Citation
The Beekeepers item

Material Information

Title:
The Beekeepers item
Place of Publication:
New Braunfels, Tex
Publisher:
[s.n.]
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Monthly
regular
Language:
English
Edition:
Volume 4 no.9 September, 1920
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 24-40 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Bee culture -- Periodicals ( lcsh )
Bees -- Periodicals ( lcsh )
Honey -- Periodicals ( lcsh )
Bee culture ( fast )
Bees ( fast )
Honey ( fast )
Genre:
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 1916).
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 30, no. 7 (July 1946).
General Note:
Imprint varies.
General Note:
Issues for Sept. 1924-Dec. 1935 sponsored by and designated official organ of multiple state and regional apicultural associations.
Funding:
“Funded by Project Ceres, a collaboration between the United States Agricultural Information Network (USAIN), the Agriculture Network Information Collaborative (AgNIC) and the Center for Research Libraries (CRL).”

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Florida Dept. of Agriculture & Consumer Services Division of Plant Industry
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
020353358 ( ALEPH )
07497048 ( OCLC )
Classification:
SF521 .M6x ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Dixie beekeeper
Preceded by:
Bee-keepers' review
Preceded by:
Domestic bee-keeper
Preceded by:
Western honey bee
Succeeded by:
Modern beekeeping

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text









Louis H. Scholl, Editor


heeee Beekeeperstem
A Small Item in Itself, a Bid Item For Beekeepers


Entered in the Postoffice at New Braunfels, Texas, as Second-class!Matter.


Fifty Cents Per Yean


VOL. 4 NEW BRAUNFELS, TEXAS, SEPTEMBER, 1920 NO. 9



yVit to a "VeryRemarkable Family



There are Many Prominent Beekeepers, Scattered Over the World, Who are

Well Known for What They have Accomplished, but of Them All there is

Oe Family that is Characterized as a Most Remarkable One.


"Westward the course of empire takes its way." So wTote a wise man long ago. Observation proves that other things than empires also find their aegis following the setting sun. It seems to be true at least of beekeeping. During the warm days of late September when old summer brazenly and for the last time flaunts her gorgeous colours of goldenrod and asters to the world, I had the pleasure of visiting the home of the Dadants on the banks of "The Father of Waters." In the impressions there received I felt that I had come at last to the present center and home of modern apiculture.
There resides a family of remarkable men; kindly, hospitable and unselfish. By this last word-unselfish-I find them more accurately described than by any other word. When most of us strive to further the interests of honey production we often in our secret heart are consciously or unconsciously "boosting our own game." Our honey is the most excellent; our methods are the most successful; merchandise of our manufacture is far superior; our bees are more docile and better honey gatherers than any in the wide, wide world. Not so the Dadants. Few have done or are doing more than they to foster and further the interests of bee-


E. Guy LESTOURGEON


CAMILLE P. DADANT Author, Beekeeper, Editor American Bee Journal.


guages and his name and methods are known to the corners of the earth. He is the logical successor to Dr. Langstroth as the leader and mentor of our craft. When conditions in Texas beekeeping were intolerable and we felt that our business was doomed to early collapse he came to visit us and at meeting after meeting across our state he planted the seed of cooperative effort that afterward blossomed in our matchless Association. To us is he especially endeared because of his wise advice and sage counsel in that hour.' A great measure of our success during the past few years is due to him.
The home of C. P. Dadant sets far back among beautiful trees on the very crest of the high bank of the Mississippi. The foot of the great Keokuk dam rests on the Illinois side at exactly this spot and the lake above the power house laps at the feet of the sage.
There are three sons in the business of Dadant & Sons, and one son-in-law. They are, Louis C., Henry C. and Maurice G. Dadant and Leon Saugier. One of the notable features of this notable family is the unity with which it is bound together in a common purpose. One soon feels in contact with them that this purpose is not the building up of a firm name nor yet a great business but finds its center and in-


The Dadant Force: Left to right-Leon Saugier, Maurice G. Dadant, C. P. Dadant, Henry C. Dadant, Louis C. Dadant.


keeping and yet at the countless meetings of beekeepers there is seldom one held without a member of this family or a representative of the firm present and never is any "drumming for trade" a part of the program. This is in great part the cause of their success. Honest to a fault, tolerant of everyone's ideas, generous


and charitable to all and earnestly striving to build firmly the future of our industry, they inspire a feeling of respect and confidence that binds men to them.
C. P. ',Dadani, senior of the family, is an author and thinker of international repute. His books are translated into most modern lan-


terest in our common good-in the making of American beekeepers and in the extending and improvement of beekeeping.
Each of these men fit -snugly into a fixed place in the organization. Louis is the outside managing head of the business. Henry is the office manager. Maurice has the great apiary


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The old Dadant hom-estead atnd home ,,piary. On this location
bees have been kept continuously fr ov er fifty years.






114


system in his charge and is the business manager of the American Bee Journal. Leon has the factory as his province and watches daily to jealously guard the quality of its output.
It was interesting to note the system In Henry's office where several peole are employed to take care of the many shipments of bees-wax and combs that are handled every day. It is a sad fact that as many as 17 such shipments arrived in one day with no name to show from whom they were received. I found that Texas beekeepers are as bad as any others on this score. I was told of a half dozen packages in the "unknown" file from our own state.
The American Bee Journal office is a busy place. The Dadant family is not all made up of boys. Two wonderful women, Misses Valentine and Clemence are carrying on the Dadant idea in giving service here. Their publishing business is growing by leaps and bounds. Most of the more valuable books in modern beekeeping are being issued from their press.
In the American Bee Journal office also one receives a hearty welcome from that staunch friend of Texas beekeepers, Mr. Frank C. Pellett. He is an author of more than national note and a naturalist of world-wide fame. We spent many hours in recalling incidents of his visits to the homes of Texas bee-men. A reading of his remarkable book on American Honey Plants shows how vividly he was impressed by our flora and our climate.
I find that owing to thelimits of space I have not said the things I wanted to say about these kindly and hospitable people. The visit to the orchards hanging full of red and golden fruit; the tramps through the autumn woods;.the auto rides in the early twilight; the musical treat in the evenings when these talented friends played and sang for our pleasure; the great friendly library of Mr. Dadant with its wealth of beelore gathered from the writings of the centuries; and many other such pleasures that always must remain as vivid imressions on my memory of happy days. I cannot express these things to you as I wish that I might and I cannot adequately describe them. I can only urge you, if opportunity should arise, not to fail to personally visit and become better acquainted with this, the most remarkable and most whole heartedly American, of the families devoted to modern apiculture-the Dadants of Hamilton, Hancock County, Illinois.
San Antonio, Texas.


TrHE USE OF AN OVER-FLOW PAN

A. G. VAN RoNZELEN
A pan four or five inches deep and eighteen inches square, or round, or any other shape, will save the average beekeeper many a dollar. Put it under your honey faucet to set the honey cans in when filling. It will catch the overflow when you forget to turn off the faucet. Of course, those among us who never let honey run over will not be interested in this. Among the rest of us who do perhaps there are many who thought of this wonderful scheme the first time this accident happened, but the idea may save somebody's religion and OCGasional undue strain.
P. S.-Come to think of it, if you forget too long you ought to have a larger pan.
St. Louis, Mo.

Let us all market our honey slowly.

A new bee escape with four exits instead of the one or two provided by the old Porter type will be a feature of the 1921 catalogs,


THE BEEKEEPERS ITEM

TO MANAGE WITHOUT EXCLUDERS

T. P. MORRIS
Opinion among beekeepers as to the value of queen excluders in honey production seems to be pretty well defined. Various articles have appeared in the journals advising their use, especially in extracted honey production, while many large producers will not use them in this work.
The location of the beekeeper probably has much to do with the use he makes of this device in his business. Where the seasons are short and the flow fairly heavy he will be more favorably impressed with the merits of the excluder than in a location where the flow is slow and long drawn out as it usually is here in Central Texas. Under the latter conditions their use seems to weaken the colony and diminsh the surplus from the fall flow. For this reason the excluder is not likely to be very extensively used in this locality.
When excluders are not used, however, some trouble arises from the disposition of the bees to extend their brood nests vertically and if the beginner in the pursuit uses his extractor too freely he is likely to have more brood .than honey in the supers. This undesirable state of affairs is often found with colonies that fail to come up to full strength, and in a poor season strong colonies are likely to establish themslves in the supers, leaving the brood chambers practically empty. But in a normal season the brood can be kept in reasonable bounds by


FRANK C.PELLETT
Naturalist, Associate Editor The American
Bee Journal.

practicing the plan^ known among beekeepers as "overtiering," and the plan, as I shall give it, applies especially to old established colonies and is to be used in producing extracted honey only.
During the early spring months these old colonies require several supers to keep the bees contented-3 or 4 of the shallow variety. When full depth supers are used two of these are about right. If any honey is coming in or the supers contains any when given to the bees the queen will go up and occupy them by the time the flow from horsemint begins in May. Before this time the bees have -consumed more honey than they have gathered but from now on they should store more than they consume and the brood will be gradually forced down toward the brood chamber so that by extracting time it will not occupy more than one or two of the shallow supers or one of the deep ones. Now if all theu honey above the brood is extracted and the empty combs placed back on the hive


EINGRAVwNG
ZINCETCHINGS-COPPER AND
ZINC HALFTONES FOR PERIODJCAL AND NEWSPAPERS-ETCDRAWINGS IN PENTANDXSOR
WASH FOR REPRODUCTION
PHOTO RETOUCINGE O NDUSYOURNEXTORDSR
ASATIAL

PrrT14E NGRAV1"NG; C""
901 l CONGRESS AV'
AUJSTIN TEXAS
BE L PHONE 1242



CO-OPERATION
Means BUYING RIGHT and SELLING RIGHT. We are a co-operative association and sell the best Bee Supplies obtainable at the right prices. ItrawilaapaWstern Beekeepers to send for illusCOLORADO HONEY PRODUCERS ASS'N.



USE, OUR WANT ADS
It will pay you to use them
LET OTHERS KNOW WHAT YOU WANT.
ONLY 10c A LINE.


BUY THE FAMOUS





And get big yields from gentle bees. 4J Write for Circular and Price List

BEN G. DAVIS
Spring Hill, Tennessee





1920 - QUEENS - 1920

T HR EE BA ND ITA LIANS
OF SUPERIOR QUALITY
One $1.25; Fifty $60.00 Untested One au'ndred $100.00 BOOKING ORDERS NOW-SEND 20%
WITH ORDER
FACTSOur Queens Are Bred Only From
Our VERY BEST stock.
This Is Our 20th Year of Beekeeping. We Believe We Know
Bees and Queens.
The Quality of Our Queens Is, Not
Sacrificed for Quantity.
We Send Out no Queens We Would Not Use in Our Own
Colonies.
WE GUARANTEE SAFE ARRIVAL AND
SATISFACTION.
Ask the Editor.
BEE CO. NNUNA TAS
BEE CO. NORMANNA, TEXAS.


I.-






THE BEEKEEPERS ITEM


the queen will go up again and to avoid this a super that is about half full of unsealed honey is selected and placed next the brood and the empty supers on top. This is done at each subsequent extracting and by the end of the season the supers will contain but little brood and in many cases none. A super of unsealed honey does not obstruct the passage of the bees to the empty combs above and while too much sealed honey may accumulate between the brood and the empty supers no harm seems to be done if it does not remain too long.
Anyway, the colonies remain very strong throughout the season and the brood nests seldom contain enough honey to carry the bees to the honey flow the following year. Mayfield, Texas.'

A CONVINCING HIVE EXPERIMENT

W. S. JOHNSON

Regarding your article in the May- issue of THE BEEKEEPERS' ITEM, I wish first to congratulate you for the stand you have taken in favor of extracting supers to be used as brood chambers. If all, or even half of them, will read the article carefully and give it a trial, I am sure it will go a long way toward solving the large vs. small hive problem, which is being so frequently discussed.
Last year I had considerable trouble with the standard 10 frame hives, on which I used an extra body for the super. The queen would go above and lay in most 'of the combs, a little strip several inches wide at the bottom of the frames. And when I applied the excluder, they would not store above unless they got crowded in the brood chambers, causing swarming fever by crowding the queens' room for brood. The brood frames would have about six inches square of brood, the balance being filled with honey and pollen. After studying the advantage and disadvantage of the small and large brood chambers I decided to give them both a trial. I started ten hives with the jumbo depth frames and ten hives with three shallow extracting supers for brood chambers. The result is beyond belief unless one gives it a trial.
Next year I shall have nothing but hives made of shallow extracting supers. They are easier to manipulate, produce more brood, control swarming to some extent, and many other advantages over the standard 10 frame brood


chambers.
Alexandria, La.

MIGRATORY BEEKEEPING

ALMA M. HASSLBAUER
At the meeting of the Farmers' Congress at College Station, our association members in their sectional meeting were much interested in the subject of migratory beekeeping. Several members recounted their experiences and the hope was expressed that the practice would grow.
W. 0. Victor, of Uvalde, Texas, expressed the opinion that the recent development of migratory beekeeping was the most important thing ever introduced into the honey producing business in Texas. He felt that it is destined to revolutionize the industry.
The great draw-back in Texas beekeeping has been a lack of nourishment during certain seasons. Periods of surplus honey flow have often been followed by long weeks of little or no nectar, during which time the beekeepers


'is


E E K=EEPING , by Dr. E. F. Phillips
One of the newest books on beekeeping, that ought to be in the beekeepers library.
It contains 457 pages, divided into 24 chapters with appendix, and illustrated with 190 en- = gravngs.
While the author says the book is not intended as a textbook it covers nearly the whole ground of beekeeping, much of it from a scientific standpoint.
The author, Dr. Phillips, of the Depart ment of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. is so well known that it is guarantee enough that the book is authentic and one need not hesitate about procuring a copy. Published by The McMillan Co., of New York. Price $2.00. With The Beekeepers Item, one year, $2.35.
Send your orders to
T H E BE EK E EF E R ITENI
NEW BRAUNFELS, TEXAS






ADVANCED PRICES ON






The prices shown in our 1920 catalog have been revised. Write
for new price list before placing orders.


EARLY ORDER DISCOUNTS


An early order discount of 7% is allowed on all Lewis Beeware
and Dadant Foundation orders placed during October. Take
advantage of this by making remittance now and ordering your
supplies as you need them. A remittance of $93.00 will be credited
to you as $100.00 against your future purchases of





LEWIS BEEWARE


DADANT FOUNDATION


ALUMINUM HONEY COMBS


exas Honey Producers Association

1105 S. Flores St. P. 0. Box 1048 San Antonio, Texas


,...,.. .. 4


9-o---o---o-o-a-o-o-o--o---o-a-a-"-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o---o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-+


Extracted Honey Wanted

Must be of good quality and flavor. State size of containers, source of honey and send sample. Price wanted must be stated, all in first letter.

THE LOUIS H. SCHOLL APIARIES New Braunfels, Texas







THE BEEKEEPERS ITEM


suffered loss. In seeking locations for migratory beekeeping it is well t familiarize oneself with floral and climatic conditions before moving. Wheen bees have finished harvesting a flow in one locality they may be moved to another and then even to yet another. When moved however, they should be in the pink of condition and their removal should be timed to reach the new location in time of a honey flow.
Preparation for moving is very important. The earlier in the season it can be done the better success one will have. The cooler the weather at the time of moving the stronger may the colonies be.
When moving in carloads he prefers a stock car because of added ventilation. He builds a deck or skeleton floor to set the hives upon and after one layer of hives have been loaded he builds another deck above them for the next layer. This gives air circulation and provides ventilation, which is very important with strong colonies.
He has used refrigerator cars but at the present time they are not advisable owing to the uncertain ice supply. This will some day be the best 'way to move bees. Very strong colonies will be moved in thoroughly refrigerated cars. In moving bees the strength of the colony must be determined according to the heat and the time of the year. In very hot weather it is not wise to try to move extremely large or populous hives. Such colonies should be divided before moving. Colonies of 100,000 individuals or so should be divided into three before moving and will then be strong enough to build up at once on the new location. After the second harvest has been gathered these may be again divided and taken to the third location. Thus from one colony in the spring it is often possible to have six good strong ones at the end of the season.
In making the colonies smaller less honey need be left on the hives. Since the bees are to be taken at once to another honey flow he leaves only about 10 pounds to each hive. Thus in this kind of beekeeping we are enabled to take a greater percentage of honey than where the bees are to be left on their home locations.
Mr. Victor thinks that the practice of nigratory beekeeping will grow and that there is enongh room in Texas for its development without considering the interstate feature.

PLANT SOME SWEET CLOVER


BRIGGS & RITER
Everybody who has bees should plant some sweet clover. In most sections it never fails to yield nectar, and it is 'a valuable honey plant for beekeepers, while it is a farmer's friend in disguise.
You can plant the seed at most any time; with your wheat or oats in the fall or spring. And when you lay by your corn plant it there and you will see a telling tale on the next crop of corn. Plant it in every waste piece of ground by simply scattering the seed over it broadcast. We could tell much more about the value of sweet clover as a honey plant.
Barstow, Texas.

The new systems of brushing zinc excluders has placed them into the position of being the best bee excluders made. The expensive and unsatisfactory wire excluders will very likely fall into disuse and few 1921 catalogs will list them.


.U


The-New Subscripti on Price



Will be One dollar a Year





The Beekeepers Item for 1921

In 1916 this publication was founded as a mere eight page "newspaper" for beekeepers. From this small beginning it has grown in size and improved in appearance and increased in circulation to such an extent that it has outgrown its former sphere. It h4s now reached a period of its established and useful life that warrants making a change in style and price.


Will Be in Magazine Form

With the ever-increasing popularity won by this publication there has developed a demand for a smaller size, more easily adapted for binding into complete volumes. It is an appreciated fact that beekeepers, more than those in most other professions, preserve their copies for future reference. We are, therefore, pleased to announce a new size, of 32 pages, for the new year.


The Price Will Still Be ow
Considering the high cost of almost everything, the new subscription price will still be a moderate one. Paper, ink and all printing materials, labor and postage and all other expenses have increased to such an extent since we first issued our little eight page paper for 50 cents a year, that we are compelled to advance the subscription price to $1.00 per annum; not for the same but a better beekeeping publication.


Send in Your Subscription Now
You will not want to miss a single issue as this publication will be better than ever before. There will be a number of special issues on important beekeeping subjects throughout the year, as well as much other information. By sending your subscription now your name will be enrolled without delay of the first or January number. Proper adjustments will be made on all subscriptions and renewals received under the old rate and the new so that all of our subscribers will get their share of subscription for the amount remitted to us.

Our Special Clubbing Offers
Any of these will save you money and furnish excellent reading:


American Bee Journal, a year--...$1.50 With the Beekeepers Item, both_-_._$2.00 Gleanings in Bee Culture, a year.$1.00 With The Beekeepers Item, both..$1.90


THE BEEKEEPERS ITEM,
New Braunfels, Texas


Western Honey Bee, a year.------$1.00 With The Beekeepers Item, both...$1.75 Domestic Beekeeper, a year----.--$1.00 With The Beekeepers Item, both......$1.75


Date........... ........


Dear Sir:
Please find enclosed $.............................................for..........................years subscription to THE

BEEKEEPERS ITEM.
Clubbed with the following, as per our special clubbing offer:


Nam e. . ........................ ------- . ----.......... . .................................................


Street....--.....-------- ..........----- ......-......................... . F. D.D ........................... ...... ..


city-....... - -....--.- -...... - . .......State ..............................................


III


116






THE BEEKEEPERS ITEM


I.


MoJdified Datdanlt Hive




Glance at this illustra- Your present brood m
tion to compare this hive equipment can be
tofe above the Modified Dawith "Standard" Lang- dant hive used as full
stroth hive. depth supers.
You get 40 per cent nFeatures are deep
frames, large 1-story
greater brood comb area brood nest, frame space I
than in the "Standard" .ventilation, excellence in
wintering, swarming easten frame Langstroth. ily controlled.




Modified Dadant Hive Features. I

1. Eleven frames, Langstroth length, 4. Dovetailed body, regular reversible
Quinby depth. bottom and metal roof cover with
2. Frames spaced 1/ inches for inner cover.
swarm control. 5. Langstroth "Standard" equipment
3. Extracting frames 6% inches deep. easily used with this hive.

FOR FREE BOOKLET WRITE ANY DISTRIBUTOR OF LEWIS "BEEWARE," OR TO


R G. B. LEWIS CO., Watertown, Wisc. DAmDANT & SONS, Hamilton,Ill.



Please Mention THE B EEKEEPERS ITEM when Writing Advertisers.


0I& I
A re Y Au"",re Uedin F drmfin ?


You will want to read the farm paper published by the editor of your bee paper. You will find it an excellent

medium on agricultural affairs.



LOUs H.MSnthly FarEdt

]LOUIS H. SCH-OLL, 1Editor


-Only 50 Cents


a Y e ar


It is a farm and home paper, of interest.to every member of the family, in country or town. It has departments on the household, boys and girls, bees, poultry and fruit etc. You will appreciate it.



School S onFar New Braunfels, Texas


Some Beekeepers of Texas
Conducted by
E. Guy LESTOURGEON
P. 0. Box 1048 San Antonio, Texas


(Editor's Note.--4We have established a new department in The Beekeepers' Item in which Guy Le Stourgeon intends to humorously (?) discuss certain beekeepers, well known 'to the bees but little known to the fraternity at large. Guy sometimes is about as funny as "a queenless hive" or "a bad case of foul brood," but we believe his new department will be interesting to our readers.)
I have known Ellis for some time. Once he told me the story of an old hen who had eleven chicks. Ten were pullets and one was a cockerel. One day the Methodist minister came to the house for dinner and that night only ten chicks followed the old hen to roost. Son was missing. The mother asked the girls where he


DR. A. CASWELL ELLIS


could be. They answered, "Brother has entered the Ministry." The hen observed: "Well, I always felt that he would never become a lay member."
There you have Ellis. He is too uniformly a school teacher to be a "lay-member" of our fraternity.
You ought to see his bees. He has an ideal farm up there at Easterly, Texas, and he works hard nine months out of every year at the University of Texas to get money enough to keep the farm going. The bees are on the farm and he pampers them something awful. They get the very best of everything and will not associate with common apiary bees like yours and mine. Caswell can take a check book in one hand and a bee supply catalog in another and enter up an order for more different kinds of beeware than his dealer knew he had in stock. And the bees respond to the treatment, too. If Texas were to cast up the list of her valuable living citizens the name of Dr. A. Caswell Ellis would hold no mean place. -There is hardly a rural school house in our great commonwealth, built within ten years, that does not reflect in


SPA


-11


I


117






THE BEEKEEPERS ITEM


some measure his careful thought and earnest endeavor. In developing the great latent wealth that Texas owns in the pecan growing industry he has been a pioneer. In beekeeping he has always been a modest figure but at every meeting of the Texas Farmers' Congress his smile has beamed upon the meeting and when the idea of the Texas Honey Producers' Asscoiation was in its infancy he rallied to the support of the co-operative idea with his purse and with his influence.
If you should ever go to Austin be sure and run out to the State University and call on Ellis. He will make you welcome and even though he is a confirmed bookworm and an incurable school-teacher, he will still be able to give you some valuable points on his greatly beloved hobby of beekeeping.
I wanted to let you see a picture of Caswell in his apiary, but getting the likeness above is the best I could do. He explained that if I got a picture of him in a bee yard it would have to be a "moving picture."
San Antonio, Texas.

A CURE FOR SKUNKS

J. W. TAYLOR
If your hives are not a foot or more above ground, and the ground in front of them is clean and smooth as if it had been swept with abroom and with prehaps a slight depression, it is a sign that a skunk is after your bees, A skunk will go at night nad sit in front of a hive and tap on it, and when the bees come out to investigate he makes a meal of them.
Go to your druggist and get a box of empty capsules, size No. 1, and a can of sodium cyanide. Pulverize the cyanide and fill the capsules, being careful to not get them damp. Take some hard grease, tallow or any grease that will ball and hold its shape, cover the full capsule with enough to keep out all moisture.
At night place one at the entrance of any'hive visited by Mr. Skunk, and he is yours the day after the night before. Take up all that are not eaten and keep in a cool place until the next night; in that way you can get rid of all skunks.
I do this in the fur season, January and February, and get from $1.50 to $6 for the furs.
To skin a skunk: First take a sharp knife, slit carefully the tail and hind legs to the "scent bag," and skin the tail, being careful to not tear


it; take out all the bone, skin the legs down and then peel the skin off over the body and front legs; carefully skin over the head and nose, taking ears with skin; then you have the skin wrong side out. Take a dull knife and scrape off all fat and flesh, turn your fur right side out and stretch. Stretch over a frame made for the purpose by bending a small rod or largewire. Be sure not to let the flesh sides touch, but have it so the air can get to all parts, and hang in a cool, shady place to dry; never dry furs in the sun.
Julian, Calif.

Have you a county beekeepers' organization?

Fine furniture polish. Melt two cupsfuls of beeswax. Remove it when melted to a distance from the fire, add one cupful of turpentine, stir until well mixed and set away to cool. Apply with a soft cloth to furniture, polish with cheese cloth and you will find your old furniture looks like new.


j


















se -~


Used Honey

Cans


Good, used honey cans, clean and in good condition. We have some to offer, f. o. b. here, at $1.00 per case of 2-60 lbs. cans. These will cost you much more new.



Tlie Louis H.1,Selioll
Apiaries

NEW BRAUNFELS, TEXAS


o-o-o-o-o-o-o--o-o--o-o----o-o-o-


THAT THE LEAHY MANUFACTURING COMILI' __ PANY are manufacturers of the best Comb Foundation,
Frames, Hives, and all Bee Keepers' Equipment, at the most reasonable prices? They do that very thing. And if
you .are in need, or will be soon, don't delay in sending
__ your inquiry to LEAHY MANUFACTURING COMPANY, HIGGINSVILLE, MO. A. M. HUNT, GOLD
_ THWAITE, MILLS COUNTY, TEXAS. Prompt shipments and highest quality supplies.





The Severin welterr and Se"ara""or"
Combined is the melter for all progressive keekeepers who wish to use the best labor saving appliances. It melts the cappings and separates the honey and wax V-ready for market; leading everything in order after.the day's work is done.
This melter occupies small space in the extracting
- room and is easily transported to outyards.
Though compact in form it has a large melting capacity.
Write for description.
F. J. SEVERIN,
Box 145, Imperial, California


Please Mention THE BEEKEEPERS ITEM When Writing Advertisers





Pollell's Pr cIc 1 80 *rin

BY FRANK C. PELLETT

To get the best honey yields it. is necessary to have good queens in your colonies . No matter how good your ability to care for the bees, how well adapted your hives, nor whether the honey flow may be abundant, the colonies will not give best results unless they are in first-class condition and strong in number of bees. This will depend upon the kind of a queen in the hive.' This new work on queen rearing methods should be in the hands of every beekeeper whether he owns a few or mafly colonies.
All the leading practical queen rearing methods are, discussed in a plain manner so every reader can understand them. The book is worth many times its price.

You Need A Copy - Opder It To-Day

Arrangements have been made whereby a copy ean be obtained with a club subscription to this publication. Price $1.00, with The Beekeepers Item, sne year, both $1.25.


Send Orders to The Beekeepers Item, New-Braunfels, Texas
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118


9


1!-*4 -


o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-a-a-


ROOT'S BEE SUPPLIES For North Texas Beekeepers, for sale by
STILES BEE SUPPLY CO.,
Stillwater, Okla.
Beeswax Wanted. Free Catalogue.


N4IXED FEEDS for
Horses, Mules and Dairy Cows. Ej Made by
4G J.E.MUGGE& CO
Wholesale Grain Dealers
San. Antonio, Texas







SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS.


-4


0 I










WAIL PA PER, WINDOW GLASS


Harrison's Town and Country
Paint, Artists' Material

Let us figure on your needs of Bee Hive and
Other Painting.

Prompt attention to out-of-town orders.


SF RED 'HU M MER


204-6-8 W. Commerce St.

San Antonio, - - - - - - - - - Texas



Attention: Texas Beekeepers

Do you know Carl F. Buck of Augusta, Kansas, makes the very best Weed Process Comb Foundation in the country? And the freight to his factory is less And his price for working wax and selling foundation are very low? And he pays the best prices for beeswax. Write him. His address is

CARL F. BUCK


"PRODUCTIVE BEEKEEPING"
By Frank C. Pellet
One of Lippincott's "Farm Manual" Series, this book of 326 pages is finely gotten up, finely bound, and has 134 illustrations, nearly all original with the author. Price $2.50
READ THE CONTENTS BELOW:
1. Beekeeping a Falscinating Pursuit 8. Feedin*.
2. The Business of Beekeeping 9. Productoin of Comb Honey
3. Making a Start With Bees 10. Production of Extracted Honey
4 Arrangement of the Apiary 11. Wax-A By-Product of the Apiary
5. Sources of Nectar 12..Diseases and Enemies of Bees
6. The Occupants of the Hive 13. Wintering
7. Increase 14. Marketing the Honey Crop
15. Laws That Concern the Beekeeper
Clubbed with The Beekeepers Item, One Year, Postpaid, $2.75 Send All Orders to The Beekeepers Item, New Braunfels, Tex.


16A


CYP PRESS BY TEST

zubstiltutes by Talk ov

THE PROOF?--2LETTERS FROM BEEMEN

"Our correspondent makes serious complaints against....--.------and MAKES A PLEA FOR
CYPRESS as a BEEHIVE MATERIAL. We hope you will look into this matter," Etc.)-and here's another
"Mr. of - just came into the office. He informs us that they tried a
car of CYPRESS LUMBER last year for the first time, and are so well pleased with it that they are ORDERING ANOTHER CAR for use in making HIVE BOTTOMS."
Is there value to you in an, endurance test of 45 years in greenhouse sash? It is reported to us that sash made of heart Cypress by a prominent greenhouse contractor in Chicago, and placed in position in a greenhouse at Des Plaines, Ill., in 1868 are STILL DOING SERVICE.
IT WILL SERVE YOU AS WELL and save you the nuisance 'and expense of repairs and replacements.I
The argument backed by. such facts cannot be answered by mere talk. Ask the manufacturer or contractor who wants to give you a "substitute" for Cypress to cite you to an endurance test of 30 or 45 years to the credit of the so-called "substitute."
That is no more than a fair precaution on your part-good ordinary business sense.
WRITE US FOR VOL. I. OF THE FAMOUS CYPRESS POCKET LIBRARY WITH FULL U. S.
GOVERNMENT REPORT ON "THE WOOD ETERNAL."


OU T H GYE RNY P R E oSSM F R S.' A SSOC I A T 10 N
1277 Heard National Bank Building, Jacksonvivlle, Fla.,
and 1277 Hibernia Bank Building, New Orleans, La.
Fot quick service address nearest office


16A rm16


119


THE BEEKEEPERS ITEM




FER D STAFF E L
ESTABLISHED 1890


San Antonio's Largest Seed, Feed and Poultry Supply House

Queen's and Cypher's
Incubators,
Brooders and Hovers.

Write Us for Prices
Main Store, 321 E. Commerce St.

SAN ANTONIO, - - - - - TEXAS




STANDARD PRINTING COMPANY
(Successors to Wilson-Schwegmann) Printers, Blank-Book Manufacturers
English, German, Spanish

We Print The Texas Honey Producers Association Special Letter Heads for Members.

Also Other Stationery.,
206 Navarro Street, San Antonio, Texas


New Mexico-All report fair to heavy yields with spots of low production. Utah particularly heavy, as is Arizona. Quality up to average, selling slowly. Mostly sold out of state.
Oregon and Washington-Yields reported fair to heaviest in years in spots. Quality excellent, market draggy, selling slow, not much shipped market draggy, selling slow, not much shipped.
California-Early reports couched to indicate possible failure. Considerable 1919 honey was being held early, this mostly moved. Reports indicate biggest average yield California ever knew in twenty years. Offerings have been reported as low as 16' c. Moving slow, market draggy, offering heavy.
Southern honeys selling slowly, prices reported low as 12c. Eastern, New York particularly, some moved at 22'2c, big quantities. -Offerings by big buyers seem seldom above 22y2c anywhere; . buying cautious, market slow from sugar price range down and usual first market uncertainty. Comb honey, No. 1, selling in all markets apparently at $7 per case up, jabbing.
Watertown, Wis.


/


A RESUME OF HONEY YIELDS AND MARKETS
GLEANED FROM CORRESPONDENCE

KENNITH HAWKINS
Editor's Note-Under date of August 23, 1920, a bulletin issued by The G. I. Lewis Co., Watertown, Wis., and known as "Beeware Service," quotes the following honey crop conditions in the several states of the United States, which are quite interesting.-Editor.
New England States-Good honey flows are reported from most parts of these states, but the exported crop is too small to affect markets.
New York and Pennsylvania-Yields have been very spotted in these states, but where yields were secured, they were far better than average and New York particularly will have much honey for sale, of good quality. Buckwheat light.
Ohio, West Virginia, Kentucky, Indiana and Michigan-Yields in these states have been spotted but in all the yield, particularly in Ohio, is far above the average. Light honey.
Tennessee, North Carolina and South Carolina-Reports indicate the biggest yield of surplus honey known in these states for years, and North Carolina particularly will ship much honey of the gallberry-tupelo type.
Georgia and Alabama-Yields in these states have been good and excellent flows prevailed. Out shipments will be about as usual of fair to dark.
Florida-Florida west coast and north state men secured the biggest yield in years of excellent quality tupelo-partridge pea type, which will be shipped out heavily and seriously affect southern market sales. Crop reported moving slow. East coast-failure. Orange type yield good.
Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, OklahomaCrops reported only fair, due to excessive rains throughout the early year, Oklahoma and Mississippi may ship out some honey which is usually quite fair quality, sweet clover, alfalfa.
Texas-Reports best average yield throughout state in several seasons. Much of this sold locally, some individuals selling heavily for out shipments.
Illinois, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska nad Dakotas-All these report excellent crops as a whole, white clover usually light, sweet clover and other white types available in quantities. Wisconsin heaviest in years, yield affected somewhat by serious winter losses. Selling rapidly.
Montana and Wyoming-Reports very heavy yields in river valleys; crop probably up to normal, quality standard for district. Selling slow. Colorado, Utah, Idaho, Nevada, Arizona and


AUGUSTA, KANSAS.


Established 1889.


LIPPINCOTTS, FARM MANUALS






PRODUCTIVE BEE-KEEPING BY FRANK C PELLETT.


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120


The Beekeepers Itemu

LOUIS H. SCROLL......-Editor and Proprietor

Published Monthly
Subscription-------------------------.---------------...--------50c Year

Entered as second class matter Dec. 13, 1916, at the Postoffice at New Braunfels, Texas, under the Act of March 3, 1879.

CHANGE OF ADDRESS: When a change of ad-dress is ordered, both the new and old must be given. The notice should be sent as promptly as possible before the change is to take effect.
DISCONTINUANCES: Notice will be given just before expiration. Subscribers arq irgeal, if unable to make payment at once after expiration, to notify us when they can do so. Any one wishing his subscription discontinued should so advise us upon receipt of the expiration notice; otherwis it will be assumed that he wishes The BeeKeepers Item continued and will pay for it soon. ADVERTISING RATES: These will be furnished upon application.


The Texas State Fair will be in full swing by the time this issue reaches our readers. The dates are October 9 to 24th, and it promises to be one of the greatest events ever staged by that association. The beekeepers' exhibits will be good, and those of our readers who possibly can go should take a few days off and spend them at this great fair. ft

The leading bee supply dealers of the country held an important meeting at Watertown, Wisconsin, on Sept. 15th to 18th. The manager of the 'Texas Honey Producers Association represented us there. An earnest effort was made to simplify and standardize beekeeping equi ment. The catalogs of the various dealers will give less space in the future to the description of archaic and discredited appliances. One inch starters, 8-frame hivas, certain types .of excluders, erroneous and useless literature, antiquated types of s'nokers and other supplanted or little used articles will be excluded from the catalogs in future.

Our reader's attention is called to an announcement on page 116, regarding the new subscription price of THE BEEKEEPERS ITEM for 1921. Beginning with the January number it will be issued in a new, smaller size form, of 32 pages. This feature will make it more suitable


for binding, a desire many of our readers have expressed for some time. This and other improvements will compel us to raise the price to a dollar a year, but it will be moderate enough even then when the advanced prices of everything that goes into the making of the publication, as well as higher expenditures in evrything else, is considered. We feel that our readers will appreciate the change.

The editor is indebted to the G. B. Lewis Co., of Watertown, Wis., through our friend Kenneth Hawkins, sales promoter of that concern, for a full set of "How" booklets, to be added to his library of beekeeping publications. There are fourteen of these little books under the following, titles: "How to Use an Observation Hive," "How to Care for Package Bees," "How to Extract Wax from Combs," How' to Manage Bees in Spring," "How to Prevent Swarming," How to Buy Queen Bees," "How to Locate -an Apiary," "How to Feed Bees," "How to Transfer Bees," "How to Care for Nuclei," "How to Unite Bees,"


THE BEEKEE'PERS ITEM

"How to Winter Bees Outdoors," "How to Use Comb Foundation." These were specially designed for answering correspondence and for simplicity of recommendation.

Notice has been received from the publishers of "American Bee Journal" that the subscription price of that excellent bee journal would be advanced to $1.50 a year from October 15th. In announcing the increase in price, the high price of material, labor, etc., was given as the reason for doing so, and our own position at the present times gives us an opportunity to -see why such an advanced price may be warranted. This will change our clubbing rate in clubs of this journal with our own.- This will hereafter be $2.00 a year, counting the American Bee Journal at $1.50 and THE BEEKEEPERS ITEM at the new price of $1.00. a year.' For other clubs your kind attention is invited to the rates advertised on page 116 of this issue. It must be borne in mind, however, that our new price on THE BEEKEEPERS ITEM is on a new and different style of publication of 32 pages, and not the present form.

There is a tendency on the part of some beekeepers to desire to get 'rid of their honey in a hurry at this time. To do so would tend to have an ill effect on the present market. Although a number of things have dropped in price during the last month or two there is little reason for honey to go to a lower level in the Texas market for a while at least. This is due to the fact that there is not enough supply to last until the new crop next year. Selling it now, and at a low price, would only mean a bare honey market later. Although the demand has not been as brisk as usual, on account of unsettled conditions, there is always a good market for honey in the latter part of January, and throughout February and March. The honey producers -co-operative association of this state has continued with the same price for its members through the entire season and will be in position to handle the balance of their present crop honey business in the same way.

Read bee books this winter. Pellett's "American Honey Plants," "Productive Beekeeping," "Practical Queen Rearing," and "Beginner's Bee Book" are good. Revised Langstroth by C. P.


Dadant is perhaps the best bee book of all. We also highly recommend "First Lessons in Beekeeping" and "The Dadant System" by the same author. M. G. Dadant's "Out Apiary Management" is excellent. "Fifty Years Among the Bees" and "A Thousand Answers to Beekeeping Questions" by Dr. C. C. Miller should be in every library. We also have a good supply of "Beekeeping" by Dr. E. F. Phillips. Any or all of the above may be had from the Association.

Texas beekeepers will remember our old friend Kennith Hawkins. He endeared himself to our readers when, as a member of the States Relations Service, he traveled over the greater part of our state addressing meetings of beekeepers. We are glad to learn that we will be able to see him again personally at the State Fair where he will be in charge of an exhibit of beekeeping supplies. Mr. Hawkins is now the extension specialist for the G. B. Lewis Company. His exhibit of Beeware at the Dallas fair will' be the most elaborate and complete ever shown.


DEATH OF DR. C. C. MILLER

E. G. LESTOURGEON
Dr. C. C. Miller of Marengo, Illinois, passed away on September 4th shortly after passing his 89th birthday.
There are few names better known in modern apiculture than his. For years his pen has added humour and wisdom to the pages -of beekeeping literature. His department of answers to the questions on beekeeping subjects has been a permanent and popular feature of the American Bee Journal. As an author he was best known by his books "Fifty Years Among the Bees," and "A Thousand Answers to Beekeeping Questions." The writer had the pleasure


DR. C. C. MILLER


of being a visitor in his home when the issuing of- the last named book was decided upon.
Dr. Miller was always an example of good cheer and kindliness. His pleasant smile' was infectious. Happiness and optimism radiated from his presence. No one came. in contact with him without feeling lifted up in spirit and being better fortified to face the problems of existence.
Surrounded by countless warm and loving friends, and in the fullness. of his years our gentle leader has gone to sleep. His place cannot be filled. His good works will go on and live among us, a growing monument to the memory of one of the kindest, sweetest and most wholesome men that our industry has produced.
San Antonio, 'Texas.

Did you ever hear of G. C. Ridegay? 'No. And nobody else did before. On January 1, 1920, he had one hive of bees. Now he has 25. Yes, and he has harvested ' and sold 1,000 pounds of honey. Seldom in the annals of modern beekeeping has Grover's success been equalled. And even in addition to this record he says he intends to make. a lot of fall increase. He lives at 301 Bill Green Avenue, San Antonio,'Texas.

Success is not a geographical position, a condition or a date. It is in you.









TEXAS BEEKEEPERS' NEWS ITEM

What Friends of THE BEEKEEPER'S ITEM Are Doing.

A. J. Kolb who used to get his mail at Mabank has removed to Ennis, Texas. Since Ellis county is the banner cotton county of the State friend Kolb should not suffer from his change of location. The cotton honey produced around Ennis and Waxahachie has always taken first prizes at the fairs where they have been exhibited.

Think of it! D. 0. Kubricht of Wallis started with a total of 29 colonies spring count. He now has 52 colonies in good condition for winter and has marketed over 1800 pounds of honey at a good price. Does Texas beekeeping pay? I'll say it does!

It seems too bad that our old friend LaGrand LaRue has decided to give up beekeeping. We do not believe it will last. Our idea is that once a beekeeper, always a beekeeper. He sold his bees to Eugene Ault. He thinks he can quit. Here is our prophesy that next spring will find him in our ranks again, even if he has to cut a bee tree to become one of us.

Fred L. Wignall, of Kerrville, has made a success of beekeeping in a district frowned upon by the experts. He can not name a single one of the major honey plants of Texas as contibutors to his success, and yet he gets results. He is a living proof that beekeeping practice far outweighs climatic advantage.

Do you know T. K. Rea, of Pottsville? No iNeither did we until recently. He is a very modest man but when he digs down into beekeeping he gets results. He can show for 1920 an increase of 20% in number of colonies and a production of $8.00 per colony.

C. C. Bee and F. M. Martin operate their apiaries under the firm name of Martin & Bee at Brenham. Their spring count was 75 colonies and their production averaged 160 pounds per hive. They have increased to 175 colonies for wiffter.

FAMOUS LIES.

Lord Angus thou hast - ed.


Beyond the Alps -s Italy. The light that -s in woman's eyes. Here s.
Let sleeping dogs
Father, I can not tell a

A LESSON FROM TREES

"The tree, for one thing, keeps its feet firmly on the ground. It is a good citizen. It is a substantial citizen. The stronger the wind, the more firmly it attracts itself to the soil, the deeper it sends its roots until a solid foothold is secured.
"A tree has its hardships just like an individual. Every time there is a strong wind and it is blown back and forth, the tree is strengthened. In fact, it needs that bending back and forth to develop its powers of resistance just as we in our lives are made better because of our difficulties and hardships. If we meet them and overcome them, we are stronger and better in our everyday lives and in our attitude to-


THE BEEKEEPERS ITEM

ward others. We are of better fiber.
"If you plant a tree too close to others where it is shady it is deprived of its light-and to us education is light. Such a tree is either stunted or grows up in a narrow sort of way. It does not have a wide outlook. It is narrow in its view. The same is true with you and me. Unles we get light, unless we study and are educated, unless we broaden out and see the problems of others, we are likely to be narrow in our views."-U. S. Secretary of Agriculture.

A hive full of bees at the beginning of a honey flow is worth five hives full after it is over. Don't wait "Do It Now."




- A


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g


121


QUEENS i3ees by the Pound QUEENS
The rush o four bee shipping season will practically be over by July 1st, and wve will then be in position to take care of your QUEEN orders.
Just received a picture from a party showing a colony built up from about 2 pounds of bees and a queen last spring, 1919, and at that weighed 330 ponds gross. Others in the yard did better than that
one. We have had colonies here gather 400 pounds spring crop.
Party wrote from Chicago: "The shipment of bees was received on May 7th this year, hived same day; did not examine untli 18th, when we found all queents accepted and had laid in three frames. We greatly appreiiate receiving such good .grade of bees and hope to favor you with larger orders in the future." Another from Nebraska: "Wish to tell you how well pleased I am with the business done with you; some of the 50 packages had less than 100 dead bees in them. These queens of yours are the best
uniform QUEENS I have ever received. What is your price on 200 two-pound packages with queens for spring 1921 ?"
Our QUEENS are hardy, gentle Italians. They throw bees that fill the supers. GURANTEE safe arrival and satisfaction on QUEENS. With my method of feeding can ship bees successfully in July and August. Get a few packages and build them for the fall flow or winter. Send for FREE circular giving reference, prices by parcel post, nuclei, guarantee, etc.
Advertising, labor and sugar have all advanced, yet we quote bees and Queens July 1st balance of the year as follows:


1 6
Untested Queens-------------------------------------$1.50 $7.
Select Untested----------------------------------------1.65 8.
Tested Queens----..--------------------------------------2.50 131.
Select Tested Queens----------------------------------3.00 16
1 pound package Bees----------------.-----$2.40 25 or more, eac
2 pound package Bees---------------------- 4.25 25 or more, each
3 pound package Bees---- ...-..--....------6.25 25 or more, eaci
Add price of Queen wanted when ordering bees.
Nueces County Apiaries, E. B. AULT, Prop.


5 12 50u 10u
50 $13.50 $ 48,00 $ 95.00 25 14.5 52.80 104.50 50 27.00 110.00 20 -
h -.-- .---- $2.16
-- --------- ------------5.62

Calallen, Texas


lililiilili111111111 [fllllllililii ill I 111 11111111111111111111111111111111 1111111 II VV- WILL SELL AT WHOLESALE

IRA CHAESuplOIantN A Big Stock of -Bee Supplies
Bee KeeinerWSuipl 11f. pa
ALL BOXED, ready to ship at once-thousands of Hoffman Frames; also Jumbo and Shallow Frames of all kinds-100 and 200 in a box. Big stock of Sections and fine polished Dovetailed Hives and Supers. Send
- for a price list. I can save you money.
Will take your Beeswax in Trade at Highest Market
Price.

- ~ 159CHAS. MONDENG
-ne A- 159 Cedar Lake Road MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.


NOTICE!

TX AS -1N " kEl I-fL OB'SERVATTO'NS ;ANTl) REMINSCENCE, byDr. R. eager represents
a scientific as well as a popular written and responsible treatise on Nature affairs around old historic San Antonio, and it is just the kind of book you should have and read about Texas insect life, reptiles, native birds and bird nests, game in general, hunting and fishing, and olden days wild life and prairie reminiscences around San Antonio's environments: written and photo illustrated directly and true to nature, with cover 300 fine half-tone photogra phs, including magnificent, full page illustrations of the famous Albert Friedrich Bnckhorn Collection-the finest and rarest display of Texas and foreign animal horns ever exhibited here or elsewhere in Texas. Professor Chas. S. Meek, Superintendent of the Public Schools of San Antonio, in a letter to the author, said: "the book is a great contribution on the fauna of this region," and ordered twentythree copies of the, book for every grade school and each of the high schools of San Antonio. It is also highly endorsed by Professor Edward F. Bigelow, editor of the "Guide to Nature," Sound Beach, Connecticut, and also by the "American Review of Reviews," New York City and many others.
The small remittance of $2.25 will bring the book to your address at once.
DR. R. MENGER,
San Antonio, Texas.


4.w


FORSALE; 150 COLONIES OF BEES

All in good frame hives, 12 to 3 stories, in good condition, in fine locations on and near the San Bernard River. Reason for selling, am in mercantile business and can't attend to both. Most of my colonies paid me $10.00 per stand.
For particulars writeM. B.KIMMEY, Brazoria, Texas






122


LLI

Over the entire southern half of the State it has been too dry again for the best interests of the bee people. There has been no secretion of nectar reported from any of the late blooming flora. Even the always present "yellowtop" has withered away without colouring our combs or scenting our hives with its golden and pungent surplus.
The broom weed may or may not give us a fall flow depending upon the weather during the next few weeks. A rain is badly needed over most of the area in which it grows. Cool nights and light frosts will be a great help in securing surplus from this source. Should it fail again to yield this fall I am afraid that many apiaries will suffer for winter stores.
Cotton yield has been about normal and many are still. reporting the storing of some surplus. In the northern part of the cotton belt rain was more abundant and the honey yield has kept up fairly well.
Bees in East Texas are in very good condition and a great deal of increase is being made. Many, members are reporting as much as 100% increase in number of colonies. This is a healthy sign and bears out the idea I have often expressed that this portion of our State is to have a great future in beekeeping. I trust that my readers will watch closely their fall honey flows and keep me advised of


fl


THE BEEKEEPERS ITEM

any sources of nectar. We know too little about the plants that provide our bees with honeyfor wintering. I am particularly interested in live oak, kinnickinick and other sources. Any observation you can make, will help us all. San Antonio, Texas.


TELEGRAPHIC HONEY MARKETS


The Bureau of Markets report under date of September 15th shows very little activity in the honey trade and very little movement. On the whole, however, the price seems to b holding up fairly well considering the trend of prices in other commodities.
Los Angeles-Demand slow. Few sales.
Orange and sage 16 to 18 cents. Some as high as 20 cents. Light amber asge 16-17c. Alfalfa 13-15c. Beeswax 40-44c.
Boston-Demand and movement very light. Beeswax 40-42c.
Chicago--Demand and movement slow, market weak and unsettled. White 18% to 19,c. Light amber 17-18c. Beeswax, light, 40-42c, dark 35-39c.
Cincinnati-Practically no demand or movement. No sales reported. Beeswax, 44-46c.
Cleveland-Demand slow, movement draggy, market slightly weaker, alfalfa, 16-18c. Clover 17-19c, orange 19-21c.
Kansas City-Colorado light amber 22c.
New York-Demand and movement slow,
market dull. California light amber 12-15c. Orange and white sage 18-19c. Sweet clover 12-18c. West Indian $1.20 to $1.45 per gallon. Beeswax, South American and West Indian, light 28-40c, dark 24-26c.. Minneapolis-Demand and movement slow,


The Honey Crop Conditions
Conducted by
Miss A. M. HASSLBAUER
P. 0. Box 1048 San Antonio, Texas


Idaho.
Cincinnati-One car California. New York-420 lbs. from Maine. Philadelphia-36,000 lbs. California, cases from New York.


1400


BRITISH HONEY REPORT

During the past month there has been a little more enquiry for Chilian honey. The total sales amount to 560 barrels. 2607 barrels arrived per S. S. "Kenuta" and 130 casks St. Domingo sold at 68/- per cwt. The value of extracted honey in American currency is 14 cents per lb.
Beeswax: The market continues dull. 30 bags Chilian have been sold. The value in American currency is 37 cents per lb.
Taylor & Co.
Liverpool, England.

Don't miss the coming important articles in our next and future issues by subI, rib-g now.


NEW PRICES FOR WORKING BEESWAX INTO




Dadant Per fect Foundation


Where You Furnish Wax
We work beeswax into Dadant Foundation at the following prices f. o. b. San Antonio, for- prompt shipment. Less Than Med. Brood Light Brood Thin Super Ex. Thin 10-lb. Lots --------40c 45c 50c 55c
25-lb. Lots --------38c 43c 47c 50c
50-lb. Lots --------35c 40c 42c 45c
100-lb. Lots_--------32c 35c 38c 40c
500-lb. Lots_--------30c 32c 35c 37c


Price List of Foundation Where You
Do Not Furnish Wax
25 lbs. or more
in Wooden
Style 1-lb. Boxes 2-lb. Boxes 5-lb. Boxes Boxes Medium Brood--$1.00 $ .95 $ .92 $ .90
Light Brood --- 1.03 .98 .95 .93
Thin Surplus --- 1.08 1.03 1.00 .98
Extra Thin ___ 1.10 1.05 1.02 1.00


We always pay the highest price for


BEES


w


Cash price f. o. b. San Antonio, 35c; exchange price, 38c. Ship us all the Beeswax you can. Our price is two to five cents per pound more than Texas dealers are offering.




Texas Honey Producers Association


San Antonio, Texas


Southwestern Distributors


II,, :~iI


"


Ax


- - -- -. * - - - - - - -


-o-o-


market dull. Alfalfa 20-21c. Clover 21c.
Philadelphia-Mrket steady, orange 21c, clover 19c.
St. Louis-Market dull. Light amber 16-18c. Beeswax market weak, yellow 30-31.c
St. Paul-Demand and movement slow, market dull.

HONEY ARRIVALS

During the two weeks ending Sept. 15th the following arrivals of honey in important markets have been reported. Medina-(Sept. 1st) 10,275 lbs. Ohio. (Aug. 24th) 8,327 lbs. Ohio.
Chicago--One car each from California and


I


i


4















The Beekeepers Househo I

Conducted by

MRS. EMMIE S. SCHOLL

P. 0. Box 159, New Braunfels, Texas




TWO HINTS FOR HOUSEHOLDERS


MRS. CARRIE ZIEGLER
Since I have a recipe for cookies requiring honey and no sugar I thought the readers of THE BEEKEEPERS ITEM might wish to see it published.
Honey Cookies

Three pounds honey, %2 pound butter or lard, 1 pound pecans, 1% tablespoon soda, 1 ounce cinnamon, % ounce allspice and cloves, juice


THE BEEKEEPERS ITEM


and rind of a lemon, flour enough to roll.
Pot Handling Pads
I also find pads for handling pots better than dish towels. I make them just like those used for holding the irons when ironing. A few in the kitchen are very handy.
San Antonio, Texas.


WHAT PUZZLED HER


Lady to Beekeeper-"So you keep bees! I think they are just perfectly adorable little creatures; I have just read Materlinck's 'The Life of the Bee.' But one thing has always puzzled me: How do you put that little wooden box around the cake of honey without crushing that delicate wax?"


Ice cream can be kept hard for 24 hours if it is placed in a paper cooking bag and the


123


ends of the bag being folded over tightly to keep out the air, is put in the refrigerator directly on the ice.


When the freshness of eggs is doubtful break each one separately in a cup before mixing them together. To ascertain the freshness of eggs without breaking them-put them in a solution made of two ounces of salt to one pint of water. A fresh egg sinks. An egg in a few days old has a tendency to rise a little In the liquid, while a stale egg floats on the top of it.


Do all the good you can and you will find this is not such a bad old world


If your oven burns on the bottom a piece of wire door screen cut to fit will insure you against further annoyance.


T he Beekeepers Household Fashion Department


3169~







(k r


13


LULUJ


33 /-


3356


-1359

























. W












3359-3349. A Stylish Costume. Blouse 3359 cut in 7 sizes, 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, 44 and 46 inches bust measure. Skirt 3349 cut in 6 sizes: 24, 26, 28, 30, 32 and 34 inches waist measure. To make the costume for a 38 inch size will require 7 3-4 yards of 38 inch material. The width of the skirt at Its lower edge is about ] 7-8 yards. TWO separate patterns 12
cents FOR EACH pattern. 3353-3345. A Costume for Business Wear.


- J 3354

















WaIst 3353 cut in 7 sizes: 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, 44 and 46 inches bust measure. Skirt 3345 cut in 7 sizes: 24, 26, 28, 30, 32, 34 and 36 inches waist measure. It will. require 2 1-2 yards of 38 inch material for the skirt and 2 3-8 yards of 36 inch material for the waist for a medium size. The width of the skirt at its lower edge is 1 5-8 yards. Two separate patterns 12 cents FOR EACH pattern.

3357-3319. A Dressy Gown.
Waist 3357 Cut in 7 sizes: 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, 44 and 46 inches bust measure. Skirt 3319 cut in 6 sizes: 24, 26, 28, 30, 32 and 34 inches waist measure. To make this model for a medium size will require 7 3-8 yards of 40 inch material. The width of the skirt at lower edge is 1 3-4 yards. . TWO separate patterns 12 cents FOR EACH pattern.


Date....................... ..................


The Beekeepers Item,


3344. Dress for Work or Porch Wear. Cut in 7 sizes 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, 44 and 46 inches bust measure. A 38 inch size requires 6 yards of 36 inch material. The skirt with plaits extended measures about
1 3-4 yards. Price 12 cents. 3367. Child's Dress. Cut in 4 sizes: 4, 6, 8, and 10 years. A 6 year size will requier 2 3-4 yards of 27 inch material. Price 12 cents. 3346. A Child's Coat. 'ut in 5 sizes: 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 years. A 6 year size will require 3 yards of 44 Inch material. Price 12 cents. 3356. A Dainty Dress. Cut in 4 sizes. 4, 6, 8, and 10 years. A 6 year size will require 2 5-8 yards of 36 inch material. Price 12 cents. 3354. Girls Dress.
3365. Boy's Suit.


Cut in 4 sizes: 3, 4, 5 and 6 years. A 4 year size will require 1 1-2 yards of 27 inch material for the blouse and 1 1-2 yards material for the trousers. Price
12 cents.
3169. Ladies' Dress. Cut in 6 sizes 34, 36, 38, 40 ,42 and 44 ut in 4 sizes: 6, 8, 10, and 12 years. A L2 year size rekuires 4 1-2 yards of 38 inch material. Price 12 cents. inches bust measure. A Medium size will
require 6 3-4 yards of 40 inch material. Width of skirt at lower edge, is 1 3-4 yards. Price 12, rents'. 3361. A Popular "Cover All" Apron. Cut in 4 sizes: Small, 32-34; Medium, 36-38; Large, 40-42; and Extra Large,
44-46 inches bust measure. A medium
size will require 6 3-4 yards of 27 inch material. Price 12 cents.


Household Dept., New Braunfels, Texas.


Herewith find............for which send me the following patterns:


Pattern No.


...........................................................Size


Pattern No..................................................................Size..............................


Pattern No. -....-......................................... z..........


Nanme.................................Address..............................

Be sure to sign your ful name and address.


rr'F


PIZ


Ar



A











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3319


A


-







124


CLIPPINBS FROM OUR NEIGHBORS

THE CO-OPERATIVE ROUTE-The shortest road to reasonable prices for all farm produce-"reasonable" to both producer and .consumer, is by the co-operative route. Only by this method is the consumer's dollar properly spent,'for it then pays only the legitimate costs and profits incidental to production and distribution.
The producer gets his just share; middlemen assisting in distribution get theirs, but only what is fair, and the consunAr p4ys no profit tb speculators, to ignorance or to sloppy and unbusinessnesslike methods.
Our every move has in mind the conducting of the affairs of Your Exchange upon a strictly business basis, thus insuring for you a fair return for your honey. You are an important factor in bringing about a full measure of success for the Exchange (and therefore the beekeeping industry) by your hearty, sincere loyalty and cooperation. .
JUST THINK! What would it mean to you, and every beekeeper, member or nonmember, if every one of our 950 members would be a nactive "booster" for The California Honey Producers Co-operative Exchange?-California Co-operator.

One of the finest things about co-operative advertising is the splendid spirit behind it. Any force that brings men closer together, that helps them, forget their petty jealousies and appreciate their inter-independence, performs a social service. It helps to promote kinship and craftsmanship-distinct social assets.
Oranges are not the rare luxuries today that they were twenty years ago. To the public it has meant that more consumers could eat more oranges. This is bringing -a decided betterment to public and producer.
Since 1912 the returns to growers of the Associated Raisin Company have increased'99 per cent while the price to the consumer has only increased 30.4 per cent.-Don Francisco in Fruit Growers' Exchange.

R. V. Couser of San Diego county has recently -joined the Exchange because, as he says, "I know by experience how difficult it is to secure a just price for your honey, year after year, through the brokers."
So do we, brother; and we remember attending a "bee-meeting" in your county some years ago, when one member confessed to selling his


honey at 6 cents; while his neighbors got 11 to 13 cents for the same grade of honey from the same firm on the same day. "Them was the happy days"-nit.-Honey Producers' Co-operator.

San Diego, the oldest county in California, has surpassed itself this year with a large crop of. extra fine honey which is bringing high prices. The estimated production of honey for San Diego for this season is 100 cars of 40,000 pounds each, a total of 4,000,000 pounds of honey.-California Development Board Bulletin.

This clipping from Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce Bulletin:
"The man who 'takes no part in affairs of civic and business advancement, is stealing a ride on the chariot of progress-his standing as a citizen fails 'to measure up with those 'who achieve for the community.'
Note: This might also well apply to the beekeeper who "believes in co-operative marketing," but prefers to let the other fellow hold the um-


THE BEEKEEPERS ITEM

brella and shield him from the storm, rather than being a working unit in doing his part in constructive work for the beekeeping industry.Millspaugh.

A Los Angeles broker recently sold a car of light-amber alfalfa honey from Arizona at 132 cents. The Exchange is selling the same grade at 17% Cents. Some beekeeper was pinched hard. What he lost would have paid the Exchange membership all the rest of his natural life.-Honey Producers' Co-operator.

The .increased prosperity of co-operative association members results, not from any increased cost to the consumer, but from the absorption by the co-operator of the tremendous margin of profit which the independent dealer made.Millspaugh.

THE BEST KNoWN-"Under the co-operative marketing systems of California, which even the government regards as the best known method, of middlemen, elimination, various production-economy campaigns in which all the associated growers unite make it possible to turn the products over to the consumer at the lowest possible prices."-Carlisle Thorpe.

Our brands are becoming known to the public and the time has now arrived when we can advertise our honey in the public prints without stimulating the sale of everybody's honey as well as our own.-f. D. Bixby.

Send us something for publication, and also pictures. Others will appreciate what you may have..

Remember, neither the whole of truth nor the entirety of good is revealed to any single person. The other -fellow always has some knowledge-of truth and good that you have not yet acquired.




"Superior" Foundation
"Best by Test"

ASSURES REAL QUALITY

Let -us manufacture your- Beeswax


FOR. ALE


155 acres of good farming land; located near
Fant City, Bee county, on S. A. U. & G. Ry.
Several deep oil tests now going down. Oil
rights go with land. For further - particulars
write to B. Schwegmann, 206 Navarro St., San
Antonio, Texas.



Odeil Learn & Co.

500 Dolorosa Street, San Antonio, Texas.
Buy All Kinds foLIVE SNAKES AND ANIMALS.
BEST PRICES PAID.













Electric Imbedder
Price without batteries $1.25, not postpaid Actually cements wires in foundation.
Will work with dry cells or with city
current.Best device of its kind on the market.
For sale by all bee supply dealers.

- DADANT & SONS
Manufacturers,
= HAMILTON, ILLINOIS,




DOCTOR MILLER'S
THOUSAND ANSWERS TO BEEKEEPING
QUESTIONS
Is the new 280 page cloth-bound book. It is a compilation of some 1000 questions out of more than 10,000 that Dr. Miller has answered for beekeepers in
The American Bee Journal.
You should know it. The book is offered only
in combination with a year's subscription.


Please Mention THE BEEKEEPERS ITEM when Writing Advertisers.



Breeder of .288 Egg Line Single Comb White Leghorns Exclusively

Baby Chix and Eggs for Hatching from Pedigree Trapnested Stock.

EGGS THAT WILL HATCH ARE'NOW READY STARTING WITH DAY OLD CHIX IS VERY POPULAR

Careful study of the development and chick requirements enables us to "Guarantee Safe Arrival of Chix" when destination' is within a radius of from forty-eight to seventytwo hours' travel. The chick "envelopes" the yolk of the egg just before it breaks the shell, which provides food for at east 48 hours and which accounts for the chix reaching destination larger and with more vitality than when they started on their journey.


RIVER CREST POULTRY YARDS, NewBraunfels, Texas


into "Superior" Foundation.
We are in the market for your Beeswax


SUPERIOR HONEY CO.
OGDEN, UTAH


PRICE OF BOTH POSTPAID ONLY $1.75
Clubbed with The Beekeepers Item
One Year, Only $2.00.
Send all orders to
THIE BEEKEEPERS. ITEM NEW BRAUNFELS. TEXAS.


......... X.W











SUGAR USED, NINETY POUNDS PER CAPITA


The production of sugar in the United States, while increasing to 22 pounds per capita is still far below our present consumption of 90 pounds. Retailing today in the neighborhood of 17 cents per pound, the drop in August alone of '6' cents was due chiefly to the large imports stimulated by the previous high prices. The fact that during the last fiscal year approximately nine and a half billion pounds were imported into the United States, nearly seven billion pounds coming from Cuba alone, testifies to the high standard of living and prosperity of our country. The record per capita consumption just alluded to, occurred despite an increase of 350 per cent in import prices over those of 1914 and periods of positive scarcity in many districts.
-Irving National Bank Bulletin.


BOOK REVIEWS BY DR. C. C. MILLER.


The following' book reviews published in the May American Bee Journal are of particular interest to Texas readers just at this time.
"Outapiaries and their Management," the new book by M. G. Dadant, being .the first of its kind to appear, gives tokefi that beekeeping is going more into the hands of specialists," and that outaparies are on the increase.


THE BEEKEEPERS ITEM


Every year the number is larger of those whose colonies become too great in number to be kept profitably in one place, and when a man decides to establish a second apiary. in a new place he is confronted with questions that have not before troubled him-questions that he would like to have answered by some one who has been through the mill. For such persons this book is designed, and meets the case nicely. The bee-lover will enjoy its clear instruction, and the book-lover will enjoy its clear typography.

The beekeeper of the present day may congratulate himself that as a new need arises a new book arises to meet the need.

Many a beekeeper whose printed information concerning honey plants has been limited to a few pages in some book upon beekeeping in general, has eagerly longed for something fuller on the subject. Now no less an authority than Frank C. Pellett has given us "American Honey Plants," a book of 300 large pages entirely devoted to the subject. To be sure, many of these pages are taken up with pictures of honey plants but this makes the book all the more valuable. However familiar the reader may become with the reading matter, he will always come back to dwell fondly upon the illustrations, because of their real beauty.


125


OUR ORCHARD APIARY


E. G. LE STOURGEON

Who has not heard of Dillon, the man who has been dubbed, "The Wizard of the Black Jacks," or "The Burbank of South .Texas?"
Dillon made two dewberry vines to grow and produce, where none had grown before. He took the heavy shifting sand of the despised ,"black jaks" and transmuted it into peaches oI delicious flavor, plums of surpassing excellence, and pears that rival in texture the fruit of the more famous climes.

We were given the opportunity to' place one of the Sunny South apiaries in an orchard on one of the Dillon farms. We jumped at the chance. Mesquite mesas stretch~ mile on mile one way, and in the West the "sandy land" horsemint grows stirrup high among the black jacks. Besides that we had the large orchards and the acre on acre of berries for an early brood-stimulating crop.

Dillon knew the value of bees as pollenization agents for his fruit when he invited us to come. With his help, we felt that we could build up bumper colonies, and take a big honey crop. With our help he felt that he could fertilize millions of fruit and berry blooms, and take a bumper fruit crop.


POSITIONS WANTED. ,
POSITION WANTED--With intention to learn Texas beekeeping methods and queen rearing wish position with progressive beekeeper- of this State. Have three years experience in clover section of Indiana. Can give good references. Address A. 0. Smith, Care of Texas
Honey Producers Assn., P. 0. Box 104' San Antonio, Texas.
A POSITION.We can't begin to fill the demand made on us for Draughon-trained students. We will get you a good position or give your money back if you qualify here, Draughon Business College, San Antonio, Texas.

1,000 AGENTS WANTED to sell a selfheating sad-iron. Labor and fuel saver. Pay salary or commission. Agents make $15 to $20 per day. Ladies make good representatives. Write for terms and free sample. Imperial Sad Iron Company, Box 1005, Fort Worth, Texas.


HONEY AND WAX.


HONEY WANTED-A few cases of extracted Mesquite catclaw honey, new crop. Send small sample and quote price F. 0. B. AddressD . p. Hunt, Blm, Texas.

DARK EXTRACTED HONEY-Can use
some off grades or dark extracted honey of otherwise good quality at low price. Send sampis, and write size of packages, quantity, and lowest price wanted, all in first letter. The Louis H. Scholl Apiaries, New Braunfels, Texas.

WAX REFUSE-Don't throw away your
"slum-gum" from your wax meltings. Save them up and Ahip tous. We will get a lot of wax out of it for you and pay you highest price for it or make it into foundation for you. Write for rates. Dadant & Sons, Hamilton, Ill.

MISCELLANEOUS.
BEES FOR SALE--200 to 210 colonies of bees for sale. Prices and particulars on application. Ten shares association stock and 100 lbs. foundatioA goes with bees. W. B. Hamilton, Bigfoot, Texas.

"TEXAS NATURE OBSERVATIONS"- 323 pages, photo illustrated true to nature, by Dr. R. Menger, San Antonio, has been honored by all who purchased a volume as a valuable work of information, not to be found in any other book, on Texas rauna and flort, insects, reptiles, hunting and fishing, and nature reminscences and Texas wild lire in general, says Capt. W. Druse, Chief Deputy Sheriff, Bexar County: "I am so well pleased with the copy of "Nature's Observations" that I now wish two more copies: one for "The Waterloo (Ills) Library Club, and the other for "Waterloo (Ills) High School"; please send nice copies, etc. Price $2.25 to any address in Texas.


BEE SUPPLIES.


FOR SALE-Two frame Novice honey extractor, almost new, $15.00. Twelve 5" supers with shallow extracing frames, with foundation, $1.00 each. Several colonies of Golden and Leather colored Italian bees in 10 frame hives, with full sheets foundation wired, (hives used this year only at $5.00 per colony, f. o. b. here. Will sell all or part. to buyer. J. A. CUNINGFIAM, Rural Letter Carrier No. 2, Saint Jo, Texas.


TRY THEM-These classified want ads. Others say they are "result getters," why not for you? Only ten cents a line-the cheapest way to let others know what you have or what you want.


WANTED-We have installed a steam
proces for rendering old combs cappings, and slum gum, and want you to give same a trial. Write us for terms. We pay market price for wax rendered or will make same into MILLER'S CALIFORNIA FOUNDATION. Send for our Catalogue. MILLER BOX MFG. CO.. 201 N. Ave. 18. Los Angeles, Cal.

FOR SALE-50 Root 8-frame supers,
for 41/j plain sections, nailed and painted, without sections, at 80c each; 2,000 "A" Grade 4% plain sections, $5.00 per 1,000. f. o. b. here; $40 for entire lot. A bargain. Honeydale Apiaries, Centerville, Texas.

TYPEWRITERS

REAL values in second-hand and rebuilt typewriters, a guarantee of satisfaction with each purchase.
Remington No. 105......................................$ .00
Oliver No. 5 . ..... --..................27.50
L. C. Smith No. 2 back spacer-......-.... 37.50
Underwood back spacer..............................47.50
Remington No. 6-........................................15.00
These machines are guaranteed in perfect working order and if not so may be returned. Corona and L. C. Smith, sole factory dealer. A. F. BEYER, 310 West Commerce Street,
San Antonio, Texas.

AUTOMOBILE REPAIRS.

AUTOMOBILE owners should subscribe for the Automobile Dealer and Repairer; 150-page illustrated monthly devoted exclusively to the -care and repair of the car. The only magazine in the world devoted to the practical side to motoring; The ''Trouble Department" contains five pages of numbered questions each month from car owners and repairmen -vhich are answered by experts on gasoline-engine repairs. $1.50 per year. 15 cents per copy; We have 350 subscribers in Texas. Postals not answered. Charles D. Sherman, 106 Highland Court, Hartford, Conn.'


BEES AND QUEENS.

THREE BANDED ITALIAN QUEENSBy return mail, 1 untested, $1.25; 6 for $6.60; 1 tested, $2.50.. E. W. Somerfeld, R. 1., Brenham, Texas.

PURE 'ITALIAN QUEENS-Golden or Leather colored; packages and nuclei; one untested queen, $1.50; 6, $7.50; 12, $13.50; 50, $55; 100, $100; virgins, 50 cents
each. Packages 24 and under $2.25 per b; 25 and over $2.00 per lb. nuclei, 1 frame $4; 2 frame, $6; 3 frame, $7.50; queens extra, One story tea-frame colony with queen, $12. Golden Star Apiaries, New Almaden, near San Jose, Calif.

FOSTER'S SELECT THREE-BANDED ITALIAN QUEENS are reared from the best mothers and are mated to choice drones. They are guaranteed to please. Write for descriptive circular and price list. Safe arrival and satisfactoin guaranteed. Hardin S. Foster, Dept. A-1, Columbia, Tennessee.

GOLDENS THAT ARE TRUE TO NAME
-Hundreds of testimonials annually. Write for list every queen guaranteed. One Selected Unt $1.50; 6, $7.50; 12, $13.50; 50,a$55; 100, $100. Garden City Apiaries, San Jose, Calif.

THREE BAND ITALIANS ONLY-Output over 8,000 queens a year. Selected
Untested, one $1.50; 6, $7.50; 12, $'13.50; 50, $55; 100, $100. Safe arrival I guarantee; booking orders now. H. G. Dunn. The Willows, San Jose, Cal.

PURE GOLDEN QUEENS-Queens from special selected stock; untested queens, 1, $1.50; 6, $7,.50; 12, 13.50; 50, $55; 100, S100. The Royal Apiaries, San Jose Cal.

QUALITY THREE BAND ITALIANSQueens from excellent stock; untested queens, one $1.50; 6, $7.50; 12, $13.50; 50, $55; 100, $100. N. J. James, 1185 Bird Avenue. San Jose, Cal.

BEES BY THE POUND, ALSO QUEENS
-Booking orders now. Free Circular gives prices, etc. See'large ad. elsewhere. Nueces County Apiaries, E. B. - Ault. Proprietor, Calallen, Texas.

200 TESTED QUEENS-3 and 5 band Italians, $1.00 each by return mail. Twenty years experience as breeders. H. A. ROSS. 1711 Van Bureu Ave., Evansville, Ind.

PURE LEATHER COLORED QUEENSby return mail. Prices 1 untested, $1.50; 6, $8.00; 12, $15.00; . 50, $62.50; 100, $100. Tested, $2.50 each; select tested $3.00 each Breeders, $15.00 each. I guarantee safe arrival and pure mating. I keep no Goldens' in my yard.
My reference, Hellman Commercial Trust and Savings Bank, Los Angeles, Calif. Geo. E. Sigmont, Watts, Calif.

POULTRY AND EGGS.

WANTED.To buy live snakes, live animals, pets of all kinds. For prices, address W. Odell & Co., '504 Dolorosa St., San Antonio, Texas.

EGGS-Send for booklet telling particulars of our Tom Barron's 200 egg strain White Leghorns. Eggs $2.25 per 15. Roseberry Farm, Scottsboro, Ala.


SPECIAL NOTICES.
FOR SALE-Our well established 'business of handling honey and beekeepers supplies as we are going to retire. This i% a wonderful chance to make money. We have sold $50,000 worth of honey this year. With this business a man can clear up from $2,000 to $4,000 annually. THE HYDE BEE CO., Floresville, Texas.

HONEY LABELS-New designs. Catalog free. Eastern Label Co., Clintonville, Conn.

QUEEN REARING OUTFIT-Fifty baby nuclei hives, with shallow frame. and fasteners to hold two frames together to hang in regular shallow super; two swarm boxes, cell cup holding bars and several hundred wooden cell cups; cell compressor to form cells into cups, etc. Account of extensive honey business not time to use it. Just the thin for one who has. Write us. The Louis H. EchoU Apiaries, New Braunfels, Texas.

BEE BOOKS WANTED-On account of frequent inquiries we have decided to buy and sell for our readers such bee books and journals as they may have to offer or wish to buy. The Beekeepers Item, New Braunfels.. Texas.

SEEDS AND PLANTS

A HARDY TEXAS Thornless Cactus, producing enormous tonnage of green feed at all seasons. Adapted to poorer soils with little or no cultivation.-A soil renovator and wash filler. Prolific. Controllable. Inexpensive. Write for pamphlet. B. R. Russell & Son. San Saba, Texas.


THE DOMESTIC BEEKEEPER is
published "Wholly in the interest of the honey producer." It will
help you to "Keep more bees," and produce more honey at the best
price. If you are paying a long price for your tin and glass honey containers, and other supplies, perhaps we can help you. Published monthly. $1.00 per year. Sample
copy free. Address, The Domestio Beekeeper, Almont, Mich.


. t,


HOW IT
WORKS IN THE STREET.

The j i n k x must be on me, I haven't been able to make any monpy for a month.,
I hope you are not super stitious.
No, all the fellows who are sup e rstitious have mad*
money.


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS


Rates in these columns are ten cents a line. Minimum charge will be 25 cents. When sending advertisements for this department it must be so stated or we will not be responsible for errors.







THE BEEKEEPERS. ITEM


I.


Texas Honey Producers Ass'n
Notes by
E. G. LESTOURGEON, Manager P. 0. Box 1048 San Antonio, Texas


L


It was inevitable that the price of beeswax should decline. Beginning October 1st we willi pay 35c cash and 38c in trade f. o. b. San Antonio, Texas.

The Association is not buying any extracted honey at present. Honey of members is handled on the Association plan. Members should ship their honey to San Antonio direct.

The October early order discount on bee supplies is 7%; You will need some supplies next spring. Order now and make this saving.

Many beekeepers are joining the Association now. In the face of lower markets next season a membership in the Association will be of doublevalue. The investment of fifty or one hundred dollars now in our stock will be to your interest.

The can situation is very unsatisfactory. Factories are unable to give definite shipping dates and are not booking any orders. We have been unable to give very satisfactory service for some weeks.

If you visit the State Fair be sure and see the Association bee and honey exhibit. We will have a complete display of Lewis Beeware. Many members are enterting honey exhibits for the liberal premiums.

Modified Dadant hives are carried in stock by the Association. These large type hives seem to be adapted to our climate and many beekeepers are becoming very enthusiastic over their advantages. The roomy brood nest and wider frame spacing is reported to be a deterrent to swarming.

Renewal time for your magazines is about here. Be sure that you read "THE BEEKEEPERS' ITEM" and "The American Bee Journal" next year. They can be clubbed together through the Association. Each brings you the newest and best thoughts of the masters in our industry. Club price $2.00 per year for both of these valuables papers.

The Association is collecting a complete library of beekeeping. If you have any old files of bee papers and magazines that you do not want we will be glad to buy them from you.


If you know of anyone that has old bee books that they do not want please give us their addresses.

BUSINESS AND THE BUSINESS OF LIVING.

The oldest business in the world; the greatest business in the world, the universal business of the world, is the business of living.
Leading from the cradle to the grave is the broad highway of life. Each one of us must travel that road. There are no return tickets. The price of the one-way ticket is the cost of living.
The whole purpose and end of all government


L-. 1


) 0 dwb I iiam o 4011a odHow ( I -dli* () ljjj*b, C I 4WEAJ, ($ 43WW 4) 4joW 1) 40WW J) #&416 0 4dml 0 4d1lb- 0 40imill- i ) 41fow 4;


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200 COLONIES BEES FOR SALE

Have 200 to 210 colonies of bees for sale. Prices and particulars on application. Ten shares of Texas Honey Producers' Association stock and 100 pounds of comb foundation goes with the bees.


W. B. HAMILTON, Bigfoot, Texas.








orBeeVga


0 I WM-~-


The Blumberg Motor Manufacturing Co. is tors for delivery in 60 days.


now taking orders for Trac-


If you are in the market for a Farm Tractor and want the best, place your order now for future delivery.

Blumberg Steady Pull Tractors
I0
are manufactured in San Antonio, and for four years have given satisfaction to owners.

Write for catalog today.


BLUMBERG MOTOR MFG. CO.

Mesquite and -Burnett Streets SAN ANTONIO, T EXAS


CO0R N


..


#:# ).QjY& 4 $ 41ijil, 0 4MkW 0 41W* 1) 0 46-&b- () A*921 () AMAO 0 am" Ovibip o twiw o 4w6ip ( t 46bffr ( 15mmor i) 4iw 0 Qm 4


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Special Queen Sale We have about 75 vigorous Italian Queens, average 3 months old, prolific and healthy, that we offer for $1.00 each, Account of requeening a yard with Goldens. Bees run 2 to 4 banded. Geo. W. Coltrin & Son,
MATHIS, TEXAS


126


w


Shelled or in the ear. Will buy by the wagon load or in straight car lots. Also want

aize and Kafir Corn

M. Marucheau Grain Co.
SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS
Elevator on Guadalupe St., and I. & G. N. Ry. Tracks.






THE BEEKEEPERS ITEM


and all civilization, and of commerce and industry, and of art and invention, is to keep unbroken the procession of human beings who travel the highway from the cradle to the grave. As the grave receives a pilgrim it is necessary that another must start from the cradle if the endless life-chain is to be unbroken.
It is the general welfare that children may be decently born of sound bodies and brains; that they may be decently fed and their minds and bodies so dveloped that each can do his share of the world's work when his turn comes, pay his passage down the highway of life and provide somewhat for a comfortable old age.
Alongside the highway of life runs the broad River of Commerce, upon whose mighty tide float countless craft freighted with the fuel and the food, the clothing and the materials for shelter, as well as the pleasures and luxuries which supply the pilgrims on the Highway of Life. It is the theory of our laws that this great River of Commierce shall be kept forever clear of artificial obstructions and that the craft which navigate it, whether they be great er small, shall each enjoy the fullest possible freedom of movement consistent with the similar rights of every other craft on the stream.
It is the theory of the law that whoever has for sale anything which he has produced on farm, in factory, in mine or in mill, shall have free access to the River of Commerce. Here it is committed to the care of the merchants, the wholesaler, jobber and retailer, whose function it is to take it to the place where it is most needed.
It is the theory of the law that the travelers on the Highway of Life have free access to the River of Commerce so that each may select whatever he may need and can afford from the vast stores that float upon the stream.
Whoever by conspiracy, by monopoly, or unfair advantage founded on privilege, obstructs free access to the River of Commerce interferes with the whole great scheme of things contrary to the public interest-contrary to the rights of all of us who are the pilgrims through life. Whoever on the River of Commerce, whether his craft be great or small, so navigates it as to impede or imperil the craft of another or to obstruct and disarrange the orderly navigation of the stream is guilty of unfair practices in commerce contrary to the public interest and in violation of the rights of all.
Whoever seeks to cut off from the shores c the River of Commerce that free access which


is the right of all; whoever seeks to erect unnecessary tollgates on the Highway of Life and to make it unnecessarily difficult or costly for the demand which arises out of human needs to be satisfied by the supply of goods which is provided out of natural resources and industry and commercial processes through the employment of human labor of hands, and brains, and the employment of capital; all these act contrary to the common welfare and impede rather than forward the scheme of orderly living.
The Federal Trade Commission and Business
The access to, and movement upon, the River of Commerce, constitutes the state of fair and free competition which is at the bottom of our present theory of business law. The Federal Trade Commission has been created to aid in keeping the channel free of obstructions and the Ships of Commerce moving freely without undue interference, one with the other.
In creating the Commission the Congress wrote a single sentence which seems to me to


Please Mention THE BEEKEEPERS ITEM when Writing Advertisers.


To Section Comb Honey Producers

We can dispense with the following slightly used and new items at a very low price, f. o. 1). here. By referring to supply catalogs you can readily understand the items and mgake price comparisons.


300 slotted section holders, 414 sections.. 200 slotted wood separators, 44 sections 100 fence separators, 4/ sections.-..


I

I



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...... ... .. ...... .........- 1.50

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200 H.vde.Scholl slotted separators, wood................. ..........3.00

3 M ny -"mon atted separators, tin.-.............. ............. ....6.00

2 Section presses, for all sizes, each.........-------------................--.20

1 Scholl foundation fastener, for all sizes........................... .50

The Louis H. Scholl Apiaries, New Braunfels, Texas


Ir-ir-r~ir -I I xI-UMSM1"UMM am 34 - ,U iM 1--


I


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BO KS-LABELS-STATIONERY



TWO NEW BOOKS

OUTAPIARIES, by M. G. DADANT-Many valuable hints to the beekeeper who would extend his operations are to be found in this cloth-bound book of 125 pages. The .author has had a life-time experience in Outapiary management. Price $1.

AMERICAN HONEY PLANTS, by FRANK C. PELLETT-The first book in the English language on the honey plants. Invaluable to the live beekeeper who would make the most of his locality. The important honey sources of each state are listed separately and all treated in alphabetical order. 297 pages, 155 illustrations. Price $2.50.


OTHER GOOD BEE BOOKS

Langstroth on the Honeybee, revised by Dadant, 575 pages, $1.50. First Lessons in Beekeeping, by C. P. Dadant, 167 pages, $1.00.. 1,000 Answers to Beekeeping Questions, by C. C. Miller, $1.25. Practical Queen Rearing, by Frank C. Pellett, 105 pages, $1.


LABELS

Now is the time to create a permanent demand for honey. A distinctive label will help to attract the consumer to your product. There are none better than turned out by our shop. Send for our new catalogue of latest designs.


STATIONERY

Attractive printed matter will help your business. The printer in charge of our plant devotes his entire time to printing for beekeepers. Best quality, prompt service, and satisfied customers keep our shop busy



AMERICAN BEE JOURNAL, Hamilton, Ill.


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sum up the ideals of American business and to be at once the Constitution, the Bill of Rights and the Declaration of Independence of American business. These are the words:
"Unfair methods of competition in cornmerce are hereby declared unlawful."
This declaration means that in commerce there shall not be trickery or chicane; that there shall not be the rule of might as opposed to right; that unfairness, meanness; ruthlessness and dishonesty, have no place in American business.
In administering this law, the Federal Trade Commission follows scrupulously a procedure carefully laid down by the Congress. When any one believes that unfair practices are being indulged in to his injury, and he addresses the Federal Trade Commission with a brief statement of the facts as he understands them, the Commission makes a preliminary investigation and if, in the end, it has reason to believe that it is to the interest of the public that the matter be formally inquired into, then it issues its complaint in writing, directed to the concern against whom the accusation has been made. The issuance of the complaint is no judgment of guilt but a resolution for an orderly trial of the matter.
The accused is then given 40 days in which to prepare his reply in writing and thereafter a full hearing is had, the respondent being present in person or by attorney with every opportunity to cross-examine witnesses and examine documentary evidence.
After that, there is placed at his disposal all the processes of the Commission so that he may produce his own witnesses and compel the production of books and papers or any other documentary evidence which he may wish to employ in his defense. In the end, the Commission may find either that the acts complained of have not been committed, or if committed may not properly said to be unfair. In which case the whole matter is dismissed.
If, however, it is found that the things complained of have actually been done, and that they are contrary to the public interest, the Commission's order to cease and desist from the practices complained of, is issued. But thereafter the respondent may, if he believes that the decision is unfair to him, appeal to the Circuit Court of Appeals of the United States and thence to the Supreme Court of the United States; so that every possible safeguard of law is thrown about the proceedings.


Experience has shown that about two out of three of the complaints which are brought to the Commission's attention are not such as to warrant any formal proceedings and those matters are dismissed without annoyance to the respondent, without publicity and without public knowledge.
In the five years of the existence of the Commission, there have been 1990 of such applications for complaint made. These cases have passed through or are passing through the procedure which I have outlined.-Excerpt from speech of William B. Colver, member Federal Trade Commission.

Order is nature's first law, and man should maintain order to the very best of his ability.

The man who knows nothing and wants nothing ought to be comparatively happy.

Men who become great and influential must of necessity have aims higher than their 4wn personal prosperity.


THE BEEKEEPERS ITEM




WANTED-Pre11$8

Comb or extracted. Give full information as to grade, kind, sizes (new or old', your price and the amount you have or will have to sell, f. o. b. your station.

6SmA N DE R 8 PmuR E HU'mNEY
MARE
1300 Houston St. Fort Worth, Texas
"Where You Don't Get Stung."


Ji


Beekeepers' Supplies


We manufacture and keep in stock Bee Hives and Supplies for the Beekeeper.


Write for Catalogue


GRAHAM MFG. CO.,

Greenville, Texas


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Use Our Classified Advertisernts.
For anything you have to sell or trade, or anything you want in any line, our little WANT ADS. will help you get it.
There is something about your premises you have no use for but that the other fellow can use. There is something you want that the other fellow has. Advertise it. Only 10 cents a line. THE BEEKEEPERS ITE M New Braunfels, Texas


THE HERSHISER WAX PRESS

Do you know that nearly every dealer who extracts wax from old combs for beekeepers or for his own use to make into bee comb foundation uses an exractor of the Hershiser type?
This is because it is the most efficient wax extractor on the market which will handle quantities of old combs or cappings at one time. Less than one per cent of wax is left in the slumgurn.
The Hershiser wax extractor tank may be used to heat or liquify extracted honey as it holds four 60-pound honey cans. Many beekeepers use it to drain cappings and to work wax into big cakes.
Sold by Distributors of Lewis "Beeware."
Write for free booklet on this press.
Early Order Cash Discount, 7% in October.


BEWARE
IL1ook WHEREYOU BUY YOUR This
BEEWARE
For - -I VVIS. Mark
MAKES THE FINEST.



G. B. LEWIS COMPANY
Hoie Office, Watertown, Wisconsin. Texas Honey Producers Ass'n,
Branch, 10-12 Front St., Memphis, Tenn. Box 1048, San Antonio, Texas


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PAGE 1

VISA, PT, A Small Item in Itself, a Big [te Louis H. Scroll, Editor Fifty Estr Entered in-the'Postoffice at New Braunfels, Texa, as Second. issMtter. VOL. 4 NEW BRAUNFELS, TEXAS, SEPTEMBER, 1920 My Visit to a 'a Very RemarkableF M5, se any, Pr inen r h orn eekteper atte-, d6 0 IP Known Jor -,What" 'e v(, lp"I"I 11 Th' h4 A 6. 6 on 0 oll ne'. r t s d Caract as 'Westward the course of empire takes its way." So w ote a wise man long ago. Observation proves that other things than empires also find their aegis following the setting su It seems to be true at least of beekeeping. During the warm days of late September wheai old summer brazenly and for the last time flaunts *her gorgeous colours of goldenrod and asters to the world, I had the pleasure of visiting the home of the Dadants on the banks of "The Father of Waters." In the impressions there received I felt that I had come at last E. GuLESTOURGEON 2 I guages and his nar to the corners of t1 successor to Dr. La mentor of our craft' beekeeping were in our businesswas d caie to visit us an across oir state he tive effort. that a .endear( counsel I There resides 4 family of remarkable men; kindly, hospitable and unselfish. By this last -word-unselfish-I find -them more accurately described than by any other word. When most of us strive to further the interests of honey Production we often in ou secrethearire cei"niotsl or unconsciously "boosting our own game. Our honey is the most excellent;. our methods are the most successful; merchandise of our manufacture is far superior; our bees are more docile and better honey gatherers than any in, the wide, wide world. Not so the Dadants. Few have done or are doing more than they to foster and further the interests of beeI There are three dant & Sons, and Louis C., Ienry C. CAMILLE P. DADANT Author, Beekeeper, Editor American Bee Journal. is bourId tog soon., feels in pose is not t yet a great t N AJ:> r: N, I Dadant hoinesead anid home apiary. s have been kept continuously for over this location y years I The Dadant Fo: Dadant, C. P. and yet at the countless meetings of rs, there is seldom one held without a. of this family or a representative of and charitable to all and build' firmly the future of inspire a feeling of'respect earnestly striving to our industry, they and confidence that i j '1 2 m terest

PAGE 2

THE IlEEKEEPERS ITEM system in his charge and is the business managerof the American BeeJournal. Leon has the factory as his province and watches daily to jealously guard the quality of its output. It was interesting to note the system in' Henry's office where several people are employed to take dare of the many shipments of beeswax and combs that are handled every day. It is a sad fact thatas many as 17 such shipments arrived in one day with no name to show from whom they -were received. I found that Texas beekeepers are as bad as any others on this score. I was told of a half dozen packages In the "unknown" file from our own state. The AmericanBee Journal office is a busy place. The Dadant family is not all made up of boys. Two wonderful women, Misses Valentine and Clemence are carrying on the Dadant idea in giving service here. Their -publishing, business is growing by leaps and bounds. Most ,df the more valuable 'books in rnodern beekeeping are, being issued from their press. In the American Bee Journal office also one, receives a hearty welcome from that staunch friend of Texas beekeepers, Mr. Frank C. Pellett. He is an author of more than national. 71 naturalist of world-wide fame. We y hours in recalling incidents of his e homes of Texas bee-m'en. A read-remarkable book on American Honey vs how. vividl'* he was impressed by I find -that owing to the'limits of space I have not said the things I wanted to say about thesekindly and hospitable people. The visit to the orchards hanging full of red and golden fruit;. TO MANAGE WITHOUT .EXCLUDERS T. P. MORRIS Opinion among beekeepers as to the value of queen excluders in honey production seems to be pretty well defined. Various articles have appeared in the journals advising their use, especially in extracted honey production, while many large producers will not use them in this work.: The location of the beekeeper probably has much to do with the use he inakes of this device in his business. Where the seasons 'are, short and the flow fairly heavy he will be more favorably impressed with the merits of the ex-, cluder than in a location where the flow is slow and long drawn out as it usually is here in Central Texas. Under the latter conditions their use seems to weaken the colony and diminsh, the surplus from the fall flow. For this -reason the excluder is not likely to be very extensively used in this locality. When excluders are not used, however, some. trouble arises from the disposition of the bees to extend their brood nests vertically and if the beginner in the pursuit uses his extractor too freely he is likely to have more brood .than honey inthe supers. This undesirable state of affairs is often found with colonies that fail to come up to full strength, and in a poor season strong colonies are likely to establish themslves in the supers, leaving the brood chambers practically empty. But in a normal season the brood can be kept in reasonable bounds by 9 '4 7> ,3". ENGRAVING ZINC ETCHINGS-COPPER AND ..INC HALFTONES FOR PERIODICAL AND NEWSPAPERS-ETC DESIGNING DRAWIGSMN P4N AM OR WASH FOR RPRODUCTION'. PHOTO RETOUCMING SEND) US YOUR,'NEXT ORDER *' 4 _ATRlAL PITAL PHOTO NGRAVING CO. 90 11CONGRESSAV. AUTINEXAS -CO-0OPERATI ON Means BUYING RIGHT and SELLING RIGHT We are a co-operative association and sell the best Bee suPlies obtainable at the right prices. at wil "paAy" Wetern Beekeepers to send for Illustrated Catalog. COLORADO:HONEY PRODUCERS.:ASSN DENVER, COLORADO. USE OUR WANT ADS It will pay you to use them LET OTHERS KNOW WHAT YOU WANT ONLY l0c A LINE. many other such pleasures that always remain as vivid impressions on my memof happy, days. I cannot. express, these s to. you as I wish that I might and fIcanidequately describe them. I can only urge if opportunity should arise, not -to fail to nally visit and become better ,acquainted this, the most remarkable and most whole: edly American, of the families devoted to ,rn apiculture-the Dadants of Hamilton, USE OF, PAN A. G. VAN RoNZELEN pan four or five inches deep and eighteen s square, or round, or any other shape, ave the average beekeeper many a dollar. t under your honey faucet to set the' honey in when filling. It will catch the overflow you forget to turn off the fauCet. Of course, among us who never let honey run' over not be interested in this. Among the rest s who do perhaps there are many who rht of this wonderful scheme the. first time accident happened,-but the idea may save body's religion and' ocGasional undue strain. S.-Come to think of 'it, if you forget too nave a 1 rger pan. .y. '9 Naturalist, FRANK C. PELLETT Associate Editor The Bee Journal. American practicing the planknown among beekeepers as "overtiering," and the plan, as I shall give it, applies especially to old established colonies and is to be t'sed in producing extracted honey only. During the early spring gionths these old colonie's require several supers to keep the bees contented,-3 or' 4 of the shallow variety.. Vhen full depth supers are used two of -these are about right. If any honey is coming in or the supers 'contain any when given, to the bees the queen will go up and occupy them by the time the flow from horsemint begins in May. Before this time the 'bees have" consumed more" honey than they have gathered. but from now on they should store more than they consume and 'the brood will be gradually forced down toward the brood chamber so that by extracting tinme El BUY THE FAMOUS DAVIS. GOLDENS nd get bil fields from r and Price -1 BEN G. DAVIS Sprng Hill, Tennessee 92 0-Q U E EN S -19 20 "THREE BAND ITALIANS OF SUPERIOR QUALITY One $1.25; Fifty $60.00 ntestedOne Hundred $100.00 BOOKING ORDER'S NOW-SEND' 20% WITH ORDER FACTSOur Queens Are Bred Only From' Our VERY BEST stock. This Is Our 20th Year of Beekeeping. .We Believe We Know Bees and Queens. The Quality of Our Queens Is Not Sacrificed for Quantity. We 'Send Out 'no Queens We Would Not' Use in Our Own Colonies. WE GUARANTEE SAFE ARRIVAL AND SATISFACTION. t. .1 1%00%~ 1 1 $? t:

PAGE 3

SBEEKEEPERS the queen will go up again and to avoid this a super that is about half full of unsealed honey is selected and placed next the brood and the empty supers on top. This is done at each subsequent extracting and by the' end of the season the supers will contain but little brood and in many cases none. A super of unsealed honey does not obstruct the passage of the bees to the empty combs, above and while too much sealed honey may accumulate between the brood and the empty ,supers no harm seems to be done if it does not remain too long. Anyway, the colonies remain very strong throughout the season and the brood nests seldom contain enough honey to carry the bees to the honey flow the following year. A if C.0 i rf iaywild, T.exas. Extracted Honey Wanted Must be of good quality and flavor. State size of container source of honey and send sample. Price wanted must be state all in first letter. THE LOUIS H. SCHOLL APIARIES New Brainfels, Texas 9a 4 A CONVINCING HIVE EXPERIMENT W. S. JOHNSON Regarding your article in the May issue THE BEKEEPERS' ITEM wish first to co gratulate you for the stand you have taken favor of extracting supers to be used as broc chambers. If all, or even half of them, w read the article carefully and give it a trial, am sure' it will go a long way toward solving the large vs. small hive problem, which is bei so frequently discussed. Last year I had considerable: trouble with the standard 10 frame hives, on which I used an extra body for the super. The queen would go, above and lay ,in most 'of the combs, a ,little strip several inches wide at the bottom of the. frames. And when I applied the excluderl. they ; would not store above unless:4hey, gotcrowded. the brood chambers, causing swarming fever by crowding the queens' room for brood. The brood frames would have about six inches square of brood, the balance being -filled with honey and pollen. After studying the advantage and disadvantage of the small and 'large' brood chambers I decided to give them both a trlal. I started ten hives with the jumbo deph fram 'and ten hives with three 's h a llow -exitracting supers for brood chambers... The result is beyond belief unless one gives it a trial. Next year I shall have nothing but, hives made of shallow extracting supers. They are. easier to manipulate, produce more brood, control swarming to some extent, and many other advantages over the standard 10 frame 'brood chambers. Alexandra,La. BEEKEEPING, by Dr. E.I One of the newest books on beekeeping, that ought to be i It contains 457 pages, divided into 24 chapters with appendix, and -grayngs.. of While the author says the book is not intended as a text whole ground q beekeeping, much of it from a scientific standpoil The author, Dr. Phillips, of the Depart ment of Agriculture well known that it is' guarantee enough that thebook is authent Dd tate about procuring a copy. Published by The McMillan Co o ill With The Beekeepers Item, one year, $2.35. Send your orders to ng THE BEEK EE PER F. NEW BRAUNFEL elms The prices shown in our, 1920 for new price list before placing EARLY OR 'R An early order di'scount of 7% is allowe and Dadant Foundation orders placed dt advantage of this by making remittance r supplies as you need them. A remittance of to you as $100.00 against your future purcha I f ll I Itfil I I I II ti l i I I II IfI [ 11 111 111 111 111 MIGRATORY BEEKEEPING ALMA M.,HASSLBAUER At the, meeting of the Farmers' Congress at College Station, our association members in their sectional meeting were much -interested in the, subject of migratory beekeeping., Several members recounted their' experiences and the hope was expressed that the practice would grow. W. 0. Victor, of Uvalde, Texas, expressed the opinion that the recent development. of migratory b eekeeping was the most important thing ever introduced into the honey producing business in Texas. He felt that it is destined to revolutionize the industry. The great draw-back in Texas beekeeping t1 L '..r* LEWIS BE DADANT FOI ALUMINUM HO Texas Honey A $93.00 will ng THE ITEM

PAGE 4

THEBEEKEEPERS loss. In seeking locations for migrabeekeeping it is well t r familiarize oneself floral and climatic conditions before moving. en bees have finished harvesting, a flow in locality they may be moved to another and even to y another. they should be their removal When in the pink of should e new location in tim' of Pre aratinn for moving moved howcondition be timed to reach a honey, flow. verr imnnrtant The earlier in the season it can be done the better success one will have. The cooler the weath-. er at the time of moving the stronger may the colonies be. When moving in carloads he prefers a stock car because of added ventilation. He builds a deck .orskeleton floor to set the hives upon and after one layer of hives have been loaded he, builds another deck above them for the next This, gives. air circulation and provideAs 1, which is very important with strong has 'used refrigerator cars but at the they are not advisable 'owing to ice supply. This will some day be to move bees. ved in thoroughly moving bees the, strength determined according to the, trv hives. Si moving. should be to move L extremely ich colonies should Very strong colonies ref rigerated cars. f the colony must the time not Wise large or pc be divided. Colonies of 100,000 individuals divided into three before .ong populous before, or so moving and' up at once The New Will I be In 1916 this publication Subscription One Dollar, a was founded as a mere eight rrice Year page "newspaper" for beekeepers. From this small beginning it has grown n size and improved appearance and increased in circulation to such an extent that it has outgrown its former sphere. It has now reached a period of its established and useful life that warrants making a, change. in style and price. Will Be in Magazine Form With the ever-increasing popularity won by this publication there .has developed a demand fora smaller size, more easily adapted for binding into complete volumes. It is an appreciated fact that beekeepers, more than those i most other professor ns, preserve their copies for future reference. We are, therefore, pleased to announce a new size, of 32 pages, for the new year. The Price Will Still Be Low Considering the high cost of almost everything, the new subscription price will still be a moderate one. Paper, ink and all printing materials, la6or and postage and all other expenses have increased to such an extent siice we "first issued our little eight page paper for 50 cents a year, that we are compelled to advance the subscription price to $1.00 jer annum; not for the same but a better beekeeping publication. our Subscription smaller less honey' hives,. Since the bees are to another honey flow he about 10 pounds to each hive, Thus d of beekeeping we are enabled to iter percentage of honey than where -e to be left on their home locations. thinks that the practice of nxigrabeekeepi I; h, roo m-il PLANT IEverybody reet clover. eldc nectar, beekeepers, can will grow and that there is for its development w ithiterstate feature. T SWEET CLOVER BRIGGS & RITER vho has bees sho )uld plant some In most sections it never fails to and it is 'a valuable, while it is a farnpe plant the honey plant r's friend in seed at most any dne; is You'will notant to miss a single issue as this publication will be better than ever before. There will be a number of special issues on important beekeeping subjects throughout the year, as well as much other information. By sending your subscripti now your name will be enrolled without delay of the first or January number. Proper adjustments will be made on all subscriptions and renewals received under the old rate and the new so that all of ou r subscribers will get their share of subscription for the amount remitted to us. 4 r wheat or,oats in .the fall' or spring. a you lay by your corn plant it there will see a telling tale -on the next crop Plant it in every waste piece of ground y scattering the seed over' it broadcast. 'Our' Sp Cia lubbing Offer tcl e r s Any of these will save you money and-furn lsh excellent 'reading:, American Bee Journal, a y' With the Beekeepers Item; b Gleanings in ee ulure, a With The Beekeepers Item, ear.....$1 .50 oth.-..$2.00 year.......$1 .I00 both......$1 .90 =: -u THE BEEKEEPERS ITEM, New Braunfels, Texas Dear Sir~ / Western Honey Bee, a year_...-----$100 With .The Beekeepers Item, bot...$1.75 Domestic Beekeeper, a year...---$1.00 With The Beekeepers Item, both......1.75 Date-..........-.. Please find enclosed $.... .-.-..........for..-. .-years subs'eripton to TOE BEEKEEPERS ITEM. Clubbed with the following, a per our special .1 clubbing offer *1 I 4. I I IN tell much more ab' r as a honey plant. zinc out the value of 4 I. ....... .......... .......~..... ......................... ........... ........... Street. ... ........ ............m.........................,. F' .................... e,.xclud( 4' The Beekeepers Item for.1921 YN I colonies at 'V AS, 1OW, ----------.............. ................ ........... ............. ............ lip: ITE I n UZ-2 -:!V -4 :,4VzV.%v

PAGE 5

THE, BE EKE EP ERS vocdiien Dad Glance at this illustration to compare this hive with "Standard" Langstroth hive.' You get 40 per cent greater brood combarea than in the "Standard" ten frame Langstroth. taut Hive A Your present equipment can be above the Modified dAnt hive used depth supers Features brood put. Daas full are de e p frames, large 1-story brood -nest, frame space ventilation, excellence in' wintering, swarming easily controlled.. E.G P. 0. Box 1048 (Editor's met in TI geon intend ers, wellI fraternity as "4a. que but we be] toour read to humorous own -to the large. Guy less hive" or ve his new. I have known Ellis told me t ory of chicks. Tenwei erel. One day t the house for d chicks followed i missing. The m Modified Dadant Hive Features. 1. Eleven frames, Quinby depth. 2 Frames spaced swarm control. Langstroth 1%2 inches length, for 4. Dovetailed body, regular reversible bottom and metal roof cover with inner cover. 5 Langstro th easily used "Standard C. B.LI WIS CO., Water Mention THE B EEKEEPERS ITEM when Writing Advertisers. Are YouInterested in F You will want to re published by the editor of your bee paper. You will .find it an excellent Medium on agricultural affairs. holl's Monthly LOUIS H. SCHOLL, Editor iiy< 1 50 C Cent-s a Year s a farm and home paper, of interto every member of the family, in intry or town. It has departments the household, boys and girls, bes and fruit etc. You a IT] San KI ?) Please I Fl lti est cot

PAGE 6

~lEBEEKEEPERS IE measure his careful thought and earnest )r. In developing the great latent wealth: ,xas owns in the pecan growing industry been a pioneer. In beekeeping he has been a modest figure but .at every meetthe Texas Farmers' Congress his smile, amed upon the meeting and when the the Texas Honey Producers' Asscoiation its infancy he rallied to the support of >perative idea with his purse and with his u should ever go to Austin be sure an( to the State University and call on Elli make you welcome and even though h >nfirmed bookworm and an incurable teacher, he will still be a'ble 2to give yo' aluable, points on his greatly belove f beekeeping. ited to let you see a picture of Caswel apiary, -but getting the likeness abov ist I could do. He explained that if cture of him in a bee yard it would hav -.S0 d e e I Good, used honey cans, clean and in good condition. We have some to offer, f. o. b. here, at $1.00 per case of 2-60 lbs. cans. These:I Will cost you much more new.' The Louis H. School Apiaries NEw BRAUNFELS, TEXAS -S. $I-----,-H OT'S' ESg ROO'SBEE SPLE For North Texas Beekeepers, for sale by STILES BEE SUPPLY CO., Stillwater, Okia. Beeswax Wanted. Free Catalogue. MIXED FEEDS S Horse., Mul.. uad Dairy Cows. Made lb J. E. MUSSE & CO Wholesale Grain RDeler SnAntonlioexas NANTONO, TEXAS'. ERV EEN )R SKUNKS TAYLOR. t a foot or. re above re THAT THE LEAHY MANUFACTURING COMPANY are manufacturers of the best Comb Foundation, Frames Hives and all Bee Kee ,s' Eq ment at the is after your bees, Askunk id sit, in front of a hive and i the bees come out to investiyou'. are in need,or will be soon, don't ,delay in sending ,your inquiry to LEAHY MANUFACTURING COMPANY, HIGGINSVLLE, MO. A M. HUNT, GOLDTHWAITE, MILLS COUNTY, TEXAS. Prompt shipments and highest quality supplies. IIIIhIIIII Melter and 5 Combined is the -Melter for who wish to' use the best la It ielts the cappings and s vi' 'in ext hat way, you can get rid of all y and Febthe furs. sharp knife, : the "'scent to not tear Write for description. F. .SEVERIN, 1ox 145, Imperial, California Mention THE BEEKEEPERS ITEM When Writing Advertisers 11111111111111111111 111111111111111 1111111 iHii 11iii 1111I 1111111111111111111111! 111 .1 iUiHi Take a, / ai ne a This new FRANK C it. is necessary best h in in queen is wor are pr knife 9' is in ted y in I T HE tons will, MAN OWN wo sm mom -vow a ITEM

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T BEKEEPERS N W&LL PAPER, WINDOW GLASS H arrison's Town and Country. Paint, Artists' Material Let US figure on your needs of Bee Hive and Other Painting. Prompt attention to out-of-town orders. FRED HUMME RT 204-6-8 W. Commerce St. Texas San Antonio, U Attention: ------Texas Beekeepers -4 Do you know Carl F. Buck of Augusta, Kansas, makes the very best Weed ProcessComb Foundation in the country? And the freight to his factory is less And his price for working wax and selling foundation are very low? And he pays the best, prices for beeswax. Write him. His address is CARI V,. 1* FERD ST AF FEL San Antoio's Largest Seed, Feed and Poultry Supply House Queen's and Cypher's Incubators, Brooders and Hiovers. Write Us for Prices Main Store, 321 E. Commerce St. SAN' 0 ANTONIO, -----TEXAS STANDARD PRINTING COMPANY (Successors to Wilson-Schwegmann) Printers, Blank-Book Manufacturers English, German, Spanish We Print The Texas Honey Producers Association Special Letter ,Heads for Members. A ]RESUME OF HONEY GLEANED FROM KENNITH HAWKiNS Editor's Note-Under date of August 23, 1 issued by The G., B. Lewis Co., Waterto, known as "Beeware Service," quotes the f crop conditions in the several states of the hich are quite interesting.-Editor. New England States-Good hon reported, from' most parts of these the exported crop is too small to al New York and Pennsylvaniabeen very spotted in these yields were secured, th average and much honey wheat light. Ohi6, New York for sale, 0. West Vi Michigan-Yields in the spotted but in all the yiel( is far gbove the average. Tennessee, North lina-Reports indi< plus honey known North Carolina honey of the g Georgia and have been goc Out shipments Also .0 pages tions, is fnely gotten up,,finely bound, and'has 134 nearly all original with the author. Price $2.50 READ THE CONTENTS BELOW: k of 326 illustraTexasstate in PRODUCTIVE BEE-KEEPING BY FRANK C PE..ETT 1. 2. 3. 4 5. 6. 7. Beekeeping a Fal The Business of Making a Start V Arrangement of t Sources of Necta The' Occupants O0 Increase scinating 'PursgIt P d8. ueedin Beekeeping 9. Prdutt of Comb i Honey vith Bees 10. -Production of Extracted Honey he Apiary 11 Wax-A By-Product of the Apiary r 12. Diseases and Enemies of Beesf the Hive 13. Wintering 14. Marketing the Honey Crop 15. Laws That Concern the Beekeeper $2.75 CYPRESS BY TEST titutes byTalk THE PROOF? --2 LETTERS FROM BEEMEN: and MAKES A PLEA FOR" look -into this matter," Etc.) and with sp6ts heavy, as selling' sic Oregon is Arizona. LUMBER NQ ANOT at Des Plain LL SERIES just came info the office: ,He informs us that they tried a last year for the first time, and are so well pleased with it that HER CAR for use in making HIVE BOTTOMS.7-1 endurance test of 45 years in greenhouse sash? It is reported to us that .prominent greenhouse contractor in Chicago, 'ahd placed in position', in a in 1868 are STILL DOING SERVICt. to heaviest in yea market draggy, smarket draggy,,se -California-Ear] )IC J AS WELL and save you the nuisance 'aid expenseof repairs and replacebacked by such facts cannot be answered by mere tal. to give 'you a "substitute" for Cypress to cite 'you to a of the so-called "substitute." an en uL part-'good ordinary business sense. CYPRESS POCKET LIBRARY WITH FULL ON "THE WOOD ETERNAL. IL Clubbed with The Beekeepers Item;-One Year, Pc r I ever been r U. S. ICIATION ESTABLISHED 1890 WA Al Da lou 11 THE IT lilliniminlillinmilt

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GCHOLL ................Editor and Proprietor, ..... .....a....u50 ter! Dec. 13, 191f :, Texas, under .DkLESS: When a change of both the new -and old must e should be sent as promptlA ie change .s to take effect. CES: Notice will be given Subscribers arq irged, ifunz at once after expiration, to no n do so. Any one wishing THE B-EEKEETERS -ITEM "How to Winter B. es Outdoors," "How to Use Comb Foundation." These were specially designed for answering correspondence and for simplicity of recommendation. Notice has been received. from the publishers Year of "American Bee Journal" that the subscription 5, at price of that excellent bee journal would be adthe vanced to $L50 a year from October 15th. In announcing the i crease in price, the high price of material, labor, etc., was given as the reason ad-fro o u w for dong so, and our own position at the prest be e as nt times gives us an opportunity to -seewhy such an advanced price mIay be warranted.. This just will change our clubbirig rate in clubs of this able journal with our own7This will hereafter be tify $2.00 a year, counting the American Bee Jourhis nal at $1.50 and THE. BEEKEEPERS ITEM 'at the Von ne ew picof $1.00. a year. Other clubs. your tem kind attention is invited to the rates advertised on page16 of thisisse It must be borne -in hed mind, .ho Wever, that our new p.rice. on THE BEE-' KEEPERS ITEM ,is on a new and different style of publication of 32 pages, and not the present. form. DEATH OF DR C. C. MILLER E. G. LESTOURGEON Dr. C. C. Miller of MV~arengo, Illinois, passed away on September 4th shortly after passing. his 89th birthday. There are few names better known in modern apiculture than hi.. For years his pen has added humour and wisdoin to. the pages'of beekeeping literature. His department of answers to the questions on .beekeeping subjects has been a permanent and popular feature of the Ameri-. can Bee Journal. As an author he was best known by his books "Fifty Years Among the Bees," and "A Thpusand Answers toBeekeeping Questions." The writer had the pleasure A by There is a tendency on the part of some beekeepers to desire to get rid of 'their honey in a hurry at this time. To ,do so would tend to id a AlJU5 4 ILLL 1 -L ~L 111119s 'lave MIJ9J9PL u II price during the last month or two there is little reason for honey to go to a lower level in the Texas market for a while at least. This is Y due to. the fact that there is not enough supply the price iain Read bee books this winter. Pellett's "Amerin Honey Plants," "ProductiveBeekeeping," of the last named book was decik Dr. Miller was always an ex cheer and kindliness. His pleas infectious. Happiness and' optir ii .ci an-

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TEXAS BEEKEEPERS' NEWS ITEMWhat Friends' of THE BEEKEEPER'S TEM Are Doing. A. J. Kolb who used' to get his mail at Mabank has removed to Ennis, Texas. Since Ellis county is the banner cotton county of the State friend Kolb should not suffer from his change of location. The cotton honey produced aroundEnnis 'and Waxahachie has always taken first' prizes at the fairs where they have been exhibited. Think of it! D. 0. Kubricht of Wallis started with a total of 29 colonies spring count. He now has 52 colonies in good condition for winter and has marketed over 1800 pounds of honey at a good price. Does Texas beekeeping pay? 'll say it does! It seems too bad that our old friend LaGrand LaRue has decided to give up beekeeping. We do not believe it. will last. Our idea is that once a beekeeper, always a beekeeper. He sold his bees to Eugene 7 Ault. He thinks he can quit. Here is our prophesy that next spring will find him in our ranks again, even if he has to cut a bee tree to become one of ''us. Fred L. Wgna made A T H E BEEKEEPERS 'ITEM ward others. We are of better fiber. "If you plant a tree too close to others whee it is shady it is deprived of its light-.and to us education is light., Such a tree is either stunted or grows up in a narrow sort of way. It does not have a wide outlook. It is narrow in its view. 'The same is true with you and me. -Unless we get light, unless we study' and are educated, unless we broaden out and see the problems of others, we are likely to be narrow in our views."-U. S. Secretary of Agriculture. A hive full of bees at tle beginning of a honey flow is worth fIve hives full after it is over. Don't wait, "Do It Now. 'A "nuun unnu nu n nu nn I I j 1 N I '"TERXAS NATURE RE NSCUNCE8,' by Dr a sew1ntific as well as a U sponsible -treatise on Nat historic San Antonio, and bdok you should have insect life, reptiles, native game in.. general, hunting cays wild life and prairie San AntonioWs environmer illustrated directly nd tr 300 fine half-tone nhotog iisia; exhlb: andr The book AFOR SALE; All in good frame h ~ --A Neitherdd-weutilrecently. He is a y modest.minbut when he, digs down into keeping he gets'results. He can show for O ihcrese f 20% in number of -colonies [a production of $8.00 per colony. C. Bee and F. M. Martin operate their aries under the firm name of Martin & Bee Brenham. Their spring count was 75 colonies QUEENS 1\3ee The rusho four bee shipping season position to take care of your QUEEN just received a picture from a-party queen last spring-_ 1919, and att thatw one. We have had colonies here gather Party wrote from Chicago: "The s day; did notexamine untli 18th, when greatly appreiiate r cei ing such good arrival and satisfa August. Get a f< reference, prices b Advertisig, la year as follows arce post, nuclei, and sugar have a Untte Queens---------------..elect Untested .---.--------Tested Queens-------------------Select Tested Queens------------------------1 nund nDackave' Bees_------------..-----..I 1 eyes. -3.00 " "40,,0id

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BEEKEEPERS Texas th6 entire southern half of the State it n too dry again for the best interests of people. There has been no secretion ir reported from any of the late blooma., Even the always present 'yellows withered away without colouring our. r scenting our hives with its golden and m ay not give us a the weather during ain is badly needed in. which it grows. sts will' be a great n this source. Should all I am afraid that of. mal and of some ie cotton .e honey. -olonies.This is a market the idea I have often Orange, 1 of our State.is to 12-18c. Conditions s City-Colorado light amber 22c. York-Demand and movement slow, dull. California light amber 12-15c. and white sage 18-19c. Sweet clover West Indian $1.20 to $1.45 per gallon. market dull. Alfalfa 20-21c. Clover 21c. Philadelphia-M rket' steady,, orange 21c, clover 19c. St. Louis-Market dull. Light amber 16-18c. Beeswax market weak, yellow 30-31.c St. Paul-Demand and movement slow, market dull. 1 0 Conducted by A. M. HASSLBAUER San Antonio, any sources of nectar. We know too little about the plants that provide our bees with honey for wintering. am particularly interested in live oak, kinnickinick and other sources. Any observation you can makewill help us all. San Antonio, Texas. TELEGRAPHIC HONEY MARKETS The Bureau of Markets report under date of September 15th shows very little -activity in the honey trade and very little movem ent. On' the whole,-however, the price seems to b holding up fairly well considering the trend of prices in other commodities. Los Angeles-Demand slow. Few ..sales. Orange and sage 16 to 18 cents. Some as high as 20 cents. Light amber asge 16-17c. Alfalfa 13-15c. Beeswax 40-44c. Boston-Demand and movement very lightBeeswax 40-42c. Chicago-4Deand and movement slow, market weak and unsettled. White 182 to 192c. Light amber 17-18c. Beeswax, light, 40-42c,' dark 35-39c. Cincinnati-Practically no demAnd or movement. 'No 'sales reported. Beeswax, ,44-46c. Cleveland-Demand slow, movement draggy, market sliehtlv weaker. alfalfa. 16-18. Clover Beeswax: The market continues dull. 30 bags Chilian have been sold. 'The value in American currency is 37 cents per lb. 'U. )Ol criming now. Listof Foi Do Not' Iin Where Yo Wax 25 lbs. or mc in Woode HONEY ARRIVALS During the two weeks ending Sept. 15th the following arrivals of honey in important markets have been reported. Medina-(Sept. 1st) 10,275 lbs. Ohio. (Aug. 24th) 8,327 lbs. Ohio. Chicago-One car each from California and Idaho. Cincinnati-One car California. New York-420 lbs. from Maine. Philadelphia-36,000 lbs. California, 1400 cases from New York. f sk d V I BRITISH HONEY REPORT T HE I.TEM During the past month there has been a little more enquiry for Chilian honey. The total sales amount to 560 barrels. 2 barrels arrived per S. S. "Kenuta" and 130 casks St. Domingo sold at 68/per cwt., The value of M81

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a a a TiHE TWO HINTS FOR HOUSEHOLDERS MRS. CARRIE ZIEGLER Since I have a recipe for cookies requiring honey and no 'sugar I thought the reade s of THi BEEKEEPERS ITEM might wish to see it published. Honey Cookies Three pounds honey, % pound butter or lard, 1, pound pecans, 12 tablespoon soda, 1 ounce cinnamon ounce allspice and cloves, juice BEEKEEPERS ITEM and rind of a lemon, flour enough to roll. Pot Handling Pads I also find pads for handling pots better than dish towels. I mnake thei just like those used for holding the irons when ironing. A few in the kitchen are. very handy. San Antonio, Texas. WHAT PUZZLED HER Lady to Beekeeper-"So you keep bees! I think they are just perfectly adorable little creatures; I have just .read Materlinck's 'The' Life of .the Bee.' But one thing has always puzzled me: How do you put that little wooden box around the cake of 'honey yiithout crushing that delicate wax?" ends of the bag bei: keep out the air, is directly on the ice. IThe Deekeepers Househol Conducted by MRs. EMMIE S. SCHQLL P. o. Box 159, New Braunfels, Texas If your oven Ice cream can be kept hard for 24 hours if of wire door sc: it is placed in a paper cooking bag and, the against further I I I ~,' I *1~~ I-7777 77 74 The Beekeepers Househ0ld Fashion I1 a I N x Y 'NA \ ffI'I'i t:' 'I 3356 'I j I I, N N' .I IL Blouse 3S5 42, 44 -and. 3349cut in 34 lnch~s N costume for 7 3-4 yards of the skirt U #30 AIiL 1 VW of 38 inch material. t at Its lower edg ne Cut ---------.............for When the freshness of eggs is dou each one separately in a cup bel them together. To ascertain the f eggs without breaking them-put solution made of two ounces of salt of water. A fresh egg sinks. Ai few days old has a tendency to in the liquid, while a stale egg fi top of it. ,Do all the good you ca and this is not such a bad old world, 32 I Ill: SPORT 330

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THEBEEKEEPERS ITEMi LIPPINBS FROM OUR NEIGHBORS CO-OPERATIVE ROUTE-The shortest road onable prices. for all farm produce-"reato both producer and coftsumer,.is by operative route. Only by this method is tsuner's dollar properly spent,'for it' then fly -the legitimate costs and profits mcito production and distribution. producer gets his just share; middlemen g in distribution get theirs, but only what and the consueM~j'p-4ys no profit to specuto ignorance or to sloppy and unbusinessmethods. every move has in mind the conducting affairs of Your Exchange upon a strictly s basis, thus insuring for you a fair return Ur honey. Youare an important. factor going about a full -measure of success for .hange (and therefore the beekeeping inby your hearty, sincere loyalty and coto ld ey ?-CalifOrn brella and shield him from the storms, rather than being a,-working unit in doing his part in constructive work for the beekeeping industry.Milispaugh. A Los Angeles broker recently sold a car of light-amber alfalfa honey from Arizona at 1 3 cents. The Exchange -s selling the same grade at 172 -ents. .,Some beekeeper was pinchedhar. What he lost would have paid the Exchange membership all the rest of his natural, life.-Honey Producers' Co-operator.' The .increased prosperity of co-operative association members results, not from any increased cost to the consumer, bu from the absorption. by the co-operator of the tremendous margin of profit which the, independent dealer made.Millspaugh. THE BEST KNoWN-"Under the co-operative marketing systems of California, which even the government regards as the best known method. of middlemen, elimination, various production-economy campaigns in whichall the associated growers unite make it possible to turn the products over to the consumer. at the lowest possible prices."-Carlisle Thorpe. FOR. SALE 155 acres. of good farming land; located near Fant City, B e county, on S. A. U. & G. Ry. Several deep oil tests now going down. Oil rights go with land. For further' particulars write to B. Schwegmann, 206 Navarro St. San Antonio, Texas. ukm iW. Odell Learn & Co.I .500Dolorosa Street San Antonio, Texas. *Buy All Kinds fo LIVE SNAKES AND -'ANIMALS. .'BEST PRICES PAID. fil 11 111 111111 1ll 1.11,11 111 .H wi alousies 'and appreciate performs a 'social serkinship and craftsmanand the time has now arrived when we can advertise our honey ini the public prints without stimulating the sale of everybody's honey as well as our own.-J. D. Bixby us som for publication, and also appreciate what you may Electric Imbedder Price without batteries $1.25, not postpaid Actually cements wires in foundation. apply dealers. )f good is revealed to any single person. r -fellow always has some knowledge *of [ good that you have not yet acquired. DADANT & SONS, Manufacturers, HAMILTON, ILLINOIS of San Diego county has reExchange because, as he says," rience how difficult it is to se-, or your honey, year after year, iber attend-' some .ears ) Ns' (o-( vurul Eu 'I UUIIUumIUlI "Best by Test" ASSUES RAL OALITY Let us manufacture your Beeswax into "Superior" Foundation. We are in the market for your Beeswax S I SUPERIOR HONEY CO. OGDEN; 'UTAH Please -I 1I1 I. Is the new 280 page cloth-bound book. It is a compilation of some 4000 questions out of more than 10,000 that Dr. Miller has answered 'for beekeepers in The Ameican Bee Journal. You should know it. The" book is offered only in combination with a year's subscription. PRICE OF BOTH POSTPAID .ONLY $1.75 Clubbed with The Beekeepers-tem One Year, Only $2.00. Send all, orders to THL2 BEEKEEPERS. ITEM Mention THE BEEKEEPERS ITEM when Writing Advertisers. Breeder of [288 Egg Line Single Comb Leghorns Exclusively Baby Chix and Eggs for .Hatching from Pedigree Trapnested Stock. EGGS THAT WILL HATCH ARE NOW READY STARTING WITH DAY OLD CHIX IS VERY POPULAR Careful study of the development and chick requirements enables us to Safe Aitdval of Chix" when destination'is within a radius of from forty-eighttwo hours' travel. The chick "envelopes" the yolk of the egg, just before sit shell, -which' provides food for at least '48 hours and which accounts for the ch dpqtitntin 1ar'r andwith morii vifnlif than whrn fhpv earc Anon th~ik in mr "Guarantee to seventybreakstle *' C N' N' I -ch ste 0% e

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SUGAR USED, NINETY POUNDS PER CAPITAL The production of sugar in the United States, while increasing to 22 pounds per capita is still far below our present consumption of 90 pounds. Retailing today in the neighborhood of 17 cents ver pound, the drop in August alone, of '6Y2 ent s was due chiefly to the 4arge imports stimulated by the previous high prices. The fact that during the last fiscal year approximatelY' nine and a half bilionpounds were imported into the United States, nearly seven billion pounds coming from Cuba alone, testifies to the. high standard of living and prosperity of our. country. The record per capital consumption ust alluded to, occurred despite an increase of 350 per cent in import prices over those of 1914' and periods of positive scarcity in many distri ts. -Irving National Bank Bulletin. BOOK REVIEWS BY DR. C. C. MILLER. Th@ following"book reviews published in the May American Bee Journal are of particular .interest to Texas readers just at this time. "Outapiaries and their Management," the new book by M; G.. Dadant, being -the first of its, kind to appear, gives tokeA that beekeeping is going more into the 'hands of specialists,* and that outaparies are on the increase. TH. BEEKEEPERS IT-EM Every year the number is larger of those hose colonies become too great in 'number to be kept profitably in one place, and vhen a man decides to establish-a second apiary. in a new place he is confronted with questions that have not before troubled him-questions that he would like to haVe answered by some one who has been through the mill. For such persons this book is designed; and meets the case nicely. The. beelover will enjoy its clear instruction, and the book-lover will enjoy its clear typography. The beekeeper of the present day 'may congratulate himself that as a new need arises a new. book arises to meet the need. Many a beekeeper whose printed information concerning honey plants has been limited".to a few pages in some book upon beekeeping in general, has eagerly lopged for something fuller on the subject. Now no less an authority thanFrank C. Pellett has given us "American Honey Plants," a book ff 300 large pages entirely devoted to the subject. To be sure9many of these pages are taken'up with pictures of 'honey plants but this makes the book allthe more valuable. However familiar the reader may become withthe reading matter, he will always come back to dwell fondly'upon the illustrafions,, because of their real beauty. OUR C E. G. LE STOURGEQN Who has not 'heard of Dillon,' has been dubbed, "The Wizard Jacks," or "The Burbank of Sou Dillon made two dewberry vines produce, where none had grown took the heavy shifting sand of .,black jaks" and transmuted it in delicious flavor, plums of' surpass andpears that rival in texture th more famous climes.We were given the opportunity of the -Sunny South apiaries ina' one of the Dillon farms.We,.u chance., Mesquite one way, and in t] horsemint grows sti jacks. Besides that and the acre on a( brood-$timulating cri Dillon knew the v agents for his fruit' With his help,we' bumper colonies,'ai f~JT Rates in these columns are ten cents a line. Minimum cha 25 cents. When sending advertisements for this department it stated or we will not be responsible for errors. I -~---C ~ -, --7t'C'N'V'' '>~ '-' '----C POSITIONS WANTED. POSITION WANTED -.With intention to learn Texas beekeeping methods and queen rearing wish position with pro-' gressive be&keeperof this State. Have three years 'experience in clover section ofIndiana. .Can give. good references. Address A. 0. Smith, Care of Ti'xas Honey Producers Assn., P. 0. Box 104"?, .SanAntornio, Texas. A POSITION-We can't begin to fill tbe demand made on us for Draughon-trained students. We will get you a good position or give your money back if yoI qualify here, .Draughon Business College, San Antonio, Texas. 1,000 AGENTS WANTED to sell a self.heating sad-iron. Labor and fuel saver. Pay salary or .commission. 'Agents make $15, to $20 per day. Ladies make good representatives. Write for terms and .free sample. Imperial Sad Iron Company, Box 1005, Fort Worth, Texas. HONEY AND WAX., HONEY WANTED-A few cases of extracted Mesquite catclaw honey, new crop. Send small sample 'and quote price F. 0. B. Address D. p. Hunt, Blum, Texas. DARK EXTRACTED 'HONEY-Can ,:use ome off grades or dark extracted honey of' otherwise good quality at low price. Send samples, and -write size of packages, quantity, and lowest price wanted, all in first letter. The Louis H. Scholl Apiarieg, New'Braunfels, Texas. WAX REFUSE-Don't throw away your slum-gum" from your wax meltings. Save them up and sbP 'to us. We will get a lot of wax out of it for you and pay you highest price for it or -make it into foundation for you. Write for" rates., Dadant & Sons, Hamilton, Il. MISCELLANEOUS. BEES FOR SALE'-200 to 210 colonies of bees for sale. Prices and particulars, on application. 4en shares association' stock and 100 lbs.foundation goes with, bees. W. B. Hamilton, Bigfoot, Texas. "TEXAS NATURE OBSERVATIONS" -323 pages, photo ~illustrated true to' nature, by Dr. R., Menger. San Antonio. has been BEE SUPPLIES. OR SALE-Two frai actor, almost 'new, $ ers 'with shallow e Novice 0 TV o'1y at; .v per colony, r. o. b. ere. Wi l sell all or part. to' buyer. J. A. CUNINGHAM, Rural Letter Carrier No. 2, ':Saint Jo, Texas. TRY THEM-These classified want ads. Others .av thev Ar "rennlt watta wrhy" WANTED-We havI installed a steam, proces -for rendering old combs cappings, and slum gum, and want you to -give same -'a trial. 'Write us for terms. We pay market price for wax rendered .r will make" same into MILLER'S CALIFORNIA FOUNDATION. Send for our Catalogue. MILLER 'BOX MFG. CO.. 201 N. Ave. 18. Los Angeles, Cal. FOR SALE-50 Root. 8-frame 'spers, for 414 plain sections, nailed and painted, without sections, at 80c each ;,2,000 "A",Grade 44 plain sections, $5.00. per 1,000. f. o. b. here; $40 for entire lot. A bargain. Honeydale Apiaries, Centerville, Texas. TYPEWRITERS REAL values in second-hand and rebuilt typewriters, a guarantee of satisfaction with each purchase. Remington No. 10 ...........................$35.W Oliver No. 5.................... .................. 27.50 L. C. Smith No. 2 back spacer .............:,. 37.50 Underwood' back spacer............................47.50' Remington No. 6 '...................................... 15.00 -These machines are guaranteed in perfect working order' and if not sol may be returned.. Corona and L. C, Smith, sole factory dealer. A. F. ,,EYER, 310 West Commerce Street, San Antono, Texas. AUTOMOBILE REPAIRS. e a3 AUTOMOBI] .be for the Auto Liufa 150-page illu and elusively to and car. The on' W. .voted to the dUe .ted S I tne t fo untested queen,$1..50 ;-6, $7.5 50, $55 100, $100.; virgin each. Packages 24 and unc 1b; 25 and over $2.00 per frame $ 4; 2 f ramie, $ 61; '3j queens extra, One story' ten.with queen, $12. Golden E Write for descriptive list. Safe arrivaland anteed. 'Hardin S.. Columbia, .Tennessee. GOLDENS THAT ARI =--Hundreds of test Writefor. .it evrv Unrested, one $15-0; 6, $7.50;.12,t '13.50; 50, $55; 100, $100. Safe arrival I guarantee; booking orders now. H. -G. Dunn. The Willows, San Jose, Cal. PURE GOLDEN QUEENS-Quieens' from special selected stock;untested queens, 1, '$1.50;' 6, $7'.50; 12, 1.8..560; 50, $55; 100, $100. The .Royal Apiaries' San Jose Cal. QUALITY THREE BAND ITALIANSQueens from excellent stock; untested queens, one,$1.50; 6. $7.50; 12, 4'13.50; 50 $55; 100, $100. N. .. James, 1185 Bird Avenue. San Jose, Cal. BEES BY THE POUND, ALSO QUEENS -Booking orders 'now. Free Circular gives prices, etc. See large ad elsewhere. Nueces County 4piaries, .B.Ault, Proprietor, Calallen, Texas. 200 TESTED QUEENS-3 and 5 -band Italians, $1.00 each by return mail. Twenty years experience as breeders.H. A. ROSS. 1711 Van Bureu Ave., EvansviUe,: Ind. -e -an PURE LEATHE] by return mail. 6, $8.00; 12, $ $100. Tested, $ ed $3.00 each I guarantee safe ing. .I keep -no My ,reference, He and Savings Baw Geo. E. Sigmont, POULTRY 4 tand SI A 4F T I 410'ing;U -A a

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BEEKE PERS ITEM lio, the price y October Texas of beeswax Ist we will n'trade f. o. b. San Anbu ying any extracted r of members is han1 Members should' Special Queen Sale We have about 75 vigorous Italian Queens, average 3 months old, prolific and healthy, that we offer for $1.00 each, .account of requeening a yard with Goldens Bees run 2 to 4 banded. Geo. W. Coltri & So6 MATHIS, TEXAS I I..0 0 0'R N Shelled or in the ear. Will buy by the wagon load or in straight car lots. Also want Maize and.K fiC r M. Marucheau Grain Co. SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS Elevator on Guadalupe St., and I. & G. N. Ry. Tracks. *'II.0 o( 4 W RN0W ( 4E 40 N 4 0 20Q ,,COLONIE1S BESFORSLE I~~~~~~~~~ Hae20tI1 ooie fbe o ae rice nd particulars on application. Ten shares of ,Texas.HoeyPrducers' Association st ck and 100 pounds of comb foundtingoswith the es We, B., HAMILTON,. Bigfoot, Tlexas. I I ampimmy-esyome-omboespemmommomwonwons empenaoamoammen empem em enw-emyo-eamw-emmoemomwoomoewo4 For Be I (1I 11,-) .. I a: best, place i T H ke

PAGE 15

EEPERS IT and all civilization, 'and of comnierce and industry, and of art and invention, is to keep unbroken the procession of human beings who travel the highway from the cradle to the grave. As the grave receives a pilgrim it is necessary that another must start from the cradle if the endless life-chain is to be unbroken. It is the general welfare that children may be decently bornof sound bodies and brains; that they may be decently fed and their minds and bodies so developed that each can do his share of the world's work when his turn comes, Tay his passage down the highway of life and provide somewhat for a comfortable old age. Alongside the highway of life runs the broad River of Commerce, upon whose mighty tide float countless craft freighted with the fuel and the food, the clothing and the materials for, shelter, as well as the pleasures and luxuries which -supply the pilgrims on the Highway of Life. It is the theory of our laws that this great River of Commlerce shall be kept forever clear of artificial obstructions and that the craft which navigate it, whether they be great or mall, shall each enjoy the fullest possible freedomn of movement consistent with the. similar rightsof -every other craft 'on the stream. It is the theory of the law that whoever has for sale anything which he has produced on farm, in factory, in mine or in mill, shall have free access to the River of Commerce. Here ,it is, committed-. to the care of themerchants the BOOKS -LABELS-STATIC TWO NEW BOC OUTAPIARIES, by M. G. Di the beekeeper who would extend his cloth-bound book of 125 pages. experience in Outapiary managem( important honey sources of each state are list treated in alphabetical order. 297 pages, 155 illu OTHER GOQD BEE11 Langstroth on the Honeybee, re $1.50. First Lessons in Beekeeping, $1 .00 1,000 Answers to Beekeepin $1.25. Practical Queen Rearing, by I Now is the ti distinctive label v hway of Life have free access toi the stream. runwith the wnole greatscneme oi -wngs conaray to the public interest-contrary to the rights of all of us who are the pilgrims through life. Whoever on the River of Commerce, whether, his craft be great or small, so navigates it as Attractive printed matter will I in. charge of our plant devotes his U. A *is Whoever seeks to cut off from the shores c' the River of Commerce thai free access. which is the right of all; whoever seeks to erect unnecessary tollgates on the Highway of Liie and to make it unnecessarily' difficult or costly for the demand which arises out of human needs to be satisfied by -the supply of goods which isDrovided outof natural resources and ry' scheme of orderBusne Iseparators, 3m y x-I'Ln dotted separators, ti Federal ) aid in )ns and To Section We can dispense b. here. By ref mission f 41/I lal 2 for all THE B E

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I T HE BE KEEPERS ITEM the. ideals of American business and to ice the Constitut'on, the Bill of Rights Declaration of Independence of 'Aneri.ness. These are the words: ir methods of competition in commerce by declared ulawful."r declaration means that in commerce iall not be trickery or chicane; that all not be the rule of might as opposed that unfairness, meanness; ruthlessIdishonesty, have no place in .American stering this law, the Federal Trade follows scrupulously a procedure I down by the Congress. When eves that unfair practices are being: to his injury, and -he addresses the ie Commission with a brief statefactsas he understands them, the makes a preliminaryinvestigation e end, it has reason to believe that iterest of the public that the matter inquired into, then it issues its c-mting, directed to the concern against .-n i A 'r iA; fill IIIIIIIIIIII W A -------------............. ............ ----------Comb or extracted. Give full informa.tion as to grade, kindj, sizes (new or old', your price and the amount 'you have or will have to sell, f. o. b. your station. SANDERS PURE HONEY MARKET 300 Houston St. Fort Worth, Texas "Where You Don't Get Stung." Beekeepers' S upp lies We manufacture and stock Bee Hives and for the BeekeeperWrt for keep in Supplies Caa E || Greenville, Co., Texas Use Our Classified Advertisements. For anything you have to sell or trade, or anything youwant in any line, our little WANT ADS. will help you get it There is something about your premises you have no use for but that the other fellow can use. There is something you want that the other fellow has. Advertise it. Only 10 cents a line. THE BEEKEEPERS ITEM New Braunfels, Texas evidence. is placed at his disposal Commission so that he n exall iay AX Is MONE Y O"l I a, I gainedd of, is issued. But thereondent may, if he believes that s unfair to him, appeal to the of Appeals, of the United States the Stipreme Court of the United t every possible safeguard of law THE HERSHISER WAX PRESS Do you know that nearly every dealer who extracts wax old combs"for beekeepers or for his own use, to make into bee foundation uses aii exractor of the Hershiser type? from comb out of This is because it is the most efficient wax extractor on the market which will, handle.quantities of old combs or cappings at one time. Less than one per cent of wax is left in-the slumiguni. The Hershiser wax extractor tank may be used to heat or liquify extracted honey as it holds four 60-pound honey cans. Many beekeepers use it to drain cappings and to work wax into big cakes. Sold by Distributors of Lewis "Beeware." Write for free booklet on this press. Early 'Order Cash.Discount, 7% in October. )ro'011 r, memn -f and 'Man should st of his ability. hing and wants I Look For I This Mark I BEWARE WtIEREYOU BUiYYOUR BEEWARE M A K ES T HE FINEST. G. B. LEWIS COMPANY GRAHAM MFG. is lillll lillllllllllllllllllil l .X--