Boatwright, E A Birdsong, S A Cunningham, Joseph B Carpenter, Annie Clayton, H C Crocker, Clark & Hunt, B G Davis, Daughty & Miller, Deceracy, Eliza Eubank, Wm A Eubank, J R Eubank, L B Folk, W L Grier, Jno B Gibson, George H Gibson, R S Gotherman, Wm Gardner, W C Higdon, John J Hall, Maj Harper, Leonard Harting, Daniel Henry, J M Hutchinson, F J Hinson, Fred Holland, Solomon Holland, J M Hamilton, Ii Hill, C E Hadden, A J Hinson, A T Hart, A Hardee, Doublin Howard, C C Higganbotham, G W Higganbotham, J R Hawkins, W Holland, S H Hamlin, R L Hopson, Joseph Hanson, OT Jewett, Clinton Johnson, J A Johnson, R F Jones, J PI Jones, W F Jones, W M Jones, James Kirkland, L Kinsley, A D Levesque, A C Lawton, C F Law, F M McTureous, M A McTureous, D McRaney, J R Money, R I Milan, H A Oler, John Pike, S H Pike, S L Pattillo, Benj Parks, John A Packard, M W Rowell, W M Rowell, F S Roberts, J J Rutherford, John Robinson, S H Richmond, H Robinson, G A Robinson, T Robinson, Wm H Reed, John Robinson, Shultz, C A Stapleford, W Stewart, J H Shultz, W L Stephens, W G Shores, J W Sprague, W H Steinmeyer, Spillman & Co, S J Simmons, Geo E Strout, W F Shelton, Alex Shelton, James M Thomas, J W Treadwell, APPLES. I make a specialty of Fancy Apples. J. B. REEDY, Grocer, and Importer of Fruit, Savannah, Ga.

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Sugar Mills and Pans. Our Leading Specialty. WM. KEHOE & CO., Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 1 33 R F Trowbridge, J C Tiner, Geo W Tyler, J A Wilson, J T Whitney, F E Woodward, A J Wainwright, James K Webster, H Walters, Samuel Wilson, Jno F Walker. ANCLOTE. Hillsborough county. Situated in the extreme northwest corner of Hillsborough county, at the mouth of Anclote river, on the coast of the Gulf of Mexico and 30 miles from Tampa, the county seat ; stage line daily from Tampa, and steamboats semi-weekly from Cedar Keys. John M Craver, P M Connally Wm N, hotel Craver j C, physician Craver John M, notary public Farquebar A A, saw mill Gause P D, carpenter and constable Hill E A, genl mdse and justice of the peace Hope S E, land agent Marks M R, land agent Morrish G M, genl mdse Pent H F, carpenter Tessier E L, saw and planing mill and shingle mnfr Walton J B, civil engineer and surveyor Webster C D, civil engineer and surveyor Whitcomb — physician La?id Owners — J C Boyer, K Conant, J M Craver, J L Cornell, Charles Carlson, E PI Coleman, A L Donaldson, H T Ferguson, A A Farquhar, Geo Gotee, A Gause, T O Gause, W K Gause, N B Gause, S E Hope, W W Hawkins, D W Morrish, J S Murphy, Hiram Pent, J H Pilfer, M D Patterson, J F Pierce, A H Pierce, R M Scott, Junice Spotfield, C A Youngblood, J B Youngblood, R T Youngblood. ANTHONY PLACE. Marion county. Situated on the Florida, Transit & Peninsula Railroad, 8 miles north of Ocala. It is a thriving little place of some 100 inhabitants. It is surrounded by an extensive region of farming, vegetable and orange raising. S. J. Hussey, P M Anthony E C, saw and plaining mill, cotton gin. Anthony S P, saw and grist mill Armstrong & Acosta, saw mill Boyt R K, justice of the peace Bradshaw A A, tax assessor, Marion Co Collier Orr Rev, Methodist Disbenet John, painter Forbes Davis, meat market Fields Anson, carpenter Guthman, S, genl mdse Gordon N A, carpenter Hussey S J, genl mdse and notary public Hoover A R, contractor and builder Hoover W, painter Hemmingway W S, hotel Kendrick — saw mill Lindner C A. physician Meadows N W, carpenter Owens J B, physician T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY possesses an excellent bouquet. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.

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Q T? Aj W ]?v TIxe Preferred Route -L oo VV .1^. ^TO FLORIDA.^ 134 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Priest & Marsh, cotton gin Richards T J, blacksmith Swain E H, real estate Smith W H, genl mdse Swain J S, cooper Land Owners — Thomas Ambrose, J C Baskin, W H Baskin, A P Baskin, A A Bradshaw, Hardy Crawford, J R Connell, Nathan Davis, Win Duckett, James Duckett, Asberry Duckett, J A Duckett, George Ervin, H Ervin, L Ervin, M Gary, D Gary, A Gary, Abram Green, L Green, E Gaskin, G Griner, H C Gates, James Gates, M Gordon, John Gary, Thomas Gary, A Halcomb, J S Harvey, H Harvey, S J Hussey, Wm Hemmingway, A B Irwin, Thomas James, T P Jones, S Jones, H Jacobs, C Kennedy, I C Kennedrick, Jacob Leitner, T J Leitner, C Leitner, A Leitner, H A Liftman, M Liffman, Wm Liffman, C W Linder, Nace Miles, R G Neil, G A Patterson, C C Priest, A J Shu ford, A J Smith, F V Swain, F J Sterman, Paul White. APALACHICOLA. Franklin county. Is situated at the mouth of the river by the same name, and on the Bay of Apalachicola, is 79 miles southwest of Tallahassee; this city has communications by the Gulf steamers with New Orleans and Pensacola on the west, and with Gulf ports — St. Marks, Cedar Keys, Tampa, Key West, and Cuba — on the east, also with Columbus and Bainbridge, Ga., by river steamers. The principal trade of export is timber, which is on the increase. Fish and oysters abound. Emanuel Smith, P M Alexander M T, druggist and physician Atkins J A, elk Franklin Co Court. Baker R G, judge Franklin Co Brash H, genl mdse Chapman A W, physician Clark J L, blacksmith Cook John, genl mdse and saloon. Coombs & Co, genl mdse saw mill, naval stores, and ship chandlers Cypress Lumber Co, saw mill and lumber Edgebert F J, genl mdse and tax assessor Franklin Co Floyd S A, sheriff Franklin Co Floyd Samuel Mrs, boarding Fogerty physician Fry D, U S inspector hulls Fuller William, boarding Grady John E, State representative Hicks H C, lawyer and Co supt public schools Howland B F, genl mdse and saw mill Humphries H, butcher Hunt & Smith, canning factory Johnson H W, publisher Tribune JohnsonS D, butcher Lind M Mrs, fancy goods Lovett D, city marshal McNeal J M, billiards Messinea F, genl mdse Meyer, A F, saloon Meyer, L S Mrs, genl mdse Raisins, Nuts, Etc. I am the largest Dealer in this line. J. B. REEDY, Savannah, Ga.

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Saw Mill Work OF ALL KINDS FURNISHED BY JOHN IiOUBKE, 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 1 35 Monro, Clay & Co, saw mill Murat A J, genl mdse Ottensesen, — junk Patton George A, tax collector Franklin Co Patton & Pearce, genl mdse Phillips, physician Pickett, M C, lawyer Pohlman C A Miss & Co, fancy goods Porter & Grady, genl mdse Reiley H, blacksmith Robinson Mary Mrs, boarding Romeo W, genl mdse Rouge H & Sons, genl mdse, naval stores, and ship chandlers Sawer S M & Co, ins agts Smith G W, blacksmith Theobald John, saloon Tribune, H W Johnson publisher Vanhorn Mrs, boarding Vincent F, genl mdse Wakefield F B, druggist Wise P S, U S inspector hulls Wise P Mrs, boarding Land Owners — Geo Asher, M T Alexander, Atkins & May, Joseph Atkins, J C Brayton, est Julia Bryant, Joseph Chandler, Antonio Campo, Central Florida Mill and Lumber Co, est Benj Elliam, Henry Humphries, Wm Humphries, est J W Humphries, Sarah C Humphries, Joseph Jackson, Lewis T James, Elizabeth James, H W Jones, Robert Knickmeyer, Mrs M Land, Mrs Ann Miller, est Thos Murphy, Anthony Maige, Thos G Newman, est Thomas Orman, Rogers & Murdoch, est W G Porter, M C Pickett, Pickett & Co, Henry Russell, S E Rice, Francis Soderburg, est J C Stummer, W S Turner, Eli Taylor, J T Thompson, J M Wright, George Weafing, Robt Yent, Rufus Yent, Genaro Zingarell. APOPKA. Orange county. Is located 12 miles north of Orlando, the county seat, directly on the line of the Orlando, Tavares and Atlantic Railroad, which will, when completed, connect with the Transit Railroad at Leesburgh, forming direct all rail route to the North. Three and a half miles from Apopka are the celebrated Clay Springs, which are the source of the Wekiva river, navigable for steamboats to the St John’s, which is only 18 miles distant. The public buildings of Apopka are a town hall, masonic lodge, Methodist and Baptist churches, a public school building, a livery stable, a weekly newspaper, and two steam saw mills. Population about 8oo. Postal arrangements afford a money-order office, a daily mail from the North via Lounwood station by stage, and a semiweekly mail from a number of interior county localities. W R McLeod, P M Apopka Citizen, F A Taylor editor and proprietor Beemer H S, physician Combs J J, genl mdse Davis & McKinney, real estate agents Dorsett J D, genl mdse mHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY possesses an excellent bouquet. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA. 17

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S., F. & W. Ry. Florida Dispatoli, Fast Freiglit Lino. 13 6 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Fitzsimons J T, saw mill Henley, L F, physician Hood H D, boarding Jone G L & Co, druggists Jones R M, hay and grain Lovell W A & Son, genl mdse McClure H H, saloon Marshall J B, livery stable Mays J F B Rev, Baptist Mills & Emerson, saw mill Morgan E C, justice of the peace Morgan P Mrs, hotel Norton W F Rev, Methodist Owens Frank, dentist Prince E R, genl mdse Taylor F A, editor Apopka Citizen Whitehead H C, genl mdse Wood B F, barber Land Owners — John E Anderson, E D Bradshaw, J G Bradshaw, M E Bryant, John M Bedford, C T Buchan, W T Bostick, O S Caldwell J B Campbell, J T Chapman, Mary A Cummins, Mrs J T Champneys, Mrs O K Champneys, I F Champneys, S A Dunnaway, Charles J Day, W S Deek, Dorsett & Hackney, Dorsett & Whitehead, F H Davis, Davis & Etting, Mrs AM Davis Mrs F E Davis, Mary F Dinkle, A G Egstrom, Mrs F L Fudge, J D Fudge, H K Fuller, J W C Guilford, John D W Girtman, Wm H Gove, F R Greene, A P Harris, Mrs M A Harrison, Samuel Hyde, Hyde, Turpin & Taylor, John Holt, E C Hoffman, Joseph Henschen, John Harshbarger, J B Hazelhurst, H W Hubbard, Daniel Hackney, Stephen Hooper, Mrs E P Hardy, Dr D N Howard, J Johnson, Johnson & Co, J A Johnson, M A Jeffcoat, W J Jackson, W A Lovell, Mrs W A Lovell, Mattie Lovell, E E R Laws, E J Laws, J F Lamp, Mrs J F Lamp, Daniel Lake, H B Lindley, George Leaver, Lin & Co, Annie Lockhart, Mary Lawrason, Peter Loper, R M Mitchell, A S Miller, H Meisealm, J B Marshall, Z H Mason, James Mendhain, Sarah Moses, A L Mills, L J & T A McMaster, Dr. J. T. McKey, J M & D C McCall, D McGee, H H McClure, J F Mears, E C Morgan, Mrs P Morgan, W A McLean, Page McKinney, M R A Parrish, JEW Parrish, Nelson Pierson, E R Prince, Mrs J S Page, Monroe Peterson, F H Perry, W B Raulerson, L Raulerson, James Rowley, L L & B B Rowley, C Rutland, Wm Roberts, J A J Ranney, F J Ranney, Benj F Royal, W C Redding, D B Stewart, Mrs D B Stewart, Matthew Stewart, M Stewart (agt), James L Stewart, Eliza Stewart, John L Stewart, A E Shepherd, D D Shepherd, E L Shepherd, J D Shepherd, M A M Shepherd, J F Silling, Mrs B A Silling, D F Simmons, L C Stevens, P W Swan, J D Smith, F S & H M Smith, John H Smith, A Thompson & Co, S M Thompson & Co, H Towns, W J Turner, Mary Turner, E C Vick, John Varner, Z W Whitney, H C Whitehead. Confectioners’ Supplies. J. 5. REEDY, Grocer, and Importer of Fruit, Savannah, Ga.

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Sugar Mills and Pans. We Guarantee our Prices. WM. KEHOE & CO., iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 1 37 ARCHER. Alachua county. A thriving little place of some 200 inhabitants, located in' a fine agricultural section, 40 miles from the Gulf, 15 miles from Gainesville, the county seat, and 113 miles from Fernandina. The place has express and telegraph offices, several churches and one school, a saw mill, livery stable, hotel, etc. ; mails received daily. Wm C Andrews, P M Archer William C, druggist Baukright C, genl mdse Baukright F G, genl mdse, livery stable, cattle dealer, butcher, ice, furniture Blitch George W, genl mdse. Boynton S W, physician Clark W S, physician Fleming J F, genl mdse Geiger W A, genl mdse George J D, genl mdse Hodgson W B, genl mdse Jackson W L, genl mdse Johnson J K, cattle dealer Lavy H J, holel and carpenter Lipsey W B, nurseryman McDonell J F, saw mill and judge Levy County McDonell J S, justice of the peace Neal James C, physician Pearson T B, carpenter Robinson J E, saloon Skinner James, wheelwright and blacksmith Stephens Samuel, shoemaker Williams J W, genl mdse Land Owners — Henry Allen, Charles Andrews, W D C Andrews, Wm C Andrews, Henry Anglin, C W Bauknight, T G Bauknight, Miss C F Bauknight, Henry Bell, Mrs H A Blitch, Edmund Brown, Frank Brown, Susan Brown, C S Bryce, S J Brewer, Mrs Sarah Campbell, Mrs Lizzie Caven, Oliver Carn, — Christi, W S Clark, Alfred Coleman, — Danzy, Miss M S Darden, P Darden, Edmund Dean, Jeff Dennis, John Doby, Caroline Dukes, Floyd F Dukes, S W Duncan, John Elbertson, M C Fleming, Rosa D Fleming, Wade A Geiger, Mrs D D Gibbons, Adam Grant, Maria Greene, V H Hane, W B Hodgson, Julius Holsey, J G Hill, John E Hughes, Mrs A M Jackson, W L Jackson, J H Johnson, Mrs B J Knight, Lane & Neal, C L Law, Mrs H H Lipsey, W B Lipsey, Willis Matthews, Wm Mitchell, Ramsey Mitchell, J Mitchell, J S B McKinney, C M McKinney, J F McDonnell, J S McDonnell Jr, Abraham Nattiel, Fortune Nattiel, John Nattiel, Mrs I A Neal, James Page, Allen Persley, C I Pearson, James Reden, Peter Spann, J M Seaton, James Skinner, A B Suaverly, Mrs M Smith, Paul Thompson, Mrs M E Turner, Wallace Walden, Jesse Wells, John White, Harriett Williams, Milton Williams, Samuel Williams, Saunders Williams, William Williams, Washington Wilson, John H Winslow, Jos A Winslow, Peter Wright. ARCYLE. Walton county. A station on the Pensacola and Atlantic T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is distilled from the choicest qualities of Grain. S. GUCKENHETMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga.

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Tfi JD \1T TJ xr FAST MAIL TRAINS THROUGH WITS StJtf • } • AX' TT • rtj'. FEW STOPPING POINTS. 138 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Railroad, 5 miles north of Euchee Anna, the county seat, has express and telegraph offices, two churches, one school, and one hotel ; mails daily. Mrs Mary McDonald, P M Ansley Bros & McCoskill, genl mdse and naval stores Campbell & Co, genl mdse Edge & Edge, genl mdse Gillis and McCoskill, genl mdse Flounoy & McCoskill, genl mdse McDonald Mary Mrs, hotel McSween John, sheriff Morrison Bros, genl mdse Potter & Ansley, naval stores Thames G G, blacksmith Travis W S, express agt Wahl George, wheelwright Williamson William, druggisj Land Owners — C Kelley, W Horne, E Richardson, O Garrett, Joseph Garrett, James Garrett, M Murphy, S Murphy, J Douglas C Douglas, A Douglas, L McSween, Wm McDonald, J G Owens, H Owens, J Day, J C Day, J Hardee, A L Campbell, S Parish, W Parish, F Neel, D Neel. ARLINGTON. A steamboat landing on the east bank of the St. J ohns River, two miles from Jacksonville. ARREDONDO. Alachua county. A small, thriving little settlement on the Florida Transit Railroad, 104 miles from Fernandina, has express and telegraph offices, and several churches and schools near. The business of truck farming is very productive at this point. Some idea may be had of its extent when it is stated sixty thousand crates of vegetables have been shipped from this point in a single season. Reese George, genl mdse Rice W F, genl mdse Taylor Z F, saw mill Land Owners — Cornelius Ammons, Peter Armstrong, T Harper Beville, Mrs Lizzie Beville, L Cotman, T W Chestnut, J B Dill, Wm Ellis, J R Flewellen, M M Garton, Walter Glover, D G Harvard, Hardy Harvard, Wiley Harvard, Chas James, F James, Wilson January, Francis Lake, Long & Foster, J B Mays, E Montgomery Sr, W C Mowry, Eli Ramsey, P G Ramsey, T G Ramsey, L K Rawlins, W F Rice, I Rutledge, J T Simmons, I G Stokes, F Starkes, G H Sutherland, Z T Taylor, Sr, Jackson Trapp, J B Wafies, Mrs M Wafies, Jesse Welch, Washington Welch, Wm Watts, J T Walls, Persey Wilson, J D Young agent. ASTABULA. Sumter county. Fifteen miles from Fort Mason, and 5 from Yalaha ; is on the southeast bank of Little Lake Harris. Joseph C Kern, P M Crosby D R, carpenter Hunter J C, justice of the peace Kern J C, genl mdse Snyder Ann Mrs, hotel Snyder T K, blacksmith Wells & Keffer, saw mill BANANAS I am the only Importer of Red and Yellow Bananas in the State. J. B. REEDY, Savannah, Ga.

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John Rourke, agricultural iron and JsrasS WOr£s, 2 BAT STREET, SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 139 ASTOR. Orange County. Northern terminus of the St. Johns & Lake Eustis Railway, 134 miles from Jacksonville, on the west side of the St. Johns River. AUCSLLA. Jefferson County. A way station on the Florida Central & Western Railroad, 131 miles from Jacksonville. BAKER’S MILL. Hamilton County. Only a way station on the Savannah, Florida & Western Railroad, miles from Jasper courthouse. J R Wheat ly, P M Baker & Fender, saw mill Land owners — E J Baker, John Baker, Baker & Fender, J A Blackwell, P W Carter. BALDWIN. Duval County. Junction of the Florida Central & Western and the Florida Transit Railroads, 19 miles from Jacksonville and 47 from Fernandina; has express and telegraph offices, and several churches and schools in the vicinity. G W Ford, P M Bouroughs J H, railroad agent Colemon G, genl mdse Coy E, boarding Deipray W H, genl mdse Ford E T, genl mdse Fourakers W L, genl mdse Murphy John, restaurant Smith A, justice of the peace and express agent Tanner T H, genl mdse Upton B, saloon Wilcher STL, blacksmith Land Owners — W H Coleman, Eli Hicks, B L Higgenbotham, L P Howard, A J Higgenbotham, Milton M Ivey. S A Lowe, Bettie McClellan, Louis Motis, Mrs H Motis, James Murray, John Murray, Rebecca Murray, Mrs S Oliver, Archibald Peterson, Daniel J Parish, Robert Parish, David Pringle, Amariah Sellers, James Smith, Alfred Stalls, David Stratton, D H Tanner, Mrs V Thomas, Benj Upton, Jonas Wilson. BANANA. Putnam county. Banana is situated in the northwest corner of Putnam county, adjoining Alachua, Clay and Bradford counties, and on the south end of Santa Fe Lake, and about middle ground between the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico, and is the highest point between the two. The water from the Santa Fe runs both to the Gulf and the Atlantic. This is one of the healthiest portions of the State, far away from the bleak, damp atmosphere of the coast and free from the malarial fogs of the larger rivers and prairies. McRae G W A, genl mdse, grist mill and physician BARRSVILLE. Columbia county. Fourteen miles southeast of Lake City, the courthouse and shipping point ; mails daily by private conveyance. milE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is soft and mellow to the taste. A S. GUCKENHEIMER h SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.

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S., F. & W. Ey. SBOBT ItNB! QUICK TIME. 140 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER J H B Gunnin, P M Andrew J R, genl mdse Cook G R, physician Gauldin Frank, blacksmith Perry J W, sheriff Columbia county Whetstone & Gunnin, genl mdse, saw mill, grist mill and cotton gin Land Owners — James P Farnell, C P Farnell, Geo Witt, L Witt, J M Gresham, T H Gresham, G W Sheely, B Sheely, Wm Sheely, J W Perry, M Bailey, S Wiley Dutson, James Thompson, Thos C Carroll. BARTOW. Polk county. County seat ; is located on Peace Creek, about 45 miles from Tampa, on the west and about the same distance from Kissimmee City, which is the south terminus of the South Florida Railroad. Bartow has a population of 500, and contains two saw mills, two hotels, two livery stables, several boarding houses, two churches and three schools ; mails triweekly by stage. C C Gresham, P M Atkins W S, sawyer Baskins D J, real estate agent and justice of the peace Beall F M, blacksmith Blount R R, hotel Blount & Whitledge, real estate agents Boully D W D, publisher Informant Boyd J T, saw mill Brookins A B, druggist and physician Burrows J H^-genl mdse Carpenter W B, boarding Dial H T, saw mill Ferguson D C, physician Gates G M, hotel Gresham C G, sheriff Polk co Hanson G A, lawyer Holcomb M A, barber Hooker J N, genl mdse Hudleston R H, physician Hughes E, genl mdse Humphries J H, lawyer Hyman J M Rev, Baptist Informant, D W D Boully publisher Johnson W H, justice of the peace and tax assessor Lee W H, genl mdse Lybass Thomas M, saloon and livery stable Lytle L, livery stable Pearce S J, clerk Polk co court Pearce W H & Co, real estate agents Sharp J R Rev, Methodist Smith G W, genl mdse Snell H W, genl mdse Snoddy John, lawyer Snoddy Mrs M L, milliner Statham J P, druggist Statham S, shoemaker Whitledge W T, boarding Wright J C, genl mdse Wright P D, lawyer and boarding Land Owners — Samuel Balden, Jack Bartels, F F Beville, A S Blanchard, B F Blount, D D Blount, E B Blount, J C Blount, J O C Blount, MAC Blount, Blount & Look, J M Brewer, A B Brookins, Peter Brown, J J Bunch, J O C Bunch, J B Bunch, J C Bunch, W H & LEMONS. 1 handle house J. B. REEDY, Savannah, Ga,

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Sngar Mills and Pans, A full Stock of all Sizes. WM. KEHOE & CO., Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 141 J L Carney, W T Carpenter* J F Cashy, S C Cochran, I A Cooper, Jefferson Crews, J B Crum, J M Crum, Z L Crum, J C Culbertson, John Davidson, Ervin Davis, F T Dossey, J B Duffee, G L Dudley, Sarah A Durrence, A B Ferguson, D C Ferguson, W P Ferrell, M W Fuller, G W Gandy, J A Gandy, W H Gaskins, H T Gay, Asa Gibbons, Nancy Gilbert, B G Gloner, Jennie A Goode, SRA Granger, J H Griffin, W T Halladay, B F Hallen, James Hamilton, V Hamilton, Wade Hamilton, G A Hanson, A D Harden, Annie I Harden, James Harden, J M Hayman, M J Hayman, W C Hayman, R H Hendelsten, Martha Hewitt, Dan’l D & W M High, Sarah C Hollingsworth, J Hoke, David Hughes, Hughes & Wellborn, J H Humphries, W A Ivey, G A Johnson, P A Johnson, W H Johnson, R P Jordan, W C Jordan, P O Keen, W E King, T J & Lybass Lawson, T M Lybass, L Lytle, John McAuley, R A McAuley, J S McClelland, J A McCormick, S K McCormick, W W McDaniel, Mattie McKinney, J J McKinney, J E Maloy, J F Maloy, J W Maloy, M D L Mayo, B D Mann, G E Mann, D J Mann, J C Mims, T B Mims Sr, Peyton Merritt, R B Mitchell, E E Mizell, Andy Moore, I N Morrison, A H Moseley, G A Moseley, S H Page, L A Parker, Streaty Parker, T H Parker, John Patterspn Sr, John Patterson Jr, S J Pearce, S I Pearce, W A Pearce, W H Pearce, J T Pollard, R N Pylant, PYanklin Raulerson, W S Rudisill, J W Rushing, G W Sanders, — Shepherd, W P Shererty, J J Sikes, G T Smith, G W Smith, J S Smith, R M Stillham, Jasper Summelin, W S Taylor, James Thomas, J T Tice, J E Tison, Matrtha Tison, N J Tison, L Trammell, Elizabeth Tyree, S S Varn, W B Varn, W G Varn, W R Varn, J S Vaughn, Mathew Walker, W H Wallace, Noah Waters, Henry Watkins, Thomas Watkins, G W Watsons, J B Watsons, C H Wentz, E A Whitledge, Whitledge & Page, W T Whitledge, J L Widden, J A Williams, T E Williams, T J Williams, Jas T Wilson, N J Wilson, T L Wilson, A G Zipprew. BATTON. Alachua county. Name changed to Palmer. A way station on the Florida Transit Railroad, 108 miles from Fernandina. BAY PORT. Hernando county. A small settlement on the gulf coast, 50 miles from Cedar Keys, discontinued as a postoffice. Bonner J S, physician Garrison, Mrs L M, hotel Gotter Joseph, contractor, Johnson, Mrs H, boarding McDaniel John, notary public | Parsons John, real estate T he celebrated thistle dew whiskey is absolutely pure, S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, SOLE AGRNTS, SAVANNAH, GA,

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Si V Xr W Tt\r W AY CROSS SHORT LINE 1 W T? J1 J TO FLORIDA. 142 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Sanders L B, genl mdse Sharpe, George H, carpenter Trammell Y B, carpenter Whisenant, J H, hotel. Land Owners — J S Bronner, J M Garrison, L M Garrison, John Parsons, L B Saunders, J P Whisenant. BAY VIEW. H illsborough co. A very small settlement on the banks of Old Tampa Bay, about 25 miles west of Tampa court house. McMullin B, dentist and boarding Pearce E H, fruit and vegetable shipper. BEAUCLERC. Duval county. A landing on the St. John’s River, 10 miles from Jacksonville; mails daily by DeBary’s Baya Line of steamboats. N D Sawyer, P M Bowden Thomas, justice of the peace. Hamilton George I, physician Sawyer N D, genl mdse Land Owners — M A Kilburn, Edward Myers, Frank Myers, Emily Myers, G W Myers, Hattie Myers, Lucinda Myers, Robert C Myers, David Wanton. BEAZLEY. Jefferson county. Is situated north of the Ocala River one mile, and thirty miles east of Tallahassee. S B Smith, P M Beazley J P, genl mdse Beazley W M, justice of the peace Ledbetter R R, saw mill McCardy M W C, State representative Smith S B, grist mill and cotton gin Land Owners — Ned Ackerman, H and E. Acre, Hiram Allen, Mrs J M Anderson, J R Atkinson, S A Beazley, James Bird, Mary Carroll, A A Chester, Richard Clair, James Cole, Mrs A A Croom, Mrs A R Croom, Hardy Croom, Isaac Delaney, M F Douglas, T H Douglas, R N Griffis, C R Harris, Paul Jennings, R R Ledbetter, R N Leopard, G W Pettu, A J Pollock, J G Powell, Mrs M Powell, J D Reagan, Sally Scurry, B Shepherd, J H Slaughter, M V Smith, S B Smith, J P Strickland, N W Strickland, J J Walker, Joe Walker, R M Walker, George Washington, Betsy Williams, Cuffee Williams. BEECHER. A landing on the east bank of the St. Johns River, 101 miles from Jacksonville. BEL AIR. Orange county. Three miles from Sanford, the location of Gen. Sanford’s famous one hundred and twenty acre grove of orange and lemon tiees. Near here are the groves ol Gen. Babcock, Fred. Grant, Thurlow Weed, Senator Anthony and others. No postoffice. (See Sanford.) \T TTO ITTH A BT T7Q ‘Always on hand a full supply of the best. J. B. REEDY, Savannah, Ga.

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J? GIVEN ON ALL KINDS OF MACHINERY AND REPAIRS, XjS T jllllil L(3S by JOHN HOUllKE 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. I43 BELLEVIE W. Marion county. Formerly known as Roach’s Pond, is only a railway station, 12 miles from Ocala, the court house ; mails twice daily. J F Pelot, P M Belleview District School Benbow & Perry, (Alfred Benbow and Fred’k Perry) genl mdse Blackwell Jarrett, genl mdse Mason Wm W, saw mill Pelot J F, genl mdse and railroad agent Summers P O Rev, Baptist Land Owners — W W Mason, W Smith, L Griffin, R B Wootten, Daniel J Fogg, J C Fogg. Robt Jackson, J Blackwell, Wm Goodrun, Frank Togni, Andrew Jackson, George Ross, Jack Brown, W C Mason, H E Mason, D E Stroble, Isaac Nichols, J H Owens, J F Pelot, D Jenkins, P Sligh, M Felder, Alfred Benbow, F Perry, Wm Jenkins, B Galloway, L Reaves, Adam Sligh, W C Gibson, John Hamlin, J H Owens, P O Summers. BELLEVILLE. Hamilton county. Situated on the Withlacoochee river, two miles south of the Georgia boundary line and thirteen northeast of Madison. J P Bracewell, P M Dickson J A, genl mdse Polhill A J, State senator Rowland W A & Son, genl mdse Land Ozvners — Amos Baker, Miss Ann Bell, Dan Beville, Georgia Beville, J P Bracewell, Eunice Burch, J J Cates, W M Conner, D T Cross, Simeon Daniels, C E Duckworth, Thos Fort, J T Godfrey, N J Coleman, Allen Henderson, W B Holmes, Thomas Holton, Mrs E J Holzeadorf, J L Howell, J W Howell, J W Hyers, P S Hyers, M James, J W Jones, Greene Kelly, Wm Mikins, Albert Posted, Arnold Posted, O T Perry, A J Polhill, S A Polhill, T A Polhill, Albert & C J Reames, Martin Riley, — • Rossiter, W A Rowland, Stewart Simmons, J F Staplin, J R Staplin, R L Staplin, A D Stewart, Kate Stewart, M T Wilder, H R Williams, B L Wooding. BELMONT. Hamilton county. Situated within one mile of the Suwannee river and 14 miles from Jasper court house ; mails semiweekly by stage line. W L Peeples, P M Belmont Private School Hutchinson George, justice of the peace Johns Jackson, constable Lee H M, genl mdse, saw mid, grist mid and cotton gin Murray William, blacksmith Peeples W L, genl mdse, physician, saw mid, grist mid and cotton gin Land Owners — E Bryan, F W Bullard, James Bullard, A J Cannon, C Chambers & Bro, Mrs Mary Chauncey, H Cheshire, Wm Cheshire, W R Cheshire, Mrs Ada Cone, Bracton Davis, HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY IS ABSOLUTELY PURE. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, SOLE AGENTS, SAVANNAH, GA. 18

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S., F. & W. Ry. Elegant Passenger Equipments ; Westinghouse Air Brakes; Miller Platforms; Janey Couplers. FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER 144 GWDrawdy, Stephen Feeker, C N Fletcher, Mrs J Hollinin, J R Hunter, T J Hunter, A M Johns, H J Johns, A J D Knight, H M Lee, Martin L Lee, E W McCall, Randal McDonald, Ellen Mclnnis, H McInnis, Angus McLeod, N A McLeod, Mrs E Morgan, Benjamin Nelson, A Parrish, N J Patterson, W L Peeples, H J Pennington, James L Pennington, Joseph Pennington, C J Richardson, Nancy Roberts, H H Saunders, W E Sistrunk, J W Smith, R Sullivant, W W Wetherington, Wm Wood, N R Woodward, Wm Woodward Sr, Wm Woodward Jr. BEf^ELLA. On the west bank of the St. Johns river, 120 miles from Jacksonville. BENTON. Columbia county. Population of about 125 ; is situated within a mile of the Suwannee river, and 20 miles north of Lake City. D N Cone, P M Cone D N, genl mdse Cone W H & D M, saw mill, grist mill, and cotton gin Wright G, blacksmith and wheelwright Land Owners — W P Beal, John Burritt, D N Cone, W H Cone, John H Douglass, Mrs J Peeples, G W S Waldrow, B Wheeler, W Wheeler. BERESFORD. Volusia county. Only a small settlement located on the east side of the lake having the same name, 163 miles from Jacksonville Alexander &.Co, saw mill Felt D A, boarding Lowrie Samuel, notary public Stewart R H, boarding Wellman A L & Co, genl mdse and saw mill Land Owners — A A Alexander, Mrs Eugenia Alexander, Neil M Alexander, H D Bracey, W F Bucknor, Mrs C Cook, J P Cook, John W Cook, L P Cook, A Cosner, Munson Crabtree, DeVal & Bracey, Mrs S A Felt, B F Finical, B D Gainey, J E Gavison, R S Gillispie, Mrs R S Gillispie, G Gordan, O J Hill, R O Knowles, G W Lancaster, Wm Lowe, Samel Lowrie, S B McLin, Moses Marsh, A L Munson, A F Nute, J W Samuels, W G Scarlett, W W Scarlett, J Smith, M W Voorhees, H F Whitney, J E Wiles, George Woodward, Woodward & Hamilton. BETHEL. Walton county. Located on the Yellow river, 20 miles from Crestview, the nearest station on the Pensacola & Atlantic Railroad ; mails received every Saturday by horseback. Michael King, P M Bethel Academy Cedar Grove school Centerfit Peter, grist mill Clary J D, justice of the peace Davis Alfred, blacksmith Harrison John, saw and grist mill Peaniits. Tirgiaia North Carolina and Tennessee in large variety at J. B. REEDY’S Grocer, and Importer of Fruit, Savannah, Ga.

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Sugar Mills and Pans. Strong and Durable. WM. KEHOE t CO. on Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) 145 AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. King Michael, painter, wheelwright and carpenter Magnolia school Saunders Perry, grist mill Steele W B, genl mdse Stewart Daniel, grist mill Land Owners — Edw’d Steele, Jos Steele, W C Steele, Peter Steele, J110 L Steele, W L Steele, U B Steele, Peter Steele Sr, P M Steele Jr, Isaac Steele, Jayson Steele, Julian Steele, James Moore, Alfred Davis, H Cutts, W C King, James Howell, Hyman King, B Tucker, Samuel Clary y J D Clary, Leonard Clary, E Carter, A Campbell, W A Cambell, J A Clary, Wm L Richbourg, John Clary, K Howard, Davis Lott, Wm Gavins, John Kelly, Perry Saunders, R Kelly, Wm Johnson, Daniel Johnson, M Eddenfield, Charles Gavins, B Gavins, David Hart, James G Davidson, John Hart, James Baggett, Samuel Fowler, John Fowler, John Campbell, John Sunderland, M Gordon, J Edge, Richard Campbell, Alex Cutts, Jerry Driscoll (col). BISCAYNE. Dade county. Situated on Biscayne Bay, Atlantic Ocean, and is of no importance. BLACK POS^T. Duval county. Situated on the St. Johns River, 3 miles from Jacksonville, no postoffice. (See Jacksonville.) BLACKWATER. Santa Rosa county. Two miles south of Milton, at the head of Pensacola Bay, lumber is the chief interest A H G reen, postmaster Allenger & Bruce, ship yard Bagdad sash, door and blind factory Co Chase C O, genl mdse Green A H, genl mdse Simpson & Co, saw mill and lumber Sindorf H W, State representative Land Owners — A J Adams, W W Allen, W E Anderson, George Haskell, Nellie Howard, Mrs Eliza Miller, Ollinger & Bruce, Simpson & Co, est E E Simpson. BLAKE. Volusia county. (See also Daytona.) Only a landing on the Halifax river, 3 miles from Daytona. Daggett Nelson, shoemaker. Fischbach G, tailor Land Owners — Isaac R Daggett, Felson Daggett, F A Montague, Stephen Snow, H H Knapp, T R Rodgers, Edwin Mansfield, Chas H Mansfield, Leach Bros, Miss Mary Wri ght, John B Heirsky, John R Gillman, John Woltz. BLOOM INC DALE. Hillsborough county. A country store, 1 7 miles east of Tampa, the seat of justice, mail tri-weekly by the stage line, running between P'ort Meade and Tampa. Frederick Worth, P M. Coady Thomas, lawyer T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is soft and mellow to the taste. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.

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Q P X/ W T?V r ^ e Preferred Route KJ., J. Q O VV ’ ’ ^=TO FLORIDA.^ 146 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Cooper John L, contractor and builder. Fiche Anton, nurseryman Galvin Daniel J, genl mdse Mt Pleasant school Wallace W G F Rev, Presbyterian Windhurst A W, saw mill Worth, Charles E, land agent and surveyor Land Owners — A F Bermier, J B Bledsoe, W B Brewton, — Burchholtz, Anton Fiche, Israel Garner, J B Gully, P D Hendrix, C M Johnson, A J Kelly, N D Kelly, S Magbee, A A Hansell, G W Wathes, G M E Moot, D Mulvenin, L M Smith, T B Smith, J J Wallace, W D T Wallace, E E Worth, Frederick Worth. BLOUNT’S FERRY. Columbia county. Situated on the Suwannee river, in the extreme corner of Columbia county, within three or four miles of the Georgia boundary line, 30 miles north of Lake City and 16 miles east of Jasper. Brown E, genl mdse, saw and grist mill, cotton gin and stock dealer Ring W W, real estate agent Bunch John J, blacksmith Knowles A M, genl mdse Land Owners — C Arnold, Jackson Bonnell, John Bonnell, John A Bonnell, E Brown, John Crews, D E Fletcher, George W Green, Daniel Hurst, Mrs Harriet Inman, Mrs R S King, James J Knowles, Benj F Lancaster, W H Long, A G Matthews, C C Mattox, George Rhoden, E G Rogerson, Moses Skinner. BLOXHAM. Leon county. Formerly Jackson’s Bluff. Is 22 miles west of Tallahassee, on the Ocklokonee river. Mails semiweekly. G B Hopkins, P M Hopkins G B, blacksmith and carpenter Rithman J W, barber Sanders W W, physician Land Owners — E A Allen, Joseph Allen, W H Allen, Hugh Black, Wm Bush, Wm Deanix, Christopher Gray, Shirley Gray, E C Grissett, J B Harvey, James Harvey, M L Harvey agt, Sarah Harvey, J T Harvin, J Heatley, C B Hopkins, Micajah Key, Miss A Purvis, W W Saunders, Daniel Stoutamire. BLUE SPRING. Volusia county. Situated on the east side of the St. Johns river, 168 miles from Jacksonville. No postoffice. (See Orange city, 2 miles distant.) BLUFF SPRINGS. Escambia county. A way station on the Pensacola and Mobile Railroad, five miles south of the junction. Cauthen J A, genl mdse Crary J W, brick mnfr Pritchett P M, rice mill, and grocer Williams V D, genl mdse Foreign Dried and Green Fruit and Importer of Fruit, Savannah, Ga.

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Sugar Mills, AND PANS OP ALL SIZES, MADE BY ,TOlltf JROUBKE, 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 147 Land Owners — J E Bowman, J L Byars, E Beasley, R D BOCIA. Byrne, J W Crary, Sarah Dailey, P A Dawson, E V Dickson, Downing & Thomas, Mrs Ann Duke, J N Giles, O P Godfrey, J D Godwin, Clifton Hall, R Johnson, J W Kelly, Robert Kendrick, Kate Laskie, McDavid & Byrne, P R McNeal, M Martin, Mayo & McCurdy, F M Miles, S Miles, Sarah Nichols, Mrs H Pritchett, H H Renfrea, D Turner, D Williams, J M Williams, J M Williams agent, W J Williams, J Willis. BLUFFTON. Volusia county. A landing on the east side of the St. Johns river, 140 miles from Jacksonville. South and east of this point are Lake Dexter and Spring Garden Lake, on the east side of which are very rich lands and large orange groves. BOARDMAN. Alachua county. Forty-nine miles from Palatka. At this point are the celebrated orange groves of Sampson & Keep. Fambach J, blacksmith Schlaten J R, railroad and express agent Walkup H C, physician Land Owners — J J Barr, M Brinson, J Fambach, A G Hester, L W Lipsey, J H McClymonds, S McCormick, S C Means, B W Reeves, J Sampson, W P Shuttleworth, F Simonton, M M Simonton, W B Simonton. Escambia county. Name changed to McDavid. BOmFACIA. Hillsborough county. Discontinued as a postoffice. BOULOGNE. Nassau county. Near the boundary line of Georgia and Florida, 135 miles from Savannah ; is the first station in Florida to receive the traveler. As yet but little evidence of activity characterizes this location, but its position near the head .of navigation on the St. Mary’s river must in time lend it importance. BONIFAY. Holmes county. A way station on the Pensacola & Atlantic Railroad, 108 miles east of Pensacola and 45 miles north of the Gulf. Price William, genl mdse, naval stores and lumber BRADEN. Leon county. A farmers’ postoffice, 16 miles west of Tallahassee on the Ocklokonee river. Mails weekly. Jacob D Richards, P M Bradford, saw and grist mill Harvey & Harvey, saw and grist mill Land Owners — Christopher Gray, E C Grissell, J D Richards, J B Richards, P B Chambers, J R Harvey. 1 IHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is distilled from the choicest • qualities of Grain. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga.

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^ tF Rj Height in through cars, in pa&t O., -C 06 Vv £i,y trains, without transfer. 148 FRORIDA STATE GAZETTEER BRADFORDVILLE. Leon county. Ten miles northeast of Tallahassee. Bradford & Ross, genl mdse Bull R B, genl mdse Davis Mack, State representative Pepper J D, justice of the peace Whitehead R M, genl mdse Land Owners — MrsS M Ball, John Bradford, M L H Bradford, Robert F Bradford, W H Bradford, N W Epps, N W Epps agt, Richard Gadsden, J W Gramlin, Mrs S M Lester, W H Lester est, James D Pepper, James D Pepper agent, Alfred Queen, Rebecca Regan. BRAIDENTOWN. Manatee county. Two hundred inhabitants. Is on the south bank of the Manatee river, 4 miles from its mouth. Graham E M, lawyer Gulf Coast Progress, O J Andrews publisher McNeil C E, genl mdse Patton E C, boarding Land Owners — Mrs Julia Adams, Mrs J Atzroth, B F Carter, Ceorge F Collins, G C Dereman, B Fogarty, John Fogarty, W H Fogarty, John M Fowler John Hodler, H Jackson, S W Litchfield, D McLeod, W C Patton, C H Smith, R C Stewart, L W Sylvester, Mrs L E Tresea, S C Upham, John Williamson. BRANDON. Polk county. Three miles and a half south of Bartow, the county seat ; connected with the same by the Bartow & Fort Meade stage line. J M Brandon, P M Harman William, cabinet mkr Huddleston physician Land Owners — T N Anderson, S L Blanks, G S Durrence, W H Harman. BRANDY BRANCH. Nassau county. A way station on the Florida Transit Railroad, 41 miles southwest of Fernandina. Bryce G W, genl mdse Clark & Co, saw mill Cook & Nostrand, saw mill Peterson Thomas J, justice of the peace Upton & Arnold, saw mill and lumber Wadleigh saw mill Land Owners — George W Bryce, J C Counts, W R Dyass, A Fourakers, E Fourakers, N Fourakers, N Fourakers Jr, A Higgenbotham, WED Pringle, Wm H Pringle. BRANFORD. Suwannee county. Known in railroad circles as Rowland’s Bluff, is situated on the Suwannee river, and is a station on the S., F. & W. R. R., 24 miles south of Live Oak. Branford House, Coffee & Barnard proprietors. Edge & Co, genl mdse Herrin Bros, livery stables Ingersoll A M, saw mill Painter & Demsey, grocers Roof & Swearingen, genl mdse Florida Oranges Consign your Oranges to J. B. REEDY, the largest Dealer in FRUIT in Georgia at SAVANNAH.

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Sugar Mills and Pans. Our Pans arc Smooth and Uniform in Thickness. WM. KEHOK & CO., Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 149 Rice Bros, genl mdse Telford B, grist mill and cotton gin Vansolan J N, genl mdse BRICK YARD. Franklin county. A landing on the Apalachicola river, 26 miles north of Apalachicola court house. Land Owners — L H Fowler, J H Glenn, A B Merchant. BRIDGEPORT. Putnam county. This name is lately given to the section lying in Putnam county, on the west bank of the St. Johns river, directly opposite to Federal point. The locality has been called Palmetto Bluff, Brooklyn, the Henderson Place, etc., but has never contained any considerable number of inhabitants, a few scattered families here and there about the country comprising the population for several miles around. BRISTOL. Liberty county. County seat; is situated on the east bank of the Apalachicola river, 30 miles south of Chattahoochee, its shipping point. It has a population of about 400, a new court house just completed, a good high school, several churches, a saw and grist mill, etc. The Central and People’s lines of steamers touch here on their way from Apalachicola to points in Georgia. Daniel G Harrell, P M Bristol High School Carson Lewis D, physician Flatman Albert, justice of the peace Howell David D, physician Jeter W W, elk court Liberty county McDuffie Peter A, naval stores mnfr McWilliams Lee, blacksmith Oxendine Henry, naval stores Perry Franklin, carpenter Revel John, boarding Robertson Wm H, saw and grist mill Stearnes T S & Bro, genl mdse Sheppard T J, physician Sheppard W B, lawyer Shuler, W E, tax assessor Liberty co Solomon M S, judge Liberty county Land Owners — R Gregory, John Revel, S J Revel, G J Sheppard, Joseph Sheppard, Bowen Sheppard, Walter Sanders, T J Walker, R Boykin, C Edwards, C S D Johnson, T P Shuler, A Deason, J C Durham, Frank Kever, B Hall, R Williams, E Peddie, Sophia Simmons, J Chambers. BRITTAINS. Putnam county. No post office, only a way railway station, 9 miles from Palatka. BRONSON. Levy county. The county seat is situated on the Florida Transit & Peninsula Railroad, 33 miles east of Cedar Keys, has good churches and schools, two grits mills, a weekly newspaper, T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY possesses au excellent bouquet, S. GrUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAYANNAH, GA.

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S., F. & W. Ry PULLMAN SLEEPING QAR SERVICE between ALL IMPORTANT POINTS. 150 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER express and telegraph offices, a hotel and a number of boarding houses. Bronson is immediately on the route of the survey of the Live Oak and Charlotte Harbor Railroad, and the starting point of the branch of the Florida Transit Railroad to the Suwannee River, and it is the main shipping point for the agricultural products of the county ; population 600. S Bachman P M Barco B B, tax collector Levy co Barco J M, elk circuit court Biggs L A, barber Bingham & McDonell, grist mill and cotton gin Carter Sydney L, lawyer and justice of the peace Clark G Mrs, hotel Coachman B H, justice of the peace Cook A H, justice of the peace Coulter A B, lawyer Coulter Henry B, railroad agent Epperson W J, genl mdse, grist mill and cotton gin F'olks W H, justice of the peace Jackson J M, physician, druggist and express agent Jones W J, livery stable and butcher Levy Enterprise (The), R B Mitchell publisher Long Thomas Rev, Baptist McDonell John F, county judge Mitchell R B, publisher Enterprise Mixon J J, sheriff Levy county Pass P D Rev, Methodist Selander A, shoemaker Sheffield S Rev, Baptist Stage William P, physician Stroble D A, blacksmith and wheelwright Tousey Y & Co, genl mdse Turner A J, genl mdse Washington George, restaurant Willis J M, justice of the peace Land Owners— Solomon Bachman, Jas M Barco, Wm Burns, J & H Booth, B Burnseed, H Benford, Laura Benford, Wm H Byles, Albert Clark, Carter & Epperson, B A Coachman, Benjamin Coachman, F Cobb, Mary A Colson, A H Cook, W R Coulter, W J Epperson, C C Gaines, J K Garrison Sr, J K Garrison Jr, Wm Gomme, Jas Gordon, Christian Hafelee, Peter Hall, Mrs C E Hall, W H Hall, L W Hamlin, Charles A Hansom, Sarah E Headley, Geo Hiers, Eliza Hubber, John Hub. ber, A Jackson, A Johnson, J W Jones, Mrs H M Judd, W T Kown, Ellen Lea, L B Lewis, Ihomas J Long, Thomas S Lord, Alexander McLeod, John Marcum, S P Mitchell, Moger & Guy, Isaac Memder, J S Parker trus, John Pellett, est Oliver Pellett, R P Priest, John C Richard, Otis Richardson, Andrew Ridgel, A E Rogers, Anna B Rogers, Anna Sebring, George W Sanchez, Sarah J Shands, G M Simmons, R D Simmons, Mrs C E Smith, Hampton Smith, S B Smith, T N Smith, E J Stanley, Mary H Stanley, J Stephens, D A Stroble, T P Swailes, Allen Tindale, M M Tousey, L D Townsend, Mrs H W Vezzey, Elias WalkCOCOANUTS! J. B REEDY IS THE ONLY IMPORTER IN SAVANNAH, GA.

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John Ilourfee, AGRICULTURAL IRON AND BRASS WORKS, 2 BAY STREET, SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 15 er, Elisha Walker, C Welman, Wm H Whitehead, Geo A Williams, Joseph Wilson. BROO&SViLLE. Hernando county. The county site, almost centrally located, is a small incorporated village of 600 inhabitants, containing the court house, jail, two churches — a white and colored — ten stores, office of the Florida Crescent newspaper, located here in 1880, three small boarding houses, a restaurant, market, and livery stable. The town is regularly laid our, and is situated on one of the highest points in the county, being some three hundred feet above the sea level, sixteen miles away. To the north and northwest lies the Annutaliga hammock, one of the largest and finest bodies of hammock land in the State. South and east is the Choocochattee hammock, another magnificent body of land, while all around the town, at from three to five miles, are smaller bodies of detached hammocks. A good saw-mill is located one mile south, and another about the same distance north of town. Both of these mills have planers attached, and one has a shingle mill also. Bay Port, at the mouth of the Wekinachie river, sixteen miles distant, is the shipping point for Brooksville. A daily stage line between Wildwood and Tampa connects at Brooksville, and one from Fort Dade every Thursday and Friday. F L Robertson, P M Alexander W C, surveyor Austin James W, lawyer Barret Wm J, lawyer and trial justice Bell R E Rev, Baptist Bennett Lula Miss, millinery Bischoff J E, contractor and builder Bodine Academy Bradley R J, tax assessor Hernando county CerglerS T, genl mdse and lawyer Cheef A N, genl mdse and hardware Clark Thomas W, lawyer Cook Thomas J, genl mdse Florida Crescent (The), F L Robertson editor Finley & Shuckleford, lawyers Hale J J & Co, John J Hale & H T Tykes, genl mdse Hancock E C, boarding Hancock & Edington, William S Hancock & Frank H Edington, genl mdse Hancock William, saloon Hennis D G, butcher Jefferies Sydney A, real estate agent Keathley C C, State representative Law J C, elk Hernando co court Lespenassen A J & Co, genl mdse McKeown & Keathley, John T McKeown & Christopher • Keathley, genl mdse Marshall J A, physician Marshall & McCall, J A Marshall & T Brown McCall, druggists HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY IS ABSOLUTELY PURE. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SO^, SOLE AGENTS, SAVANNAH, GA. 19

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FAST MAIL TRAINS THROUG-H WITH BUT FEW STOPPING POINTS. 8., F. & W. Ry. 152 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Martin George C, lawyer Martin A, genl mdse Mickler J B, sheriff Hernando co Nevitt C A, saw and grist mill Palmer Thomas, lawyer Payne Charles E, dentist Ramsey G V, lawyer and judge Hernando co Rhodes N B, stock dealer Riddick John M, genl mdse Robertson F L, editor Florida Crescent Russell A M C, co supt public schools Russell & Lanier, boarding Sims D M, restaurant Sims, L M Mrs, dressmaker Springstead W, saw mill Steele John W R, butcher Stringer Sheldon, physician Temple & Day, saw mill Thomas George, shoemaker Townsend F M, State representative Wade A T, livery stable Washington John A, prop Hernando hotel, contractor and builder White Samuel M, furniture Wickersham C C, saddles and harness Wiggins S O, blacksmith and wheelwright Land Owners — M A Adderhold, Virgil Alberson, Martha V Allen, C R Arnold, J W Austin, David J Ayers, J W Austin, B E Bagwell, Mrs Adeline Baker, Samuel Baker, W J Baker, W J Barnett, G W Batten, R E Bell, Linton Bird, E M Bishop, Mrs E Bishop, L S Broadham, S A Brown, J E Burnsides, J C Calhoun, D S Cappleman, W W Carruthers, Tempa Carter, James Chapman, A N Chelf, J W Clark, T W Clark, J T Coogler, T S Coogler, T J Cook, A C Croom, H Dick, Henry Dingens, F PI Edrington, W H Garrison, MrsT H Gary, Charles Giddens, E S Giddens, George Gillett, James Gillett, J D Godman, M H Gold, P Gold, James Graham, Thomas Graham, J J Grier, W O Griffin, W H Haager, J J Hale, J F Hall, James Hall, G J Hancock, H M Hancock, R B Hancock, T H Hancock, W S Hancock, N Hart, T W Hart, E M Harville, J R Harville, F M Hedick, J M Hedick, D G Hennes, W W Herd, J B Higginbotham, GW Higgins, J J Higgins, J D Hope, WE Hope, Wm Hope, L W House, S A Jeffords, J A Jennings, E J Johnson, S C Johnson, Mitchell Jones, C C Keathly, Alex Kennedy, B F Kirk, J W Knight, J T Landrum, J C Law, W E Law, G W Lowman, Fred Lykes, H G Lykes, C McDaniel, John McDermaid, Wm McCampbell, A M McGeachey, E C McGeachey, D F McGrivie, A P McKeown, C W McKeown, J T McKeown, LeMcKeown, R W McIntosh, Hugh McNatt, J P McNatt, W J McNatt, G C Martin, G T Marshall, J N Marshall, W M Mason, A Mayo, J R Mayo, Theodore Meyer, J B Mickler, James Mitchell, Joshua Mizell, Josiah Mizell, I Montgomery, Candy, Crackers, etc. Send for

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(Jn/jnii Milk and P^riQ Our Mills run perfectly true. WM. KEHOE & CG., Oll^dl 111 1 11 0 flllU rflllDi Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 153 W L Moore, John Moody, D R I Morgan, J E Muldrow, C O I Neitt, H R Nicks, W R Nicks, A P Nott, John O’Neal, Philip O’Neal, Solomon O’Neal, M W Page, Thomas Palmer, R B Parker, A O Pearce, G H Peters, E C Peterson, R H Peterson, G V Ramsey, James Ramsey, W J Ramsey, N B Rhodes, F L Robertson, Jerry Robertson, C M Rooks, D F Rooks, AM C Russell, Frederick Russell, Wm Rutledge, Aaron Ryalls, D C Ryalls, F E Saxon, H W Sever, T M Shackleford, E F Simpson, E Sinclair, A Smith, R B Smith, S W Smith, T N Smith, W A Smith, W H Smith, W L Smith, J R Snow, R B Stanley, Wm Stanley, A Stringer, S Stringer, Stephen Sylvester, J R Temple, James Thompson, J F Tompkins, H C Tucker, H T Valentine, M E Valentine? D L Vinnegarholtz, Samuel Waters, T C Whitman, G C Willingham, H H Wilson. BROOKLYN. Duval county. A small suburban part of Jacksonville, which lies immediately south of LaVilla, another suburb of same place. This place has no postoffice, but is known as a separate and distinct part of Jacksonville, with a population of | about 6oo. For names of parties doing business here see Jacksonville list. BRYANVILLE. Orange county. Only a flag station on the St. Johns and Lake Eustis Railroad, 9 miles from Astor. BUFFALO BLUFF. Only a way landing on the west bank of the St. Johns river, 87 miles from Jacksonville. BULA. LaFayette county, A way landing on the Suwannee river, 16 miles above Branford. Dees Thomas, contractor and builder Leggett John F, genl mdse Morgan & Bro, grist mill and cotton gin Ward James K, blacksmith Land Owners — M Adams, Norman Allen, W H Allen, H E Barrington, J W Belle, A Bell, Charles S Brown, E G Brown, Mrs Elizabeth Brown, H Brown, Joseph Brown, L G Brown, T B Brown, W G Brown, Mrs S E Cates, John T Cates, Mrs Elizabeth Clark, John W Clark, Wm T Clark, John W Day, I M Dees, John S Dees, E Edwards, Mrs Jane Folsom, Wm Folsom, Wm E Folsom, J J Friar, Mrs Sarah Hickey, James A Hodge, J C Horn, R H Hunter, Allen Johnson, J D Johnson, G W Lawson, j L Lawson, J F Leggett, Z Leggett, George Lee, John McDonald, W H Mobley, Jesse Murray, J I Murray, Robt Murray, G C Newman, A J Palmer, S S Proctor, Alfred Revels, D J Revels, Owen Revels Sr, Owen Revels Jr, B W Rogers, Isaac Shiver, Joseph Shiver, J T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is soft and mellow to the tastej S. GUCKENHEIMER k SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.

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& T? & W 1? WAY-CROSS SHORT LINE X. W TV Aw J • TO rE’IjOXT.IID-A.. 154 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER V Singletary, John R Snipes, Mrs M M Snipes, N E Snipes, Uriah Snipes, Mrs A Strayhan, Mrs N G Strayhan, A J Toole, J F Toole, Lott Townsend, J A Ward, John Williamson. BURRmS. Bradford county. Sixty-eight miles from Fernandina. CABBAGE BLUFF. A St. Johns river landing, 165 miles from Jacksonville. CALLAHAM. Nassau county. S., F. & W., and F. T. & P. Rys. Junction of the above roads ; 27 miles from Fernandina, 152 miles from Savannah, and 20 miles from Jacksonville. John O’Donald, P M Booth & Booth, hotel Buford C, restaurant Cay Raymond Jr, genl mdse and saw mill Cook & Co, shingle mnfrs Dyal & Upton, saw mill Grantham John, saw mill Higginbotham D, saloon Higginbotham L W, county supt public schools Jones S D, genl mdse Mahoney W A, genl mdse, grist mill and naval stores Moore John N, naval stores O’Donald John & Sons, genl mdse O’Donald John, hotel Smith G W, druggist and physician Upton N & Son, genl mdse LandOwners — MJ Albitton, J T Albitton, A Barber, James O Berry, J F Booth, John Booth, W J Booth, A J Braddock, A R Braddock, Hamilton Braddock, H H Braddock, N S Brown, F B Bryant, J D Buford, John H Buford, Robert Cain, A D Carroll, R Gary Jr agt, M Chapman, George Coleman, John Copeland, A H Colson, F M Connor, J R Connor, Joseph Connor, Wm Cram, Joseph Crews, J W Crews, Mrs M A Crews, James Y Davis, B G Dial, D Dial, D A Dial, Dial & Upton, J R Gale, J H Geiger, A D Gerald, A J Green, David Green, T J Griffin, Jesse Grun, J R Grun, N S Grun, R N Grun est, C Harvey, J H Higginbotham, L W Higginbotham, M Higginbotham, Wm F Higginbotham, A R Johnson, H C Johnson, J J Johnson, Wm Johnson, Tobias Johnson, H Jones. Harley Jones, J B Jones, J H Jones, John Jones, Mack Jones, S D Jones, R W Kirkland, M A Klapp, Wm K Lacey, Moses Lang, Mrs M L Lloyd, J A McIntosh, W A Mahoney, C McDonald, E McDonald, John McDonald, A E O’Gilvie, A O’Gilvie agt, J Pendarvis, J S Pendarvis, N Peterson, H C Pickett, Peter Rowe, Peter Rowe Jr, H C Ryals, E Sauls, J H Sauls, J W Sheffield, Benj Stewart, E G Stewart, Duval Sykes, Joseph Taylor, John Tison, Henry Thompson, W H Thompson, F Tomlinson, Mrs S Tomlinson, Wm Tomlinson, ONLY EXCLUSIVE FRUIT HOUSE J T> A1IJj IN SAVANNAH. GA„ IS • JD. XiJLJjiJLr A

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Saw Mill Work OF ALL KINDS FURNISHED BY JOHN liOUIlKE, 2 BAY ST.. SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. I 55 J J Upchurch, Nat Wilson, Daniel Woods, Jacob Young. CALLSYSLLE. Hillsborough county. A newly appointed office, of not much importance. Wells G W, genl mdse Land Owners — N C Bryant, A J English, N English, Wm English, E M Lambert, J R McDonald, W J McDonald, W M McDonald, Jacob Matchett, J M Matchett, G E Mohrel, W A Pemberton, M H Sistrunk, W H Sistrunk, A Watkins, R W Watkins, G W Wells, J R Wood, John Wood. CAISPBELTfi a Jackson county. A flourishing little place in the northwestern part of the county, near the State boundary line of Alabama. Calloway I W, hotel Clark John, grist mill Daniels W J & Co, genl mdse Daniels & Patrick, grocers Dekle & Daniels, genl mdse Farrier J R & Co, genl mdse Holladay Bros, genl mdse Peters J C, genl mdse Shoemaker & Daniels, saloon Shoemaker J R, genl mdse Wynn W B, genl mdse CAMP IZARD. Marion county. Located on the Withlacoochee river, 22 miles southwest of Ocala, the seat of justice. Crystal river its gulf connection is 15 miles west. A daily stage connects the place with Ocala. Sidney W Layton, P M Brown John R, genl mdse Layton Sidney W, genl mdse Lyles Thomas W, genl mdse Snowden R R, genl mdse Land Owners — A Adams, T Brasell, G P Bridges, S F Brooks, John J Brown, John W Brown, Simon Horne, A Jacobs, A W Jones, J PI McCon, Joseph Mickel, F Munroe, B Redding, Abram Ross, E H Ross, F W Ross, W W Vincent, J T Wear, H W Wells, M Wells, A M Winston. CAMPViLLE. Alachua county. Campville is a postoffice and station on the Florida Transit & Peninsula Railroad, 10 miles south of Waldo. It has a population of 250, two general stores, a wagon and repair shop, a blacksmith shop, cotton gin, grist mill and a saw and plaining mill, with a capacity of 20,000 feet of lumber per day, employing from 40 to 50 hands regularly. The place has one church and one school, and enjoys a daily mail. Warren Bacon, P M Bacon Warren, groceries, pat medicines, stat, confect, tob, cigars, etc Camp R J & Bros, Robert J, John S & Benj, genl mdse, saw mill, grist mill, planing mill, cotton gin and nursery Kayton William H, manager R J Camp & Bros’ nursery mHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is distilled from the choicest qualities of Grain. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga.

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S., F. & W. Ry. Florida Dispatojk. Past Preiglit Line. 156 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Rich John F, blacksmith Ross, James R, wheelwright Ryan William T, contractor and builder Vanlandingham Benjamin F, physician Land Owners — Andrews Agerson, Eli Amos, John Bates, R J Camp & Bro, Oscar Gamage, George Hall, J N Hayman, James Hobkirk, John Holden, TC Holden, E A Holt. CANAVARAL. Brevard county. A newly established post office, located on the east bank of the Banana river, within a few miles of the coast of the Atlantic Ocean ; mails received once each week by mail boat. Henry Wilson, P M Land Owners — M O Burnham J H Hogan, George M Quarterman, O A Quarterman, P D Wesson, Henry Wilson. CARRABELLEd Franklin county, James Island, upon which the place is located, is in the Gulf of Mexico, midway between St. Marks and Apalachicola, and in the same latitude with St. Augustine. It is twenty-one miles long, and embraces the highest tract of land on the Gulf coast between Pensacola and Tampa, having at the west end an altitude of seventy feet above the Gulf level. It is acknowledged to be the healthiest portion of Florida, both for summer and winter residence. The soil is adapted to all semi-tropical fruits and other productions of this latitude. The town of Carrabelle is incorporated, has two large steam saw mills in operation, and the best harbor on the Gulf, with steamboat running semi-weekly, connecting with the river boats at Apalachicola during the winter months; a stage line connects with Tallahassee, distant 60 miles; mails tri-weekly from the latter point, by private conveyance. Miss Carrie A Hall, P M Aiken Lewis B, ins agt and lumber Fowler R P, contractor and builder Kelly Fannie L, hotel Kelly 0 H, real estate agt Kimball Samuel, blacksmith Parlin Charles H, genl mdse and saw mill Reynolds Charles, genl mdse and saw mill Rinowee Wm, cabinet maker Rogers Charles H, real estate agt and lumber Vandyke John, genl mdse Vandyke William, ship carpenter Land Owners — John R Blocker, W C Campbell, C A Hall, Mary Holly, Garaphaiia Kelly, Grace H Kelly, Mrs L B Kelly, Parlin, Coombs & Co, M C Pickett. CARTE RSV8LLE, St. Johns county. Of no importance, except as a farmers’ post office. Land Owners — Duncan BoI AM HEADQUARTERS FOR CIDER. J. B. REEDY, Grocer and Importer, Savnanah, Ga CIDER

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Sugar Mills and Pans, Our Leading Specialty. WM. KEHOE & CO., Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. hannon, Benj R Carter, D J Carter, H T Carter, John Carter, A M Goethe, J J Harvey, J B Johnson, John Simons, Mrs M A Stevens, R S Stephens. CARYVILLE. Washington county. Only a way station on the Pensacola & Atlantic Railroad, in the northwest corner of the county, 15 miles from Vernon the county seat ; mails daily. John W Aldridge, P M Cahall John C, railroad and express agent Edwards J K, saw mill, lumber, and genl mdse Johnson Danl W, genl mdse Land Owners — J K Edwards, Thomas Ellis. CEDAR KEYS. Levy county. Situated on one of the group of islands on the Gulf of Mexico, forming the northern boundary of Wacassa Bay, and 15 miles south of the mouth of the Suwannee river, known as Cedar Keys. Business interests are chiefly mercantile. Sponge gathering, fishing, cutting cedar for making pencils, and pine timber, are important interests. There is considerable business done at this point with New Orleans and Havana. Cedar Keys is the principal town in the county, being the terminus of the Florida Transit Railroad to the Gulf of Mexico, and is a United States port of entry. Vessels load at this port for all parts of 157 the world, and the trade with Cedaf Keys, for miles up and down the coast, amounts to hundreds of thousands of dollars per year. It is a prosperous, thriving town, and destined to be a very important place. A regular line of steamships run from here to Tampa and Key West, touching at all intermediate landings ; and Morgan’s Line of ships leave weekly for Havana, Key West, and New Orleans. Pensacola is also connected by steamships, and there are a number of river boats to and from the place. Abbott Mrs Laura, millinery and fancy goods. Andrews J O & Co, J O Andrews and R Y H Thomas, gents’ and ladies’ furnishing goods Anderson Wm H, dry goods clothing, and justice of the peace Barco Berney B, Barco, Campbell & Gore, and collector customs Barco, Campbell & Gore, B B Barco, J W Campbell, and J Ira Gore, proprs Gulf Coast Land Agency Batty William & Son, William and Eugene, butchers Bean M H, manager The Suwannee Benson Charles H c, barber Bettilini A, fish, oysters, game, etc Bettilini House, O Bettilini propr Bettilini O, propr Bettilini House and saloon T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY possesses an excellent bouquet. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAYANNAH, GA.

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1 5 § §HC&ET LINE! quick; time. FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Biekei Wm P, photographer Bodiford James S, druggist Bradshaw Charles J, grocer and saloon Brown William H, genl mdse Bunting William S, manager Cedar Key Ice and Fish Co Campbell Josiah Wm, lawyer and notary public Carter Thos L, propr Magnolia House Cedar Key Ice & Fish Co, W S Bunting manager Chace James, dentist Churchill C C, physician Convey Lee c, genl mdse Cottrell, Finlayson & Scott, J L Cottrell, W D Finlayson and G S Scott, genl mdse and cedar timber dealers Cottrell James L T, lawyer and State senator Crosswell Jas J, agent Southern Express Co Darby Thomas A, saw and planing mill Davis George W, U S signal observer Davis Thomas W, saloon and billiards Dibble Wyatt N c barber Dozier M Mrs, boarding Dozier Richard M, agt F T & P R R Eagle Pencil Co, James E Richards manager Evickson J H, boarding Fagan Joseph, fish and oysters Fairchild Charles A, manfr lumber, shingles, mouldings, etc Farley Judge c, restaurant and shoemaker Florida State Journal, J Ira Gore publisher and proprietor Florida Telegraph Co, C O’Donald manager Gibson William T, genl mdse Gore Frederick S, book seller, stationer and news dealer Gore J Ira, Barco, Campbell & Gore and proprietor Florida State Journal Goss S C agent, fish and oysters Graham David, watchmaker and jeweler Gulf Coast Land Agency Barco, Campbell & Gore proprs Gulf House, A B Wheelock propr Hamlin L W, postmaster and editor Levy Enterprise Hollister D J, saloon and restaurant Holzendorf Richard L, restaurant and boarding Hudson W R, contractor and builder Jack Jane Mrs, restaurant Jack John, carpenter Jones A P, prop Jones House Jones House, A P Jones prop King & Parker, E King & Geo B Parker, fancy groceries Lockett Warren, genl agt Tampa Steamship Co Lutterloh Edward J, lawyer, real estate agt and mayor Cedar Keys Lutterloh J B Mrs, milliner McCullough Henry, manager Marine Hospital Mcllvaine F & W B, wholesale fish dealers Mcllvaine Robt H, proprietor Suwannee House J Tg SAVANNAH, G-A handles more FLORIDA. ORANGES • THAN ANY HOUSE SOUTH. TRY HIM.

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Corrections and Omissions. Brown & Fraser, James Brown and J Geddie Fraser, plasterers Chafer R M, steamboat agt Crosswell J J, agt Southern Exp Co Faber Pencil Co Gause Samuel C, fish dealer Hirst J, collector U S customs Reddick S C, master str Caddo Belle Southern Express Co, J J Crosswell agt

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Cedar Key, Florida. ^SZE^SOZEST OUT* 1883-84. Has been thoroughly renovated, kalsomined, and supplied with large additions of New Furniture, Carpets, and First Class Bedding. A New Bath Room has been added since last season, with hot and cold water and shower bath. This house has accommodations for 80 to 100 guests, and will be found fully up to the requirements of a First-Class Hotel. R. H. McILVAINE, Proprietor. M. H. BEANE, Manager. C B. ROGERS. E. A. CHAMPLAIN. C. B. ROGERS & CO. Wholesale and Retail Dealers in (Jp* KF ^||| IP HI % Terms Cash. Flour, Meal and Grits, Specialties. Corner 2d and C Streets, CEDAR KEYS, Fla. CEDAR KEY, FLORIDA. This House having been repaired and renovated throughout, is comfortable, airy and convenient TABLE SUPPLIED WITH BEST THE MARKET AFFORDS. TEMS, only $1.50 per day, or $7 per week. T. L CARTER, Propr Cedar Key, Florida. CT. IRA GORE, ( The largest paper in the State.) The Journal has a large circulation in all the G-ulf Counties, and is ati excellent advertising medium for this section. 160

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XT GIVEN 0N ALL KINDS OF MACHINERY AND REPAIRS, J^SlllUaliCS BY JOHN ROU11KE 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, G A. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. l6l McKechnie F M, contractor and builder Magnolia House, T F Carter prop Marine Hospital, Henry McCullough manager ‘ Marshall John F, lawyer Miller & Henderson, John Miller & W B Henderson, owners and proprs Tampa Steamship Co Mitchell Thomas J, grocer and hardware Morton Warren, grocer and com mer O’Donald Constantine, manager Florida Tel Co Olburn J J, sailmaker Parson & Hale, L B Parson & F E Hale, whol and ret genl mdse, ship chandlers, fertilizers, and agts New Orleans and Havana S S Line Patterson Sarah c, fruits Post Henry, Capt Eliza Hancox Prebel E S & Co, E S Prebel & D D Bartholamew, whol and ret ice and hay dealers Richards James E, ins agt and mangr Eagle Pencil Co Risley James, contractor and builder and undertaker Risley M A Mrs, milliner, dressmaker Rogers C B & Co, C B Rogers & E A Champlain, whol and ret genl mdse Savarese John whol fish, oysters and fruits Schlemmer N & Son, Nicholas & Christian, fancy groceries and bakers Smith Isaac H N c, tailor Storch & Lisenby, F H Storch & J M Lisenby, carpenters Sullivan John J, fish and oysters Sutton J B, grocer Tampa Steamship Co, Miller & Henderson props The Florida Town Improvement Co, E N Dickerson pres, D L Yulee manager The Suwannee House, R H Mcllvaine prop, M H Beard manager. Thomas Robt Y H, physician Thurston Samuels, tailor Walker John W, blacksmith Wall Giles F c, chief police Walpole & Ellis, Richard Walpole & William B Ellis, genl mdse Webster Hardy, fruit and oysters Wheelock Anson B, prop Gulf House White W R, justice of the peace Williams Theodore H, tin, copper and sheet-iron worker Wilson Joseph, shoemaker Wolfe F A & Co, F A Wolfe & B W Mason, genl mdse Wooldridge Napolean, druggist Zewadski William K, genl mdse Land Owners — Wm Batty, B P Boulware, T A Darby, Thomas W Davis, R M Dozier, L W Edward, S W Edwards, j Ira & T S Gore, A E Hodges, Sarah Hodgson, Sarah Holzendorf, Mitchell & Cooksey, Jas R Mitchell, John Parsons, L B Parsons, S C Reddick, W M Sapp, C Schlemmer, N Schlemmer, J B Sutton, D R Thomas, Richard Woodward, Wm E Yearty, W K Zewadski. T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY possesses an excellent bouquet, S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA. 20

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S, F. & W. Ry. FREIGHT IN THROUGH CARS, IN FAST TRAINS, WITHOUT TRANSFER. 162 FRORIDA STATE GAZETTEER CENTER HILL. Sumter county. A newly established postoffice, for the convenience of the farmers and orange growers, of which there are a large number. The place is 10 miles distant from Sumterville, the seat of justice ; mails semi-weekly. Thomas W Spicer, P M LaGette — physician Smith James E, saw, grist and planing mill Spicer T W, genl mdse, drug gist and notary public Venable C F, notary public and county surveyor Land Owners — Robert Anderson, S Alexander, F Douglas, T Goodwin, C Griffin, E M Knight, Henry M Knight, James H Knight, Lovell & Spicer, Thomas U Spicer, Chas F Venable. CENTREVBLLE. Leon county. Eleven miles north of Tallahassee. A daily stage line connects the place with Tallahassee and Thomasville, Ga. Dr J M Carn, P M Bradford John, saw and grist mill Carn J M, druggist and physician Connor J B, justice of the peace Gramling D F, genl mdse Roberts T J, grist mill and cotton gin Land Owners — Est R R Atkins, Peter Brown, Mrs E G Bryan, J M Carn, J B Connor, Mrs O F Connor, D F Gramlin, Mrs Sarah Harley, N M Izler & Bio, N M Izler, Nancy L Izler, T J Izler, James Lee, W T Snipes. CERRO GORDO. Holmes county. County seat; situated on the Choctawhatchie river, about 8 miles from Westville station. Calk James S, State representative Hart & Frater, genl mdse Hymson M, genl mdse Milligan & Chaffin, genl mdse, saw mill, and lumber mnfrs Pittman T H, elk Holmes co court Wiggins Russell, lawyer Land Owners — Est Benjamin Andrews, J E Blackman, Margaret Blackman, J M Brownell, J S Calk, B H Callahan, est A C Douglas, S Drake, L D Glass, Wm Glass, Samuel Graves, H M Hewitt, R F Hewitt, J C Hodd, J A Huggins, W R Huggins, H S Hunter; James McLean, Alexander Morrison, T H Pittman, E T Reynolds, B E Sellers, G B Simmons, S P Walder. CHAFFIN. Santa Rosa county. A station on the Pensacola & Atlantic Railroad, 47 miles east of Pensacola. J E Blackman, P M Hughes J E, genl mdse Smyth J M, physician Land Owners — J D Brown, J M Cobb, S W Powell, Martha Wilkerson. When going home, stop in and ord^r a box of the choicest FLORIDA ORANGES, at J. B. REEDY, Savannah, Ga.

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Qiidfli 1 WHIIq purl Pqtiq mi our Mills are fuiiy warranted. wm. kehoe & co., UU^dl lillllb dllU fdllji Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 163 CH AIRES. Leon county. A railroad station, but no postoffice. CHARLOTTE HARBOR. Manatee county. Two hundred miles south of Cedar Keys, is a well protected harbor with a fine depth of water, and is destined to become a place of great importance as the terminus on the Gulf of the Live Oak, Tampa and Charlotte Harbor Railway, opening up not merely the transportation system of this immediate section, but becoming the entrepot of a vast commerce from Key West and the West Indies. CHASEVILLE. Duval county. A landing on the St. Johns river, 7 miles from Jacksonville. Bailey George W, grocer and justice of the peace Philips A, nurseryman Singleton C, ship carpenter Wheaton S, carpenter Land Owners — James Aberdeen, B Balton, Julia Bartley, John H Chase, Edward Demps, Elias Demps, Marshal Demps, James O Farrell, Geo Faulkner, James W Faulkner, M Frazier, Sarah A LaRoche, Addie McCabe, John McCormick, S W McCormick, Wm B McCormick, Dan Milspaugh, Ed Mitchell, Elizabeth Mitchell, Joseph Mitchell, James Shields, S C Summers. CHATTAHOOCHEE STATION. Gadsden county, function of the Savannah, Florida & Western, and the Florida Central & Western Railroads, 3 miles from Chattahoochee Landing, the postoffice. Near this point is the State Penitentiary and Insane Asylum. CHATTAHOOCHEE. Gadsden county. Situated on the east bank of the Chattahoochee river ; is the eastern terminus of the Pensacola & Atlantic Railroad, and the western terminus of the Florida Central & Western. Steamboats run to Apalachicola, Eufaula, Columbus, etc. Chattahoochee is 22 milesfromQuincy, the county seat, and about 44 miles from Tallahassee. Charles B Scull, P M Brown W r illiam, barber Duval H S, State engineer Kutner M, genl mdse Forman W B, physician Goodson T B, genl mdse Hardy R T, fishery Hymson Max, genl mdse and hotel McIntosh Wm, genl mdse Philbrick E E brick manfr Randolph J H, supt Asylum Rice Joel, saloon Richardson Ike, bakery Scarborough E W & Co, genl mdse Scull Chas E, druggist and physician Sims W B, justice of the peace Spear H H, genl mdse and hotel T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is distilled from the choicest qualities of Grain. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga.

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164 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Sweet Bristol, blacksmith Sheppard J N, State senator Whaley W H, saw mill Land Owners — Lewis Adams, Harriet Banks, S Beil, B B Bower, Mrs E E Bower, Ianthus Bower, Lewis Butler, Precilla Byrd, Alfred Clark, Harry Crews Sr, Harry J Crews, Mrs Ellen Dolan, H S Duval, Mrs M L Edwards, T J Edwards, Mrs Emily Ernest, W B Foreman, Lewis Fowler, J P M Gilchrist, John O Hare, Mrs E L Harrison, Mrs S B Harrison, Benj Howe, J C Johnson, W L Jones, Mrs. M E Key, Mrs E McAlphin, Jas R McDonald, W P McDonald, J Mcjunkin est, A McMillan, Henry McMillan, M Martin, J P Poythress, J P Poythress trus, Joel Rice, Mrs S F Rice, J H Richardson, Mrs S W Rodgers, Mrs F Sadler, J F Sadler, J L Saunders, J Scarborough, Mrs M L Scarborough, C B Scull, Mrs M V Scull, I N Sheppard, W B Sims, Gabriel Smith, H H Spear, P Sweet, J L Sunday, Jube Turner, B F Watson agt, George Wilson, Jesse Wood. CHICOPJL Polk county. Situated on the Alafia river, 15 miles from Fort Meade; mails semi-weekly. H E Padgett, P M Albritton B J & Bro, genl mdse Albritton & Johnson, wheelwrights Alderman M, stock dealer Luke G A, justice of the peace and blacksmith Lunn I W, real estate agent Land Owners — G W Albritton, Henry Albritton, J T Albritton, M R W Albritton, O H Albritton, Thomas Albritton, J A Alderman, John Altman, B S Booth, Martha Durrence, A Ellis, Elizabeth Keen, G A Luke, I W Lunn, J C Pearce, Richard Pellam, A R Smith, V H Surnency, Clayton Taylor, J H Thomas, ^W Whidden, Winnie Whidden. CHIPCO. Hernando county. Seventeen miles north of Brooksville court house ; mails semiweekly. C C Gant, P M Gant C C, genl mdse Welton A, carpenter Land Owners — G L Faulk, W L Osborn, J E Burnside, W E Dowling, R C Bankston, T Hancock, C C Gant, J W Gant, James Miller, J M Oberry. CHIPLEY. Washington county. A way station on the Pensacola & Atlantic Railroad. Everett Edward, saw and grist mill Jones A Q, genl mdse Lassiter Walter, genl mdse Melvin E P, grist mill Miller Thomas G, genl mdse Woodward F H, genl mdse Land Owners — H D Brooks, Mrs J Brooks, G B Bush, J M Calloway, Stephen Chance, G W Cook, F L Daniels, Sanders Davis, T L Davis, W A Dun"O q -j q-J -p-. q AT, F a TPF r* 1 am ttLe I ar g est Dealer in this line. -LVcLLblllb, -LN LLbb, All UL. J. B. REEDY, Savannah, Ga.

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Sugar Mills, ANb bA&9 bE ALL SIZES, MADE BY JOHN ROUBKE, 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH. GA. 165 AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. C8TRA. can, John Enfinger, E N Everett, S H Gainer, Samuel Gainer, W W Gainer, E S Gaskin, C P Gilbert, Alex Gilbert, J T Gilbert, Mrs R A Gilbert, D B Godwin, C Horn, D H Horn, Burris Kent, Hampton Lacy, Mrs S A Lacy, Mrs F B Langley, Angess McQuagg, Jno McQuagg, J A Mathias, J J Mercer, J W Mercer, J H Morris, T G Owens, R M Peel, A D Pinkney, James Riddick, A M Rooks, Isaac Scott, Mrs Martha Sowell, Worley Sowell, T A Syfret, J R Taylor, W J Tiller, F M Wachob, J F Wachob. CHIPOLA. Calhoun county. Situated on Chipola river, 8 miles south of Abe’s Spring, the court house, and 54 from Tallahassee; mails semi-weekly, by steamboat, on the Apalachicola river. J H McClellan, P M Bailey J, saloon Fan in (J P, lawyer McClellan J H, grist mill and State senator Messer Z T, justice of the peace Payne William, genl mdse Richards J T, grist mill Stanfill James, physician Land Owners — Wm Bird, W M Edginfield, E C Kendrick, Mrs A Lamb, J P M McClellan, W E Maer, I P Messer, Z T Messer, R W Nelson, J M Felt, Mrs Anna Richards, F B Sexton, J W Smith, Susap Taylor, J W Whitfield, R P Whitfield. Marion county. About 200 inhabitants, is on the Florida, Transit & Peninsula Railroad, 20 miles north of Ocala. Carlton & Monroe, genl mdse Douglas R C, genl mdse Harris C C, physician Harris & Murphy, druggists Harvey H R, saloon Murphy G W, physician Park M T Mrs, proprietor Citra House Reddick O G, butcher Robinson H P & Bro, genl mdse Land Owners — Davis Barcus, P P Bishop, D D Burleison T B Burleison, W B Burleison, J D Caldwell, Mrs E M Caldwell, J B Cabbarrass Henry Carrels, R F Carrels, T A Carrels, W H Carrels, F M Caraway, W A Carlton, W F Carlton, Calvin Coat, J Coleman, T M Coleman, W H Cone, Daniel Conyers, C S Cork, Geo Coulson, James Dancy, P Danel, R Dangra, Alfred Demsey, W G Dent, A J Douglas, R C Douglas, A Duncan, H B Dunn, L W Dunn, W r esley Hall, James A Harris, J H Harris, H Harvey, Hobkirk & Brooks, J D Hobkirk, James Hobkirk, Nick Howell, O G Lamar, F W Lambert, Wm Lipsey, H Lushington, W H McConn, J C MeEwen, J O Mathews, J S Martin, J I Miller, W J Moore, — Morrison, James Rochell, N Scofield, J Sims, G G Smith, J J Smith, Joseph Smith, B C Smith, George Smith, T B Smith, V L Smith, W B Sparks, T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY IS ABSOLUTELY PURE. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, SOLE AGENTS, SAVANNAH, GA.

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F. & W. Ry. PULLMAN SLEEPINGCAR SERVICE betweeii ALL IMPORTANT POINTS. 1 66 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER W S Stewman, H S Teaple* O A Tuples, George Thomas* C C Waits, H C Walkup, A R Wartman, E L Wartman, Wm Washington, Joseph Weaver, C E Weston, Wm Weston, L L Wilkinson, J R Williams, J W Williams, W B Williams, H Willis, W W Willoughby M J Wilson. CITY POINT. Brevard County. A small settlement, situated on Indian river, 15 miles south of Titusville and about 10 miles from the Atlantic Ocean ; mails semiweekly, by steamer A J Whitlock, P M Black H S, carpenter Chancey George N, carpenter Hatch A L, genl mdse Heintz C A, physician Holmes C W, physician McQuaig D W, tax collector Sams John H, co supt public schools Saunders W R, tax assessor Sharpe W H, State senator Sharpe W H Mrs, hotel Whitlock A J, justice of the peace Land Owners — W Beggs, M J Bullock, C R Cautine, Geo Chancey, Jacob Chancey, Mrs Susan Chancey, Geo Chester Geo Cleveland, Adam Dixon, Mrs Jane Dixon, R L Dixon, W L Dixon, Y K Dixon, Mrs C A Everett, Albert Faber, C L Faber, J R Field, E W Hall, A. L Hatch, George W Holmes, R J LaRoche, D W McQuaig, J G Martin, A N Mathes, M S Sams, J M Saunders, John J Saunders, T H Saunders, John Setze, Wm H Sharpe, W A Simmons, J P Spratt, Harriet L Wilson. CLEAR WATER HARBOR. Hillsborough county. Eighty miles south of Cedar Keys, situated on the bay of the same name, on the Gulf of Mexico. It is on the site of old Fort Harrison. A C Turner P M Blanton J F, genl mdse Dak Mao, hotel Dwight M C, Orange Bluff Hotel McMullen J J, State representative Pierce A, saw mill Turner A C, genl mdse Land Owners — A G Andrews, A C Arthur, S J Belcher, W A Belcher, John Black, T F Blair, E Blanton, J F Blanton, L L Blanton, James Bodwell, Wm Brown, J P Brownlow, A V Campbell, B F Campbell, M F Campbell, W M Campbell Wm Carruthers, Willis Castang, W W Cobb, E F Dodge, J W Drew, M C Wwight, R C Dyer, L M Eavey, W S Elliott, N N Friend, J J Halley, John Hammon, G W Hammock, J G Ham, W J Ham, W A Hart, J T Humphries, A H Hunter, C M D Inlons, E Jeffords, C W Johnson, T Keller, B Kilgore, J S Kilgore, J T P Kilgore S H Kilgore, E P Leftwich, J T Low, G W Lynch, B L McMulFRUIT. When you want Strictly Choice Fruit, at bottom prices, send your orders to J. B. REEDY, Savannah, Ga.

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Sugar Mills and Pans, A full Stock of all Sizes. WM. KEHOE & CO., Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. \6y len, Daniel McMullen, David McMullen, E McMullen, G W McMullen, J D McMullen, J F McMullen. J P McMullen, j Y McMullen, J T McMullen, Joel M McMullen, R L McMullen, M E McMullen, M J McMullen, R F McMullen, S McMullen, T F McMullen, W E McMullen, W J Madre, H C Markley, M M Mastrom, W R Mastrom, G W Mattingly, A S Mears, R Mears, M E Montrose, T R Moody, Sami Morgan, J M Moore, S W Moore E Norman, M A Owen, V W Olds, F Parmer, A Pearce, E H Pearce, M I Bowledge, S E Reynolds, H A Roberts, W R Robertson, W Rodgers, S F Rodgers G D Rosseau, J L Rosseau, W W Rosseau, J W Russell, T Sheridan, W S Smith, J G Snedeker, C H Snow, A Summerlin, J S Taylor Sr, J S Taylor Jr, J N Taylor, T L Taylor, T H Thieler, J A Thompson, W H Towles, A C Turner, M Turner, R Wallace, Wm Wallace, John C White, Joshua White, W F White, A A Whitehurst, R J Whitehurst, J C Whittle, W H Williams. CLIFTON SPRINGS. Orange county. The famous picnic resort for all Sanford, Tuskawilla, Lake Charm, and all surrounding country ; is one of the most charmingly beautiful situations in all Florida. It is on the south side of Lake Jesup, which is a magnificent expanse of water, seventeen miles long and five miles wide. Clifton Springs takes its name from Dr Henry FosterÂ’s place in western N. Y., and from the great number and variety of sulphur springs, all in a short distance of each other. The location is a beautiful one ; luxuriant tropical growth. The shore is a hard, white sand beach, and rises up from the waterÂ’s edge to a height of ten feet. It presents a most eligible hotel site, is in the centre of a magnificent belt of orange land, thickly studded with orange groves. The waters are full of fine fish, and the hammocks are alive with game of all kinds. It is rapidly growing into notice, and will, in a short while, become a great winter resort. COEÂ’S MILL. Liberty county. Fourteen miles east of Bristol, and 24 west of Quincy. Hoseford R F, sheriff Liberty county Sheriff T P, tax collector CONCORD. Gadsden county. Sixteen miles northwest of Quincy, the county seat and shipping point ; mails tri-weekly. J N McKeown, P M Bell S B, physician Clay W H, wheelwright Connell J I, grist mill and cotton gin Hand C D, physician nnHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is soft and mellow to the taste, i S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.

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S, F. & W. Ry. Elegant Passenger Equipments ; Westinghouse Air Brakes; Miller Platforms; Janey Couplers. 1 68 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Hendry G A, State representative Hendry W C, millinery Hinson J J, shoemaker Kennedy R, physician Lott Lee. dentist McKeown J M, genl mdse McManus R, cotton gin Maxwell D L, genl mdse Norman J J, blacksmith Nicholson H M, physician Patterson D, lawyer and justice of the peace Perkins A E, cotton gin Reeves H S, elk Gadsden co court Land Ozvners — David Aiderman, Jacob Alderman, G W Barber, J W Barber, Jordan Barber, Jordan & G W Barber, 5 H Barber, William Barber, Joseph Barnes, J L Bell, Larkin Bell, Mrs Mary Bell, V T Bell, W I Bell, Bond & Miller, M L Bond, W G Booth, J E Bowen, M J Bowen, Mrs Susan Bostic, T L Burns, C W Butler, L F Butler, D R Carroll, Abner Chester, F J Chester, Wm Collins, Carrie 6 Elizabeth Connell, J G Connell, J I Connell, G W Cook, S Cooper, J H Darsey, C P Donaldson guardian, Susan Dudley, Mrs D Elkins, J H Elkins, W H Elkins, N Eubanks, Brantley Ferrell, K A F'errel, A J Finklea, E S Finklea, Mrs Elizabeth Gore, Mrs M L Gorman, Mrs Kate Grey, I A Hall, N R Hand, B F Harrison, W C Hendry agent, J J Higdon, John Higdon, D M Hinson, D M Hinson Jr, J W Hinson, Miss M W Hinson, N M Hinson, Wilson Hinson, Mrs E E Johnson, Mrs Eliza Johnson, I E Johnson, J E Johnson, Nat Johnson, B A Kemp, Mrs M Kemp, W B Kemp, R Kennedy, C H Lairy, J H Lairy, N M Lairy, W E Lairy, Miss Georgie Lassiter, Lee Lott, Walton Lott, Z M Lott, Levy McCreary, E E McCorquedale, Miss L McDearmid, W A McDearmid, Benj McGriff, J N McKeown, Mrs Martha McRae, J H Mashburn, D L Maxwell, J W Merritt, A J Miller, D W Miller, G W Miller, J M & W S Miller, Mrs Ann Mills, G B Mills, J B Nelson, J W Nelson, Cyrus Nicholson, D W Nicholson, Lucretia Nicholson, Richard Nicholson, Wisdom Nicholson, G O Patterson, Henry Pease, T J Peavy, A E Perkins, J B Perkins, Mrs A Poppill, B G Poppill, V G Poppill, W L Poppill, W S Poppill, John Regan, John Robinson, W M Rodgers, E M Saunders, Mrs Elizabeth Saunders, J J Saunders, B F Shelter, M E Shelfer, N H Shelter, W H Shelfer, W W Shelfer, T R Smith, James Spooner, G W Sweet, Mrs M A Taylor, Mrs M Taylor, J M Thomas, George Truluck, J R Truluck, Alford Vickers, Mrs A Vickers, Mrs Angeline Vickers, A L Vickers, A J Vickers, C H Vickers, Drew Vickers, E Vickers, F O Vickers, Mrs N M Vickers, Bryant Walsh, Fdward Walsh, Mrs D Ann Walsh, Drew Walsh, Jordan Walsh, Patrick Walsh, H M Wamack, W B Whiddeon. APPLES. I make a specialty of Fancy Apples. J. B. REEDY, Grocer, and Importer of Fruit, Savannah, Ga.

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AGRICULTURAL IRON AND BRASS WORKS, 2 BAY STREET, SAVANNAH, GA. John Rourke, AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 1 69 CONE. Putnam county. A way station on the Florida Southern Railroad, 25 miles west of Palatka. Montgomery J J, physician CORK. Hillsborough county. Known also as Crawford’s Mill. Within 1 y 2 miles of the line of the South Florida Railroad, and 20 miles west of Tampa the county seat. Mails semi-weekly, by stage running between Tampa and Bartow. Rev E S Tyner, P M Andrews C W, notary public Casey James, dentist Casey Jos, justice of the peace Cohen Misses the, milliners Evers J T, genl mdse, saw and grist mill Franklin W R, genl mdse Gallagher Hugh, tax assessor Green B K, blacksmith and wheelwright Tyner E S, genl mdse, saw and grist mill, and real estate West Benjamin, constable Wilder C L, State representative. Land Owners — R Alderman, A A Baker, T J Baker, F M Bambrill, T J Beatty, W A Beatty, J J Blanton, Oscar Blocker, S W Blocker, W W Bostic, Lorenzo Bryant, Rob’t Bryant, Thomas Bryant, John Carney, Jas Casey, John Casey, Joseph Casey, M E Cohen, D J Collins, E M Collins, Enoch Collins, Hardy Collins, J N Collins, John Collins, T A Collins, Wm Collins, D L Crum, Wm Douglass, L B Ellis, J T Evers, J W Evers, J A Faulkner, H M Frier, J R Frier, O J Frier, George Trunkling, W R Trunkling, Hugh Gallagher, John Gallagher, John W Gallagher, J E Garvin, Samuel H Garvin, Charles Gay, James Hall, M F Hall, J A Hancock, W H Hancock, T B Harrell, J W Hayes, Daniel Hines, N B Kenard, J L Kersey, G W Knight, J B Knight, W S Knight, J S Lanier, J W Lanier Sr, J R Lanier Jr, W A McLirm, Benj Mills, T D Moore, W C Moore, Berian Platt, Peter Platt, H A Prime, R S Prime, C E H Robertson, C M Robertson, L D Robertson, W A Robertson, J E Rodgers, S S Rodgers, Samuel Rodgers, J C Rutledge, Clayton Sherose, M L Shannon, J L Simmons, S A Simonton, J Simpson, Orville Sloan, E B Sparkman, S E Sparkman, D B Spikes, W H Starling, O J Stevens, J M Thomas, L R Thomas, J L Thompson, J W Tucker Sr, R J Turner, John Vickers, W A Vickers, L G Waldon, S Waldon Sr, S W Weeks, B C West, B T Wheeler, J S Whitehurst, A J Whittamore, E J Wiggins, L H Wiggins, W C Wiggins, W L Wiggins, Wm Wiggins, C L Wilder, E G Wilder, H A Wilder, T H Wilder, T W Wilder, Josehh Wilson, W F Wooten, T B Worthington, Burrill Yates, J D Young Sr. T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is distilled from the choicest qualities of Grain. S, GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga. 21

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S F & W Rv ^ = o., 1 • 00 VV QUICK TIME. 170 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER COTTON DALE. Jacksonville county. A new and thriving little place of some 400 inhabitants, is on the Pensacola & Atlantic Railroad, 10 miles west of Marianna and 70 from Tallahassee. Considerable shipping from Alabama is done at this point, of wool alone sixty thousand pounds were shipped this season. The place has three saw mills, a planing mill, grist mill and cotton gin, one private school and one church ; mails daily. J E Voss, P M Cottondale Academy Fair George, blacksmith Fretwell E, cattle dealer Goodwin A R, genl mdse, saw mill, planing mill Griffin S M, justice of the peace Hackett Joseph Mrs, dry goods Harper John, constable Kennon R E, saw mill Moore M R, saw and grist mill Padgett & Fretwell, John D Padgett & Erwin Fretwell, genl mdse Padgett John D, cattle dealer and cotton gin Powell J L, physician Sharrett James, genl mdse Voss John E, druggist Land Owners — A R Godwin, B F Callaway, J N Mitchell, Jas Bowles, John C Long, John Harper, S M Griffin, G H Cartledge, W E Petnay, James Sharrett, J Russ, T O Revier, George Tharpp, Cofield King, Allen Thomas, George Shores. COTTON PLANT. Marion county. Eight miles west of Ocala. Population about 300. Bacheldor Wm, genl mdse. Brooks John H, genl mdse Hudgins H H, justice of the peace O’Neal W R, physician Land Owners — Henry Adams, Jerry Adams, Jerry Alexander, Chapel Austin, O S Bachelder, W B Bachelder, J H Badger Jr, M Barco, Wm Barco, E Bass, John H Bates, P Blackman, Bothwell & Sutherland, George Bowler, J W Brooks, Wiley Brooks, James Y Brown, S H Brown, Stephen Brown, Andrew Burton, Yancy Butler, Albert Carter, F H Carter, J Carter, S Chisolm, H N Clark, Frank Crutchfield, Thomas Daily, Geo Davis, Lewis Davis, Thos Davis, M J W Dean, J J Edwards, J Fenley, J E Folks, W J Folks, M Freeman, M P Frink, N PYrguson, Peter Garrison, J T Grieger, Peter Gipson, J J Godwin, Stephen Good, J J Goodwin, S Graham, John Gray, T Guilfoyle, John Hamilton, W P Hammons, Harris & Brooks, Wm Harris, R Harrison, Lewis Harvill, W Hisson, O Plodge, S Howell, C H Hubbert, H H Hudgins, R C Jacobs, Abram Johnson, David Johnson, M Johnson, Robert Johnson, Jackson Jones, C A Langley, A A Lewis, H W Long, James Long, Thomas Long, W McCullough, George McDavis, R F Marlow, L B Mason, ReuConfectioners’ Supplies. J. B. REEDY, Grocer, and Importer o| Fruit, §>AY4NNAU, @4,

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"We Guarantee our Prices. M. KEHOE
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k, F. & W. Ry. RAST MAIL TRAINS THROUGH WITH BUT FEW STOPPING POINTS. T72 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Wilds, W J Carlton, A Higgenbotham, J M Austin, L Jones. CRAWFORDSVILLE. Wakulla county. The county seat, is situated near the centre of the county, 12 miles west of St Marks, the shipping point, and 21 miles from Tallahassee; mails tri-weekly by horseback. W W Walker, P M Adams J W, genl mdse Alligood C S, sheriff Wakulla county Bradley H E Mrs, boarding Cox C M, wheelwright and blacksmith Duval W T, lawyer Gavin L, shoemaker Giles W A, judge Wakulla co, and justice of the peace Laid H C, cooper Laid J E, physician Laid M J, cooper McMillan R C, tax collector Wakulla co Moore T H, dentist Smith R S, genl mdse Swearinger T F, senator Fully G W, State representative, grist mill, cotton gin, wheelwright, and blacksmith Walker, H H, tax assessor Wakulla co Walker N R, lawyer Walker W W, genl mdse, grist mill, cotton gin and livery stable Watts E Y, cattle dealer and butcher Land Ozvners — J W Adams Jr, C S Allegood, J M Allen, T Allston, W H Andrews, Robt Baldwin, Annie Barco, Lemuel Barco, S A Barco, Mrs A E Braswell, H H Braswell, Harriet Braswell, N W Butler, Warren Butler, R J Carraway, W W Cesseau, Jonathan Clemmons, Nancy Clemmons, W K Coleman, J W Coggins, G W Core, Jesse Cornelius, John Council, C M Cox, Charles Cox, John T Cox, Hiram Cox, W T Cox Sr, Nathan Donaldson, J W Degga, John A Durrance, E W Duval, Duval & Walker, Wm E Duval, Wm T Duval, Peter Epps, W H Eubanks, H K Eubanks, James A Ezell, A M Ferrell, C J Ferrell, John S Ferrell, J W Duggar guardian T B Ferrell, R B Forbes, S W Forbes, Frank Gavin, H Gavin, I Gavin, Lewis Gavin, Peter Gavin, Viney Gavin, S J Giles, Wm A Giles, L R Gilchrist, Mrs H C Gregory, E M Green, F T Green, T J Greer, Lewis Gwaltney, Haldeman & Ferrell, L F Hall, J B Hammitt, Richard Hargrett, J J Harrell, John B Harvey, Noah Harvey, M L Henderson, T J Herring, Edward Hill, George Hill, Mallory Hinton, Handy Jackson, Joseph Jackson, J Johnson, Miss Ida Lavender, John L Lavender, George Lawhorn, H D Lawhorn, J M Lawhorn, Mrs Nancy Leak, Henry McAlister, Hugh McAlister, R C McMillan, S W Mathers, Mrs S Mathers, T H Moore, Benj Nelson, R G Nichols, C E Nims, J J Pearce, Durant Pelt, J E Piggott Sr, J E Piggott Jr, BANANAS. I am the only Importer of Red and Yellow Bananas in th State. J. B. REEDY, Savannah, Ga.

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Saw Mill Work 6 f All kinds furnished by roust BOUBKE, 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 1 73 J C Piggott, S T Piggott, Porter & Taylor, W R Porter, N A Posey, Noah Posey, T J Posey, E Powell, Z T Powell, A D Raborn, Henry Baker, Jacob Baker Sr, Jacob Baker Jr, Jacob Baker, John K Baker, M D Baker, R H Baker, T J Baker, Wm Baker, S Randall, D D Redd, H C Rehwinkel, H C Rehwinkel & Co, M J Revell, M J Revell agt, Oscar L Revell, C R Reynolds, John L Reynolds, S H Scott, Mrs Nancy Silva, Mrs Dr Slossom, A F Smith, G R Smith, J W Smith est, Daniel Spears, Mrs Susan Spears, G N Stanland, N T Stanland, W R Stokely, M Strickland, I A Sutton, W B Sutton, T F Swearingen, John Thomas, Mason Thomas, William Thomas, Alfred Tucker, A J Tully, A P Tully, G W Tully, W C Tully, Ephraim Vanse, E W Vanse, Y M Vanse, Alfred Vickers, E L Vickers, Mrs Mary Vickers, H H Walker, H W Walker, N. R Walker, W H Walker, W W Walker, S K Wallace, E Y Watts, John K Whaley, Edwin Whaley, Henry Whetstone, J C Whetstone, M Williams, R S Williams, T Williams, N A Wood, J W Wood. CRESCENT CITY. Putnam county. Crescent City is located on Crescent Lake, about midway of the district. The town is beautifully laid out with the streets running at right angles, forming blocks of about four acres, each subdivided again into four lots. There are portions reserved for parks and drives, while directly back of the town lies Lake Stella, a beautiful internal lake of several miles in circumference, having an elevation of 40 feet above Lake Crescent. Crescent City boasts of two firstclass stores, two hotels, several private boarding houses, a drug store, postoffice, blacksmith shop, saw mill, two very pretty Episcopal churches, and two good school houses. Ballard L A, real estate Beach & Miller, genl mdse Bentham, Perry & Co, genl mdse Griffin C R, real estate Johnson Frank, blacksmith Lounds Thomas, druggist Lakeside House Potter M M, propr Potter House Perry Henry, real estate Wade I N, photograph Willis & Canard, saw and planing mill CREST VIEW. Walton county. A newlyestablished postoffice and a way station on the Pensacola & Atlantic Railroad, 51 miles east of Pensacola. CROWÂ’S LANDING. A steamboat landing on the west side of St Johns River, 159 miles from Jacksonville. CRYSTAL RIVER. Hernando county. 25 miles from Cedar Keys ; in the midst of a fertile section, and fine minT HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY possesses an excellent bouquet. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.

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V Ar W Rv WAY CROSS SHORT LINE 1 TT xt V • TO FLORIDA. 174 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER eral springs. Game is plenty in the vicinity. Barco N, genl mdse Mann A S, lawyer and State senator Miller J L, genl mdse, grist mill and cotton gin Paul & Willis, genl mdse Shands — physician Land Owners — N Barco, D W Blitch, David S Folks, Caroline Robinson. CRYSTAL LAKE. Putnam county, This place is situated on Fruitland Peninsula three miles east of Welaka on the St Johns river, and the same distance from Pomona, on Crescent or Dun’s Lake. There are five good general merchandise stores within three miles, where most anything can be bought at a fair price. Their stock is complete, and having a good patronage is always fresh. There are four churches within two and one-half miles, viz: Methodist, Episcopal, and two Baptist. Two good mills supply as good lumber as can be bought at any place. They are supplied with the necessary machinery to cut casings, flooring, lath and in fact anything that is wanted in a house or in the building line. The price of lumber per thousand range for rough $10 and $16 for dressed. CYPRESS. Jackson county. A new postoffice and way station on the Pensacola & Atlantic Railroad, 12 miles east of Marianna court house, and 56 from Tallahassee. J A Bevis, P M Bevis J A, genl mdse McClellan J S, saw mill, grist mill and cotton gin Land Owners — J W Bird, F McFarland, John McFarland, Wm Grubbs, J S McClellan, L Womberly, Nathan Mims, B Edwards, O Bird, D Cumeford, J Cumeford, Gen McNealy, Wm Holton, M Stephens, Jas Carpenter, Wm Carpenter, Henry Carpenter, Z Johnson, C Hill, G Johnson, E Whilden, M Heath, J Jeter, E Jeter, D Roberts, C Roberts, C Robinson, T J Mears, W H Logan, Henry McMillan, B F Sims, Wm McKey. CUSTER. Located on the F. C. & W. Road, five miles west of Live Oak, contains one store, one extensive turpentine still, operated by C. K. Dutton, Esq. DANCY’S WHARF. A landing on the east bank of the St. Johns river, 66 miles from Jacksonville. DARBYVILLE. Baker county. A station on the Florida Central and Western Railroad, 28 miles west of Jacksonville. Hampton W A Rev, Methodist McClenney & Co, genl mdse and hotel McClenney C B, saw mill LEMONS 1 handle r t r hes“te any h0Me J. B. REEDY, Savannah, Ga.

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Sugar Mills and Pans. They are Strong and Durable. WM. KEHOE k CO., Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 1 75 Williams F G, druggist and physician Land Owners — A Burnsed, M G Berry, Mrs E Barber, Graham Crews, I E Chambless, John C Crawford. B R Dinkins, Wm Garrett, W P Horne, W C Horne, W A Hodges, Martin Jackson, C B McClenny, Edward Mobley, Jas H Powers, H L Reed, Isham J Rhoden, D H Rowe, Willis Rauls, R L Rowe, James Sweat, James M Strickland, Jos Salmon, J M Thompson, Walter Turner, Henry Wilson. DAVENPORT. A steamboat landing on the Ocklawaha river, 34 miles from Palatka. DAVIDSON. Manatee county A small hamlet, 14 miles northeast of Fort Ogden. Altman W H, stock dealer Bailey Jas W, notary public Carlton A, blacksmith and wheelwright Johnston A S, druggist and physician Johnson A W, physician Parker C H, stock dealer Whidden Jno W, stock dealer Land Owners — Robert Barton, J W Bailey, Jas N Blount, Jerry Carlton, Daniel Carlton, Wright Carlton, Mrs M H Curry, John J Duncan, R C Henry, Wm H Hooker, Lewis Mercer, James McBride, L H Parker, T O Parker, J R Parker, F N Platt, J W Whidden, Jas E Whidden, S E Whidden DAYTONA. Volusia county, Two hundred and fifty inhabitants, is located on the Halifax river, 45 miles from Enterprise, the seat of justice ; it has one private school, one church, two hotels, a saw mill, and a weekly paper ; a stage line runs to St. Augustine tri-weekly, and a steamboat from Jacksonville weekly. Geo H Clark, P M Barr B, genl mdse Clark George H, matches, clocks, etc Coast Co operative Association, genl mdse Dayton E, dentist Daytona Female Inst Garrison J E, physician Grace F C, dentist Herdman W S, physician Hoag Mary, Palatka House Huston L D, justice of the peace, co supt public schools Huston M, druggist Jackson Wm, genl mdse and notary public Journal, Halifax printing co Mouty John, saw mill Niver J H, furniture and undertaker O’Connel W B, genl mdse Peck Bros, genl mdse Rogers D E, notary public Snow E M, genl mdse Thompson G, genl mdse Thompson L, dry goods Franer W H, prop Ocean View House Wallace G M, physician mHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is soft and mellow to the taste, A S, GUCKMHEIMER h SON, SoJq Agents, SAVANNAH, GA,

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Florida Dispatch. Fast Freiglit Lino. S., F. & W. Ry. 176 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Land Owners — Mrs J G Anderson, Wm Archer, L Arnold, J Lewis Baldwin, John Ball, Annie C Barr, A C Barr, John C Bennett, W C Bennett, W J Berne, Giles Bliven, Lucy M Bohanan, B W Brown, Julia C Brown, J S Bryant, J B Caldwell, E Camprelle, C W Carraway, J W Carraway, Chas. H Carpe, D 0 Clark, Dr Clarkson, Ella E Coleman, E B Coombs, J C M Coombs, Mrs H S Cooper, J P Corwin, W S Elgin, J H Futch, J Gothrope, Jas A Gruver, H P Hand, Mary Harper, Noah Harper, Mrs Ann Harris, J D Hegan, John Helms, G P Hosmer, Chas E Jackson, Wm Jackson, C D Jones, G W Kingston, C W Leavins, J C Maley, John Manley, R W Martin, Ben Mason, Carswell J Mason, G P McDonald, W M Merrill, J D Mitchell, Grace B Noble, J L Muckles, J A Parker, A J Perkins, G R Pucket, Randall & Thompson, J A Redfield, F L Rodgers, D D Rodgers, D B Rodgers, Lunt & Rodgers, A D Rowe, George Sanborn M L Smith, M V Smith, W A Smith, E M Snow, W A Spencer, D B Taylor, W H Trainer, Solomon Tyre, W H Vigal, G M Wallace, Mrs C W Wilder, T F Wingate, J W Wingate, Mathias Zeigler. DeLAND. Volusia county. Is located 5 miles east of its landing on the St. Johns River, with which it is connected by a regular daily mail and passenger stage line. The place was established in 1876, by Mr. H. A. DeLand, of Fairport, New York. It is the centre of the orange belt, and the orange groves here are doing well, and general crops also yield abundantly. The population of DeLand is now 2,000, and it contains a number of good churches and schools, several first-class boardinghouses, a good hotel, two livery stables, two newspapers, an ice factory, six saw mills, a bank and other points of interest. The following is the list of all the trades and pursuits of its inhabitants : B B Bennett, P M Agriculturalist, C Codrington & Co publishers Anthony Mrs M L, millinery and notions Armstrong Wm, saw mill Bennett Peter S, druggist Brickford L A, steamboat agt Bond & Co, saw mill Brown Harmon, brick mnfr Brown J D, lawyer Cannon John W, photographer Chambers Bros & Dunn, saw mill Cleveland W W & W S, genl mdse Codrington C C, notary public and editor Agriculturalist Davis Major, genl mdse DeLand & Parce, real estate agents Drake Mary, boarding Dreka George A, fertilizers Dreka G A & Co, genl mdse DeLand High School DeLand Kindergarten T7 T?0 FT A T) T Always on hand a full supply of the best. TlhVTililAijljjLOf J. BREEDY, Savannah, Ga.

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Sugar Mills, AND PANS OF ALL SIZES, MADE BY JOHN HOUJRKE, 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, G-A. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 1 77 Erhart Victor J, baker and confectioner Feam George, real estate agt and agt DeBary’s Baya steamships Fenner L G, private school Fish O F, paints and oils Fisher George W, druggist and physician Florida Agriculturist, C Codrington editor Goodrich Fred S, banker and jeweler Hutchins F W Mrs, millinery Hoffman J A Mrs, boarding Jones C J K, lawyer Jordan John B, tax collector Volusia county Keen E W, boots and shoes Kingsbury A G, ice factory and dairy Klapp Wm, hardware, doors, sash and blinds Lakin Charles W, lawyer Lancaster G W, real estate agt LaCelle Robert, saw mill McDonald E H, barber McLurin & Stockton, general mdse and real estate agents McLeod E D, grocery McNeill & Allen, furniture Miller C A, livery stable Minot J, hotel Mower H O, dentist Mower William, saw mill Orange Ridge Echo, Johnson & Co publishers Parce J Y, justice of the peace Rawlins Robert, butcher Ross J D, carriage and wagon mnfr and blacksmith Sawyer J N, shoemaker Seaman A, boarding Stockton A H, genl mdse Swift, Bros, genl mdse Tanner H A, livery stable Terry O R, boarding Whitcomb & Gordon, tinsmiths Wellman A L, saw mill Wellman & Camp, saw mill Whitmore F Y, banker Wilcox C P, saloon Wright C H, justice of the peace Wright C H & S B, real estate agents Wright S B, notaty public Land Owners — D W Adams, Lance Adams, L W Adams, Rose M Adams, Jno W Adams, T D Adams, D M Adu, J J Adylott, W J Adylott, Wm W Allcott, Geo Arnos, E W Atwater, Fanny L Atwater, Annie P Austin, H B Austin, T O Bailey, Mrs T B Barth, T Bassett, S A Beanseman, J S Benedict, B B Bennett, Mrs M A Bennett, Sands Bennett, L A Bickford, G M Biggers, C R Bloomer, O D L Boardman, Frank L Bond, E Bond, Richard Bond, C Bowler, Emma W Broom, J D Broom, M A & J D Broom, Scott E Brown, Harmon Brown, G A Brown, Mrs J S S Brown, Arthur Brown, Wm Brownlee, C M Buffington, Sarah A Burke, Wm Burke, R T Burton, G Busick, R E Burton, Jno Camp, F A Cannon, Mrs E J Cannon, Mrs E O Carpenter, N B Carpenter, S L Carpenter, Edward Caspin, G R Caspin, Chambers & Dunn, Mrs E Chambers, John L Chandler, Mrs M E Cheney, Mrs D Clayton, Kane & Sage Clough, C Cod|HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is soft and mellow to the taste. S. GU CKEN HEIM ER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA. 22

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S., F. & W. Ry. FREIGHT IN THROUGH OARS, IN FAST TRAINS, WITHOUT TRANSFER. FRORIDA STATE GAZETTEER 178 rington, Mary R Coffin, E S Coffman, R D Coffman, B F Colcord, Val P Collins, John Conner, David Cook, James Cooney Sr, James Cooney Jr, Conns & Wood, G F Cords, A Conell, J Conell, Ben Conell, Mrs W A Conell, J S Craig, J B Crosby, John Cronin, T Dalton, Jas M Dart, D W Davis, E R Dean, H A DeFand, DeVale & DeÂ’Revera, Jno P Ditson, J W P Dodd, Jos Dore, B H Dorman, Ichabod Dougherty, John Dougherty, J F Drake, Geo A Dreaka, Alice P Driggs, Henry K Dubois, Wm M Dunn, Dunn & Davis, J H Dunn, Martha A Dulin, Cary Emmons, Rhoda G Everson, A L F'ay, Geo Fearn, H B Fenster, H P Field, Jno A Fisher, Geo W Phsher, Winnie Fisher, E Fissett, John Fitchner, Mrs Mary A Foote, W H Fosdick, G A Foy, Louis B Frayser, R B Frayser, Jno P Frayser, Mrs L Fudge, Martha Fulce, W L Fuller, R A Gailbraith, G S Gaines, Crawford Gilbert, H H Gillen, A J Gillmore, Eliza J Gillmore, B Glascock, Geo Glendon, D T Goodrich, Barney Goodwin, E F Gould, F A Graff, Helen May Green, J A Green, J H Griffeths, Mrs E H Griffeths, Allen Ham, J T Hamilton, J E Hardy, J B Hardy, M C Hargrove, Sarah B Hargrove, Mrs V Harper, Harwood & Schermerhorn, Hawkins & Thorne, Kate C Hedrick, Ella A Hedrick, Hildreth & Cheny, Samuel T Hillman, A D Hilton, W W Hite, Mary A Holcomb, Henry F Holmes, S Honeywell. E H Hopkins, S B Hopkins, C F Hopkins, Abram Hopper, C S Howard, C D Howry, Jno C Howard, Geo A Hughes, J A Huffman, N W Hullings, Hullings & Brinley, JAB Hull, Edward S Hulst, George D Hulst, George Hulst, Emma O Hulst, W W Hulst, Mrs Ann Hunter, Byron E Huntley, F<_ev Hutchison, A Jackson, C J Jackson, C J B Jackson, G F Jacobs, P James, Anna B James, Mrs C Johnson, J S Johnson, Sarah L Johnson, C W Johnson, C B Johnson, C B Johnson, E Johnson, C J K Jones, Mrs L M Jones, Mitchell Jones, J B Jordan, L B Kaler, H H Kelley, C B King, Henry King, Alex Kinmont, C E Kirk, F Kirker, Wm Klapp, Kevit & Hffiden, E A Knowlton, W S Knowlton, A W Kransman, R L Lacell, M E Lafollet, E L Lamson, Mrs S W Lamson, A T Lane, R T Leach, A A Leverich, Mrs A Levi, A D Ligren, Frank S Lewis, E L Little, S C Little, W C Lombard, Jno Lynch, M Marsh Jr, Mrs M J Marsh, Reuben Marsh, John H Mason, W W McAlpine, Sophia McClellan, S L McCorrihe, E B McConley, Mcjohnson & Reinhart, F C McKay, Samuel McMillan, McNeil & Cleveland, Allen McNeil, C A Miller, L H Minter, D B Moore, M B Morse, H C Mower, Munger, A G Mum, M G Mum, W mriHl A TVTTT^l ? J B REEDY IS THE ONLY IMPORTER Vlfvv4-ii v A 10 5 |N SAVANNAH, OA,

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Sugar Mills and Pans. Our Pails are Smooth and Uniform in Thickness. WM. KEHOE & CO., Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 179 G Mum, Jno A Nelson, E E Nixon, J G Owen, J R Palmer, L M Parce, W M Parce, H B Parker, L L Parson, F G Pate, Hannan Patterson, E J Patterson, J Peddie, D G Phillips, C N Pierce, Laura W Pollard, C T Pollard, Mrs C Prevatt, F A Prevatt, J N Pritchett, W D Rankin, Robert 'Rawlins, H Rawlins, Peter Rawlins, Wade Rawlins, Wm Rawlins, G A Resse, E B Reese, Mrs M Rhame, Geo B Rice, Jno Rich, R B Richardson, E S Richardson, A D Rike, W T Risque, J A Roe, Roscoe & Fisher, J D Ross, Geo Sackett, A A Sage, G W Samuels, N R Scoville, A Seaman, A Shattuck, E Shattuck, Emma L Shaw, J T Shields, R T Shields, R T & J T Shields, Mrs E G Shriverly, Wm Shriverly, Mrs E L Smart, Alice T Smith, H E Smith, B D Smith, W H Smith, G W Smith, A T Sparkman, Stephen Sparkman, PI P Speckman, Phil Speed, F A Spencer, Mrs M Starling, A R Steadman, Griffeth Steadman, U L Stevenson, A H Stockton, J W Stone, D Stootroff, H C Strack, Albert Subee, C Subee, J O Sutton, P P Sutton, Samuel Swing, H A Tanner, W PI Taylor, James Taylor, A G Taylor, W W Taylor, A C Teft, E A Tenny, O P Teny, H E Thomas, Mary A Thompson, Emma A Thompson, W B Titus, M V Timmons, A W Tuthill, Susan A Undergrift, Jas M Van Hook, H A Veits, J J Vinzant, R G Walasby, W J Wall, S W Waltz, Hiram Waters, E A Watson, Mrs C W Watson, Edgar Watson, Warren Wager, R H Wheeler, F W Wheeler, W Whitmore, Mrs S M Whitted, Wm Whittier, Mrs V Wilcox, W S Wilks, Angie Williams, James Williams, Samuel Williams, J W Wilson, James E Wilson, A C Wilson, B M Wilson, Chas S Wright, J B Wood, W P Wood, A W Witherspoon, C H Wright. DeLAND LANDING. Volusia county. 162 miles from Jacksonville, on the east side of the river, is a landing. DeLand is 5 miles from this landing. A stage line connects with mail boats. DELLWOOD, Jackson county. Seven miles west of the Chattahoochee river. DmsmoRE. Duval county. Discontinued as a postoffice. (See Jacksonville.) DSSTG N„ Plillsborough county. A newly established postoffice, of not much importance as yet. DRAYTON ISLAND. Putnam county. As the name implies, this is an 'island, three and one-half miles in width at the centre, and is situated in the southwest corner of Putnam rjlHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is distilled from the choicest A qualities of Grain. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga.

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S„ f. & W. Ey. PULLMAN SLEEPING CAP SERVICE between ALL IMPORTANT POINTS. 180 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER county. It lays at the entrance of Lake George and has an area of 1870 acres. The St. Johns river steamboat stops at the wharves. The population is 100. Daniel W Crosby, P M Brown B T, carpenter Crill E S, physician Crosby Daniel W,real estate and civil engineer Darling D, physician Darling Georgia, nurseryman Lombard Mrs Lucilla, boarding Pellett B M, physician Reed F W, nurseryman Rodgers T Thomas, physician Land Owners — W P Wright, Samuel Scurry, B M Pellett, E S Crill, D Darling, T F Rogers, D W Crosby, V L Lombard, Mrs N Almond, R N Parker, Charles Haskell, S Walker. DRIFTOfeL Jefferson county. F. C. & W. R. R. ; discontinued as a postoffice. (See Monticello.) DRIERISON. A steamboat landing on the Ocklawaha river, 1 14 miles from Palatka. DUNEDBN. Hillsborough county. On the St Johns Bay, 75 miles southwest of Cedar Keys. Douglass & Sommerville, genl mdse Edgar L, physician Gunn J H, hotel Jones George L, real estate Moody A H, physician Land Owners — Lavilla Allen, E L Allen, W T Bradbury, R J Booth, E M Beckett Richard Booth, W O Booth, George Booth, J D Booth, J E Brown, G A Brown, B W Brown, T A Brown, W R Bicker, C Castaing, S W Dixon, J O Douglass, M H Douglass, M E Daniel, S Daniel, J R Daniel, S L Daniel, J Dynen, J D Edgar, James H Gum, S R Garrison, Jas Hartley, W E Johnson, W S Johnson, G L Jones, C Johnson, D C McMullen, J M McClung, E L McClung, McCollum, E J Nicholson, W T Neigles, Albert Nelson, J P Nash, O’Flarharty, S Patrice, Tony Paslago, James Sommerville, Hugh Sommerville, M C Sutton, L L Sutton, A P Sutton, G W Sutton, W L Tate, W L Thompson, H M Tinny, S J Thomson, S E Winslow, W L Wilson, G W Whitehurst, Watson Whitehurst, R R Whitehutst, M E Whitehurst, J R Wescott Jr, R Whittle, J E Weiglesworth, S S Youngblood. DUTTOft. Nassau county. Thirty-six miles from Fernandina; a shipping point for lumber and naval stores. Carroll & Bro, genl mdse, lumber and naval stores Land Owners — W R Adams, W F Gwynn, Jack A Hicks, N A Hicks, Z Jones, Mrs C Lang, Dal Norton, J J Pringle, J R Surrincy, J P Swails, J A Surrincy. Peanuts. Tirginia North Carolinaand Tennessee in large variety at J. B. REEDY’S Grocer, and Importer of Fruit, Savannah, Ga.

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fji 4. m Q i n given 6n All kinds of machinery and repairs, JVSllilIclM3k by JOHN JROUEKE 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 1 8 1 DYAL. Nassau county. S., F. & W. R. R. Only a way station on the above road, io miles north of Callahan. EAU GALLBE. Brevard county. Only a landing on Indian river, 35 miles south of Titusville. Olmstead H R, genl mdse Land Owners — John L Caspar, Geo F Ensey, Sarah G Gleason, W H Gleason, F A Houston, J C Houston, J C Houston, B J Stewart, Rufus B Stewart. EAST PALATKA. Putnam county. This very desirable suburb is located on the east side of the river diagonally across from Palatka. No postoffice. (See Palatka.) ENCONFINA. Washington county. A country store at Porter’s Ferry on Bear Creek. Colquhoon G, genl mdse Colquhoon C H, saw mill Gainer J W, justice of the peace Land Owners — Stephen An derson, C W Cox, Sharpless Evans, J W Gainer, Andrew Gainer, W A Gainer, W R Gainer, J M Mashburn, R B Mashburn, Mrs S J McQuagg, Mrs Elizabeth Pearson, W J Porter, H L Porter, Joseph Porter, G Colquhoun. EDEN. Brevard county. Located on the St. Locie Sound, 120 miles sou h of Titusville, with which it is connected by a tri-weekly line of steamboats which ply between that town and Lake Worth, Ankeny J F, physician Moise Charles F, painter Richards H W, carpenter Richards Thomas E, hotel, physician, dentist and blacksmith Richards W T, ship carpenter Smith Lucian, physician EDCEWATER. On the east bank of the St. Johns river, 80 miles from Jacksonville. Land Owners — L E Richards, T E Richards, W S Richards, H W Richards, F B Richards, H J Richards, L Smith, Joseph Hurst, J Fletcher Ankeny, Charles F Moise, Everett J Shattuck, Charles Negley, John Thompson, L A Crabtree, Q S Munson, Charles Wilder. ELDGRA. Volusia county. Located on a peninsula, between the Hillsborough river and the Atlantic ocean ; is 35 miles from Enterprise, the county seat. No business done here but that of orange culture. King J R, justice of the peace Nelson R S, lime dealer Land Owners — John R Rawlston, Frank E Meyer, Russell milE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY IS ABSOLUTELY PURE. A S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, SOLE AGENTS, SAVANNAH, GA.

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F &7 w TfV Tlle ^efewed Moxrfce .00 VY 1VJ. ^TO FIjORIOA.,^ 182 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Hancock, J M Chambers, J S Watson, Robert S Nelson, J H King, H H Moeller, T D Adams, George R Pitzer, Wm P Shysack. Land Owners — H 0 Cannon, J W Cottington, Jno H Franklin, J D Franklin, MrsS M Leffingwell, S S Lamb, Geo Patten, Chas A Turner. ELLAVILLE. EBViPORIA. Madison county. F. C. & W R. R. Situated on the west bank of the Suwannee river, at its junction with the W^ithlacoochee, it is admirably adapted to the lumber business, in which Messrs. Drew & Bucki, the founders of the place, are extensively engaged, they having several large mills in the vicinity. Bucki L & Son, genlmdse and saw mill Land Owners — E Adams, J E Blanton, L Bucki & Son, Wm Bridges, W I Blanton, G W Bell, W T Dorman, Mrs Louisa Dease, Henry A Greer., Wm M Green, Geo Glass, W P Hayes, Marion Hicks, T P Hurst, S A J Home, Chas Herring, J D Herring, Wm Johnson, L M Long, John P Lyons, D J McMullen, G W Moody, J L Ratliffe, W J Simmons, J W Sellars, Brit Smith, G W Shiver, J O Stroud, T J Stroud, L M Stroud, James Stroud, D H Tidwell, S H Fowler, G W Westberry, A G Wells, J H Wells, J H Warren. ELLENTON. Manatee county. A small settlement on the north side of Manatee river, six miles from its mouth. Foreip Dried and Green Fruit Volusia county. Only a general store, located 40 miles north of Enterprise and 4 from Volusia, a landing on the St. Johns river. A daily line of stages connects the latter place with Emporia. Eldridge L H, genl mdse, saw and planing mill, notary public and justice of the peace Miner M M, watches and clocks Moore T L, contractor and builder Horn & Stafford, blacksmiths and wheelwrights Richardson L H, justice of the peace Wasson W T, genl mdse Wilson E V Mrs, boarding Wilson S B, surveyor Wooley C L, druggist and physician Land Oivners — Mrs C Biers, J L Biers, G M Buchanan, G B Buckwalter, J P Buckwalter, J R Buckwalter, R M Cook, W W Cozart, John Davis, Davis Bros, Jefferson Davis, R F Dougherty, J F Dundy, L H Eldridge,. C H Felt, E W Felt, E T Felt, J P Felt, J W Frant, A J Goodson, B V Guess, Mrs M Harrison, John Horn, C F Lair, C M Miner, M M Miner, J L Moore, J E Parrot, U Pierson, U L Pierson, Peter Piers6n, W P Russ, C L Wooley. In large variety, at J. B. REEDY’S, Grocer, and Importer of Fruit, Savannah, Ga.

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Sugar Mills and Pans. Our Mills run perfectly true. M. KEHOE & CO., Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) ^83 AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. ENTERPRISE. Volusia county. E. & I. R. R. This is the county seat of Volusia county, and has a population of about 300 ; has express and telegraph offices, good hotel accommodations, public schools, and churches ; mails daily by the MerchantsÂ’ DeBary Baya line of steamboats, which line is the main means of travel from this point to Jacksonville, and points along the St Johns river. It is situated on the north shore of Lake Monroe, about 200 miles south of Jacksonville, and 6 from Sanford, and on an elevated spot which has its many attractions, and adds to its notoriety as a resort to winter tourists. The main purpursuits are packing and shipping vegetables, and other semitropical fruits. Very little mercantile business of any kind is carried on here, and no manufacturing interests, there being only a few stores to supply the local demand for goods. There are mineral springs here with medical properties, which is said to cure rheumatism, liver and skin diseases, and many visit them in search of relief of those ailments. Large shell mounds, supposed to have been erected by the Indians, are to be seen here, and some are 250 feet in diameter and rise to a height of 35 leet. This was a favorite camp-ground for some of them, and during the Seminole war was the scene fought battles. milE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW & Indian River R. R., which is now being rapidly completed, with Enterprise its western terminus, will no doubt add to the population and growth of the town, and open up for it a new field of existence. W H Caven, P M Atkinson & Harold, James Atkinson and W R Harold, saw and planing mill and lumber dealers Bennett S S, saw mill and blacksmith Branning William C C, watchmaker and news dealer Brantley House, N C Wilting manager Brock House, G A Stone manager Bucknor C B, justice of the peace Buell & Boyce, S S Buell and Patric Boycek, blacksmiths and wagon makers Caven W H, Caven & Rossetter, and druggist and physician Caven & Rossetter, Dr W H Caven and J C Rossetter, real estate agts Chandler J H, judge Volusia co Cone W A, sheriff Volusia co Count Geo H, grocer and agt Southern Express co Crowell Mrs M, boarding Dawson Allan, editor Enterprise Herald Dawson T C, editor and manager Enterprise Herald Dickens John W, elk Volusia co Donald S A, orange cultivator and improvement of many hard The Enterprise WHISKEY possesses an excellent bouquet, S. GUCKENIIEIMER & SON, Sole Adepts, SAYANNA1I, GA.

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S., F. & W. Ry. Elegant Passenger Equipments; Westinghouse Air Brakes; Miller Platforms; Janey Couplers. 184 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Duren R L, hack stable Enterprise Herald, T C Dawson editor and manager Fisher Charles G, Fisher & Newton, and co surveyor Fisher & Newton, Charles G Fisher and W W Newton, real estate agts Hodges A J, tax assessor Volusia co Leonardy & Osteen, Philip Leonardy and Marion Osteen, butchers McLean, John, livery and sale stable Moore & Dickens, Richard C Moore and Wm M Dickens, genl mdse Rossetter Arthur, nurseryman Stone C A, manager Brock House Thayer William S, Thayer & Sauls, and treas Volusia co Thayer & Sauls, William S Thayer and John Sauls, genl mdse Walstine Alfred c, saloon Wilting N C, manager Brantley House Yandell Mrs, boarding Land Owners — G W Akins, M C Akins, R L Akins, Jasper Alman, Wm N Armstrong, H Asken, John Atkins, W R Bainhart, Nancy J Beck, Titus Bines, Mrs E C Bodine, J H Bodine, Mary E Bodine, D B Bodar, Pat Boyce, Gail Branner, W C C Branner, R D Brooke, C B Bucker, George Burgess, Strouder Calhoun, Robt Cams, Ora Carpenter, W H Carson, W H Caven, Wm Christopher, D C Clark, Lester Clark, Lot C Clark, H Cousins, Miss M Crowell, W A Cummings, A H Davis, W H Davey, F DeBary, J W Dickens, Robutta Dickens, Henrietta Dickens, Hattie P Dickens, S A Donald, J R Dash, J S Driggs, F Dubois, John G Dyall, Amos Emanuel, Mrs E Emanuel, J J Emanuel, C G Fisher, H K Fowler, James Fulce, J S Gains, Briste Goodwin, Isaiah Gorey, Chas Gorey, Hale & Gardner, R P Hardy, S W Harmon, C C Hart, Robert Hill, Geo Houston, G W Houston, J R Houston, J S Houston, July Jenkins, A L Jenkins, Daniel Jung, T B Kelly, Louisa A Knight, B J Krulder, Philip Leonardy, Jno G Long, J L Long, J N Long, W J Long, Redding Long, M E Long, A Monks, P McBurney, Haywood McBurney, E McClellan, D McDonald, Mrs W D McLean, DG McLean, C D McLean, P C Mosier, Miss Alice Mundie, Chas Mundie, W W Newton, S V Miles, A Nodo, G E Oeten, E A Osborn, A C Osteen, Bryant Osteen, H E Osteen, James Osteen, J W Osteen, W F Osteen, T L Osteen, John Osteen, S D Osteen, C O Osteen, R F Parker, Henry Peters, J H Prevatt, Mrs P Prevatt, F N Prevatt, J W Price, Miles Price, C F Purdience, G A Richmond, Wm Rivers, N Robins, Jerry Roper, Jacob Rosenborough, A Rorsetter, Geo Sauls, Thos Sellus, W T Shaw, Wm Sheppard Sr, Wm Florida Oranges Consign your Oranges to J. B. REEDY, the largest Dealer in FRUIT in Georgia at SAVANNAH.

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AGRICULTURAL IRON AND BRASS WORKS, 2 BAY STREET, SAVANNAH, GA. John Rourke, AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 1 85 Sheppard Jr, Starling Sheppard, Siebald & Seyton, Morris Smith, Mary Smith, J B Spencer, C P Standing, A Stark, Frank Stark, J D Stark, J W Stark, Thos Stark, C A Stone, F A Storer, L G Stringfellow, Jane Stringfellow, Mrs M J Sumners, E C Summerlin, J A Summerlin, F D Summerlin, Joe Sydney, L C Tauny, Thayer & Sauls, Mrs L Thrasher, B A Thrasher, J W Tower, J L Tyler, L H Tyson, E B Underhill, Nelson Walstein, D Watkins, E Watkins, Walter & Goldsbury, Isaac Ware, S B Weston, Irene E White, D L Wickham, N L Wieting, Butler Williams, E F Yandell. ESCAMBIA. Escambia county. A way station on the Pensacola & Atlantic Railroad, 9 miles east of Pensacola. McDavid John, genl mdse and saw mill Skinner E F, genl mdse and saw mill ESPERAMCE. Sumter county. Formerly called Nithsdale. Situated on Lake Harris ; is only a steamboat landing, and a postoffice for the convenience of the orange growers. Abram Sinclair, saw mill Robertson dentist Taylor J Hay Mrs, boarding Taylor J Hay, real estate agt Land Owners— W R Cooper, M M Haynes, D Webley, G Divine, W N Jackson, D E Lowell, G I Gibson, J P Poe, D Robinson, W H Barclay, D Walt, H Frith, S G Parker, Ch Armstrong, J Hay Taylor. ETO^IIA. Putnam county. A very small settlement, located in the northwestern part of the county. E LICHEE ANNA. Walton county. County seat, of no importance otherwise ; is 5 miles from Argyle, a station on the Pensacola & Atlantic Railroad. Campbell D L, tax assessor Walton county Campbell John L, State representative Campbell Jno L & Co, genl mdse Douglass John C, supt county schools McCaskill, A L, genl mdse McLeod D, judge Walton co McLeod W B, tax collector Walton county McSween J G, sheriff Williamson Wm, genl mdse EUREKA. Marion county. A country store, situated in the eastern part of the county. Harrison J A, genl mdse Land Owners — Archey Balding, J J Brinson, Jasper Brinson, A M Browning, H S Baker, R A Carlton, A P Geiger, J M Geiger, J K Gore, J B Gore, L A Hogan, J W Flail, Thomas Harrison, j A Harrison, T F T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY possesses an excellent bouquet, S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA. 23

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S., F. & W. %. Florida I) asp atoli Fast Freiglit Lino. 1 86 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Harrison, W H Harrison, W R Kelsey, H C Moore, W B Milligan, Jas Marsh, S P Martin, J S Milligan, Marcus McGee, P V Milligan, N B McCann, R A McClure, R Marsh, A McQuaig, W Martin, W H McConn, L L Megg, C Milligan, E T Moore, W J Moore, W A McQuag, Joseph Priest, Geo A Tuton, Joe E Wells, T N Wells. EUSTIS. Orange county. Formerly called Lake Eustis ; is situated on the east bank of Lake Eustis, and is a station on the St. Johns & Lake Eustis Railroad. Adams B F, shoemaker Badger R, dentist Bancroft O N, jeweler Clifford G D, genl mdse Foust George, contractor and builder Henderson House, H W Wood propr Hutchins G, druggist and physician Herrick D W, wheelwright Hore & Osborn, planing mill and carpenters Lake Eustis House, A D Key propr McDonald J A, real estate Norton G H, nursery Ocklawaha House, E C Gable propr Reed D, saw and planing mill Robinson H, contractor and builder Smith Chas T & Co, genl mdse Stephens G E, carriage and harness maker Whitney N I, photographer Land Owners — G D Clifford, R D Coulter, R H Cannon, J W Cannon, J P Donnelly, T & A Dixon, J T Dominey, M E Emery, — Farnham, — Finley, Albert Farmstock, Geo Foust, R M Franklin, Chas J Fox, Alonzo Fowle, F Obed Foss, Augustus Goltsche, W P Henry, C W Hough & Co, L J Hicks, Jno M Hutchins, Walter L Head, L N Herrick, D W Herrick, S B Hewett, T F & J H Howell, Ransom Holland, Wm B Howard, Dr Hinson, Jackson Knight, Hardin Kuhn, Chester Kirney, A D Key, H H Key, Helen C Key, Chas S Loper, Ed Lynch, Jas Leonard, Walter Mathews, P P Wovin, Samuel H Mead, G H Norton, F M Oakley, S H Power, C A Pratt, L G Prescott, A S Pendry, J E Rosecrance, H Robinson, M Savage, E G Silva, Sage & Kinney, J H Sage, C W Stevens, Geo E Stephens, A J Sembles, W H Sembles, S E S Sembles, J S Schultz, Wm H Sexton, F J Titcomb, S J Titcomb, W S Taylor, M J Taylor Jr, N L Wetmore, Washburne & Ames, J H White, A Wright. EYERCREEEU. Nassau county. Only a country residence, with postoffice for the convenience of the orange growers. Owens, justice of the peace and P xM Land Owners — -Robert Alburtin, Jack Alburt, John A Candy, Crackers, etc, w Send for PrioeList

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§ngar Mills and Pans, Our Leading Specialty. WM. KEHOE & CO., Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 187 Braddock, John H Braddock, John Braddock, Mrs H L Braddock, Nelson Benton, Benzant Cooper, J N and Mrs S A Carlton, S Crandall, A D Carroll, Moses Chapman, Philip J Gum, A J Higginbotham, D H Higginbotham, Mrs L E Higginbotham, Mrs N S Higginbotham, John S Higginbotham, Mrs E Higginbotham, Andrew Higginbotham, Aaron Love, Richard Murry, E Murry, S. Murry, Joseph McKindon, John Owens, B C Parker, J O Russell, W B Ratcliff, G T Stewart, J A Vinzant, Wm Vinzant, P M Wilds, Marion J Wilds, Daniel Wilds, Edward Wilds, Arch White, C Wingate, E J Wingate, W J Wilson, C Wilds. EVINSTON. Alachua county, F. S. R. R. is situated on Orange Lake, 20 miles south of Gainesville, the county seat. This place is in the midst of the finest orange groves of the State, some of the heaviest shipments of oranges and vegetables ever shipped from one point being proof of that fact. R G Bass, P M Bass R G, real estate Reeves B M, hotel Sanchez J R, carpenter Shettlewith W P, genl mdse Land Owners — J I Miller, J R Sanchez, O C G Lamar, Wm Briggs, H C Cory, John T Miller, W L Milder, J W Reeves, Mrs M R Bass, M Bateman, J R Little, J P Britt, W S Shuforcl, B M Reeves, J L Wolfenders, J A Reeves, Willis Reeves, W D Evans. FAIRBANKS. Alachua county. A station on the Pdorida Transit & Peninsula Railroad, 7 miles from Gainesville and 40 west of Jacksonville. Bell A D, justice of the peace and physician Berry V, druggist and physician Frazier D L & Co, genl mdse Frazier D L, real estate agent Frazier J, express agent Finger W L, saw mill Furman C D, real estate agent Furman C H, nurseryman Hall E C, railroad agent Hunsicker A, jeweler and locksmith Lee H, contractor and builder Pelton C B, genl mdse Pelton Charles, nurseryman Smith J, notary public Soss J D, saw mill Thomas C W, butcher Land Owners — Thos Baker, J C Balis, Louisa C Balis, Wm Bancroft, Martha J Bell, Reuben Bennett, A B Boger, John Darly, F W Dean, G H Douglas, — Duncan, Levi Ellis, Mary E Farmer, S F Finger, W L Finger, Green Hall, Robt Isaacs, Mrs M D Laflin, Harry Lee, Mrs Emily M Levan, Mrs J P Lewis, Wm W Low, P W Moore, Mrs M B O’Neal, C M Paine, S H Paine, C B Pilton, D S Smith, Jno M Smith, John Tyndal, J H Vandiveer, Mrs R IHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is soft and mellow to the taste. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAYANNAH, GA.

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S., F. & W. By. ii (i it-r quick: LI3STE! TIME. 188 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER L Warner, George Whitcomb, Chas H Whitney. FAIR PLAY, Holmes county. Is situated in the northwestern part of the county ; is only a small settlement, with no business. Brownwell A H, judge Holmes county Land Owners — Christian Bowers, W F Greene, D D Gillis, John Smith. FANTVILLE. Marion county. A country store, 18 miles northwest of Ocala. Blitch S H, physician Fant J W, genl mdse Fant V, saw, grist mill and cotton gin Land Owners — Edward Atkinson, E Armstrong, S L Armstrong, W H Blitch, B R Blitch, L Curry, S J Carter, J W Curry, Thos Curry, J W Carter, James Carter, R J Curry, F J Carter, A J Dallas, Sidney Dinkins, V Fant, S J Feyer, B J Freymik, E W Furguson, Wm Cale, J A Helvinston, T R Helvinston, M J Limbough, R K Limbough, H E Mills, Augeline Miller, J B Mills, J W Marlow, W W McCully, A J Mention, John Marcum, A F Morgan, A D Marlow, John McCullough, J S Pedrick, Prince Roberts, J M Robinson, W B Rawls, M A Sistrunk, C C Stephens, S B W Stevens. FEDERAL POINT. Putnam county. This place is located on the east bank of the St. Johns river, 60 miles south of Jacksonville and 15 miles north of Palatka. Mails received daily by the St. Johns river steamers. J F Tenney, P M Dorr W L, justice of the peace Lattin D A, physician, Tenney J F & F F, genl mdse and real estate agts Smith Edwin, genl mdse Land Owners — Edmund H Hart, Walter N Hart, Augustus Baldwin, Edwin S Hulbard Geo Wilkinson, Lewis S Blakely, Charles D Barron, W Hankins, Leslie Brubaker, Edward Lieurance, William Boynton, Hamilton Riley, Isaac Thompson, H C Bullard, Mary A Tarbell, Elizabeth Cornell, A A Bosworth, !Harry Wilkins, Wm A Evans, Lewis Thompson, Levey S Green, Charles Mirrifielee Mitchel Rene, Otis E Heath. FELLOWSHIP. Marion county. A general store, 10 miles west of Ocala. Schmidt & Agnew, genl mdse FERNANDINA. Nassau county. F. T. & P. and F. & J. R. R. Population 3,000. The county seat of Nassau co., and a port of entry, express and telegraph offices. Situated on the above line of railroads, Amelia river and Atlantic Ocean, 33 miles north of JackJ D SAVANNAH, GA, handles more FLORIDA ORANGES • _0. J ? THAN ANY HOUSE SOUTH. TRY HIM.

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Saw Mill Work Ali KINDS FURNISHED BY JOHN ROXJRKE, 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 189 sonville and 193 from Tallahassee, the State capital. There are Baptist, Methodist, Presbyterian and Episcopal churches, a convent, weekly newspaper, three hotels, public schools, and four saw mills. The principal pursuits are mercantile, manufacturing and shipping ; the principal products of the county are lumber, naval stores, cotton and vegetables, truck farming being very extensively looked after and fruit and orange growing will soon figure a very important part in the countyÂ’s future pursuit. The city of Fernandina is located on Amelia Island, which island is two miles wide and sixteen long, and is formed by the Atlantic Ocean, Amelia and Bell rivers. The harbor here is said to be the best on the Florida coast, and the Amelia beach the finest beach. On the latter there is a hotel that is open throughout the summer for the reception of guests ; so Fernandina offers to her visitors both a winter and summer resort alike. This is the next oldest place in the United States (St. Augustine being the oldest), and many of its ancient looking buildings goes to prove the truth of the assertion, though it is now rapidly putting up new houses which changes its former appearance to a more modern phase. The general offices of the Florida Transit & Peninsula and Fernandina & Jacksonville Railroads, together with that of their shops, are located here. There is a line of ocean steamships from here to New York and an inland steamboat line to Savannah, Ga., which makes daily trips, connecting with trains. Samuel D Riddell, P M Accosta D A, genl mdse Accosta Julia Mrs, boarding Angel & P'riend, Mrs Bertha Angel & Mrs E O Friend, grocers and bakers Ansley Frederick W, watchmaker and jeweler Austin Richard, stoves, tinware and sheet iron mfr Avery Gilbert F, livery, boarding and sales stables, and carriage dealer. See page 192 Baker Hinton J, county judge and lawyer Bauknight Wm K, agent, butcher, stock and ice dealer Berg Charles H, foreman The Florida Mirror Brownson Norman, bookseller and stationer and musical mdse Brownson N Mrs, private school Bugnet Leopold B, asst postmaster Busby C S, blacksmith Bushnell J W, engineer Florida Transit & Peninsula R R Carrio S, cigar mfr Clay R D,propr Tourist House Clay Wm H, manager Tourist House Courter Peter J, livery and boarding stables Dickerson Edward .N, land trustee mHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY IS ABSOLUTELY PURE. JS. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, SOLE AGENTS, SAVANNAH, GA.

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FEED W. ttOYT, Late of Sanborn & Etoyt. m W. 6. JE^FkfcYS, & Co. FERNANDINA, FLA. Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Groceries, Ship Chandlery, Grain, FURNITURE AND BUILDING MATERIAL. AGENTS WARREN RAYÂ’S LINE SAILING VESSELS FROM NEW YORK. Having been thoroughly renovated, newly carpeted and furnished, offers superior accommodations to the traveling public. Every Room Connected with Electric Bells. HOT AND COLD WATER BATHS. HEADQUARTERS FOR COMMERCIAL MEN. F. C. SUHRER, Manager. A.. B. NOYES, Wholesale and Retail Dealer in Groceries, Provisions and Ship Stores, HAY, GRAIN, HARDWARE. Glassware, Crockery and Furniture. CHOICE WINES AND LIQUORS. 0OBHBB ESfBE AKB SIMIDj 010., Near Steamboat Landing, FERNANDINA, FLA. H. S. SCHTTTLER, C. ZED. AECHITECT. Plans and Specifications prepared for buildings of all descriptions. Accurate work and reasonable charges. FERNANDINA, FLA. REAL ESTATE AGENCY. Choice Florida Lands, Groves, and City Property on sale. FBR1VARDXXIA, FLA. 190

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Sugar Mills and Pans. A full Stock of all Sizes. WM. KEHOE & CO., Iron Founders, Savannah, G-a (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. IQI Dotterer H E, grocer and ship stores Downey Mathew, genl mdse Duryee Wm B C, saw and planing mill Eddin Richard, junk dealer Edwards John A, county elk Egmont Hotel, George W Kittelle propr Ellerman John A, sheriff Nassau co Fairbanks George R, editor Florida Mirror Fernandina & Jacksonville Railroad, D E Maxwell genl supt, A O MacDonell audiditor and genl pass agt. See page 32 Fletcher Emma Mrs, grocer and seeds Florida House, Mrs A Leddy prop Florida Land and Immigration Co, C W Lewis comÂ’r Florida Mirror, book and job printing Florida Town Improvement Co, C W Lewis correspondent Florida Transit & Peninsula Railroad, D E Maxwell genl supt, A O MacDonell auditor and genl pass agt, R P Papygenl freight agt. See page 31 Frank Carl, butcher Funke Paul, dry goods, clothing, boots and shoes Garland William H, tax assessor Glaiber Albert, saloon Godfrey Metts J, blacksmith Hammond David A, lawyer Hardy Thomas A, gun and locksmith Harrison Robert, physician Hayley C A, mayor P'ernandina Henderson Robt M, undertaker Heyer A M, tax collector Orange co Higgiribothan Lewis J, county supt public schools Hillyer Charles V, ins agt and deputy col customs. See page 193 Hobein Henry, shoemaker and sewing machines Hodges Jno, cashier Florida Transit & Peninsula and Fernandina & Jacksonville Railroads Horsey & Co, J H and Mrs E C Horsey, druggists Howell J W, collector U S customs Hoyt Fred W & Co, Fred W Hoyt, and W O Jeffreys, wholesale and retail grocers, ship chandlers, hay, grain, etc. See page 190 Hudson P J Mrs, boarding Huot Cleophas H, saw mill and genl mdse Hynes William H, baker and confect Jones E LeRoy, homeopathic physician Jones W Albert, insurance and Southern Express agt Kelley Don, boarding Kimball Charles J, contractor and builder King B A Mrs, varieties and curiosities Kittelle George W, prop Egmont Hotel Klarer Jacob, grocer Klutz prop Pavilion Restaurant T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is distilled from the choicest qualities of Grain. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga.

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Tjl JD XT| T T1 FAST MAIL TRAINS THROUGH WITH BUT ^•5 ^ H Hy. FEW STOPPING POINTS. 192 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Kydd J & G, James and Thomas, dry goods, clothing, boots and and shoes Lake William, watchmaker and jeweler Latham Francis C, saloon Lawtry William, cotton seed, naval stores, lumber exporter, and cotton gin Lewis Charles W, land fcom’r Fla Land and Immigration Co, and treas The Florida Mirror Linville L Ft, supt Fernandina cotton gin Lohman John F, saloon and billiards Loomis Edwin S, palmetto fibre manf Lowe John D c fruits and confec Lucia Louis, restaurant, fruits, and confec McGiffin James, contractor and builder McQuitty Robert G, tailor MacDonell Augustus 0, genl pass agt Florida, Transit & Peninsula and Fernandina & Jacksonville Railroads MacKenzie A C Fisher Mrs, millinery and fancy goods Mallory Steamship Line, R W Southwick, agt Mansion House, E C Suhrer manager. See page 190 DEALER IN CARRIAGES, BUGGIES, HARNUSS AND WHIPS. Maxwell D Elwell, genl supt Florida, Transit & Peninsula and Fernandina & Jacksonville R Rs Meddaugh James E, grocer Miller Henry, shoemaker Mode Adolph II Mrs, genl mdse Mode Bros, J S and J I, dry goods, clothing, boots and shoes Muller Charles, barber Nix Edward W, newsdealer, stationery, and sewing machines Woyes Alonzo B, wiiol and ret grocer, ship chandler, hay, grain, &c. See page 190 Oaks Oliver S, saw and planing mills, contractor and builder Palmer Bros, Dr John D and T Walter, druggists Palmer John D, Palmer Bros, and physician Papy Frank B, genl frt agt Florida, Transit & Peninsula and Fernandina & Jacksonville Railroads Pope W H, physician Prescott J Henry, boots and shoes Proctor Robert, saw mill Reed J C, saw mill Reynolds Albert c, shoemaker Reynolds Edwards, barber Riddell Samuel D, postmaster Rutishauser John C, barber e. F*. AT ERY, Livery, Sale, Feed aid Exchange State, FERNANDINA, FLORIDA. First-class Rigs and Turnouts on hand to let at Reasonable Rates. rrUl? ONLY EXCLUSIVE FRUIT HOUSE T T> BrUHV InL in SAVANNAH, GA., IS V • XiJAJUlJ 1 •

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-|ri Ii'imoIao GIVEN ON ALL KINDS OF MACHINERY AND REPAIRS, l^Sl IllhllC S by JOHN ROUltKE 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 193 Robinson R E, State representative Schuyler George W, real estate agent, attorney and justice of the peace. See page 190 Schuyler Robert S, architect. See page 190 Scott Warren F, tax collector Nassau co Seagar Mrs Benjamin, boarding Seydel A & Bro, Adolph and August, genl mdse Simmons Francis local agent Florida Transit and Peninsula Railroad Smith Robert 1 V 1 lawyer Snyder William E, dentist Southern Express Co, W A Jones agent Southwick R A, agent Mallory Steamship Line Starbrook 1 heodore, physician Stark Gustav, baker and confectionery Steil Arthur, saloon Streety William P, stoves and tinware Stewart D C, mnfr naval stores Suhrer F C Major, manager Mansion House. Seepage 190 Sweeney Mrs George, restaurant and boarding Tourist House, R D Clay proprietor Tucker W Bailey, ticket agent Florida Transit and Peninsula R R Waas Benjamin F, baker and grocer Werner Mrs C, dry goods and notions Wilkinson John, State representative Wood Richard c, grocer Wood Wm F Jr, notions, boots and shoes Land Owners — Chas Angel, Geo Aken, C T Bryan, Daniel Baxter, W J Benedict, Flarvey Barker, J H Burton, Mrs W A Benquit, O Castle, Mrs FI B Cook, John L Clay, Peter Coon, W H'Cope, C S Colby, Stephen Drummond, Henry Daniels, W B C Durgin, C B Dibble, Geo C Dewson, J W Dougherty, M Downing, T D Eason, Charles Estis, J D Edward, Mrs A C Fisher, Mrs E Fletcher, R L Ferveriva, F Franks, R Freeman, E A Gardner, W H Gardner, R Glover, D Gilman, G F Gilman, Philip Goodbread, Eli J Gregg, — Greenbaum, Frank Griffin, H B Gurganus, Mrs Anna Howard, D M Hammond, H Hobein, C H Huot, Geo Henry, Wm Hamilton, J M Hood, A Hazelton, J H Hall, F W Hoyt & Co, Frank Lewis, Romeo Lawrence, C W Lewis, Elias Lotra, Wm Lanting, E F Langly, Chs W Lewis, Donald McRae, John McRae, C F McCary, Mrs A J McDowell, CHARLES V. lira, GENERAL MARINE, FIRE, ACCIDENT and LIFE INTSTJRAIsrCEl. Corner Second and Centre Streets, Fernan&ina, Florida. T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is distilled from the choicest qualities of Grain. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga. 24

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WAY-CROSS SHORT LINE TO FLORIDA. S., F. & W, Ry. I94 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Gabe Means, J E Meddough, A O McDonnell, Henry Muller, C A Meddough, Mrs M C McDermott, Neil McCleman, A B Noyes. Jas T O’Neil, F J Pons, N Priest agt. Samuel Petty, N Priest, L C & C B Payne, W J Roper, J Roberts, Moses Robinson, F L Suhrer, H Shannon, Mrs M H Sanderson, C H Swann, Wm Swearingen, W J Scott, D W Suydam, David Stewart, J T Souther, Samuel Swann, Mrs M R Swann, B B Swearingen, H Stenitt, L W Stanley, Carl Thuder, Taunton Manfg Co, Mrs H M Thugpin, Mrs Philip Thomas, W N Thompson, A A Wood, Wm F Wood, Williams & Swann, R T Wilson, F T Willis, Louis Walker, Ed Warden, Thomas Wynn. FERRY PASS Escambia county. This is only a small settlement located on the Escambia river, 1 mile from Escambia bay and 10 miles from Pensacola. The en tire population are nearly all timber workers, this being the inspecting and shipping point for the vast quantities of timber from South Alabama which comes through the Escambia river and its tributaries. The timber is first brought here from the various mills on the river in huge rafts, is inspected, and then again rafted to Pensacola, from where it is shipped to all parts of the globe. Ferry Pass is connected with Pensacola by a private telegraph line. Mails daily. Philip H M Tippen, P M Anderson B L, genl mdse and timber inspector Murphy & Murphy, timber inspectors Taylor S B, genl mdse Tippin A, timber inspector Whitmore E, timber inspector Whitmore K J, timber inspector Wilson C M, timber inspector Wilson F H, timber inspector Land Ozvners — B L Anderson, D DeGraff, Ed Whitmore, Jno L Hoyt, Henry W Jones, Z T Jones, Robert Nobles, W L Nobles, S P Hendrix, A C Tippin, Jas B Church, K J Whitmore, E G Creighton, C M Wilson, Frank H Wilson, F Parazine, G Parazine, J Clarke, Jacob Wilson, J E Anderson, G E Anderson, P N Wilson, C Smith, E Dunaho, B DeGraff. Wm Mitchell, Sami Gates. FLEI^IMCTOB^. Marion county. Situated in a good agricultural district, 4 miles west of Orange Lake. Benjamin S H, genl mdse Bennicker J L, blacksmith Chitty Bros, wheelwrights Green J L, genl mdse Matthews J C, wheelwright Matthews R B, genl mdse Paisley E C, physician Payne M L, co supt pub schools Shiretzki M, genl mdse Sturdevant J A, justice of the peace Wilkinson W A, State representative CIDER. I AM HEADQUARTERS FOR CIDER. J. B. REEDY, Grocer and Importer, Savnanab, Ga

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Sugar Mills and Pans, Ali our Mills are fully warranted. WM. ItEHOE & CO Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 1 95 Land Owners — P Anderson, M E Avery, A J Albritton, M Atkinson, James N Brinson, G M Bishop, B L Britt, J L Bishop, C N Barry, J L Benniker, N C Bomars, C Brinson, G S Brithon, P Burgin, M A Britt, J S Binnicker, W V Belen, J F Boyer, J P Bruron, J Q Bishop, W G Bruton, J R Curry, J E Curry, W F Chitty, T L Carter, Wm Curry, J R Chitty, M J Chitty, C L Caldwell, E C Chitty, Henry Clark, VV E Curry, J L Colding, H PI Colding J W Cooper, T. L Cooper, G A Cooper, John M Curry, F S Depnies, A B Depnies, D S Depnies, W C Denman, E Drummer, James Dunning, F E Dreker, John Dixson, H Drummer, J N Edwards, J E Edwards, J S Edwards, O E Edwards, Warren Frazier, Fred Frey, John W Green, P Gorden, Smart Green, Isaac Gothrin, E Gaskins, M Geiger, J Gunnel, Homer Gorden, H Gatrell, C J Gorden, Giles Gorden, S J Geiger, Henry Gatrell, S P Geiger, S J Geiger, E Green, M Geiger, M Hair, M R Harrison, G E Hammond, Charles Hamilton, J Harbin, L A Hogan, Daniel Howell, M Hardee, N Hammond, B Holland, M E Harrol, Alfred Hopkins, C W Howard, H Jenkins, W Johnson, R James, A Kennedy, M J Lovett, C J Mixson, C B Mixon, A Morris, W D Matthews, J C Matthews, M M Mayfield, C B Mixson, J C Morton, Colbert Mickens, Robt Mathews, John S Mathews, L E Mason, PI P Mattais, R G McEwen, James D Mixon, L Mason, N H Minson, John L Mathews, M McMahan, R B Mathews, Prince Mitchell, Jno Mitchell, Miles J Mixon, J B Mixon, L B Mason, Albert Nance, E C Pasley, Allen Potts, M L Payne, N W Potts, Wm Ransome, J J Robinson, R M Richardson, R N Richardson, M L Rutledge, J Riley, W M Stocks, H J Sistrunk, E J Stanley, E L Striker, James Stuart, M J Standley, R Sprinkle, Jacob Stanley, M M Stokes, S E Smith, W Syms, Sol Smith, L M Smith. E L Smith, J P Smith, C M Smith, V P Smith, O A Sturdivant, H J Sistrunk, M Stokes, A E Solle, Ned Thomas, A J Taylor, John Thomas, T Wood, Wm Williams, G A Williams, N Williams, M O Williams, M E Williams, J Withington, W A Wilkinson, N W Williams, M E Williams, G Washington, J A Weisner, G Walker, W Whittington, Murphy Williams, E S Vann, J E Vandiver, E J Vaughn, Jacob Vanstrand. FLORENCE. St. Johns county. A landing on the east bank of the St. Johns river, 38 miles from Jacksonville. Landie A W, genl mdse Powers George C, senator FORCARTYYiLLE. Manatee county. Mails go to Braidentown. flYHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is soft and mellow to the taste. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.

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F. & W. Ry. FREIGHT IN THROUGH CARS, IN FAST TRAINS, WITHOUT TRANSFER. 196 FRORIDA STATE GAZETTEER FORT DADE. Land Owners—} F Adams, John Cox, Geo H Cubbage, Thos Dean, Paladore Dean, Peter Falany Jr, Fay & Phelan, Jerome Fay, Stephen Ferris, F N Fuller, Otto Gudenroth, Clem Hawkins, J H Hewson, John Hewson, Simon Jacoblief, RW Landre, John P Masters, Bentura Masters, J W Masters, Florida Mickler, J H Myers, J W Myers, M A O’Dell, Ignacio Ortegas, Prudencio Ortegas, Ignacio T Ortegas, Antonio Ortegas, Chas S Ponce, Isadore Ponce, Mary C Powers, Geo C Powers, L F Quinn, Anna Quinn, Joseph Refore, C F Sallas, Sarah Schill, Scipio Simmons, Jessie Walker, Henry Wilson. FOREST. Taylor county. A small settlement of no importance, 20 miles east of Perry. J B Whitfield, P M FOREST C8TY Orange county. A new post office just established, on the South Florida Railroad, miles west of Altamonte. George Reed, P M Reed George, genl mdse FORT BUTLER. A landing on the St Johns river, 138 miles from Jacksonville. FORT BROOKE. Located on the Ocklawaha river, 61 miles from Palatka, is only a steamboat landing. Hernando county. Is one of the most thrifty and flourishing settlements in this section of the State ; is 22 miles south of Brooksville, the court house, 38 miles from Tampa, it*s coast outlet, and 42 from Wildwood, its railroad shipping point. The place has a newspaper, several churches and schools, and a number of saw mills ; mails received semi-weekly by stage from Brooksville John Sumner, P M Alexander physician Anderson & Meacham,genl mdse Bell R E Rev, Methodist Brockman G D, carpenter Carter N A, genl mdse Cochran W W, physician Dial & Rowe, genl mdse Dunna E F, lawyer Earnest E E, genl mdse Eiland Levi, wheelwright Evans Bros, saw mill Evans & Chapman, saw mill Frese Bros, genl mdse Marshall & Sumner, genl mdse Messenger, D H Mosely publisher Moseley W H & Co, genl mdse Ravisies Edmund, saw mill Ray B L, physician Raymond John, surveyor Reddings & Mills, saw mill Shafner & Son, genl mdse Spring J J Rev, Baptist Sumner Robt, wheelwright Sumner W C, genl mdse Sultenfuss & Co, saw mill Thrasher D FI, lawyer Wallace J G, lawyer Wells Jno, saw mili APPLES. I make a specialty of Fancy Apples. J. B. REEDY, Grocer, and Importer of Fruit, Savannah, Ga.

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Sugar Mills, AND PANS DF ALL SIZES, MADE BY JOHN ROURKE, 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. I 9 7 La.nd Ozvners — C R Alexander, RA Brown, James Black, T A Boyett, W J Butler, W W Cochran, W D Cochran, R T Colding, J L Colding, S B Colding, N A Carter, W L Crum, Charles >Croft, Moses Daniel, S J Davis, PAM Duviance, J W Darby, Levy Eilard, N D Eilard, W D Eubanks, J L Fortner, C C GantJ W Gant, G W Gant, Charles Goodman, S L Hancock, J J Howell, J G Howell, A F Hill, Wm Hutto, J W Jackson, W F Jackson, W F Jackson, Henry Jordan, W A Jones, C F Kuster, D W Leneare, C F Lewis, Isaac Lanier, Wm McLeod, Geo McKendre, R B McKendre, A McMim, C C McMim, H L McRae, W L Mobley, J B Miller, Tazewell Miller, G E Mills, G S Mills, W R Mills, J R Oberry, N F Oberry, H B Oberry, W L Osborne, David Osborne, J W Pixton, T W Prichard, W R Pritchard, J M Riggs, J Ravises, E Ravises, A H Ravises, C M Ray, G M Roberts, Wm Roberts, J C Smith, W C Sumner, A J Sumner, J C Sumner, A C Sumner Jr, J R Sumner, J W Sumner, J K Sumner, A C Sumner Jr,D L Sellers, G M Sarven, R Seay, J N Saunders, J T Sanderson, J F Tate, V C Thrasher, J L Thompson, Stephen Weeks, A M White, T J White, J O B Winn, R M Wilson, J G Wallace. FORT CATES. Putnan county. Discontinued as a post-office. (See PTuitland.) FORT GEORGE. Duval county. Situated at the mouth of the St. Johns river ; has a hotel and two general stores. Armo J W, genl mdse Gilbert G W, hotel Spencer C B, U S signal observer Steele J B, genl mdse Land Owners — L R Cooper, Sarah L Cooper, Mary M Campbell, Louisa M Grisham, John Johnson agt, Ruth Johnson, J Johnson, Jno F Rollins, Henry C Steele, Wm C Stuart, John Stuart, Robt S Turner, Francis S Weston. FORT CREE N. Manatee county. A small settlement 18 miles southwest of Fort Meade. Blanton C E, genl mdse Hendry Bros, genl mdse Land Owners — N S Allbritton, A B Altman, Wm Altman, Peter Brown, W L Bostick, T S Browning, Edmund Chancey, Geo W Casin, Henry E Carlton, Albert Carlton, P Y Chancey, S J Chancey, H S Downing, Dennis Driggers, H H Davis, J J Dunham, Eli English, Mrs Alice Foy, J M Farabee, J W Hendry, Albert Hendry, Jas M Hendry, Seth Howard, Mathew O Jones, Caswell S Jones, W A Lundy, Daniel B Lott, W D McEwen, W P & J F McEwen, B O McKenney, Malcolm Mc[ \IIE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY possesses an excellent bouquet. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.

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&, F. & W. Ry. Elegant j?assenger Equipments; 'W’estihghoii^ Air Brakes; Miller Platforms; Janey Couplers. 198 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Lane, I J Mitchell, Mrs P Newton, Erasmus Rye, Alfred Rich, Daniel Safford, Mrs A R Strickland, A F Shuman, Jno Safford, Daniel Smith, S L Sparkman, J T Taylor, Jessie Taylor, L Towns, Jas G Urquhart, W W Wilkins, Wm Whidden, J D Watts. FORT McCOY. Marion county. Eighteen miles northwest of Ocala, the seat of justice and four and a half miles from Eureka, a landing on the Ocklawaha river via which it is connected with Palatka by Heart’s line of steamboats ; mails four times a week. James W Stevens, P M Boyle George W, butcher Davey A M, physician Fort McCoy Private School Grantham Daniel, cooper Grantham Elijah, shoemaker Hall Joel, justice of the peace Hogan D A, constable McGehee Marcus, Cooper McQuaig John N, barber Martin Harmon Rev, Baptist Pateur George, genl mdse Perry T J, blacksmith and wheelwright Sherouse John E, blacksmith and wheelwright Stevens James W & Son, genl mdse, saw and grist mill and cotton gin Williams John W, genl mdse Land Owners — Alex Brown, G W Boyls, Barney Baulding, J L Beal, H Boyles, John Chitty, James Duffey, W S Fletcher, E F Forbs, H B Forbes, W T Forbes, A R Griffin, Wm E Goode, Elijah Grantham, R Gillis, A T Gunter, G W Grantham, D Grantham, D Galbraith, E S Grantham, Wm Gillis, Joel Hall, L O Henderson, A S Hall, Joel Hall, W E Hall, A Holley, Manley Ingram, Isaac Johnson, R Lewell, N E Lang, John Morgan, L L Meggs, J Morgan, A M Martin, G Pastures, G A Patterson, M E Prichet, J S Perry, T A Pastures, T J Perry, S Proctor, G Priest, J K Priest, Joseph Post, M Patterson, Preston Perry, M Reed, J E Sherouse, J W Stephens, M D Strand, R A Shaw, D M Shaw, J W Stevens, N J Tuton, M Tuton, David Turner, C Thomas, Joseph Thomas, P W Tooten, M B Waldron, J W Williams, Myrtin L Ware. FORT MASON. Orange county. Is situated on Lake Eustis, and is a station on the St. Johns and Lake Eustis Railroad. Alsabrook B T & Co, genl mdse, saloon and livery stable Bryan John M, State representative Lake View Hotel Nutt T N, livery stable Owens S M & Co, genl mdse, saw mill and cotton gin Smith Charles T & Co, genl mdse Land Owners — Z T Alsobrook, Mrs M J Albright, Z F Alsobrook, A M Adams, Elijah Bates, C H Bates, S D Booker, W Bramhall, Geo W Bowen, Miss Barton, Lewis Buckle, Jno When going home, stop in and order a box of T T) "PPPTIV dOTTOTinoll Pq the choicest FLORIDA ORANGES, at J C. IlMD I M V alllldll, iTCl.

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Sugar Mills and Pans. Thev are Strong and Durable. WM. KEHOE & CO., Iron Pounders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. I99 M Bryan, Bryan & Wofford, A Cassady & Kelly, N N Cassady, Eli Cooper, Fannie E Colbert, Jas N Crabbe, Ben Dowd, E H DeCotters, G W DeClark, M C Danforth, F S Dewey, Dora Ann Drawdy, Jno E Davis, J B Davis, D O Davies, J L Dobbs, Dodds & Dowd, Daniel Evans, R F Finley, Nancy Fessenden, J H Fessenden, H Fortson, C F Farmer, Warren Farmer, Ira Gray, Geo B Gray, G W Guard, J J Haizlip, J N Harris & Co, Haskins & Cummings, E M Horton, N W Hicks, G A Hinman, J M Igon, Chas P Janes, W J Jarvis, C W Kelley, Dr E B Miles, R & J W Moore, J W Moore, Dr E Manes, Charles McEwen, Maughame & Co, R F McEwen, Nathan Norton, W P Nutt, W C Nutt, Frank Norton, W C Neary, S M Owens, Mrs S M Owens, S M & G G Owens, G G Owens, Pike & Butler, O J Paine, Phillips, Leroy Pope, A Quarterman, G W Redding, E G Rehrer, Miss C M Rehrer, J T Regester, S Rossiter, L J Rossman, E J Sharadin, W A Smith, C F Smith, C F Smith & Co, Elnora A Smith, Jno L Stinson, August Swanson, J Swanson, J O Swisher, J S Tucker, Jas M Thomas, C F Trofton, W A Trofton, H A Wilson, Wofford & Burge, Wofford & Davis, Wofford, Bryant & Dodds. FORT MEADE. Polk county. Quite a flourishing little place of some 200 inhabitants ; is situated on Peace river, 12 miles from Bartow, the county seat, and is connected with that place by a tri-weekly stage line, also with Tampa by another stage line. Charles L Mitchell, P M Arnold Marcellus O, physician Atkins W S, lawyer Dzialinski Ceorge, livery stable Dzialinski Phil, hotel French A J, hotel Hayman Mrs Edna, millinery Hayman S G, dentist Hendry George W, real estate Hook J N & Co, genl mdse Johns' n John R, blacksmith Johnson Robert, carpenter Johnson Warren, butcher Lanier Lewis, cattle dealer Lightsey Cornelius B, hotel McAulley William, carpenter McKinney L Mrs, boarding Mitchell Chas L, druggist, saw mill, and real estate agt Pelot R E Rev, Methodist Robeson John A, surveyor Sater J F, gunsmith Snoddy John, supt pub schools Thompson Wm T, notary public Tillis I P, tax collector Polk co Tillis James D, U S internal revenue collector Tillis V L, justice of the peace and druggist Wilson Chas C, genl mdse and lawyer Wilson Thos L, lawyer Land Owners — Moses Allen, M O Arnold, Francis Bryan, W M Bowen, W B Brown, C B Benedict, Martha Carlton, Perry T he celebrated thistle dew whiskey is absolutely pure. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, SOLE AGENTS, SAVANNAH, GA.

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S, F. & W. Ry, PULLMAN SLEEPING CAR SERVICE between ALL IMPORTANT POINTS. 200 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Cowart, J W Carlton, S W Carson, A Debinan, J W Dunence, J R Dunence, N M Dunence, J H Dunence Jr, J H Dunence Sr, U R Dunence, J L Dunence, E Disshany, Alfred Davis, Sami Davis, Rachel Davis, Mathew Davis, W T Denham, G S P Dzialynski, Mary Dzialynski, E F Durrence, Lewis Goodwin, A E Goodwin, Benj Guy, Sami Hart, Theophilus Hill, F M Hoze, J T' Hancock Jr, Mary R Hooper, G W Henry, L W Hooker & F D Roberson, E M Hay man, Jessie Hicks, J T Hancock Sr, H W Hancock, E J Hillard, L W Hooker, T C Keller, Luther Keller, John M Kilpatrick, N A Lightsey, C B Light.ey, S E Lightsey, T J Lamb, T B Langford, M E Langford, G R Langford, J M Manley, R J Mann, W M McAuley, Margaret McCleok, B F Moody, Louisa Moody, C L Mitchell, Isabella McCleland, J C Quernyers, A J Pollard, G A Peeples, R H Peeples, Banister Poole, Willy Parker, C W Rockner, C E Roberts, S A Roberson, Wm Raulerson, NEB Roberts, J E Roberson, F B Roberson, Elizabeth Smith, J F Sherman, J A Stephens, M M Snow, Monroe Scott, E E Skipper, W W Tillis, T G Tillis, T D Tillis, W Tillis, F N Varn, Spicey Whidden, C C Wilson, Thos Wade, G W Windgora, Bennette Whidden. FORT OGDEN. Manatee County. Situated on the Peace river, 12 miles south of Pine Level, the court house. The Peace river is navigable, and the shipping is therefore done by water. Stock raising is the chief industry ; mails five times per week. O E Roesch, P M Bogges T C M, justice of the peace and notary public Branch T R Rev, Baptist Carlton S J, furniture Carr J O, genl mdse Curry M Mrs, boarding Hull E J Rev, Baptist Johnson, J M, wheelwright Kabrich J C S, contractor and builder King, Carney & Co, genl mdse King Z, cattle dealer Manck George F, contractor and builder Manck S H, saw mill Newton J N, cattle dealer Parker L H, cattle dealer Parker Thomas O, cattle dealer Hoesch 0 E, druggist and physician Schindel H O, job printer Sherrell H, wheelwright Simmons W H, genl mdse Williams J A, butcher Williams W T, boarding Land Owners — A Daugherty ,k N H Decosta, J W Driggs, Jno Daugherty, O Daugherty, Benj Guy, J R Guy, Charles Hendry, W A Johnson, W H Johnson, Z King, Mrs Mary Lanier, Wm McClenithan, John M Pearce, T J Sparkman, J Singletary, E Thompson, J W Williams, Max Whidden, W H Youmans, Jas J Youmans, J M Raisins, Nnts, Etc. I am the Largest Dealer in this line. J. B. REEDY, Savannah, Ga.

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Saw Mill Work OF ALL KINDS FURNISHED BY JOHN IiOURKE, 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 201 Youmans, J H Youmans, Martha Youmans. FORT REED. Orange county. A general store four miles south of Sanford. Nicholas & Holland, genl mdse Powell G W, carriage maker Wills John, carpenter Wyley K, physician Land Owners — Joseph Finnegan, R H Fristoe, Jno B Fortier, Hiram Loomis, O Mitchell, P Mitchell, E Meszaros, Nichols & Holland, H Nelson, J M Nichols, F A Nessly. FORT WHITE. Columbia county. Only a country store and saw and grist mill, 20 miles from Lake City. This is a newly established postoffice, with as yet no business. McKinney J ohn, genl mdse, saw and grist mill and cotton gin Land Owners — J W Bunch, J J Barr, Joseph Bynum, Claborn Bynum, Richard Bynum, Wm Banks, Friday Banks, Mrs D A Bryan, M Bryan, Calder Banks, Geo K Bradley, J Burt, J J Coleman, H B Cannon, T F Cook, A N Cain, Jos W Cox, C H Collins, Samuel Cannon, W H W Cason, John E DuBose, C C Drummond, W J Duncan, J F Dennis, Miles G Dennis, G M Ellis, Geo B Ellis, A G Ellis, Martin Fulgar, T W Getzen, T E Getzen, Samuel Hendricks, Z S Harrel, J B Harris, Wm B Hooker, Geo T Hurst, David Jordan, Andrew Johnson, Nathan Jones, Peter Jones, Irwin G Kinard, L R Koon, J IC Koon, W M Kirby, S G Kinard, Joseph Knight, T J Knight, Rev Geo T Leitner, Charles A Liddon, F M McNair, F M Maxey, George W McKenney, John E Moreland, J F McComb, M L McComb, John McKenney, Mrs Laura E Myers, W M Myers, Jos McCoy, W O’Keefe, W B Osteen, Ephraim Polk, Rev W H F Roberts, Dicy Rowland, Mark Rigell, Robin Shepherd, John Shepherd, R F Shepherd, Wade Shepherd, T Sumpter, Calvin Sumpter, Mat Shepherd, May Sumpter, J P Terry, Wm L Terry, Jason Truluck, W T Turner, T G Timmons, Wm White, H White, Mrs T W Watson. FORTY FOOT BLUFF. A landing on the Ocklawaha river, 8o miles from Palatka. FRANCES. Putnam county. Six miles east of Palatka ; no postoffice ; mail goes to Palatka. FRANKLAND. Alachua county. Is situated in the northwestern part of the county, 35 miles from Gainesville. Polk W W, genl mdse, grist mill and cotton gin Land Owners — J P Abbott, Elijah Asbell, I S Alderholt, J rilHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is soft and mellow to the taste. A S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA. 25

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S.,F.& W.Ry. Tlie Preferred Route ^TO 202 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER W Aspbell, Baker & Clark, J C Bell, J A Brock, W A Bryant, S B Bryant, J L Curry, W C Cannon, Jessie R Everet, J M Faircloth, W H Gray, J Knight Sr, John Knighton, Lafayette Moore, Henry Polk, F YV Polk, J H Polk, Levi V Polk, Mrs Elizabeth Polk, Mrs Margaret Polk, Samuel Polk, Stephen Polk, S W Polk, I B Rogers, Mrs Nancy Rutledge, Lewis R Thomas, Jno L Townsend, Wm Townsend, Mrs L A Weeks, Henry Woodward. FREEPORT. Alachua county. Is situated within four miles of Choctawhatchie Bay. Caskill F M & Co, genl mdse Crawford Wm, genl mdse Gillis A L, druggist and physician Hatcher H H, State senator McCullough Marion, genl mdse McGowan — Mrs, genl mdse Rentan H, genl mdse Rentan Samuel, justice of the peace Vaughan J P, State representative FRUIT COVE. St. Johns county. A landing on the St. Johns river, 19 miles south of Jacksonville. Scott J W, genl mdse and saw mill Scott W B, justice of the peace Land Owners — S R Bardin, Martha Black, G W Black, J W Brady, Mrs Mary H Collins, J C Conyers, John Fasho, Robt Fasho, Jany Gallaway, J W Glenn, Barbara Gray, J T Hogan, Lathe & Moore, John Lourcey, W J Magill, T V Moore, T W Moore, James Osteen, John F Roberts, Laura Scott, Wm B Scott, J W Valentine, Geo A Walker, W 0 Wherry. FRUITLAND. Putnam county. This place is in the midst of the best orange growing section of the State, is a landing on the St. Johns river, 30 miles south of Palatka ; mails received daily. S R Causey, P M Austin John A, boarding Broward Preston, butcher Carter John C, butcher Causey Stephen R, genl mdse Stokes William, justice of the peace, notary public and wheelwright Land Owners — William L Allen, Joseph Tucker, Wm S Tucker, Geo J Tucker, Henry R Smith, Benj N Bradt, Cyrus M Hatch, John Marshall, Joe Hicks, John H Green, Solomon S Green, James P Appleby, Jno G Saunders, Frank E Reeves, Rev Charles A Koger, Ellis H Stearns, Benj F Shook, William Perry, Lionel Jacobs, Col Thos J Foster, Jno C Carter, Walker Smith, Albert W Farnham, D H Stryker, Griffin Johnson, Alfred Small, George P Fowler, Felix Smith, Wm Porter, Lawrence K Tucker, Jno C Tucker, John Rafferty, Henry Konon, FRUIT, When yop w^ht Strictly Choice Fruit, at bottom prices, sepd your orders to J, B. REBDy, Savannah, Ga.

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Sugar Mills and Pans. We Guarantee oilr Prices. WM. KEHOE & CO., IrOri Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 203 Benj P Thompson, Adam King, John Wetherbee, Lewis Funk, John Gilbert, Arthur Howell, Fletcher Allen, Virginius Smith, Horace Mizell, Seabron Little, Robt Crutchfield, F Crutchfield, John H Babers, I S Jennings, John E Marshall, Wm A Pine, Andrew J Garner, Robt Ray Johnson, John R Hayden, John E Smiley, James Garner, J O Melzer, Julius Melzer, Mox Melzer, William Parrish, Dr. J S Brown, Wilber Brown, Jonathan C Greeley, Preston Broward, Murry Flinn, Fred Smith, Alex Ray, Frank C Pora, Ed Yetter, Wm Stokes. FULTON. Duval county. Recently established as a postoffice, is a landing on the St. Johns river, 15 miles from Jacksonville. Gilmore & Son, painters Kent C, painter Kendall J, architect FUNSAK. (See Lake DeFuniak.) CAINESVSLLE. Alachua county. County seat, and the trading centre of the most populous and productive section of the county, is 50 miles from Palatka by the Florida Southern Railroad, and 73 miles from Jacksonville by the Florida, Transit & Peninsula Railroad. Its population is about 4,000, which is rapidly increasing. The city covers an area of one mile square, with a new edition known as East Gainesville, while the new town of New Gainesville, closely connecting, with its hygienic hotel, cottage sanatoriums, and fine business and building lots, will rapidly increase the power and importance and influence of the place. The U. S. Land Office, the East Florida Seminary, and the Military Academy are already located here, and it is likewise proposed to locate the State Agricultural College in the centre of this great agricultural region. Gainesville is of the largest cotton shipping stations in the State ; the firm of H. F. Dutton & Co. alone handles one-fourth of all the cotton raised in the State, for which they pay out to the growers annually over $600,000. The cotton ginneries of H. F. Dutton & Co, are the first great attraction which meet the eyes of the traveler as he approaches the town, on the Transit R. R. from Cedar Keys ; they consist of a number of large, substantial looking buildings, situated near the depot. The iron foundry of J. Doig, one of the institutions of the city, is also situated near the depot. The mercantile business of the city is centred on four sides of the public square, in the centre of which stands the county court house. Diverging from this square, the town is regularly laid out with broad, well shaded streets, running north, south, T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY possesses an excellent bouquet. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.

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8., V. & W. By. FAST MAIL TRAINS THROUGH WITH FEW STOPPING POINTS. 204 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER east, and west. There are many very handsome residences in all parts of the town, of various style of architecture, the larger portion of them being surrounded by fine orange groves and gardens, in which temperate, tropical, and semi-tropical fruits, plants, and flowers grow side by side. Besides the points of interest already mentioned, there is a planing mill, two newspapers, four white churches, and four colored, also good schools for both white and colored. Alfleck A H, prop Magnolia House Alachua Advocate, J C McCreary pub Arnow George J, P M Baird C P, dentist Baldwin & Halstead, B H Baldwin and I J Halstead, real estate and R R ticket agts Barnes L A, register U S land office Bayer F, saloon Broome B K, genl mdse Burnett Samuel J, mayor Carlisle J A, county elk Chestnut & Clinton, L E Chestnut and J N Clinton, grocers Coker W P, sewing machine agent Coleman Geo M, shoemaker Coyne John, agt Florida Southern R R and manager Fla Commercial Telegraph Co Crawford Bros, J R and J L, butchers Cromwell J D, dentist Davis Lawrence c baker Dawkins T W c, barber Day H E, agt Fla Transit & Peninsula R R and manager Fla Telegraph Co, and dealer in fertilizers, oils, laths; etc Dell, Pound & Co, J B Dell, E C Pound, J M Dell and W O Tison, livery, feed and sales stable Dennis L G, propr Arlington House and State representative Denton H C, co collector Dodd C B, stoves, tinware and hardware Doig & Harris, James Doig and Z T Harris, foundry and machine shops Drake B C, rice, grist and planing mill Dromgoole T A, fruits, cigars and tobacco Dutton H F & Co, H F Dutton, J G Nichols and W G Robinson, bankers, cotton factors, cotton gin and fertilizers East Florida Seminary, Hon J H' Roper proprietor Eastman J C Mrs, private school Eastman John C, bookseller, stationer, musical instruments and confectioner Endel Bros & Burkheim, clothing and gentsÂ’ furnishing goods Endel Moses, clothing, boots and shoos and gentsÂ’ furnishing goods Endel M & Bro, Marcus and J M, drygoods and notions Estes J H, manfr bed springs Ferrill George W, grocer Fields Charles L, propr and editor The Daily Bee Finley S Y, lawyer VEGETABLES. Always on hand a full supply of the best. J. B. REEDY, Savannah, Ga.

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John Rourke, AGRICULTURAL IRON AND BRASS WORKS) 2 BAY STREET, SAVANNAH, G-A. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 205 Folk & Smith, W H H Folk and P Y Smith, butchers Gainesville Manufacturing Co, G N Saussey proprietor and manager Gardner J C, county judge Goodale J O, contractor and builder Goss & Dunson, J H Goss and WEW Dunson, lawyers Hall J W c, barber Halliday & Rush, S F Halliday and B Rush, real estate and lawyers Halliday S F, notary public Hampton C O, lawyer Hampton & Jordan, W W Hampton and B F Jordan, insurance agents Hampton Wm W (Hampton & Jordan) real estate and notary public Harrall Marcus I, grocer Hick D M, milliner and dressmaker Holden G W, propr Oliver House Hunt A R, bed spring manfr Jernigan Lewis A, watchmaker and jeweler Joseph Gerson, genl mdse and musical mdse Keller & Setzer, Smith Keeler and D T Setzer, painters and grainer, paints, oils, and interior decorations King Thomas F, circuit judge DOIG Sc HARRIS, Proprietors. MANUFACTURERS Cotton Gins, Sugar Mills, etc., GAITNUSA IIA A J, FLA. REPAIRING MILL MACHINERY A SPECIALTY. rill IE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is distilled from the choicest A q n. S. GUCK EN 1 1 EIMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga.

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S F & W Rv -*r*3! £ QO VV J^y • QUICK TIME. 206 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Klein B, genl mdse, fruits and dry goods Knadler G W, boarding Lambeth John E, real estate and insurance agent Lancaster R A, physician Leighton Bros & Green, J M and A W Leighton and Wm P Green, lumber, fruit and vegetable crates, moss gin11 ers Little J C, photographs Leonard & Pearce, A H Leonard and Pearce, cotton gin Lewey M M, State representative McClelland & Ellis, hardware, stoves, tinware, paints, oils, sash, doors, blinds, harness and saddles McCormack William N, propr Varnum Hotel McKinstry J F, physician McMillan & Miller, James T McMillan & M F Miller, druggists, seeds, etc Magnolia House, A H Affleck, propr Martin Daniel C, city clerk Martinez A & Co, P Martinez & J S Banhagon, cigar mnfrs Matheson J D, dry goods, boots and shoes Matheson & McMillan, James D Matheson & James F McMillan, real estate agts Maughs G T, agt Southern Express Co Meisner Peter, harnessmaker Miller T X Mrs, dry goods, notions and millinery Miller John M, ice dealer Miller M F, McMillan & Miller, notary public Miller Philip, grocer, hay and grain Oliver House, GW Holden propr Parker J A c, druggist and physician Phillips N D, physician Post J H, watches, jewelry and curiosities Rawlins & Wilson, L R Rawlins & P F Wilson, genl real estate and insurance agts. Reynolds & Roth, restaurant and curiosities Robb R L & S L, physicians Rollins John F, receiver IT S land office Ross Steve c, shoemaker RAWMI REAL ESTATE AGENTS — OF — -^MIDLAND FLORIDA. The Orange Belt, the Vegetable Section, the Railroad Centre, Gilt Edge, Rural and City Property, improved and unimproved, to suit everybody. Come and see us. Correspondence solicited. Office, Gainesville, Fla. Confectioners’ Supplies. J. B. REEDY, Grocer, and Importer of Fruit, Savannah, Ga.

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Sugar Mills and Pans. Our Mills run perfectly true. WM. KEHOE & CO. Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 207 Rush Benjamin, State represen' tative Sadler Stanhope C, genl mdse and justice of the peace Samlinson Joseph, grocer and saloon Scarratt R, dry goods and notions Schmedling M E, photographer Seigler W L, dentist Seigler & Phifer, William D Seigler & William B Phifer, grocers Sheals W N, prof, secy East Fla Seminary and co supt of schools Sheldon C A, grocer Shivery R E, tailor Snell Mrs, boarding Taylor & Sanchez, R F Taylor & E C F Sanchez, lawyers and notary public Tebeans Miss, private school The Daily Bee, Chas L Fields editor Thomas & Thomas, G P & T F, physicians Trapp Wm, State representative Tucker S C, sheriff U S Land Office for State of Florida Vidal Adolph T, druggist Webber Carl, journalist Winges S H, co assessor Wilson W N, bookseller, stationery and news dealer You n glove G D & Son, carriages, wagons, harness, hay, grain and livery stable Land Owners — Sami Atkins, A H Affleck, Miss E P Allen, Mrs E Ashley, Sarah H Austin, Mrs Elizabeth Avera, J H Avera, Mrs Harriet E Avera, C F Bailey, E C Bailey, Mrs S R Barnes, Barnes & Dutton, Maud Beville, Mrs Jennie H Beville, Ephraim Bird, Jas R Brown, G K Broome, S Briggs, S J Burnett, L L Brown, Alex Cable, Horace Campbell, Jas Chennit, Harry Chislom, Mrs C E Clark, Mrs J B Coker, Cannon & Wilson, Mrs Julia Cessna, F B Chambelain, N & D Chislom, C Q Colclough, W A Colclough, A J DaCosta, Stephen Dampier, J G Dampier, Mrs E L Day, Hampton Deas, Jno B Dell, W N & W C Dell, L G Dennis, Mrs K M Denton, Mrs S M Deporter, W D Dickinson, Aaron Doby, Jno Dogan, Ben Drayton, W T Dubose, H F Dutton, Israel Dulan, T C Ellis, Geo R Ellis, Lewis Ellis, W B Ellis, Moses Endel, J W Farmer, Thos Freeze, Laura G French, P Giddings, Mrs Elizabeth Giddings, J D Goss, Jerry Gregg, J M Graham, Amelia S Haile, Jno Haile, A Hague Jr, A Hague Sr, J L Hague, W W Hampton, E A Hawkins, Miss F Hawkins, R H PI aw kins, L Hill, Mrs L E Hill, J S Hinnant, R J Johns, Jessie Ames Johnson, W H Johnson, Ed Johnson, M S Land, Cy Law, Vick Lang, E W Lengle, A H Lenora. Charles Lewis, A D Loomis, M E Love, Harrison Lynch, S C Little, Jno Martin, Mrs Emma Martin, Mrs S E Malphus, Matheson & Thompson, A L Mays, L E Means, M Fitch Miller, Philip Miller, Geo mHl CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY IS ABSOLUTELY PURE, A S, GUCKENHEIMER & SOtf, SOPE AGENTS, SAYANNAH, GA,

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S., F. & W. Ry. Florida Bispatcli. 2P
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Sugar Mills, AND PANS OP ALL SIZES, MADE BY JOHN ROURKE, 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH. GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 2C9 Perry Wm, cabinet maker Stephens Philip, painter Stewart A A, elk co court Tappen Edwin, carpenter Thorn George H, express agt Vandergriff David, fishery Ware Aaron, shoemaker Land Owners — Franklin Alden, J Bagger, — Hiscocke, W W Otwell, W D Owens, J Q Stewart, Peter Wittfield. GLENCOE. Volusia county. A small settlement of 100 inhabitants, situated in a good, healthy location, 30 miles north by west of Enterprise, and within 4 miles of the Atlantic ocean, is connected at New Smyrna by the boats on the Hillsborough river; mails tri-weekly by stage from Enterprise. Wm A Coe, P M Bryan G D, cattle dealer Bryan J D, cattle dealer Howard Alfred, surveyor Lee W W, carpenter Rush John, photographer Land Owners — R S Andrews, Simons Bennett, Geo W Bennett, Mrs H A Boyd, A H Breed, Georgiana Bryan, Dr J D Bryan, P N Bryan, G D Bryan, Mrs W H Coe, Mrs D L Coe, Miss M Constant, Mrs } E Cransby, Wm Davis, J T Dickinson, G W Futch Sr, G W P'utch Jr, H H Gause, Nat Harty, Hanks & Breed, A B Hawley, A V Hiscock, S J Hodges, M Lewis, W H McKenney, D L McKinon, T N Morse, Miss M Wapp, C W Wash, L H Wash, C Olson, B C Pacetti, T J Packwood, M B Rolf, R D Smith, A C Spencer. GLENDALE. Orange county. Only a country store and saw and grist mill, and a station on the St. Johns & Lake Eustis Railroad ; mails daily. G Gordy, P M Brown T R, genl mdse Gordy G, saw mill, grist mill, real estate agent and boarding Land Owners — T R Brown, Mrs S E Brown, Jessie Garrett, G Gordy, N M Gordy, G A Horkan, R P Johnson, M A Pennington, R L Wiggins. GLEN JULIA. Gadsden county. About five or six miles northeast of Mt. Pleasant, the nearest station on the Florida Central & Western Railroad. Davis T L, genl mdse Howell Samuel, blacksmith Howell Thomas, physician Lee Wm & Son, genl mdse McPhail H, tax assessor Snider A N, saw mill Land Owners — Olof Anderson, M Bates, Mrs E E Bates, Henry Beach, G W Creswell, H J & I G Davis, Wm Davis, Mrs L A Davis, T J Davis, Tom Davis, Scarborough & Davis, Frederick Diggs, J B Earnest, B N Faircloth, J J Ferrell, H J Gilbourn, S S Gilchrist, Mrs M E Hawkins, Geo Howell, W B Howell, Wm Hutchinson, John Till IE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY possesses an excellent bouquet. S. G-UCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA. 26

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WAY CROSS SHORT LINE TO FIjOHID A.. 8„ I 1 '. & W. Ry. 210 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER H Johnson, J M Johnson, H C & VV G Lee, W M Lewis, Frank Love, Solomon Mathews, M L Martin, M Morgan, T A Morgan, J F Morgan, Hamilton McPaul, H McPaul agt, Caroline McDougald, D L Nixon, T J Nixon, J W Posteen, Anderson Ragston, John Silas, Charlotte Smith, Henry Smith, PTank Thomas, B S Whedon, Pleasant Word. GLEN ST. MARY. Baker county. Recently established as a postoffice and a station on the Florida Central & Western Railroad, 30 miles west of Jacksonville. Tilton T M Mrs, hotel Land Owners — C Eiserman, Miss Mary A Gould, Henry H Slayton. GORES. A way landing on the Ocklawaha river, 108 miles from Palatka. GOTHA. Orange county. Is situated on the shores of Lake Olivia, and near several smaller lakes ; is ten miles west of Orlando, and has an elevation of 200 feet above tide water. The lands in this section are the choicest rolling, high pine. Mails received four times a week. Henry P Belknap, P M Belknap Henry P, notary public Hamphill Henry A, saw mill Land Owners — E S Dann Jr, E L Dann, S L Dann, M S Dann, John A Mohr, Willis G Murray, Frank W Murray, Wm O Griffin, D M Griffin, A Griffin, D E Griffin, Dan A Reaves, S Reaves, Edwin Griffin, J Jenkins, A S Spear, Harry Moore. GRAGEVILLE. Jackson county. A crossroads postoffice, principally for the convenience of the large farming community of this section ; it is 12 miles from Chiply station, and 26 miles from Marianna court house. Collins & Kirkland, saw mill, grist mill and cotton gin Condsey Nathan, wheelwright Grace George M, blacksmith Nash William, blacksmith Tindal S, stock dealer Whitaker James D, stock dealer Williams Wm, stock dealer Land Owners — G B Yawn, John W Johnson, Hardy Watford, Jefferson Grace, Emanuel Syfrett, Frank Syfrett, George Phillips, Alex Carmichael, King White, I White, Sebern Goldin, Noah Goldin, Buck Williams, J Frankling, Wesley Brown, Jas T Whitaker, Nat Sutton, John Crutchfield, Thomas Crutchfield, Bart Hinson, Hadly Hinson Sr, Hadly Hinson Jr, Wm Harrell, Stephen Harrell, James Williams, Nelson Walford, Miles York, Willey Parker, Tom Parker, Jasper Parker, Henry Yawn, Daniel Register, Allen Register, William Register, Burrell Register, Joseph BANANAS. I am tjie only Importer of Red and Yellow Bananas in t^e State, J. B. REEDY, Savannah, Ga.

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Out Pans are Smooth and Uniform in Thickness. WM. KEHOE & CO., Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 21 I Register, Martha Adams, Jack Adams, Philip Fourhance, Strip Abbott, Phelix Harden, Woodrough Hill, A Cooley, Jno Ships, Randald Elmore, Wm Elmore, Wm Suggs, Price Duncan, George Nealey, Jant Miller, Henry Miller, Jeff Grant, Calven Tool, Kincon Strickling, Simon Jinkins, John Pellom, Levi Smith, James Smith, Jos Baldin, Lewis Ball, George Ball, George Keith, James Keith, Josh Crue, C I Hutto, Randal Stokes, Moses Tindal, Elias Worley, John Worley, James R Jackson, Mack Carnley, Jacob Carnley, Wm White, James Hinson, Joseph White, Jones Whithust, Z Register, Buck Register. CRAHAMVILLE. Marion county. A way landing on the Ocklawaha river, 1 18 miles from Palatka. Howard J H, genl mdse and saw mill Land Owners — Samuel Anderson, W Y Bessant, M F Barksdale, C T Burr, W P Chalker, J N Chalker, D E Chalker, M E Counts, Thos Dixon, W H Dudley, G W Denham, E Erwin, J A Evans, N A Fort, W R Fore, J R Gore, J C Gore, P Z Griggs, Lemuel Griggs, L M Graham, J C Graham, J B Griggs, H M Guile, J Gordon, J E Herndon, J E Haiston, J T Hull, B S Hull, B F Holly, J P Holly, R Holly, W B Holly, J H Howard, A T Hoodwel, E M Henderson, E B Jordan, J King, N Leeman, S A Lons', S A Lisk, G W Manson, T C Marlow, R D McDonald, L Marlow, W B Mock, W H Mayson, Suanza Marlow, S McDaniel, James Nelson, H N Perkins, H Parramore, H Parks, J F Roberts, A Roberts, T W Randall, J W Randall, S Reynolds, A Sellers, J D Standland, M S Surler, C N Sinder, Joseph Standaland, F Welhorner, B A Winsor. GREEN COVE SPRINGS. Clay county. J. T. & K. W. and G. C. S. & M Railroads* The county seat of Clay county ; has a population of 700. Situated on the west bank of the St. Johns river, via which it is 28 miles south of Jacksonville and 35 from Palatka. The St. Johns at this point is about 3 miles wide and its compact waters are constantly being ploughed by the busy steamboats which at present furnishes all the transportation and mail communications between this and points north and south, but the Jacksonville, Tampa & Key West Railroad, which is nearing completion and will soon have trains running to this point, will furnish rail communications in all directions. The Green Cove Springs & Melrose Railroad, which will be a distance of 30 miles, is now running trains a short distance and will soon put this place in direct communication with Melrose. There are express and telegraph T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is distilled from the choicest qualities of Grain. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga.

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S., F. & W. Ry. PULLMAN SLEEPINGCAR SERVICE between ALL IMPORTANT POINTS. 212 FRORIDA STATE GAZETTEER offices here (Southern Express Co. and International Ocean Tel. Co.) ; a weekly newspaper, three churches and good public school advantages. The town derives its name from the spring that was discovered about 70 years ago by a prospecting party, and no doubt but that its many beautiful and natural surroundings were the means of the county site having been established here. It is now supplied with several commodious hotels and favorably compared with other portions of the State as a winter resort. The springs is located immediately in the central portion of the town, and is possessed principally of sulphurious properties and is surrounded by a massive growth of live oak, whose protruding branches overhangs the bright crystal water, are burdened with a heavy tonnage of Spanish moss, which helps to form, and completes the picture of Nature’s own handiwork. The spring has natural dimensions of 25 feet deep and 8 feet wide, and passes from its artesian like supply 3,000 gallons of water per minute, the surface of which has a temperature of 78 deg. Fht. This water is utilized for bathing, and extensively used for domestic and drinking purposes and said to be very beneficial to health in its use. The escaping waters form a brook which, at a distance of some 200 feet from its source, finds its way into the St. Johns river. Daily mail, via DeBary-Baya Merchants line of steamers. Thomas Roberts, P M Ackley Shreve, pres Green Cove Springs Railroad Applegate Joseph W, hotel Banks W S, manager International Ocean Telegraph Company Bardin George N, justice of the peace, deputy co elk and mayor Green Cove Springs Bell Thos, barber Bemis C C, real estate agent Bemis George C, notary public THE BAYARD TRACT. 20,000 AGEES — OF — ORANGE, VEGETABLE ill SUGAR LANDS, For SALE CHEAP, and on EASY TERMS to ACTUAL SETTLERS. TEN MILES FRONTING ON ST. JOHNS RIVER. Town Lots and Villa Sites. Address at Green Cove Springs, Fla., CD. C. BEMIS. COCOANUTS J. B REEDY IS THE ONLY IMPORTER IN SAVANNAH, GA.

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ini J • J GIVEN ON ALL KINfrg OP MACHINERY AltfD REPAIRS, iLSllIlldl^h BY JOHN HOUllKE 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 21 3 Bemis H E, business manager The Spring Bemis Mrs L F, propr The Pines Hotel Black C, contractor and builder Bolls William H, saloon Bram J c plasterer Branning T J,tax assessor Clay county Brazee G A, contractor and builder Brooker James R, blacksmith and wheelwright Buddington O A, saw mill Burrows Hamilton H, saw and planing mill Butler & Ardern (G T Butler and J C Ardern), cotton gin and grist mill Callory William, manager Oakland House Canova Matthew J, physician Canova Philip J, livery stable Canova R B, secy and treas Green Cove Springs R R Canova & Corken (Matthew J Canova and Archibald S Corken), druggists, newsdealers and stationers Chalker A S, tax coll Clay co Clarendon Hotel, Harris & Applegate proprs Clinch N B, editor and manager The Spring Colmar Walter D, druggist and physician Copeland J T, judge Clay co Corken Archibald, watch and jewelry Crocker Joseph C, genl mdse Davis Robt W, lawyer, notary public and ins agt and supt public schools DeWitt James W, sheriff Edgerton T T, genl mdse Frisbie Geo R, surveyor Clay county Gerard Mrs C A, proprietor Riverside House Greer J F, justice of the peace and ins agt Harris & Applegate, proprietors Clarendon Hotel Hendricks S M, State senator International Ocean Tel Co, W S Banks manager Jones James M, saloon Kirkpatrick J L & Co (James L Kirkpatrick and William E Coleman), genl mdse Lovelace Mrs A C, boarding Merrill Charles M, physician Morgan Wm G, hotel Moon C B, propr St Clair Hotel Mrs, C, A, Gerard GREEN COVE SPRINGS, Florida, SUMMER SEASON, FOREST LAWN, Cold Spring Harbor, LONG ISLAND. [ THE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY IS ABSOLUTELY PURE. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, SOLE AGENTS, SAVANNAH, GA.

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S., f. & W. Ry. FREIGHT IN THROUGH CARS, IN FAST TRAINS, WITHOUT TRANSFER. 214 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Moore J N, turpentine still Moss Chas H, genl mdse Moss James M, saw mill Moulton Edward, shingle mills Oakland House, W Callory manager Plummer William S, agt Southern Exp Co Rankin Wm, genl mdse Riverside House, Mrs C A Gerard proprietress. Roberts Thomas, postmaster Robertson William T, restaurant and confec St Clair Hotel, CB Moon prop Sallin Dover J, blacksmith Sawyer Matthew, barber Seavey Osborn D, manager Magnolia Hotel Simpkins M J, dentist Souter Daniel, saw mill Southern Express Co, Wm S Plumer agt Sullivan Royal B, constable The Pines Hotel, Mrs L F Bemis prop The Spring, N B Clinch editor and manager Tyler Daniel F, hotel Voglbach A F, genl supt Green Cove Springs Railroad Weston Isaac T, county elk Wilson W J & Bro, Wm J and James H, genl mdse Wilson & Peeler, Daniel M Wilson and William F Peeler, butchers Zittel George, restaurant Land Owners — Jas Andrews Sr, J C Anderson, Sami Branch, R N Batten, J C Batten, John Bachus, Mrs S A Brazee, C Black, Lemuel A Baltimore, A R Bundy, John Barrow Sr, Jno Barrow Jr, James R Brookes, Joseph Brookes Sr, J H Burton, D W Brown, S G Benyen, Wm H Bullman, John Berry, G W Brower, Gould Butler, E N Bradley, C C Burrows, T J Browning, G W Browning, C C Burris, C C Bemis, E H Bemis, O A Buddington, Croft & Fay, J H M Clinch, R B Canova, John Conniff, Stafford Clark, A C Cammors, G F Cox, C S Cole, 5 J Coleman, Marion Dean, Mrs Kate C Davids, J W Dewitt, Mrs M L Dickerson, Ancher A Eddy, John Ellis, Geo E Forester, L F Forester, Sampson Forester, J M Frasher, Marion F Fowler, John F Geeger John W Glisson, James Glisson, D W Glisson, H N Hancock, Harris 6 Applegate, Jas Hickory, N W Hall, G B Hall, Mrs A E Hall, G W Hinson, Mrs E R Houghton, Robt Harris, B F Hadsock, Margaret Johnson, T Jenkins, S M Joyner, Fannie Knowles, John Knowles, Milton Lewis, Frank S Lewis, Julius Lemons, G W Little, Henry Lenders, G W Lyle, Edward F Lawrence, Taraca Miller, W O McIntyre, W E Minton, Mrs M R Morgan, Leonard Mitchell, Bryant W Moore, Jno Moore, A H Moss, S B Morse, J M Moss, H & J Moss, Mrs F C Neff, C H Powers, Palmer & Tenis, W S Plumer, J II Peeler, Mrs S J Peeler, W J Peeler, P R Peeler, Samuel Ponds, Joel B Register, Samuel Register, WAD Roberts, Thos Roberts, W T Robertson, W Pickens, J P Rivers, Florida Oranges Consign your Oranges to J. B. REEDY, the largest Dealer in FRUIT in Georgia at SAVANNAH.

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Sagar Mills and Pans. Our Leading Specialty. WM. KEEOE & CO Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 21 5 T D Rivers, J B Rivers, Edward Rigby, Mary Silcox, John W Silcox, Eliza Silcox, D Souter, Mrs S C Souter, E D Souter, C D Souter, R B Sullivan, J Scanton, Samuel Spencer, W W Sledd, Mrs Charlotte Taylor, Wm Thompson, J C Thompson, A M Thomas, A J Wilder, W Wilson Sr, Jessie E Wilson, Bryant Wilkerson, Jas Weeks, Mrs C A Weeks, Isaac E Weston, C L Wright, C & A Wysong, Mrs Frances Williams. GREENVILLE. Madison county. A station on the Florida Central & Western Railroad. Is situated in the midst of the cotton-growing section of the State. Blythewood J F, physician Hayes E J, genl mdse and grist mill Harley C S, genl mdse Harley G P & Co, genl mdse Marshal J B, lawyer Redding J H,genl mdse Land Owners — L B Bradley, Mrs Sarah Bozeman, E E Barclay, O H P Barclay trust, O H P Barclay, E G Barker, Cap Bennett, G C Bishop, G M Bradley, Mary S Christian, Mrs R T Chatham, E C Cone, W H Cone, Emily J Cone, Moses Clinton, C E Coyle, Mrs S E Culpepper, W B Cooper, Mrs NEC Jane Dallas, T F Drew, David Delk, H H Fletcher, Mrs Josephene Fletcher, Mrs M A Griffin, W D Griffin trust, Jef Gear, W A Hamerly, H Hinson, Mrs S A E Hampton, Anthony Hall, C S Harbel, J Hurst, Mrs T J Hines, W F Hooker, E J Hayes, Jane Jenkins, Mrs J H J ones, E J Kersey, Albert Livingston, W M Linton, J N Lan, T J Linton, Mrs M E Matticks, M P Morgan, Mrs Martha A Morgan, Gabriel Moody, Mrs M S Mayo, Mrs Alice Mundee, Mrs A O Mays, Hannah Mitchell, David McLoud, Green McManus, J D McLoud, J B Marchall, Wilson Palmer, A P Porter, J A Porter, T J Redding, J A Rodgers, J H Redding, R G Reaves, Mrs Margaret Redding, Antony Richard, H H Radford, Jonathan Slaughter, H J Slaughter, Mrs Sheftall, Mrs M J Stripling, Mrs Elizabeth Slone, Fred Saunders, Tom Skipper, B R Scott, Mrs S A L Shackleford, W R Shackleford, S Simpkins, J H Slaughter, Lucy Thigpen, Mrs Mary Thigpen, Ephriam Taylor, Whit Tinsley, Mrs Eliza Thigpen, Jas Townsend, W S Venderver, M A Whittle, J B Watts, Chas Wiggin, Littleton Wyche, Jacob Worthington Sr, J M Warren, Rufus E Warren, Mrs Sallie Walker, D M Walker. GREENWOOD. Jackson county. Eight miles west of Marianna court house. Alsabrook & Pinder, genl mdse Barkley B B, genl mdse Conley & Co, genl mdse Dickenson ETC, genl mdse Lewis James O, physician Long N B & Bro, genl mdse rr\HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is soft and mellow to the taste. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.

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S, F. & W. Ry. Elegant Passenger Equipments; Westinghouse Air Brakes; Miller Platforms; Janey Couplers. 2l6 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Moburg, Conley & Co, genl mdse Petry W E & Co, genl mdse Pinder R R, genl mdse Robinson Jas A, State representative Taylor W H, grocer and saloon GROVE PARK. Alachua county. A newly established office, not yet six months old ; has several schools and churches near, also a number of saw mills and a phosphate manufactory. Is 14 miles from Gainesville. Adkins Charles, butcher Bain & Botts, saw and planing mill Clawson & Co, saw mill Dent Horace, dairy Dent T, real estate Greenman A S, genl mdse Price F, undertaker, Rosenborough A, saw mill Simonds — Dr, saw mill and phosphate works Townsend Noah, stock dealer Waits Samuel, stock dealer Land Oivners — N Gradic, E Gradic, John Higpen, Noah Townsend, W Waits, Samuel Waits, Bechum Adkins, Frank Price, Charles Adki ns, Jonston, W W Conner, Green Townsend, W H H Holridge, A S Greenman, T O Dent, Horace Dent, Dr Simonds, Mrs Dr Burden. GRUELLE. Alachua county. Formerly known as Perry ; is the junction of the main branch with the Ocala Division of the Florida Southern Railroad. It is a thriving little town, about 10 miles from Gainesville; has a hotel, two or three stores, a saw mill and an express office. Baird Bros, saw mill Collins A J, genl mdse Coulter A, genl mdse Finger H L, saw, grist mill and cotton gin Kelly J L, physician McAllister John, genl mdse and druggist Perry S J Miss, real estate Zetroner A T, stock dealer Land Owners — Wm Adams, Mrs F S Alexander, Samuel Douglas, Wm Evans, Mrs R B Feastor, E H Gaskins, Andrew Graddick, Mrs M M Graddick, Nick Graddick, Gus James, Miss C J Kennedy, S A Kennedy, T R Kennedy, Mrs M A McLeod, W S Perry. GOLF HAMMOCK, Levy county. Twenty-four miles south of Bronson, the county seat, and about the same distance from Cedar Keys ; mail every Tuesday and Friday. J O Wood, P M Bittings J A & Co, genl mdse Evans Wingate, prop Gulf Hammock House Glen cross F, physician Wingate C B Mrs, hotel Land Oivners — G W Wrey, H S Evans, R C Kermode, F Glencross, Dr McKinney, Mrs A E George, A S Madeville, P Burris, J A Bitting & Co, Mrs W A Mendenhall, G D Mendenhall. Foreign Dried and Green Fruit In large variety, at J. B. REEDY’S, Grocer, and Importer of Fruit, Savannah, Ga.

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Saw Mill Work OF ALL KINDS FURNISHED BY JOHN ItOURKE 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 21 7 HAMBURG. Madison county. Ten miles north of Madison, the county seat. Harrell, J J, genl mdse Martin J P, saw mill and cotton gin Land Owiiers — Danl Burnett, B W Burnett, D F Burnett, J T Burnett, Mrs A C Bedingfield, Mrs J H Brown, Reuben Brown, Mrs M L Brown, J S Collins, W S Collins, Mrs Carrie Collins, Henry Coleman, Henry Deney, Henry Deney agt, Soil Deney, Mrs C Drew, R M Davis, Mrs E A Davis, J E Drew. HAMILTON. Hamilton county. Of no importance except as a farmers mail distributing point. Land Owners — Mrs Julia Butler, Gip Boon, C Boon, J A Brown, Mrs Margaret Brown, James Bland, Harvey Blair, W W Blair, Bryant Burnam, C A Burnam, James Burnam, G W Clifton, S K Collins, O Culbreth, M M Dease, Mrs A E Dease, Sallie Fishburne, J F Gardner, Allen Herndon, Thos Kendrick, G W Leigh, J F Mathis, Matthew Mathis, R W McCall, Celestia McCall, W E McCall, B N McCall, P F McCall, G M McCall, U T McCullors, Mrs Purviance, Felix Patterson, Daniel Rutnell, J Taylor Rutnell, Robert Rawlins, J Black Taylor, Mrs Ann Winn, B F Zippner, Alex Zippner. HAMMOCK RIDGE. Alachua county. The centre of a good farming section. No postoffice. HAMPTON. Bradford county, A way station on the Florida Transit & Peninsula Railroad, 18 miles from Lake Butler ; mails daily. Wm Bennett Young, P M Florida Mill Company, saw mill and lumber Lake Navarre Institute Manire J H, photographer Mitchell B, genl mdse Swindle Owen, cooper Webb Wm, blacksmith Land Owners — Hon J B Cason, J W Sutton, Isaac Tyree, R H Livingston, Angus Hall, Bolen Hall, Fred Luben, David Jones, Wm Jones, Elijah Jones, Thomas Durden, S F Gardiner, Jacob Rhame, Henry Saxon, John Saxon, Ogden, B S Jones, J M Beasley, H H Hall, Levi Johns, James Cason, P H Cason, Futch, J Mad Hall, B Mitchell, P P Parkhurst, W B Young. HART’S ORANGE GROVE. A way landing on the east bank of the St. Johns river, 75 miles from Jacksonville. No postoffice. HART S ROAD. Nassau county. Twelve miles from Fernandina. Is at the junction of the Florida Transit rnHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY IS ABSOLUTELY PURE. JS. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, SOLE AGENTS, SAVANNAH, GA. 27

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PAST MAIL TRAINS THROUGH WITH BUT FEW STOPPING POINTS. F. & W. Ry. 218 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER & Peninsula and the Fernandina & Jacksonville Railroads. Beasley David, genl mdse Farmer Webster W, genl mdse, R R agt and telegraph operator Russell R, constable Snowball E R, genl mdse Snowball John C, justice of the peace and architect Wingate H B, stock dealer Land Owners — Jos H Acosta, Mrs M E Acosta, John Acosta, Benj Cook, E Everett, W W Farmer, John H Higginbotham, E O Houston, W B Houston, Miss L Houston, D B Houston, J P Higginbotham, Mrs E J Johnson, E Jones, Eli Jones, P H J ones, Phineas Johnson, J E Johnson, Ralph Russell, Mrs E J Snowball, E R Snowball, D B Wilson, S P Whitemore, HB Wingate, Mrs M C Wingate. HATCH’S BEND. LaFayette county. Is located in a bend of the Suwanee river, 7 miles from New Bradford. Bigelow R J, physician Hatch Joseph, blacksmith Sims J L Sr, genl mdse, grist mill, cotton gin and blacksmith Land Owners — B G Davenport, A M Delaney, Thos A Fletcher, Mrs S A Fletcher, John L Fletcher, C D Fletcher, Joseph Hatch, W C Hart, Green B Lord, Mrs Seneca A Purvis, John R Robuck, W M Sanders, Jas L Sims, J T Word. HATTON. Hernando county. Only a country store, situated in the heart of a vast pine forest, 27 miles from Brooksville court house. Dial & Rowe, genl mdse Wallace & Rowe, genl mdse Weaver P R, grist mill Land Owners — N F O’Neal, John Raymond, Jas T Smith, J A Smith, Thos Shiveley, J D Thrasher, Wm Thrasher, P A Tucker, W Tucker, A W Tucker, C E Wells, T C Wells, Wm Williamson. HAULOVER. Discontinued as a post office. HAWKINSVILLE. Orange county. Away landing on the St. Johns river, 45 miles southwest of Orlando. DeBary Baya Merchant’s line of steamboats touch here on the daily trips to and from Jacksonville. Crow John R, genl mdse Land Owners — Beny Anderson, H B Anderson, Wm Armstrong, Wm Boatwright, W S Burdett, H E Benedict, John R Crow, Joshua F Crow, L A Dade, Dade & Armstrong, Jos Evans, W A Davis, W W Dreggors, Rachael Griffin, Geo W Griffin, L H Jackson, Andrew Owens, M E Owens, J P Owens, Mattie E Rose, Allen S Stoples, S H Turner, W B Wofford, O A Walker. PnnniitQ Virginia, North Carolina and Tennessee in large variety at J. B. REEDY’S, iCflllUli. Grocer, and Importer of Fruit, Savannah, Ga,

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Sugar Mills and Pans, A full Stock of all Sizes. WM. KEHOE & CO., Iron Founders, Savannah, G-a. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 219 HAWTHORN. Alachua county. This is a flourishing incorporated town of 500 or 600 inhabitants. Is at the junction of the Florida Transit & Peninsula, the Florida Southern and the Hawthorn & Orange Springs Railroads. The place is located in the great orange belt, and oranges form the leading product. A great deal of cotton is also raised, and vegetables of all kinds yield abundantly. Hawthorn has good hotel accommodations, livery stables, a weekly newspaper, a private school, two public schools, several churches, and a number of saw and grist mills in and near. Mails daily. J D Bell, P M Adkins Bros, genl mdse Adkins E A, mayor of Hawthorn Adkins C W, butcher Bailey W W, civil engineer Bell J D, bookseller, stationer, lawyer and notary public Boon VVm, shingle manfr Brown J C, blacksmith Bullard & Stewart, genl mdse and fertilizers Cain M A, nursery Carraway W F, west end fishery Constine & Co, saw mill Hammond F J, groceries, hay and grain Hawthorn Academy, prof T J Walker principal Hawthorn Graphic, J B & J A Matthews publishers Hawthorn & Orange Springs R R, A Monroe president Hawthorn & Weeks, cotton gin Johnson W W, druggist and physician King H M Rev, Baptist, Leavett E E, boarding McCarroll J, contractor and builder McRae T J, genl mdse Maynard C C, contractor and builder Moore W S, hotel and marble works Morrison A, justice of the peace Peacock J W Jr, propr Lochloosa fisheries Price & Berryman, carriage manufrs, undertakers, and cotton gin Sheffield W K, fishery Simmons C A, propr Magnesia Springs and phosphate manfr Stemire W H Rev, Methodist Stringfellow R H, justice of the peace Sykes J T, wheelwright and blacksmith Townsend A B, butcher I Tyner S I, boarding Weaver D B, saw and grist mill, and cotton gin : Weeks R B & Son, genl mdse Wertheim L, genl mdse j West W M, painter Zin n J W, photographer Land Owners — Mrs S M Adams, W J G Adams, Adkins & Bros, C W Adkins, Mrs F J Adkins, Silas B Adkins, J R Adkins, A Baird & Bro, Mrs Elizabeth Beck, M J Beckham, F A Bell, I D Bell, Berkseser & Bro, J H Boone, J L Brown, Dr J G Bullock, H M Cameron, J A Chartine, R R Chartine, A rilME CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY possesses an excellent bouquet. 1 8. OUCKENH EIMER A SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.

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S., f. & W. Ey SHOBT lIKEi QUICK TIME. 220 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER N Chreghton W W Conner, J F Cox, Mrs L A Crumpton, J A Dean, F W Fennell, Mrs R B Fletcher, Jacob Gamble, Jeremiah Gamage, S V Garkins, Ned Garsher, Charles Hall, G W Hall, S U Hammond, W B Hammond, J J Hardenburg, Henry Hastings, T G Hammond, E T Hawthorne, G W Hawthorne, J M Hawthorn, M Hinson, W M Hinson, J H Johnson, R E Johnson, B J Jones, Ezekiel Jones, Tal Jones, J W Kennedy, Jacob Link, Nancy C Link, John Mann, L C Martin, J A Mathews, Mrs E F Merritt, M J Miller, Mrs Jennie Moore, Washington Morrison, C C Morrison, H A M^orrison, Joseph McCarrol, D C JMclnfosh, M E Me Michael, J N Ormand, M H Ormand, R R Ormand, Wills Peacock, Geo T Perryman, W B Phifer, McCollum Phifer, F H Price, J W Price, N Rodgers, W H Rodgers, H J Riles, Miss M E Roxborough, David Rowe, R Rowe, H Roundtree, M C Sanders, Z M Sanders, Israel Sherouse, J G Sherouse, J W Sherouse, C A Simmons, E J Smith, J D Sparkman, E E Stokes, S B Stoler, Nancy Terrell, Jno C Thigpin, Ballard Thomas, H S Thomas, J A Thomas, Samuel Thomas, Sabian Thomas, Ward Thomas, M M Tillman, S D Tillman, S F Tillman, W D Tillman, W N Tillman, C C Townsend, Jas L Townsend, James F Townsend, Joel N Townsend, Noah Townsend, Wm H Turner, Annie E Valentine, Henderson Valentine, E E Voyle, Caswell Wade, B W Waits, J M Waits, S F Waitsj T W Waits, J Walker, D B Weaver, J Wilson Weaver, Franklin Williams, P E Woodward. HAYWOOD’S LANDING. Jackson county. A way landing on the Chattahoochee river, 15 miles north of Chattahoochee. Liddon & Co, genl mdse HENDRY. Discontinued as a postoffice ; mails go to Fort Green. HERNANDO. Recently established as a postoffice, as yet no business. HIBERNIA. Clay county. A way landing on the St. Johns river, 22 miles south of Jacksonville. Land Owners — Jno D Bigger, George A Bradley, Mrs Mary Cherry, Chas Colson, W R Dewitt, Francis Eugene, Wm Eilbeck, Jane Frasher, F A Fleming, Fleming & Armstrong, M L Fleming, J F Fleming, W H Fleming, Davis Floyd, George Floyd, Mrs Helen Hogans, Pompey Jenkins, Jessie V Jones, Walter and Helen Lucas, Joseph Moorehouse, Blackwell McCoy, J W Maynard, Mrs S F Maynard, George Norton, Andy Peterson, James A Silcox, Mrs miTT? ONLY EXCLUSIVE FRUIT HOUSE f T> I>TA1A \ JX£j IN SAVANNAH, GA., IS • -B. MX XJMlllJ JL

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* T> /vr( .,1., AGRDHtLTttRAL IRON AND BRASS WOR&S) dOllll J\0ill It (3 5 2 BAY STREET, SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 221 Elizabeth C Silcox, Jacksori Sharp, H Walker, M P Willingham, Lewis Wilford HIGHLAND. Clay county, a station on the Florida Transit & Peninsula Railroad, 61 miles from Fernandina. This point is one of the most elevated sections of the State. Payne, Cook & Co, genl mdse and saw mill HIGHLAND STATION. Clay county. (See Highland.) H0GLEY. Orange county. A small place with some 80 inhabitants ; is on the surveyed route of the Jacksonville, Tampa & Key West Railroad, 30 miles from Orlando ; mails tri-weekly. George W Webb, P M Adams George W, wheelwright Bowers R A, hotel Smith Bros, painters Thomas James, butcher Webb Geo W, notary public Webb & Higley, saw and planing mill and real estate agts Young W B, physician Land Owners — W J Young, Maynard T Smith, Hiram C Smith, James H Jackson, Geo W Smith, L W Johnson, D J Thomas, D McCraney, R L Hopson, J M Sims, C C Hig genbotham, T J Stark, Reuben Stark, A M Adams, James M Thomas, E E Higley, R B Ern. HILLIARD. Nassau county. S., F. & W. R. R. A way station on the Waycross short line, at this point a large lumber interest is springing up, and some good land can be found in the vicinity. Flilliard & Bailey have a large saw mill at this point, connected by a railway with King’s Ferry, on the St. Marys. Hilliard & Bailey, saw mill and lumber McCully W W, genl mdse Land Owners — John Blake, Mrs M E Brewer, Monroe Davis, Early Davis, James H Davis, Henry J Davis, Hiram Davis, Daniel Davis, Mrs Jane Davis, Henry Davis, J W Geiger, John Henderson, Geo W Hodges, Hilliard & Bailey, E Hodges, Dan Nelson, George Stewart, D C Stewart, J H Sikes, L P Tracy, Miss Ada Tracy, Frank Watson, Sarah Washington, W H Wingate. HOGARTH’S LANDING. Situated on the east bank of the St. Johns river, 38 miles from Jacksonville. HOLT. Santa Rosa county. A way station on the Pensacola & Atlantic Railroad, 39 miles east of Pensacola. Black J P, saw mill Bovis Henry, genl mdse Haskell Wm, genl mdse Holt D A, genl mdse Ollinger, saw mill miFE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is distilled from the choicest A qualities of Grain. S. GUCKENHEIMER k SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga.

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S., F. & W. Ry. Tlie Preferred Route ^"TO PliORIDA.^ 222 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER HOLLY HILL. Volusia county. Situated on the west bank of the Halifax river near Daytona. Land Owners — Maria A Archesteller, W H Carter, J M Jules, H B Martin, S R Rouse. HOMOSASSA. Hernando county. Thirty miles south of Cedar Keys. This is a point growing in favor with sportsmen each season, and furnishing great attractions to the tourist. HORSE LANDING. Only a steamboat landing on the St. Johns river, 94 miles from Jacksonville. HOUSTON. Suwanee county. Only a way station on the Florida, Central & Western railroad, 6 miles east of Live Oak, the county seat ; mails daily. George R Thrall, P M Allen Elbert Rev, Baptist Hicks Wm M, physician Kennedy Thomas, grist mill and cotton gin Morgan J P, genl mdse Morgan Pliney, genl mdse Rich J S, genl mdse Thrall Geo R, druggist Williams Arch, carpenter HUDSON. Hernando county. A farmers’ post office on the Gulf coast, twenty-five miles from Brooksville court house. Hudson J B, genl mdse Hudson Jno W, genl mdse Pinkerton H, genl mdse Land Owners-— Isaac W Hudson, Wm M Lang, M Fullman, H W House, J T Hudson, W B Hay, Ran Rivers, J B Hudson, C U Hopkins, J W Hudson. M N Hill, J B House, Wm Whidden, James Worley, Jessy Hay, J J Whidden, W E Frierson, A J Rivers, J R Chaney, W W Chaney, A M Bellamy, H C Bush, Petter Wever, Shingle Keen, James Gillet. IAMONIA. Leon county. Situated in the northern part of the county, within one mile of a lake of the same name, 18 miles from Tallahassee. Bell S B, physician Bradley J E, genl mdse Robertson W F J r, physician Land Owners — Wm Aiderman, J A Anders, Cromartie & Bell Anders, A T Berry, C W Bannerman, Miss K P Bannerman, Miss M E Bannerman, S E Bannerman, J C Bannerman, R J Bannerman, W T Bannerman, J H Brown, S W Brown, Geo T Brown, J O Bradley, W H Bibb, Dr S B Bell, A G Cromartie, Henry Copland trust, Henry Copeland, F A Coles, J Q Cromartie, J C Courtney, Lewis Cromartie, C P Davis, W J Dickey, Israel Ellis, D C Felkel, B F Harrison, Mrs S L Hays, John Hays, Titus Hays, Mrs Julia V Johnson, B M Johnson, A M Manning, E R Candy, Crackers, etc. w se„ d &r p* ja J s -J h ee i y>

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Qndar Milk Q n r? Donn All our Mills are fully warranted. WM. KFUIOE & CO., Uligdl llllllu dilU fdllbi i ron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 223 Murray, E B Manning, A T & H J McIntyre, W J Parnell, L H Rains, G B Strickland, A J Strickland, A R Sessions, L Smith agent, Lyman Smith, Peyton Tollivan, Richard VanBrunt, J C Van Brunt, B F Walker, C B West, W J Walker, Mrs Alsie White, Chas Williams, Peter Witherspoon. ICHATUKNEE. Discontinued as a postoffice, mail goes to Fort White INTER LACHEN. Putnam county. F. S. R. R. Inter Lachen, formerly Blue Pond, Putnam county, eighteen miles from Palatka. This place, as its name indicates, is among the lakes. It would be hard to find a more beautiful situation for a town. The country is high and rolling, and slopes gradually towards the water. Several fine residences and a large hotel are in process of erection here, and by virtue of its favorable situation, Inter Lachen bids fair to be a favorite resort for the tourists. Allen Lott, real estate and justice of the peace Brush C A, millinery and notions Clark T L, saw mill Grooms & Barbor, genl mdse Hastings Geo W, saw mill Houghton A M & Bro, genl mdse Long George, surveyor, Mupp O S, druggist Stock Geo, justice of the peace Wall R L, genl mdse Land Owners — Chas Francis Jr, Geo Stock, Henry Elliott, F A Lumpkin. IOL A. Calhoun county. Only a country store, 20 miles south of Abe’s Spring ; mails daily except Sunday by hack line to Wawalatchka. W O Donalson, P M Bell Frank B, hotel Bower Frank, lumber Bush John, saw and grist mill and cotton gin Connell N L, justice of the peace Coxwell C W, co supt public schools Davis L C, wheelwright Donalson J A & Co, genl mdse and warehouseman Donalson W 0, justice of the peace Stanfell James, physician Land Owners — W L Connell, W J Connell, James A Connell, W R Cason, John Davis, L C Davis, J E Davidson, I S Etheridge, Jno M Griffin, Johnson & Stone, James McCabe, J M Peacock, R H Richards, Thos Spencer, J B Stone, J K Stone, Joe H & Silas Stone, L M Stone, Stone & Clark, Seaborne Tate. ISTACHATTA. Hernando county. On the banks of the Withlacoochee river, io miles from Brooksville. The place is connected |HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is soft aDd mellow to the taste. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.

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F. & W. Ry. Florida Dispatcli. Past IPrciglit Line, 224 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER with the Gulf by steamboat, making weekly trips. F M Townsend, P M Barker A H & Co, genl mdse and real estate agts Hays N R, saw and grist mill Morris T E, justice of the peace Temple J R, saw and grist mill and physician Wright W J, physician Land Owners — F M Townsend, Stephen Peters, George Peters, J W Knight, Charley Moor, Jake Moor, Thos Graham, C C Townsend, A H Barker, Tom Townsend, Jim Miley, Jeff Miley, W R Timple, Bill Miley, Dan Miley, N A Colson, C R Arnold, J W Baker, J C Graham, G D Graham, G W Gomans, Henry Bouknight, Green Arnold, N F McDonald, L Mundon, J Caruthers, Wm Goss, L C Peters, F Blackburn, A Freeman, Dan Baker, G T McKay, B E Bagwell, Goss Brittle, Gabe Brittle. ITALIA. Nassau county. A station on the Florida Transit & Peninsula Railroad, 18 miles from Fernandina ; it has a population of 100, and there is one saw mill, and shingle mill, one school and church ; mails daily. Wm MacWilliams, P M Brown A A, saw mill and mnfr tool handles Craycroft T B, bricks, tiles, etc LaVon & Upton, shingle and saw mill MacWilliams William, genl mdse and brick mnfr Land Owners — John C Wilson, Peter Green, A J Higgenbotham, Harley B Jones, Curtis Higgenbotham, Joseph H Jones, John Johnson, Phineas Johnson, John V Johnson, Jos H Johnson, C C Jones, J B Jones, J P Higgenbotham, Edward Jones, R H Jones. IZACORA. Holmes county. Only a country place, six miles from Cerro Gordo ; mails semi-weekiyCurry Whitemill, blacksmith, wheelwright, carpenter, and supt co school Ellis T V, sheriff Newton J J, tax assessor Williams R E, tax collector Land Owners — E A But ram, Wm Barnes, Whitemill Curry, T D Curry, Nathaniel Chapman, G W Crews, S, S Curry, M Y Chance, M L Curry, J D Davis, Briant Dickson, James Dyson, Thos Ellis, Samuel French, Elbert Faircloth, Amos Forehand, Dianah Faircloth, Rebecca Faircloth, C J Holmes, W L Harris, J N Harris, G H Harris, J W Hathaway, A B Hathaway, B F Hathaway, W J Hagan, M J Jordan, Richmont Leavins, Mary E Lee, James Leavins, Ira McNeal, A J Miller, Mary Mills, Bethiel Mattox, E A Mayors, J J Mattox, W H Pitts, J C Pitts, Wm Price, J J Perkins, A B Riddles, Wm Riley, S A Register, W W Scott, S P Sellers, Jasper Taylor, Milla Wilcox, W M Ward. J. B. Reedy, SAVANNAH, GA, handles more FLORIDA ORANGES THAN ANY HOUSE SOUTH. TRY HIM.

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o Florida Illustrated, contains 20 imperial size colored views ot' Florida Scenery, illustrated orange growing and different sections of Florida. Price 50c. Practical Orange Culture, by Arthur Manville. The latest, best and most practical work on the subject. 12 mo. paper, price 75e. Cloth, $1 00. Florida Fruits and How to Raise Them, by Helen Harcourt. A practical little volume on growing the orange, lemon, lime, fig, piheapple, guava, Japan persimmon, plum and other Florida Fruits. 12 mo. paper, price, 75c. Cloth, $1.00. Florida, Past and Present, its climate, soil and productions. The land of the orange and guava, The pineapple, date and cassava. By Samuel C. Upham. Illustrated. 12 mo. paper, price 50c. Florida Breezes, or Florida, New and Old, by Ellen Call Long. Describes life and society in Florida, before and during the war. “A delightfully entertaining volume.” 12 mo. price $1.00. A Treatise on Orange Cultuve and other Citrus Fruits, by Dr. Geo. W. Davis. A bandy and practical little work on this great fruit industry. Price 50c. Florida Dispatch, an illustrated agr i_ cultural weekly. Gives best and most reliable information on Florida. Subscription, pe r year, $2.00. Sample copies 5c. Bertram Raymond ; or, Cruise of the Dolphin, by Helen Harcourt. A charming book of adventure for boys. 12 mo. cloth, price $1.25. Detail Hap St. Johns River, Florida. Nearly eight feet long in length. For the use of tourist travelers. Price 25c. Hand Book of Orange Culture in Florida, Louisiana and California, by T. W. Moore. 3d edition, cloth, $1.00. South Florida, the Italy of America. Its climate, soil and productions. How to get there — cost of land and expense of making a home— of planting a grove of fruit trees — raising cattle, horses, hogs, sheep, &c., &c., by F. C. M. Boggess. Paper, price 25c. Tourist and Invalids Reference Book of Popular Winter Travel, with maps. 8 vo. paper, price 50c. | Gardening in Florida, A manual of ; by Prof* J. N. Whitner Paper, price 50c. Flora of the Southern United States, containing an abridged description of the flowering plants and ferns of Tennessee, North and South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi and Florida, arranged according to the natural systems, by A. W. Chapman, M. D. Ferns by Prof. Daniel C. Eaton. 8 vo. cloth, price $4.00. Coltons New Sectional Maps of Florida, the latest and best edition published, price $1.00 Coltons Pocket Map, latest edition, price 75c. Florida : For Tourists, Invalids and Settlers, by George M. Barbour, profusely illustrated. 12 mo. cloth, price $1.50. Florida: Its Scenery, Climate and History, by Sidney Lanier, illustrated. 12 mo. cloth, $1.50. Guide to Fast Florida, by Edwards; a handy little volume. Paper, price 10c. History of Florida, by George Fairbanks, a standard work. Crown 800, price $2.50. History of St. A ugustine, by W. W. Dewhurst. 12 mo. price $1.00. Guide to St. Augustine and Florida, illustrated with maps. Paper, price 25c. Florida as a Permanent Home, by Jacques, a book every one interested in Florida should read. Price 10c. Camp Life in Florida, by Halleck. 12 mo. price $1.25. McClellans New Digest of the Laws of Florida. 8 vo. sheep, price $7. (Postage, 30 cents extra.) Index to the Decisions of the Supreme Court of Florida, by Rhydon M. Call, Esq., of the Jacksonville Bar. Price $3.00. County Pamphlets. Duval, Orange, Sumter, Putnam, Polk, St. Johns* Madison, Alachua, Price 25 cents each. VIEWS OF FLORIDA. STEREOSCOPIC, superior quality... per dozen, $1 50 HELIOTYPE VIEWS, on heavy German paper “ 1 25 (Very handsome, and give general satisfaction.) SOUVENIR OF FLORIDA, small size, in book form, 12 views 25 OF JACKSONVILLE, large size, 12 views 50 “ ST. AUGUSTINE, “ “ 50 SCENES AND CHARACTERS OF SUNNY SOUTH, 12 views 25 FLORIDA ILLUSTRATED, consisting of twenty colored views, in cloth case 50 Any of the above Publications mailed, postage free, on receipt of price. Address publishers, ASHMEAD BROTHERS, Publishers, Booksellers, Primers, Binders and Stationers, 21 West Bay St., JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 28 225

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FLORIDA REAL ESTATE. i ij 64 WEST BAY STREET, Jacksonville, Florida, Have for sale, on the most favorable terms, every variety of l/AlfSS In nearly every part of the State. improved” lands, Consisting of every class of Orange Groves, varying in prices from $1,000 to $75,000. CITY PROPERTY. Fine Hotel Property with Furniture complete, Vacant Lots for residences, splendid Business Lots on Bay Street. SUBURBAN LOTS On the north-east of the city. Lots containing from 3 acres to 12 acres. Some beautiful ones fronting on the St. Johns River. RIVERSIDE Between 800 and 1,000 Lots in the beautifully elevated Town of Riverside. Those Lots constitute, without a doubt, the handsomest and most desirable suburbs in the' State. They are an average of *J 5 to 30 feet above Bay Street, and in point of healthfulness are unsurpassed by any spot of earth, perhaps in the United States. UNIMPROVED LANDS. W e have also large bodies of heavily Timbered and good Farming Lands, at prices ranging from 50 cents per acre to $10 per acre. In addition, we say to Florida Land buyers, that we can suit you in anything you may want. We have more Lands and a greater variety to select from, and being the Oldest and Largest Real Estate Dealers, the advantage of seeing us, and what we have for sale, must be plain to every one seeking investment for speculation or for homes in the Flowery Land, where there are advantages unsurpassed in the United States. Many of the Orange Groves we have for sale are on the market because the owners have LARGELY OVERTRADED, and are compelled to unload at least a part of their burdens. We can, therefore, offer GREATER INDUCEMENTS to Land or Orange Grove buyers than can be found in the State. Send for our Catalogues, read and see what we have for sale, then come and see us and judge for yourselves. 226

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JAMES M. FAIRLIE, 22 Laura Street, Jacksonville, Fla. (ROUND THE CORNER FROM GRIFFIN’S DRUG STORE.) WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN PAINTS, OILS, COLORS, VARNISHES, BRUSHES, ETC., ETC.. SPECIALTIES ETJBBEE PAIETT, this mmmT in thje, worlej. Guaranteed PURE OIL PAINTS, for Cottage and Farm. The only reliable cheap Paints in the market. HAMMOND’S celebrated “ SLUG SHOT,” the great Insect exterminator for Fruit Trees, Flowers, and Farmers generally. Cheap and easy to use. The right thing in the right place.” Bakers’ and Confectioners’ Supplies, HOPS. MALT, HARTSHORN, ESSENTIAL OILS, FLAVORING EXTRACTS, for the Soda Fountain, etc. Special Agent for CHAS. LIPPINCOTT & CO., of Philadelphia, SODA WATER FOUNTAINS and APPARATUS. CORRESPONDENCE fc OLICITED P. 0. Box No. 760. JACKSONVILLE, FLA. ANEW HOUSE NEWLY FURNISHED THROUGHOUT. Beds cannot be excelled having Patent woven wire springs and best curled hair mattresses. ROOMS ALL PLEASANT AND AIRY. BATHROOM with HOT and COLD WATER on second floor. The table is supplied with the VERY BEST NORTHERN MEATS and FRESH EARLY VEGETABLES from my own garden, including a fine plot of Noonan Strawberries which commence ripening in January. HOUSE CENTRALLY LOCATED, Corner ForsytTie and Clay Streets Three blocks from Way-Cross, Florida Central and Western Depots, JACKSONVILLE, .... FLA. Telephone Call 3XTo. 66, G-. W. SMITH, Proprietor. Also general Southern Agent MARVIN’S SAFES, and Agent FAIRBANK & CO.’S SCALES. 227

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T. T. S^OCkTOlt T. fe. STRiBLlNG. 1 Wholesale and Retail Dealers in BOOTS, SHOES, LEATHER AND FINDINGS. Burt’s Fine Ladies’ and Gents’ Shoes. J, S. TURNER’S FINE GENTS’ SHOES A SPECIALTY. Merriam’s Fine American Kid and Pel). Goat Shoes From $2.50 to $5.00. _A_ FULL LINE OIF Children’s Spring Heels and Solar Tips From $1.00 to $2.00. (^“Parties ordering Shoes from abroad will find it to their advantage to send us their orders, ms we carry the largest and most complete stock in our line in the State. We order direct from the Factories, and guarantee to sell goods at New York prices. Stockton & Stribling, 47 W. Bay Street, JACKSONVILLE, FLA. No. 24 LAURA STREET, JACKSOlsTVILLE, FLA. GUN AND LOCKSMITHS. Dealers in GUNS Ammunition, — AND — FISHING SHELLS Loaded to Order. Baggage Checks, Key Checks, Badges, Stencil Plates, Stencil Ink and Brushes, Indelible. Ink, Burning Brands, Steel Stamps, Key Rings, Linen Markers, Brass Alphabets, Figures, (fec.j'&c. 228

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STATE AGENT FOR POWELLÂ’S PATENT CHAIR FAN. 8 .^ 2 T: BEDDING, BABY CARRIAGES AND TOYS, Oil Paintings, Pictures and Frames Mouldings in great variety. UPHOLSTERING MATERIALS OF ALL KINDS, ALSO The oldest as well as the cheapest house in this State to buy the above goods. Orders by mail promptly attended to. 24 & 26 LADRA STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLA. W. H. PILLOW, FORWARDING f COMMISSION MERCHANT BEST FACILITIES for handling Oranges, Strawberries, Tomatoes, CucumberSj Watermelons, etc., economically and well. YENTILATED FRUIT CARS AND T. C. T. CO.Â’S REFRIGERATOR CARS AT COMMAND. OFFICE AND PACKING-HOUSE AT NEW WAREHOUSE OF S., F. A W. R R. GENERAL STATE AGENTS SAVANNAH GUANO CO.Â’S FERTILIZERS. Send for circulars and stencils. W. H. PILLOW* P.O.Box 331. Telephone No. 101. C. D. OU^SCAM a 229

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!TI!E LOW PEICE SHOE 13L3AjD^^. Jobbers and Retail Dealers in Ladies’, Gents’, Misses’ and Child’s BOOTS, SHOES and SLIPPERS, Of Every Inscription, at tlie Lowest Cash Prices. Nos. 6) & 7 7 West Bay St, Jacksonville, Fla. Branch House, 21 & 23 South Main Street, FALL RIVER, MASS. DREW, HAZELT1NE & LIVINGSTON, OWNERS AND AGENTS OF Line of Vessels Hunning North, and East —AND— JACKSONVILLE MARINE RAILWAY, 'AND DEALERS IN Lime, Plaster, Hair, Cement, Hay, Brick and Ice. LAURA STREET WHARF, JACKSONVILLE, FLA. FORWARDING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, — AND— Wholesale Groceries and Provisions. Agents DuPONT’S POWDER, and AYERILL CHEMICAL PAINTS, and KIRK’S SOAPS. Also, Dealers in Coal and Hotel Supplies. 23 and 30 E. Bay Street, JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 230

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C. A. MILLER & CO. If elksei&f 1 le f Florida. —WHOLESALE— PACKERS AND FORWARDERS OF Florida Oranges and Lemons, — AND DEALERS IN— POULTRY, EGGS, BUTTER, FRUITS, VEGETABLES, and all kinds COUNTRY PRODUCE. FERTILIZERS. CHURCH ANDERSON fCOU JACKSONVILLE, FLA. — WHOLESALE— AND— Commission Consignments Solicited. Orders Promptly Filled for POTATOES, ONIONS. APPLES, k SPECIALTIES: PEANUTS AND DF.IED FRUIT. R. N. ELLIS. A. E. McCLURE. Ellis & McClure Plans, Specifications and Estimates FOR BUHEIDIRI GrS OF -A.3L.IE_i Kills] IDS. WATER SUPPLY, DRAINAGE, SEWERAGE, BRIDGES, ROOFS, to. P. 0. Box 784, 'Room 12, Palmetto Block, BAY STREET. JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 231

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TERMS STRICTLY CASH. Office and Works West of Waycross R. R. Depot. ARCTIC I CM COMPAMY, J. H. GILLEN, Superintendent, P. 0. Box 1044, JACKSONVILLE, FLA. Manufacturers and Wholesale Dealers in GHSEpsa o>yupwwiaiua el C El 1 Bloclis from 70 to 125 Pounds. Only pure Well Water used, and the quality and purity surpasses that of Natural Ice. Orders from wholesale dealers and country trade supplied. FLORIDA SAVINGS BANKS*-ANDReal ZEs'baVb ZEC:x:oIb_aa=Lg e JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA, —HAS FOR SALE — CHOICE LOTS, ORANGE GROVESiWILD LANDS, ALLOWS INTEREST ON DEPOSITS, Collects Rents and Interest, Negotiates Loans, &c. J. C. GREELEY, Prpsidenl HENRY S. ELY, Treasurer. m Sherlock ffofWawj REAL ESTATE AGENTS AND DEALERS, — AND — INTO THIRTY PUBLIC, Ji'A CJKBOIf VI&IdB. FLORIDA* ^”We ha ve on hand some of Florida's best Lands, and can suit all as to price and quality. o %Va wo Civil Engineer and Surveyor Post Office Box 5-27. ROOM 3, REED S BLOCK, JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 232

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Wholesale and Retail Dealer in Carriages, Buggies, Wagons, HARNESS, WHIPS, Ac. JACKSONVILLE, FLA. STATE AGENT — CORTLAND WAGON COMPANY, GQETLANBz Nj s Y., — AND— OOLUHBUS BUSif Auctioneer Commission Merchant. DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF GOODS. CONSIGNMENTS RESPECTFULLY SOLICITED. No. 56 West Bay St., JACKSONVILLE, FLA. REFERENCES. BANK OF JACKSONVILLE, M. A. DZIALYNSKI, Esq., and the LEADING BUSINESS MEN OF THE CITY. JACKSONVILLE HOTEL, ON THE EUROPEAN PLAN. Opposite Florida Central Railroad, CORKER BAY AND JULIA STREETS. ROOMS FOR ONE, FROM 50c. TO $1.50. FIRST-CLASS RESTAURANT' Attached, where Regular Meals are served. Breakfast, 30c. Dinner, 50c. Supper, 30c. Twenty-one Meal Tickets, $5 BATH ROOMS ON EVERY FLOOR FREE TO GUESTS. SHAD EROS., Proprietors. Also, Dealers in STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES. Bay, corner Julia Street, JACKSONVILLE, FLA. (29) 233

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GUMBINGERs^ WATCHMAKER, JEWELER AND OPTICIAN FLOBIBA GVRIOSXTIB8. 79 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Fla. Opposite Astor luilcLing. J. R. TYSEN. C. B. SMITH. TTSEN & SIMZITZEL, e: STEAMBOAT OWNERS AND AGENTSJACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA -AVHOLESALE DEALERSFLOUR, G-RITS, MEAL, HAY, GRAIN, FEED Grocers and Orange Dealers Supplies. BRICK, LIME, CEMENT, PLASTER, SHINGLES AND BUILDERS’ MATERIALS; Independent Line Steamers — For Sanford, Enterprise and Intermediate Points 3 Beach & Miller’s Line Steamers— For Crescent City. Palatka and Intermediate Points J. S. Smith, Jr. Frederick J. Dubos. SMITH & DUBOS, GRAIN, MEAL, BUTTER, LARD, CHEESE, CHICKENS AND EGGS. Office and Warehouse, Foot of Newnan Street, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA. Reference— First National Ranis, Jacksonville. MUMBY, STOCKTON 4 KNIGHT, I Importers Wholesale and Retail CROCKERY, CHINA, GLASS AND EARTHENWARE, ETC.. GENERAL KEROSENE FIXTURESHolmes, Booth & Haydens’ A-l Silver-Plated Spoons, Forks, Etc HEADQUARTERS FOR HOUSE-FURNISHING GOODS. I —Sole Agents for the MONITOR Oil Stove and the LITTLE JOKER Oil Can 13 West Bay St., Jacksonville, Fla, 234

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JACKSONVILLE, FLA. Tliis is tlie Leading Hoixse. “OPEN ALL THE YEAR.” ample Rooms for Commercial Travelers. Tables always supplied with the Best in the Market. Rooms Large and Well Furnished. JACKSONVILLE, FLA. Centrally located, convenient to all the St. Johns River Boats. ^ate, • $2.00 to $3.00 Per Day. GOOD SAMPLE ROOMS. Liberal Discount by the "W eek. GEO. A. HOVER, Proprietor. IMEattaix* J3£o-olsso JACKSONVII .LE, FLA. CENTRALLY LOCATED. H. DeWOLF DODGE, Proprietor. Jacksonville, Fla. WEST FORSYTHE ST., BETWEEN OCEAN AND PINE, erms, $2.00 TO $2.50. SPECIAL RATES BY THE WEEK. isr TAKE STREET CARS AT RAILROAD DEP0TS.=li 235

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J. O. BESSENT, (Successor to HULL & BESSENT,) Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 61 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Florida. CHEAPEST AMD OLDEST SHOE HOUSE IN THE STATE. itadies' and Gentlemen's. Hand Made Geeds a gpeeialty.. MANUFACTURERS OF THE CELE3RATED DEALERS IN PAINTERSÂ’ SUPPLIES. Office and Factory, No. 26 OCEAN STREET, JACKSONVII.I.E. FLA, HARRY R. JONES. LE ROY YERILL. PAPER HANGING AND SIGN PAINTING. 23 Laura Street, Jacksonville, Florida. CH. D O DILLON & CO., (Formerly Steward of Steamer Fannie Duncan,) 89 West Bay St., JACKSONVILLE, FLA. (OPPOSITE ASTOR BUILDING.) Oysters and Luncheons, nooms from. SO Cents to $1.00 per Day. 236

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DWARF ORANGE TREES, JnekAciivIlltf, SBevido. Write for List of Fruit Trees, Plants and Seeds. Pioneer Manufacturer of and Dealer in Carriages, Wagons, Carts, Harness, &o. AG-ENT FOR THE CELEBRATED Manufactory and Repository, Cor. PINE AND CHURCH STS., JACKSONVILLE, FLA. — AND — JACKSONVILLE TRANSFER COMPANY, Bay St., Cor. Cedar, Orders for Carriages, or the Transferring of left at the Stables or Street, willreceive M. L. HARTRIDGE, Jacksonville, Fla. Buggies, Saddle Horses, Passengers and Baggage, Office, No. 22 West Bayprompt attention. Manager. L. F. HOEFER. R. E. FORKERT. HOEFER & FORKERT, Proprietors, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA. A NON* ALCOHOLIC BEER, which is free from License, and contains more nutriment than Lager, and is warranted to keep longer than any other Beer. TRY IT.H 237

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Geo. A. DeCottes, COAL YARD. GRIST MILL LIGHTERS TO LET. LIGHTERING and TOWING DONE Dpposite the Carleton House, Jacksonville, Florida. a ra ? o ^ lig Wholesale and retail Dealer in INDIAN RIVER ORANGES. Hotels, Boarding Houses, Steamboats and Families supplied with selected Fruit. Boxes packed special for shipment North, East and West. Store Rear of Post-Office, JACKSONVILLE, FLA. m % ZEPIR, A-ISTIKI JR. IF* 0 1ST ID 3 IE?:r?0:p:t'e J bo:r'_ Engines, Boilers, Saw-Slills, Gearing and Pulleys Kept constantly on hand, and Machinery in general repaired at shortest notice. Medart Patent Wrought Iron Pulleys, Hancock Inspirators, Ac. Agent for Watertown Steam Engine Company. P. O. BOX 305. JACKSONVILLE, FLA. —HEADQUARTERS FOR LWilT S FBINISST QOQii l SEND FOR OUR COMPLETE PRICE LIST. JONES & BOWEN, Jacksonville, Fla. Franco-American Florida Floral Purfumes Manufacturing Co. Yallee des Fleurs’ Grove, San Mateo, Florida and 23 Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla. E. MOULIE, Proprietor. AROMATIC PLANT, FRUIT AND FLOWER GROWER, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. — x_ a-RiFFiisr & co.r CORNER BAY AND LAURA STREETS, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA. ‘Importers, Wholesale and Retail Dealers in DRUGS, MEDICINES, CHEMICALS, &c., FRENCH AND ENGLISH BRUSHES, PER* FUMERY, ETC., ETC., FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES. Physicians’ Prescriptions carefully compounded. Sole Manufactures of the celebrated “ Florida Pine Tar Cough Syrup.” Patent Elastic Self-Sealing; Caps for vials and bottles. Can be removed and replaced instantly. German and French spoken here. GEORGE HENRY. GEO. E. HEITZ. HENRY & HEITZ, —PROPRIETORS OF 8 T A E, BOT'XLXiM'OW OEK8, Bottlers of Lager Beer, Ginger Ale, Soda and Mineral Waters. Prompt and careful attention to orders. COR. BAY AND JULIA STREETS, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA* 238

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TH. ROBHTSON& CO. -WHOLESALE x* b nr m a, m p p a i w x hous e ALSO, DEALERS IN Fancy Goods, 1ST otions, Scgars! Segars a Specialty. Sole Agent for the Celebrated Crown Mixed Paints No. 75 WEST BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA. o r jj 3 B; a* ^ WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN ISTortliern Meats, Poultry, Game, AND ALL KINDS OF. SAUSAGES. Stall 9 & 10 City Market, Jacksonville, Fla. tins, lines. AND A FINE LINE OF KID GLOVES. Worsteds. 50 West Bay Street, cor. Laura, Jacksonville, Fla. : HI Hi W ELLEE.I — J E W E Is E K t JACKSONVILLE, PLORIEAEverytliing that is elegant and useful in my line at reasonable prices. Fine and Intricate Watch Repairing a specialty. Orders by mail promptly attended to. 35 EAST BAY STREET, OPPOSITE POST OFFICE. S. I.\ BURGERT, PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTIST. 71 h West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Fla. Pictures Copied and Enlarged to any s'ze. Fine assortment of Frames, Mats, etc., always on hand. AUGUSTUS W. COCKRELL. AUGUSTUS W. COCKRELL, JT. A. W. COCKRELL & SON, ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELLORS, PRACTICE IN STATE AND FEDERAL COURTS. Bay, S. E. Cor. Pine, Jacksonville, Fla. J U L E S BARA TIE El MEE,oia:^.2srT tailoe Keeps constantly on hand a fine assortment of Foreign and Domestic Goods. 27 Laura St., near Bay, ra Jacksonville, Fla. W43L w* ^ to, ci ja.it; 9 ''Ui.i, i I oa* Keeps constantly on liaml a fine assortment of Foreign and Domestic Goods. 30 HOGAN STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 239

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WILLIAM BAYA, PRODUCE COMMISSION, —AND— Manufacturers’ Agent, —AND DEALER IN— POULTRY, EGGS, Butter, Cheese, Fruits, Vegetables, Syrups, S.c. U Newnan St., JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 23 OCEAN ST., J acksonville, Fla. fine Caramels, Chocolates and Mixtures, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL—ALSO, DEALERS IN— FRUITS, NUTS. &c. HORACE BERRY, Proprietor, 9 East Ba^r Street; JA QMS QEYILLEj, FLA, Prescriptions carefully prepared. FIRST-CLASS PRIVATE BOARD. Bath Boom, with Hot and Cold Water, g f BOOMS fe Commodious and well furnished, and accommodations first-class in all respects. S. W. cor. Forsythe & Julia Sts., JACKSONVILLE, FLA. No. 14 West Monroe St., JACKSONVILLE, FLA. AMPLE ACCOMMODATIONS, GOOD LOCATION, SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. Rates S i .50 to S2 per day. SPECIAL RATES BY THE WEEK. Mrs. C. A. SLEDGE, Proprietress. CHARLTON DuPONT, ATTORNEY AND 52% W. Bay St., JACKSONVILLE, FLA. RMYDON+M.+CflLL, ATTORNEY ATTORNEY — AND— Co-unselor at Law, ROOM No. 2 — AND — Commissioner ot Deeds for the States, 7H BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLA. AND NOTARY PUBLIC. Jacksonville, Fla. 240

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G1YE ^ 0N ALL KINDS OF MACHINERY AND REPAIRS, JLllUldilt5 BY JOHN ROU11KE 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. JACKSONVILLE. Duval county. This beautiful city, the Indian name which was “Wacca Pilatka,” meaning “cow ford,” is on the north bank of the St. Johns river, 25 miles from its mouth, on the Atlantic Ocean, and 171 miles from Savannah. Its present name was given in honor of General Andrew Jackson, the first governor of Florida. The population is about 17,500, including East Jacksonville, La Villa, Brooklyn, and other suburban places. Jacksonville has been called the “City of Hotels,” and its supurb hostelries are the wonder and delight of the pilgrim who comes to Florida, expecting to see an undeveloped country. It is safe to say that these splendid hotels have no superiors, and few equals, this side of New York and Baltimore. Anywhere among the elegant parlors and saloons, or upon the spacious balconies and verandas, maybe seen costumes as handsome as the country affords, and the flash of diamonds is as dazzling here as at Saratoga or Cape May. In the course of the season, at one of these hotels, one will see as much 'Style in dress and as many suggestions of unlimited wealth as at any American centre of fashion. Each of the five largest is provided with a special orchestra, and music and dancing make the gaslit hours of the evening whirl pleasantly away. The first of these hotels that meets the tourist’s eye is the elegant Everett, from whose spacious verandas and noble front is to be had the finest river I view in Jacksonville. Next the cozy Duval, enjoying a fine and well deserved reputation, then the tasteful and elegantly kept Windsor, the equal of any, and just across the way the grand St. James, with its several hundred satisfied guests always at home upon the long verandas. At the opposite end of Bay street, from the Everett, stands the popular Carleton, the last but not the least of the five principal hotels. Besides these, there is the St. Marks in the hands of Fred Foster, artist as well as landlord, Grand View Hotel, Jacksonville Hotel, Tremont House, Elmwood House, Mattair House, Sledge House, Bettelini’s, and a whole host of minor hotels and boarding houses comfortably and well kept. All of these houses are conveniently located and accessible by street railway from the depots and various landings of the river boats. But the larger hotels have come to be numbered among the chiefest fraternizers of the sections. In the generous social splendors of their parlors and ball rooms, in the “hops” and “sociables” and masquerades, the local and visiting chivalry and beauty meet in the softest and kindliest relations, and the coldness and antagonisms of section are meltBtHB CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is distilled from the choicest L qualities of Grain S. GU CK KN HEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga. 30

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S, F. & W. Ry. FREIGHT IN THROUGH CARS, IN FAST TRAINS, WITHOUT TRANSFER. 242 FRORIDA STATE GAZETTEER ed away in the glow and the gayety of social warmth and pleasure. The Yacht Club House is one of the most romantic and elegant structures in Jacksonville. When William Astor, of New York, was commodore of the Yacht Club, this house was built, with a large donation from Mr. Astor. It is a light and beautiful building, built on piers, extending some distance out into the river. It has an upper and lower veranda extending around the building. On the first floor the boats and sculls of the Club are kept. The ball-room is on the second floor, and although the floor of the room is not as large as that of many in the city, it is one of the completest and most perfect in the country. The hall is well ventilated on all sides, and whenever the weather is warm the balconies outside make the most delicious and beautiful of promenades, with the fresh river breeze kissing the warm cheek of the dancer and the gleam of the moonlight upon the ruffled surface of the splendid river all around, or the silver stars peeping over the rim of the blue sky to find their radiant images reflected there. Visitors amuse themselves in other ways as well. Next to the yacht house is a boat yard, where row boats, sail boats and steam yachts may be had for pleasure parties, and in the afternoons the river is dotted with these pleasant and shapely little crafts bearing pleasure parties about the river. A steam ferry for a shining nickel carries one across to the other side, where there are some pleasant, shady walks ar d pretty orange groves, and further on the base ball park of the Florida Herald Base Ball Association, which it is proposed to improve into a pleasure ground for the people, where all sorts of games and diversions may be enjoyed. Driving, too, is a frequent amusement. There are some handsome teams to be had at the various liveries in Jacksonville, and the shell road drive by the fair grounds out to beautiful Panama Park, and that out Pine street to the romantic spot known as Moncrief Spring, as well as the Brooklyn and Riverside shell road, all become fashionable and spirited with the gay turnouts and “ high steppers ” that roll along almost every afternoon. It is in contemplation to build a shell road along the bank of the St. Johns from Jacksonville to Orange Park, 13 miles, which, when completed will be the most superb drive in the South. Omitting the hotels there are many handsome and attractive buildings, residences, and stores in Jacksonville. The Astor block, near the Florida Central depot, wherein are the offices of the Southern Express Company, Savannah, Florida & Western Railway, and other Raisins, Nuts, Etc. I am the I argest Dealer in this line. J. B. REEDY, Savannah, Ga.

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Sugar Mills and Pans. They are Strong and Durable. WM. KElHOE
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& v & w Vi xr WAY-CROSS SHORT LINE IV H TO FLORIDA. 244 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER State. The motto of the tourist in any part of Florida is a paraphrase of Hoyle’s noted rule in whist — “When in doubt, return to Jacksonville.” Many of these shorter excursions can be pleasantly accomplished in a day. Orange Park and Mandarin, on opposite sides of the river, twelve miles up, are delightful excursions that may be made in small boats, steam yachts, or in the regular passenger boats that go up to Palatka in the morning to return in the afternoon. By these regular mail boats one can also spend the major portion of the day at the celebrated Green Cove Sulphur Springs, or the superb Magnolia Hotel two miles below. These boats also make such connections with the St. Augustine Railway at Tocoi that passengers can take this route and spend an hour in the ancient city, returning to Jacksonville in time for tea. The Jacksonville & St. Augustine Railroad is now completed and in running order, and makes two trips a day to St. Augustine, the run consuming only an hour and a half. This route will enable one to spend the entire day in St. Augustine. One of the pleasantest short trips from Jacksonville is to Mayport and Fort Geoige’s Island, and the jetty works of the St. Johns twenty-five miles below the city, at the mouth of the river. The fishing is capital and the ocean view is fine. At Mayport there are sand hills as high as a house and as white as the driven snow. The lomantic drives and walks through the long palmetto-shaded avenue of Fort George’s Island are among the prettiest in Florida. Its shell-covered beach, and its curious legends also attract. This was one of the first settling places in the history of America. The Indian, the Huguenot, and the politician have figured in its legends. Aaron Burr lingered here during a period of his eclipse, with a friendly Scotchman named McIntosh, and later legends tell of a kingly slave-trader named Kingsley who occupied the island in almost barbaric state, and finally made a romantic mesalliance with a comely African princess who shared his splendor. There are daily boats and excursions to the mouth of the river during the season. As may be seen by the following transportation lines, Jacksonville has both rail and water communications with all parts of the world, neither does she lack in her telegraphic facilities. This is the objective point of the Savannah, Florida & Western Railway Co., the Central & Western, the Jacksonville, St. Augustine & Halifax River, Jacksonville & Fernandina, St. Johns and the Jacksonville, Tampa & Key West Railroads and DeBary-Baya Merchants, St. Johns River Fast Day Line, APPLES I make a specialty of Fancy Apples. J. B. REEDY, Grocer, and Importer of Fruit, Savannah, Ga.

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Sugar Mills, AND PANS OP ALL SIZES, MADE BY JOIIK JIOUJRKE 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH. GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 245 and Tourists Line of steamboats, Mallory, Jacksonville & Baltimore & Florida Steamship Co. line of steamships, Southern Express Co., Western Union and International Ocean Telegraph Companies. Jacksonville is an organized and well ordered city, with a complete system of government and municipal improvement. It has a morning and evening daily, each containing full dispatches of the Associated Press, and each enjoying a fine circulation. The chief industry is the shipping of yellow pine lumber, of which there is over sixty million feet shipped annually, over forty-five million oranges are also shipped yearly. Jacksonville is a city with a future. The glory and the beauty of its development will depend largely upon the enterprise and liberality of its people. A & G C C & Okeechobee Land Co. See advt Abbott William S, whol Indian river oranges, rear postoffice. See p 238 Abell Henry, genl delivery elk P O Ackerly Gilbert D, genl frt and passenger agt Jacksonville, St Augustine & Halifax River Ry Co Adams & Gillen, Willoughby Adams & Edward W Gillen, butchers, Market Alderman W H, fruits, 7 Bridge Allen J, cabinet maker and upholsterer, Pine st Alsop & Clark, Wm Alsop & Henry Clark, saw httd planing mill, 180 E Bay Alspaugh Florence Miss, newsdealer and stationery, 3 W Bay Ames William 0, genl frt and passenger agent Florida Central & Western Railroad, Astor bldg Ambler Daniel G, Ambler, Marvin & Stockton and Ambler & Taliaferro Ambler, Marvin & Stockton, D G Ambler, John L Marvin & John N Stockton, bankers, 18 E Bay Ambler & Taliaferro, Daniel G Ambler & James P Taliaferro, lumber, 4 W Bay Anderson Church & Co, Church Anderson, wholesale produce, fruits, commission merchants and orange packers and shippers, 12 W Bay. See P 231 Anderson & Townsend, Z T Anderson and J F Townsend, wood dealers, foot Catherine Andreu D A & Bro, Dennis A and John P Andreu, variety store, 13 E Bay Andreu R, grocer, Ocean cor Duval Andrus & Carradice, Ida M Andrus and C E Carradice, physicians, 29^ Laura st Appleyard T J, foreman TimesUnion Archibald James W, atty at law and loan agt and notary public, 10 W Bay Archibald Robert B, atty at law, 10 W Bay rilHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is soft and mellow to the taste. 1 S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.

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S., F. & W. Ry. Elegant Passenger Equipments; Westltoghotise Air Brakes; Miller Platforms; Janey Couplers. 246 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Arctic Ice Company, W B Bancroft pres, E H Bancroft sec and treas, J H Gillen supt ; office and works WayCross R R depot. See page 232 Ashmead Bros, Clarence H and William H Ashmead, publishers Florida Dispatch, booksellers, stationers, printers and binders, &c, 21 W Bay. See p 225 Avery Simon G, livery stable, Pine st Babcock William H, Clarkson & Babcock, and journalist, 7 W Bay Baker James M, judge circuit court, atty at law, 10 W Bay Baldwin Abel S Dr, propr Palmetto Block, and trustee Sanitary Improvement Fund, 39 W Bay Baldwin Mrs Mary E, grocer, Adams cor Catherine Baldwin William L, physician, W Bay Bank of Jacksonville, W Barnett pres, W D Barnett cashr, Pine cor Forsythe Baratier Jules, merchant tailor, 27 Laura. See page 239 Barlow John T, saddles, harness, &c, 21 Pine Barrs Cabell C, dentist, 13 W Bay Barrs Jno M, atty, notary public, Times-Union bldg Barrs & Hunter, Amander W Barrs and Wm R Hunter, real estate agts, 41 W Bay. See back cover. Bartholomew Laura A Mrs, boarding, 123 Forsythe Bartholomew M B, carriage and wagon manfr, 123 Forsythe Bates William E, manager J E Tygert & Co Baxter & Ryan c Thomas Baxter and Jack M Ryan, saloon and billiards, 20 W Bay Baya Hanara T, whol and ret grocer, auditor DeBaryBaya Merchants’ Line, 2 E Bay Baya Wm, produce, commission and manfrs agent, 24 Newnan. See p 240 Beach Joseph S, cane manfr and curiosities, 28 Laura Bean & Challen, Eben Bean and Jas R Challen, com mers, forwarders, and shippers oranges and lemons, &c, Way Cross R R whf Beckwith John P, agt Cincinnati Southern R R, 49 Bay Beglow Silas L, money clerk Southern Express Co Belisario Moses M, justice of the peace and notary, 24 Ocean Bell James S, real estate and loan agt, notary public and abstract office, 10 W Bay Bennett G R, real estate, 22 E Bay Bentley G W, general manager Jacksonville, Tampa & Key West Ry, Astor bldg Bergman Charles A, restaurant and saloon, 53 W Bay Bergner & Engel Brewing Co, John Joost manager, 78 W Bay CIDER. I AM HEADQUARTERS FOR CIDER. „ REEDY, Grocer and Importer, Saynanah, Ga.

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Sugar Mills and Pans. Our Mills run perfectly true. WM. KEHOE & CO., Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 247 Berlack Harry, auction and com, 38 W Bay Berne W J & Co. William J and Wm J Berne Jr, manfrs Amazon ready mixed paints, and dealers in paints, oils, &c, 26 Ocean Berry Horace, whol and ret druggist and chemist, 9 E Bay Bessent James 0, whol and ret boots and shoes, leather and findings, 61 W Bay Bettelini Fred, European Hotel, 16 and 18 E Bay Bettes Jerome N, physician, 5 y 2 E Bay Bicaise Francis A, novelty and variety store, 39 and 47 W Bay Biggs R W, wheelwright and blacksmith, 124 Forsythe Bingham S L Mrs, proprietress Bingham House, 61 Forsythe Bisbee Horatio Jr, U S representative Bogue & Wilson, T H Bogue and Geo W Wilson, carpet upholsterers and interior decorators, 5 W Forsythe Bohler John C H, saloon, E Bay Bonnetheau Henry D, soap manufr, grist and feed mills, and agt Toledo Oil Co, 90 and 92 E Bay Botto V, saloon, 48 W Bay Bowden James E T, drygoods, fancy goods, notions, boots and* shoes, agt ButterickÂ’s patterns, 1 1 W Bay Bowden M R, local reporter Times-Union Bowden Uriah, sheriff Duval co Braden Robert, deputy city tax collector, 22 W Bay Bradford Roberta H Mrs, principal East Jacksonville Grammar School Bradley Fertilizer Co, of Boston, Mass, Geo E Wilson State agt, 15 W Bay. See front fold on State map Bradley Henry C, propr Florida Palm Works Bradley Silas A, lawyer, Bay n w cor Ocean Brickwedel Conrad, grocer and liquors, r E Church Britz Charles J, restaurant and saloon, Bay cor Newman Brock & Ellis, John E Brock & Geo C Ellis, real estate agts, civil engineers and surveyors, near postoffice. Brooks Henry W, mdse broker, 22 W Bay Brown Moses J, State and county tax collector Brown R L, State representative Brush Charles H, attorney at law, justice of the peace and notary public, Bay cor Pine Buchanan W A, baker, 75 W Bay Buckman Ellwood H, real estate bought and sold, W Bay. See front fold on State map. Buchman Henry H, atty at law and notary public, 10 W Bay Buckman T E, elk Duval co court Bucky Jacob D, clothier, 5 W Bay mHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY IS ABSOLUTELY PURE. A S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, SOLE AGENTS, SAVANNAH, GA.

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S., F. & W. Ry PULLMAN SLEEPING CAP SERVICE between ALL IMPORTANT POINTS. 248 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Buesing August, genl mdse Burbridge John Q, real estate dealer, 17 E Forsythe Burch Joshua L, brick manfr, 4W Bay Burget S P, photographer, 71 y 2 W Bay. See p 239 Burland W H, physician, 30 Monroe Burleigh John H, grocer Burroughs Joseph B, ticket agt S, F & W Ry Co Burroughs Lewis S, deputy collector and inspector customs, 52 j 4 W Bay Burton John H, hats and gents furnishing goods, 51 W Bay Burton J W, sale stables, Forsythe st Buser J P, genl agt St Johns 6 Lake Eustis Ry, 74 W Bay Byrne Wm, grocer and liquors, 10 W Bay Cadorette H Huan, physician, 3 1 E Bay Calk Wm, livery and boarding stables, Forsythe st Call Rhydon M, lawyer, room 3, 7J^ Bay. See p 240 Call Wilkinson, U S senator Campbell Abram, butcher, Market Campbell Alexander B, pianos and organs and musical mdse and job printers and binding, 7 W Bay Campbell H J, architect and civil engineer Campbell Jeremiah R, propr St James Hotel Canepa Frank, groceries and meats, Shell road Canova L A, grocer and liquors, 94 Cedar When going home, stop in and orcFr a box of the choicest FLORIDA ORANGES, at Carleton The, Stimpson & Devnell proprs, E Bay corner Market Carlilse Joseph, prof banjo and guitar, theatrical manager, 43 W Bay Carter S B, chief engineer Jacksonville, Tampa & Key West Ry, Astor building Cassidy Bell, clerk Florida Central & Western R R Castell Wm G, candy manfr, 35 E Bay Cecil George, vice-president DeBary-Baya MerchantsÂ’ line Chace E E Mrs, boarding, 40 W Adams Chappell Adolpho G, boat builder, rear 78 E Bay Cheney RI, U S attorney Northern district Chess-Carley Co, of Louisville, Ky, D T Gerow manager, kerosene and lubricating oils, Bay corner Cedar Christian B F, fruits and confectionery, 23 E Bay Christopher M J & Co c, Milton J Christopher, produce commission merchants, 38 W Bay and Market Churchouse F W, manager Wheeler & Wilson Manfg Co City and Club Stables, M L Hartridge manager, Bay corner Cedar. See p 237 Claiborn Thos<:, junk dealer Clark Harry W, Clark & Graves, and business manager Florida Daily Herald and notary public Clark John, John Clark, Son & Co, and pres First Nat Bank J. B. REEDY, Savannah, Ga.

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John Ron rke. AGRICULTURAL IRON AND BRASS WORKS, 2 BAY STREET, SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. Clark John, Son & Co, J and J E Clark and W R Cox, forwarding and com mers, whole* sale and retail grocers and dealers in coal and hotel supplies, 28 and 30 E Bay. See page 230 Clark John A, whol and ret fruits and produce, 24 Ocean Clark M Ella Mrs, millinery and fancy goods, 31 E Bay Clark & Graves, Henry W Clark and John T Graves, publishers and propr Florida Daily Herald, Bay cor Pine. See p 38 Clark Richard J, manager Fla Collecting and Mecantile Agency, room 7 Palmetto blk Clarkson Walter B, Clarkson & Babcock, principal Dual High School Clarkson & Babcock, Walter B Clarkson and Dr Wm H Babcock, real estate, 7 W Bay Cleveland & Son, E E and W W Cleveland, furniture manfrs and dealers carpets, 60 to 66 W Bay Coates William H, agt Halifax & Indian River Steamboat Line Cockrell AW & Son, An gustus W and Augustus W Cockrell Jr, attys at law, Bay s e cor Pine. See p 239 Coffin E C Mrs, millinery and dress and fancy goods, 57 W Bay Cohen Bros, dry goods, 41 and 43 W Bay Coleman Lewis H c barber, 72 Pine 249 Coleman Walter G, genl trav agt Florida Central & Western R R Coloney, Talbot & Co, Myron Coloney, John T Talbott & Henry H Menager, real estate agts, rooms 13 and 15, 39 W Bay. See back cover Conner O T, fruits and confectionery, 21 E and 79 W Bay Cook C H, prof optician, dealer in spectacles, eye glasses and optical goods, 5 E Bay Cook D Alf, watchmaker and jeweler, 33 W Bay Cooley Roselle C, asst cashier First National Bank of Fla, Ocean cor Bay Cooper C P & J C, attys at law, 1 1 W Bay Corley Hugh A, land com Fla Land & Mortgage Co, 10 W Bay Cowan Arthur C, trav agt Fla Despatch Line, Astor bldg Cowan Charles P elk Sou Exp Co Cronin Jeremiah, route agt Sou Exp Co Cross George L, passenger agt L & N R R, 80 W Bay Crowley D J, manager W U Tel Co Culp D W Rev, prin Jacksonville Colored Grammar School Curtis George A, grocer, 219 E Bay Custom House, 52^ Bay DaCosta Aaron W, attorney, justice of the peace and notary public, 78 j 4 W Bay DaCosta Charles W, asst job foreman Times-Union 1 1HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is soft and mellow to the taste, S. GUCKENHEIMER SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA. 31

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R F 1 Rl W T? V Preferred Route 0,,X.O (J ^ TO FLORIDA,.^ 250 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Dancy W McL Hon, Dancy & Davis, and mayor of Jacksonville Dancy & Davis, W McL Dancy and Clarence W Davis, dentists, 1 y }4 W Bay Daniel Richard P, physician, Duval corner Pine Davidson Wm M, general manager Florida Central & Western R R, Astor building Dawkins Crosby, notary public rubber stamps, seals, etc, i8j4 W Bay Dawkins DeWitt C, lawyer, 38 W Bay Day S A Mrs, boarding, Laura cor Ashley Deans Geo Wheaton, attorney at law and commissioner ol deeds for the States and notary public, 8 W Bay. See advt DeBary A, President DeBaryBaya MerchantsÂ’ Line DeBary-Baya MerchantsÂ’ Line, A DeBary president, George Cecil vice-president Geo Poggenburg secÂ’y and treas, W B Watson genÂ’l manager, H T Baya auditor, C B Fenwick general freight and passenger agt. See p 33 DeCorsey Major H, butcher, City Market DeCottes George A, wood and coal, grist mill, lighters and tow boats, E Bay st. See P 238 DeLyons Alexander c barber and bath rooms, 21 Ocean Deming Granville, genl soliciting passenger agt St Johns River Fast Day Line Dennis Frederick W, foreman news dept Times-Union Dewhirst B, merchant tailor, 30 Hogan. See p 236 Dey J Ramsey, wagonmaker and undertaker, 29 and 31 W Adams Dingee Charles M, contractor and builder Dobbins AN & Bro, Albert N & James H Dobbins, gun and locksmiths and stencil cutters, guns and ammunitions, 24 Laura. See p 233 Dodds Sutton B, mangr The Singer Mang Co, 30 Ocean Dodge H DeWitt, prop Tremont House. Seep 235 Bodillon Ch & Co, Charles Dodillon & Charles A Walters, ladies and gents dining rooms, 89 W Bay. See p 236 Doggett A, atty at law, 10 W Bay A. DOGGETT, ATTORNEY AT LAW, 10 W. BAY. Douglass Wm W, city editor Florida Daily Herald. Douglass James, jeweler, stationer and artists supplies, 29 E Bay ConfectionersÂ’ Supplies. J. B. REEDY, Grocer, and Importer of Fruit, Savannah, Ga,

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“We Guarantee our Prices. WM. KEHOE k CO., Irdn Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) Sugar Mills and Pans. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 25 I Drawdy R A, fish, oysters, meats, fruits, etc, Bay cor Bridge st Dreher Louis, barber, 93 W Bay Drew C Sr, State Immigration agt, Pine cor Forsythe Drew, Hazeltine & Livingston, Mellen W Drew, Benjamin P Hazeltine, and Theo H Livingston, lime, cement, plaster, hay, brick, and ice and boat agts, foot Laura. See p 230 Drew Horace, bookseller, stationer, printer, ruler, and bookbinder, 51 W Bay Dunne J J, vice pres Florida Land and Improvement Co. See p 253!. Durke James H, U S marshal Northern District Dupont Charlton, atty at law, room 4, 52^ W Bay. See p 240 Dzialynski John, cigar manfr, 50 and 52 W Bay Dzialynski Morris A, wholesale carriages, buggies, wagons, harness, and whips, State agent Courtland Wagon Co, Cortland, N Y, and Columbus Buggy Co, Cincinnati, O, 72 W Bay. See p 228. Eagan Dennis, collector Internal Revenue, Astor bldg Eells Thomas S, Marine Underwriters’ agt, i 8 j 4 W Bay Elliott Charles G, fancy grocer, wines and liquors, 69 W Bay Ellis R M, Ellis & McClure, and superintendent Jacksonville Water Works, Palmetto bldg Ellis & McClure, Robert N Ellis and Alfred E McClure, architects and civil engineers, room 12, Palmetto block. See p 231. El Modelo Cigar Manfg Co, cigar manfrs, G H Gato manager, 6 to 14 Reed’s blk Elmwood House, Geo A Hover propr, cor Hogan and Forsythe. See p 235 Ely Franklin W, Ely & Owen, and notary public, 64^ W Bay Ely Henry S, treas Florida Savings Bank and Real Estate Exchange. See p 232 Ely & Owen, Franklin W Ely and William B Owen, attys at law, insurance, real estate, conveyancing and collecting agency, 64^ W Bay Emery Alpheus S, contractor and builder, Adams st LaVilla Emery W N & Co, W N Emery, W T Simmons and George Emery, boots and shoes, leather and findings, 63 and 77 W Bay. See p 230 Eppinger& Russell, lumber and shingles, S F & W Ry whf Evans Edward T, engraver and watchmaker, Pine cor Adams Everett Hotel, J M Lee propr, W Bay cor J ulia Fair lie James M, drugs* paints, oils and colors, 22 Laura and East Jacksonville Drug Store, State agent for “Slug-shot” for orange groves and farm use. See cover lines and p 227 T he celebrated thistle dew whiskey is absolutely pure. S. GUCKENHEIMER k SON, SOLE AGENTS, SAVANNAH, GA.

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S., F. & W. Ey. SHORT QUICK IXKE t TIME. 252 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Fairchild Charles A, vice-pres First National Bank of Fla, residence Cedar Keys Falaney Charles, butcher, Duval st Farwell & Page, James A Farwell and Frederick H Page, whol and ret furniture, mattresses, &c, 18 and 20 E Bay Fenwick Charles B, genl frt and passgr agt DeBary-Baya Merchants Line. See p 33 Fernandez F, tailor and repairer, Pine st Fernandez John D, physician and surgeon, 2iJ^ W Bay Finnen Richard, grocer First National Bank of Florida, John Clark pres, C A Fairchild vice-pres, Jas M Schumacher cashier, R C Cooley asst cashier, Ocean cor Bay Fitzgerald Jas W, supt Peoples’ Line steamers Flattery Jonathan, physician, 39 W Bay Fleming Bros, Goode H and W P Fleming, grain and provision brokers and manfrs agts, 7 E Bay Fleming & Daniel, Louis I Fleming, James J Daniel and Francis P Fleming, attorneys at law, 52^ W Bay Fletcher Duncan U, attorney at law, Bay cor Pine Florida Collecting and Mercantile Agency, Richard J Clark manager, Room 7 Palmetto block Florida Central & Western R R, Wm O Ames general freight and pass agt, Wm M Davidson genl manager, T W Roby auditor and cashier, Walter G Coleman genl trav agt, offices Astor building. See p 23 Florida Churchman, Episcopal weekly, 21 W Bay Florida Daily Herald, Clark & Graves proprs, Bay cor Pine L’Engle block. See p 38 Florida Dispatch, Ashmead Bros publishers and proprs, 21 W Bay. See p 225 Florida Fence Co, A E Sawyer manager, 154 E Bay Florida Informer, J B Ley proprietor, 72 W Bay Florida Land and Improvement Co, Hamilton Disston pres, J J Dunne vice-pres, T H Asbury treas, R Salinger sec, W T Forbes manager Florida Land and Mortgage Co, 10 W Bay Florida Methodist Weekly, 21 W Bay Florida News Co, Telfair Stockton mangr Florida Palm Works, IT P Bradley prop, Pine st Florida Real Estate Exchange, W & W S Walker props. See p “226 Florida Savings Bank and Real Estate Exchange, J C Greeley pres, Henry S Ely sec. See p 232 Florida Ship Canal and Transit Co, J F LeBaron resident engineer, 7 E Bay VEGETABLES. Always on hand a full supply of the J. B. REEDY, Savannah, Ga. best.

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tbn'm W*11 XM'nvh 0F kUj KINDS FURNISHED BY JOHN ^ilVV 1IJL1J1 II III Si ROURKE, 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 253 Florida Steamship Co, H Gaiiland agt Florida Stove Pipe Mnfg Co, E D Rockwell supt, manfrs all kinds piping, Bay cor Cedar Florida Weekly Times The, Jones, Varnum & Co publishers Florida Workman Foster Geo R & Co, George R Foster, James A Marvin and Lawrance Haynes, ins agts, wholesale grain, hay, &c, and ship agts, 72 y 2 W Bay Foster Stephen E, atty and counsellor at law, First Nat Bank bldg, Bay cor Ocean Foster Fred E, prop St Marks Hotel. See p 235 Foster Wm L, agt Evaporative Milk Co, 80 W Bay Fox Samuel W, notary public, abstracts and conveyancing, E Bay st Freeland Mrs C, bdg, 35 Julia Fricker M E, harness and saddle mnfr, 12 W Bay Fridenberg Henry P, Florida curiosities, trunks, &c, 15 W Bay Fries A F & Co, Alexander P Fries and German drug store and chemists, 5 E Bay. See adv Fritot, H M, cigars and tobacco, 27 E Bay Gahagan Thomas, registry elk postoffice DISSTON PURCHASE 4,000,000 ACRES! FLORIDA LAND AND IMPROVEMENT COMPANY. HAMILTON DISSTON, President. T. H. ASBURY, Treasurer. J. J. DUNNE, Vice-President. R. SALINGER, Secretary. Lands for Sale at Government Price of S 1 .2 5 per Acre IN BLOCKS OF NOT LESS THAN 80 NOR MORE THAN 640 ACRES. W. T. FORBES, • Land Commissioner, Jacksonville, Fla. A. & G. C. C, AMD OKEECHOBEE LAND COMPANY. LANDS FOR SALE IN LOTS OF FROM 40 TO 10,000 ACRES, In the Counties of BREVARD, POLK, MANATEE and MONROE. W. T. FQREES, Land Commissioner, Jacksonville, Fla. 200,000 -A-OIRIES Choicest Location for Residence and Cultivation of Oranges, Lemons, Pineapples, Bananas, Cocoanuts, Etc., In the Counties of ORANGE, BREVARD, SUMTER, POLK, HILLSBOROUGH, MANATEE and MONROE. W. T. FORBES, Manager, Jacksonville, Fla. T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is distilled from the choicest qualities of Grain. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga.

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s, f & w. By. 254 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Gailliard Henry, agt Fla S S Co Garrett, Bowen & Van Buren, Geo W Garrett, J C Bowen and E R Van Buren, whol & ret hardware, stoves and tinware, paints, oils, doors, sash and blinds, harness and saddlery, plumbers, &c, 58 and 60 W Bay Gates John B, collector TimesUnion Gato Gabriel H, manager El Modelo Cigar Mnfg Co Gee Mrs B W, 35 E Forsythe Genovar Frank, grocer Gerow D T, manager ChessCarley Co, Bay cor Cedar Gibbons William A, butcher, Pine cor Church Gibbs Thomas V, prin Oakland Colored Graded School Gibson & Horning, James A Gibson and Martin H Horning, genl com mers, packers and shippers Florida oranges, fruits, &c, 105 W Bay Gifford Wendell P, notary public and bkkpr Fla Land and Improvement Co Gilbert W A, lock and gunsmith, 28 Hogan Gilchrist George G, accountant, Bay s e cor Pine Gillen E W, butcher, City Market Gillen J H, supt Arctic Ice Co. See p 232. Gleason, W H, saw and planing mill, EauGallie, Fla Gleason W H & Co, William H Gleason and attorneys in land cases and Spanish grants, 22 E Bay Goff Geo D, contractor and builder, Newman cor Ashley Gonzales A, cigar manfr, East Jacksonville Gonzales Manuel, cigars and confectionery, 33 E Bay Gould & Co, Frank J Gould, fertilizers and fertilizer materials, and commission merchants, 58 W Bay Grand View House, G W Smith propr, cor Clay & Forsythe. See p 227 Graves John T, Clark & Graves, and editor and chief of staff Florida Daily Herald Gregor J, engraver Greely J E, pres Fla Savings & Real Estate Exchange. See p 232 Green John D, restaurant, rear 8 and 10 E Bay Greenleaf D & Co, Damon Greenleaf, John W Pomeroy and Joseph H Crosby Jr, watches, clocks, jewelry and curiosities, 9 W Bay Griffin Geo B, real estate a^d loan agts, notary publi W Bay Griffin J I & Co, J I Griffin, and importers wholesale and retail drugs and chemicals, mnfrs Florida pine cough syrup and patent elastic selfsealing caps for vials and bottles, Bay cor Laura. See p 238 Grimme E C, genl mdse, Bay cor Hawk Grunthal I & H, whol grocers, 95 and 97 W Bay Guillemin Chas, carpenter and builder When you want Strictly Choice Fruit, at bottom prices, send your orders to J. B. REEDY, Savannah, G-a.

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Qlldflr Milk Anri Pam 0ur heading Specialty. WM. KEHOE & CO., Tron Ullgdl lulllu Uilu I Cllloi Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 255 Gumbinger J, watchmaker and jeweler and optician, 79 W Bay. See p 234 Gustarella Leopold, barber, 17 E Bay Gwynn & Hull, Walter Gwynn and Noble A Hull, real estate agts, 31 Laura Halifax & Indian River Steamboat Line, C D Smith pres, Ti Jackson sec and treas, Coats agt linnie, clothing and ^ciiib furnishing goods, 37 W Bay Hallows William A, grocer, 14 E Bay Hamilton Simon c oysters, Market sqr Hardee L A, nurseryman Harkisheimer & Co, W J Harkisheimer and grocer, 55 W Bay Harman, Putzel & Co, William N Harman, Lehman Putzel and poultry, fruits, &c, 22 Ocean Harn James L, atty and counsellor at law, 5 J 4 E Bay Harrison James, barber, 39 W Bay Harrison Zeph, civil engineer and surveyor, 7 E Bay Hart J E, wholesale flour, grist, meal, grain, seeds, and fertilizers, grist mill and elevator, 22 W Bay Hartridge J E, lawyer, 7*^ Bay Hartridge Madison L, city tax collector and manager City Transfer Co, and City and Club Stables, office 22 W Bay. See p 239. Hartridge Theodore, whol grocer and fertilizers, near 14 E Bay Hazen W H, saloon and pool, 33 Hogan Hearn A, justice of the peace, 4 y 2 W Bay Helper Hinton A, staff correspondent Florida Daily Herald Henry & Heintz, Geo Henry and Geo E Heintz, proprs Star Bottling Works, cor Bay and Julia. See page 238 Henandez S F & Son, Francis S and Joseph E Hernandez, cigar makers, 663 Duval Herron J H, fruits and confectionery, 32 Hogan Hess Geo A, boot and shoe maker, 26 Newman Higgins Edwin, collector customs, 52 y 2 W Bay Hoefer & Forkert, L F Hoefer and R E Forkert, proprs New Era Brewery. See P 237 Hoey James A, contractor and builder Holleyman A T, manfr baking powders Hollinger A Clifford, furnishing goods, boots and shoes, 97 W Bay HoltÂ’s Pharmacy, Mrs M T Holt, drugs and medicines, 31 W Bay Hopkins Edward H, genl solicing agt DeBary-Baya MerchantsÂ’ Line Hopkins E & Co, Edward and Cariolanus Hopkins, genl mdse and com merchants, 50 W Bay |HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY possesses an excellent bouquet. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.

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FAST MAIL TRAINS THROUGH WITH BUT FEW STOPPING POINTS. 8., F. & W. Ry. 256 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Hopkins & Co, orange growers, packers and shippers, Laura street Howe Theodore L, propr Delmonico dining hall, 29 Laura Huau & Co, Joseph Huau and cigar manfr, 36 WBay Hubbard S B & Co, Samuel B Hubbard and hardware, stoves, piping, doors, sash, blinds, paints, oils, etc, W Bay Hudnall E Mrs, propr St. Johns House, 41 Forsythe Huff A E, commission and genl mdse, 58 W Bay Hughes Benjamin L, chemist and druggist, opp St James Hotel Hughes George, chemist and druggist, 1 W Bay and 507 Madison ave, N Y Hughes Wm D, clerk St Johns River Fast Day Line Hungerford Alfred L, general business mangr Leve & Alden Hunter G & Son, Dexter Hunter and saw and planing mill, foot E Bay Hunter Wilson It, Barrs & Hunter, and notary public, 49 W Bay Hurter W & Co, William Hurter and Sherman Conant, genl com mers, whol grocers, hay and grain, 18 W Bay Hussey Albert B, grocer and com mer, 14 W Bay Hussey Theodore F, frt clerk Sou Exp Co Industrial Machine Works, Frank R Pond propr. See P 238 International Ocean Tel Co, J G Thornton supt, D J Crowley manager Itjen William H, grocer, Hogan cor Ashley Ives Albert M, agt S F & W Ry Co Jackson William, sec and treas Halifax & Indian River Steamboat Line Jacksonville Hotel, Shad Bros proprs, Bay cor Julia. See p 233 Jacksonville Library Association, J Q Burbridge pres, H H Buckman sec, C S Mead treas, Adams cor Laura Jacksonville, St Augustine & Halifax River Ry Co, W L Crawford treas and genl manager, St Augustine ; H S Ming supt, G D Ackerly genl frt and passenger agt, offices rear postoffice. See P 32 Jacksonville, Tampa & Key West Ry, Wm VanFleet pres, G W Bentley genl manager, W R Moran genl pass and frt agt, genl offices Astor bldg Jacksonville Transfer Co, M L Hartridge mangr, 22 W Bay, See p 239 Jacksonville Water Works, R N Ellis engineer and supt, Palmetto bldg Jacobs Lionel, saloon, 6 E Bay Jeacle W & Co, William Jeacle shoe mkr, Pine cor Adams Jobson E E & Co, E E Jobson & druggists, Julia cor Church LEMONS LhmAl ™X^ hmse J. B. REEDY, Savannah, Ga.

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Ql WJ1] AND PANS OP ALL SIZES, MADE BY JOHN k3llgt!i I'-illlOj ROURKE, 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, GrA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 257 Johnson Charles W, homeopathist physician Johnson Glen S c blacksmith, Cedar st Johnson Perry E, homeopathist physician, Astor bldg Jones Charles H, Jones, Varnum & Co and editor TimesUnion Jones Geo W, Jones, Varnum & Co, business manager TimesUnion Jones J N, dentist, Palmetto block Bay st Jones Loton M, atty at law and notary public, ro W Bay Jones Peter, boat yard Jones, Varnum & Co, Charles H Jones, John P Varnum, and George W Jones, publishers Daily Times-Union, Florida Weekly Times and Sunday Times-Union, W Bay Jones William, clerk St Johns River Fast Day Line Jones & Bowen, Eobert H Jones and Daniel Bowen, wholesale and retail grocers, 30 W Bay. See p 238. Jones & Verill, Henry R Jones and Leroy Verill, wall paper, window shades, paper hangers, and painters, 23 Laura. See p 236. Joost John, manager Bergner & Engel Brewing Co, 78 W Bay Joost Nicholson, grocer. Pine corner Beaver Jordan Manuel C, atty at law and notary public, i 8 j 4 W Bay Kaufman Julius, china, glass, and queensware, 28 Ocean Keene 0 L, millinery, fancy and dress goods, 67 W Bay. See p 239. Kennedy D H, notary public, conveyancer, surveyor, and civil engineer, 71^ W Bay Kenworthy Chas, T physician, Market cor Duval Kiley Thomas, grocer Kissimmee Land Co. See page 253 Knape & Son, Henry H and Ferdinand E Knape, upholsterers and cabinet makers, 101 Pine Knight Fraser S, clerk Southern Express Co Koehler Hilmar, artist, 31 W Bay Koerner Peter W 0, civil engineer and surveyor, 10 W Bay. See p 232 Kohn, Furchgott & Benedict, M Kohn, Hermann, Max and Leopold Furchgott and C Benedict, wholesale and retail dry goods, carpets, mattings, millinery, clothing, hats, etc, W Bay cor Pine L’Engle EM & W J, Edward M and Wm J L’Engle, attorneys at law, 70^ W Bay L’Engle Frank F, mayor of La Villa L’Engle F F & Son, Francis and Porcher L’Engle, attorneys at law, 71% W Bay L’Engle John C, drugs, coal, tow and tug boats, Pine cor Bay Lamm Joseph T, ticket agent 57 W Bay Lampkin George T, dentist, 17% W Bay OnHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is soft and mellow to the taste. •*S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GrA. 32

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S., F. & W. Ry. w ™ E “LISgSi: INE 258 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Landson C J, fruits, City Market Law Wm, attorney at law and notary public, iS }4 W Bay LeEaron J Francis, resident engineer Fla Ship Canal & Transit Co, 7 E Bay Ledwith Wm M, postmaster and notary public Lee Jos E c deputy collector and inspector customs, 52 x / 2 W Bay Leite & Bro, Paul J & Octavio J Leit, grocers, 80 E Bay Leve & Alden, Gustav Leve & Henry PAlden, tourist ticket agts, A L Hungerford genl business manager, Bay cor Ocean Ley John B, publisher Florida Informer, 72 W Bay Lilienthal Henry, grocer and saloon, corner „ Julia and Adams Lindsay George, blacksmith, cor Cedar and Monroe Linn John, dentist, 5 E Bay Littlefield Howard, asst night editor Times-Union Livingston Charles 0, whol and ret furniture, picture frames, &c, 24 and 26 Laura. See p 229 Livingston Jno, physician, 41 y 2 W Bay Lockwood W & Co, Wm Lockwood & Fred G Ashley, whol produce and com mrs, 36 E Bay Lofton George, mail elk P O Lohman Louis, grocer and baker, 4 E Bay Long Wm, genl mdse, East Jacksonville Lucas Nick, grocer, cor Cedar and Monroe Lucus Wm H, Fla agt Georgia Central R R and Banking Co, 15 W Bay Lueders H C, grocer and meat market, 92 Cedar McCallum Archibald, grocer and meat market, Hogan cor Church McConihe George L, hardware, stoves, tinware, paints, oils, doors, sash and blinds, and builders’ materials, 42 W Bay McCormick W H, State representative MeCuen E B, local ticket agent Florida Central and Western R R McDonald E A Mrs, grocer, 231 E Bay McDonald F, tailor, 29 Hogan McDonald Moses c, restaurant and saloon, Bridge street McDonell Thaddeus A, lawyer, 1 7% W Bay McGinnis Joseph H, propr St. James’s stables, 81 Hogan McGuire James A, contractor and builder Mclnnis Daniel M c, tailor and repairer, Pine street McLaughlin Bichard, president St. Johns Ry, Astor building. See back paster McMurray Patrick A, carriage and wagon manufr and dealer, Pine corner Church. See p 239 McMurray Thomas, livery and sales stable, Newman corner Forsythe Florida Oranges Consign your Oranges to J. B. REEDY, the largest Dealer in FRUIT in Georgia at SAVANNAH.

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Sugar Mills and Pans. Onr Pans are Smooth and Uniform in Thickness. WM. KETlOE & CO., Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 259 McQuaid P, wholesale grain, hay, flour, grits, meal and meats, and State agt Baker & Bros fertilizers, 44 and 46 W Bay MacDuff Wm A, contractor and builder MacLellan Geo B, justice of the peace and notary public McLean W A, judge Duval co Mackey J I, jeweler and curiosities, 45 W Bay Mahoney Jennie Mrs, palmetto hat manfr and jewelry, 26 Hogan Mahoney C, contractor and builder, 26 Hogan Marion F, cigars, fruits and confectionery, 89 W Bay Mallett C H, physician, 17 % W Bay Mallory Steamship Line, John Rich genl South passgr agt, 88 W Bay Marcy J C Jr, J C Marcy & Son and justice of the peace, 64 W Bay Marcy J C & Son, J C & J C Marcy Jr, attys at law, 64 W Bay Marean Charles L, grocer and meats, Laura cor Ashley Markens Geo W, wines, liquors and cigars, 87 W Bay Marryday L H & Co, Lew H & William A Marryday, Palatka, Fla, pianos, organs and musical mdse, 31 W Bay Marvin Charles & Co, Charles & John L Marvin, boots and shoes, 7 E Bay MACKEYÂ’S FLORIDA CURIOSITY BAZAR. JIWELER mi IK CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY IS ABSOLUTELY PURE. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, SOLE AGENTS, SAVANNAH, GA.

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S„ F. & W. Ry. FREIGHT IN THROUGH CARS, IN FAST TRAINS, WITHOUT TRANSFER. 260 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Marvin John L, Ambler, Marvin & Stockton Marvin Wm, asst ticket agt S F & W Ry Co Marvin & Bisbee, Robert S Marvin and C R Bisbee, drayage, 72 W Bay Mason Harry, saloon, W Bay Masters R T, stoves, housefurnishing goods, tin, copper, and sheet iron worker and roofing, 31 Hogan Mattair House, Mrs M A Mattair propr, W Forsythe between Ocean and Pine. See page 235. Mattair Mrs M A, prop Mattair House, W Forsythe bet Ocean and Pine. See p 235. Meek Almon R, atty at law, notary public, and U S commissioner, 10 W Bay Melton Stephen H, restaurant whol fish, oysters, &c, Central whf Mercier J A, ticket agt Sea Island Route, 1 Bay Merrill Jas G, blacksmith, 763 E Bay Merrill & Bro, James E and Alexander R Merrill, boiler makers and blacksmiths, 154 E Bay Metropolitan Opera House, Jos Carlisle manager, Bay opp postoffice Meyer & Muller, Claus Meyer and Gustave Muller, wholesale and retail grocers, provisions, liquors, Bay cor Ocean Meyerson M, jeweler, 24 Hogan Middleton W A, butcher Miller C A & Co, Charles A and whol com mers, packers and forwarders Florida oranges, and dealers in fertilizers, foot Newnan st. See P 231 Mills & Co, Thornton A Mills and com mers, fruit and vegetable shippers, Roots Wharf Ming Heron S, supt Jacksonville, St Augustine and Halifax River Ry Co Mitchell J D & Neal, physicians, Forsythe Mitchell & DeWaal, John S Mitchell and Charles M DeWaal, photographers, 77 and 97 W Bay Moody E F Jr, teller Florida Savings Bank Moran M XL, genl frt and passgr agt Jacksonville, Tampa and Key West Ry, Astor bldg Moss Charles H, cigars, tobacco and fruits, 32 Laura Moulie Eugene, manfr extract perfumery, 32 Hogan. See p 238 Mulford E A & Co, E A Mulford and Alfred C Lauphere, Railroad ticket brokers, 27 W Bay Mmnby, Stockton & Knight, Frank W Mumby, John N C Stockton and Raymond D Knight, crockery, china, glass, earthen, wooden and willow wares, house furnishing goods, &c, 13 W Bay. See p 234 Murphy H Ernest, agt Wanamaker & Brown, 31 Laura Foreip Dried and Green Fruit and Importer of Fruit, Savannah, G-a.

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25th YE Alt 25th YEAR. MOORE’S BUSINESS UNIVERSITY AND ENGLISH TRAINING SCHOOL, BUILDINGS Nos. 26 & 28 EAST ALABAMA ST. A kTLAliTf A, G A A STANDARD INSTITUTION. A SCHOOL FOR THE TIMES. The Business World in Miniature. Students daily on change. No copying from books. The science of accounts exemplified by daily transactions between the students. Actual business from the day a student enters. The largest and best equipped business school in the South, supplied with every facility for qualifying young and middle-aged men for the duties of active business life, in the shortest possible time and the least expense. Send for circulars, terms, etc. 5J v A NEW REVISED EDITION NOW READY. An Elegant Present for any one “To the teacher of General History it is invaluable.” My children knew more of history after three months with Adams’ Chart than I did when I graduated from college.— Rev. T. A. McCurdy D. D., Wooster, 0. It is a text-book — a library of history — a panorama — and a picture gallery. — Rev. J. H. Vincent D. D. I wish that every teacher of Sabbath or day school, every parent and every scholar could have access to one of these Charts.— Pansy {Mrs. G. R. Alden). It is a most capital help for Sabbath school teachers.— Rev. F. N. Peloubet, author of Notes on the International S. S. Lessons. Thousands in use in schools and families. It enables one to fix in the mind the general order of events. It enables one to definitely LOCATE, in time, Individual Events. It enables one to SEE the CONTEMPORARY EVENTS of any period, as in a picture. PRICES. On Hollers, (turned by cranks, and occupying such space on the wall as may be desired) for Families and Schools $15.00 In Portfolio Form, for table use 15.00 In Book Form 10.00 Send for Descriptive Circular. Not found in Book Stores anywhere. Address only COLBY & CO., Publishers, 5 Union Square, N, Y. Note.— Any one ordering this Chart, and mentioning this Gazetteer, will receive $1.00 discount from the above prices. Agents wanted at once for every County in Florida.

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FRANK NOONEY. CHARLES A. NOONEY. THOMAS NOONEY & SONS, WHOLESALE MAEKET SQXTAIRE, JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 38 MORRISON ST., NEW YORK.

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T?| j | i GIVEN ON ALL KINDS OF MACHINERY AND REPAIRS by JOHN ItOUIlKE 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 26 l Murphy Jas G, grocer, 173 Julia Murphy Timothy, blacksmith and machinist, 160 E Bay New Era Brewery, XIoefer and Forkent proprs. See p 237 New York Clothing Co, clothing, hats, furnishing goods, P Fischler mangr, 3 and 5 E Bay Newcomb Wm, dentist, 1 1 W Bay Niles John N, physician, 71 W Bay Noland J F, druggist and physician, 94 W Adams Noland J F Mrs, boarding, 94 W Adams Nooney Thomas & Sons, Frank & Charles A Nooney, wholesale produce and com mers, Market sqr, Jacksonville and 38 Morrison st, N Y. See advt Norris George H, orange grower, packer and shipper, S F & W Ry whf Norton Fred E, State agt Caligraph Writing Machine, 1 Bay n w cor Ocean Norton John H, genl agt fire, life, marine and accident ins, notary and commissioner of deeds, Bay cor Ocean O’Neal J110, saw and planingmill Oak Byron E, furnishing undertaker and marble and granite dealer, 25 Laura. See back cover Oltrowge H, pressman TimesUnion Only John E c, contractor and builder Ortagus John, restaurant, 33 E Bay ESTABLISHED 1856. BYRON £. OAK, 25 LAURA STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLA. EMBALMING DONE. CL;y~ Sexton and Snpevintend-eiit o Cemeteries. m™ AGENT FOR IRON RAILING, FANCY IRON WORK, MANTELS, GRATES, Ac. mHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY possesses an excellent bouquet. A S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.

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S, F. & W. Ry. PULLMAN SLEEPING CAR SERVICE between ALL IMPORTANT POINTS. 262 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Owston J G Miss, artist, 37^ E Bay Owens A W, Jacksonville State atty Paine Bros, John B and James H Paine, whol produce, butter, flour, teas, coffees and tobacco and cigars, 32 W Bay Parro John T, chief engineer Peoples Line steamers Pattisoxi H A, lawyer and notary public, 70 Ashley Peoples Line Steamers, W Bay Perry Frederick A, botanic physician, W Forsythe near Ocean Persian Art Co, $ 5}4 W Bay Peters Charles, whol & ret Northern meats, City Market. See p 239 Peterson William R, painter and dealer in painters supplies, Fosters lane Pillow William H, orange packer and shipper and com mer, S F & W Ry. See p 229 Pittman William C, guns, cutlery and ammunition, 3 W Bay Platt Harmon, grocer and liquors, Duval cor Liberty Poetting Chas F, grocer, fruits, &c, 99 Pine Poggenburg George, sec and treas DeBary-Baya Merchants Line Ponce Joseph, grocer, 97 Ocean Ponce & Platte, Joseph Ponce and Henry Platte, grocers, Washington st Pond Frank R, propr Industrial Machine Work. See p 232 Post C H, general agt St Johns River Fast Day Line. See p 24 Powell Hugh G, grocer and genl com mer, 29 W Bay Powers M, grocer and dry goods, 5 Bridge street Price S M & P, genl mdse, Bay cor Bridge Price A c, cigars and billiards, cor Clay Puetz Arnold, florist, plants, seeds and nurseryman. See top cover lines and page 239 Quackenbush Leslie R, physician, 43 W Bay Quelch W H, painter, 5 Abbott blk Ragan J Hampton, asst manager Randall E M, chief justice State supreme court Ranson John, night editor Times-Union Rebston Albert M, intelligence office, 12 Forsythe Register & Farrew, Jno R Register and Joseph C Farrew, genl mdse, East Jacksonville Reynolds George R, grocer, 41 E Bay Rice Marshall C. com merchant, and wholesale grain, hay, hominy, meal and coffee, 74 W Bay Rich John, genl South passenger agt Mallory Steamship line and State agt John Merryman & CoÂ’s fertilizers, 88 W Bay Rich Wm, gem cigar store, 15 W Bay Rigney E, saloon, 95 W Bay BANANAS. I am the only Importer of Red and Yellow Bananas in State. J. B. REEDY, Savannah, Ga. lie

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Sugar Mills and Paas. A full Stock of all Sizes. WM. KB HOE & CO., Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 263 Ritzewoller S, dry goods, carpets, oil cloths, mattings and clothing, wholesale 64 and 66 and 73 W Bay retail Rivas & Koopman, Jos Rivas and Henry Koopman, bakers and grocers, 19 W Bay Roberts T E, grocer, 124 Pine Robinson H & Go, Henry Robinson, wholesale druggists, paints, oils and glass, 75 W Bay. See p 239 Robinson Galvin L, G L Robinson & Son, and U S commissioner, U S shipping commissioner, and notary public, 64 W Bay Robinson C L & Son, Calvin L and Edward I Robinson, attorneys at law, 64^ W Bay Roby Thomas W, auditor and cashier Florida Central & Western R R, Astor bldg Roche John B, wholesale and retail grocer, 8 W Bay Rockwell E D, supt Florida Stone Pipe Manfg Co, Bay cor Cedar Rockwell & Woodall, Albert F Rockwell and Frank M Woodall, genl com mers and packers and shippers Florida fruits, vegetables, &c, 6 W Bay Rohrer J B, boarding, 127 W Forsythe Root William, hay, grain, and feed, and com mer, and genl agt Armour & Co, of Chicago Russell Albert J, county supt of public schools, 2iJ^ W Bay Russell James S, agt Southern Express Co St James Hotel, J R Campbell propr, Duval cor Laura St James Pharmacy, Benj L Hughes propr, opp St James hotel St James Stables, J H McGinnis propr, 81 Hogan St Johns House, Mrs E Hudnall propr, 41 Forsythe St Johns Railway of Elorida, Richard McLaughlin pres, F M Clark genl fgt and pass agt, Tocoi, genl offices Astor Bldg. See back paster St Johns River East Day Line, C V H Post genl agt. See page 24 St Johns & Lake Eustis Ry, office 74 W Bay St Mark’s Hotel, Fred E Foster propr, Bay cor Newnan. See page 235 Sav, Ela & Western Ry Co, ticket office Bay cor Hogan, general offices Savannah, Ga. See top lines Sawyer A E, manager Elorida Fence Co, 154 E Bay Schnabel George E, fire, life, marine and accident insurance agt, i8j^ W Bay Schumacher Jas M, cashier First National Bank of Fla, Ocean cor Bay Scofield E H, mnfr palmetto hats, and agent Domestic Household and New Home sewing machines, 73 W Bay Searing S G, local agent St Johns River Fast Day Line Seavey Charles, genl mdse, 80 Julia 1 1HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is distilled from the choicest • qualities of Grain. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga.

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S, F. & W. Ry. Elegant Passenger Equipments; Westingliouse Air Brakes; Miller Platforms; Janey Couplers. 264 FRORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Sedgwick William, wheelwright and blacksmith, 134 Adams Settle Thomas, judge U S district court Northern District Shad Bros, SF&H C Shad, proprs Jacksonville Hotel and grocers, Bay cor Julia. See P 233 Shane Mary L Mrs, art stores Shepherd A, shoemaker, Forsythe Sherlock Thomas, Sherlock & Getchell, and notary public, 84 Forsythe. See page 232 Sherlock & Getchell, Thos Sherlock and Edward L Getchell, real estate agts, 84 Forsythe. Seep 232 Simkin Richard G, restaurant and confectionery, 11 EBay Simpson William H Jr, general mdse broker, 32 W Bay Sister Island^ Fertilizer Works, W W Stowe propr, office 12 W Bay. See p 265 Skilton Bros, James A & Louis A Skilton, cane manfrs, 32 Laura Slager Julius, auction and commission merchant, dry goods, &c, 52 Bay. Seep 233 Sledge C A Mrs, propr Sledge House, 14 W Monroe. See p 240 Sledge House, Mrs C A Sledge propr, 14 W Monroe. See p 240 Smith Charles A, mdse broker, 32 W Bay Smith C D, pres Halifax & Indian River Steamboat Line Smith Daniel P, State and county tax assessor Smith Francis E, New York Laundry, Bay cor Liberty Smith G W propr Grand View House and State agt for MarvinÂ’s safes and FairbankÂ’s standard scales, Forsythe cor Clay. See p 227 Smith H B, watchmaker and jeweler, 9 E Bay Smith Joshua, grocer Smith Toney c, blacksmith, Adams cor Catharine Smith & Bukos, J S Smith Jr & Frederick J Dubos, produce com mers, grain, meal, butter, poultry and eggs, foot of Newnan. See p 234 Smucker C C, clerk Southern Express Co Solary Antonio, grocer and com mer and saloon, 34 E Bay Sollee Frank C, assistant P M Southern Bell Telephone Co, J G Thornton superintendent, Bay cor Ocean Southern Express Co, James S Russell agent, Bay street Speer Eugene E, trav agt and correspondent Times-Union Spence W A, physician, Duval cor Ocean Staples F E & Co, painters, 156 E Bay Star Bottling Works, (Henry & Heintz proprs. See p 238 Stein Lawrence, baker, 39 E Bay Stephens Louis I, watchmaker, jewelry, and Florida curiosities, 27 and 29 W Bay Stiles Wm A, watchmaker and jeweler, 31 W Bay COCOANUTS J. B. REEDY IS THE ONLY IMPORTER IN SAVANNAH, G-A.

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John Rourke, AND AGRICULTURAL iron and brass works, 2 BAY STREET, SAVANNAH, GA. BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 265 Stimpson & Devnell, E Crosby Stimpson and Geo A Devnell proprs The Carleton, E Bay cor Market Stockton JohnL, Ambler, Marvin & Stockton Stockton Telfair, manager Fla News Co, Jacksonville Stockton & Stribling, Thos T Stockton and T E Stribling, wholesale and retail boots and shoes, leather findings, 47 W Bay. See p 228 Stone & Co, successors to T Davis & Co, wholesale candy manfrs, 32 Ocean. See p 240 Stout Dr, homeopathic physician, 41 pine Stowe Walter W, fertilizer manfr, office 12 W Bay Streely S H Mrs, boarding 124 W Forsythe Sturges L C Mrs, boarding 130 E Forsythe Sullivan J F, fish and oysters, Bay st Sumners Owen J H, atty at law and city atty, 36^ W Bay Sunday Times-Union The, Jones, Varnum &Co pubs Sunnyside Hotel, S M Hall propr, Forsythe cor Cedar Sutherland James H, whol and retail grocer, fruits and com mer, 1 and 3 W Forsythe Taylor’s European House, G W Taylor propr, 89 to 9S W Bay Taylor George W, passenger agt Associated Railroads of Va & Carolinas, 49 W Bay Taylor G W, European Hotel, 1 01 W Bay The Daily Times-Union, Jones, Varnum & Co publishers, 52 to 54 W Bay The Duval, Mclver & Baker proprs, cor Forsythe and Hogan The Singer Mnfg Co, S B Dodds manager, 30 Ocean Thompson S C, deputy collector Int Revenue, Astor bldg ^ c *sonville For Building and Fertilizing, IN BULK OR IN BARRELS. — ALSO— G^ouyf) so;K< -AND— Bone Potasli Fertilizers, Especially adapted to Florida. —MANUFACTURED AT — Sister Island Fertilizer forte, Ml and v Fla., W. W. STOWE, Proprietor. — office15 West Bay St., Jacksonville, Fla. Send for Prices that defy competition. HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY possesses an excellent bouquet. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents. SAVANNAH, GA. 33

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Q TP W T? V The Preferred Route O.J-C.OO VV.^J. isr-i-o FLORIDA.^ 266 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Thornton J G, supt W U Tel Co Tibbitt S L, seeds and com mer, 2 E Bay Times-Union, The Daily and Sunday, Jones, Varnum & Co publishers, 52 to 54 W Bay Tischler P, manager New York Clothing Co, 3 and 5 E Bay Togni John B, wines, liquors and billiard saloon, 17 and 19 E Bay Toll Albert C, cake baker and restaurant, 78 E Bay Tourists Steamboat Line, H Gailliard agt Townsen James F, grocer, 155 E Bay Tremont Mouse, H I) Dodge propr, Pine cor Forsythe. See p 235 Treveres J J, architect and civil engineer; Pine cor Forsythe Trujillo Genaro, cigars and tobacco, 14 Pine Trumpeller D W, merchant tailor, 51 W Bay Tucker Louisa Miss, prin Jacksonville White Grammar School Tucker & Pearce, W W Tucker & O W Pearce, drugs and medicines, Bay cor Hogan Tugby Thomas, whol and ret Florida curiosities, fancy goods and manfr alligator teeth, 37 E Bay Turner Michael P, sec Peoples Line Steamers and agts, sec S, F & W Ry Co Tygert J E & Co, fertilizer manfrs, 22 W Bay Tyler John F, grocer, Pine cor Ashley Tysen & Smith, J R Tysen & C B Smith, whol flour, grain and feed, lime, cement, plaster and builders materials and steamboat agts, foot of Ocean. See p 234 Vanderpool Eugene, fish, Market sar VanDoornum Cornelius, confectioner, 31 and 75 W Bay Varnum John P, Jones, Varnum & Co, and city editor TimesUnion Varty Mary C Mrs, dry goods and notions, 33 W Bay Veach Harry, mdse broker and State agt Evansville Pump Co, 22 E Bay Verelst Charles F, deputy State and county tax collector VonGlahn John, grocer VonGlahn Nicholas, grocer & liquors, 128 Pine and Julia cor State Waffner Frank, cigar manfr, 13 1 Bay Wakefield A J, physician, 61 Ocean Walker H S, dry goods and millinery Walker John T and Geo U, attorneys and counsellors at law, Bay cor Ocean Walker William S, notary public, 68 W Bay Walker W & W S, Whitfield and W S Walker, Fla real estate, 68 W Bay. See p 226 Wallace Robinson, freight agt L & N R R Wallace & Cashen, Alexander Wallace and Thos V Cashen, saw and planing mill, E Jacksonville B H AAflir SAVANNAH, GA handles more FLORIDA ORANGES • J&eeuy, THAN ANY HOUSE SOUTH. TRY HIM.

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Qndfll 1 WHIIq flllfj PjniQ All our Mills are fully warranted. WM. KEHOE & CIO., Uligdl ltiliiu dilU I (XUoi Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 267 Walzer R, variety store, 53 W Bay Wamboldt Nelson C, fruits and curiosities, 22 E Bay Ward Mella L Mrs, firstclass private board, Julia cor Forsythe. See p 240 Warrock & Co, manfrs candies and fruit preservers, 29 Pine Watson Arthur G, fruits, 5 Pine Watson Charles H, local ticket agent DeBary-Baya MerchantsÂ’ Line, 58 W Bay Watson William B Captain, genl manager DeBary-Baya MerchantsÂ’ Line Waycross Short Line, S F & W Ry Co, office Bay cor Hogan. See top lines Webber John, butcher, Bay cor Hawk Webster Norman, physician, 20 E Bay Webster Wilbur P, druggist Weller Horace L, watchmaker and jeweler, 25 E Bay. See p Wells Thomas B, bkkpr Florida, Central & Western R R Weiskoff Harry, paints, oils, varnishes, glass, &c, 40 W Bay West W H, sign painter, Julia cor Adams Western Union Telegraph Co, J G Thornton supt, D J Crowley manager, cor Pine and Bay Wethington Pinckney F, notary public, Times-Union bldg Wheeler & Wilson Manfg Co, F W Churchouse manager, 31 W Bay Whetmore G W, State representative Whistler W S, contractor and builder Wightman & Christopher, William S Wightman and John G Christopher, wholesale grocers, cotton factors, and ship agts, 16 W Bay Wightman F V & Co, Frank V Wightman and William M Sommerville, produce and com mers, 8 Hogan Wiginton John B, physician and surgeon, E Bay Williams Edward, fruits, East Jacksonville Williams H c, shoemaker, 25 Hogan Wilson George E, State agt Bradley Fertilizer Co, office 15 W Bay. See front fold on State map Wilson G C & Co, George C Wilson and estate H C Richard, whol and ret grocers and provisions, 4 W Bay Wilson G W, carpet upholsterer and decorator, 5 W Forsythe Wilson James W, physician, Braught cor Forsythe Wilson & Bro, George S & Jas Y Wilson, dry goods, boots, shoes and saddlery, 10 E Bay Wilson & Hunting, saw mill Wilson & Parker, Thos M Wil son & Geo M Parker, brokers, commission merchants, hay, grain, flour and provisions, 7 E Bay Windsor Hotel, Laura opp Park Witschen John D, whol grocer, 76 and W Bay mHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is soft and mellow to the taste. A s. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.

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a V Jir W Bv Florida Bispatoli, 1 • ^ n • Fast Freiglit Lin. 268 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Wright Augustus O, genl Fla agts New York Life Ins Co, Times-Union bldg Yates Walter R, atty and counselor at law, room 4 First National Bank bldg, Bay cor Ocean Young William B, atty and counsellor at law, 7 E Bay Youngs George, architect and builder, 20 E Bay Zacharias Aaron, clothing and furnishing goods, 17 W Bay Land Owners — Jno N Alison, Alsop & Clark, A Anderson, J C Anderson agt, J Anderson, S Anderson, C H Ashmead, J T Bacon, James Bagley, Emile Bagwell, James M Baker, James Barbour, H M Barrett, A W Barrs, Jas Bartley, E Barrs agt, Thos Basnet, Albt Batchelder, Chas M Batchelder, Isaac H Batchelder, J F Baya, H T Baya, Prince Bayard, R Bland, Lydia J Bebee, J S Bell, Mary Benevaris, George R Bennett, Eliza C Benton, Francis Bennett, Fred Bettilini, J L Betters, A J Bidwell, Eugene Bigelow, Horatio Bisbee Jr, Milton C Blair, Wm M Bostwick, Uriah Bowden, James M Bradberry, Lewis Braddock, Sandy Brien, Chas J Britz, Geo E Bryson Hiram N Brooks, D J Brown, June Bryant, Jacob D Bucky, H H Buckman, Burch & Bro, Burlap Harris, C H Burleigh, Jane Burns agt, Wm Burrell, Wm Bryne, W M Belesario, Eliza Broward, Alex B Campbell, Archibald L Campbell, J R Campbell, Juba Campbell, Martha Campbell, Sarah Campbell, A C Carter, Levi C Carter, W Carson, Robt Calhoun, Wm Caulk, J E Campaign, Eliza A Chase, Geo E Chase, Sarah E Chase, M F Cheetham, Ed M Cheeney, Jos H Clark, F J G Coxetter, Wm Clark, Mrs M C Crews, Frank Clayton, Julius Cohen, Michael Cohen, Canada C Collins, Chas W Connoly, D M Connoly, J Clark, G Cook, Mrs Amanda Clarke, Amos P Cooley, C T Cordell, O H P Champlin, T J Clark, H T Campbell, Spencer Chauncey, James M Cox, Hatch Cox, A Cubfage, Julia S Dale, Wm E Dale, Daniel & Fernandez, H Daniel, J J Daniel, Richard P Daniel, Geo W Davis, R D Davis, G W Dean, Mary E Dean, Mary M Dean, Geo A DeCottes, jas L Denton, Alex S Devine, Robinson Dewhurst, Aristides Daggett, C R Doran, Wm Wallace Douglass, Charles Drew, Columbus Drew Jr, C W DaCosta, H G Drinknate, Maria C Drysdale, M A Dzalynski, Hennan Ebersole, Thos S Ellis, Chas G Elliott, Wm H Elliott, W H Ellis, Geo M Elwell, Henry Ewart, Fannie L Fehrenback, Julia Finch, Warren Fisher, H M Fritot, Fleming & Daniel, Francis P Fleming, Jno Floyd, Jeremiah Folansbee, Lucretia R Foss, Geo R Foster, D T Fowler & C H Hunting, Arnelia L Frazee, Beny H Gandy, I H Gardner, P Gardner, Mary A Gardner, Irenius Geiger, Abraham Geiger, Jno T Geiger, miTTl ONLY EXCLUSIVE FRUIT HOUSE J O X'Tf'OV XJUDi IN SAVANNAH, GA., IS • JO. J&JCiJjXr X

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Mil! 0F ALL KlkftS i'UHNlSHED BY JOHN lOtlW Mill Oi Sl HOURKEj 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 269 I H Geiger, Jno S Geiger, Jno R Geiger, Josephine Geiger, Edward W Gillen, Oliver P Gorton, Jonathan C Greeley, Hannah Grandison, James B Grant, G B Griffin, Isaiah Greiger, Martin Griffin, J I Griffin & Co, T J Griffin, Jacob Grimsley, Walter Gwynn, Edmund Green, Daniel Haddock, Lloyd Hall, George R Hall, James H Hall, Susan A F Hall, Wm Hall, Wm J Hall, Mary A Hammond, Sarah A Hammond, Geo E Hare, Esther E Hardie, J A Huau, Alvin P Hart, T Hartridge, John E Hart, S E Hatch, D Hartridge, Lena S Holmes, Charles T Hopkins, J P Here, Miss E Harrison, Flanders Heyward, Jerry Heyward, Frank J Hazelton, Andrew Heim, E A Hendricks, Geo A Hess, Eliza Higginbotham, Jno S Higginbotham, Madison Higginbotham, David Hill, Amos Holmes, Edwin P Holmes, H H Hooper, E and S L Hopping, Ed O Houston, Mrs Isaiah Houston, W H Howell, Lucinda T Howell, Hubbard & McDuff, Samuel B Hubbard, Eliza Hudnall, David Hall, Francis S Hudnall, Henry Hudnall, Fanny Hopkins, Toby Habersham, F T Hurlburt, J G Harvey, Wm James, Edwell Jamison, Morris Jackson, M Jenkins, Jacob Jenkins, Ed T Johnson, F C Johnson, H Johnson, G R Jones, E Jones, Jack Jones, Josephine Jones, Mack Jones, Peter Jones, Wyley L Jones, Perry E Johnson, James Kellum, Henry Kellum, Geo W Kellum, David H Kennedy, Chas W Kinnie, Solomon W Knight, John T Kornahrens, J H Kornahrens, Wm Knowles, W A Lacey, Lucy Lacouse, Mary Landon, Geo Lansberry, Jessie Lay, Lizzie P Lees, Edward M LÂ’Engle, Fannie W LÂ’Engle, John C LÂ’Engle, Porcher LÂ’Engle, David B Lewis, James Lewis, Robt W Lightbody, Lindsey & Douglas, Chas O Livingston, H R Lohmeyers, April Lourcey, Helen F Lucas, Gustave Ludwig, Frederick Leuders, Catherine Mahoney, Nancy A Mann, J C Marcy Jr, Emily E Marshall, John B Marshall, Antonio Martinez, Jas A Marvin, E H and H J Mason, Cicero C Mattox, Mrs S L McConihe, Emeline McCormick Sarah J McKinlay, Wm A Mclean, Adeline Mehrtain, Laura and Esther Melton, Riley M Merrell, Sallie Merrell,M A Merrell, Geo Miller, Jacob Miller Sr, John W Miller, Mary P Miller, Meshac Mimms, James Mitchell, Joseph D Mitchell Martha Mitchell, Myra H Mitchell, W F & M Mimms, Harriet Monson, Mary L Moody, Solomon Moses, Margaret Muquet, John W Nelson, John M Niles, Jas F Nobles, Thomas Nooney, Jas North & Co, Jas H Norton agent, E C Ochus, Sharper Oliver, Elizabeth Ortagus, Jacob S Parker, Jos A PedenJ B Parsons, Parson, Hu. ling& Livingston, Louisa W Pet_ fill IE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is distilled from the choicest qualities of Grain. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga.

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^ At “W Bv FAS ^ mail trai ^ s through WITH fetfa j• CM H C FEW STOPPING POINTS. 270 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER terson,D Petty, Ralph Phelps, M I Phillips, C A Pickett, Ed C Pickett, Emma A Pickett, Hiram J Pickett, Henry E Pickett, James E Pickett, Jno S Pickett, John W Pickett, T M Pickett, Wm S Pickett, Wm H Pillow, P A Pledger, Wm P Pledger, Laurence E Foulk, Mrs F S Pappy, Geo W Plumer, Austin D Pratt, Aaron W Price, A Millard and J H Price, Mary J Price, Miles Price, H B Phillips, Elizabeth Ratigan, A M Reed, Edward J Reed, Harrison Reed W W Reed, Louisa Register, G R Reynolds, R M Reynolds, Aaron Richardson, Diana Richardson, Thos W Richardson, Wm Richardson, T W Richardson agent, S Ritzwoller, Conner Roberts, Geo W Roberts, Thos F Roberts, Elizabeth S Robinson, Wm W Robertson agent, Maurice D Roche, Mary A Rodgers, Maria Rohr, Mary J Rushing, James Ray, John S Sammis, Annie Sams, Emethy Sauls, Wm Sedwick, C C Seeba, Joseph H Sellers, Mary E Shadd, Wm H Shields, Isaac Silcocks, John J Simpkins, Wm H Simpson Jr, Nathan H Small, Daniel P Smith, John F Smith, Antonio Salary, Alminia St John, Henderson Stanley, Jane M Stevens, Josephene Stills, Mary Stills, A C Stoddard, David Stone, Flenry R Stone, W W Stowe, Thos Streeter, Adin F Styles, O J H Summers, Thos S Swain, Anson A Swift, Anna P Talbot, J P Taliaferro, Ambler & Taliaferro, Wm H Tate, Andrew Teynact, Maria Thomas, Moses Thomas, Riley Thomas, R G Thompson, C V Thrasher, Adam Tillman, Mary J Tillman, Chas F Townsend, James F Townsend, Arthur L Triesback, Francis C Turner, Lemuel Turner, John F Tyler, Wm L R Tyler, Anthony Tillman, Tillman Valentine, John Varnum, James Vinzant, Geo Walker, W & W S Walker, Philip Walker, N C Wambolt, M M Wambolt, A A Ward, Norman Webster, H L Welsh, R H Weller, Enoch Wells, Wm H West, J B Whilden, Adam White, Moses White, Alonzo C Whitner, J B Whitney, Judson W Whitney, A H Whittaker, Catharine Whittaker, John S Whittaker, S V Whittaker, Wilder & Co, Mary A Willmarth, David Wilson & E B Hunting, Geo Wilson, J Y Wilson, Wilson & Bro, Riley Wilson, Thos M Wilson, Vincent H Wood, Fannie Wright, W P Wright, Lewis H White, Thos Yates, Robt Yates, Yorick Young, Teresa Zackarias. JASPER. Hamilton county. One hundred and sixty-three miles from Savannah ; county seat ; is situated in a productive and improving section, with health and a good soil to offer settlers. Truck farming and melon raising has been successful, and the staple crops of cotton, grain, rice, corn, potatoes, are grown profitably. The town is under PP/JTllltQ Virginia, North Carolina and Tennessee in large variety at J. B. REEDY’S, rcamua, Grocer, and Importer of Fruit, Savannah, Ga.

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Sagar Mills and Pans, Our Mills run perfectly true. WM. KEIIOE & CO., Iron Pounders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 271 good municipal government, and has churches and good schools. The Hamilton County Times ” is published weekly at this place. Jasper is thedistributing point for the trade of several adjacent settlements. White Springs, Tyner, Belmont, in the eastern side of the coun f y, and Hamilton and Belville, on the western side. No regular hotel is kept, but a number of private houses furnish good board at reasonable rates. Passengers for the White Sulphur Springs can get conveyances at this point. Altman S, sheriff Ancrum James H, genl mdse Arnold & Co, photographers Bailey M Miss, millinery Baker E J, genl mdse and saw mill Beville Robt J, State representative Blackwell B B, State attorney Caldwell J M, clerk Hamilton county court. Duncan J M, tax assessor Frink J S, genl mdse and naval stores Green John L, saloon Green W H, genl mdse Hamilton County Times, J H Ancrum editor Jasper Manufacturing Co Johnson D B, lawyer Lanier T E, genl mdse Lee & Mosely, saw and grist mill McLeod W H H, tax collector Peeples Wm L & Co, genl mdse and saw mill Register Samuel, genl mdse Sharp J E, harness maker Smith' E P, genl mdse Smith J E W, druggist Smith J F & Son, saw mill Stewart H J, judge Plamilton county Taylor J W, genl mdse Tuten W R, genl mdse Tuten J D & Bro, genl mdse Yates W R, genl mdse Land Owners — James H Ancrum, Sampson Altman, W L Altman, R A Altman, Scippio Adams, James A Adams, Danl Arnold, A M Adams, Ura Allen, John Bennette, Mrs M M Blount, J W Brooks, Wm Back, O W Bailey, Turner Bass, W W Burke, J J Bryan, Hardee Bryan, D S Bryan, J W Barton, Mrs Catherine Barton, Wm Barton, Thomas Baker, C Byrd, E Byrd, A Byrd, Wm Bell, T N Bell, E L Bell & Son, B R Bellflower, H J Bellflower, G D Bellflower, W K Bellflower, W Brown, B J Beville, B R Bellflower, B B Blackwell, C C Carter, W A Collins, Nepsey Cheshire, G C Connell, R E Connell, B Cheshire Jr, J N Crews, J and P Collins, J T Cooper, P D Clardy, D B Clardy, D R Clardy, J M Clurdy Jr, J M Clardy Sr, W B Clardy. Mrs Margaret Clardy, W Calhoun, B B Donnan, G W Duncan, Jas Duncan, Charles E Duckworth, Robert Fennell, Dorcas Fennell, John O Fleming, Dempsey Fleming, Nathan Faircloth, Mrs M F Frink, L F Frink, J S Frink, Z Frink, Thos Ferguson* S W Ferguson, A M Fulcher, mHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY IS ABSOLUTELY PURE. A S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, SOLE AGENTS, SAYANNAH, GA.

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S F & W Rv = O K T X^XISTE 00 vv x^^y. jqxjxok rpxnviiEs. 272 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Henry J Geiger, Claibe Garbling, Abram Greyer, Wm Gillislee, J W Gray, W C Goolsby, Nehemiah Hall, N S Hall, D G H Hall, Perry Hall, D R Hall, W Hall, Calla Hall, E D Hervey, Jack Harbuck, Thos Harris, J W Holton, A H Hogans, John Hogans, L L Hardee, J S Harmon, Augustus Hinton, W H Hinton, Daniel Harrold, J S Johnson, D B Johnson, B Johnson, Moses James, E P Jones, G J Jones, Z W Jackson, Silas King, R A Knowles, W T Knight, Thos Knight, Joseph Lane, S T Lamb, W E Lanier, T E Lanier, T J Law, J S Lewis, J T Lewis, Philemon Leigh, Zilpha Leigh, Henry Mitchell, Ellen McCredie, Wm McGanley, W W Musseluhite, Henry Mezelle, J S Marlow, Mrs Nancy Marlow, Sarah A Miller, Sarah McDonald, J H McDonald, John McDonald, R E McDaniel, Wm McDonald, G W McDonald, Henry McGhin, M R Cullert, J M McCullert, C M McCullert, Aaron McLeod, Elihue Morgan, Mrs Elizabeth Massey, W L Morgan, J W Morgan, J M Nunn, Mrs Margaret Nunn, Frank Peterson, J T Padget, M F Rouse, J N Reid, Margaret Redding, C E Rice, Darrill Roundtree, B Rainey, R Roberts, John W Rainey, Joseph Rainey, R L Ratliffe, A G Ratliffe, Henry Ratliffe, J W Register, C A Register, W G Sandlin, Lizzie Spairy, W F Staken, Mrs Ella Staten, D B S Leffield, Lavina Sapp, R S Stewart, E Startling, Smith & Caldwell, C E Smith, J R Stewart, J D Smith, J F Smith, N M Smith, Sarah C A Smith Sr, W D Smith, E T Smith, J B Smith, J C Smith, J D Smith, R E Stephens, M Stephens, C C Sauls, J F Sauls, J A Shivers, N B Shivers, L J Strictland, H J Stewart, Mrs Sallie Stewart, L L Taylor, W R Tuten, J B Tuten, J E Tuten, J M Tuten, H M Tuten, J B Taylor, S R Underwood, W F Ward, D F Ward, D H White, J W Webb, Coalson Watson, J R Watson, Mrs Marv Waters, J T Willis, J E Willis, L C Willis, Mrs Lavinia Wood, Lawrence Wood, Peter A Williams, E S Williams, John Williams, Anderson Williams, WR Yates, Owen Yates, T J Zippner, CM Zippner, T Ely Zippner, S F Zippner. Hamilton county. Two country stores and two saw mills. Cox G S, engineer and blacksmith Dale A R, carpenter Jennings Geo S, genl mdse, saw mill and cotton gin Rowland W A & Co, genl mdse, saw mill and cotton gin Land Owners— B Alderman, R L Alderman, B F Averette, J E Averette, James Averette, T W Beatty, S H Boon, C C Bush, W B Bush, Nancy Bradshaw, Mrs Nancy Burnham, E Candy, Crackers, etc. w s d for p ™ eList

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Sugar Mills, AND PANS OP ALL SIZES, MADE BY JOHN IlO (JUKE 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 273 J Cunningham, J T and G W Cunningham, T M Caldwell, Elizabeth Dempsey, A J Dempsey, W M Dempsey, Charles Dease, J Dease, J J Devane, W D Devane, R W Devane, Gabe Forth, J A Guest, Mrs Paithrinia Graham, J E Hendricks, J H Hendricks, A B Horne, S W Herring, R C Hodge, James Inabuitte, G S Jennings, Geo Jennings, W T Jennings, Thos Jennings, Bryant Jones, B T Jones, J D Kimp, J D Lewis, John H Lee, John C Lee, Geo Meeks, B F McCall, C C McCall, E M McCall, J and E McGhin, John McGhin, Jos Morgan, J A Nobles, H P Nunn, S S Putnell, Millie Putnell, Stephen Putnell, William Roberson, Allen Ratliffe, J M Robuck, Robert Rodgers, W R Rodgers, W A Rowland & Co, J E Scaff, Wm Stowe, George Street, Mrs Jincey Slacle, S S Sharpe, Aurora Smith, L F Smith, W Smith Jr, Floyd Stephens, G M Turket. JOELLA. Alachua county. A country store, saw and grist mill, situated on Santa Fe river, 25 miles north of Gainesville, the court house. McKinney C G, genl mdse, saw and grist mill and cotton gin Land Owners — Jas McCaslan, John Bell, Allen Bell, Wm McCombs, Aaron McCombs, Geo McCaslan, W Wideman, B Wideman, Alex Bradshaw, Fred Poe, Frank Berry, James Truett, M Phillips, J E Jones, S Payne, D Ayshown, J Bradshaw, J J Hewett, Wm Strobel, Marion Osteen, H H Loff, S Blanton, Geo Osteen, B Bradley, Wm Brown, B Brown, T Brown, T E Jones, J T Prince, R E Wright, James Wright, A A Wright, G W McKinney, T J McKinney, Frank Jones, W R Hines. JOHNSTON. Putnam county. A way station on the Florida Southern Railroad, 23 miles west of Palatka. Johnston D W, genl mdse and R R agent JOHN’S PASS. Hillsborough county. Is situated on Boca Siega Bay, on the Gulf, 30 miles southwest of Tampa. Archer Charles, hotel Archer W R, contractor and builder Dodge W L, saw mill and lumber Grabble A, architect and builder Grabble S B, carpenter Hammer J, gun and locksmith Hoffman A P, real estate agt Murray & Hoffman, genl mdse and manfrs jellies and marmalade Thiele F H, blacksmith and wheel right JONESVILLE. Alachua county. Formerly known as Dudley’s. Is about T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is distilled from the choicest qualities of Grain. S, GUC3£ENfIEIMER & SON, Sple Agents, Savannah, Ga, 34

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F. & W. Ry FAST MAIL TRAINS THROUGH WITH BUT FEW STOPPING POINTS. 274 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER 13 miles west of Gainesville, and is noted for cotton raising and the vegetable products. DuPree E, genl mdse Griffin J I, genl mdse Jones J J, genl mdse Land Owners — N Blakening, James A Bradshaw, H Boyken, Nancy Bozzell, Louis Brown, Matilda Brown, James Brown, Anthony Buchannon, David Buchannon, James Bullock, W S Campbell, J W Cannon, Polly Carrer, G W Chappell, Mary Chapron, Washington Childs Sr, Smith Coleman, Horace Dickson, P B H Dudley, J B Elams, Wm Fisher, Elvin Furguson, Flora Furguson, P H Furguson, R A Furguson, Mrs Percy Geiger, M Green, Jessie J Griffin, Sophia Griffin, Jno J Grimes, J Grimes Sr, Martha Plamilton, Wm J Hamilton, J D Hodges, W J Hodge, W D Holden, J M Holt, Sarah Ho t, Starling Hunt, Richd Hughes, Milligan Hurst, Imanuel Hayes, L D Hagood, Nancy Hamilton, Sami J Hathcock, Frank Harrison, David Henry, Richard Henry, Josiah Hodges, Rosanna Hill, J PI Hodges, J J M Hodges, G M Hoffman, Annie Hamilton, George Hamilton, T Harrol, J James, S James, Jacob Johnson, Samuel Johnson, Susan Johnson, Wm Johnson, Mrs V E Jones, J J Jones, T M Kirby, Mrs J Z Kirby, Edward Martin Sr, F Meckins, Phelan Miles, James Minton, Thos Minton, Jane McLaughlin, Harvey McLeod, John Nipper, Lewis Pauling, Aleck Perry, T R Pickett, H J Poncey, Wm Quiller, Eliza Rochelle, Danl G Roland, Mrs M A Roland, Sarah Rollins, Thomas Rollins, Peter Rutledge, Philip Rutledge, Jessie Taylor, Stephen Taylor, James M Terry, Thos Thomas, Anthony Trapp, Thompson Trapp Jr, Thompson Trapp Sr, Wm Trapp, Alex Tucker, Edward Tucker, Basil Turner, Solomon Warren, G W Watson, Martha A Watson, Washington Weaver, Bingham Welch, Jackson Welch, Purdy Welch, Simon Welch, Spencer Welch, Columbus Wilkerson, Nelson Williams, Nelson Wood, Charlotte Wilson, Guy Wright, R E Wright, York Wright, Samuel Wright Sr, N A Wright. JOPPA. Alachua county. Name changed to Trenton. KEUKA. Putnam county. A way station on the Florida Southern Railroad, 19 miles from Palatka; mails daily. Joseph F Reed, P M Clark Thomas L, saw mill Lamoreaux A, contractor and builder Leavitt J O, contractor and builder Reid R R & Son, R R and Jos F, genl mdse Shaw D E, contractor and builder PPAflllk Virginia, North Carolina and Tennessee in large variety at J. B. REEDY’S’ i HUmld Grocer, an4 Importer of FruR, Savannah, Ga ?

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Sugar Mills and Pans. Thev ate Strong and Durable. YU\f. KEFtOE & 0&, Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 2 75 KEYSVILLE. Hillsborough county. Discontinued as a postoffice ; mail goes to Chicora. Fortner J A, judge Polk co F'ortner M G, State senator Land Owners — Hiram Aiderman, Hannon Adams, Mike Alderman, Wm Alderman, J E Altman, Mitchell Alderman, D M Blue, Elbert Browning, John Brown, David Branch, J S Bryan, Jackson Bryce, B F Carpenter, — Colding, W L Conart, Geo H Dunance, Chas Francis, B H Frink, L P Foy, M G Fortune, Henry Gibbon?, Miseon Gillett, D W Gillett, F R Grizelle, John A Gilbert, John D Higgersow, J H Hunter, J J Hatcher, May Hum, W J Ivey, J A. Jameson, W L Jameson, W H Jameson, Harriet Johns, S D Johnson, G J Kennedy, J W Keene, Andrew Kicklighter, J T Kelly, J L Keene, James Lyons, Wm Lastinger, Clayton, Lasington, Mathew Lewis, Able Lee, W A Lee Sr, Andrew Lee, W A Lee, J W Lynn, N Lewis, G B Lastinger, A J Lastinger, E Lightsey, S J Lightsey, J A Moody, A J Mann, J J Mills, J H Mann, G W Mitchell, M C Owens, S S Peters, O Purvis, D W Proctor, E Pollard, Jeptha Purvis, R E Ranson, R W Ridgdell, J W Ridgdell Jr, J W Ridgdell Sr, B Rodger, M E Sparkman, W H C Smith, G W Smith, J R Stewart, S T Stewart, D D Stroup, Trapnell & Swann, John Startling, E S Insley, J J Stewart, H W Thompson, E J Townsend, W W Trapnell, C J Yates. KEY WEST. Monroe county. The county seat and the seat of the United States Court for the Southern District of Florida; has a population of about 13,000 and is situated at the extreme southern boundary of the United Srates, on the Gulf of Mexico, 90 miles from Havana, Cuba, and 190 from Cedar Key ; has express and telegraph offices, two hotels, (Russel House the leading hotel) four weekly newspapers — Florida News Key West Democrat Key Of The Gulf and La Propaganda the latter being a Cuban paper published in the Spanish language. The main pursuits are mercantile, cigar manufacturing, sponging and fishing, raising fruit and vegetable products ; the principal shipments, cigars, sponges, vegetables and fish, the latter of which are mainly shipped to Havana and other foreign ports. The Tampa Steamship Co. runs a semi-weekly service between this and the ports of Tampa and Cedar Key, carrying the U. S. mails, arriving here Wednesdays and Saturdays and departing the same day on their return trip, touching at Punta Rasa and making connections with the direct line from Tampa to Cedar Key at Manatee, where a transfer of passengers are made. The Morgan line of steamers mHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY possesses an excellent bouquet. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAYANNAH, GA.

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S„ F. & W. Ry. PULLMAN SLEEPING CAR SERVICE betYbefr ALL IMPORTANT POINTS. 2 76 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER ply between the ports of New Orleans and Havana, making Key West and Cedar Key their intermediate points both going a,nd coming. The Mallory line of steamers also runs a weekly service between this point, New Orleans and New York. These two lines also carry the mails and therefore puts Key West in direct mail communication with all the above ports. This is the thirteenth port in rank in the United States, and has one of the best harbors on the Gulf coast. Its importance as a port of entry is partly from its location in a commercial point of view, but mainly from the cigar manufacturing industry that is so extensively carried on here. From July 1, 1882, to June 30, 1883, the total receipts of this port was $282,367.26. There was for the same period 676,030 pounds of foreign leaf tobacco received, the duties on which amounted to $236,610.67. From December 31, 1883, to January 1, 1884, 3,663 bales or 206,945 pounds of sponges were bought and shipped from Key West, and the total amount paid for same was $244,309.50 Key West has 82 cigar manufactories, which paid for the year 1883 $153,882.52 for revenue stamps alone, and during that year manufactured 42,000,000 cigars, which consumed 1,681,000 pounds of leaf tobacco and give employment to 2,703 operatives (men and women). APPLES. The manufacturing of cigars is the principal pursuit of the Cubans, and, with a few exceptions, the factories are all owned and operated by them. Each large factory employs a reader to entertain and instruct their hands while at work. His reading is conducted from papers and books in the Spanish language, and his voice is the only one heard among the large, number of operatives employed in a single building. Key West (Key a derivation of the Spanish word Cay or Cayo denoting island) is situated on an island of the same name, whose average width is a mile and a half, by four long, and contains about 1,900 acres. This island was granted to Juan P. Salas in 1815 by Don Juan de Estrado, then Spanish Governor of Florida, for some military service rendered the Spanish government by the former, Juan P. Salas in the year 1821 transferred his right and title to John W. Simonton, then of Mobile, Ala., for the sum of $2,000, and the latter took possession of the island, January 19th, 1822, surveyed a portion of it out in lots, some of which he gave to parties to make their settlement on his land. The United States Government made a survey of the coast and harbor on this island during the above year, and in 1824 a company of United States marines were stationed here, who put up buildings for temporary uses I make a specialty of Fancy Apples. J. B. REEDY, Grocer, and Importer of Fruit, Savannah, Ga.

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TEWiTVin^i a &IVEN ON ALL KttfDS OF MACHINERY AND REPAIRS, XiStllllftllUS by JOHN ROZJUKE 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, G-A. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 2 77 and in 1831 the government purchased ten acres in the eastern section of the town upon which to erect their buildings, and have since built a naval depot, custom house and marine hospital, all of which are imposing structures. Port Taylor, though years were spent in its construction, was not finished in 1861, but was so far completed, as to be available for garrison purposes and was occupied by the United States Army during the late civil war. The city is regularly laid out in broad streets and avenues, forming blocks of perfect squares, the streets present a city-like appearance, and their surface is firm and level and afford delightful thoroughfares. The buildings all present a neat and attractive appearance, surrounded as they are with the growth of tropical flowers and fruits of the most delicious kind ; in a word this is a beautiful and thriving city, and with nothing to impede its progress, it certainly has in store for itself a bright and properous future. It is in the midst and surrounded by a most lovely and delightful climate, whose everpresent spring time and congenial rays of bright sunshine, together with that of gentle beams of moon-light, cannot but help win favor and admiration from those who visit its shores and experience its tropical influences. The tall cocoa-palm whose feathery branches are spread aloft and far above its sister tmpics, and whose beautiful plumage ever bends under the influences of a breeze emitted from the Gulf sea, lends enchantment to a surrounding panorama of romantic charms. The people are pleasant, sociable and agreeable and exercise much refinement, businesstact and energy, and enjoy good church and school advantages and all necessary comforts that tends to make life pleasant and happy. About one-third of the population are Cubans and a very limited number of them speak English, the Spanish being their prevailing language. They make good, peaceable and quiet citizens, and by nature are courteous, gentlemanly and extremely polite, desirous of treating all with due reverence and respect. They are generous, entertaining a feeling of public spirit, and endeavor to combine their interests and welfare in creating prosperity for all. The city government is conducted at a trifling expense and less trouble ; there being very few depredations committed or arrests made. Everything seems to work in peace and harmony and no occasions are offered for and ensuing disturbances. The business done here is voluminous and extensive, this being as it is, the market for the greater portion of the sponges gathered mHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY IS ABSOLUTELY PURE. A S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, SOLE AGENTS, SAVANNAH, GA.

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F Oj TIT -p T FREIGHT IN THROUGH CARS, itf klS^ e (X VV JOhy TRAINS, WITHOUT TRANSFER. 278 FRO RIDA STATE GAZETTEER from the gulf coast and the vegetables raised on the neighboring islands and surrounding country. N F English, postmaster Abbott S M, prin Sears School Acosta Domingo, grocer Adams Frank c, restaurant Adams Thos J, grocer Adderley Frank c, grocer Albertus Eduarde, grocer Albury B & Son, Benjamin Albury, dry goods and groceries, boots and shoes Albury Gilbert, dry goods and groceries Albury Henry Clay, genl mdse Albury John F, dry goods and groceries Albury Joseph F, grocer Albury Richard H, dry goods, notions, boots and shoes Albury William H, dry goods and groceries Albury William J, ship carpenter and builder Alfonso B & Co, Benito and Benito Alfonso Jr, cigar mnfrs Alfonso F & Co, Francisco Alfonso and Domingo Vildostegui, cigar mnfrs Alfonso Roman & Co, Roman Alfonso, Louis F Corral and L B Conde, cigar mnfrs. See adv Alfonso & Vildostegui, Francisco Alfonso and Domingo Vildostequi, cigar manfrs Alie Francisco, restaurant Allen George W, lawyer and deputy collector int rev Alvarez Luis, grocer Alvarez Ramon, special deputy collector U S customs Angulo Jose R, cigar manufr Arango J Delgado Y, Spanish vice consul Araro Martine, butcher, Archer Benjamin B, blacksmith Arencibia A & Co, cigar manfrs Armas Severo, cigar manufr Armas Vicente de, restaurant Artrell William M, elk custom house Atkins John T, painter Babcock Harriet Mrs, dry goods, millinery and notions Baez D & Co, cigar manufrs, dry goods and groceries Baez, Milord & Co, cigar manufacturers Baillou James Me, shoemaker Baker Benjamin P, undertaker, contractor aud builder Baldwin Sophia Miss, school Ball James T, job printer and propr BallÂ’s Express and consignee Southern Ex Co BallÂ’s Express, J T Ball propr Barker Daniel B, grocer, cigars and tobacco Barker John T, grocer Baron Charles S, county judge Monroe co Barranco M & Bro, Manual Barranco and estate Augustine Barranco, cigar mnfrs, grocers, wines and liquors Barranco & Rico, Manuel Barranco and Antonio Rico, cigar mnfs Bartlum W J, dentist Benitez Jose R, dry goods, notions, boots and shues Bennett Thomas M, fruits and notions Bermudez Augusto, Spanish Consul When going home, stop in and order a box of T T) "DPPTIV QqITQTITIQIi f* Q the choicest FLORIDA ORANGES, at J JJ. A Mil I UQ V ClllilCill, llU.

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Our Pans are Smooth and Uniform in Thickness WM. KEIIOE & CO., Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. Bethel L W Hon, lawyer and Lieut Governor of Florida Bethel Melli Miss, school | Bethel William W, grocer Biaz Frank, tailor Bier George H, elk to commanding officer U S navy Blake Charles E G, professor music and barber Bolano DeJ, coffee house i 1 Bolanos Y, butcher I Borroto Frank, fruits Bowers Benjamin F H, chief Fire Dept Brady Thomas, grocer Brooks A A, livery and hack stable Browne Alexander W, sergt in charge U S Signal Office Browne Jefferson B, lawyer JEFFERSON B. BROWNE ATTORNEY AT LAW, PRACTICES IN UNITED STATES AND STATE COURTS. Key West, Florida. Bryant Peter W, inspector U S customs Cambridge John C c, boot and shoe mkr Campuzano P D, cigar mnfr Canals Enrique, cigar mnfr Canals & Co, Enrique Canals and leaf tobacco dealers 279 Cappick Wm J, asst P M Cardemasjose M, grocer Cary John T, grocer Cash Wm D genl mdse, ship chandler, grocer, paints and oils, auction and com mer, cor Front and Duval streets. See advt Castillo A I & Co, A M and Nicholas F Castillo, cigar manufrs. See advt Castillo N F & Co, Nicholas F and A M Castillo, cigar manufrs. See advt Castro John Ramon, grocer Cecilio Roger, barber Cervantes De V, barber Co-coa-nut Grove Hotel, Mrs. Wyman & Zumstein, mangrs Cold Paul M, painter Coleman & Bart ium, John H Coleman and Geo L Bartlum, auctioneers and com mers, lumber and shingles Colston Henry c, grocer Conde Laureano B, dry goods and groceries Cordero Manuel M, merchant tailor, shoes, fancy goods and notions Corral, Conde & Co, Louis F Corral, L B Conde and Roman Alfonso, cigar manufrs Cotera E V, cigar manufr Cowly Ramon, grocer Cox John A c restaurant and saloon Crane Henry A, editor and publisher The Key Of The Gulf. See advt Crane & Duffy, H Crane and R J Duffy, proprs Key West News Co [ 1HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is soft and mellow to the taste, S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.

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C XI & W Rv WAY-CROSS SHORT LINE A W J1 V • TO FLORIDA. 280 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Cruz Bros, Andres, Alejandro and Jose Cruz, cigar manfrs Cunningham Frank J, principal Douglas School Curry B S, auction and com mer and grocer. See advt Curry Chas, county treas Curry James R, dry goods and notions Curry Joseph, fish dealer Curry Richard, saloon Curry Thomas, grocer Curry William, whol and ret com mer, ship chandler, groceries and provisions, lumber, & c Curry William S, grocer Curry & Curtis, Benjamin Curry and James C Curtis,' dry goods, notions, hardware, groceries and provisions Delaney John J, clothing, boots and shoes. del Castillo Jose H, grocer Delgado J Avelino, sewing machines de Lono Gabriel A, grocer and provisions The Key Of The Golf, Published every Saturday at KEY WEST, FLORIDA. “ INDEPENDENT IN POLITICS,” AT $2.00 PER YEAR, 33 3T H. A. CRANE, Editor and Proprietor, del Pino Antonio & Bros, Antonio, Manuel J and Augustine del Pino, cigar manfrs and leaf dealers, del Pino A Si Bro, Antonio and Manuel J del Pino, cigar mfrs, leaf dealers and grocers. Demerritt Geo H, sheriff Monroe county Demerritt John D, fish dealer de Yduate Felipe, coffee house Diaz Maximo M, druggist, grocer and fruits Dominguez Cayetano S, cigar manfr de Lono Angel W, justice of the peace Douglass Arthur A c, mattress maker Douglass School, F J Cunningham prin Duffy R J Mrs, millinery and notions Duffy & Williams, R J Duffy and Wm H Williams, stoves, tinware, roofing and guttering Duncan James, fish dealer Duval E, dentist English Nelson F, postmaster Escassi Manuel, examiner tobacco U S custom house Espinoza Joaquin, barber Estevez Andres J, phqtographer Estevez Enrique, dry goods, groceries and liquors Estrada Jose R, publisher and propr La Propaganda Ferguson Geo W, whol & ret grocer, provisions, hay, grain, paints, oils, lime and cement, hardware, &c. See adv Figueredo A & Co, Angel Figuerado and Gabriel Ayala, grocers r.inFR 1 am headquarters for cider. „ y iy Groeer and Importer, Savaanab, Ga.

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John Rourke, AGRICULTURAL IRON AND BRASS WORKS, 2 BAY STREET, SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 28 I Figuredo F & Co, F Figuredo and Joaquin Gomez, grocers Filer Samuel, whol & ret lumber and shingles, doors, and blinds SAMUEL FILER r (Successor to FILER & SON,) LUMBER YAED, No. 1 FRONT STREET, Has constantly on hand all kinds of -DRESSED AND UNDRESSED— Yellow Pine Lumber, Mahogany, Juniper and Cypress Boards, JUNIPER SHINGLES, Mouldings, Poles and Laths. TERMS CASH. Flemming Edward J, inspector U S customs Florida News c, J W Menard & Son, editors and proprietors. See adv Fogarty Jeremiah, Fogarty & Johnson, and Underwriters agt for European Cos Fogarty & Johnson, Jeremiah Fogarty and F W Johnson, whol & ret com mers, ship chandlers, grocers, hardware, crockery, &c. See adv Foresight Flenry c, fruits and vegetables Fulford Hiram G, genl mdse Gabrado Jose, fruits Gabriel Robert, inspector U S customs Gandolfo Laura, coffeehouse Garcia M & Co, Maguel Garcia & Enrique Villarell,dry goods and notions Gato Edurado H, cigar mnfr. See advt Geraux Louis A, watchmaker and jeweler LOUIS A. GEEAUI, WATCHES, CLOCKS, And a Fine Assortment of KEY WEST, FLA. Gonzales J F, cigar mnfr Gonzales M & Co, Manuel Gregory, Rapheal & Joseph Gonzales, cigar mnfrs and grocers Gonzales Pedro, grocer Gonzales Urbano, restaurant Gonzales Ynocente, grocer and cigar mnfr HHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is soft and mellow to the taste. L S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.

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S, F. & W. Ry. Elegant Passenger Equipments ; Westinghouse Air Brakes; Miller Platforms; Janey Couplers. 282 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Gordon Roger, fancy goods, notions, stationery and news dealer Gordon Wm, fish dealer Gregory John H, cigar mnfr and dealer Griffin Uriah, grocer Grillon John B, ice cream saloon Guiteras John, physician Gwynn Edward 0 auctioneer, shipping, forwarding and com mer E. O. GWYNN, AUCTIONEER Shipping 1 and Forwarding Agent, KEY WEST, FLORIDA. Has been in the business from his youth and is prepared by reason of experience to meet all the demands of the trade. RETURNS MADE ON THE DAY OF SALE. Gwynn Wm A, grocer Hanson Wm, physician Harris J V, physician Harris Wm C, dry goods, notions and groceries Harris William Jr, grocer and fruits Hayman Leon G, dry goods, notions and clothing Helling Martin L, cable mangr Int O Tel Co, and Telephone Exchange Henriquez Cecilio, cigar manfr Henriquez Eduardo, cigar mfr and groceries and saloon Henson John P, blacksmith and horse farrier Hernandez Federico, coffee hse Hernandez Manual, grocer Herrera & Valladares, Martin Herrera Domingo Valladares, cigar manfrs and grocers Herrick Hamilton M, carpenter and builder Holm es Henry C, tailor Howe Charles, manager A Sariol Hudson George, pay elk U S Navy Ingram Joseph, grocer International Ocean Tel Co, C S Maloney manger Jaquez Pedro, cigar manfr Johnson Charles S, physician and druggist Johnson Frede :ick, cigar manfr and grocer Johnson George V, butcher Johnson John, fish dealer Johnson S Otis, butcher Johnson William A, fish dealer Jones Jas G, pres Key West board of Aldermen and acting deputy U S marshal Jordon John W, paymaster U S Navy Kemp Cornelius F, dentist Kemp Alfred W c jeweler Kemp George W, grocer Kemp Richard M, dry goods, carpets and furniture Kemp W & B W, Benjamin W Kemp, dry goods and grocer Kerr Benjamin, inspector U S custbms Kerr Wm R, architect, builder and lumber dealer Key Of The Gulf, H A Crane editor and propr Raisins, Nuts, Etc. I am the I argest Dealer in this line J. 13. REEDY, Savannas, Ga.

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Sugar Mills and Pans. We Guarantee our Prices. WM. KEHOE
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S„ F. & W. iiy. Florida DispaioSi* Past Preiglit Xjiue. 284 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Maloney Charles S, mangr Int Ocean Tel Co Marrero Francisco, cigar manfr and leaf dealer. See advt Marrero M, cigar manfr Marsh Marshall H c, grocer Martin Philip B, saloon Martin Russell, inspector U S customs Maslin George W, grocer and baker Mead John H, carpenter and builder Menandez Safreno, grocer Mena Jose, saloon Menard J Willis J W Menard & Son, and inspector U S customs Menard J W & Son c, J Willis & Willis T Menard, editors and proprietors Florida News THE FLORIDA NEWS Leading Independent Paper, Eight Pa ps,-$2.0 0 a Year, ). WILLIS MtMRd k SON, Editors and Proprietors, KEY WEST, FLORIDA. Merrill Charles T, mangr Russell House. See advt Metzger George, barber j Mitchell H L, co judge Monroe co Moffat & Johnson, E F Moffat & T H Johnson photographers Molinet John, physician Monsalvatge K, Alfred Hon, mayor city Key West Monsalvatge Wm H & Co, Wm H Monsalvatge, whol & ret grocers and ship stores and com mers Mora Rafael, grocer Moreno Felix, baker Moreno Fernando J, com mer, agt of American Underwriters, British Vice-Consul and Vice-Consular agent of France Moreno Manuel R, physician and druggist Moreno Mason S, coll rev Monroe co Morgan Steamship Line, A F Tift agt. See adv Morrow Robt, undertaker and cabinet mkr Mouteresi Ramon, physician Munnings S A c, saloon Noda Gabriel, coffee house Navarro Bros, J M J Navarro, leaf tobacco dealers Navarro J M J, cigar mnfr O’Relly Carlos, watchmkr and jeweler Ohalloran R F, cigar mnfr Olivieri Marcus A, saloon Olsen George, grocer Orueta Juan, grocer and saloon Otto Joseph, physician and druggist Page Albert J, fish dealer Palacios Frederick, butcher \F 1? P 17 T A 1) I T7Q Always on hand a full supply of the best V it/ \J 11/ 1 A 15 L I j IO. J. B. REEDY, Savannah, Ga.

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Saw Mill Work OF ALL KINDS FURNISHED BY JOnti ROURKE, 2 BAY ST., SaYANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. • 285 Palmer Richard, fish dealer Parodi Esteban, cigars and fruits Patterson Geo Bowne, lawyer and U S district attorney southern dist Fla Peekin Maria Mrs, grocer Pent Jeremiah, butcher Perez D Geronimo, butcher Perez Navarro, T Perez and J F Navarro, cigar manufrs Perry Robert J, druggist Philbrick John Jay, com, shipping and forwarding mer, dealer in grain, hay, lime, cement, coal and ice, agent Tampa Steamship Co. See advt Pierce C R, sponge buyer Pierce Geo R, Recio & Co, and constable Pierce Henry J, fruits Pierce Lewis W, wholesale and retail clothing, dry goods, fancy goods and notions, hats, caps, boots shoes and furniture. See advt Pinder Rebecca Mrs, millinery and notions Pinder Theophilus, groceries, provisions, paints, oils, sponges, etc Pinder Wm, coffee saloon Pinder & Parks, Wm M Pinder and Ivison Parks, restaurant Pino Fernanda C, notary public Pitcher Asa, dry goods and grocer Plummer J W V R, physician Portal Ruben S, barber Portencia Pedro J, coffee house Pritchard Joseph, grocer Ramirez Juan J, coffee roaster Rawson Edward h, storekeeper custom house Recio Carlos, Recio & Co, and grocer, cigars and liquors Recio & Co, Carlos Recio & Geo R Pierce, grocers and dry goods Reynolds G W & Co, G W Reynolds & John G H Yatt, cigar manfrs Richardson John R, butcher Riley Edward, shoemaker Roberts Benjamin, ship carpenter and builder Roberts Benjamin Jr c, tailor Roberts Fernando W, grocer, confectioner and fruits Roberts John H, dry goods and notions Roberts Joseph, grocer Roberts Joseph P, estate Samuel Roberts mangr, genl mdse, fruits and com mer Estate if J. P. ROBERTS, Samuel Roberts, Manager. Are now offering the Finest and Cheapest Stock of Ever brought to this City. Also, a full line of Domestic Dry Goods, CROCKERY and GLASSWARE, Tinware, Wood and Willow-ware, &c. You will find it to your interest to price these goods before buying elsewhere. Special attention given to supplying Farmers, Spongers and Fishermen. Key liLAkT' cst, Roberts Joseph W, marshal Key West Rodriguez Clara Mrs, coffee house mHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY IS ABSOLUTELY PURE, A S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, SOLE AGENTS, SAYANNAH, GA.

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V & W Sv LIKE! o., r Co vv xlj. quick txivee. 286 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Rodriguez Juan, restaurant Romaguera Joaquin E, grocer Romero J, grocer Romero Manuel, grocer & fruits Russell Adolphus, millinery Russell House, C T Merrill mangr. Seeadvt Russell Thos, contractor and builder St John A, fish dealer St John Charles, shipsmith and blacksmithing Sagel Francisco, grocer Saladriga Ygnacio, grocer and fruits Salo J Romero, cigar mnfr Samoro Alcemo, grocer Sanchez Augustine, cigar mnfr Sanchez Jose C, grocer Sanchez Miguel, coffee house Sang Wang, grocer Sariol Arthur, genl mdse, dry goods, clothing and groceries and provisions Saunders Benjamin, fish dealer Saunders John, grocers Saunders William H, millinery Sawyer Edward, grocer Sawyer Jabez, grocer Sawyer John W, clothing, boots, shoes and gents furnishing Schepens Augustus, dry goods, millinery, grocer and saloon Scheurer John, dry goods, groceries and baker Sears School, S M Abbott prin Sabastian Louis M, coffee house Seidenberg & Co, Joseph and Samuel Seidenberg, cigar manufrs and leaf dealers Sendoya Pablo, grocer Shavers Frank c, grocer Shultz Thos, sewing machine agent JOHN SCHEDRER, Wholesale Dealer in FLOUR, And Retail Dealer in Groceries, Dry Goods AMD NOTION'S. BaRery -A.'trbaiOla.ecL. Key West Fla Solares Victoreno, grocer Someillian Henrico B, Spanish and English teacher Soria Cayetano, cigar manfr and grocer Stevens Roman M, inspector U S customs Stickney Mary L Mrs, grocer Stillman E H & Co, E H Stillman and Wm Ledwith, whol and retail wines,, liquors and cigars Sturrup Theo, grocer Sweeny I) T, manufr and bottler mineral waters, lager beer, etc., wines, liquors and cigars. See advt Sweeting, Chas B, physician Symmonett Wm, coffee saloon Tampa Steamship Co, J J Philbrick agt. See advt Taylor Wm J H, notary public and custom house broker The Key Of The Gulf, H H Crane editor and propr. See advt Thimon M S, notary public Thompson J E, dry goods LEMONS e “r§|r t0U8e l B. REEDY, Savannah, Ga.

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Sugar Mills and Pans, A full Stock of all Sizes. WI. KEHOE & CO., Iron Founders, Savannah, G-a (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 287 Thompson J L, boots and shoes Thompson Philip, editor and propr Key West Democrat. See advt Thompson Rosa B Mrs, shell artist Tift A F, com mer, ship broker and storage, agt for Mallory and Morgan Steamship Lines, dealer in ice and coal. See advt Toledo & Cordero, Jose Toledo and Virgilio Cordero, grocers Torres Enrique & Co, Enrique Torres, groceries, provisions and fruits Valdez Miguel, billiards Velario & McLenland, Manuel Velario and W E McLenland, butchers Waite William H, fish dealer Wallace John c, lawyer and inspector U S customs Walton David c, grocer Warren Jerry J, watchmaker and jeweler Weatherford James H, clothing, boots, shoes and gents’ furnishing Weatherford John W, saloon Wellacott John F, restaurant Wentzel Rudolph, barber Whalton Beverly B, dry goods and groceries Whalton Joseph C, elk custom house Whalton Joseph C Jr, notary public and justice of the peace White John, banker and genl mdse, dry goods and groceries Wicker Frank FT, collector U S customs Wilkinson Samuel c } fruits and vegetables Williams John S, fish dealer Williams J P & Co, J P Williams and James H Carey, auctioneers and com mer Williams Peter A, U S marshal southern district of Florida Williams William H, blacksmith and wagonmaker Williams & Warren, P A Williams and G D Warren > furniture, undertaker and hardware P. A. WILLIAMS. G. D. WARREN. WILLIAMS k WARREN, UNDERTAKERS AND DEALERS IN W U' R m I; X nr R m LETaarcL-vu-airre., & c. CORNER OF CHARLES AND DUVAL STREETS KEY WEST, FLORIDA. Wyman & Zumstein, Mrs E M Wyman and Mrs E M Zumstein, proprietors Co-coa-nut Grove Hotel Ybor V M & Co, V Martinez and Eduardo Ybor and Eduardo Manrara, cigar manfrs and leaf dealers Zair John, restaurant and oysters Fruit and Vegetable Growers. J H Adams, R W Adams, Alonzo Albury, Joseph Albury, 1 1HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is distilled from the choicest • qualities of Grain. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga.

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S tp £7 \JT IDt r T3ie Preferred Route 288 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Philip Albury, Robert Albury, William B Albury, William H Albury, William F Allen, Benj B Baker, E Baker & Bros, P J Baker, Bethel & Patterson, A Brost, W B Brown, E Carey, William T Collier, Benjamin K Curry, Henry Filer, Filer & Fogarty, John Gardner, FI E Hamilton, J V Harris, E Pliggs, Charles Johnson, F W Johnson, Henry Johnson, Mendez Johnson, Samuel Johnson, Thomas Johnson, John Knowles, E O Locke, J A Lockhart, Amos Lowe, Benjamin Lowe, John Lowe, John Lowe Jr, Joseph Lowe, Samuel S Lowe, William Lowe. William H Lowe, Lowe & Johnson, Chas S Maloney, Walter C Maloney Jr, Maloney & Williams, P B Myers, Adolphus Pinder, Cephas Pinder, Cornelius Pinder, H Pinder & Thompson, Jeremiah Pinder, John Pinder, Sylvanus Pinder, Uriah Pinder-, W Pinder, Pinder & Carey, Pinder & Stickney, John Roberts, Richard Roberts, R S Roberts & Son, Thomas Roberts, Benjamin Russell, Jno H Russell, Thomas Russell, Phillippe Sanchez, Robt Sands & Co, John H Saunders, Joseph Sawyer, Richard Sawyer, Wm Sawyer, Asa Sweeting, George Sweeting, Thomas Sweeting, Job Tedder, Jos Tedder, R Tedder, W Tedder, Mrs Mary Weeks Williams, Warren & Sweeney. A. M. CASTILLO & CO. MANUFACTURERS OF FINE CIGARS. FACTORY No. 33. Post Office Box 29. N. T. CASTILLO & CO. MANUFACTURERS OF Factory 39 Postoffice Box 29. KEY WEST, FLORIDA. When you want Strictly Choice Fruit, at bottom prices, send your orders to J. B. REEDY, Savannah, G-a.

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TTVfJivio + rktt GIVEN ON ALL KINDS OF MACHINERY AND REPAIRS, rjSllllldlt3k BY JOHN ROU11KE 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 289 KING’S FERRY. Nassau county. Population about 400. It lies immediately on the St. Mary’s river 60 miles from Fernandina, the county seat. The principal business is mercantile, timber and lumber, and considerable truck farming is pursued in the country surrounding. Miss E S King, P M Atkins W T, blacksmith Baker H C, State senator Davis J E & Bro, genl mdse and log dealers Davis L H & B, saw mill Hawkins T D, druggist and physician Herring T, genl mdse Higgenbotham — genl mdse Mizell J & Bro, genl mdse and saw mill Russell & Norfleet, genl mdse and saw mill Wright J E, physician Wright J E & Sons, druggists Land Owners — W T Atkins, Adam Anderson, A Armstrong, P Benjamin, Allen Brown, H Benjamin, J C Bufford, Thos Boston, David Colley, Caldwell & King, Wm Cain, Ed Collson, W M Cushing, — Cummings, John Campbell, Allen Cope, Martha Dunham, J E Davis & Bro, Delonaga Davis, C H Davis, W C Davis, Wm C Davis, Allen Davis, John Davis, Eliza Eubanks, Henry Fisher, Geo Fisher, Geo Grant, Chas Garry, A Holland, H Henderson, Celia Henderson, R Haddock, Jas T Haggon, Geo W Haddock, Jos Haddock, John W Haddock, Paul C Haddock, Rufus G Haddock, James Haddock, Danl P Haddock, Chas E Haddock, T Herring, John T Haddock, Jeff T Higginbotham, T W Higginbotham, Mrs T W Higginbotham, A J Higginbotham, Thos Haddock Danl Johnson, G W Libbey, Benj Libbey, L P Larson, John McKinzine, J Mizell & Bro, D McHaffin, D McKay, W Mott, Geo McKinzie, B B Nix, Tobias Nelson, G P Pollard, Jas Payne, R Rowe, Jos Redmon, C T Redmon, W J Reynolds, Mark Rollerson, Wm Sadler, Robt Scipio, Robert W Swearingen, Preston Stewart, Gus Underwood, John J Van zant, Samuel Malker, A J Walker, Arrock Williams, S H Walker, J B Wingate, Jos Washington, David Waters, Wm Wiggins, Sandy Young. KINGSLEY. Clay county. Situated on Lake Kingsley, 26 miles west of Green Cove Springs, and 6 east of Starke, its railroad shipping point on the Florida Transit & Peninsula Railroad ; mails semiweekly. H W Strong, P M Carpenter C B, ship carpenter Heappard Wm H, justice of the peace Ladd W C, saw mill & real estate Ordnay M W, contractor and builder Puddy Richard, hotel Stokes G W, harness maker Strong H W, genl mdse fl^HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is distilled from the choicest qualities of Grain. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga. 36

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S., F. & W. Ry. Elegant Passenger Equipments ; Westinghouse Air Brakes; Miller Platforms; Janey Couplers. 290 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Land Owners-— B H Alden, W C Blanchard, F C Bingham, D W Bingham, James T Burton, D Bremmer, Frederick Burton, Charles Burkenstream, Amos Blumberg, W P T Carpenter, Wm Conway, Thos M Dean, W H Edwards, Wm Fisher, Chas Fisher agt, H R Fisher, J D Griffin, John Howe, W H Hefford, R J Janett, H Janett, Isaac Janett, L W Kickliter, M Keible agt, Wm C Ladd. Ladd & Blumberg, Chester Northrup, J C Newcastle, M W Ordway, John Osborn, Richard Puddy, Puddy & Ladd, J W F Prevat, Mrs E H Prescott, Ed H Roberts, Simeon Strickland, Abraham Strickland, David J Silcox, David G Silcox, A W Strong, J W Strong, Wm Star, Mrs H C Webb, Miss C Wurts. IOSSSSSi^EE a Orange county. S. F. R. R. This flourishing little place is situated at the head of navigation of the Kissimmee and Caloosahatchee rivers, and has direct water communication through these streams and Lake Okeechobee to the Gulf of Mexico. The northern communications are had by the South Florida Railroad to Sanford on the St. Johns river and through the same on to Jacksonville, where connections are made with all trains North and West and also the steamships to different ports. Arlen J H, saw mill Bass Bros, saw mill Given E B, physician Johnson A D, genl mdse Johnson & Prescott, saloon Lake House, W A Patrick propr Mathews H A, real estate Ockeechohee House, J B Goff propr Osborne & Summerlin, real estate agts Patrick W A, genl mdse Tahopkabaga Hotel, Robt Bass propr Trudal M D, saloon Land Owners — J H Allen, Mrs J H Allen, J H Allen & Co, Geo E Allen, Robt Bass Sr, Geo W Bass, A J Barber, Henry Barber, R C Barber, Joseph Barber, A C Bass, P A Bass, Charles Bass, W J Brock, Crawford Bass, Quinn Bass, David Bass, E D Bronson, Geo Bronson, Chas Bronson, R B Bronson, J A Barber, Jno C Barber, W F Barker, W B Clarkson, Wm R Davis, C W Deison, Levi Drawdy, John Evans, W H Frill, Wm M Goodman, Sarah J Hall, Isaiah Hall, John A Hall, H F Haralson, N H Hawes, C N Halderman, H C Harrell, Robert L Irey, Ewin Johnson, C W Johnson, A D Johnson, Jr, J J Keen, W M Keen, Nancy P Locke, Abmeda Locke, Isaac M Lanier, Jas II Lanier, Robert H Lanier, J M Lee, Frank Lawson, H A Mathews, Tarbal Nichols, O W Norton, Henry Overstreet, E L D Overstreet, J J M Overstreet, M N Overstreet, D W Prescott, W A Patrick, Patrick, Bryan & Co, Wm Park, James J Pad. Raisins, Nnts, Etc. I am the largest Dealer in this line. J. B. REEDY, Savannah, Ga.

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Sugar Mills and Pans. I'hev at 4 ?. Strong and t)urable. WM. KEFtOE fc CO. Iron Founders, Savannah, G-a. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 29I gett, R C Partin, H G and R C Partin, S C and R C Partin, H G Partin Jr, J T and H G Partin, Joel Riles, Zachariah Riles, Ed Rogers, R E Rose, W J Sears, J Strickland, J B Shiver, Arthur Shiver, W A Thomas, Alex Tindall, Alex Tindall Jr, J T Tindall, James Tyson, S A Tiner, Martha Tyson, J Ward, Thos Whaley, H C Whaley, W R White, E M Wright, W H Yates, Sarah Yates, Malintha Yates, Mrs W H Yates. KNOX HILL. Walton county. Discontinued as a postoffice ; mails goes to Euchee Anna. LA CROSSE. Alachua county. Is situated 15 miles almost due north of Gainesville, and near the Santa Ee river. It is in a most beautiful and rich agricultural section, has one church, two general stores, one drug store, and a grist mill ; mails five times each week. J E Futch, P M Futch J E, genl mdse Geiger L R, druggist Markee J E W, grist mill Parker H C, genl mdse Robuck J H, justice of the peace Sloan J R, grist mill and cotton gin Land Owners — E Anderson, Friday Andrews, Wm Adams, Mrs Martha Adams, Jake Brown, W M Blitch, S H Burnett, Peter Bailey, Joseph Barry, Frank Boats, Hester Brockington, W L Bennett, Matilda Bennett, Jack Banks, Legacy Brown, F j Barry, Mrs Elizabeth Bennett, Wm Brockington, Ransom Cason, W D Cauthren, Albert Clark, J B Cason, G W Cason, Richard Collins, E P Cail, W H Colson, George D Cheiser, Mrs Martha John Chesser, Harry Cooper, S P Cox, W H Carver, J Cellon, R A Cox, I H Cason, Miss Mary E Chesser, J A Cellon Jr, J A Cellon Sr, Minus Davis, S Durant, J T Futch, Eli Futch, Jas Futch, Sumner Fields, Chester Fields, J E Futch, James Ford, Kelly Flynn, Benj Gaines, Irwin Holder, D Holley, Elizabeth Holder J I Holbrook, Mrs C A Holder, W Harrison, Jno E Hill, S B Hubbard, J W Harris, J N Kirtlin, S T Kirtlin, Jno Kite, J W King, M M Mays, J M Malphus, J W Malphus, N J Malphus, Dolly Mango, Nancy May, Cynthia J May, Reuben May, JEW Markey, Mary Ann McCraig, Mrs E A Newman, C F Parker, Mrs G A Pope, W W Pope, N Powers, Mrs Jane Parker, H C Parker, J H Robuck, Robt Robinson, H N Richard, Ed Standley, J L Strickland, J H Schofield, Irvin Simmons, Eliza Simmons, Moses Simmons, Thos Sweat, Allen Singleton, J R Sloan, Albert Strickland, H Thomas Charney Thomas, E P Thomas, Chas Thomas, J M VanlandingrjVHE CELP1BRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY possesses an excellent bouquet. S. GrUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.

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S., F. & W. Ey. FREIGHT IN TffROtlGH CARS, FAsf TRAINS, WITHOUT TRANSFER. 292 FRORIDA STATE GAZETTEER ham, Phineas Young, Marshall Posey. LA GRANGE. Brevard County. North of Titusville miles. Brady A, supt co schools Brady E L, genl mdse Johnson T, cooper Thomas W M, genl mdse Land Ozvners — H F Atkinson, A Brady, E L Brady, Mrs Jane E Brady, N C Bryan, L J Carlile Elbert Carter, J A Chappell, W Chandom, Cockshutt, Mrs Julia A Coleman, W P Day, C M Feaster, Mrs Janette Feaster, Mrs Rebecca Feaster, J M Feaster, Peter M Fisher, Andrew Froschu. Daniel Gray, B J Mims, W S Norwood, A J Pace, Harry Roberts, Mrs Sarah ASingleton, L I Stringfellow, Geo Warren, J R Watson. LAKE BUTLER* Bradford county. County seat, sixteen miles west of Starke, the nearest point on the Florida Transit & Peninsula R R Cone A D, State senator Croft John, grocer Edwards W H, State representative Newson S, physician Rhodes L B, supt co schools and lawyer Richards J R, judge Bradford co Rivers W C, blacksmith and carpenter Robertson John H, genl mdse York H F, clerk Bradford co LAKE CITY. County seat of Columbia county, on the Florida Central & Western Railroad, 59 miles from Jacksonville and 102 miles from Tallahassee. Has express and telegraph offices, a population of about 1,200. Lake City is one of the Florida towns that hasn’t been struck by the tide of Northern emigration. It is an old Southern country town that lets well enough alone, situated as it is in a rich farming country where cotton, corn, tobacco, rice, sugar-cane, early vegetables, oranges and other Southern fruits do well. Lake City has been selected by the State as the point for locating the State Agricultural College. A site has been selected and preparations made for erecting necessary buildings. The St. James Academy, a private institution of learning for girls, under the management of Rev. C. S. Snowden, together with the Peabody Public School, assisted by the Peabody fund, furnish ample means of learning ; religious societies of various denominations have organizations here. Lake City has two saw mills, three cotton gins, one in particular being very extensive, managed in the interest of J. & P. Coats & Co., thread manufacturers. Adicks Geo O, baker Appell J F, physician When going home, stop in and ordor a box of the choicest FLORIDA ORANGES, at J. B. REEDY, Savannah, Ga.

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Sugar Mills, AND PANS OP ALL Sl^S, MADE h Y JOHN ROZJRKE, 2 BAT ST., SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 293 Ashmeads & Thompson, W H and C H Ashmead and S B Thompson Jr, booksellers and stationery Ashurst & Co, A P Ashurst and proprs Florida Baptist Witness Bacon W T, physician Bates John C, marble yard Baya J F, genl mdse Baya & Masters, J F Baya and J C Masters, cotton gin and crate mnfrs Begelow A G & Co, genl mdse and cotton gin Borum A E Mrs, proprietress Borum House Brookins M c blacksmith Brown A D, county assessor Bush C L, genl mdse Bush Thomas J, grocer Bush William R, lawyer Chalker W R, physician Chicago House, J M Wilson propr Cleaveland Hall Cline George M, grist mill and cotton gin Cline Geo W, grocer Cline John C, genl mdse Colson & Phillips, Wm H Colson and Wm M Phillips, butchers Columbia Star, Story & Harrison proprs Cone & Harden, Wm S Cone and Wm Harden, livery stable and carriage dealers Crim & Baya, J H M Crim and J F Baya, livery stables and carriage and wagon dealers Curry Arthur W, genl mdse Davidson A, grocer Dowling John W & Co, J W T he celebrated thistle dew S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, so and Thomas Dowling, saw mill and lumber dealers Edge & Porter, genl mdse Finley E A, propr and editor The Lake City Reporter Francis L F Mrs, millinery French S, lawyer and notary public Getzen Thomas W, State representative Goff John W, grocer Hagan A B, lawyer Harrison E L, grocer Harrison L, lawyer, notary public and justice of the peace Harrison S C, agt F C & W Railroad Henderson T G, grocer Hendry Arthur J, lawyer and notary public Hensley & Emmons, J W Hensley & H H Emmons, contractors and builders and architects Hunter G H, physician Hunter & Son, G H & J H, druggists Hutchinson M M T, physician L, Harrison. Attorney at Xhuu, Notary Public State at Large. LAKE CITY, Florida, [^“COLLECTIONS A SPECIALTY. Business entrusted to me will receive Prompt Attention. EEFEEE1TCES : First National and Bank of Jacksonville, Jacksonville, Florida. R. B. Post & Son, New Orleans, La. Bendhum Bros. & Co., Savannah, Ga. Eckman & Vetsburg, “ ‘ J. E. Yonge, Lake City, Fla. J. F. Baya, “ “ New York, K. K. & F. B. Thurber & Co. WHISKEY IS ABSOLUTELY PURE. iE AGENTS, SAVANNAH, GA.

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S, F. & W. Ry. PTJLLMAN SLEEPING CAP SERVICE betweeii ALL IMPORTANT POINTS. 294 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Ives W M, county judge Ives W M Jr, lawyer Johnson L W, wagonmaker and blacksmith King C R, lawyer and notary public King & Harrison, C R King & L Harrison, real estate agts Knight Wm B, manager Western Union and Int Ocean Telegraph Companies Lake City Bank, N S Collins cashier Lovier R H, watches and jewelry McLeod F, post master Masters J C, grist mill and blacksmith Moncrief J D, contractor and builder Moncrief & Wood, J D Moncrief & L B Wood, brick mnfrs Niblack J L, physician Palmer B H, lawyer Parish J L, tax collector Perry J W, sheriff Potsdamer J, supt co schools Potsdamer M, genl mdse Potter L H, dentist, physician and millinery Richards W W, lawyer Roberts B S, genl mdse Roberts H L R, State senator Roberts S D, grocer Robinson, W E, jeweler and curiosities Ross A E, watches and jewelry and express agt St James Academy, Rev C C Snowden principal Satchwell & McClamma the Misses, millinery and notions Seeph Duval, genl mdse Sheffield Wm A, mayor Stoy & Harrison, H R Stoy & L Harrison, proprs Columbia Star Streety J D, stoves, tinware, paints and oils Summerall John R c, grocer Taylor Wm, grocer and saloon Thrasher House, Mrs M P Thrasher propr Thompson & Hart, S B Thompson & A B Hart, saw mill, lumber dealer, brick mnfrs and cotton gins The Florida Baptist Witness, Ashurst & Co pub The Lake City Reporter, C A Finley editor and propr' Tillis T B, genl mdse Tompkins John W, State representative Troyman J H, dentist Vinzant J Jr, clerk co court Watts D A, physician Watts G W, grocer Williams Henry, barber Wilson J M, propr Chicago House Wilson Wm H, hardware, agricultural implements, sewing machines and undertaker Wood J S, genl mdse Young Jas E, genl mdse Land Owners — A J Anderson, Romeo Alexander, Frank Anders, London Allen, Major Allen, Samuel A Adams, Mrs Sarah A Adams, J M Allison, Zipp Allen, A H & H H Allen, W W Anderson, Waldman Allstrom, J A Aarons, Dennis Adams, Thos J Adams, D W Brown, Dr G M Bates, James P Bruden, Foster Brooks, Louisa CIDER I AM HEADQUARTERS FOR CIDER. J. B. REEDY, Grocer and Importer, Savnanah, Ga.

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Sugar Mills and Pans. Our Leading Specialty. M. KEHOE & CO., Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 295 F Bryant, S P Buie, John W Barret, H F Barwick, J Barber, Wilson Butler, F C Bethea, Thos C Bethea, B A Braunen, Wm Bethea, E H Braddock, J W Boatwright, B B Bell, B F Bell, Mrs S S Bateman, Adolphus Brooks, B F Brinson, B Burnett, K T Bell, John A C Bates, Dr W T Bacon, Laura Bartholomew, W B Brinkley, H Boose, Andy Bradley, A B Brown, Mary A Bryant, E Braunen, J F B aya, Bigelow & Taylor, Bigelow, Taylor & Perry, C B Bartley, A G Bigelow, A A Bethea, Simon Boggs, WmBarnett, J Bright, H Brown Sr, J R Brunson, W H Baker, Robt Burgoyne, Jno E Bruden, J Burt, W S Cone, Mrs Martha Cook, W R Cain, P Clark, W O Chambliss, Mrs Jane Chambliss, Miss Elmira Chambliss, D C Copeland, W A Cox, Wm Clir.e, G W Chambers, G W Crim, S B Cathey, K Chambers, J B Crim, Mrs M M Colson. P Carson, O P Carson, P T Chastain, K V Crouly T C Carter, R H Cox, E Carington A L Charles, T L Cox, James F Cathey, M J Curry, Eliza Carrington, S R Curtis, G M Cline, L Croft, Samuel Cannon, Willis D Cathey, Wm Clark, Geo Coles, Moses Corbin, Wm Corbin, R W Cain, Peter PI Clemens, David Cook, R PI Charles. C F Crews, A Davidson, T F Dicks, T C Denham, J WDicks,W Douberly, A Daughtry, W E Dennard, I Doidge, Burrell Davis, D S Driven, Mrs M M Dortel, Joseph Dicks, Frank DeFerro, G F Duke, W M Duke, J W Dowling & Co, Phillip L Drye, Emily Davis, Jacob Douberly Mrs Martha Daniel, J A Daughtrey, Jacob E Ellis, M H Edwards, R S Evans, L J Edwards, Mrs L D Ezell, Stephen Edwards, Mrs Sarah Easton, T J Edwards, J L Elder, J N Emerson, J J Finley, Edward Foster, N B Foreman, J J Fielding Franklin Fleming, Gilbert Francis, M PI Feagle, T W Fielding, S B Fielding, C N Fielding, J W Funk, Luke Fleming, J W Fleming, Rev C G Fife, AnCHICAGO HOUSE, LAKE CITY J~_ dVC_ ‘WILSOFr, IpTrojpJuieLoau.. Headquarters for Commercial Men. Table supplied with the best. Hates $2.00 and $2,50 Her Day, Special Rates for Tourists spending the Winter, also, liberal terms by the Week or Month. |HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is soft and mellow to the taste. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAYANNAH, GA.

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WAY-CROSS SHORT LINE F. & W. Ry TO FLOMDA. 296 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER thony Fleming, G N Fletcher, Sprague Fleming, Jos Fleming, W J Forson, C A Finley, A A Guise, Geo Groomes, J C Godbold, C B Godbold, J j Groomes, R J Groomes, John Griffin. Wm Griffin, Mrs A Gouldiug, Dr T C Griffin, C Groover, R C Gillen, Fanny Gurganus, S G Godbold, A Grffin, Robert Griffin, Jacob Goodbread, James O Green, Mrs Minerva Hancock, W M Hunter, Rosannah Hunter, Lenora Hunter, A F Hunter, Susan D Hardon, J L Hinton, James Flogan, R J Hill, A J Henry, Frank Haffner, W T Hoover, H H Havird, J R Herndon, Dock Hall, Geo W Helton, S N Hunt, Rev W H Hunter, W W Havird, Isaac Hogens, Amos Hodge, P J V Hutchioson, Danl Hancock, Mrs C Hening, David Haddock, Mrs P Harington, H A Hooker, John Henry, J J Hoke, C J Hutchinson, Mrs Jane Hutchinson, T A Hutchinson, Dr M M T Hutchinson, Shadrach Holt, Alex F Hunt, W P Harvey, H J Hodges, Alex Hamilton, Dr G H Hunter, L Harrison, J E Henry, Hayne Hunter, J W Hensley, Simon Hancock, A Harrison, A B Hagen, E P Hickson, John F Herb, Mrs Kesiah Herb, Edward Hogens, Solomon Hooks, Thos F Herb, Wm M Ives Jr, Danl Johnson, D B Jones, J H Jones, Chas Jones, Alfred Jones, J C Jones, H S Jones, Alfred Jernigan, Isaac Jenkins, W C Jernigan, Philip A 001 ITC ^ raa ^ e a specialty of I MfTLEd. Import. Jackson, Amos Jerry Sr, M Johns, Mehala Johns, John Johnson, Nancy Johnson, Mary Jones, W H Jernigan, Andrew Jones, John B Johns, Dr J M Jackson, Henderson Jackson, David Johnson, Randall Johnson, Mary Johnson, Wm J Jordan, W H Knight, Mrs Margaret Kent, Wiley A Kinard, James P King, Geo G King, C R King, JAM Kirby, H J Kirby, W B Knight, Jos B Keen, W C Langston, G Little, Hughes Lee, Thos Laws, Thos A Langford, Betsey Livingston, Geo Lowe, J F Lines, Mrs B A Law, Wm Lake, A C Laing, Eli Livingston, Selina Landers, J D Moncrief, GC Miller, W H Morgan, J W Morgan, Henry Morell, Samuel McLane, R W Marcum, Mrs MB Meigs, Robt Morehead, E H Mattox, G C Mattox, M H Mattox, W B Moore, H C Marcum, H J Marcum, Leonidus Mclred, P Miquel, R M Moseley, John McGam, Susan McPield, John Mole, B L Morgan, W D Muller, Mrs Susan R Moore, J A Moye. J C Marcum, F McLeod, E Q McLeod, York Mizell, J H Mickler, John P Mays, Susan McRay, Alfred McRay, A B McDuffie, V S McNider, W F Miley, Peter Mallet, Tillman Malden, S R McMillen, M McLellan, Mrs Attalia Niblack, Wm Nobles, Dr J L Niblack, John Niblack, J W Niblack, W G Niblack, Mrs H Niblack, Arch Niblack Jr, Joel T Niblack, A Nelson, P Nepoleon, H ncy Apples. J. B. REEDY, Grocer, and of Fruit, Savannah, Ga.

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Saw Mill Work OF ALL KINDS FURNISHED BY JOHN JROURKE 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 297 Noegel, C Noegel, J P Nettles, Mack Nobles, William Nobles, Isaac Ogden, W J Owens, Burnell Outlaw, G R Ogden, W W Ocain, Mrs Sarah Ogden, W H Ogden, W T Owens, A Owens, A Owens, L F Ogden, Edinboro Owens, J Owens, J P Phillips, Robert Parnell, Carl A Pueschal, Thomas Page, Wm H Paschol, R D Phillips, Danl Parrot, Jas J Powers, S M Parker, W H Parker, Samuel Price, Mrs S H Parnell, James T Parnell, Lucius Padgett, John C Paxson, Polidora Price, W A Phillips, Simpson Parnell, John L Porter, Edmund Pendleton, R S Prichard, Calvin Parnell, H H Pearce, Mrs Eliza Pearce, N B Pearce, N E Pearce, B H Palmer, Joseph Price, W L Peeples, Berrien Powell, N J Patterson, J W Payne, Hartwell Pendleton, J B Quince, G W T D Rich, G P Reddick, J W Reddick, R B Roberts, Wm Robinson, David Roberts, C H Rizer, John C C Roberts, Antler Roberts, B C Rigdon, D J Rivers, I Rivers, D J Rivers, L W A Rivers, Louis Rivers, J R Roberts, W B Roberts, B J Roberts, E H Roberts, David Roberts, Dr H L R Roberts, John D Roberts, Yarrow Rountree, Joseph Robinson, Alex Reese, Moses Reese, M K Reid, J Rutland, L H Raulerson, Asa Richards, M C Rich, Stephen Reddin, A Rathenbenick, Jonathan Robinson, W B Rowe, S D Stewart, Stephen Strauder, Harry Stephen, D F Shute, Deal Sherman Sr, Joseph Smith, Lewis Soloman, J J Sealey, Ambrose P Smith, Pricilla Smith, A J Smith, L P Summerall, Harvey Simons, Allen Sims, R G Strange, Joseph Shade, Deal Shermon Jr, Thos Steed, Margian Summerall, G A Smithson, Geo B Smithson, James Sanders, H M Summers, R R Strange, P B Summers, Henry Summers, Y F Shepherd, C H Shepherd, J L Strange, Hatten Sample, C R Summer, W D Scarborough, Mrs T Shepperd, W P Shepperd, D P Summers, M M Scarborough, Wm Sanders, G Stewart, Wm Summers, D T Summers, Mrs E Summers, J W Sever, Charles Smith, Adam J Smith, Charles J Sandell, Sami R Scott, Jessie Smith, Swift & Bro, Rev J G Taylor, Chas Turner, Wesley Tate, Joseph Taylor, J W Tompkins, P A Thomas, A B Turner, W B Turner, J H Taylor, Mrs C Tompkins, John H Tuyman, Paul Tonsil, Frank Tonsil, S B Thompson, Thompson & Hart, Robert Taylor, J J Thrasher, H D L Taylor, S B Thompson, W H Tyre, John Vinzant Jr, Martin VanBuren, G Vinzant, W H Wilson, Amos A Williams, F M Waldress, F B Walker, G H Waldron Sr, L F Walker, V E Wadsworth, J R Wise, W R Wheeler, Theo Williams, W F Watson, S L Williams, Mrs Mary Willis, Paris R Williams, A J Warren, Josiah Warren, W W Willis, Jerry Wilson, Enoch T HE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY possesses an excellent bouquet. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents. SAVANNAH, GA. 37

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S F^r W T?V LINE o., r oo vv s & y quick time. 298 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Wardlaw, Henry Wilson, J Williams, Adam Watts, Ned West, G Wood, R Wilkins, J C Waldron, W F Williams, J S Wood, W L Warren, David Williams, W P Wadsworth, C G White, Wiley W Williams, M S Weston, Martha Williams, Peter Williams, G T Wickingham, James E Young, Mrs A O Young, James Young, Mary Youmans. LAKE COMO. Putnam county. This place derives its name from the Lake of the same name, which is a beautiful, clear sheet of water about 3 miles in length and 1 in width. It is surrounded by settlers engaged in the orange business. It has a landing on Lake Crescent, distant one and three-quarter miles, by means of which there is daily communication with Palatka 25 miles distant. Mails daily. C T Potter, P M Abercrombie John, saw mill Bird W W, physician Dusenbury D E, real estate and ins agt Manchester J A, ins agt Potter C T, genl mdse Prior Horace, timber Slade Charles, contractor and builder Smith W G, dentist Land Owners — Wm K Prior, C G Ellis, W G Smith, Charles Smith, A J Robinson, C V Hutchins, E Abercrombie, F N W G Slade, Geo E Miller, F W Post, B C Post, H Carter, Wm Bingham, D Bingham, John Hawkins, C P Roberts, A Baker. LAKE BE FUmAK. Walton county. This is comparatively a new place, only a year old, is situated on the north bank of Lake DeFuniak, and is a station on the Pensacola & Atlantic Railroad ; the place has five stores, a saw mill, a grist mill, a weekly newspaper, one church and one school, and a new hotel is in course of construction, which will cost over $60,000 ; mails daily. W B Saunders, P M Baker R Q Rev, Presbyterian Bodiford J C, druggist and physician Campbell D L, druggist and physician Cawthorn M A, genl mdse Cawthorn W J, butcher Cockcroft, W A, blacksmith Dill T D, physician Dupont F L Rev, Baptist Gossett J C, hotel Henderson J J, genl mdse Henderson W J, justice of the peace Jones A P, hotel Lake DeFuniak Academy Lake DeFuniak Grist Mill, R R Smith Lake DeFuniak Hotel & Park Co Lake DeFuniak Saw Mill, D J Stubbes McCullough Jno, saloon McSwain Alex, genl mdse McSwain D G, genl mdse Monroe W A, genl mdse FRUIT When you want Strictly Choice Fruit, at bottom prices, send your orders to J. B. REEDY, Savannah, Ga.

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We Guarantee our Prices. WM. KEltOE
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XK? “Rv Motive to., x oo vv &?rrr^j> etjORida.^ 300 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Patton R T, hotel Rainey F, livery stable Richardson J A, justice of the peace Simmons J M, druggist Spiller J W, boarding Stone A, physician Stronge Geo H, R R and express agent Taliaferro B J, dairy Turner E, genl mdse Land Owners — D J Allen, A S Apgar, Mrs J J Ansley, W H Barton, Wm Britt, Buchman & Eshleman, W P Brown, J S Bispham, E R Baker, C C Beasley, John Beasley, S P Cheseldine, H S Cox, E T Crafts, C W Cook, Marcus Desha, J C Eaton, F W Elbrey, H A Elkins, S J Errickson, W S Eldridge, J J W Ford, Sami H Garvin, W H Heath, Wm A Hunter, Eliza A Hunter, J E Hill, Ed C Hungerford, R L Hungerford, — Holt, G W Hill, Geo E Hudson, Alfred Iverson, Mrs A Iverson, Minnie Iverson, H S Kedney, H S Kedney & Co, Kedney & Apgar, Kedney & Whipple, Kedney & Graham, J S Kedney, Kedney & MeHenry, Kedney & J McHenry, T B Kimball, L H Lawrence, Nancy Lee, T H Lewis, John Limback, James Little, Alfred Marsh, Jno R Mizell, R G Mays, Oscar Mejo, Marks & Bigelow, F G McMurry, C M Nell, R V Nevins, D E Patton, W T Patton, O H Palmer, John A Prentice, Arden Renekar, E H Richmond, Andrew Richmond, Edgar Richmond, V Richmond, Confectioners’ Supplies. J A Richmond, Geo N Stevens, Geo T Smith, Smith & Mays, E T Sturdivant, Benj Self, G W Strong, J C Stovin, Mary G Stovin, J C Smith, W E Smith, Thos Simms, Simmons & Kennedy, J S Simmons, C H Simmons, H L Sholes, Fisk Sholes, L A Shaffer, Symond & Chase, C R Switzer, W W Taylor, J D Taylor, V B Townsend, J R Tantum, C B Thurston, J K VanBibbs, C E Ventress, G F Ward, H B Whippie, Mrs E S White, N A Wilson. LAKE PANASOFKEE. Is a very picturesque body of water, and the traveler finds many valuable orange groves upon its shores. It is famed by sportsmen for its splendid hunting and fishing. Connection is made here with steamers for the Witklacooche river, which ply from the lake to the mouth of the river, which flows into the Gulf 20 miles south of Cedar Key. The river is narrow and very deep. LAKE SIDE. Clay county. A general store 30 miles west of Green Cove Springs, and 9 east of Starke ; has one church, one school, saw and grist mill, etc; mails semiweekly by stage to Starke. Morgan W Lee, P M Fewkes Joseph F, saw, grist, and planing mill and cotton gin J. B. REEDY, Grocer, and Importer of Eruit,“SAYANNAH, Ga.

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John Rourke. AGRICULTURAL IRON AND BRASS WORKS, 2 BAT STREET, SAVANNAH, G-A. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 301 Lee M W, genl mdse and boarding Moore J H, justice of the peace Murray C R, physician Pratt J, Justice of the peace Tanner D W C, physician Land Owners — Martha Fewkes, Elizabeth Fewkes, Joseph T Fewkes, Wm Fisher, Chas Foster, Chas B Griffis, R Griffis, J W Dean, J W Battin, E J Branen, G W Wiley, D L Phillips, James Phillips, Andrew Sulivant, Rubin Sulivant, Thos Dixon, Moses Coleman, John Coleman, Elias Moore, Henry Moore, J C Srtickland, S A Strickland, Jessie Hagan, M Anderson. LAKE WEIR. Marion county. Sixteen miles from Ocala, is situated on Lake Weir in a good agricultural district. Ayer L, physician Benson Chas F, justice of the peace Campbell George E, nurseryman Henderson J H, saw mill Hood M, notary public Lake Weir Female Inst Lake Weir Common School Morton Geo, notary public Morton William, notary public Thompson Ruffin, physician Wright Harry, genl mdse Wright Thomas F, genl mdse Land Owners — L M Ayer, Alfred Ayer, L P Ayer, — Bitchfield, W W Britton, B T Baker, B F Bracken, S Blackwell, C T Benson, E Conner, A F Carney, E L Carney, G E Campbell, T F Guin, N M Grundy, W S Harland, J J Havis, J Hunt, N L Holmes, Ben Hunt, L M King, James Mitchell, T J Myers, John Morrell, N O Oberry, T M Richards, W H Shackelford, H Short, B F Smoot, E L Turnley, A E Williams, J E Wilson. LAKE WORTH. Dade county. A mail distributing point, situated between Lake Worth and the ocean, 80 miles north of Miami, the county seat. Cocoanuts, bananas, pineapples, etc., are the chief products; mails weekly by sail boats. V O Spencer, P M Brilsford John H, State representative Dimick E N, hotel Heiser A E, notary public and county judge Lanehart Wm M, saw mill Moore C, justice of the peace Potter G W, county surveyor Potter R B, physician and justice of the peace Land Owners — Stephen Andrews, Mrs D Brelsford, Minnie Brelsford, David Brown, James W Copp, E Candradson, DeHanscom, E M Dimick, M M Dimick, H P Dye, Albert Geer, H D Hendrickson, Allen Heyser, A L Hammond, H F Hammond, Irvin Henry, Charles A Lane, Patrick Lemon, Benj Lanhart, W H Lanehart, W H Moore, Chas Moore, — McFarlane, — McKenna, E B Potter, mHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is soft and mellow to the taste. A S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA.

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b p iD XJST FAST MAIL TRAINS THROUGH WiTH BUT' ^•9 iJ OO f. Al J • FEW STOPPING POINTS. 302 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Geo W Potter, D O Spencer, M E Spencer, L Swinheard, Abner Wilder, A G Winberg, E I Wilder. LA VILLA. Duval county. A western suburb of Jacksonville which is only separated from the latter by an imaginary line, Clay street being the division. It has a mayor and is an entirely distinct corporation, but has no postoffice of its own. Its population numbers about 1,500. For names of parties doing business here see Jacksonville. LAWTEY. Bradford county. A way station on the Florida Transit and Peninsula Railroad Railroad. Shipman V J, genl mdse Todd E A, physician LECAS^TO. Hernando county. A newly established postoffice, which receives a semi-weekiy mail from Brooksville, the county seat, 20 miles south. John E King, P M. Allen Charles E, butcher Haralson John R Rev, Baptist King John E, justice of the peace Morrison John P, carpenter Paul Warren S, carpenter and builder Land Owners — H B King, John E King, James W King, Thomas Payne, Josiah Payne, John B Haralson, Eugene A Harrison, Columbus Home, J T Barnes, James W Johns, John P Morrison, David Pierson, Jno J Davis, Charles E Allen, Wm A Allen, John A Allen, W S Paul, Henry V Taylor, Wm H Anderson. LEE. Madison county. A new postoffice and a way station on the Florida, Central and Western Railroad, 8 miles from Madison court house. Cotton is the chief product ; mails daily. Thomas L Boon, P M Boon Thomas L, section master Brass & Wadsworth, genl mdse Haven Henry & G B, genl mdse Phillips James, saw and grist mill Williams J A, grist mill and cotton gin LandOwners — John Williamson, J G Williams, T J Williams, J L Kent, Minzy Baley, R E Wadsworth, J D Willis, Wm R Hayes, J E Blanton, J Sullivan, J I Rhodes, Henry Haren, Niger Bros, BA Horton, M E Williams, Nedham Rye, W V Tool, John Rye, B T Ponder, John S Haven, J A Jones, William Johnson, James Fryar, John G Phillips. LEESBURG. Sumter county. Is on Florida Southern and Florida Transit Railroads, is also reached by St. Johns & Lake Eustis R. R., LEMONS. 1 haadle sStT house J. B. REEDY, Savannah, Ga.

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Sugar Mills and Pans, Onr Pans are Smooth and Uniform in Thickness WM. KEIIOE & CO., Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 303 by means of a line of boats owned and managed by the Road that run from Eustis to Leesburg across Lakes. Eustis and Harris. Has Southern Express Office and Florida Commercial Co., and Sanford Telegraph Co. The town is situated on a high pine ridge overlooking Lakes Harris and Griffin, in which fish are found in great abundance; here hunting is also good, which furnish great attraction for the sportsman. The town has a population of about 700; has two good hotels and several boarding houses, three churches, and good public schools, and may be classed as one of the growing towns ol Florida ; early vegetables are produced in great quantities, also oranges, pine apples, bananas, &c., all of which find sale in the Northern markets; is 107 miles from Palatka, and 182 from Jacksonville. Alston W W, manager and editor Leesburg News Baer B M, genl mdse Blocker S B, restaurant Bradford N G, contractor and builder Carr W P, propr Leesburg Hotel Clark R J, butcher Collins & Watts, M W Collins and J M and G H Watts, genl mdse Coudey J M, justice of the peace Dean R H, physician Downing J C C, physician Efird Able B, genl mdse Gibbons House, J D Ryalsprop Gibbons Thomas F, plasterer Hampton H J, blacksmith Hampton M M, physician Hester & Bro, M K and Willis W, billiards Hocker & Mabry, William A Hocker and M H Mabry, lawyers Hull J H Mrs, boarding Hunter J A, justice of the peace Kentucky House, Watts & Lanier proprs Leesburg Hotel, W P Carr propr Leesburg News, W W Alston editor and manager Lees John W, real estate, notary public and insurance agent Lovelace & Miller, Thomas J Lovelace and Eben Miller, druggists, stationery, etc Lovelace Thos J, boarding Matthewson J P, physician Maughlin W W, architect Meriwether H B, photographer Millen J B, agt Southern Ex Co Miller John, grocer Moore J Nat, real estate agt Mote E H, livery stable Parsons G, dentist J. W. LEES, Real Estate Agent Loans Negotiated. Collections made. Fire Insurance placed in Reliable Companies CONVEYANCES, DEEDS, MORTGAGES And other Documents promptly written. NOTARY PUBLIC for the STATE OF FLORIDA AT LARGE. OFFICE MAIN STREET, LEESBURG, FLORIDA. mHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is distilled from the choicest -1qualities of Grain. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga.

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Florida Dispatoli Fast P'roiglxt Lino. s., r. & w. Rj. 304 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Pearce, Hanson & Co, T I Pearce, J A Hanson and J A Hunter, hardware, stoves, tinware, furniture and undertaker Powell Erwin, barber Ramey J B, harness maker and shoemaker Roach David D, boarding Ryals Jas D, propr Gibbons House Sharrard Robert E, watches, clocks, etc Stevens N C, physician Taylor David J, agt Florida Southern R R Fowle John W, wheelwright Turner Bros, E L Turner, genl mdse Vanlandingham JB & Co, J B Vanlandingham and J A Collins, grocers, hay and grain, house furnishing goods Venable N E & Co, N E Venable and J B Farrar, druggists, booksellers and stationers Watts & Lanier, Geo H Watts and Belton C Lanier, proprs Kentucky House Weedon Geo B, physician Wheeler Harrison H, manager Sanford Telegraph Co, and Florida Commercial Co. Land Owners — Moses Adams, Owen Albright, J S Adams, Jessie T Adams, Charlotte Atkinson, Mrs P Armstrong, P B Alsobrook, Akney & Protois, Mrs Nancy Brown, E B Bailey, S A Borders, J E Borders, Mary J Bryant, J I Boswell, Augustus Bozenquet, Mrs Barkley, Virginia Blackman, Charles Benedict, Wm Broaden, Bishop Hoyt & Co, B M Baer, J H Bishop, Mark H Collins, G M Clark, Cooper & Jones, Frank Clows, Matthew Coleman, J A Clary, Mrs. W H Cough, D B Campbell, R Coleman, S T Cox, F C Childs, Rev A E Cloud, F W Craft, Jas A Condry, R S Cravens, J R Cunningham, A J Cassadv, Wm A Cassady, H S Childs, M W Dozier, J W Dyches, E A Delouest, J J Dickinson, Mrs Eliza Downing, J S Dyches, Geo H Drawdy, Thos Dillon, Butler Dabney, Mrs Elizabeth Dojier, Obed J. B. VAEANDIMAM i CO. LEESBURG, FLA. DEALERS IN HAY AND GRAIN, FERTILIZERS, Wood and WClow-W are and Crockery. VEGETABLES. Always on hand a full supply of the best. J. B. REEDY, Savannah, Ga.

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TV J* J GIVEN ON ALL KINDS OF MACHINERY AND REPAIRS, JVSllllilllLS BY JOHN ROU11KE 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 305 Fuhsell, A D Field, Benj Frazer, Philip J Fretwell, Wm Goodson, Salana Galloway, J L Goldsby, Thos J Griffith, Floyd Grant, Chas N Gould, Thomas P Goodrich, J J & R T Gardner, Jas J Gardner, Gill & Portrois, J I Gibbons, Hubbard & McDuff, Mrs Martha Hardin, H G Heisle, J W Hansbro, J B Hunter, Hendon & Hubbard, Tbos Hallman, Mrs M Holden, Mrs F B Holden, Thos Hansbro, Thos Hyatt, Duke M Hopson, V L Hopson, J S Hopson, Hopson & Doline, Volney V Haynes, Wm Henshaw, Mrs E K Hendrix, C P Herndon, Wm Hyten, Mary S Hampton, Haynes & Whedor, Edward Hipgins, James Hull, Geo M Hubbard, H B Hill, E H Hodges, Geo A Hay, Henry H Hay, T K Hall, Samuel Hansbro, A M Hammell E C Hood, Edward Howe, John A Hunter, Mrs J T Harris, W F Jameson, John James, Wm M Jones, Joe Johnson, Levi Jones, Jackman & Rainbow, Jaffrey & Heckshire, Mrs Mary Johnson, Jessie Jones, J A Kimmons, C M Knott, Mrs H B Koster, Myron M Lovell, Lake & Fleming, T G Lanier, J C Lee, Wm H Long, P A Lee, L B Lee, Geo M Lee, Jonah A Lee, Geo S Legrane, B D Langford, Dr Jas Leffers, S J Lawson, W F Lowe, Jacob Lassetta, D S Low, Susan J Lanier, J W Lees, C P Lovell, J C Love, N C Lee, H B Merriweather, James Mitchell, Alice Mundie, Jessie Miller, Maria McM&in, A B McCullum, A H Mathes, Malasa McAllister, Murry McAllister, Sarah A Me Allister, Mrs C V Miller, W H McCormack, Dr James Mathewson, J E McClung, Alex McRae, J N Moore, Walter McIntyre, D R Moore, Hobbs Mitchell, David Mathews, C E Moore, James Monroe, Ezekiel Mathews, Mrs C Mathews, Jno J McClendon, W H Moss, E H Motte, Isaac Nayles, A B Nelson, W F Norton, W W Ormsbee, John H Perkins, Soloman J Peters, G B Parker, Geo W Parsons, Jos H C Pratt & Bros, Henry R Pierce, E T Pepper, J Porter & Bros, Mrs J B Procter, Jacob Robinson, Mrs M J Robinson, Mrs EB Roberts, Elmina Roberts, N B & J H Roberts, N O Roberts, Geo G Rambo, Wm Reeve, Geo Robinson Sr, A J Rivark, J A Robb, Geo L Robinson, J E Roads, David Roach, A P Roberts, A P Rook, Josephine M Rooks, Rambo & Lanies, James H Robinson, Dr A A Stivender, Mrs F H bligh, Jacob M Sligh, R N Simson, S B Sligh, S J Sligh, G C Stapleton, Mrs E L Sharrard, Akin Stivender, Lucinda H Stone, J T Stinson, James W Speaght, S W Siglar, Stapylton & Rooks, Sims & Culley, Stevens & Cunningham, Dr N C Stevens, R A Stewart, E S Turner, W S Turner, Turner & Bradford, Samuel J Tanner, Martin Tanner, Wm E Vail, F B D Vaughn, Dr N E Vanable, Albert W Vinson, Mrs A mllE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is soft and mellow to the taste. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, SAVANNAH, GA. 38

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PULLMAN SLEEPING CAR SERVICE between ALL IMPORTANT POINTS. S., F. & W. Ry. o 0 6 FRORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Williams, Rayford Williams, Mary S Wilson, Jacob W Walton, G H Watts, Wm W Ward, Thos Waterman, Spencer Willis, Joseph Wright, G H Warring, Allen J Ward, Mrs W W Warner, Mrs C Witherington, Robs N Winn, Anthony Workman, A R Williams. LEB*JARD. Hernando county. Lately established as a postoffice, is 14 miles from Brooksville court house, from which it receives a semi-weekly mail. W S Kustor, P M Daniel Moses, justice of the peace Isley Simon, blacksmith Huster C F, photographer McLeod Daniel T Rev, Baptist McLeod Elijah, constable Oberry Joseph, stock dealer Land Owners — Thomas L Bleatch, Henry Bratham, Wm Crum, David Crum, Freeman Croft, Newton Dowling, James Dowling, Moses Daniels, Chas F Kuster, Wm S Kuster, David W Leneve, W McLeod, David McLeod, E McLeod, Wm T McLeod, E Morgan, H C McRae, Wm T Seay, William L Daniel, Franklin P Daniel, Geo Mills, Freeman McLeod, Jordon Boatwright, Clarence W Close. LESMO. Columbia county. Is situated on the Santa Fe river, 20 miles south of Lake City. Whetstone G M, genl mdse LEVYVSLLE. Levy county. The former county site, is a thriving village in the midst of a fine farming section, situated as it is half way between the Florida Transit Railroad and the Suwanee river. It does a fine business in the handling of live stock, lumber, Sea-Island cotton, oats, potatoes, &c. Its health, location, good schools, pleasant society and populous neighborhood offer superior inducements to settlers. Iron ore in large quantities is found near this place, and a company has already been organized to work the mine. A route for a branch road from Bronson to the Suwanee river, running by these mines, has been surveyed and will be soon built. The survey of the Live Oak, Tampa and Charlotte Harbor Railroad, that will cross a portion of Levy county, runs near by. Appel Louis, tax assessor Bredleman E M, grist and saw mill and cotton gin Butler F H & Co, genl mdse Carter N R, county treasurer Carter N R & Co, genl mdse Clyatt Wm W, State representative French C E, druggist and physician Heirs J D, saloon Prevatt T J, justice of the peace Land Owners — J Adams, J T Allen, L Appel, J ulia A Barnett, E M Beidelman, M A Beck, S B Bryant, R Boytt, Margaret Barrow, Hiers & Carter, N R CarBANANAS am the only Importer of Red and Yellow Bananas in the State, J, B, REEDY, Savannah, Ga.

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Sugar Mills and Pans. A full Stock of all Sizes. WM. KEHOU & (jO., iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 307 ter & Co, Ira J Carter, Turner & Carters, Martha E Cosan, M F Clyatt, S J Clyatt, John M Clyatt, Caroline Clyatt, Wm W Clyatt, T P Clyatt, Mrs Frances J Colson, Madison Carmon, James N Dixon, Geo E Elliott, Daniel Faircloth, John Faircloth, Mrs M J Fletcher, Sarah Feaster, John Garner, J P Gore, A G Graham, Lizzie Hagen, Susan Hardee, J S Hardee, H K Haze, Sarah E Ham, J D Hiers, W H Highsmith, Elizabeth Highsmith, S F Highsmith, Caleb Higginbotham, L J Hogans, Daniel B Hogans, M A Holston, G V Hudson, John P Jackson, Mrs M E Jackson, Moses Keen, W M Lancaster, H Lancaster, Mary A Love, James Lewis, J R McGrath, David L McGowan, C W McElroy, W B McElroy, R P Miller, R J Mooney, S S Moore, Pompey Norris, Ed Norris, Jas A Overstreet, Rebecca Owens, A D Perryman, Jos P Phelps, Emma Potts, T J Prevatt, J M Prevatt, Fanny Prevatt, L J Purdham, Samuel Quincy, Wm Richardson, Elizabeth F Rogers, A B Sanchez, Moses L Sandlin, Levy Sanderson, Simeon Shoffield, Jas K Shoffield, Henry Smith, Mrs M M Smith, H Studstell, Emanuel Studstell, Martha Studstell, Garrott Swindall, Isaac Swindall, C C Swindall, T Tillis, Jno W Tindale, Sarah E Hardee, Mrs N S Hardee, J Thompson, R S Tucker, S P Turner, J S Turner, Florida Tyson, Edward Ward, Mrs C M Ward, S N Watson, W J Watson, G H Waterson, John Waterson, Richard Wilder, D L Wilkinson, C A Wilkinson, W Williams, LeRoy Wood, T J Wood, R Woodward. LS3OTONA. Hillsborough co. Eighteen miles west of Tampa court house, with which it is connected by stage semi-weekly. J G Knapp, P M Burdick E L, saw and grist mill Coe J L, saw mill Ferris H C, genl mdse Limona Academy Loring E D, physician Land Owners — F C Avery, W H Block, Isaac M Brandap, J M Brown, E L Burdick, S E Bacon, J Brandon, J H Brandon, Geo Baker, G T Chamberlain, J L Coe, A E Coe, B E Coe, D G Cox, John P Dopp, J A Davenport, E E Dickerson, C S Doolittle, R Gholson, J H Hickman, A Hewett, M H Hewett, M L Hewett, N B Hendrix, A H Hires, H S Hewett, R J Hendrix, Henry Hewett, T W Jones, J G Knapp, J R Kinsey, J R King, C A Linsley, J Leach, E D Loring, W J Lewis, W A Leggat, D A Moore, Souder Parish, L D Parmer, J Packer, E E Pratt, John Parish, T F Reynolds, Alexander Shaw, R Summerall, O’Neal Shaker, G W Tousey, J F Wright, M Williams, John Weeks. nnHE CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY is distilled from the choicest qualities of Grain. S. GUCKENHEIMER & SON, Sole Agents, Savannah, Ga.

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F. & W. By. WAY-CROSS SHORT LINE TO FLORIDA. 308 FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER LIMPKIN BLUFF. A steamboat landing on the [ Ocklawaha river, 122 miles from Palatka. LITTLE RIVER. Suwanee county. Little river is situated near the centre and on the eastern border of the county in a quiet neighborhood of good, industrious citizens, all of whom are farmer. The above site is six miles from the F. C. & W. Railroad, Welborn station being the nearest shipping point. This neighborhood is noted for its forests being densely covered with the very best and largest of yellow pines for saw mill enterprises. LIVE OAEC. One hundred and seventynine miles from Savannah, 82 from Jacksonville and Tallahassee ; Western Union Telegraph station, postoffice and agency of the Southern Express Company ; population about 1,500; county seat of Suwanee county. It takes its name from the live oak sink, which was a celebrated landmark with the early settlement of this portion of the State, from 1824 until it was selected by the engineers in locating the branch road as the starting point to connect with the Georgia system. The ffive oak tree which marked the sink, and gave to it the name, is now dead, having been destroyed by the rising of the water in the sink, caused by the railroad emForeign Dried and Green Fruit bankment, which obstructed the outlet. Truck farming is carried on extensively at this point, and large quantities of vegatables are shipped to the Northern and Northwestern cities every season. Formerly this point was the gateway of all the traffic to and from Florida by rail ; but since the completion of the Waycross Cut-off, a large portion of the traffic has sought East Florida by the way of Jacksonville and Callahan. The largest naval stores manufactories in the world are located near here, and several mills and gins worked by steam power, give a local importance to the place. Allison Robt F, State representative Baisden Bros, genl mdse Bird Wm H, genl mdse Blackman M M, judge Suwanee co Bulletin, DMM cAlpine editor Bryson Wm, State' senator Bynum J R, lawyer and real estate agt Carroll J T, genl mdse Clark & Blount, contractors and builders Clouts JAM, groceries Clouts SLA, genl mdse Collins John A, painter Davis George, blacksmith Dexter H F, genl mdse Dexter — Mrs, cotton gin Button C &, naval stores mnfr Ethel House, John Fraser propr Flake & McAlpine, real estate agts In large variety, at J. B. REEDY’S, Grocer* and Importer of Fruit, Savannah, Ga.

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Sugar Mills, AND PA&S OF ALL SIZES, MADE BY JOHN ROURKE, 2 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, GA. AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 309 Flake Wm, druggist Florida Institute, Rev J L A Fish pres Fraser House, Jno Fraser propr Fraser John, grist mill and cotton gin Gallagher J C, lawyer Gornto F M, grist mill and cotton gin Hall John W, genl mdse Hawkins A T Mrs, millinery Hawkins J S, physician Hawkins W, baker and confec Hopkins Thos, photographer Ingalls C M, blacksmith Intelligencer, Whitfield Bros Jennings L A, grocer and baker Johnson A, saw mill Jones J O C, co supt schools Levin, H K, genl mdse McLeod A, State representative Mearson J L, genl mdse Moore T F & Co, genl mdse Overstreet S T physician Potsdamer G, saloon Railroad House, R Jones propr Reed Robt A, elk co court Reed, Broome & Moseley, genl mdse Sessions J R, sheriff Sessions W H, tax collector Shad O A, genl mdse Stephens & McCall genl mdse Suwanee House, W H E Seate prpr Suwanee Real Estate Agency White & Bryant, grocers White & Bryson, lawyers LIVERPOOL. Manatee county. Situated on Peace River ten miles north of Charlotte Harbor, has direct water communication with New Orleans, Key West, Cedar Keys, and all intermediate ports. This place is near the line of a surveyed railway, which will have its terminus at Charlotte Harbor. Mail for Liverpool goes to Fort Ogden. Cross John, notary public, real estate, and genl Florida land broker. Notary Public State of Florida, Agent for FLORIDA LAND AND IMPROVEMENT COMPANY. (DisstonÂ’s 4,000,000 acre purchase.) Agent for OKEECHOBEE LAND COMPANY. Agent for KISSIMMEE LAND COMPANY. ORANGE GROVES MADE AMD CARED FOR. Parties coming to Florida in the near future will do well to have a G-rove made two or three years before they come. Orange Grove Clubs are very popular. Send for my 4-acre grove proposition ORANGE, LEMON, LIME, BANANA and PINEAPPLES all planted on a 4-acre lot, and cared for for 3 or 5 years. Address, J. CROSS, Notary Public and General Land Broker, LIVERPOOL, MANATEE CO., FLA. CELEBRATED THISTLE DEW WHISKEY IS ABSOLUTELY PURE. S. GUCKENHEIMER, & SON, SOLE AGENTS, SAVANNAH, GA.

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S, F. & W. Ey. Elegant Passenger Equipments; Westitlghotise Air Brakes; Miller Platforms; Janey Couplers. 3IO FLORIDA STATE GAZETTEER Florida Land & Improvement Co,(Disston’s purchased 4,000,000 acres,) Manatee county, Charlotte Harbor Agency, John Cross agt FLOYD’SJefferson county. F. C. & W. R. R. A station on the above road, exactly on the dividing line of Jefferson and Leon counties, has telegraph and express offices. Bond N J, genl mdse Bond W L, grist mill, cotton gin and cotton seed oil mill Dennis G E, genl mdse Giles W W, contractor and builder Houston S J, justice of thepeace Laney M, wheelwright Lloyd T H, genl mdse and cotton gin Lloyd W F, saw mill McRory H W, druggist and stationery McRory W B, railroad agt Simmons Mrs, mantua-maker Walker J, blacksmith Whitfield L W Mrs, hotel Whitaker J W, contractor and builder Willie J J, co comsr Land Owners — G W Alford, Mrs Lou Averitt, Perkins & Averitt, B Anderson, Mrs F E Andrews, Mary Armstrong, W R Blake, H J Bond, J H Brittle, J L Bryan, B M Busbee, Frank Barrington, J Bell, Wm Bowman, B C Chapman, Mrs A Christopher, Mrs Calvinia Davis, Mrs M S Davis, G E Dennis, Mrs I K Edwards, Mrs C A Edwards, Mrs C M Edwards, J D Edwards, Mrs C P'isher, J W Freeman, Mrs Nancy Freeman, W W Gelzer, M Glennon, Irwin Granger, J A Haynes, R B Hightower, S J Housten, S Hamilton, Caroline Hicks, G M Jones, W S Jones, N G Jones, W F Lloyd, T H Lloyd, Bull McKay, T Moss, D J McLeod, H W McRory, G W Patterson, Wm Perkins, W Roberson, Mrs Adeline Saunders, Mrs D Sturges, M J & T B Taylor, J W Thompson, Mrs D Tubberville, H Tucker, Mrs S A Tucker, Mrs P'rancis S Thompson Sr, Mrs L Whitfield, E A Willie, W A Willie, J E Wyrick, Randolph Williams. LOCHLOOSA. Alachua county. A station on the Florida Transit & Peninsula Railroad, thirty miles from Gainesville; is also a landing on the lake of the same name, and the shipping point from the various landings. The lake is a beautiful sheet of water, and has great attractions for sportsmen and tourists. Mails daily. H J Koerner, P M Benson P P, contractor and builder Blake J B, saw mill and crate manufr Bounds J W, shoemaker Cain F, private school Coleman Frank, contractor and builder Ellis M W, physician Koerner H J, genl mdse Florida Oranges Consign your Oranges to J. B. REEDY, the largest Dealer in FRUIT in Georgia at SAVANNAH.

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Sugar Mills and Pans. Our Mills run perfectly true. WM. KEHOE & CO., Iron Founders, Savannah, Ga. (See front paster.) AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 3 I I Merry — Miss, private school Mingledorff R G, railroad agt Morrison Angus, justice of the peace Posey M, wheelwright and blacksmith Rountree Asa, shingle manufr Tompkins J R, butcher Land Owners — Mrs Ann Thompkins, J R Thompkins, Mrs R Thompkins, W P Thompkins, G H Winch, J D Caldwell, J Sims, W Abraham, P W N King, Calvin Johnson, Richard Nelson, Richard Roe, J C Cochran, Hu