Citation
awe/agency

Material Information

Title:
awe/agency
Creator:
Gugliotti, Nicole
Affiliation:
Art -- Art and Art History
Place of Publication:
[Gainesville, Fla.]
Publisher:
College of the Arts; University of Florida
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Master's ( Master of Fine Arts (M))
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Art
Committee Chair:
Smith, Nan S
Committee Members:
Arbuckle, Linda Jane
Calluori Holcombe, Anna
Smith, Craig

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Abortion ( jstor )
Art education ( jstor )
Beauty ( jstor )
Health care industry ( jstor )
Heroes ( jstor )
Narratives ( jstor )
Recorded interviews ( jstor )
Video sharing ( jstor )
Viewers ( jstor )
Women ( jstor )
Genre:
Project in Lieu of Thesis

Notes

Abstract:
Despite being legal in the United States, rarely is abortion portrayed as a responsible, brave decision. Portrayals of abortion in pop culture and politics would have us believe that the choice is only acceptable when the alternative is ultimately self-destruction. People who have had abortions are cast as villains or, more benevolently, victims and rarely as heroes of their own story.1 My thesis exhibition awe/agency combines formal beauty and wonder with pointed, direct content in the service of offering an alternative model to the dominant narrative surrounding abortion in the United States. For some choosing to embrace or decline motherhood it is a difficult decision, for others, the choice is clear immediately. Regardless, societal pressure, stigma and stereotype shouldn’t be the driving force in how one arrives at any healthcare decision. Thankfully in the face of this difficult situation some people are able to focus on themselves, their families and their futures instead of stereotyped societal pressures. These audacious few offer us a model for how to make authentic healthcare decisions. Through a combination of feminist activism and form awe/agency opens up the conversation around issues of reproductive justice so that vulnerability, growth and change may occur. ( ,, )
Abstract:
The interconnected porcelain vignettes in awe/agency create an abstracted landscape that utilizes the gallery context to offer an opportunity for wonder, contemplation and ultimately new insight. Text in the form of video brings in words culled from interviews that I conducted with people who have had an abortion and self-identify this decision as a positive one. A murmur of voices can be heard emanating from abstracted porcelain speaker boxes scattered across the wall. Repeated and sometimes interlocking organic forms are used to express a feeling of many creating a whole, or the old adage, “All for one and one for all.” My installation promotes a sense of unity and solidarity. Just as many objects create a whole, so can many voices create a new paradigm.
Abstract:
1 Because, Staff. 2012. Women are Heroes. Because: 12-14.
General Note:
Ceramics terminal project
Statement of Responsibility:
by Nicole Gugliotti

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Nicole Gugliotti. Permission granted to the University of Florida to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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awe/agency By NICOLE GUGLIOTTI SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE NAN SMITH, CHAIR LINDA ARBUCKLE, MEMBER ANNA CALLUORI HOLCOMBE, MEMBER CRAIG SMITH, MEMBER A PROJECT IN LIEU OF THESIS PRESENTED TO THE COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENT FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF FINE ARTS UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 2014

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© 2014 Nicole Gugliotti

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Dedicated to those who work for beauty, truth and choice.

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4 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I would like express my gratitude to my committee, Chair Professor Nan Smith and members Professor Linda Arbuckle, Professor Anna Calluori Holcombe and Dr. Craig Smith for their support and guidance over the last three years. I have had numerous opportunities during my graduate studies that could only come to pass because of their confidence in me and I am truly grateful. Additional thanks ar e due to all of my fellow graduate students as well as the larger community both in ceramics and in the School of Art and Art History especially Mariana Baquero, Liz Sauer, Abby Braiding, Anne Marie Furlong, Cheyenne Rudolph and Nigel Rudolph. Finally I wo uld like to thank the individuals who were willing to share their experience and their wisdom with me, I am honored to have been able to record their stories.

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5 TABLE OF CONTENTS page ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ................................ ................................ ................................ .. 4 ABSTRACT ................................ ................................ ................................ ..................... 6 PROJECT REPORT INTRODUCTION ................................ ................................ ................................ ............. 8 THE DOMINANT NARRATIVE ................................ ................................ ..................... 10 REPRODUCTIVE JUSTICE ................................ ................................ .......................... 13 THE ADACIOUS FEW ................................ ................................ ................................ .. 14 FEMINISM AND ACTIVISM ................................ ................................ .......................... 17 BEAUTY, WONDER AND THE GALLERY CONTEXT ................................ ................. 1 9 THE WORK ................................ ................................ ................................ ................... 2 1 INFLUENCES ................................ ................................ ................................ ............... 2 5 CONCLUSION ................................ ................................ ................................ .............. 2 9 APPENDIX A QUOTES INCLUDED IN VIDEO ................................ ................................ ............. 3 1 B TECHNICAL STATEMENT ................................ ................................ ..................... 3 2 LIST OF REFERENCES ................................ ................................ ............................... 3 5 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH ................................ ................................ ............................ 3 6

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6 Summary of Project in Lieu of Thesis Presented to the Graduate School of the University of Florida In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Fine Arts awe/agency By Nicole Gugliotti August 2014 Chair: Nan Smith Major: Art Despite being legal in the United States, rarely is abortion portrayed as a responsible, brave decision. Portrayals of abortion in pop culture and politics would have us believe that the choice is only acceptable when the alternative is ultimately self destruction. People who have had abortions are cast as villains or, more benevolently, victims and rarely as heroes of their own s tory. 1 My thesis exhibition awe/agency combines formal beauty and wonder with pointed, direct content in the service of offering an alternative model to the dominant narrative surrounding abortion in the United States. For some choosing to embrace or decli ne motherhood it is a difficult decision, for others, the choice is clear immediately. Regardless, societal pressure, stigma and stereotype in the face of this difficu lt situation some people are able to focus on themselves, their families and their futures instead of stereotyped societal pressures. These audacious few offer us a model for how to make authentic healthcare decisions. Through a 1 B ecause, Staff. 2012. Women are H eroes. Because : 12 14.

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7 combination of feminist act ivism and form awe/agency opens up the conversation around issues of reproductive justice so that vulnerability, growth and change may occur. The interconnected porcelain vignettes in awe/agency create an abstracted landscape that utilizes the gallery con text to offer an opportunity for wonder, contemplation and ultimately new insight. Text in the form of video brings in words culled from interviews that I conducted with people who have had an abortion and self identify this decision as a positive one. A m urmur of voices can be heard emanating from abstracted porcelain speaker boxes scattered across the wall. Repeated and sometimes interlocking organic one and one for many objects create a whole, so can many voices create a new paradigm.

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8 on the peaky mountain wrapped in rainbows with a harp and a sword in my Zora Neal Hurston 2 INTRODUCTION Despite being legal in the United States, rarely is abortion portrayed as a responsible, brave decision. Portrayals of abortion in pop culture and politic s would have us believe that the choice is only acceptable when the alternative is ultimately self destruction. People who have had abortions are cast as villains or, more benevolently, victims and rarely as heroes of their own story. 3 My thesis exhibition awe/agency combines formal beauty and wonder with pointed, direct content in the service of offering an alternative model to the dominant narrative surrounding abortion in the United States. For some choosing to embrace or decline motherhood it is a diffi cult decision, for others, the choice is clear immediately. Regardless, societal pressure, stigma and stereotype in the face of this difficult situation some people ar e able to focus on themselves, their families and their futures instead of stereotyped societal pressures. These audacious few offer us a model for how to make authentic healthcare decisions. Through a combination of feminist activism and form awe/agency o pens up the conversation around issues of reproductive justice so that vulnerability, growth and change may occur. 2 Hurston, Zora Neale. 2006. Dust tracks on a road . Reissue edition ed. Harper Perennial Modern Classics. 3 B ecause, Staff. 2012. Women are H eroes. Because : 12 14.

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9 The interconnected porcelain vignettes in awe/agency create an abstracted landscape that utilizes the gallery context to offer an opportun ity for wonder, contemplation and ultimately new insight. Text in the form of video brings in words culled from interviews that I conducted with people who have had an abortion and self identify this decision as a positive one. A murmur of voices can be he ard emanating from abstracted porcelain speaker boxes scattered across the wall. Repeated and sometimes interlocking organic otes a sense of unity and solidarity. Just as many objects create a whole, so can many voices create a new paradigm.

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10 THE DOMINANT NARRATIVE In an article for the journal Because, Tracy Weitz talks about the need to change the way people view abortion in both the anti choice and pro choice fronts. She states that the current feeling about abortion in the United States is that women are being saved from something such as rape, inces t or perhaps their own irresponsibility. This frames people seeking abortion as victims. Naturally, every victim needs a savior or a villain and the doctor plays that part respectively in the pro choice and anti choice camps. In either case women are cast as passive victims who are not taking an active role in their choice. 4 4 B ecause, Staff. 2012. Women are H eroes. Be cause : 12 14.

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11 Weitz goes on to debunk this misconception stating that abortion is not something that just happens to women; it is something they choose and have chosen throughout history. For just a s long as they have chosen to be mothers, women have chosen not to be. Abortion is a part of the whole reproduction picture and society needs to accept it as just that. She urges for a transition to a culture that accepts abortion as a respected choice, wh ere the woman is the hero of the story, instead of being acceptable only when the person getting the procedure want it. In an appendix to her humorous pop culture memoir How to Be a Woman , British author Caitlin Moran delves deep into her ex perience having an abortion. While abortion laws are seemingly stricter in England than in the United States, by most accounts 5 it is easier, in practice, to obtain the procedure. abortion services is similar to tha t in the United States where even the most zealous at about how abortion is vilified and how the women who seek it are cast as victims by the state. Referencing a Gua rdian article by Zoe Williams, she speaks of a generous state legally allowing for abortion because left to their own devices desperate women would get themselves killed in a botched back alley abortion. She hits the nail on the head with her cheeky articu lation of the systematic victimization of women. The idea that women should be punished for choosing abortion by a lifetime of guilt and regret pervades our culture. The message we are sent, she argues, is that women should be endless fountains of selfles sness and mothering who prefer to simply trickle 5 Marcotte, Amanda. 2013. Abortion is Different in Europe Because Religion is Different in E urope . Http://www.Slate.Com .

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12 away rather than make proactive choices about motherhood. She proposes an end to arguing whether or not it is alive in favor of giving the pregnant individual and her n ot life level, if women are, by biology, commanded to host, shelter, nurture and protect life, 6 accounts about abortion she had ever read before had research scouring the plethora of online abortion story repositories and YouTube abortion story videos, this holds true. It is as if the will of the dominant social narrative is enacted on women by themselves as they hold themselves accountable for their presumed crime against society. I set out through the interviews included in awe/agency to offer an alternative model that would allow individuals the space to feel what they felt without the responsibility of 6 Moran, Caitlyn. 2011. How to be a W oman . 1 st ed. London: Ebury. 267.

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13 punishing themselves. This openness also allows people to process the full spectrum of emotions they might experience without feeling the need to keep a stiff upper lip, on the one hand, or unravel altogether, on the other. Furthermore, awe/agency takes these them into neutral territory. By exploring this issue in an unapologetic and non political way, it models a dispassionate, constructive way of talking about health care experiences. REPRODUCTIVE JUSTICE Loretta Ross coined the term reproductive justice in 1994 while attending an international conference i n which activists were using a human rights framework to talk about reproductive rights. They were interested in how that created a more holistic movement where abortion was not the most important topic and where economic justice and access to basic health care were prioritized. Since some communities have been historically subjected to population control, the right to have and to raise children is just as pertinent to the topic of reproductive freedom as is the right to abortion access. 7 I have chosen to l imit the scope of my project to the topic of abortion and specifically to the experiences of those living in the United States where abortion is legal and relatively 7 makers.com. Loretta Ross: Feminist O rganzier .

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14 accessible. Though awe/agency deals specifically with abortion experiences, these events a re simply a microcosm for the myriad situations in which inequity, sexism and social stigma deny individuals agency and empowerment. THE AUDACIOUS FEW The content of awe/agency was mined from and built around interviews I conducted with four women who had made the choice to have an abortion. I was moved to begin collecting these stories by two profound occurrences. First in the course of my research I discovered the phenomenon of young women taking to the web to tell their stories of abortion. Second, aro und this time I was discussing my work with a friend and she offered me the story of her abortion. I was not surprised to find people telling their stories on YouTube. Confessionals from women regretting their decision and urging others not to make the sa me mistake are a common tactic used by the anti choice movement. What did surprise me was that there were also many stories that were told factually, clearly and free from persuasion. While the motivation for each YouTube story was different, in many of th ese videos young women are offering the story of their experience from

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15 wanted to tell my own abortion experience for anyone that's looking for the other side or for young girls 8 User first hand experiences would have been really helpful for me when I was scheduled to 9 Subse resemble a talk show with her fielding questions from an invisible audience, presumably her YouTube followers. 10 It struck me that this was an excellent model for how this type of healthcare decision could be discussed. While researching these stories, a friend shared her own story with me. At the age of sixteen, living in a small, rural and religious town, she found herself pregnant. After some time in denial her parents found out and confronted her. She woke up one morning to two concerned parents who asked her what she wanted to do. They then supported her emotionally during and after the decision. Unfortunately, after making her choice she learned she was too far along to obtain a legal abortion in her home state. Her father found out where the procedure could be done and booked plane tickets and a hotel there, along with her appointment at the clinic. She says of this experience that 8 Rachel Mae, YouTube User. 2013. Firsthand abortion experience . YouTube. 9 MyAbortionExperience, Youtube User. 2012. My abortion experience . YouTube. 10 ItsKatie73, YouTube User. 2011. 5 questions about my abortion .

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16 with no tinge of doubt or derision intrigued me. I wondered if there were other women with similar confidence in their choice and if I could collect their stories. I have had the honor of talking to hundreds of people on the occasion of their abortion in my role as an abortions services worker and while I feel co nfident they were all sure of their choice , I believe that they did not feel entitled to confidence in that choice. I was curious about what quality my friend and these brave young women on YouTube possessed that allowed them confidence in their own action s. Was it the presence of supportive parents, partners or friends or was it something from within? After obtaining IRB approval I put out a call on the web and through word of mouth. The subjects self selected by responding to my call for people who have had an abortion and self identify this experience as positive. All interviews were carried out in an informal manner and audio recorded. Participants were asked to recall their perception of the sequence of events. Some discussion and minimal follow up que stions transpired. While each individual experience differed drastically in the details, several common points emerged. For some the choice was clear immediately, for others it was more difficult, but in no case was it black or white. For most of the parti cipants, it was most cases they reference a source of support, whether it was a supportive person that was immediately involved or past experiences with family or frie nds that bolstered their

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17 confidence in their decision making. Without exception they all looked back on the experience with a healthy curiosity. life had existed but they accepted the right to and responsibility of postponing or rejecting motherhood. FEMINISM AND ACTIVISM Lynnee Breedlove 11 The band Le Tigre has long been an inspiration to me because they combine lyrics that deal with feminism, politics and social justice with dance beats and catchy melodies. Lead singer Kathleen Hannah has worked on many projects over the years and her trajectory symbol izes for me the direction we need to go in when attempting to make Bikini Kill for seven years. After Bikini Kill broke up she worked on a solo project under the name Julie Ruin . Seeking to create a stage show f or the Julie Ruin record Hannah would eventually form Le Tigre with good 11 Anderson, Sini. 2013. The Punk S inger , eds. Sini Anderson, Gwen Bialic, Tamra Davis, Rachel Dengiz, Erin Owens and Alan Oxman. 1st ed.

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18 friend Johanna Fateman. In the film The Punk Singer , Hanna talks about the transition from Bikini Kill to her work as Julie Ruin Bikini Kill I was singing to an elusive asshole man who was fucking the world over and I was allowing other women to 12 This shift from confronting the faceless has influenced me in my path as an artist. Despite the work being done in this arena abortion stories are still playing to the patriarchy instead of empowering each other to create a new narrative. awe/agency is a feminist work that was created to celebrate the capacity of individuals to act on their own behalf without shame or indignity. 12 Anderson, Sini. 2013. The Punk S inger , eds. Sini Anderson, Gwen Bialic, Tamra Davis, Rachel Deng iz, Erin Owens and Alan Oxman. 1st ed.

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19 BEAUTY, WONDER AND THE GALLERY CONTEXT what it is. When I seek out beauty or attempt to create it in my work, I am not talking about glamour, luxury or largesse. Plato and Palladio may have been on to something, equating beauty with harmony of proportion. In his book On Beauty , Umberto Eco touches on goodness as one of the many definitions of beauty. YouTube videos of real life heroes going out of their way help others exemplifies the beauty of goodn ess. They are posted to Facebook time after time because they contribute something important and necessary to the world. While it is hard to define exactly what beauty is, what most philosophers do agree on is that you know it when you see it.

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20 All encomp assing, ethereal installation work, such as that by Tomoko Ishida and Olifur Eliason, guided the conception of this installation. I wanted to create something that would embody quiet, contemplative beauty as well as wonder. Like the experience of beauty, t he state of wonder is connected to the sublime. The key difference between experiencing wonder and experiencing the sublime comes down to the lack of fear. Encountering something unknown can result in overwhelming fear but in a stable, relatively comfortab le environment such as present day United States, more often a feeling of delight and curiosity can take over. Being able to trust the environment allows one to fall into wonder and the gallery context, where health and safety are ultimately guaranteed, ca n be exploited for this purpose. According to the psychologist Jonathon Haidt, moments of wonder challenge us to take in more than we are prepared to, allowing us to experience self transcendence after which we are changed for the better. This state of sel f transcendence may allow us to feel more compassion and empathy. 13 awe/agency utilizes the beauty of goodness and wonder in the gallery context, a space in which the viewer is primed to suspend reality and take in something new, to model an alternative pa radigm. 13 More W onder . 2013., ed. Jonathon Haidt. Vol. Podcast.

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21 THE WORK awe/agency combines formal ceramic vignettes with analog audio and video components to create an immersive multimedia environment. As one enters the gallery space it is necessary to navigate around organic porcelain forms that are susp ended from the ceiling. These forms act as sentries, inviting the viewers into and guiding them through the space. The perforations in each form are repeated in the larger wall forms that sit atop painted wooden substrates. These wall pieces draw the eye t oward the video projection in which quotes pulled from the interviews are handwritten across the handwriting. Including the hand of the writer in the frame allows the viewer t o assume the role of the interview subject and walk in her shoes. Quotes from each interview are

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22 When possible, the interview subject was filmed for the video, otherwise an actor stoo d in as the writer. The last vignette consists of twelve abstracted speaker like forms scattered across the wall. Black wires extend from four of them and as one approaches a murmur of voices can be heard. The voices confidently offer their stories, but attention. ear next to a wired speaker form allows the viewer to connect with one interview subject and hear her uninterrupted story. While the interview subjects are anonymous for the purposes of a public

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23 installa tion, their individual voices, hands and handwriting make their humanity the focus of the installation, rather than a political statement. the installation. The minima l color palette of gray, bright light blue and the bluish white of raw porcelain with soft light and shadow create a calming backdrop to the more assertive audio and video components. Accents of black in the speaker wires and the cast shadow add a layer of depth to the installation palette. The muted color palette and formal elements reference geology, the bleached sand and rocks of an ancient landscape, the sun starved cave pearls, stalactites and stalagmites of a hidden cave. Sculptural forms that seem to have been formed by natural processes help pull the viewer toward a sense of wonder.

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24 Geologic formations, much like the attitudes that suppress agency and those that increase it, have been shaped over time and possess simultaneously a quality of time p assing and time fixed. They have value and beauty but continue to shift and change with time, onward and upward. The subtle colors used act to inject warmth into the calming composition. The use of multiples, the layering of the large wall pieces and the numerous perforations in all components quietly reference the phenomenon of smaller parts creating a larger whole. The constant movement of the suspended forms indicate the changing of something long held. As viewers walk through the installation they mov e around and adjust for the soft hanging forms and the forms reciprocate, swaying to make room for the viewer. The objects themselves have agency, as they constantly reinvent themselves and serve as proxies for all the stories that are still out there whic h united will transform the dominant narrative. This layering of form and content and the ability for the viewer to discover material that is not immediately evident speak to the complexity of human experience. Overall, the muted color palette and the cade nce of the sparse white forms against it invite the viewer into a comforting, familiar space and ask them to entertain briefly the experience of another person.

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25 INFLUENCES The act of conducting interviews in order to investigate elements of agency in healthcare decisions was influenced by the work of researcher Brene Brown. Her research method of choice, grounded theory research holds that the researcher allow the particip ants to define the research question. This research method relies on the emergence of theories based on the coded data from extensive interviews. Relying on this emergence results in theories based on lived experience rather than research that attempts to prove or disprove a hypothesis. 14 The interviews I conducted were curated by the call, but each story, with confidence and contradiction has a life of its own. Michael Strand, one of the most established craft artists working with social engagement in the United States has also influenced this body of work. His projects often blur the line between creating and mediating. He creates functional vessels in his studio and coordinates and curates the way in which they create exchange and connection. However the actual exchange created and the effect that each project has on those observing its documentation is beyond his control. He simply sets up the parameters within which the projects happen. I looked to his methods during the execution of awe/agency. 14 Brown, Brene. 2012. Daring greatly . 1st ed.Gotham, 251.

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26 He works in iterations, scaling projects up from small to large. I am continuing to interview and plan an expanded iteration of this project, adding richness with each story and allowing them to guide the work. scale paper ins tallations appear to have been formed over the passage of great time. Though they appear in the gallery, one can forget this for a moment and ponder what might have caused such a delicate beautiful thing to exist. They do not illustrate or narrate a system from nature or a story from life. Instead they arrest and send the viewer into a state of wondering. Each installation is crafted from paper o mikuji, fortunes that can be obtained at Japanese shrines. Favorable fortunes are kept by the recipient, inauspi cious fortunes are tied to pine trees in the shrine and it is with these paper fortunes that Ishida crafts her installations. Familiarity, the delicate nature of the material and the fact that her otherworldly installations are located in a gallery setti ng allow the viewer to follow their wonderings down the rabbit hole. This sense of timelessness, lack of narrative and simple materiality directly influenced the geology inspired objects I created for awe/agency .

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27 Finally, the work of Olifur Eliasson, spe cifically The Weather Project influenced the creation of this installation. The Weather Project, which was installed at the Tate patrons to redefine how the space was used. He con structed a semicircle of sunny orange light below a mirror and filled the darkened space with haze. His intention of making the space tangible had the pleasantly unintended outcome of people beginning g up to see themselves in the ceiling and otherwise partaking in behavior usually unsuitable for a museum 15 . I am interested in the way that this project makes the agency of the audience concrete. The participation and accidental collaboration of the a udience completes the work that Elaisson began. The parameters that I set for awe/agency allow for the telling of stories, a kind of consciousness raising, that could perhaps affect actual social change. Though the creation and use of craft objects is by definition relational, I have chosen to couch this work within the contemporary realm of socially engaged artwork as defined by Pablo Helguera in his book Education for Socially Engaged Art 15 Beccaria, Marcella. Remember the Weather P roject?.

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28 16 This term more accurately reflects my process because of the explicit reference to art making that is missing in terms such as social practice. In awe/agency I am both engaging with the viewer as well as contriving an interaction that takes place between the people I have interviewed and the viewer. The interview participants are my collaborators, their words my materials, as I curate the audio, video and sculptural elements of the installation. At all times I am walking the line of staying true to their experienc e and what has emerged from the data while creating the vision I have for the project. 16 Helguera, Pablo. 2011. Education for Socially Engaged A rt : A materials and techniques handbook . New York: Jorge Pinto Books.

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29 CONCLUSION power and vision of the great eastern sun. Then the warrior can make a pr Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche As the quote above indicates, life is complex, messy and beautiful. Therefore, it becomes necessary in life to approach pain with acceptance. One must react to injustice, look at the actions of our government with a critical eye and require fairness from all. However we must maintain balance and stay engaged. We can find a way to battle injustice while we enjoy and wonder at nature, science and goodness and always strive to create positive change. I cannot yet know whether my project will affect culture in a tangible way or remain a symbolic act. As the first grand iteration of this project, what I have learned from

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30 awe/agency will certainly guide me as I continue to collect stories and create installations arou nd them. Though my intention was clear when I set out to collect the stories featured in this installation, I could not know that they would so exquisitely reflect the multifaceted, resilient, empowered nature that I hoped to present as a new model. awe/a gency offers up a representation of reproductive justice in which the agency and self determination of the decision maker is foregrounded. The space invites viewers to experience delight and wonder, not as an escape from the struggle for social justice, bu t as a source from which to pull the inspiration and strength needed to stay and fight.

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31 APPENDIX A QUOTES INCLUDED IN VIDEO 1. view as my body or my territory. 2. My dad had a very high opinion of my conduct to that point and it never affected his opinion of me but I was worried about that. 3. 4. I think what was stronger and more instilled in me was be responsible. 5. But I did feel curious. 6. I feel really lucky that I was able to postpone motherhood to do all these things I value so much. 7. s really important to increase access for low and middle income people of a certain socioeconomic class having a choice. 8. You can do difficult things in your life and it can be h ard and stressful and it can still work out well. 9. All I want for you is to be smart and be safe. 10. happens to her body is essential to the health of women, the health of the cultur e and society and equality. 11. so I think culture can step in there and make it a more supported thing socially. 12. I probably would have been fine but I never doubted that it was th e right decision. 13. other people in my life at the time who were openly talking about it and were vocal about our political opinions and the way we saw the world. 14. My ability t o make decisions that would powerfully influence my future, the feeling that I was in control of my future was a very empowering experience to have as a young woman. 15. There was never a realistic question that I would ever do anything differently. 16. I had this new found proof of my parents loyalty and devotion to my highest well being 17. 18.

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32 APPENDIX B TECHNICAL STATEMENT Clay Body and Firing Methods All speaker box forms were constructed using Standard 257 cone 10 English Porcelain. Wall and suspended forms were constructed using Laguna Macabees Cone 10 White Body. These forms were then sprayed with a slip made from the Standard 257 body. The raw porcelain surface is left unglazed. All work was fired to cone 10 in reduction. A heavy body reduction at cone 010 for 45 minutes is followed by a light reduction at mosphere for the remainder of the firing. The kiln is turned off once it reaches temperature with no soak or clearing of the atmosphere. Forming methods Speaker box forms were slab built. Wall and suspended forms were constructed by placing ¼ inch thick s labs into blue foam drop molds. In order to compose the interlocking wall forms, tracing paper is used. Life size drawings are made and the placement of each perforation is determined. The suspended pieces are also planned out on tracing paper. The perime ter of each of these templates are then traced onto blue foam. The foam is cut on the scroll saw two sheets at a time so that there will ultimately be 2 molds which perfectly mirror each other. Foam supports are added to each mold in order to give them suf ficient height to receive the clay and stay puffy. Smaller foam pieces (place holders that will become

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33 perforations in the form) are cut, two sheets thick, in a variety of shapes and sizes that match the shapes in the initial composition. A new template o f each pieces is then created so that it matches the mold exactly and the location of the place holders is determined. These are also created on tracing paper so that the same template can be used for each set of molds by simply flipping it over. Slabs of clay are pounced into each mold and allowed to reach the leather hard stage. Any excess clay is trimmed from the perimeter as well as from the place holders. All edges are scratched, scored, slipped and joined. A serrated rib or tool is then taken to the joined edges and each newly formed perforation. The surface is then leveled with a smooth rib or tool. Once they have had a chance to reach hard leather hard stage, they are sprayed with the porcelain slip. Wooden Components The wall forms are placed on plywood and a backdrop form is composed around them. It is cut from the surrounding wood using a jigsaw. The edges are then sanded and routed to a round edge. They are painted with interior latex paint. Audio Components All au dio was recorded using a Zoom H4N portable digital recorder with an exterior microphone. Audio files were edited using Audacity, a free editor. Audio files were exported to MP3 format and loaded onto mine SD cards. Each speaker box contained a 2.5 inch sq uare TOMTOM MP3 player with speaker wired to a USB dock which supplied power for the entirely of the exhibition. Video Component

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34 I shot the video using a copy stand and a DSLR on video mode. The video was edited and compiled by Anne Marie Furlong.

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35 LI ST OF REFERENCES More Wonder. 2013. , ed. Jonathon Haidt. Vol. Podcast. Anderson, Sini. 2013. The Punk Singer , eds. Sini Anderson, Gwen Bialic, Tamra Davis, Rachel Dengiz, Erin Owens and Alan Oxman. 1st ed. Beccaria, Marcella. Remember the Weather Projec t?. August 2013. Accessed 2014. Available from http://www.tate.org.uk/context comment/articles/the weather project. Because, Staff. 2012. Women are Heroes. Because : 12 14. Bourriaud, Nicolas. 2002. Relational Aesthetics . Dijon: Les Presses du réel. Brow n, Brene. 2012. Daring Greatly . 1st ed.Gotham. Eco, Umberto, and Alastair McEwen. 2004. On Beauty . London: Secker & Warburg. Fisher, Philip. 1998. Wonder, the Rainbow, and the Aesthetics of Rare Experiences . Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press. He lguera, Pablo. 2011. Education for Socially Engaged Art : A materials and techniques handbook . New York: Jorge Pinto Books. Hurston, Zora Neale. 2006. Dust tracks on a road . Reissue edition ed.Harper Perennial Modern Classics. ItsKatie73, YouTube User. 2 011. 5 Questions about My Abortion . makers.com. Loretta Ross: Feminist Organzier . Marcotte, Amanda. 2013. Abortion is Different in Europe Because Religion is Different in Europe . Http://www.Slate.Com . Moran, Caitlyn. 2011. How to be a Woman . 1st ed. London: Ebury. MyAbortionExperience, Youtube User. 2012. My Abortion Experience . YouTube. Nehamas, Alexander. 2007. Only a Promise of Happiness : The Place of Beauty in a World of Art . Princeton: Princeton University Press, Rachel Mae, YouTube User. 2013. Firsthand Abortion Experience. YouTube.

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36 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH Nicole Gugliotti was born and raised under the hot Florida sun. She received her BFA from Flori da Atlantic Universit y in 2003. It is at this time that she began working for feminist organization Planned Parenthood. Before returning to school in 2011 s he spent three years living abroad in Tokyo, Japan, served as an artist in residence at St. Petersburg Clay Company in St. Petersburg, FL and completed p ost baccalaureate studies at Arcadia College in Philadelphia , PA in addition to her continued work in ab ortion services. Nicole received her Master of Fine Arts from the University of Florida in the summer of 2014.