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Daily Gazette

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Title:
Daily Gazette
Alternate Title:
The Daily Gazette
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U.S. Naval Base
Place of Publication:
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Publisher:
U.S. Naval Base
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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Copyright. Daily Gazette. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Preceded by:
Guantanamo Gazette
Succeeded by:
Guantanamo Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Daily Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Bay Gazette
Related Item:
Indian
Related Item:
Sunday Supplement
Related Item:
Gitmo Review
Related Item:
Gitmo Gazette

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GAZETTE


Guantanamo Bay, Cuba




Volume 38 Number 155 Monday, August 15, 1983)

ad-/4cneed


Back to negotiating table, for envoy McFarlane


LEBANON (UPI)--After overnight artillery battles that killed three civilians and wounded six others, Lebanon's rival Christian and Druze militias declared a
cease-fire.

0 Pope visits holy shrine

LOURDES, France (UPI)--Pope John Paul II fulfilled a wish today by celebrating mass at Lourdes, France, one of the holiest Roman
Catholic shrines.
Many Catholics believe that 125
years ago, the Virgin Mary appeared in lourdes to a peasant girl. The town has since gained a reputation as providing miraculous
cures for sick people.
The pope's mass in French today
marks the Feast of Assumption.
Although he visited Lourdes as a Cardinal, the pope says of his trip, "I have so -ardently desired
to make this pilgrimage."
John Paul planned a trip as pope
to Lourdes two years ago, but an attempted assassination in May
1981 forced a delay.

Drug use costs $billions
(UPI)--"Newsweek" magazine says employees using drugs on the job cost the U.S. economy nearly $26
billion a year.
One business leader quoted by
Newsweek calls the drug use "the
* biggest problem in industry today."
Another consultant says "a ton
of cocaine a year is consumed in (California's) Silicon Valley.
Some of the small electronics companies are going under because of
drugs."
More than 4,500 companies
reportedly have set up drug and alcohol abuse programs for their
employees.
The Newsweek article says drug
use is responsible or $16.6 billion a year in lost productivity, over $2 billion in medical expenses, and almost $8 billion for the
cost of crime.


Most of yesterday's shelling took place in the Israeli-occupied mountains, but one shell reportedly landed near the U.S. embassy. No one was injured.
U.S. envoy Robert McFarlane yesterday met with lebanese officials and pledged the full support of the United States.

McFarlane is going to make another attempt to change Syria's opposition to the Lebanese-Israeli troop withdrawal agreement.
According to Lebanon's official national news agency, McFarlane'sdeputy, Richard Fairbanks, will meet in Damascus today with Syria's foreign minister. McFarlane is expected to talk with


Syrian President Hafez Assad on Wednesday.
McFarlane was in Damascus last week, but was not successful in getting support for the troop withdrawal plan.
As McFarlane continues to work on Syria, the situation in Lebanon continues to deteriorate.
Beirut's airport has been closed for five days because of the threat of attack from Druze militiamen. They are demanding the resignation of Lebanon's president and cabinet, and the removal of Lebanese troops from , the Shouf Mountains.
Many Lebanese citizens are fleeing the country by water, fearing another civil war.


De la Madrid 'lectures' Reagan on Central America


(UPI)--President Reagan got a lecture yesterday on Central America. The lecturer was Mexican President Miguel de la Madrid.
Reagan and de la Madrid spoke for three hours in La Paz, Mexico, in California's lower peninsula.
De la Madrid said the show of U.S. military force in and around Central America threatens, "To touch off a conflagration."
De la Madrid insisted that unrest in the region must be
-settled through negotiations. He.-says instability can be overcme only by dealing with its root cause,,Ij;,;a lack of economic and social development.
Reagan replied that U.S. military involvement is needed to stop aggression by what he called the "Soviet-Cuban-Nicaraguan war machine."

One thing Reagan and Madrid did agree on as a new plan to clean up pollution along the Mexican-U.S. border.
The agreement says each country will try to prevent, reduce and eliminate sources of pollution that affect the border area of the other.


The president, who is of- a three-week visit outside of Washington, is in New Orleans this morning. Today he'll speak to the annual covention of the Veterans of Foreign Wars.

Airline workers strike

(UPI)--A spokesman for the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers says Continental Airlines is just bluffing � when--4 -itsays, striking workers who don't show up for their next shift will be replaced.
Will Spurlock, general chairman for the Houston district, says, "That is done in every labor dispute, as a threat to the workers."
Continental spokesman Bruce Hicks announced yesterday the airline will start to permanently replace mechanics who do not report for their next scheduled shift.

About 2,000 mechanics, cabin cleaners and maintenance workers are in their third day of a contract wage dispute with the nation's eighth-largest air carrier.


Moderation key to alcoholism.; zero tolerance on drugs


"You will not use alcohol prior to coming to work or at work, prior to coming on duty or on duty. This includes meal hours during working hours." Taylor said. (Official U.S. Navy photo).


"I'm not here to point fingers, I'm not here to put anybody on report. I'm here to inform and that's my job," said Captain H.A. Taylor, the commanding officer of the Naval Drug Rehabilitation Center at the Naval Air Station Mirimar in San Diego, California.
Captain Taylor has been talking to groups in Guantanamo about the Navy's drug and alcohol programs.
The thrust of the Navy's policy on alcohol is moderation. Drinking is not against the law or regulations.

According to the Navy, the definition of alcohol abuse is, "The use of alcohol to an extent that
(it) has an adverse effect on the user's health or behavior, family, community, or the Navy, or leads to unacceptable behavior as evidenced by an alcohol-related incident or incidents such as DUI (driving under the influence) or fighting."
As Taylor pointed out, this is an unusual definition as health, family, and community take a higher place in the priorities list than the Navy.
That means the Navy is concerned about its sailors. But, concern is not enough. There's "zero tolerance" to be considered. What is


'zero tolerance?" Taylor explained it this way. "Regardless of who you are in the military, especially in the Navy, no matter where you are, you will not abuse alcohol again."
There is help for those who need it and can benefit from it. If a sailor is identified as having an alcohol problem, the sailor's commanding officer can recommend one of four levels of treatment. Levels one and two are counseling, level three is as a patient in a hospital, and level four is seperation from the service.
This is not a hit or miss decision. The CO's decision is based on recommendations by the individual's supervisor, petty officers, and officers.
If the individual can be a productive sailor again, Taylor said, the Navy will put him or her into the program and back to work.
Once is the limit (twice for E5 and above) for treatment for alcohol abuse.
The same applies to drug abuse. Once in a career except for traffickers and E7 and above who will be seperated for a first offense.
The bottom line, according to Taylor, is to get the sailor back to work and make a better and more responsive Navy.


World


News Digest

CHAD (AP)--The French army continued to expand its military presence in Chad over the weekend. It sent a detachment of paratroopers to Chad's forward lines north of the capital. And France plans to send in reinforcements for those troops. However, informed sources are now saying there's been direct diplomatic contact between France and Libya. The Libyans are supporting the rebel forces fighting in northern Chad.

IRELAND (UPI)--American Stephen Lych is expected to take the stand today in his trial in Belfast. The 23-year-old, from Indianapolis is accused of taking part in riots that broke out earlier this week in Northern Ireland on the anniversary of an unpopular British law. Lych was among some 70 people arrested in three days of disturbances. Yesterday, police testified Lych threw stones at them.

POLAND (UPI)--In Gdansk, Poland, the Communist regime cracked down on demonstrators yesterday, the anniversary of the 1980 strike that gave birth to the nowoutlawed Solidarity union. Riot ,police swinging clubs broke up a peaceful march by about 109000 people. Police sources say several dozen were arrested.

WASHINGTON (UPI)--A top Department of Agriculture official says the U.S. comsumer will eventually pay higher food prices because the recent heat wave scorched the corn crop. Deputy Agriculture Secretary Richard Lyng says the heat wave and drought have already pushed up feed prices. That means there'll be less meat available later, and the price will rise.

GUATEMALA (UPI)--Guatemala's deposed president failed to attend services of the Evangelical church yesterday, the first since he was ousted from power in a military coup last Monday. A church member says Efrain Rios Montt, a bornagain Christian, previously attended service almost every Sunday.


Disaster Relief

Fund

Drive

$5 00 $4,000

Collected
$4 000Aso
Today

$3 000


$2 000


$1 000



We'll Help.

WillYou?


Energy Tip of the Day


Try to plan ahead and remove all ingredients for each meal at one time. Every time the door of a refrigerator or freezer is opened, its compressor has to run a bit longer to replace the cold air that spills out.
Discourage leisurely opendoor inspections of the refrigerator's contents by family members looking for
between-meal snacks.







Page 2 The Daily


COUPONSpecial Ann
, COUPON I

NEX LAUNDRY AND DRY CLEANCS pa
| " SERV ICES
I n1
The Naval Statiop Enlist$300 OFFed Dining Facility and | ON A $9.00 ORDER I Branch Facility at
Leeward Point will offer 41 IDRY CLEANING ONLY a special birthday dinner. . I I to all active duty enI RUG�22-27 listed personnel having a birthday during the month
of August. The meal will
consist of Steak and Lobster with all the trimmings and will be
----- served at 5:00 p.m. on Friday, AuAnyone who wants to see the In- gust 26th. Personnel interested spector General can on Aug. 16 be- in participating in this program tween 9 and 11:30 a.m. in the PWD must show evidence of birth date Conference Room. He is a member (I.D. card) to the Enlisted Dinof the NOSHIP Inspection Team. ing Facility MAA no later than Appointments will be scheduled 4:00 p.m. on August 25th. For through the Occupational Safety further information, contact MSC and Health office at 4529/4526. Landingin at 2860, Windward, or MSl Chapa at 6271, Leeward.


The Nursery School office will be opening for the SY83-84 on Aug. 16. The hours will be from 8 a.m. until noon. Any information on registration can be obtained by calling 2159 or by dropping by the school office during business hours. To register, your child must be three or four years of age by Dec. 31. School resumes Sept. 1. The Nursery School is located on Marina Pt.

To better serve the community the Special Services Day Care Center is considering expanding its hours of operation by opening at 6:00 a.m. vice 7:00. If anyone feels there is a need for the Day Care Center to open at 6:00, please contact Ms. Charlene Wilson at 2205 DWH or MCPO I.G. Neal at 2248 DWH or make your wishes known at the Day Care Center front desk.

Treasure & Trivia is located in building #944, the last quonset hut to the right of the Navy Exchange. The hours of operation are 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. on Tuesday, Friday, and the first Saturday of the month.



Club Activities
The next meeting of the Guantanamo Bay Amateur Radio Club will be Monday, Aug. 15, at 7 p.m. at the ham shack, located in hobby land. All hams visiting or stationed at GTMO are invited to attend.

Exchange Notes

The Navy Exchange Beauty Shop has an opening for a licensed hairdresser. Applications can be obtained in the Beauty Shop. For more information, contact Betty or Barbara at 4764 DWH.

The Marine Corps Exchange will be having a jewelry sale Aug. 16 through 23. Come see this fabulous display of fine jewelry from a well-known company. There is a layaway plan for your convenience. Don't forget to register for the pendant that will be given away on Aug. 23.


y Gazette



ouncements

The NBCPO is currently accepting applications for full-time and substitute teachers for the high school and elementary school.
Full-time teachers must be U.S.
citizens, have a college degree, and possess at least 18 semester hours of professional teacher education to be eligible. Non-qualified applicants for substitute teaching positions may, under certain circumstances, have qualification requirements waived so all interested applicants are urged to apply. All candidates must submit a Standard Form 171 (SF-171) and copies of teaching certificates and college transcripts as appropriate. SF-171's are available at the NBCPO. For further details contact Ms. Kirkland at 4819.


bulletin board


What is TOPS? Tops--Take Off Pounds Sensibly--is a nonprofit, self-help, weight control organization with physician-set weight goals and approved diets. TOPS employs group therapy, recognition, and competition to help members attain and maintain their weight goals. Men, women and teens are welcome. Our chapter meets each Tuesday evening at 6:30 in Rm. BI of the elementary school. Try us. TOPS--where befores become afters! For more information call 3432.


*,


Old Dominion University will be holding registration for the fall ,term August 15th through the 19th. The following classes will be offered. Spanish 102: Second semester Spanish with oral drills and discussion of grammar principles, written exercises, and reading assignments. Prerequisite Spanish 102. Psych 303, Industrial and Organizational Psychology: An application of psychological principles and research to a variety of human problems in industry. Among the topics covered are personnel selection, training and evaluation; human factors and engineering psychology; and the organizational and social contex of human work. TE 250, Communication: Basic Photographic Processes: A course designed to teach basic technical photographic processes. Activities include basic camera handling techniques, composition, photographic chemistry, and the processing of black and white and color photosensitive materials. All of the above courses are three credits. For more information call 4307.


Free refresher classes in
reading and math offered Campus Functional Skills
For more information, Vaunda Logan at 2575.


English, by Navy Program.
contact


The American Red Cross makes interest-free loans for emergencies.

If you're in the mood to watch a good movie and to eat delicious food, come to the Marine Lyceum. We are now serving barbecue beef sandwiches, nacho chips with cheese sauce and/or jalapeno rings, hot dogs (plain, chili dogs, chili cheese dogs), popcorn, different types of sausages, beverages, frozen sandwiches, chips, cigarettes, etc.



Educational Notes

The following ACT-PEP essay exams will be given on Thursday, Oct. 6th: Freshman English, Accounting Level II and Level III, Management of Human Resources Level II and Level III, Earth Science, History of American Education, Shakespeare, Finance Level II and Level III, Operations Management Level II and Level III, Marketing Level II and Level III; and Business Environment and Strategy. These tests are free to active duty personnel and must be ordered by Friday, Aug. 19th, via Navy Campus at 4769.

Introduction to Business. A survey of business including forms of business organization, personnel problems, managerial aids and business-government relations. Registration for this course being offered by LA Metro begins August 15th. Stop by the LA office located on McCalla Hill or call 4307/ 4748 for more information.

Not only is Navy Campus counseling free to all military and civilian employees, as well as to dependent spouses, but it can save you time and money by ensuring that you take the right courses in the right sequence. Call Ms. Reynolds today at 4769 to arrange for your personal academic assessment.


Monday, August 15, 1983
00 0 O f 0 s o-ea

a. INFLATION FIGHTER]I
q" % k for /I"
August 15 - 21-foe

� e' Available at
Stop Light Inn
.0 Villamar Snack Shack a
Marblehead Snack Shack NO
Golf Canteen /:
Kountry Kitchen

BACON & EGG SANDWICH
� \kk 99� /#



PET-Parent Effectiveness Training
will be available here at GTMO for one last time .... Registration will be at the Nursery School August 22nd through the 26th from Noon until 3:00 p.m. For more information call 2159 during the week of the 22nd through 26th. A fee of $25.00 per couple will be charged for the course. REMEMBER ........ It's your decision. Learning more effective ways of relating to your children takes courage, practice, and patience...the courage to be open to, and accept, new ideas and attitudes...practice in applying the principles and techniques at home with your own family... patience for the time it takes to discourage your children's once-effective misbehavior pattterns. In our modern society,
we have come to expect "instant" results, "instant" success, "instant" everything! But anything of real value takes time...Isn't a happy family life worth some of your time? This will be a short course which will meet every night for one week. Class starts on August 29th. Reserve your place now!


Interested in learning a second language? Fundamentals of Spanish I is being offered by LA Metro. This course covers the fundamentals of pronunciation and grammar structure, practical material for simple conversation based on everyday experiences. Stop by the LA Metro office the week of August 15th to register.

Wanted: Teachers to teach English, math and reading for Navy Campus Functional Skills Program.
Must have current teaching certificate in these or related fields. For more information contact Vaunda Logan at 2575.

Interested in going into busines, accounting, finance or marketing? Then LA Metros' course in Bookkeeping and Accounting I is for you. This course covers the fundamentals of double entry bookkeeping, preparation of the trial balance, simple financial statements, and much more. Register for this and all other LAMCO courses August 15th through the 19th.

Anyone with a MA/MS degree in English who would like to teach evening college classes should contact Ms. Reynolds at 4769.


W.T. Sampson School Registration


Captain Maurice D. Fitzgerald,

Commander, U.S. Naval Base

Lt. Cmdr. J.D. Van Sickle.........
.............Public Affairs Officer
Ens. Christy McCollom...............
...Asst. Public Affairs Officer JOC Lew Reed........................
.... Public Affairs Staff Supervisor J02 Lee Holloway...................
External Communications Coordinator J03 Michael Page............. Editor
Mrs. Susan Junkins.................
...............Production Assistant
The Daily Gazette is published according to the rules and regulations for ship and station newspapers as outlined in NAVEXOS P-35 and under the direction of the Naval Base Public Affairs Officer. Printed five times weekly at government expense on government equipment at the Navy Publications and Printing Service
Branch Office, the opinions or statements in news items that appear herein are not to be construed as official ,or a. reflecting the views of CONNAVBASE or the Department of the Navy.


The W.T. Sampson School registration for grades K-6 will be held at the elementary school multipurpose room On August 15th through 17th from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Last names beginning with letters A through L should register on August 15th; M through Z on August 16th; others who are unable toregister on these days may register on the 17th. Parents should present the previous year's report card, a copy of their orders (for newcomers only), the child's immunization record, and any other pertinent materials which will assist the school staff in proper placement. Kindergarten children also will need birth certificates. Children who attended school here last year must re-register. The first day of school will be August 29th. School hours will be from 8


a.m.-2 p.m. It is recommended that students bring the following supplies with them on the first day: two No. 2 pencils, erasers, and two notebooks. Other required materials will be determined by the individual teachers. Class assignments will be posted by Thursday, August 25th, at the elementary school multi-purpose room
(side wall by the main entrance), the Commissary Store, and the Leeward Navy Exchange.

The W.T. Sampson High School registration for grades 7-12 will be held at the elementary school multi-purpose room on Aug. 15 through Aug. 17 from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. Registration for grades 78 will be held on Aug. 15; registration for grades 9-10 will be held on Aug. 16; and registration


for grades 11-12 will be held on Aug. 17. To eliminate returning to registration all three days, parents with children in both the elementary and high school may register for both on the same day. Parents of new students should present the previous year's report card, a copy of their orders, the child's immunization record, and any other pertinent materials which will assist the school staff in proper placement. Parents of returning students must re-register their children. The first day of school will be Aug. 29.

School hours will be from 8 a.m. until 2:15 p.m. Student/Parent Handbooks, which contain school policies and other information, will be handed out at registration.


0


GAZETTE







Monday, August 15, 1983


Discipline: When children argue & fight


Call 'Time-Out' in calm,
cool way
It will not work if you make it
a punishment or if you scream, "Roger, I've told you and Eddie a hundred times not to fight over your toys. You two will just have to take a time-out and see how you
like that!"
The purpose of the time-out is
to stop undesirable behavior.
Roger and Eddie cannot fight when they are in separate rooms. The time-out gives them time to simmer down. It gives them time to think about their behavior and to realize that mother and father will
not allow it to continue.
The time-out is particularly
helpful for fighting and quarreling between brothers and sisters. . metimes children fight to get Intention. When the parent screams
and punishes, he is giving his attention and thus, giving children reason to repeat their fighting.
The time-out saves parents from
trying to decide who started the fight and who is to blame. Placing blame on one child only makes him more jealous of the child who wasn't blamed. When fighting breaks out, say, "Since you children cannot get along with each other, I think you need a time-


out." If Bryan says, "But she started it," say, "I don't care who started it. You both need a time-out."
When five minutes are up, say, "Five minutes are up." Don't say, "You can come out of your room now," or "You can come out and play now," or give any kind of directions. Just let them know that five minutes are up.
Calling a time-out instead of punishing makes for less tension between parent and child. It causes less wear and tear on the parent. If the time-out does not work, you probably are not using it correctly.
Parents who have difficulty using this method are ones who have trouble saying "No" to their children. If the child refuses to go to his room, simply take him by the hand, lead him to his room and close the door. The child needs to learn that the parent means what he says, that once a time-out is called, he is going to his room and stay there for five minutes. If the child won't stay in his room, the parent is probably not calling the time-out in a firm manner.
The parent must mean what he pays. If he calls a time-out and then does not see that the child goes to his room, the tecnhique will not work. The child soon


learns that when his parent says, "Take a time-out," he will not enforce it.
The first time you try a timeout, the children will be surprised that you are not punishing them. After they are familiar with this discipline method, they will accept it and may even call time-out on themselves.

Reverse 'Time-Out'

Instead of isolating the child, as in a time-out, the parent is isolated. Reverse time-outs can be used when the child is really "bugging" you. Remove yourself from the situation. You may not be able to change the child's behav-


ior, but you do not have to suffer through it.
If the child is acting silly, arguing, or whining, leave the child and go where he or she can't get to you. For example, take a magazine, go into the bathroom, and lock the door. Don't come out until peace and calm are restored.
Some parents may not like this discipline method. It is inconvenient, and they interpret it as $#giving in." However, children consider your presence rewarding: When you remove your presence, you are withholding a reward. Children soon learn that if they behave a certain way, mother or father will leave the room.


Preserving your eyesight is a full-time job


Before you say "Oh, gee, another
article about Personal Protective
Equipment (PPE)," read on.
Preserving your eyesight is a
full time job and your responsibility. What can be a simple injury for any other part of the body--a sliver or cut--can be catastrophic for your eyes.
In the first quarter of 1982,
eye injuries on our station increased" by almost 40% over the same period in '981. Why? Because
*I r seem to be finding more and
e excuses not to wear protective eyegear.
Next to life itself, it is our
sight we value most.When accidents happen--at work, home, or play-eyes can be injured and eyesight lost forever. Very easy to injure and very hard to repair, your eye
is a complex and remarkable organ.
When we lived in a more natural



John Walker, Metal Trades Foreman at the
Maintenance Division,
Metal Trades Branch of the Public Works Department, is presented a Sustained Superior Performance Award by


Capt. L. A.


environment, the natural defenses of the eye were enough: blink and flinch reflexes were often enough to prevent the eye from being hit; tears removed foreign bodies.
Today, however, these natural defenses are NO LONGER ENOUGH. Historically, as industrialization has increased, so, too, have eye injuries.
The question: "How can I best protect my eyes?" can be answered with simple common sense: Be careful around sharp edges, ensure safe working conditions in your shop and most important, WEAR your safe'Vy glasses, goggles or face shield for your particular job.
Remember, most of all, that 97% of all eye injuries can be prevented and proper utilization of protective eye equipment on the job can assure continuous, healthy eyesight.


Fermo,


Public Works Officer, (Official U.S. Navy photo)


Lt. Cmdr. Jim Thomas, Shops Engineer, Public Works Department, has his gold oak leaf pinned on by his wife. Looking on is Thomas's son, Jason. (Official U.S. Navy photo)


WHEN NOT


IN USE...




UNPLUG



IT!


WASHINGTON (NES) -- Electricity, since the day Ben Franklin's famous kite and key made history, has made our lives easier and more convenient. But, like the automobile, it has also claimed lives through carelessness and negligence.
According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, there are more than 5,200 fires, 250 injuries and 60 fatalities annually
associated with portable household electrical appliances. The severity of these accidents ranged from
cuts from blades of a blender to destroyed homes. Some injuries resulted from product misuse while others occurred because of malfunction or design defect.
To inform consumers, the commission, in conjunction with Underwriter's Laboratories and the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers, is supporting a national "Unplug It Campaign." This campaign is designed to make people aware that popular devices


like toasters, hair dryers and irons should be unplugged when not in use.
Electricity and water are a deadly combination:
--A young girl was taking a bath when a hair dryer, turned off but still plugged into the outlet, fell into the water. She was electrocuted, even though the bair dryer was in the "off" position.
--An elderly man, using a hair dryer while standing on a wet ceramic tile floor, was found dead from electric shock. The victim had exit burn marks on the soles of his feet. His pacemaker was stopped by the current.
--A teenager, rushing to get to school, threw a hair dryer on her bed. The switch was off but it was still plugged in. A malfunction occurred and a fire resulted.
Think Safety: If its powered by electricity, be aware of its dangers. Take the proper precautions; unplug it and live.


"We could have collected a lot more, Chief, if Harry hadn't told everyone the gift was going to be for you."


The Daily Gazette


Page3







Page 4

NFL


Sports



Shorts


(AP)--Veteran linebacker Lawrence Taylor was in the New York Giants
camp for practice yesterday, ending a three-week holdout. Taylor, an all-pro, would not comment on terms of his new contract. In the Philadelphia Eagles' 2120 exhibition win over the San Diego Chargers Saturday night, linebacker Frank LeMaster dislocated a shoulder and will be out for eight weeks. And guard Dean Miraldi's knee injury is described as not good by team officials. The Browns lost running back Charles White with a fractured ankle Saturday night. A Cleveland spokesman says White also dislocated the ankle against Buffalo and may be lost for the rest of the season.

Tennis
MONTREAL (UPI)--Ivan Lendl of Czechoslovakia won the Canadian Open men's tennis championship yesterday by defeating Sweden's Anders Jarryd. Lendl, a winner in Montreal three times in the last four years, breezed to victory in straight sets by identical scores of 6-2, 6-2. First-place carried a prize of $61,000.

PGA "
(UPI)--Wayne Levi made up three strokes on the final round yesterday to win the $350,000 Buick Open at Grand Blanc, Michigan. Levi's seven-under par 65 was good for a one-stroke victory over thirdround leader Isao Aoki of Japan and Calvin Peete. Levi also equaled the tournament record with his 16-under total of 272. Peete's second-place finish left him just $595 away from the million plateau in career earnings.

MISCELLANEOUS
Marine Corps Exchange is looking to rent or buy a single floppy disk drive for a Commodore VIC 64 home computer; model i1541. If you have one that we can rent or buy, please call Frances at 2330 or 2570 DWH.
FOR SALE
Berkline rocker/recliner with back heater and three-speed vibrator built in. Mechanism and structure excellent. Gold Herculon upholstery worn but no holes or tears. Great for den or UPH room. Could be reupholstered for a fraction of the cost of a new unit, $50. Call 2298 AT.

Ford Galaxie, good working condition, $700 neg. Call 4442 DWH or 3277 AWH and ask for Jackie.

Brand new flat and fitted sheets w/pillow case for twin size bed. For more information call 4600 or 4432 DWH or 3476 AWH and ask for Alicia.

'61 Chevy pickup, many new parts. True GTMO special. Needs a little work but the motor is in sound condition. The body is a little rough. Six cylinder, four-speed. Best offer over $200. Call 2142 AWH or 7230 DWH and ask for Brian.

'72 Chevrolet Impala, four-door, blue, good working condition, $700. Call 3370 AT or 4105 DWH and ask for Lugo.

9 " clutch with pressure plate. Price neg. Call 3285 AT.

Atari "Racing Pack," including special paddles, used once, $25; baby carrier, exc. cond.1 $3; breast feeding supplies, exc. to new items; maternity clothes; baby clothes (summer), 0-9 months, good to exc. condition; 50-piece set of stainless tableware, $20. Call Gina at 3755 AWH] or 4615 DWH.

Traffic Safety A clean


The Daily Gazette


LPGA
(AP)--Patty Sheehan is a relative newcomer on the LPGA tour. But when she went head-to-head with a pair of seasoned veterans in the tour event in High Point, North Carolina yesterday it was no contest.
Sheehan's fourth-round six-under par 66 gave her a final total of 16-under 272. That was within one stroke of the tour record for a 72hole event and strong enough for a four-shot win over hall of famer Joanne Carner.
Kathy Whitworth, another women's golfing legend, finished in third place, nine strokes back. Sheehan picked up $27,000 for her win, putting her into first place on the women's money list for 1983.

USA takes 24 medals
HELSINKI (UPI)--All in all, the results were favorable for the U.S. as the inaugural World Track and Field Championships in Helsinki, Finland ended yesterday.
Americans won a total of 24 medals, the most of any competing nation, including eight gold, nine silver, and seven bronze. The Soviet Union claimed 23 medals overall, and East Germany came away with 22, including an eventleading ten gold.
The final day of competition was a red-letter day for Mary Decker and Calvin Smith. Decker won the
women's 1,500 meter race to claim her second gold of the games,
while Smith won his second gold, taking the 200-meter dash.
Other American medal-winners yesterday were Steve Scott, who took the silver in the men's 1,500 meter run, and Carol Lewis. She won a bronze in the women's long jump.
In the men's 1,600 meter relay, the U.S. suffered its lowest point of the Helsinki games. Willie Smith dropped the baton and the American team failed to place in the event as a result. The Soviets won the race.
With Helsinki officially over, the athletes now have their sights set on the Pan Am games. They got under way yesterday in Caracas, Venezuela. Over 4,000 athletes from 35 Western Hemisphere countries will participate in the olympic-like competition. It runs through August 29th.


Tiny new, qts) $32.


1 cu.ft. Sears refrigerator, in carton, $103; one case (24 Castrol GTX motor oil, 10W40, Small 2230 AWH.


Two older-style Japanese dolls w/cases, $60 ea. or both for $100. Boy's dirt-style bike, 16", $30. Four steel/chrome-plated mag rims for Chevy, 7x14", $80 (includes lugs); new steel-belted radial tire on Chevy rim, GR78xI4, $25. Lady's evening gown w/shawl by Lerners, size 9/10, $25. Two oriental-design hanging scrolls, $5 for both. Man's three-speed bike, needs minor work, $20. Call 2454 AT.


VCR-RCA VGT 200 (catalog page B199), one year old, $400. Call LCDR Jones at 4751 DWH or 2353 AWR.

'74 Chevy Vega, four cylinder, new battery, exhaust system. Good basic trans., $600. Call 4511 DWH or 2401 (Rm. 205) AWH.

Men's ring, size 10, $40; women's jewelry; baby clothes, size 0-6 mos.; women's Navy uniforms and shoes; gold velvet queen size bedspread, $40. Will accept best offer on any of these items. Call 4580 AT.


windshield is as necessary
for driving as a clear head


At

~The!

, Park



(UPI)--A key reason for success in Philadelphia begins and ends with John Denny. The veteran righthander piled up his seventh straight victory as the NL Eastern-leading Phillies downed slumping St. Louis 5-1 yesterday.


American
EAST DIVISION
Detroit Baltimore New York Milwaukee Toronto Boston Cleveland WEST DIVISION
Chicago Kansas City Texas California Oakland Minnesota Seattle

Baltimore Toronto New York Oakland California Cleveland Boston Kansas City

National
EAST DIVISION
Philadelphia Pittsburgh Montreal St. Louis Chicago New York WEST DIVISION
Atlanta Los Angeles Houston San Diego San Francisco Cincinnati

New York Los Angeles Pittsburgh San Diego San Francisco


Chicago Milwaukee Detroit Minnesota Seattle Texas Kansas City Boston


Chicago Atlanta Montreal Cincinnati Houston


TEAC V-95RX cassette deck, less than one year old. AAFES catalog pg. R273. Excellently cared for by serious audio enthusiast. A great deal at $200. Call 4870 DWH or 4990 AWH.

'78 KZ-650 KAWA, $1600. Contact Jody at "C" complex, P-201.

We have Intellivision games, all six months old with little use, boxing, skiing, soccer, basketball, poker & blackjack, $10 ea. Baby walker, baby changing table, $10 ea. Call 2939 AT.

'71 Pontiac Braugham, 400 CID engine, PS, AT, power disc front brakes. Good tires, starts good, runs good. A steal at $720. Available at ferry landing on Sept.
2. Call 4690 DWH or 2602 AWH.


Monday, August 15, 1983

America's Cup

(UPI)--The crew of "Australia III' managed to replace a broken boom minutes before the start of its America's Cup semifinal race yesterday, and went on to capture a 3:20 victory over Italy's "Azzurra." In the only other race on Rhode Island sound, Britain's "Victory 83" triumphed after rudder problems forced "Canada I" to drop out of its race.
The controversy over "Australia II's" keel has yet to die down. Yesterday, officials of the American "Freedom" campaign admitted they had shown interest in obtaining plans of the Australian boat's keel, but added that contrary to allegations by the "Australia II" syndicate, they never intended to enter a yacht with a winged-keel in competition.

Local Briefs
Tennis and GTMO seem to go hand
and hand. Rosters for W Intercommand Tennis being accepted by Special Services through September 2nd (8 person limit). Call 2560 for more details.


Peeking around the corner is NFL action...and your chance to get in on some football fun also. September is just a couple of weeks away, and Special Services is accepting rosters for Intercommand Football. Play begins in early September, and the deadline for submitting rosters (18 man limit) is August 26th. For more information, call 2560.

How about a chance to get away from GTMO, play some golf, and enjoy stateside activities? Well, the Norfolk Navy Golf Championship is slated for September 13-16, and Special Services is sponsoring a 36-hole, no handicap tournament September 3 & 4. Get out your 2iron, and practice your "worm burner," because sign-ups are due before August 31st, at 4:30 p.m. Call 2560 for more information.


LOST
One gold earring at the COMO pool on or about Aug. 5. Please call Shirley at 2695.
WANTED
Child's safety gate. Call 4580 AT.

Radiator to fit '63 Mercury Comet with automatic transmission. Call 3800 AT.

Reliable babysitter for my oneyear-old daughter. Hours will be Monday-Friday from 7 a.m. until 4 p.m. Prefer bringing her to your home. Good rates! Call 3100 DWH or 2750 AWH.

Bottle collector desires to expand collection. Will pay $$$$ for old or unusual bottles, American or foreign. Call 2454 AT.

SERVICES
Mother of two would like to provide dependable child care for working parents. Would prefer someone three years or older. Call 2939 AT.


Will babysit your child in home. I am experienced and pendable. Call 3285 AT.


myW, de- "


Experienced babysitter will babysit your child in her home Monday through Saturday, day or night. Call Patty at 4580 AT.


Water

Use: 1,107,000 Gallons
$6,947


Target: 1,000,000 Gallons
$6,276


Electricity

Use: 294,200 KWH
$29,580


Target: 272,218
$27,370


Use: $36,527 Target: $34,024


ds classifieds

Ads must be signed by the submitter. Ads which discriminate on the basis of race, sex, creed, color, or national origin will not be accepted. The Public Affairs Staff reserves the right to edit and rewrite all submissions.


DAILY ENERGY USAGE




Full Text

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TUE DAILY GAZETTE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Volume 38 Number 155 Monday, August 15, 1983 Back to negotiating table for envoy McFarlane LEBANON (UPI)--After overnight artillery battles that killed three civilians and wounded six others, Lebanon's rival Christian and Druze militias declared a cease-fire. Pope visits holy shrine LOURDES, France (UPI)--Pope John Paul II fulfilled a wish today by celebrating mass at Lourdes, France, one of the holiest Roman Catholic shrines. Many Catholics believe that 125 years ago, the Virgin Mary appeared in lourdes to a peasant girl. The town has since gained a reputation as providing miraculous cures for sick people. The pope's mass in French today marks the Feast of Assumption. Although he visited Lourdes as a Cardinal, the pope says of his trip, "I have so ardently desired to make this pilgrimage." John Paul planned a trip as pope to Lourdes two years ago, but an attempted assassination in May 1981 forced a delay. Drug use costs millionss (UPI)--"Newsweek" magazine says employees using drugs on the job cost the U.S. economy nearly $26 billion a year. One business leader quoted by Newsweek calls the drug use "the biggest problem in industry today." Another consultant says "a ton of cocaine a year is consumed in (California's) Silicon Valley. Some of the small electronics companies are going under because of drugs." More than 4,500 companies reportedly have set up drug and alcohol abuse programs for their employees. The Newsweek article says drug use is responsible or $16.6 billion a year in lost productivity, over $2 billion in medical expenses, and almost $8 billion for the cost of crime. Most of yesterday's shelling took place in the Israeli-occupied mountains, but one shell reportedly landed near the U.S. embassy. No one was injured. U.S. envoy Robert McFarlane yesterday met with lebanese officials and pledged the full support of the United States. McFarlane is going to make another attempt to change Syria's opposition to the Lebanese-Israeli troop withdrawal agreement. According to Lebanon's official national news agency, McFarlane's._ deputy, Richard Fairbanks, will meet in Damascus today with Syria's foreign minister. McFarlane is expected to talk with Syrian President Hafez Assad on Wednesday. McFarlane was in Damascus last week, but was not successful in getting support for the troop withdrawal plan. As McFarlane continues to work on Syria, the situation in Lebanon continues to deteriorate. Beirut's airport has been closed for five days because of the threat of attack from Druze militiamen. They are demanding the resignation of Lebanon's president and cabinet, and the removal of Lebanese troops from the Shouf Mountains. Many Lebanese citizens are fleeing the country by water, fearing another civil war. De la Madrid 'lectures' Reagan on Central America (UPI)--President Reagan got a lecture yesterday on Central America. The lecturer was Mexican President Miguel de la Madrid. Reagan and de la Madrid spoke for three hours in La Paz, Mexico, in California's lower peninsula. De la Madrid said the show of U.S. military force in and around Central America threatens, "To touch off a conflagration." De la Madrid insisted that unrest in the region must be settled through negotiations. He says instability can be overcme only by dealing with its root cause, ,a lack of economic and social development. Reagan replied that U.S. military involvement is needed to stop aggression by what he called the "Soviet-Cuban-Nicaraguan war machine." One thing Reagan and Madrid did agree on as a new plan to clean up pollution along the Mexican-U.S. border. The agreement says each country will try to prevent, reduce and eliminate sources of pollution that affect the border area of the other. The president, who is on a three-week visit outside of Washington, is in New Orleans this morning. Today he'll speak to the annual covention of the Veterans of Foreign Wars. Airline workers strike (UPI)--A spokesman for the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers says Continental Airlines is just bluffing when it says striking workers who don't show up for their next shift will be replaced. Will Spurlock, general chairman for the Houston district, says, "That is done in every labor dispute, as a threat to the workers." Continental spokesman Bruce Hicks announced yesterday the airline will start to permanently replace mechanics who do not report for their next scheduled shift. About 2,000 mechanics, cabin cleaners and maintenance workers are in their third day of a contract wage dispute with the nation' s eighth-largest air carrier. Moderation key to alcoholism; zero tolerance on drugs "You will not use alcohol prior to coming to work or at work, prior to coming on duty or on duty. This includes meal hours during working hours." Taylor said. (Official U.S. Navy photo). "I'm not here to point fingers, I'm not here to put anybody on report. I'm here to inform and that's my job," said Captain H.A. Taylor, the commanding officer of the Naval Drug Rehabilitation Center at the Naval Air Station Mirimar in San Diego, California. Captain Taylor has been talking to groups in Guantanamo about the Navy's drug and alcohol programs. The thrust of the Navy's policy on alcohol is moderation. Drinking is not against the law or regulations. According to the Navy, the definition of alcohol abuse is, "The use of alcohol to an extent that (it) has an adverse effect on the user's health or behavior, family, community, or the Navy, or leads to unacceptable behavior as evidenced by an alcohol-related incident or incidents such as DUI (driving under the influence) or fighting." As Taylor pointed out, this is an unusual definition as health, family, and community take a higher place in the priorities list than the Navy. That means the Navy is concerned about its sailors. But, concern is not enough. There's "zero tolerance" to be considered. What is "zero tolerance?" Taylor explained it this way. "Regardless of who you are in the military, especially in the Navy, no matter where you are, you will not abuse alcohol again." There is help for those who need it and can benefit from it. If a sailor is identified as having an alcohol problem, the sailor's commanding officer can recommend one of four levels of treatment. Levels one and two are counseling, level three is as a patient in a hospital, and level four is seperation from the service. This is not a hit or miss decision. The CO's decision is based on recommendations by the individual's supervisor, petty officers, and officers. If the individual can be a productive sailor again, Taylor said, the Navy will put him or her into the program and back to work. Once is the limit (twice for E5 and above) for treatment for alcohol abuse. The same applies to drug abuse. Once in a career except for traffickers and E7 and above who will be seperated for a first offense. The bottom line, according to Taylor, is to get the sailor back to work and make a better and more responsive Navy. Energy Tip of the Day Try to plan ahead and remove all ingredients for each meal at one time. Every time the door of a refrigerator or freezer is opened, its compressor has to run a bit longer to replace the cold air that spills out. Discourage leisurely opendoor inspections of the refrigerator's contents by family members looking for between-meal snacks. World News Digest CHAD (AP)--The French army continued to expand its military presence in Chad over the weekend. It sent a detachment of paratroopers to Chad's forward lines north of the capital. And France plans to send in reinforcements for those troops. However, informed sources are now saying there's been direct diplomatic contact between France and Libya. The Libyans are supporting the rebel forces fighting in northern Chad. IRELAND (UPI)--American Stephen Lych is expected to take the stand today in his trial in Belfast. The 23-year-old from Indianapolis is accused of taking part in riots that broke out earlier this week in Northern Ireland on the anniversary of an unpopular British law. Lych was among some 70 people arrested in three days of disturbances. Yesterday, police testified Lych threw stones at them. POLAND (UPI)--In Gdansk, Poland, the Communist regime cracked down on demonstrators yesterday, the anniversary of the 1980 strike that gave birth to the nowoutlawed Solidarity union. Riot police swinging clubs broke up a peaceful march by about 10,000 people. Police sources several dozen were arrested. WASHINGTON (UPI)--A top Department of Agriculture official says the U.S. consumer will eventually pay higher food prices because the recent heat wave scorched the corn crop. Deputy Agriculture Secretary Richard Lyng says the heat wave and drought have already pushed up feed prices. That means there'll be less meat available later, and the price will rise. GUATEMALA (UPI)--Guatemala's deposed president failed to attend services of the Evangelical church yesterday, the first since he was ousted from power in a military coup last Monday. A church member says Efrain Rios Montt, a bornagain Christian, previously attended service almost every Sunday. Disaster Relief Fund Drive $5 00 $4,000 $4 000 Collected Today $3 000 Arican Red Cross $2 000 $1 000 We'll Help. WillYou? say

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Page 2 COUPON NEX LAUNDRY AND DRY CLEANH SERVICES OFF ON A $9.00 ORDER DRY CLEANING ONLY nUG.22-27 Anyone who wants to see the Inspector General can on Aug. 16 between 9 and 11:30 a.m. in the PWD Conference Room. He is a member of the NOSHIP Inspection Team. Appointments will be scheduled through the Occupational Safety and Health office at 4529/4526. The Nursery School office will be opening for the SY83-84 on Aug. 16. The hours will be from 8 a.m. until noon. Any information on registration can be obtained by calling 2159 or by dropping by the school office during business hours. To register, your child must be three or four years of age by Dec. 31. School resumes Sept. 1. The Nursery School is located on Marina Pt. To better serve the community the Special Services Day Care Center is considering expanding its hours of operation by opening at 6:00 a.m. vice 7:00. If anyone feels there is a need for the Day Care Center to open at 6:00, please contact Ms. Charlene Wilson at 2205 DWH or MCPO I.G. Neal at 2248 DWH or make your wishes known at the Day Care Center front desk. Treasure & Trivia is located in building #944, the last quonset hut to the right of the Navy Exchange. The hours of operation are 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. on Tuesday, Friday, and the first Saturday of the month. Club Activities The next meeting of the Guantanamo Bay Amateur Radio Club will be Monday, Aug. 15, at 7 p.m. at the ham shack, located in hobby land. All hams visiting or stationed at GTMO are invited to attend. Exchange Notes The Navy Exchange Beauty Shop has an opening for a licensed hairdresser. Applications can be obtained in the Beauty Shop. For more information, contact Betty or Barbara at 4764 DWH. The Marine Corps Exchange will be having a jewelry sale Aug. 16 through 23. Come see this fabulous display of fine jewelry from a well-known company. There is a layaway plan for your convenience. Don't forget to register for the pendant that will be given away on Aug. 23. GAZETTE Captain Maurice D. Fitzgerald, Commander, U.S. Naval Base Lt. Cmdr. J.D. Van Sickle. .Public Affairs Officer Ens. Christy McCollom. .Asst. Public Affairs Officer JOC Lew Reed. .Public Affairs Staff Supervisor J02 Lee Holloway. External Communications Coordinator J03 Michael Page.Editor Mrs. Susan Junkins. .Production Assistant The Daily Gaete s publshed acoding t the rules and regulations for ship and saton nespaprs as outlined in NAVXOS P-35 and under the direction of the Naval ase Public Affairs Officer. P inted qipe statv k NayP hicc unse nPitn Se ic rnch Office, the opinions or t tinne s items that appear herein a e not tobe co ted a official oasreflecting the viewse of COAVSE or the Dearuent of the Nay The Daily Gazette Special Announcements The Naval Statiop Enlist1 ed Dining Facility and Branch Facility at Leeward Point will offer a special birthday dinner to all active duty enlisted personnel having a birthday during the month of August. The meal will consist of Steak and Lobster with all the trimmings and will be served at 5:00 p.m. on Friday, August 26th. Personnel interested in participating in this program must show evidence of birth date (I.D. card) to the Enlisted Dining Facility MAA no later than 4:00 p.m. on August 25th. For further information, contact MSC Landingin at 2860, Windward, or MS1 Chapa at 6271, Leeward. The NBCPO is currently accepting applications for full-time and substitute teachers for the high school and elementary school. Full-time teachers must be U.S. citizens, have a college degree, and possess at least 18 semester hours of professional teacher education to be eligible. Non-qualified applicants for substitute teaching positions may, under certain circumstances, have qualification requirements waived so all interested applicants are urged to apply. All candidates must submit a Standard Form 171 (SF-171) and copies of teaching certificates and college transcripts as appropriate. SF-171's are available at the NBCPO. For further details contact Ms. Kirkland at 4819. bulletin board What is TOPS? Tops--Take Off Pounds Sensibly--is a nonprofit, self-help, weight control organization with physician-set weight goals and approved diets. TOPS employs group therapy, recognition, and competition to help members attain and maintain their weight goals. Men, women and teens are welcome. Our chapter meets each Tuesday evening at 6:30 in Rm. B1 of the elementary school. Try us. TOPS--where befores become afters! For more information call 3432. Old Dominion University will be holding registration for the fall term August 15th through the 19th. The following classes will be offered. Spanish 102: Second semester Spanish with oral drills and discussion of grammar principles, written exercises, and reading assignments. Prerequisite Spanish 102. Psych 303, Industrial and Organizational Psychology: An application of psychological principles and research to a variety of human problems in industry. Among the topics covered are personnel selection, training and evaluation; human factors and engineering psychology; and the organizational and social contex of human work. VTE 250, Communication: Basic Photographic Processes: A course designed to teach basic technical photographic processes. Activities include basic camera handling techniques, composition, photographic chemistry, and the processing of black and white and color photosensitive materials. All of the above courses are three credits. For more information call 4307. Free refresher classes in English, reading and math offered by Navy Campus Functional Skills Program. For more information, contact Vaunda Logan at 2575. The American Red Cross makes interest-free loans for emergencies. If you're in the mood to watch a good movie and to eat delicious food, come to the Marine Lyceum. We are now serving barbecue beef sandwiches, nacho chips with cheese sauce and/or jalapeno rings, hot dogs (plain, chili dogs, chili cheese dogs), popcorn, different types of sausages, beverages, frozen sandwiches, chips, cigarettes, etc. Educational Notes The following ACT-PEP essay exams will be given on Thursday, Oct. 6th: Freshman English, Accounting Level II and Level III, Management of Human Resources Level II and Level III, Earth Science, History of American Education, Shakespeare, Finance Level II and Level III, Operations Management Level II and Level III, Marketing Level II and Level III; and Business Environment and Strategy. These tests are free to active duty personnel and must be ordered by Friday, Aug. 19th, via Navy Campus at 4769. Introduction to Business. A survey of business including forms of business organization, personnel problems, managerial aids and business-government relations. Registration for this course being offered by LA Metro begins August 15th. Stop by the LA office located on McCalla Hill or call 4307/ 4748 for more information. Not only is Navy Campus counseling free to all military and civilian employees, as well as to dependent spouses, but it can save you time and money by ensuring that you take the right courses in the right sequence. Call Ms. Reynolds today at 4769 to arrange for your personal academic assessment. Monday, August 15, 1983 *.*" -.* .'.*e ** INFLATION FIGHTER for to August 15 -21 Available at Stop Light Inn Villamar Snack Shack Marblehead Snack Shack o Golf Canteen el Kountry Kitchen BACON & EGG SANDWICH j e99C l PET--Parent Effectiveness Training will be available here at GTMO for one last time.Registration will be at the Nursery School August 22nd through the 26th from Noon until 3:00 p.m. For more information call 2159 during the week of the 22nd through 26th. A fee of $25.00 per couple will be charged for the course. REMEMBER. It's your decision. Learning more effective ways of relating to your children takes courage, practice, and patience. the courage to be open to, and accept, new ideas and attitudes.practice in applying the principles and techniques at home with your own family .patience for the time it takes to discourage your children's once-effective misbehavior patterns. In our modern society, we have come to expect "instant" results, "instant" success, "instant" everything! But anything of real value takes time.Isn't a happy family life worth some of your time? This will be a short course which will meet every night for one week. Class starts on August 29th. Reserve your place now! Interested in learning a second language? Fundamentals of Spanish I is being offered by LA Metro. This course covers the fundamentals of pronunciation and grammar structure, practical material for simple conversation based on everyday experiences. Stop by the LA Metro office the week of August 15th to register. Wanted: Teachers to teach English, math and reading for Navy Campus Functional Skills Program. Must have current teaching certificate in these or related fields. For more information contact Vaunda Logan at 2575. Interested in going into business, accounting, finance or marketing? Then LA Metros' course in Bookkeeping and Accounting I is for you. This course covers the fundamentals of double entry bookkeeping, preparation of the trial balance, simple financial statements, and much more. Register for this and all other LAMCO courses August 15th through the 19th. Anyone with a MA/MS degree in English who would like to teach evening college classes should contact Ms. Reynolds at 4769. W.T. Sampson School Registration The W.T. Sampson School registration for grades K-6 will be held at the elementary school multipurpose room on August 15th through 17th from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Last names beginning with letters A through L should register on August 15th; M through Z on August 16th; others who are unable to register on these days may register on the 17th. Parents should present the previous year's report card, a copy of their orders (for newcomers only), the child's immunization record, and any other pertinent materials which will assist the school staff in proper placement. Kindergarten children also will need birth certificates. Children who attended school here last year must re-register. The first day of school will be August 29th. School hours will be from 8 a.m.-2 p.m. It is recommended that students bring the following supplies with them on the first day: two No. 2 pencils, erasers, and two notebooks. Other required materials will be determined by the individual teachers. Class assignments will be posted by Thursday, August 25th, at the elementary school multi-purpose room (side wall by the main entrance), the Commissary Store, and the Leeward Navy Exchange. The W.T. Sampson High School registration for grades 7-12 will be held at the elementary school multi-purpose room on Aug. 15 through Aug. 17 from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. Registration for grades 78 will be held on Aug. 15; registration for grades 9-10 will be held on Aug. 16; and registration for grades 11-12 will be held on Aug. 17. To eliminate returning to registration all three days, parents with children in both the elementary and high school may register for both on the same day. Parents of new students should present the previous year's report card, a copy of their orders, the child's immunization record, and any other pertinent materials which will assist the school staff in proper placement. Parents of returning students must re-register their children. The first day of school will be Aug. 29. School hours will be from 8 a.m. until 2:15 p.m. Student/Parent Handbooks, which contain school policies and other information, will be handed out at registration. 0 0 A MARm

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Monday, August 15, 1983 Discipline: When children argue & fight Call 'Time-Out' in calm, cool way It will not work if you make it a punishment or if you scream, "Roger, I've told you and Eddie a hundred times not to fight over your toys. You two will just have to take a time-out and see how you like that!" The purpose of the time-out is to stop undesirable behavior. Roger and Eddie cannot fight when they are in separate rooms. The time-out gives them time to simmer down. It gives them time to think about their behavior and to realize that mother and father will not allow it to continue. The time-out is particularly helpful for fighting and quarreling between brothers and sisters. .metimes children fight to get .tention. When the parent screams and punishes, he is giving his attention and thus, giving children reason to repeat their fighting. The time-out saves parents from trying to decide who started the fight and who is to blame. Placing blame on one child only makes him more jealous of the child who wasn't blamed. When fighting breaks out, say, "Since you children cannot get along with each other, I think you need a timeout." If Bryan says, "But she started it," say, "I don't care who started it. You both need a time-out." When five minutes are up, say, "Five minutes are up." Don't say, "You can come out of your room now," or "You can come out and play now," or give any kind of directions. Just let them know that five minutes are up. Calling a time-out instead of punishing makes for less tension between parent and child. It causes less wear and tear on the parent. If the time-out does not work, you probably are not using it correctly. Parents who have difficulty using this method are ones who have trouble saying "No" to their children. If the child refuses to go to his room, simply take him by the hand, lead him to his room and close the door. The child needs to learn that the parent means what he says, that once a time-out is called, he is going to his room and stay there for five minutes. If the child won't stay in his room, the parent is probably not calling the time-out in a firm manner. The parent must mean what he says. If he calls a time-out and then does not see that the child goes to his room, the tecnhique will not work. The child soon Parents' Corner by Rochelle Wheeler Family Advocacy Social Worker U.S. Naval Hospital learns that when his parent says, "Take a time-out," he will not enforce it. The first time you try a timeout, the children will be surprised that you are not punishing them. After they are familiar with this discipline method, they will accept it and may even call time-out on themselves. Reverse 'Time-Out' Instead of isolating the child, as in a time-out, the parent is isolated. Reverse time-outs can be used when the child is really "bugging" you. Remove yourself from the situation. You may not be able to change the child's behavior, but you do not have to suffer through it. If the child is acting silly, arguing, or whining, leave the child and go where he or she can't get to you. For example, take a magazine, go into the bathroom, and lock the door. Don't come out until peace and calm are restored. Some parents may not like this discipline method. It is inconvenient, and they interpret it as "giving in." However, children consider your presence rewarding: When you remove your presence, you are withholding a reward. Children soon learn that if they behave a certain way, mother or father will leave the room. Preserving your eyesight is a full-time job Before you say "Oh, gee, another article about Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)," read on. Preserving your eyesight is a full time job and your responsibility. What can be a simple injury for any other part of the body--a sliver or cut--can be catastrophic for your eyes. In the first quarter of 1982, eye injuries on our station increased by almost 40% over the same period in 1981. Why? Because O seem to be finding more and re excuses not to wear protective eyegear. Next to life itself, it is our sight we value most.When accidents happen--at work, home, or play-eyes can be injured and eyesight lost forever. Very easy to injure and very hard to repair, your eye is a complex and remarkable organ. When we lived in a more natural John Walker, Metal Trades Foreman at the Maintenance Division, Metal Trades Branch of the Public Works Department, is presented a Sustained Superior Performance Award by Capt. L. A. Fermo, Public Works Officer, (Official U.S. photo) Navy environment, the natural defenses of the eye were enough: blink and flinch reflexes were often enough to prevent the eye from being hit; tears removed foreign bodies. Today, however, these natural defenses are NO LONGER ENOUGH. Historically, as industrialization has increased, so, too, have eye injuries. The question: "How can I best protect my eyes?" can be answered with simple common sense: Be careful around sharp edges, ensure safe working conditions in your shop and most important, WEAR your safety glasses, goggles or face shield for your particular job. Remember, most of all, that 97% of all eye injuries can be prevented and proper utilization of protective eye equipment on the job can assure continuous, healthy eyesight. Lt. Omdr. Jim Thomas, Shops Engineer, Public Works Department, has his gold oak leaf pinned on by his wife. Looking on is Thomas's son, Jason. (Official U.S. Navy photo) WHEN NOT IN USE. UNPLUG IT! WASHINGTON (NES) -Electricity, since the day Ben Franklin's famous kite and key made history, has made our lives easier and more convenient. But, like the automobile, it has also claimed lives through carelessness and negligence. According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, there are more than 5,200 fires, 250 injuries and 60 fatalities annually associated with portable household electrical appliances. The severity of these accidents ranged from cuts from blades of a blender to destroyed homes. Some injuries resulted from product misuse while others occurred because of malfunction or design defect. To inform consumers, the commission, in conjunction with Underwriter's Laboratories and the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers, is supporting a national "Unplug It Campaign." This campaign is designed to make people aware that popular devices ;3 like toasters, hair dryers and irons should be unplugged when not in use. Electricity and water are a deadly combination: --A young girl was taking a bath when a hair dryer, turned off but still plugged into the outlet, fell into the water. She was electrocuted, even though the hair dryer was in the "off" position. --An elderly man, using a hair dryer while standing on a wet ceramic tile floor, was found dead from electric shock. The victim had exit burn marks on the soles of his feet. His pacemaker was stopped by the current. --A teenager, rushing to get to school, threw a hair dryer on her bed. The switch was off but it was still plugged in. A malfunction occurred and a fire resulted. Think Safety: If its powered by electricity, be aware of its dangers. Take the proper precautions; unplug it and live. II/ "We could have collected a lot more, Chief, if Harry hadn't told everyone the gift was going to be for you." The Daily Gazette Page 3 r v? i K e ,; r., sf ."y d" _:,, Y3. s 0 r. -Aaf

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Page 4 29 NFL Sports Shorts (AP)--Veteran linebacker Lawrence Taylor was in the New York Giants camp for practice yesterday, ending a three-week holdout. Taylor, an all-pro, would not comment on terms of his new contract. In the Philadelphia Eagles' 2120 exhibition win over the San Diego Chargers Saturday night, linebacker Frank LeMaster dislocated a shoulder and will be out for eight weeks. And guard Dean Miraldi's knee injury is described as not good by team officials. The Browns lost running back Charles White with a fractured ankle Saturday night. A Cleveland spokesman says White also dislocated the ankle against Buffalo and may be lost for the rest of the season. Tennis MONTREAL (UPI)--Ivan Lendl of Czechoslovakia won the Canadian Open men' s tennis championship yesterday by defeating Sweden's Anders Jarryd. Lendl, a winner in Montreal three times in the last four years, breezed to victory in straight sets by identical scores of 6-2, 6-2. First-place carried a prize of $61,000. PGA (UPI)--Wayne Levi made up three strokes on the final round yesterday to win the $350,000 Buick Open at Grand Blanc, Michigan. Levi's seven-under par 65 was good for a one-stroke victory over thirdround leader Isao Aoki of Japan and Calvin Peete. Levi also equaled the tournament record with his 16-under total of 272. Peete's second-place finish left him just $595 away from the million plateau in career earnings. MISCELLANEOUS Marine Corps Exchange is looking to rent or buy a single floppy disk drive for a Commodore VIC 64 home computer; model $1541. If you have one that we can rent or buy, please call Frances at 2330 or 2570 DWH. FOR SALE Berkline rocker/recliner with back heater and three-speed vibrator built in. Mechanism and structure excellent. Gold Herculon upholstery worn but no holes or tears. Great for den or UPH room. Could be reupholstered for a fraction of the cost of a new unit, $50. Call 2298 AT. Ford Galaxie, good working condition, $700 neg. Call 4442 DWH or 3277 AWH and ask for Jackie. Brand new flat and fitted sheets w/pillow case for twin size bed. For more information call 4600 or 4432 DWH or 3476 AWH and ask for Alicia. '61 Chevy pickup, many new parts. True GTMO special. Needs a little work but the motor is in sound condition. The body is a little rough. Six cylinder, four-speed. Best offer over $200. Call 2142 AWH or 7230 DWH and ask for Brian. '72 Chevrolet Impala, four-door, blue, good working condition, $700. Call 3370 AT or 4105 DWH and ask for Lugo. 9 clutch with pressure plate. Price neg. Call 3285 AT. Atari "Racing Pack," including special paddles, used once, $25; baby carrier, exc. cond., $3; breastfeeding supplies, exc. to new items; maternity clothes; baby clothes (summer), 0-9 months, good to exc. condition; 50-piece set of stainless tableware, $20. Call Gina at 3755 AWH or 4615 DWH. Traffic Safety A clean The Daily Gazette LPGA (AP)--Patty Sheehan is a relative newcomer on the LPGA tour. But when she went head-to-head with a pair of seasoned veterans in the tour event in High Point, North Carolina yesterday it was no contest. Sheehan's fourth-round six-under par 66 gave her a final total of 16-under 272. That was within one stroke of the tour record for a 72hole event and strong enough for a four-shot win over hall of famer Joanne Carner. Kathy Whitworth, another women's golfing legend, finished in third place, nine strokes back. Sheehan picked up $27,000 for her win, putting her into first place on the women's money list for 1983. USA takes 24 medals HELSINKI (UPI)--All in all, the results were favorable for the U.S. as the inaugural World Track and Field Championships in Helsinki, Finland ended yesterday. Americans won a total of 24 medals, the most of any competing nation, including eight gold, nine silver, and seven bronze. The Soviet Union claimed 23 medals overall, and East Germany came away with 22, including an eventleading ten gold. The final day of competition was a red-letter day for Mary Decker and Calvin Smith. Decker won the women's 1,500 meter race to claim her second gold of the games, while Smith won his second gold, taking the 200-meter dash. Other American medal-winners yesterday were Steve Scott, who took the silver in the men's 1,500 meter run, and Carol Lewis. She won a bronze in the women's long jump. In the men's 1,600 meter relay, the U.S. suffered its lowest point of the Helsinki games. Willie Smith dropped the baton and the American team failed to place in the event as a result. The Soviets won the race. With Helsinki officially over, the athletes now have their sights set on the Pan Am games. They got under way yesterday in Caracas, Venezuela. Over 4,000 athletes from 35 Western Hemisphere countries will participate in the olympic-like competition. It runs through August 29th. classi Ads must be signed by the s minate on the basis of race, al origin will not be accept reserves the right to edit Tiny 1 cu.ft. Sears refrigerator, new, in carton, $103; one case (24 qts) Castrol GTX motor oil, 10W40, $32. Nall 2230 AWH. Two older-style Japanese dolls w/cases, $60 ea. or both for $100. Boy's dirt-style bike, 16", $30. Four steel/chrome-plated mag rims for Chevy, 7x14", $80 (includes lugs); new steel-belted radial tire on Chevy rim, GR78x14, $25. Lady's evening gown w/shawl by Lerners, size 9/10, $25. Two oriental-design hanging scrolls, $5 for both. Man's three-speed bike, needs minor work, $20. Call 2454 AT. VCR-RCA VGT 200 (catalog page B199), one year old, $400. Call LCDR Jones at 4751 DWH or 2353 AWN. '74 Chevy Vega, four cylinder, new battery, exhaust system. Good basic trans., $600. Call 4511 DWH or 2401 (Rm. 205) AWH. Men's ring, size 10, $40; women's jewelry; baby clothes, size 0-6 mos.; women's Navy uniforms and shoes; gold velvet queen size bedspread, $40. Will accept best offer on any of these items. Call 4580 AT. windshield is as necessary for driving as a clear head Eastern-leading Phillies downed slumping St. Louis 5-1 yesterday. Ame rican EAST DIVISION Detroit Baltimore New York Milwaukee Toronto Boston Cleveland WEST DIVISION Chicago Kansas City Texas California Oakland Minnesota Seattle Baltimore Toronto New York Oakland California Cleveland Boston Kansas City National EAST DIVISION Philadelphia Pittsburgh Montreal St. Louis Chicago New York WEST DIVISION Atlanta Los Angeles Houston San Diego San Francisco Cincinnati New York Los Angeles Pittsburgh San Diego San Francisco W 65 64 64 64 64 58 49 W 62 55 56 56 57 49 46 2 4 4 6 7 3 4 6 W 60 60 58 55 52 48 W 71 64 60 57 55 54 5 5 5 10 5 L 50 49 50 51 52 57 67 L 53 57 59 61 62 70 71 GB -1 1 7 16 GB 5 6 7 7 15 17 Chicago Milwaukee Detroit Minnesota Seattle Texas Kansas City Boston L 52 55 56 60 64 68 L 47 51 55 60 62 64 1 3 1 0 2 0 3 3 GB 1 3 6 10 14 GB 5 9 13 15 17 Chicago Atlanta Montreal Cincinnati Houston 2 4 3 9 2 fieds ubmitter. Ads which discrisex, creed, color, or nationed. The Public Affairs Staff and rewrite all submissions. TEAC V-95RX cassette deck, less than one year old. AAFES catalog pg. R273. Excellently cared for by serious audio enthusiast. A great deal at $200. Call 4870 DWH or 4990 AWH. '78 KZ-650 KAWA, $1600. Contact Jody at "C" complex, P-201. We have Intellivision games, all six months old with little use, boxing, skiing, soccer, basketball, poker & blackjack, $10 ea. Baby walker, baby changing table, $10 ea. Call 2939 AT. '71 Pontiac Braugham, 400 CID engine, PS, AT, power disc front brakes. Good tires, starts good, runs good. A steal at $720. Available at ferry landing on Sept. 2. Call 4690 DWH or 2602 AWH. At The, Park (UPI)--A key reason for success in Philadelphia begins and ends with John Denny. The veteran righthander piled up his seventh straight victory as the NL DAILY ENERGY usAGE Water Electricity Use: 1,107,000 Gallons Use: 294,200 KWH $6,947 $29,580 Target: 1,000,000 Gallons $6,276 Use: $36,527 Target: $34,024 Target: 272,218 $27,370 l -J Monday, August 15, 1983 America's Cup (UPI)--The crew of "Australia II" managed to replace a broken boom minutes before the start of its America's Cup semifinal race yesterday, and went on to capture a 3:20 victory over Italy's "Azzurra." In the only other race on Rhode Island sound, Britain's "Victory 83" triumphed after rudder problems forced "Canada I" to drop out of its race. The controversy over "Australia II's" keel has yet to die down. Yesterday, officials of the American "Freedom" campaign admitted they had shown interest in obtaining plans of the Australian boat's keel, but added that contrary to allegations by the "Australia II" syndicate, they never intended to enter a yacht with a winged-keel in competition. Local Briefs Tennis and GTMO seem to go hand and hand. Rosters for W Intercommand Tennis being accepted by Special Services through September 2nd (8 person limit). Call 2560 for more details. Peeking around the corner is NFL action. and your chance to get in on some football fun also. September is just a couple of weeks away, and Special Services is accepting rosters for Intercommand Football. Play begins in early September, and the deadline for submitting rosters (18 man limit) is August 26th. For more information, call 2560. How about a chance to get away from GTMO, play some golf, and enjoy stateside activities? Well, the Norfolk Navy Golf Championship is slated for September 13-16, and Special Services is sponsoring a 36-hole, no handicap tournament September 3 & 4. Get out your 2iron, and practice your "worm burner," because sign-ups are due before August 31st, at 4:30 p.m. Call 2560 for more information. LOST One gold earring at the COMO pool on or about Aug. 5. Please call Shirley at 2695. WANTED Child's safety gate. Call 4580 AT. Radiator to fit '63 Mercury Comet with automatic transmission. Call 3800 AT. Reliable babysitter for my oneyear-old daughter. Hours will be Monday-Friday from 7 a.m. until 4 p.m. Prefer bringing her to your home. Good rates! Call 3100 DWH or 2750 AWH. Bottle collector desires to expand collection. Will pay $$$$ for old or unusual bottles, American or foreign. Call 2454 AT. SERVICES Mother of two would like to provide dependable child care for working parents. Would prefer someone three years or older. Call 2939 AT. Will babysit your child in my home. I am experienced and dependable. Call 3285 AT. Experienced babysitter will babysit your child in her home Monday through Saturday, day or night. Call Patty at 4580 AT. J :oo;


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