Citation
Digital Humanities (DH) Graduate Studio HUM 6836 Syllabus, Spring 2016

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Title:
Digital Humanities (DH) Graduate Studio HUM 6836 Syllabus, Spring 2016
Creator:
Dale, Elizabeth R.
Taylor, Laurie N.
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, FL
Publisher:
University of Florida
College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, University of Florida
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Language:
English
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Syllabus

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Abstract:
The Digital Humanities Studio is designed for advanced graduate students who have completed substantial coursework in the emerging field of digital humanities, who are prepared to be self-directed in their studio practice, and who seek opportunities to work with digital humanists from other disciplines on individual and jointly-authored projects. (For background, see: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00032330/00001). The studio is team-taught by Elizabeth Dale and Laurie Taylor, faculty members from the Department of History and the UF Libraries. Like all studio courses this is fundamentally a creative community wherein students and teachers collaborate for what John Dewey called experiential learning, and what more contemporary works call learning-in-action. (See http://www.studioteaching.org/?page=what_is_studio.) Students will regularly present work for critique and advice, with the result that much of the time in class will be spent on intensive group discussion of individual and collaborative student work. This will help students hone their skills of interpretation and analysis and to learn how to effectively and professionally document and present digital works. A further aim of the studio is that students should see it as a creative community in which to collaborate with other researchers outside of the designated class meeting times. To that end, the studio will be taught in a laboratory space that can serve as a physical hub of the course’s undertakings. The course will also make extensive use of virtual environments for supporting asynchronous collaboration, such as wikis, blogs, etc.

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Digital Humanities Studio HUM 6836 INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION: Instructor: Elizabeth Dale & Laurie Taylor Office: 07 Keene Flint Hall (Dale) & 5 28 Library West (Taylor) Phone: 352 273 3387 (Dale) Office Hours: By appointment E Mail: edale@ufl.edu & laurien@ufl.edu COURSE INFORMATION: Time: M&W 3 6pm (periods 8 10) Location: Scott Nygren Scholars Studio Library West 212) COURSE DESCRIPTION The Digital Humanities Studio is designed for advanced graduate students who have completed substantial coursework in the emerging field of digital humanities who are prepared to be self directed in their studio practice and who seek opportunities to work with digital humanists from other disciplines on individual and jointly authored projects ( For background, see: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/ AA00032330/00001 ) The studio is team taught by Elizabeth Dale and Laurie Taylor, faculty member s from the Department of History and the UF Libra ries. L ike all studio courses this is fundamentally a creative community wherein students and teachers collaborate for what John Dewey called experiential learning, and what more contemporary works call learning in action. (See http://www.studioteaching.org/?page=what_is_studio .) Students will regularly present work for critique and advice, with the result that much of the time in class will be spent on intensive group discussion of indivi dual and collaborative student work. This will help students hone their skills of interpretation and analysis and to learn how to effectively and professionally document and present digital works. A further aim of the studio is that students should see it as a creative community in which to collaborate with other researchers outside of the designated class meeting times. To that end, t he studio will be taught in a laboratory space that can serve as a physical hub of the courses undertakings. The course will also make extensive use of virtual environments for supporting asynchronous collaboration, such as wikis, blogs, etc.

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The course operates from four propositions: That the most effective digital humanities projects are humanities projects first and foremost; they are concerned with fundamental tasks of humanities study, most specifically with problems of inherited experience and intellectual innovation. That digital tools can be used by humanists to explore and engage these tasks in new ways reaching new audiences and in areas of inquiry that are uniquely suited to collaboration between humanists and researchers in disciplines that have traditionally been thought as outside the humanities, such as computer and information science s That the humanities disciplines have traditionally excelled in the study and mastery of information and communication technologies, and emerging digital and computing technologies should be no exception. That in graduate study in the humanities, which is a professional as well as a scholarly endeavor studio courses provide intensive training in the crafts of the humanities Such courses lay the foundation for lifelong and self motivated learning of the kind that working humanit ies scholars engage in, whether they practice their craft inside or outside the academy. COURSE OBJECTIVES/STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES Students who successfully complete this interdisciplinary studio will : D emonstrate fluency in the emergent digital humanities, enabling them to explore various perspectives on the human condition to which digital tools and methods are being applied. D emonstrate familiarity with digital tools from other disciplines, to encourage them to explore the ways in which those tools may contribute to their understanding of the human experience past, present, and future. S how that they have increased their ability to communicate their ideas across disciplinary boundaries, to bring their knowledge a bout human understanding to people in other fields and outside the academy, and to learn collaboration and project management skills in the process. REQUIRED TEXTS : A collection of articles and examples of digital humanities projects will be chosen to re flect the state of the field and the interests of the studio group. Articles and other relevant materials such as multimedia documents and research databases will be saved and shared with a publically accessible Zotero Group list ( https://www.zotero.org/groups/uf dhwg ) These materials will be p osted on the class website and will be added to every time the Studio is taught, to create a lasting digital archive of digital humanities works and debates. RECOMMENDED TEXTS : The essays collected in these texts represent the broad range of scholarly and disciplinary debate in the field. We will read selected essays from these collections Students should be familiar with the diversity of claims, recommendations, and predictions re presented therein.

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Burdick, Anne, et al. Digital_Humanities Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2012. < https://mitpress.mit.edu/sites/default/files/titles/content/9780262018470_Open_ Access_Edition.pdf >. Gold, Matthey, et al ., Debates in the Digital Humanities Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2013. See also < http://dhdebates.gc.cuny.edu / > Catmull, Ed, and Amy Wallace. Creativity, Inc. : Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration. New York: Random House, 2014. Bartsherer Thomas, and Roderic k Coover, eds. Switching Codes: Thinking Through Digital Technology in the Humanities and the Arts Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2011. GRADE DISTRIBUTION: Although the faculty teaching the course will assign the grades, learning in the studio will be collaborative and project based. Students will be assessed for Participation in collaborative learning projects during the studio 25% Students contributions to the courses collaborative work may be manifest in a variety of forms, including: running a training session on a particular digital technique or leading a discussion of some relevant reading, frequent contributions to weekly project sessions (see schedule of courses, below), constructive input into others projects, contributions to the Studio reading list, etc. Studio project presentation & critique 25% Presentations on projects will take place during the weeks scheduled for that in the schedule of courses, below. Presentations should take the form of a workshop presentation of a research project (students will be given specific guidelines) and should address the nature of the digital project, its relationship to a larger research or pedagogical project, and the benefit(s) of th e particular digital approach chosen. The presentation will include a Q&A session. Presentations may be done individually or in teams When a team does a presentation the members of the team should provide the instructors with a breakdown of the contributi ons of the different group members to the final project. Beginning critique guidelines are attached to the end of this syllabus. Portfolio 50% The Digital Portfolio will be posted on a dedicated studio website. Each portfolio will contain four elements: 1) scholarly bio and CV, 2) 23 digital humanities projects from the different semesters, 3) discussion of the purpose of digital humanities and the specific contribution the students projects make to either scholarship or pedagogy (in his/her own field of study as well as the digital humanities writ large if appropriate), and 4) either a traditional research project (thesis, dissertation chapter, scholarly article, exhibit, or scholarly presentation) or a syllabus that relates to the students digital projects.

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CLASSROOM POLICIES Attendance Policy : In contrast to a class or seminar, where a students absence harms the student more than the group, a studio assumes that all participants are teachers as well as learners. Effective work in the studio depends on the regular and active attendance of all participants at all the weekly sessions, and to that end engaged attendance must be more than an aspiration. Studio r equirements for class attendance are consistent with university policies (see http://catalog.ufl.edu/ugrad/current/regulations/info/attendance.aspx .) Note, however, that students with more than two unexcused absences from weekly session s may be asked to withdraw from the course or suffer significant grading penalties. Makeup Policy : Assignments and other required work in the studio are due on the dates agreed upon by the studio participants at the beginning of the semester (see the course schedule, below) Work that is missed because of excused absences may be made up as the course schedule permits. Students who are chronically unable to meet deadline s may be asked to withdraw from the course or suffer significant grading penalties Periodi c reviews of work in progress will enable students to adjust project goals if needed in order to stay within workable timelines. Course Technology : The digital studio assumes students will have access to a computer for use during the lab sessions and independently in engaging in studio work. A few desktop computers will be available in the studio lab for use by students; students who do not have a laptop should arrange to borrow one from the library ( http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/as/laptoppolicies.html ). Whenever possible, projects in the studio will be platformneutral; that is, all common operating systems supported at UF may be used. Some specialized software may be platform specific, requiri ng regular access to that operating system. Students will be encouraged to develop proficiency in all operating systems and applications appropriate to their projects. As noted above, projects from the course will be preserved as part of an evolving web a rchive. But in order to make the studio successful, we also need to share and archive workin progress. To that end, every effort will be made to provide web and classroom space for displays of working drafts during the course of the semester. The possibil ities here are limited only by the imaginations of the people involved in each studio: different iterations of this studio may make extensive use of working group websites, wikis, or blogs, while others may depend on low tech resources like bulletin and white boards. The idea is to have studio participants interact with one another and the material they are producing throughout the semester, not simply in the period set aside for the studio. Software deemed necessary for the lab projects by the faculty teaching the course will be available through UF; students whose digital projects require additional or specialized software should consult with the course faculty before the start of the semester. Grading Scale : Students will be graded using the University of Floridas standard letter grade system, as follows: Letter Grade A A B+ B B C+ C C D+ D D E, I, NG, S U, WF

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Grade Points 4. 0 3.67 3.33 3.00 2.67 2.33 2.00 1.67 1.33 1.00 .6 7 0.00 Academic Honesty : UF students are bound by The Honor Pledge which states, We, the members of the University of Florida community, pledge to hold ourselves and our peers to the highest standards of honor and integrity by abiding by the Honor Code. On all work submitted for credit by students at the University of Florida, the following pledge is either required or implied: On my honor, I have neither given nor received unauthorized aid in doing this assignment. The Honor Code ( http://www.dso.ufl.edu/sccr/process/student conduct honor code/ ) specifies a number of behaviors that are in violation of this code and the possible sanctions. Furthermore, you are obligated to report any condition that fac ilitates academic misconduct to appropriate personnel. If you have any questions or concerns, please consult with the instructor or TAs in this class. Accommodations for Students with Disabilities : Students requesting classroom accommodation must first re gister with the Dean of Students Office. The Dean of Students Office will provide documentation to the student who must then provide this documentation to the Instructor when requesting accommodation. Contact the Disability Resources Center ( http://www.dso.ufl.edu/drc/ ) for information about available resources for students with disabilities. Counseling and Mental Health Resources : Students facing difficulties completing the course or who are in need of counseling or urgent help should call the oncampus Counseling and Wellness Center (3523921575; http://www.counseling.ufl.edu/cwc/ ). Online Course Evaluation Process : Students are expected to pr ovide feedback on the quality of instruction in this course based on 10 criteria. These evaluations are conducted online at https://evaluations.ufl.edu Evaluations are typically open during the last two or three weeks of the semester, but students will be given specific times when they are open. Summary results of these assessments are available to students at https://evaluations.ufl.edu/results

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COURSE SCHEDULE Overview of the courses method and schedule Before the start of the semester, students will submit a proposal setting out their project(s) for the semester, identifying the digital tools they hope to use and why, and explaining the relationship between the project(s) and their teaching or scholarly interests. Students are welcome to submit individual projects, but are also encouraged to work together to propose collaborative (multi student) projects on which each student pursues a particular dime nsion. At beginning of the semester, the participants in the studio will agree upon a calendar of the studios efforts that semester: the dates and deadlines for training sessions, presentations, individual and collaborative digital projects, project criti ques etc. The calendar will be sequenced according to the scope and diversity of the participants projects, and will include due dates for deliverables of each stage of an individual projects progress. During the semester in the studio students will lea rn to use new tools and refine their understanding of tools they used in previous seminars to produce the digital project(s) that will be the cornerstone of the portfolio for the Digital Humanities Concentration. During the closing weeks of the semester, students will present their projects for critique by the faculty and other students in the studio and will then make final improvements based on those comments (see critique guidelines, attached). Week 1: Introduction to the studio Preliminary reading: studio teaching project: http://www.studioteaching.org/index.php Introductions to people Introductions to projects : students should prepare a light ning talk (2 3 minutes) on their project Discussion about the aims of the studio Group prepares a tentative schedule for digital training sessions and project runs based on the project statements (see project work section, below). Taylor: discussion of Intellectual Property issues Dale presentation on CPD project and network mapping us ing Segrada ( http://segrada.org ) Week s 210: Project work In general, s essions these weeks will be divided into three sections. The sections will each last roughly an hour though the actual length depends on the needs of each week. The first section of each week will be devoted to presentations. These may be presentations on theoretical or methodological issues raised in shared readi ngs, project

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presentations of work in progress or technical presentations on distinct digital techniques and tools. Som e weeks there may be several short sessions on discrete tools; alternatively several consecutive weeks might be devoted to training on a particularly complex tool. Some weeks, a training session would involve the entire group; sometimes there might be two or more simultaneous break out sessions to allow smaller groups to get specific training on tools or techniques. The second session will involve discussion of the theoretical and practical issues raised by the presentations. Discussion topics may include metadata issues; ethical questions posed by particular tools; problems of presentation and clarity (does the tool really help?). The final section each week is the weekly project session. Students will work, individually or in groups, on their own DH proj ect(s). Weeks 11 13: Pr eliminary project pr esentations and critiques ( see critique guidelines below ) Weeks 14 16: Final project and portfolio preparation Finals week: Portfolios assessment (see Portfolio guidelines, below)

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Critique guidelines ( Adapted from http://www.albany.edu/faculty/dgoodwin/shared_resources/critique.html ) In preparing for a critique in this or any studio art class, it is at least as important to determine what you want or need from the critique as it is to understand what is expected of you. Your critique should address form and content, and consider the project in and of itself Such, criticism involves much more than the relatively simple act of judging of determining whether one likes or dislikes a project. Rather, it is a means toward the end of understanding a work of intellectual labor and its significance and ability to produce new knowledge. Critical consideration usually consists of at least three main activities: Describing the work (what does it look like? what is it made of? how can it be navigated? what does it hope to say?): Assume the audience has not and will not encounter/interact with the work or problem that the work engages and that you are the sole mediator for their understanding of its formal qualities Interpreting the work (what does it mean? what is it for? what does it do or say?): Here you are asked to synthesize any contextual or biographical information you have with your own subjective interpretation of the work's significance. Evaluating the work (is it interesting? what are its disciplinary and scholarly aims? does it appear to accomplish those aims? ): This is, perhaps, the most difficult critical task, yet it is usually the one to which most people skip when criticizing a work. To thoughtfully evaluate a work, you must determine what your criteria are for judging its relative worth or effectiveness. Only you can provide this information. Do not assume the reader (or your fellow student) shares your point of view. Explain why you feel the way you do. Thumbs up or thumbs down will not cut it. To do this, think about whether the work makes the most of the opportunities that it affords. What does it enable you to do and understand, and what parts of your encounter with or use of it raise questions and concerns? You may find the discussion in Catmull, Creativity, Inc. useful in preparing for thes e sessions.

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Description of the Digital Portfolio To get credit for the certificate, students must prepare and publish a Digital Portfolio. The Portfolio will reflect work students did across the courses they took for the Digital Humanities Certificate and will be finalized Students will finalized in the Digital Studio Typically, the Portfolio will contain four elements: 1) a brief scholarly bio (describing research areas and interests) and a CV; 2) a discussion of the purpos e of the digital humanities that addresses the specific contribution the students digital projects make to his or her research, pedagogical or professional interest, 3) sample digital projects from the students depth and breadth courses ; and 4) a digital project prepared by the student during the Digital Humanities Studio. This project should represent a semesters worth of work, and may take one of several forms: a) a digital study that arises from or complements the students traditional research projec t (thesis, dissertation chapter, scholarly article, exhibit, or scholarly presentation),or b) a syllabus with related digital work that arises from or relates to the students teaching interests, c) a stand alone digital project. Note: students in the Dig ital Humanities Studio are encouraged to work with others on group projects or combine separate but related projects to create a larger exhibit or collection. Where students do work collectively, their contribution to the work will be assessed individually but the collective work will appear (with proper attribution) in the portfolios for all the members of the group.