Citation
URBAN COURTYARD: In Between Public and Private

Material Information

Title:
URBAN COURTYARD: In Between Public and Private
Creator:
Hurtado, Paulina
Place of Publication:
[Gainesville, Fla.]
Publisher:
University of Florida
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Architectural cross sections ( jstor )
Architectural design ( jstor )
Cities ( jstor )
City blocks ( jstor )
City planning ( jstor )
Civics ( jstor )
Courtyards ( jstor )
Open spaces ( jstor )
Universities ( jstor )
Urban design ( jstor )
Genre:
Undergraduate Honors Thesis, Architecture

Notes

Abstract:
Design 7 studio explores the complexities of urban architecture and its relationship with cultural identities. As a way to analyze the urban fabric of a city, a project proposal unfolds in New York City; one of the best examples of metropolitan development. As a city in constant growth, New York University is expanding its core campus in Greenwich Village, including faculty housing, classroom facilities and offices. The project is based on an unusual site where the city’s grid is broken, and two super-block are over imposed in the city plan. Therefore, in order to engage on the design process, it is fundamental to understand the general features of New York City and the local character of Greenwich Village. What is the collective identity of the city? What is public vs private space? Due to the city’s density, how can a private institution expand without totally taking over open space? What is the role of an urban courtyard in a city? These are the questions that guided the design intension in order to achieve meaningful resolutions. ( en )

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright [thesis author]. Permission granted to the University of Florida to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text

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As a sample of my creative intellect, collaborative work and commitment to the best of my abilities on developing meaningful idea s and strategies, this selected work represents my academic accomplishments on self improvement and achievement leading and influencing others in their success; so that my individual triumph also benefits others. Final Project / Design 7 University of Florida / Fall 2015 URBAN COURTYARD : In Between Public and Private Design c ollaboration with Jairo Laverde Assistant Professor: Donna Cohen Location: Manhattan, New York. Design 7 studio explores the complexities of urban architecture a nd its relationship with cultural identities. As a way to analyze the urban fabric of a city, a project proposal unfolds in New York Ci ty; one of the best examples of metropolitan development As a city in constant growth, New York University is expanding its core campus in Greenwich Village, including faculty housing, classroom facilities and offices. The project is based on an unusual s ite and two super block are over imposed in the city plan. Therefore, in order to engage on the design process, it is fundamental to understand the general features of New York City and the local character of Greenwich Vill age. What is the collective identity of the city? What is public vs private space?

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private institution expand without totally taking over open space? What is the role of an urban courtyard in a city? These are the questions that guided the design intension in order to achieve meaningful resolutions. A metropolis like Manhattan is in constant motion, constant transformation. The city is always in the state of becoming, reinventing and reforming. New York is not a cit y of finite resolutions, but rather a city in process becoming the playground of creativity and innovation. This is a place of ideas, concepts, discoveries and abstract saturation. As a result a New Yorker is perpetually in motion among common grounds of the city moving the body through urban space define d by the collective consciousness of its builders In New York, e ach person is immersed in a metropolitan context of exhibition and display where people is exposed to see and be seen The se forms of expre ssion, whether geographical and physical matter or cultural attitude, are openly manifested in public areas that serve as media of interchange and trade. However, dimensional attributions to grow are erected in a vertical grid rising to the sky. Consequently, the hyper densification of high territories is the result of disproportionate appropriation by private entities of space and natural attributions that belong to the general public by r ight. In other words, density produces shadows and congestion generates to satisfy both parties in the best possible way. One way of exemplifying this type of dialog between private and public is by analyzing the character of open areas in New York City. For instance, the Rockefeller Center as well as the Lincoln Center of the Performing Arts are complexes of s everal private buildings that successfully transition and engage the street of NYC providing iconic civic spaces for the people.

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In t he big apple the str eets play a fundamental roll. They are of the people and for the people. These are platforms were pedestrian life takes place. While modest in appearance, streets become the They are the foundation of massive fluidity and navigation systematizing rectilinear movement. And so, t he rel entless chaos and diversity of New York City is confined within the standardization of street blocks. However, when the grid is br oken into superblocks, the space generated becomes a spotlight with hierarchy designations. These changes alter the layout of urban context. In Greenwich Village the re are two super blocks providing generous green spaces and parks for its residents. Nonetheless, these b lock s prope rty of New York University, would be appointed for further expansion of its facilities. One of the main public spaces in the area is Washington Square Park which is one of the most densely used green spaces in New York. This plaza has been used for music, health and wellness classes, various manners of expressions, and dog run becoming a prim e site for the residential neighborhood. However, when NYU occasionally uses Washington square, bad connotations grow among the community interests. On these matter, there is great tension between the local community of Greenwich Village and NYU academic i nstitution. s character, the design plan to intervene on the site intends to mediate the intricacies between privatization and public open space. Prior to the design process, the main concer ns of local residents were considered for deliberation and discussion. In a city where corrupt businesses and private institutions take over civic areas it is natural to of public land, and excessive densification of open space. As a result, the design strategy evolved around the introduction of an urban courtyard which would act as an intermediate space establishing relations between the contextual architectural layout a nd its inhabitants.

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Courtyards by definition are enclosed spaces open to the sky defining the character of architectural compositions. Considering social, architectural, and urban objectives, the role of courtyards in metropolitan scenarios act as transit ional pockets of space between the in dividual, the community, and the city. By introducing an urban courtyard on the NYU expansion project, the contributions of its morphological logic dissolve the boundaries of privatization, integrate the elements of dwelling typology, offer socio cultural components, and allow generosity of open capacity by bringing the outdoors inside and dissipating natural light into the space. academic facilities into a health an d athletics center compositionally arranged around a courtyard on the northern super block and an affordable residential complex on the southern block. Additionally, one of the main tactics to preserve open space and views on the contextual built environm ent is to increase the capacity of the campus by partially expanding downwards. This means that a portion of the new academic additions would take place underground approaching the given program in sensibility with the university growing population and re thinking the city planning process. Therefore, by sinking the urban courtyard, the space created would become a c onfiguration of an underground city meant to be transitory, tentative, magnetic, transitional and experimental. It would offer a break from the frantic pace of everyday life and it would introduce a place for s ocio cultural unfolding informal meeting space s, and a dynamic civic areas for students, faculty, locals and visitors. At last, by developing alternative typologies in the urban tissue o f New York City, this exploration leads to the disclosure of the fundamental role of the urban fabric elements These components such as streets, blocks, buildings in relationship to scale, order, and infrastructure generate mute public spaces in the streets of the city with the aim to evoke a voluntary emergence of the self to be metropolitan New York City is m ade out of street life, and NYU intervention proposal intends to reinforce and celebrate the vibrancy of p ublic areas within the dense grain of Manhattan street blocks.

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Bibliography Juhani Pallasmaa The Eyes of the Skin: Architecture and the Senses (Great Britai n: TJ International, 2012) Guy Debord, The Theory of Derive (Paris: Internationale Situationniste, 1899) Ada Louise Huxtable, The Architecture of New York (New York: Anchor Boo ks, 1964) Le Corbusier, Towards a New Architecture (New York: Dover Publications, 1986) Rem Koolhaas, Delirious New York: A Retroactive Manifesto for Manhattan (Italy: The Monacelli Press, 1994) Michael Sorkin, Twenty minutes in Manhattan, (London: Reaktion, 2009) 1 Francisco Javier Rencoret, New York City: The Edge of Enigma, (New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 1991 ) Paul Goldberger The City Observed: New York (New York: Random House Inc. 1979 Guy Debord & Gil Wolman, (Paris: Internationale Situationniste, 1956)

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Site Analysis

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Preliminary sketches

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Final proposal Floor Plan

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Longitudinal Section Cross Sections

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Overall Composition

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Perspective Views


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