Citation
Daily Gazette

Material Information

Title:
Daily Gazette
Alternate Title:
The Daily Gazette
Creator:
U.S. Naval Base
Place of Publication:
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Publisher:
U.S. Naval Base
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright. Daily Gazette. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Related Items

Preceded by:
Guantanamo Gazette
Succeeded by:
Guantanamo Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Daily Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Bay Gazette
Related Item:
Indian
Related Item:
Sunday Supplement
Related Item:
Gitmo Review
Related Item:
Gitmo Gazette

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DA ILY GAZETTE


Guantanamo Bay, Cuba


Vol.. 41 -No. 212 -- U.S. Navy's only shore-based daily newspaper -- Tuesday, November 5, 1985


Judge orders

rail strikers

back to work

(UPI) - Some 700 striking railworkers say they will return to work at the Boston and Maine Railroad this morning, but only because of a judge's order to do SO.
Trainsmen, conductors and yardworkers began a wildcat strike yesterday. Twenty-five thousands commuters in the Boston area were stranded during the morning rush-hour. The Boston and Maine provides rail 'tract to the Massachusetts

Iy Transportation Authority.
A spokesman for the authority says all trains are expected to run normally today. The United Transportation Union says a central issue is safety procedures at construction sites along the tracks.


Approximately 68 Cubans workers as they passed pass through the North through the North East East Gate to work at the Gate. He said he wanted to Naval Base. They make the personally meet all the treek from Communist Cuba commuters at one time. each morning and evening. They have my greatest five days a week. Captain admiration and respect," Condos, COMNABASE, was on said Captain Condon. hand at 6 a.m. yesterday (Photo by Jo2 Neil to meet and greet the Guillebeau)




NEX needs paper manager


Many Guantanamo residents are beginning to question whether they will ever see the daily papers they expressed interest in only a few weeks ago. "The hitch," explained Larry Corcran of the Navy Exchange, "is in getting someone to be the paper manager. We have advertised the position but have had no takers."
"The issue is too important to
let it die at this point," said Base Public Affairs Officer Lt. Cmdr. Rick Fisher. That is why I'm putting the weight of the


Gazette behind it,"
It was Fisher who first introduced the idea and made contact with the Norfolk vender. "I still think we can do it, and I hope to have the papers coming daily by the end of the month," said Fisher.
To assist the MEX, the Gazette asks anyone interested in the job of paper manager to contact Larry Corcran, 3103 or 4308.
We will keep you posted in the Gazette.


Espionage game gets bizarre,

spy claims U.S. drugged him

(UPI) - The KGB official who Embassy in Rome August 1 and headed Soviet spying in the requested asylum in the United United States has thrown a States. Redman says Yurchenko bizarre element into what is signed a statement to that
already been a busy year in the effect, and the request was international espionage game. granted. He says the man
Vitaly Yurchenko claims he was believed to be the number-five abducted by unknown assailants officer in the KGB has coin Rome, spirited to the United operated fully with the CIA States and drugged for three since his arrival in America months. August 2. The State Department denies Yurchenko said yesterday in
Yurchenko's claim. It says he the Soviet Embassy he was cannot leave the United States forcibly held outside of until U.S. officials are con- Washington until his escape vinced he really wants to return Saturday. He says he was to the Soviet Union. subjected to three months of
Spokesman Charles Redman drug treatment and repeated U.S. claims Yurchenko interrogation. voluntarily defected at the U.S.




No more "special flights,"

buy ticket ahead of time

As of November 1985, "Special Flights" (Christmas, Easter,
Summer flights) are no longer available.
The Department of Defense has directed that this base will
only be provided air transportation in accordance with
applicable instructions.
The special Easter, Christmas and Summer C-9 flights which
were the result of unauthorized airlift requests will no longer
be available.
The Military Airlift Command (MAC) will, if demand justifies,
support the peak periods of holiday travel by providing larger
or additional aircraft.
Here is information concerning MAC flights for the Christmas
leave period (Dec. 13, 1985 to Jan. 13, 1986):
*** Tickets purchased will be non-refundable if the passenger
elects to travel space available/EML on opportune military
aircraft during this time frame.
*** Recommend purchasing round trip tickets as soon as
possible to confirm seats.
*** PSD Transportation (Bldg. 800) has expanded operating
hours to Monday through Thursday (8 a.m. to 5 p.m.) and Friday
(8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.)
Watch the Daily Gazette for further flight information.


$ from around the globe...


(UPI) -- That whale which swam up a river in California and did not know where it was going has finally found the right direction, back home to the Pacific Ocean. The whale called Humphrey swam blithely through the foggy Golden-Gate to hecheers of spectators yesterday. He had been
nded far upstream nearly a month.

(UPI) - President Reagan has sent word to the Soviet Union that the aim of his futuristic "Star Wars" program is not a grab for nuclear superiority, but rather a global insurance policy to maintain world peace. He said in an interview with Soviet journalists it is a protection for the world against "some madman" bent on nuclear blackmail.

(UPI) -- The Supreme Court will hear oral arguments today in abortion cases from Illinois and Pennsylvania. Both states have passed laws regulating abortion which lower courts ruled were not constitutional. The Justice Department has taken the unusual step of asking the court to return the authority to regulate abortion to the states. Many see such a step as tantamount to
banning abortion.


(UPI) - A federal judge in Reno, Nev., granted a reprieve yesterday to 32-year-old Jimmy Neuschafer, convicted of killing two teenage girls and strangling a fellow inmate after his conviction. Neuschafer was scheduled to be executed early today but the judge said he was required to determine whether a confession to killing the prison inmate was valid. Neuschafer contends he was without counsel when he confessed to prison officials.

(UPI) -- A 10-week-old girl has become the world's youngest person to get a liver transplant. She is Christine Holy of Fort Wayne, Ind. The operation was performed in a St. Louis hospital.


Tonight's Open Line
Watch Open Line tonight at 7 p.m. as Capt. John Condon, COMNAVBASE, joins Lt. Cmdr. Rick Fischer and his guests Lt. Cmdr. Sid Barrera and Lt. Roger Gozum for a 90 minute show. The topic for discussion will be the
Commissary. See page 3 for the story.


The Caribbean Naval Lodge up to be served barbequed held their annual Nasonic pig and covered dish picnic at Kittery Beach treats. (Photo by PHI Sunday. These people line Glenn Davis)















For your information...


EEO Special Emphasis Committee -- The EEO Special Emphasis Committee
will hold a special meeting November 7, Thu'sday, 2:30 D.m., PWD Conference Room, for selection of officer for Black Histo'y Celebration Month. For more information, call Bettye Martin, 4612.

Vietnam Vets -- Anyone interested in starting a Vietnam Vets Rap Group? If you have a need to talk about combat related experiences because they effect you, your job, your loved ones and many other parts of your life, please contact John at 3311 AWH.

School Advisory Committee Meeting -There will be a meeting of
the W.T. Sampson Elementary School Advisory Committee (ESAC) on November 6, Wednesday, 3 p.m., room B-10, elementary school. The
purpose of the advisory committee is to research and provide advice to the school on matters which impact on
the quality of education in the school. The meeting is open to the public. Anyone who has a suggestion or concern should contact one of
the following members: Issy Gallen, Karen Head, David Ford, Janice Castro, Betsy Wall, Mary Huffington, or Maryann Houston.

Nature Walk -- On November 9, Saturday, 8:30 a.m., a
group of nature lovers will meet at Windmill Beach's big cabanna. From there we will stroll to the Nature Trail and continue our walk for about 45 minutes along the dirt road and off onto the grassy plateau overlooking the ocean. Come join us to
share information about the floa and fauna along the trail. With sneakers, sunglasses, caps, shorts or slacks and shirts, you should be comfortable. Call 2776 or
2437, if you plan to attend. We would not want to walk off without you.

Spouse Information Seminar: -- An orientation for military and civilian dependents will be held on November 13 and 15, from 6:30
- 9:15 p.m., in the Family Service Center Training Room. Free child care will be available. For more information, call the Command Career Counselor or Family Service Center, 4141/4153.


Navy Campus Free Spanish Classes - AFRTS is running Spanish for the Caribbean, for the community personnel who cannot attend classes. These are provided by the Defense Language Institute in Monterey, Calif. Call Navy Campus, if you want to listen to the tapes for these classes, 4769.

College Degree -- If you have the desire and determination to acquire a recognized college degree, but have been unable to stay in one place long enough to meet the usual residency and course requirements of other schools, then the New York Regents may be just the program for you. There are other schools as well that you can work with to complete that long awaited degree. Call Navy Campus, 4769, for more information.

Treasure and Trivia -Store hours return to the regular time, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Thursday and Saturday. There is a special buy on ladies' slacks this week, two pair for $1. Come and choose from our large selection of cotton or polyester pants and
renew your wardrobe for that upcoming winter trip stateside. Have a November birthday? Present something with your birthdate on it and take advantage of our $2 Birthday Bag.

Reflex Photo Club - The Reflex Photo Club is holding their monthly meeting November 6, Wednesday, 7 p.m., Hobby Land. All members are urged to attend or call in for dues and information on upcoming events. The community is invited to attend. Call Mike, 2572 DWH or Dave, 2144 AWH.

Great Pumpkin PhotosDue to the large request for color photos of the Great Pumpkin, at SATCOM, that were sold at the Christmas Bazaar, the Reflex Photo Club is
taking orders for those unable to attend the Bazaar. The photo is an 8"x10" for $4.75, with a frame for an extra $1. Call Mike LaMendola, 2872 DWH (only), or Dave Ford, 7219 DWH.

NSGA/COOL" ives ClubThe NSGA/CO"L Wives Club will have a meeting November 7, Thursday, 7 p.m., Radio Point 307, Donna Wilson, 4603. All women of the command, both active duty and dependent, are invited to attend.


DAILY GAZETTE
U.S. Navy's Only Shore-based Daily Newspaper
Capt. John Condon, USN...............Ccma)der, U.S. Naval Base
Lt. (Idr. Rick Fischer USN...............Public Affairs Officer
J02 Neil Guillebeau, UN ...............Asst. PAO/Managing Editor
J03 Teri Thomas, USN ............................. Assistant Editor
Mrs. Susan Junkmns ..................... Secretary/Associate Editor
Frs. Ann-Elizabeth Efimoff ................... Production Assistant
SA Vicki Strickland ................................ Staff Assistant
The Daily Gazette is published according to the rules and regulations For snip and station newspapers, under the direction of the public affairs officer. The Daily Gazette is printed five times a week at government expense on government equipent, at the Navy Publications and Printing Service Branch Office. The opinions and statements that appear herein are not to be construed as official, or as the official views of the Navy Department or
Camander, U.S. Naval Base.


We encourage you to participate...


Your voice, your ideas...your newspaper!
By all meas, we ecourage you to participate in the Daily Gazette. Do you have a good suggestion, a 0I-'ln" or a strong opinion about a certain issue? Well then, write a letter to the editor (Stop 53). Are yCu an aspiring journalist and want to write a story? Please, let us know what is on your mind. And if you


COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD


Wednesday's agenda...


I to 3 a.m. -- Wild Animal Cont-ol, Cuban Trailer Park and Gold Hill Towers area.

6:30 a.m. - Catholic Mass at Base Chapel.

8:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. -Live Firing, VC-10.

9 a.m. -- Deadline for deparment heads to submit daily muster report to admin office.

3 p.m. -- W.T. Sampson Elementary School Advisory


Committee, B-10 at elementary school.

3 p.m. -- Leeward Point E-6 Association, E-6 Association Hut, 6531 DWH or 6232 DWH.

4:30 p.m. -- Caribbean Arts and Crafts Association, old high school, 2989 AWH.

6:30 p.m. -- Cub Scout Pack 401 Den 2 meets at Morin Center.

7 p.m. - Reflex Photo Club, Hobbyland, 2872 DWH or 2144 AWH.


New library books (rerun)


1. "Ten Philosophical Mistakes," by Montier J.
Adler.
2. "The Further Prophecies Of Nostradamus," by Erika Cheetham.
3. "The Last Taboo," by Carole Phillips.
4. If I'm Successful, Why Do I Feel Like A Fake," by Joan Harvey.
5. "Careers In Secret Operations," by David A. Phillips. 6. "The Common Sense," by Peter G. Miller.
7. "Every Woman' Guide To Military Service," by Texe Marrs.
8. "Command Under Sail," by James Bradford.
9. "Man-Of-War Life," by Charles Nordoff. 10. "Not My Kid," by Beth
Polson.


Listen

to

books

New! New!
mListen for Pleasure."
The Library has a selection
of library-bound cassette tapes of classics and
award-winning books. Choose from:

1. "Little Women," by Louisa
Alcott, read by Carol Drinkwater.
2. "Fairy Tales," by Hans Christian Anderson, read by Wendy Craig.
3. "Emma," by Jane Austen, read by Dame Peggy Ashcroft.
4. "Pride And Prejudice," by Jane Austen, read by Celia Johnson.
5. "Peter Pan," by Jim Barrie, read by Wendy Craig.
6. "The Wizard Of Oz," by
Frank Baum, read by Stephen Moore.
7. "Jane Eyre," by Charlotte Bronte, read by Dame Wendy Hiller.
8. "Wuthering Heights," by Emily Bronte, read by Daniel Massey.
9. "The Secret Garden," by Frances Hodgson Burnett, read by Gwen Watford. 10. "The Canterbury Tales,"
by Geoffrey Chauser, read by Prunella Scales.
11. "A Murder In The Mews," by Agatha Christie, read by Nigel Hawthorne. 12. "Letters From America," by Alistair Cooke, read by Alistair Cooke.
13. "Great Expectations," by Charles Dickens, read by Anton Rodgers.


have a special black and white photo[Fph you would like to see in print, bring it by our office. The Daily Gazette staff is in Building 760 (Admin Hill) and-we arjopen from at least midnight to 4:30 p.m., Sunday night to Friday afternoon. If we can help you in any way, give us a call at extension 4819 or 4502. We are good and getting better. With your help, we will be the best newspaper in the Navy!


11. "Nut-Cracker," by Shana Alexander.
12. "Outlaws Of The Ocean," by G.O.V. Mueller. 13. "The Ultimate Violation," by Judith Rowland. 14. "Guinnes Book Of Speed/Facts And Feats," by Bill Guston.
15. Rock And Minerals," by Pat Bell.
16. A Guide To Enjoying
Wildflowers," by Donald Stokes.
17. "Running Without Fear," by Dr. Kenneth Cooper. 18. The Complete Sport
Medicine Book For Women," by Mona Shangold.


7 p.m. -- Leeward Point Community Meeting, Leeward Point Community Center.

7:30 p.m. -- Iguana Video Club, Naval Station Training Room, 4448 AT.

8 p.m. - MOVIES - COMO, " Purple Rose of Cair Windjammer, "Cal;" CPO, "Into
the Night;" Downtown, "The Far Pavilions;" McCalla, "A Test of Love;" Marine, "Lost In America;" Leeward, "The Cotton Club."

*** Needle Craft classes begin Wednesday, 3241 or 3845.

*** If you have notes of interest for the community, submit them into writing (Attention: Agenda) to the Daily Gazette (Stop 53), Bldg. 760 (Admin Hill). Please include event, date and time of event, place of event and phone number for further information.


We're closing in on a killer.



leuemia '
society of america


Wardroom annex hours

All officers and civilian equivalent are welcome at the COM Wardroom Annex. Bring the family! A breakfast buffet will be available on Saturday mornings.

COM Wardroom Annex Hours

Monday Breakfast 6:00 a.m. - 8:00 a.m.
Lunch 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. Dinner 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. Tuesday - Friday Breakfast 6:00 a.m. - 8:00 a.m. Tuesday - Thursday Dinner 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. Saturday Brunch 7:00 a.m. - Noon Sunday Breakfast 7:00 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.





Spouse information seminar


0


Family Servc'e November 13 and 15

Wednesday, 13 November 1985


6:30-6:45 p.m. 6:45-7:00 p.m.


7:00-7:25 p.m. 7:25-7:35 p.m. 7:35-7:50 p.m. 7:50-8:00 p.m. 8:00-8:15 p.m. 8:15-8:30 p.m. 8:30-9:00 p.m.

9:00-9:15 p.m.


Room


6:30 - 9:15p.m.


Introduction by CAPT D. MacPherson Opening by NCf Parr, Command Career Couselor & Introducing Command Master Chief Summerlin and Family Ombudsmen
Public Affairs Office Base Slide Presentation TV-8 and Radio Functions and Programs Navy Exchange/Commissary Break
Marine Corps Exchange R & R Flights
Recreational Services: Tour and Travel Office, Child Development Center, Youth and Teen Programs Navy Relief/Chaplains Office


Friday, 15 November 1985 6:30-6:40 p.m. Family Service Center 6:40-6:50 p.m. Red Cross 6:50-7:00 p.m. Veterinary Clinic 7:00-7:15 p.m. Hospital 7:15-7:30 p.m. Dental 7:30-7:40 p.m. Household Goods 7:40-7:50 p.m. Base Security 7:50-8:00 p.m. Break 8:00-8:15 p.m. Civil Service Employment Opportunities 8:15-8:30 p.m. Survivors Benefit Plans for Military/Civil Service
Dependents
8:30-8:45 p.m. Local Educational Opportunities for Dependents 8:45-9:00 p.m. Fleet Branch Post Office 9:00-9:15 p.m. Closing Remarks by LCDR T. G. Briggs


Free Child Care Available
For seminar registration and free child care, call the Family
Service Center at 4141/4153.


Daily Gazette Tuesday, November 5, 1985














3-- THIS 'N THAT -- 3




In Paris -- Art theft of the century


By Ken Likes
Who were the robbers? And why
did they do it?
These are the two big
questions in what some are calling "The art theft of the
century."
The unsolved theft of nine
* iceless paintings from Paris' rmottan Museum.
t was a quiet Sunday morning
a week ago, when five men invaded the Marmottan Museum in a fashionable Paris neighborhood are removed nine impressionist
masterpieces from the walls.
Two of the men bought tickets
as visitors. They then whipped out high-caliber revolvers and forced the nine unarmed guards and 40 visitors to lie on the floor. Three others gathered the paintings of their choice. They stuffed them into a car and sped
away.
The whole operation took only
five minutes.
Witnesses said the gunmen were
between the ages of 30 and 40, of European origin, and of ~S~d uheight and weight. They
d no particular distinguishing
characteristics. None wore a
mask.

A week has passed, and there
is no word that a worldwide
search for the paintings has made any progress. Police say no motive is being ruled out, and they are working on several
theories.
The paintings are so
well-known that sale would be



Clean houses,

safer houses

Cleaning time is here
again. Remember, a clean
house is a safer house.
The NAVSTA Fire Department
reminds you that trash, boxes, piles of clothes and other combustibles in the home are fuel for a fire.
Getting rid of them will help reduce the chance of fire in
your home.
Clean out storage areas
such as garages, attics, closets, sheds and basements on a regular basis. Even warehouses are limited to the amount of storage they can safely keep. Do not allow areas in your home to become tempting fuel for a fire.
Throw away or give away items you are no longer using.
Clutter gives fire a place to start and creates obstacles that might prevent escaping
safely.
Oily rags can ignite
without a heat source because they produce their own heat.
Throw them out or store them in a closed, metal container.
This includes dusting rags used with a furniture polish
or spray.



AUTOS
'68 VW Beetle, excellent condition, " any new parts, must see to appreciate, $2000 or best offer. 1Call Chief Way at 6346 DWH or 6259
AWH.

'80 Toyota 2-door liftback, a/c, AM/FM, just passed inspection, great little car, $3000 or best offer.
Come see. Call 4743 AT.

'74 AMC Matador, new inspection.
Call 4588.
'77 Chevy Caprice Classic, 4-do', 8
cyl., 305 engine, mechanically maintained very well, $1500 or best offer. Call HTI Gilfert at 4396 [l]
or GiT Roam C316 AlH.
GOLF CART
One golf cart, excellent batteries, (will play 36), spare tire and charger, $600 firm. Call 6267 DWH or
3190 AWH.


unlikely on the legitimate art market. However, the works are worth millions of dollars. They include five Monets and two Renoirs.
There have been art thefts in the past in which insurance
companies were blackmailed into paying to have works returned. These paintings were not insured, however. As for demanding ransom from the government, culture minister Jack Lang has declared, "France will not yield to blackmail."
Some officials of the


international police organization, Interpol, believe that recent art thefts, and possibley this one, were organized by political groups. In this theory, the priceless works would be held to be exchanged should one of their members be apprehended or another emergency occur.

The police stress, though, that this is just a theory. The thieves have not been identified. The robbery of the Marmottan remains a mystery.


What makes-members stay?


By Donna Bolinger

(AFPS) - Which of the following statements best describes how
you feel about your job?
--Completely satisfied
--Well satisfied
--Neither satisfied or dissatisfied
-A little dissatisfied
-Very dissatisfied This question is typical of
those asked of service members through surveys that assess their satisfaction with the military.
More than one-third of first-term enlistees leave the military before finishing their term of service, and another one-third do not reenlist after completing their first term, according to a DoD study.
Determining why these groups
leave has become DoD's first step in enticing the best and
brightest recruits to stay, forming the basis of a quality career force.
Fortunately, studies show, those who stay generally are
among the highest quality recruits. Those who leave the military before their initial enlistments are completed are the lowest quality; and those who leave at the end of their first enlistment represent a mixture of the highest and lowest quality-representativess of the cross-section of new enlistees.

The group that reenlists meets or exceeds reenlistment standards based on on-the-job performance, education and scores on generalized ability tests.
So what is it, DoD officials ask, that makes these quality service members decide to stay?
Dozens of government and private studies have come up with a list of factors, some work related, others personal, that affect retention. These include rewards--both monetary and psychological--expectations about military life, and such personal attributes as
schooling, mental aptitude, and demographic and personality
characteristics. Other factors include working conditions and the availability of a way to



Potpourri & Grab


ctr'84 Honda Aero 80, $850.
Available now. Call Father McMahon at 4550 D4H or 2923 AWi.
BOATS
Onr 19' pontoon boat with Johnson 33hp outboard motor, trailer included. Like new, must see to appreciate, $2000 or best offer.
Call Chief Way at 6346 DWH or 6259 A1H.
SCUBA GEAR
One Seaquest BC, $35; one Dacor BC, $25. Like new. Call 4502 DJ or 3190 A-W.
CLOTHING
Navy blue s-piece me's sunmeq suit, the pants a-e 32x34, very fice, $40. Call 3169 AT.


resolve disputes between individuals and their supervisors.
The significance of pay in a service member's decision to remain in uniform isn't certain. Some studies indicate that pay is the main reason people leave the military; others show that pay is of secondary importance, and yet others show that the
importance of pay varies during the course of a military career.
The complexity of the military compensation program makes its influence difficult to assess.
When calculating military pay, service members must consider base pay plus a variety of special and incentive payments, including special duty assignment pay, reenlistment bonuses, allowances and retirement pay benefits.
Studies show that this calculation is so complicated that service members consistently undervalue their military pay. Even if a sizable bonus is paid, a service member is likely-to undervalue it if it's paid by installments rather than as a lump sum.
A new recruit's background, education and family situation appear to have an effect as well. Studies show service members are most likely to leave military service if they:
--have a history of
anti-social behavior, legal difficulties or poor psychological adjustment (these individuals are likely to do as poorly in the service as in civilian life);
--lack a high school diploma--those who are unsuccessful at seeing their
high school studies through to completion also tend to be
unsuccessful at seeing their military service through to completion;
--have a spouse and dependent children;
--enlist before age 18.
CAREER













-The Saler

ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT
JVC's RX500B with wireless remote control, 100w/channel, Kenwood'
KX70ORB, bi-directional, music search and repeat, both in excellent condition. Will sell tth fo- $400. Call Paul at 3200 or 3065.

Beach ghetto blaster, detachable
speakes, tape playe, 1.VR4s tereo, portable. Best offer. Call HT1 Gilfert at 4396 [WH or C G Ron C316 41H.

PETS
Need to fin: a good home for a two year old male, Siberian iisky, AKC r&,Listered. Also, a seven rn.th old G16Y,0 Special' puppy. GC(xJ watch ck.g and very affectionate. For further details, call JA:net at 2345 aIH cr 3533 AP11.


Local job market


Central Fidelity Bank

Central Fidelity Bank has an immediate opening for a part-time teller. Experience preferred, but not required.

MCX job

The Marine Corps Exchange has the following position available. Applications ill be accepted until111:30 a.m. November 8.
a. Sales Clerk, PS-2091-2, part-time position (required to work up to a maximum of 39 hours per week); three required.
For further information and a copy of the position description, please contact the Marine Corps Exchange secretary (Bldg. M-613) or phone 2330/2570.

NBCPO jobs

U.S. NON-U.S. CITIZEN JOB VACANCIES AT NBCPO: Applications should be submitted to the Naval Base Civilian Personnel Office by the close of business November 12. Additional information concerning these vacancies may be obtained at the Naval Base Civilian Personnel Office or by reviewing Vacancy Announcements posted on official bulletin boards.
ANN. NO. POSITION AND TITLE LOCATION


NAF-80-85 192-85-B 235-85 236-85 NAF-57-85-C
237-85 238-85


Cashier, AS-530-O5 Boilermaking krker, LWG-3808-08 Transportation Clerk (Typing),
GS/LiiS-2102-04 Library Aid, GS/LGS-141 1-02 Identification Checker, PS-0085-01
Clerk-Typist, GS-322-04 TEMP, Not to exceed 16 May 86 Sandblaster Helper, LWG-5423-05


COMO Club
SIMA
NAS
Amin Dept.
Leeward Pt.
CFO mess
Navy Broadcasting
Service Detachment
SIMA


POSITION AND GRADE

Sales Clerk P/T PS-1/$3.66 leading to PS-2/$3.99 or LGS-2 $2.75 leading to LZS-3/$3.42 Identification Checker F/T PS-1/$3.66 or LPS-2/$2.75 Head Sales Clerk F/T
PS-5/$4.84 or LGS-4/$4.08 Food Service Worker F/T NA-1/$3.57 or LWG-1/$2.30
Cashier/Checker F/T PS-2/$3.99 or LGS-2/$2.75 Warehouse Worker P/T (2 required) DEPT
NA-4/$4.63 or LWG-4/$3.27 Facilities Services Order Clerk P/T AS-3/$4.37 or LGS-2/$2.75 (Typing) Mitor Vehicle Operator (Courier) P/T NA-4/$4.63 or LGS-2/$2.75
Customer Services Clerk F/T PS-4/$4.54 or LGS-3/$3.42 Invoice Audit Clerk F/T AS-4/$4.68 or LGS-4/$4.08 Janitor F/T
NA-1/$3.57 or LWG-1/$2.30


CLOSING LOCATION

OPEN RETAIL STORE
MINI MART
OPEN MINI MART
OPEN RETAIL STORE
OPEN STOPLIgHT
INN
OPEN STOPLIGHT
INN
November 14 WAREHOUSE

November 6 MAINT. DEPT
OPEN PERSONALIZED
SERVICES
OPEN RETAIL STORE
SERVICE DESK
OPEN ACCOUNTING
OPEN NAVY LODGE


Barrera now in charge of commissary


The Commissary Store Officer and Navy Exchange Officer billets have been merged to form a new billet of resale officer-in-charge (OIC).
The officer filling this billet will be responsible for the overall management of both the commissary and exchange. The Navy Exchanges have been realigned under the Naval Supply Systems Command . This restructuring took effect October 1.
Lt. Cmdr. Sid Barrera now fills this billet. This resource driven decision makes 71 military officers, assigned to commissary program billets, available to fill officer fleet requirements as the Navy grows to a 600-ship Navy. The resale OIC also provides for a continuation of the required military officer leadership for the enlisted


AIR CONDITIONERS
Sears Kenmore 12,000 BTU, runs great, energy save, $250; Sears Kenmore 21,000 BTU, like new, energy saver, $500; GE 11,800 BTU, six
months old, energy save- and sleep arme, $300. All available Novanber 27-December 5. Call Chief Way at
6346 DWH or 6259 AWH.
One 18,000 BTU, $300; 11,000 BTU, $200; 8,000 BTU,$200. All cool excellently. Available during week of December 13. Call 4502 [WH or 3190 AWN.


SERVICES
I will perform magic shows for whatever the coccalo"n may be. Just call 28(4 ad ask for Rafe or Kelli fcr i:,foration a)d appoi:,tr-Lnt.


personnel serving in the Navy Commissary Program. The Naval Supply Systems Command was directed by the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations to implement this change. Navy officials anticipate a continuation of quality service to exchange and commissary customers as a result of the restructuring. Here are a few questions and answers for additional information of this change.
Q.1. What will be the relationship of the Exchange to the local command? The Navy Exchange will become a tenant activity of the local command. However, in terms of service and response to the
local command, any change would be imperceptible. The primary
mission of the Exchange is to be fully responisve to the needs of the local commanding officer in support of his personnel.
Q.2. How many Navy Exchanges anld Commissaries are there in operat ion?
There are 136 Exchanges
providing service to Navy people, 99 in Conu and 37 overseas. Commissaries total 79; 61 in C:.uq and 18 overseas.


WANTED
Pony Express needs a vocalist who plays guitar or keyboard. John lklwaad will :ot easily be replaced, but w tmst try. If you are ready to move up to an active wrkig band, call Rick at 4502 MIH.
Lady to Vreplace me in 9 a.m. Mocnay Ladie a.wling League. Great team. Good fun. Plus, your first and last-two games of this season are paid by me. Please call 4743 AT.


3 Daily Gazette Tuesday, November 5, 1985


NEX jobs

The Navy Exchange has the following job openings. Please contact the Personnel Office at Bldg. AV-34, NcCalla Hill, or phone 4348/45O8.



































































Local
Jamaican Cultural and
Recreation Committee
The Jamaican Cultural and Recreation Committee is inviting all cricketers and
soccer players, to an important meeting November 10, Sunday, 4 p.m., Cultural Center. For more information, call D. Wallace, 4577/4004.


sports
Yacht -Club --


The Yacht


Club Social Night will be held November 10, Sunday, 5:30 p.m. There will be a movie following the meal. Please plan to come and bring
a hot dish or a side dish to have a Thanksgiving meal. All GTMO residents are invited.


SPORTSWORLD Cardinals storm back to upset Dallas


NFL standings
American Conference
East
V L T PCT PF PA
New York Jets 7 2 0 .778 208 135 New England 6 3 0 .667 173 156 Miami 5 4 0 .556 220 194 Indianapolis 3 6 0 .333 172 204 Buffalo 1 8 0 .111 121 216

Central

Cleveland 4 5 0 .444 150 132 Cincinnati 4 5 0 .444 260 278 Pittsburgh 4 5 0 .444 183 153 Houston 4 5 0 .444 162 185

West
Denver 6 3 0 .667 219 181 Los Angeles Raiders 6 3 0 .667 196 187 Seattle 5 4 0 .556 221 202 San Diego 4 5 0 .444 220 231 Kansas City 3 6 0 .333 171 204

National Conference

East

Dallas 6 3 0 .667 207 146 New York Giants 6 3 0 .667 203 151 Washington 5 4 0 .556 158 168 Philadelphia 4 5 0 .444 136 145 St. Louis 4 5 0 .444 186 216


Central
Chicago 9 0 0 1.000 255 124 Minnesota 5 4 8 .556 183 180 Detroit 5 4 0 .556 170 196 Green Bay 3 6 0 .333 164 216 Tampa Bay 0 9 0 .000 184 272

West

Los Angeles Rams 8 1 0 .889 191 127 San Francisco 5 4 0 .556 228 167 New Orleans 3 6 0 .333 173 235 Atlanta 1 8 0 .111 171 284


The Sportsman


By Charles Morey

Who would you take one-on-one, "Humphrey the Whale" or "William
the 'Frigerator:?"'
It is hypothetical, of course. Humphrey is a denizen of the deep who has been making
headlines with his spouting and swimming in the Sacramento
River, which he entered from the Pacific Ocean.
William, whose name is Perry, is a 307-pound defensive tackle who has been moonlighting at fullback for the Chicago Bears and making enemy defenders see stars.
Humphrey was out of his element in the river, but proved to be a show-stopper for thousands of people who lined
the banks of the waterway to watch him frolic and spout. He also bothered naturalists who
wanted to get him back into the ocean.
William also is 6ut of his element. He got his nickname because of his fondness for food
and frequent excursions to the refrigerator. The Bears drafted him as a defensive tackle, and he was close to 350 pounds when they did it. They gave him the carrot-and-stick treatment, and got him to 307.
That gave Coach Mike Ditka an idea.
He has been using Perry as a fullback in key situations, and it has paid off. He ran the ball in for a touchdown a few weeks ago, and this past Sunday, caught a short pass for a score, as the Bears wore down Green Bay. He also has played some at his natural position, defensive tackle.


This business of using a huge
lineman in the backfield is not entirely new, although it has
not been done often.
Coach Bill Walsh of the San
Francisco 49ers shook up a few opposition defenses in the playoffs last year by employing Guy McIntyre, a 275-pound lineman, as a blocking back. He almost put a couple of defensive
halfbacks into the front row of the stands.
Going back more than 30 years, the Detroit Lions had a 350-pound middleguard named Les
Bingaman, who was used on offense a few times. A former general manager of the Lions,
Nick Kerbawy, recalled the time Les intercepted a pass on defense. "He ran six yards with
the ball and then rolled the remaining four into the end zone," said Kerbawy. Nick added,
"Les had great acceleration for one yard."
The New York Jets have a bruising defensive end, Mark Gastineau, who is beginning to get a few ideas of his own about carrying the ball.
He says that if Jet Coach Joe Walton asks him to carry the ball, he will accept happily. Gastineau has tremendous speed and might be a hard man to contain in short-yardage
situations.
Chicago running back Walter Payton had this to say about Perry as a ball carrier: "With all the fat jokes he has tc listen to, it would be easy for
him to get down on himself, but not William. He has a great sense of humor. And he'E beginning to develop a great
touch for the end zone."


When you take the place of a legend, you can feel out of place.
Vinny Testaverde, the quarterback of the Miami Hurricanes, may have felt a little bit like that at the start of the college football season.
He replaced Bernie Kosar, the textbook passer who took Miami
to the National Championship a couple of years ago with a fantastic finale in the Orange Bowl against Nebraska.
Kosar had another year of eligibility left at Miami, but took some hurry-up courses to get his degree and turned pro. He is with the Cleveland Browns.
Testaverde's debut this year was a losing one. Miami lost its opener to Florida. The
Hurricanes have won seven games in a row since then, and are taking shape as a prime candidate for a big bowl game.
Testaverde is one of the leaders in passing among the major colleges. He has thrown 18 touchdowns passes in eight games, an average of better than two a contest. His aerials have gained 23,038 yards. He can go long, short, in between, outside and over the middle. He is big enough and tough enough to stand up to furious pass rushes.
Best of all, in the eyes of the Miami players, coaches, and
fans, Vinny has emerged as a team leader. Head Coach Jimmy Johnson says the players and the coaches have unlimited confidence in him. The pro scouts are beginning to feel the same way. One small problem: He is a junior, and will not be eligible for the draft until 1987.


list. The Lion's leading
receiver this season broke this collar bone in the fourth quarter of Sunday's 16-13 loss to the Minnesota Vikings.


Chadwick has 25 catches for 478 yards and three touchdowns. Detroit filled the roster spot
by re-signing second-year receiver Carl Bland.


NHL standings
Wales Conference
Patrick Division


(UPI)- What a difference a half
makes. After a lethargic first half last night, the St. Louis Cardinals stormed back to upset the Dallas Cowboys 21-10 at Busch Stadium.
St. Louis tallied all of its points in the second half and took a 14-10 lead on Earl Farrell's eight-yard run in the third quarter. Neil Lomax's second touchdown pass of the night, a nine-yard toss to J.T. Smith in the final period, completed the St. Louis rally.
Dallas led 10-0 at halftime on a Danny White touchdown pass and Rafael Septien's field goal. The Cardinals improved to 4-5 in the NFC East, while 6-3 Dallas fell into a tie for first-place with the New York Giants.
Keith Fahnhorst says he will show up for the San Francisco 49ers practice tomorrow. The
offensive tackle staged a one-day walkout yesterday over not starting Sunday's game against the Philadelphia Eagles. Coach Bill Walsh says he just forgot to tell Fahnhorst that he would be replaced for the Eagles' opening play. Fahnhorst says he expects a fine although Walsh has not said there would be one.
Starting quarterback Dieter Brock of the 8-1 Los Angeles Rams will miss Sunday's game against the New York Giants in East Rutherford, N.J. The 34year-old NFL rookie underwent "minor" surgery yesterday for
removal of a kidney stone. Jeff Kemp, last season's number-one quarterback, will start in place of Brock. Eric Dickerson says he
will be ready for the Giants game. The running back sprained his ankle Sunday in the Rams 28-10 win over New Orleans. The Detroit Lions have replaced wide receiver Jeff Chadwick on the injured reserve


V L T PTS
9 2 0 18 6 5 0 12 5 5 2 12 5 4 1 11 5 5 1 11 3 6 3 9 Adams Division
8 2 1 17 8 3 1 17 6 5 1 13 6 5 0 12 4 6 1 9 Campbell Conference Norris Division
4 4 2' 10 4 6 1 9 3 6 2 8 1 8 3 5 1 10 0 2
Smythe Division
9 2 0 18 6 4 2 14 6 5 1 13 6 5 0 12 3 10 0 6


Penn State moves to number-one slot


(UPI)-- There is a new number-one college football team. Penn State moved up a notch in this week's Top 20 list released yesterday by the UPI Board of Coaches. Joe Paterno's Nittery Lions earned 34 of 42 first place votes and 600 points to become this season's fourth top-rated team.
Penn State stayed unbeaten on Saturday by pulling out a 16-12 victory over Boston College. The Nittery Lions have yet to overpower an opponent, but they are now number-one for the first time since their championship season in 1982. Hayden Fry's Iowa team held the premier spot


for the last five weeks but sank to number-six after its 22-13 upset loss to Ohio State. The Buckeyes vaulted from seventh to third while Nebraska moved up a notch to number-two.
Air Force rose two spots to fourth and the Oklahoma Sooners leaped from eighth to fifth. After Iowa, the rest of the first 10 spots finds Miami of Florida jumping from twelfth to seventh, Baylor is eighth, the Michigan Wolverines luckily escaped with a tie against Illinois on Saturday and tumbled from number-four to ninth and the Arkansas Razorbacks inched up a spot to tenth.


4 Daily Gazette Tuesday, November 5, 1985


Philadelphia New York Rangers Washington New York Islanders New Jersey Pittsburgh

Boston Quebec Buffalo Hartford Montreal


St. Louis Chicago Minnesota
-Detroit Toronto

Edmonton Vancouver Winnipeg Calgary Los Angeles


0


NBA standings

Eastern Conference

Atlantic Division

V L PCT GB
Boston 4 1 .800 New Jersey 3 3 .500 1 1/2 Washington 2 2 .500 1 1/2 Philadelphia 2 3 .400 2 New York 0 5 .000 4

Central Division

Detroit 4 2 .667 Milwaukee 4 2 .667 Chicago 3 2 .600 1/2 Atlanta 2 3 .400 1 1/2 Indiana 1 3 .250 2 Cleveland 1 4 .200 2 1/2

Western Conference

Midwest Division

Denver 4 0 1.000 Houston 3 2 .600 1 1/2 Dallas 2 2 .500 2 San Antonio 2 3 .400 2 1/2 Utah 2 3 .400 2 1/2 Sacramento 1 3 .250 3

Pacific Division

Los Angeles Clippers 5 0 1.000 Los Angeles Lakers 4 0 1.000 1/2 Portland 4 1 .800 1 Seattle 1 3 .250 3 1/2 Golden State 1 4 .200 4 Phoenix 0 4 .000 4 1/2




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DAILY GA ZETTE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Vol. 41 -No. 212 -U.S. Navy's only shore-based daily newspaper -Tuesday, November 5, 1985 Espionage game gets bizarre, spy claims U.S. drugged him (UPI) -The KGB official who headed Soviet spying in the United States has thrown a bizarre element into what is already been a busy year in the international espionage game. Vitaly Yurchenko claims he was abducted by unknown assailants in Rome, spirited to the United States and drugged for three months. The State Department denies Yurchenko's claim. It says he cannot leave the United States until U.S. officials are convinced he really wants to return to the Soviet Union. Spokesman Charles Redman repeated U.S. claims Yurchenko voluntarily defected at the U.S. Embassy in Rome August 1 and requested asylum in the United States. Redman says Yurchenko signed a statement to that effect, and the request was granted. He says the man believed to be the number-five officer in the KGB has cooperated fully with the CIA since his arrival in America August 2. Yurchenko said yesterday in the Soviet Embassy he was forcibly held outside of Washington until his escape Saturday. He says he was subjected to three months of drug treatment and interrogation. Judge orders rail strikers back to work (UPI) -Some 700 striking railworkers say they will return to work at the Boston and Maine Railroad this morning, but only because of a judge's order to do so. Trainsmen, conductors and yardworkers began a wildcat strike yesterday. Twenty-five thousands commuters in the Boston area were stranded during the morning rush-hour. The Boston and Maine provides rail 'vice in the Boston-area under tract to the Massachusetts y Transportation Authority. A spokesman for the authority says all trains are expected to run normally today. The United Transportation Union says a central issue is safety procedures at construction sites along the tracks. Approximately 68 Cubans workers as they passed pass through the North through the North East East Gate to work at the Gate. He said he wanted to Naval Base. They make the personally meet all the treck from Communist Cuba commuters at one time. each morning and evening, They have my greatest five days a week. Captain admiration and respect,' Condon, COMNAVBASE, was on said Captain Condos. hand at 6 a.m. yesterday (Photo by Jo2 Neil to meet and greet the Guillebeau) NEX needs paper manager Many Guantanamo residents are beginning to question whether they will ever see the daily papers they expressed interest in only a few weeks ago. "The hitch," explained Larry Corcran of the Navy Exchange, "is in getting someone to be the paper manager. We have advertised the position but have had no takers." "The issue is too important to let it die at this point," said Base Public Affairs Officer Lt. Cmdr. Rick Fisher. That is why I'm putting the weight of the Gazette behind it." It was Fisher who first introduced the idea and made contact with the Norfolk vender. "I still think we can do it, and I hope to have the papers coming daily by the end of the month," said Fisher. To assist the VEX, the Gazette asks anyone interested in the job of paper manager to contact Larry Corcran, 3103 or 4308. We will keep you posted in the Gazette. from around the globe. (UPI) -That whale which swam up a river in California and did not know where it was going has finally found the right direction, back home to the Pacific Ocean. The whale called Humphrey swam blithely through the foggy Golden Gate to e cheers of spectators yesterday. He had been nded far upstream nearly a month. (UPI) -President Reagan has sent word to the Soviet Union that the aim of his futuristic "Star Wars" program is not a grab for nuclear superiority, but rather a global insurance policy to maintain world peace. He said in an interview with Soviet journalists it is a protection for the world against "some madman" bent on nuclear blackmail. (UPI) -The Supreme Court will hear oral arguments today in abortion cases from Illinois and Pennsylvania. Both states have passed laws regulating abortion which lower courts ruled were not constitutional. The Justice Department has taken the unusual step of asking the court to return the authority to regulate abortion to the states. Many see such a step as tantamount to banning abortion. (UPI) -A federal judge in Reno, Nev., granted a reprieve yesterday to 32-year-old Jimmy Neuschafer, convicted of killing two teenage girls and strangling a fellow inmate after his conviction. Neuschafer was scheduled to be executed early today but the judge said he was required to determine whether a confession to killing the prison inmate was valid. Neuschafer contends he was without counsel when he confessed to prison officials. (UPI) -A 10-week-old girl has become the world's youngest person to get a liver transplant. She is Christine Holy of Fort Wayne, Ind. The operation was performed in a St. Louis hospital. Tonight's Open Line Watch Open Line tonight at 7 p.m. as Capt. John Condon, COMNAVBASE, joins Lt. Cmdr. Rick Fischer and his guests Lt. Cmdr. Sid Barrera and Lt. Roger Gozum for a 90 minute show. The topic for discussion will be the Commissary. See page 3 for the story. The Caribbean Naval Lodge held their annual Masonic picnic at Kittery Beach Sunday. These people line up to be served barbequed pig and covered dish treats. (Photo by PHI Glenn Davis) No more "special flights," buy ticket ahead of time As of November 1985, "Special Flights" (Christmas, Easter, Summer flights) are no longer available. The Department of Defense has directed that this base will only be provided air transportation in accordance with applicable instructions. The special Easter, Christmas and Summer C-9 flights which were the result of unauthorized airlift requests will no longer be available. The Military Airlift Command (MAC) will, if demand justifies, support the peak periods of holiday travel by providing larger or additional aircraft. Here is information concerning MAC flights for the Christmas leave period (Dec. 13, 1985 to Jan. 13, 1986): *** Tickets purchased will be non-refundable if the passenger elects to travel space available/EML on opportune military aircraft during this time frame. *** Recommend purchasing round trip tickets as soon as possible to confirm seats. *** PSD Transportation (Bldg. 800) has expanded operating hours to Monday through Thursday (8 a.m. to 5 p.m.) and Friday (8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.) Watch the Daily Gazette for further flight information. o'

PAGE 2

For your information. EEO Special Emphasis Committee -The EEO a mphiasiCommittee hold a social meeting ;ovember 7, Thurdav, 2:30 0.m., PWD Confe ence Room, Celection of officer for black Hitocv Celebration Month. For more information, call Bettve Martin, 4612. Vietnam Vets -Anyone interested in starting a Vietnam Vets Rap Group? If you have a need to talk about combat related experiences because they effect you, your job, your loved ones and many other parts of your life, please contact John at 3311 AWH. School Advisory Committee Meeting -There will be a meeting of the W.T. Sampson Elementary School Advisory Committee (ESAC) on November 6, Wednesday, 3 p.m., room B-10, elementary school. The purpose of the advisory committee is to research and provide advice to the school on matters which impact on the quality of education in the school. The meeting is open to the public. Anyone who has a suggestion or concern should contact one of the following members: Issy Gallen, Karen Head, David Ford, Janice Castro, Betsy Wall, Mary Huffington, or Maryann Houston. Nature Walk -On November 9, Saturday, 8:30 a.m., a group of nature lovers will meet at Windmill Beach's big cabanna. From there we will stroll to the Nature Trail and continue our walk for about 45 minutes along the dirt road and off onto the grassy plateau overlooking the ocean. Come join us to share information about the flea and fauna along the trail. With sneakers, sunglasses, caps, shorts or slacks and shirts, you should be comfortable. Call 2776 or 2437, if you plan to attend. We would not want to walk off without you. Spouse Information Seminar: -An orientation for military and civilian dependents will be held on November 13 and 15, from 6:30 -9:15 p.m., in the Family Service Center Training Room. Free child care will be available. For more information, call the Command Career Counselor or Family Service Center, 4141/4153. Navy Campus Free Spanish Classes -AFRTS is running Spanish for the Caribbean, for the community personnel who cannot attend classes. These are provided by the Defense Language Institute in Monterey, Calif. Call Navy Campus, if you want to listen to the tapes for these classes, 4769. College Degree -If you have the desire and determination to acquire a recognized college degree, but have been unable to stay in one place long enough to meet the usual residency and course requirements of other schools, then the New York Regents may be just the program for you. There are other schools as well that you can work with to complete that long awaited degree. Call Navy Campus, 4769, for more information. Treasure and Trivia -Store hours return to the regular time, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Thursday and Saturday. There is a special buy on ladies' slacks this week, two pair for $1. Come and choose from our large selection of cotton or polyester pants and renew your wardrobe for that upcoming winter trip stateside. Have a November birthday? Present something with your birthdate on it and take advantage of our $2 Birthday Bag. Reflex Photo Club -The Reflex Photo Club is holding their monthly meeting November 6, Wednesday, 7 p.m., Hobby Land. All members are urged to attend or call in for dues and information on upcoming events. The community is invited to attend. Call Mike, 2572 DWH or Dave, 2144 AWH. Great Pumpkin Photos Due to the large request for color photos of the Great Pumpkin, at SATCOM, that were sold at the Christmas Bazaar, the Reflex Photo Club is taking orders for those unable to attend the Bazaar. The photo is an 8"x10" for $4.75, with a frame for an extra $1. Call Mike LaMendola, 2872 DWH (only), or Dave Ford, 7219 DWH. NSGA/COOL" Wives Club The NSGA/CO"L" Wives Club will have a meeting November 7, Thursday, 7 p.m., Radio Point 307, Donna Wilson, 4603. All women of the command, both active duty and dependent, are invited to attend. DAILY GAZETTE U.S. Navy's Only Shore-based Daily Newspaper Capt. John Condon, USN .Ccmander, U.S. Naval Base Lt. Ondr. Rick Fischer, USN .Public Affairs Officer J02 Neil Guillebeau, USN .Asst. PAO/Managing Editor JO3 Teri Thomas, USN .Assistant Editor Mrs. Susan Junkins .Secretary/Associate Editor Mrs. Ann-Elizabeth Efiroff .Production Assistant SA Vicki Strickland.Staff Assistant The Daily Gazette is published according to the rules and regulations tar snip and station newspapers, under the direction of the public affairs officer. The Daily Gazette is printed five times a week at government expense on government equipment, at the Navy Publications and Printing Service Branch Office. The opinions and statements that appear herein are not to be construed as official, or as the official views of the Navy Department or Commander, U.S. Naval Base. We encourage you to participate. Your voice, your ideas. .your newspaper! By all means, we encourage you to participate in the Daily Gazette. Do you have a good suggestion, a cooiaint or a strong opinion about a certain issue? Well then, write a letter to the editor (Stop 53). Are you en aspiring journalist and want to write a story? Please, let us know what is on your mind. And if you COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD Wednesday's agenda. 1 to 3 a.m. -Wild Animal Control, Cuban Trailer Park and Gold Hill Towers area. 6:30 a.m. -Catholic Mass at Base Chapel. 8:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. -Live Firing, VC-10. 9 a.m. -Deadline for deparment heads to submit daily muster report to admin office. 3 p.m. -W.T. Sampson Elementary School Advisory Committee, B-10 at elementary school. 3 p.m. -Leeward Point E-6 Association, E-6 Association Hut, 6531 DWH or 6232 DWH. 4:30 p.m. -Caribbean Arts and Crafts Association, old high school, 2989 AWH. 6:30 p.m. -Cub Scout Pack 401 Den 2 meets at Morin Center. 7 p.m. -Reflex Photo Club, Hobbyland, 2872 DWH or 2144 AWH. New library books (rerun) 1. "Ten Philosophical Mistakes," by Montier J. Adler. 2. "The Further Prophecies Of Nostradamus," by Erika Cheetham. 3. "The Last Taboo," by Carole Phillips. 4. If I'm Successful, Why Do I Feel Like A Fake," by Joan Harvey. 5. "Careers In Secret Operations," by David A. Phillips. 6. "The Common Sense," by Peter G. Miller. 7. "Every Woman' Guide To Military Service," by Texe Marrs. 8. "Command Under Sail," by James Bradford. 9. "Man-Of-War Life," by Charles Nordoff. 10. "Not My Kid," by Beth Poison. Listen to books New! New! "Listen for Pleasure." The Library has a selection of library-bound cassette tapes of classics and award-winning books. Choose from: 1. "Little Women," by Louisa Alcott, read by Carol Drinkwater. 2. "Fairy Tales," by Hans Christian Anderson, read by Wendy Craig. 3. "Emma," by Jane Austen, read by Dame Peggy Ashcroft. 4. "Pride And Prejudice," by Jane Austen, read by Celia Johnson. 5. "Peter Pan," by Jim Barrie, read by Wendy Craig. 6. "The Wizard Of Oz," by Frank Baum, read by Stephen Moore. 7. "Jane Eyre," by Charlotte Bronte, read by Dame Wendy Hiller. 8. "Wuthering Heights," by Emily Bronte, read by Daniel Massey. 9. "The Secret Garden," by Frances Hodgson Burnett, read by Gwen Watford. 10. "The Canterbury Tales," by Geoffrey Chauser, read by Prunella Scales. 11. "A Murder In The Mews," by Agatha Christie, read by Nigel Hawthorne. 12. "Letters From America," by Alistair Cooke, read by Alistair Cooke. 13. "Great Expectations," by Charles Dickens, read by Anton Rodgers. have a special black and white photograph you would like to see in print, bring it by our office. The Daily Gazette staff is in Building 760 (Admin Hill) ano we are open from at least midnight to 4:30 p.m., Sunday night to Friday afternoon. If we can help you in any way, give us a call at extension 4819 or 4502. We are good and getting better. With your help, we will be the best newspaper in the Navy! 11. "Nut-Cracker," by Shana Alexander. 12. "Outlaws Of The Ocean," by G.O.V. Mueller. 13. "The Ultimate Violation," by Judith Rowland. 14. "Guinnes Book Of Speed/Facts And Feats," by Bill Guston. 15. Rock And Minerals," by Pat Bell. 16. A Guide To Enjoying Wildflowers," by Donald Stokes. 17. "Running Without Fear," by Dr. Kenneth Cooper. 18. The Complete Sport Medicine Book For Women," by Mona Shangold. 7 p.m. -Leeward Point Community Meeting, Leeward Point Community Center. 7:30 p.m. -Iguana Video Club, Naval Station Training Room, 4448 AT. 8 p.m. -MOVIES -COMO, Purple Rose of Cair Windjammer, "Cal;" CPO, "Into the Night;" Downtown, "The Far Pavilions;" McCalla, "A Test of Love;" Marine, "Lost In America;" Leeward, "The Cotton Club." *** Needle Craft classes begin Wednesday, 3241 or 3845. *** If you have notes of interest for the community, submit them into writing (Attention: Agenda) to the Daily Gazette (Stop 53), Bldg. 760 (Admin Hill). Please include event, date and time of event, place of event and phone number for further information. We're closing in an a killer. leukemia society of america Wardroom annex hours All officers and civilian equivalent are welcome at the COM Wardroom Annex. Bring the family! A breakfast buffet will be available on Saturday mornings. COM Wardroom Annex Hours Monday Breakfast 6:00 a.m. -8:00 a.m. Lunch 11:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. Dinner 5:00 p.m. -7:00 p.m. Tuesday -Friday Breakfast 6:00 a.m. -8:00 a.m. Tuesday -Thursday Dinner 5:00 p.m. -7:00 p.m. Saturday Brunch 7:00 a.m. -Noon Sunday Breakfast 7:00 a.m. -9:00 a.m. Spouse information seminar Family Service r aininig Room November 13 and 15 6:30 -9:15p.m. Wednesday, 13 November 1985 6:30-6:45 p.m. Introduction by CAPT D. MacPherson 6:45-7:00 p.m. Opening by NCC Parr, Command Career Counselor & Introducing Command Master Chief Summerlin and Family Ombudsmen 7:00-7:25 p.m. Public Affairs Office Base Slide Presentation 7:25-7:35 p.m. TV-8 and Radio Functions and Programs 7:35-7:50 p.m. Navy Exchange/Commissary 7:50-8:00 p.m. Break 8:00-8:15 p.m. Marine Corps Exchange 8:15-8:30 p.m. R & R Flights 8:30-9:00 p.m. Recreational Services: Tour and Travel Office, Child Development Center, Youth and Teen Programs 9:00-9:15 p.m. Navy Relief/Chaplains Office Friday, 15 November 1985 Ad 6:30-6:40 p.m. Family Service Center 6:40-6:50 p.m. Red Cross 6:50-7:00 p.m. Veterinary Clinic 7:00-7:15 p.m. Hospital 7:15-7:30 p.m. Dental 7:30-7:40 p.m. Household Goods 7:40-7:50 p.m. Base Security 7:50-8:00 p.m. Break 8:00-8:15 p.m. Civil Service Employment Opportunities 8:15-8:30 p.m. Survivors Benefit Plans for Military/Civil Service Dependents 8:30-8:45 p.m. Local Educational Opportunities for Dependents 8:45-9:00 p.m. Fleet Branch Post Office 9:00-9:15 p.m. Closing Remarks by LCDR T. G. Briggs Free Child Care Available For seminar registration and free child care, call the Family Service Center at 4141/4153. Daily Gazette Tuesday, November 5, 1985

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3--THIS 'N THAT -In Paris -Art theft of the century By Ken Likes Who were the robbers? And why did they do it? These are the two big questions in what some are calling "The art theft of the century." The unsolved theft of nine ,riceless paintings from Paris' rmottan Museum. It was a quiet Sunday morning a week ago, when five men invaded the Marmottan Museum in a fashionable Paris neighborhood are removed nine impressionist masterpieces from the walls. Two of the men bought tickets as visitors. They then whipped out high-caliber revolvers and forced the nine unarmed guards and 40 visitors to lie on the floor. Three others gathered the paintings of their choice. They stuffed them into a car and sped away. The whole operation took only five minutes. Witnesses said the gunmen were between the ages of 30 and 40, of European origin, and of adium height and weight. They ad no particular distinguishing characteristics. None wore a mask. A week has passed, and there is no word that a worldwide search for the paintings has made any progress. Police say no motive is being ruled out, and they are working on several theories. The paintings are so well-known that sale would be Clean houses, safer houses Cleaning time is here again. Remember, a clean house is a safer house. The NAVSTA Fire Department reminds you that trash, boxes, piles of clothes and other combustibles in the home are fuel for a fire. Getting rid of them will help reduce the chance of fire in your home. Clean out storage areas such as garages, attics, closets, sheds and basements on a regular basis. Even warehouses are limited to the amount of storage they can safely keep. Do not allow areas in your home to become tempting fuel for a fire. Throw away or give away items you are no longer using. Clutter gives fire a place to start and creates obstacles that might prevent escaping safely. Oily rags can ignite without a heat source because they produce their own heat. Throw them out or store them in a closed, metal container. This includes dusting rags used with a furniture polish or spray. AUTOS '684W Beetle, excellent condition, any new parts, must see to ppreciate, $2000 or best offer. Ball Chief Way at 6346 DWH or 6259 AWH. '80 Toyota 2-door liftback, a/c, AM/FN, just passed inspection, great little car, $3000 or best offer. Come see. Call 4743 AT. '74 AMC Matador, new inspection. Call 4588. '77 Chevy Caprice Classic, 4-door, 8 cyl., 305 engine, mechanically maintained very well, $1500 or best offer. Call H1 Gilfert at 4396 L1H7 or Gi-If Rxmi C316 AH. GOLF CART Che golf cart, excellent batteries, (will play 36), spare tire and charger, $600 firm. Call 6267 DH o 3190 AM. unlikely on the legitimate art market. However, the works are worth millions of dollars. They include five Monets and two Renoirs. There have been art thefts in the past in which insurance companies were blackmailed into paying to have works returned. These paintings were not insured, however. As for demanding ransom from the government, culture minister Jack Lang has declared, "France will not yield to blackmail." Some officials of the international police organization, Interpol, believe that recent art thefts, and possibley this one, were organized by political groups. In this theory, the priceless works would be held to be exchanged should one of their members be apprehended or another emergency occur. The police stress, though, that this is just a theory. The thieves have not been identified. The robbery of the Marmottan remains a mystery. What makes members stay? By Donna Bolinger (AFPS) -Which of the following statements best describes how you feel about your job? --Completely satisfied --Well satisfied --Neither satisfied or dissatisfied -A little dissatisfied --Very dissatisfied This question is typical of those asked of service members through surveys that assess their satisfaction with the military. More than one-third of first-term enlistees leave the military before finishing their term of service, and another one-third do not reenlist after completing their first term, according to a DoD study. Determining why these groups leave has become DoD's first step in enticing the best and brightest recruits to stay, forming the basis of a quality career force. Fortunately, studies show, those who stay generally are among the highest quality recruits. Those who leave the military before their initial enlistments are completed are the lowest quality; and those who leave at the end of their first enlistment represent a mixture of the highest and lowest quality-representatives of the cross-section of new enlistees. The group that reenlists meets or exceeds reenlistment standards based on on-the-job performance, education and scores on generalized ability tests. So what is it, DoD officials ask, that makes these quality service members decide to stay? Dozens of government and private studies have come up with a list of factors, some work related, others personal, that affect retention. These include rewards--both monetary and psychological--expectations about military life, and such personal attributes as schooling, mental aptitude, and demographic and personality characteristics. Other factors include working conditions and the availability of a way to Potpourri & Grab ctr'84 Honda Aero 80, $850. Available now. Call Father ibMahon at 4550 D M or 2923 AWH. BOATS Onr 19' pontoon boat with Johnson 33hp outboard motor, trailer included. Like new, must ace to appreciate, $2000 0 best offer. Call Chief Way at 6346 DWH or 6259 Al1H. SCUBA GEAR One Seaquest BC, $35; one Decor BC, $25. Like new. Call 4502 DHo or 3190 IH. CLOTHING navy blue 3-piece men' suner suit, the pants vre 32x34, very nice, $40. Call 3169 AT. resolve disputes between individuals and their supervisors. The significance of pay in a service member's decision to remain in uniform isn't certain. Some studies indicate that pay is the main reason people leave the military; others show that pay is of secondary importance, and yet others show that the importance of pay varies during the course of a military career. The complexity of the military compensation program makes its influence difficult to assess. When calculating military pay, service members must consider base pay plus a variety of special and incentive payments, including special duty assignment pay, reenlistment bonuses, allowances and retirement pay benefits. Studies show that this calculation is so complicated that service members consistently undervalue their military pay. Even if a sizable bonus is paid, a service member is likely to undervalue it if it's paid by installments rather than as a lump sun. A new recruit's background, education and family situation appear to have an effect as well. Studies show service members are most likely to leave military service if they: --have a history of anti-social behavior, legal difficulties or poor psychological adjustment (these individuals are likely to do as poorly in the service as in civilian life); --lack a high school diploma--those who are unsuccessful at seeing their high school studies through to completion also tend to be unsuccessful at seeing their military service through to completion; --have a spouse and dependent children; --enlist before age 18. CAREER -The Saler ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT JVC' sRX500B with wireless remote control, 100w/channel, Kenwood' KX00RB, bi-directional, music search o repeat, both in excellent condition. Will sell both for $400. Call Paul at 3200 or 3065. Beach ghetto blaster, detachable speakers, tape player, /1MVR4 stereo, portable. Best offer. Call HT1 Gilfert at 496 DM or CHHaPm C316 Al7H. PETS Need to find a gocd home for a two year old male, Sibeian iLakv, AKC registered. Also, a seven xeth old "GTDi Special" puppy. Gcxod watch dog ad vvaffectionate. For further detail,, call JAet at 2345 0H1 or 35331A:,11. Local job market Central Fidelity Bank Central Fidelity Bank has an mediate opening for a part-time teller. Experience preferred, but not required. MCX job The Marine Corps Exchange has the following position available. Applications will be accepted until 11:30 a.m. November 8. a. Sales Clerk, P5-2091-2, part-time position (required to work up to a maximum of 39 hours per week); three required. For further information and a copy of the position description, please contact the Marine Corps Exchange secretary (Bldg. M-613) or phone 2330/2570. NBCPO jobs U.S. NON-U.S. CITIZEN JOB VACANCIES AT NBCPO: Applications should be submitted to the Naval Base Civilian Personnel Office by the close of business November 12. Additional information concerning these vacancies may be obtained at the Naval Base Civilian Personnel Office or by reviewing Vacancy Announcements posted on official bulletin boards. ANN. NO. POSITION AND TITLE LOCATION NAF-80-85 192-85-B 235-85 236-85 NAF-57-85-C 237-85 23-85 Cashier, AS-530-05 Boilenmaking Worker, LG-380-08 Transportation Clerk (Typing), GS/LGS-2102-04 Library Aid, GS/GS-1411-02 Identification Checker, PS-0085-01 Clerk-Typist, GS-322-04 TEMP,at to exceed 16 May 86 Sandblaster Helper, LG-5423-05 CCMO Club SIMA NAS Admin Dept. Leeward Pt. CO Mess Navy Eroadcasting Service Detacent SIMA POSITION AND GRADES Sales Clerk P/T PS-1/$3.66 leading to PS-2/$3.99 or LGS-2 $2.75 leading to LGS-3/$3.42 Identification Checker F/T P-1/$3.66 or LPS-2/$2.75 Head Sales Clerk F/T PS-5/$4.84 or 1S-4/$4.08 Food Service Brker F/T NA-1/$3.57 or LWG-1/$2.30 Cashier/Checker F/T PS-2/$3.99 or LGS-2/$2.75 Warehouse Worker P/T (2 required) DEPT NA-4/$4.63 or E11G-4/$3.27 Facilities Services Order Clerk P/T AS-3/$4.37 or L.GS-2/$2.75 (Typing) Vbtor Vehicle Operator (Courier) P/T NA-4/$4.63 or 10S-2/$2.75 Customer Services Clerk F/T PS-4/$4.54 or LGS-3/$3.42 Invoice Audit Clerk F/T AS-4/$4.68 or LOS-4/$4.08 Janitor F/T NA-1/$3.57 or 1G-1/$2.30 The Commissary Store Officer and Navy Exchange Officer billets have been merged to form a new billet of resale officer-in-charge (OIC). The officer filling this billet will be responsible for the overall management of both the commissary and exchange. The Navy Exchanges have been realigned under the Naval Supply Systems Command. This restructuring took effect October 1. Lt. Cmdr. Sid Barrera now fills this billet. This resource driven decision makes 71 military officers, assigned to commissary program billets, available to fill officer fleet requirements as the Navy grows to a 600-ship Navy. The resale OIC also provides for a continuation of the required military officer leadership for the enlisted AIR CONDITIONERS Sears Kenmore 12,000 BTU, runs great, energy saver, $250; Seers Kenxre 21,000 BTU, like :nw, energy saver, $500; GE 11,800 BTU, six months old, energy save and sleep exde, $300. All available ikvunber 27-December 5. Call Chief Way at 6,i46 DiH r 6259 VIH. One 18,00 BTU, $30011,000 ITU, $200; 8,000 BTU,$00. All cool excellently. Available durineweek of December 13. Call 1502 111 or 3190 AWIH. SERVICES I will perform magic shows for whatever the oenaein amy be. Just call 2184 aud uak for Role cr Klli fcr infonatice ad appoi:5innt. CLOSING LOCATION OPEN RETAIL STORE MINI MART OPEN MINI MART OPEN RETAIL STORE OPEN OPEN November 14 SIOPLICHT INN STOPLIGHT INN WARE110USE November 6 MAINT. DEFT OPEN OPEN OPEN PERSONALIZED SERVICES RETAIL. STORE SERVICE DESK ACCOUNTING OPEN NAVY LDGE personnel serving in the Navy Commissary Program. The Naval Supply Systems Command was directed by the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations to implement this change. Navy officials anticipate a continuation of quality service to exchange and commissary customers as a result of the restructurine. Here are a few questions and answers for additional information of this change. Q.1. What will be the relationship of the Exchange to the local command? The Navy Exchange will become a tenant activity of the local command. However, in terms of service and response to the local command, any change would be imperceptible. The primary vision of the Exchange is to be fully responsive to the needs of the local commanding officer in support of his pe sonnel. Q.2. How many Navy Exchanges and Commissaries ae there in operation? Thee e -e 136 Exchanges providing service to Navy people, 99 inConus and 37 overseas. Commissaries total 79; 61 in Coue and 18 overseas. WANTED Pony Express nods a vocalist who plays guitar or keyboard. John ikwed will :xt '-asily be replaced, but we lst try. If you e 'oedy to move up to n active w ki:xg babe, call Rick at 4502 0H. tady tw-eplace me in 9 a.m. t ay Lriesl eling Lgue. G at team. Good fun. Plus, your fi -t end lstwo genes of this econ ae paid by me. Plea recall 4743 AT. 3 Daily Gazette Tuesday, November 5, 1985 NEX jobs The Navy Exchange has the following job openings. Please contact the Personnel Office at Bldg. AV-34, NcCalla Hill, or phone 4348/4508. Barrera now in charge of commissary

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NFL standings American Conference East W L T PCT PF PA New York Jets 7 2 0 .778 208 135 New England 6 3 0 .667 173 156 Miami 5 4 0 .556 220 194 Indianapolis 3 6 0 .333 172 204 Buffalo 1 8 0 .111 121 216 Central Cleveland 4 5 0 .444 150 132 Cincinnati 4 5 0 .444 260 278 Pittsburgh 4 5 0 .444 183 153 Houston 4 5 0 .444 162 185 West Denver 6 3 0 .667 219 181 Los Angeles Raiders 6 3 0 .667 196 187 Seattle 5 4 0 .556 221 202 San Diego 4 5 0 .444 220 231 Kansas City 3 6 0 .333 171 204 National Conference East Dallas 6 3 0 .667 207 146 New York Giants 6 3 0 .667 203 151 Washington 5 4 0 .556 158 168 Philadelphia 4 5 0 .444 136 145 St. Louis 4 5 0 .444 186 216 Central Chicago 9 0 0 1.000 255 124 Minnesota 5 4 0 .556 183 180 Detroit 5 4 0 .556 170 196 Green Bay 3 6 0 .333 164 216 Tampa Bay 0 9 0 .000 184 272 West Los Angeles Rams 8 1 0 .889 191 127 San Francisco 5 4 0 .556 228 167 New Orleans 3 6 0 .333 173 235 Atlanta 1 8 0 .111 171 284 Local Jamaican Cultural and Recreation Committee The Jamaican Cultural and Recreation Committee is inviting all cricketers and soccer players, to an important meeting November 10, Sunday, 4 p.m., Cultural Center. For more information, call D. Wallace, 4577/4004. sports Yacht Club -The Yacht Club Social Night will be held November 10, Sunday, 5:30 p.m. There will be a movie following the meal. Please plan to come and bring a hot dish or a side dish to have a Thanksgiving meal. All GTMO residents are invited. The Sportsman By Charles Morey Who would you take one-on-one, "Humphrey the Whale" or "William the 'Frigerator?"' It is hypothetical, of course. Humphrey is a denizen of the deep who has been making headlines with his spouting and swimming in the Sacramento River, which he entered from the Pacific Ocean. William, whose name is Perry, is a 307-pound defensive tackle who has been moonlighting at fullback for the Chicago Bears and making enemy defenders see stars. Humphrey was out of his element in the river, but proved to be a show-stopper for thousands of people who lined the banks of the waterway to watch him frolic and spout. He also bothered naturalists who wanted to get him back into the ocean. William also is out of his element. He got his nickname because of his fondness for food and frequent excursions to the refrigerator. The Bears drafted him as a defensive tackle, and he was close to 350 pounds when they did it. They gave him the carrot-and-stick treatment, and got him to 307. That gave Coach Mike Ditka an idea. He has been using Perry as a fullback in key situations, and it has paid off. He ran the ball in for a touchdown a few weeks ago, and this past Sunday, caught a short pass for a score, as the Bears wore down Green Bay. He also has played some at his natural position, defensive tackle. .This business of using a huge lineman in the backfield is not entirely new, although it has not been done often. Coach Bill Walsh of the San Francisco 49ers shook up a few opposition defenses in the playoffs last year by employing Guy McIntyre, a 275-pound lineman, as a blocking back. He almost put a couple of defensive halfbacks into the front row of the stands. Going back more than 30 years, the Detroit Lions had a 350-pound middleguard named Les Bingaman, who was used on offense a few times. A former general manager of the Lions, Nick Kerbawy, recalled the time Les intercepted a pass on defense. "He ran six yards with the ball and then rolled the remaining four into the end zone," said Kerbawy. Nick added, "Les had great acceleration for one yard." The New York Jets have a bruising defensive end, Mark Gastineau, who is beginning to get a few ideas of his own about carrying the ball. He says that if Jet Coach Joe Walton asks him to carry the ball, he will accept happily. Gastineau has tremendous speed and might be a hard man to contain in short-yardage situations. Chicago running back Walter Payton had this to say about Perry as a ball carrier: "With all the fat jokes he has tc listen to, it would be easy for him to get down on himself, but not William. He has a great sense of humor. And he's beginning to develop a great touch for the end zone." SPORTSWORLD Cardinals storm back to upset Dallas (UPI)What a difference a half makes. After a lethargic first half last night, the St. Louis Cardinals stormed back to upset the Dallas Cowboys 21-10 at Busch Stadium. St. Louis tallied all of its points in the second half and took a 14-10 lead on Earl Farrell's eight-yard run in the third quarter. Neil Lomax's second touchdown pass of the night, a nine-yard toss to J.T. Smith in the final period, completed the St. Louis rally. Dallas led 10-0 at halftime on a Danny White touchdown pass and Rafael Septien's field goal. The Cardinals improved to 4-5 in the NFC East, while 6-3 Dallas fell into a tie for first-place with the New York Giants. Keith Fahnhorst says he will show up for the San Francisco 49ers practice tomorrow. The offensive tackle staged a one-day walkout yesterday over not starting Sunday's game against the Philadelphia Eagles. Coach Bill Walsh says he just forgot to tell Fahnhorst that he would be replaced for the Eagles' opening play. Fahnhorst says he expects a fine although Walsh has not said there would be one. Starting quarterback Dieter Brock of the 8-1 Los Angeles Rams will miss Sunday's game against the New York Giants in East Rutherford, N.J. The 34year-old NFL rookie underwent "minor" surgery yesterday for removal of a kidney stone. Jeff Kemp, last season's number-one quarterback, will start in place of Brock. Eric Dickerson says he will be ready for the Giants game. The running back sprained his ankle Sunday in the Rams 28-10 win over New Orleans. The Detroit Lions have replaced wide receiver Jeff Chadwick on the injured reserve When you take the place of a legend, you can feel out of place. Vinny Testaverde, the quarterback of the Miami Hurricanes, may have felt a little bit like that at the start of the college football season. He replaced Bernie Kosar, the textbook passer who took Miami to the National Championship a couple of years ago with a fantastic finale in the Orange Bowl against Nebraska. Kosar had another year of eligibility left at Miami, but took some hurry-up courses to get his degree and turned pro. He is with the Cleveland Browns. Testaverde's debut this year was a losing one. Miami lost its opener to Florida. The Hurricanes have won seven games in a row since then, and are taking shape as a prime candidate for a big bowl game. Testaverde is one of the leaders in passing among the major colleges. He has thrown 18 touchdowns passes in eight games, an average of better than two a contest. His aerials have gained 23,038 yards. He can go long, short, in between, outside and over the middle. He is big enough and tough enough to stand up to furious pass rushes. Best of all, in the eyes of the Miami players, coaches, and fans, Vinny has emerged as a team leader. Head Coach Jimmy Johnson says the players and the coaches have unlimited confidence in him. The pro scouts are beginning to feel the same way. One small problem: He is a junior, and will not be eligible for the draft until 1987. list. The Lion's leading receiver this season broke this collar bone in the fourth quarter of Sunday's 16-13 loss to the Minnesota Vikings. Chadwick has 25 catches for 478 yards and three touchdowns. Detroit filled the roster spot by re-signing second-year receiver Carl Bland. Philadelphia New York Rangers Washington New York Islanders New Jersey Pittsburgh Boston Quebec Buffalo Hartford Montreal St. Louis Chicago Minnesota -Detroit Toronto Edmonton Vancouver Winnipeg Calgary Los Angeles w L T 9 2 0 6 5 0 5 5 2 5 4 1 5 5 1 3 6 3 Adams Division 8 2 1 8 3 1 6 5 1 6 5 0 4 6 1 Campbell Conference Morris Division 4 4 2 4 6 1 3 6 2 1 8 3 1 10 0 Smythe Division 9 6 6 6 3 2 4 5 5 10 (UPI) -There is a new number-one college football team. Penn State moved up a notch in this week's Top 20 list released yesterday by the UPI Board of Coaches. Joe Paterno's Nittery Lions earned 34 of 42 first place votes and 600 points to become this season's fourth top-rated team. Penn State stayed unbeaten on Saturday by pulling out a 16-12 victory over Boston College. The Nittery Lions have yet to overpower an opponent, but they are now number-one for the first time since their championship season in 1982. Hayden Fry's Iowa team held the premier spot PTS 18 12 12 11 11 9 17 17 13 12 9 10 9 8 5 2 18 14 13 12 6 GF 53 40 44 39 41 43 54 50 43 45 43 35 46 47 35 33 55 50 54 52 47 GA 32 35 44 38 42 51 30 39 35 50 54 41 49 48 41 52 39 41 53 42 68 0 2 0 0 for the last five weeks but sank to number-six after its 22-13 upset loss to Ohio State. The Buckeyes vaulted from seventh to third while Nebraska moved up a notch to number-two. Air Force rose two spots to fourth and the Oklahoma Sooners leaped from eighth to fifth. After Iowa, the rest of the first 10 spots finds Miami of Florida jumping from twelfth to seventh, Baylor is eighth, the Michigan Wolverines luckily escaped with a tie against Illinois on Saturday and tumbled from number-four to ninth and the Arkansas Razorbacks inched up a spot to tenth. S 0 4 Daily Gazette Tuesday, November 5, 1985 NHL standings Wales Conference Patrick Division Penn State moves to number-one slot NBA standings Eastern Conference Atlantic Division W L PCT GB Boston 4 1 .800 New Jersey 3 3 .500 1 1/2 Washington 2 2 .500 1 1/2 Philadelphia 2 3 .400 2 New York 0 5 .000 4 Central Division Detroit 4 2 .667 Milwaukee 4 2 .667 Chicago 3 2 .600 1/2 Atlanta 2 3 .400 1 1/2 Indiana 1 3 .250 2 Cleveland 1 4 .200 2 1/2 Western Conference Midwest Division Denver 4 0 1.000 Houston 3 2 .600 1 1/2 Dallas 2 2 .500 2 San Antonio 2 3 .400 2 1/2 Utah 2 3 .400 2 1/2 Sacramento 1 3 .250 3 Pacific Division Los Angeles Clippers 5 0 1.000 Los Angeles Lakers 4 0 1.000 1/2 Portland 4 1 .800 1 Seattle 1 3 .250 3 1/2 Golden State 1 4 .200 4 Phoenix 0 4 .000 4 1/2