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Guantanamo Gazette

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Guantanamo Gazette
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U.S. Naval Base
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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U.S. Naval Base
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Language:
English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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University of Florida
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AT L EA S T


2 7 D EAD I N TAKEOV ER 0 F N EW MEXI C 0 S TAT E P R I S 0 N


NEW MEXICO (UPI)--The takeover of the New Mexico State Prison began early Saturday when two guards making a room check surprisedtwo inmates drinking homemade liquor. The inmates beat the guards, the incident quickly spreading into a prison-wide riot.
About 1,200 inmates were in
the prison when the riot erupted, but officials estimate only 250 were involved in the takeover. About 800 spent last night in tents in a nearby field.
The prisoners originally took


14 hostages. They released three because of injuries, then two more on three occasions to show good faith in negotiations. That left five inside the prison when it was reclaimed today.
State police SWAT teams found a grisly scene today when they stormed the riot-torn New Mexico State Prison and took command without firing a shot, 36 hours after convicts seized 14 guards and began a blood bath among themselves.
What began early yesterday as a


takeover by inmates demanding better conditions turned into a series of reprisals of convictagainst-convict, some mutilated, some burned, one hanged.

Authorities say at least 27 inmates, but no hostages, were killed. Nine bodies were recovered and officials searched burned-out c41 blocks for others. A state official said searchers had not yet reached an area where a pile of bodies was said to have been set on fire.


The interior of the prison was virtually gutted. All doors and windows were broken, ceilings and walls caved in or bucked from the foundation from the heat of fires. Water from ripped-out drinking fountains stood three to four inches deep. The records room and kitchen were totally burned out.
Roman Catholic Arichbishop
Robert Snachez toured the building after it was secured.
He found only one room untouched,
the chapel.


*Guntanamo Gazette



Guantanamo Bay, Cuba




Vol. 35 No. 24 Monday, February 4, 1980


THE SITUATION AFTER ONE MONTH SOVIET TROOPS GROW UNEASY INSIDE AFGHANISTAN CAPITAL CITY


by Michael Keats There are more Soviet tanks in the snowbound city of Kabul now and the Russian soldiers are less friendly. After a month in Afghanistan, the strain of resistance to their occupation is obviously beginning to wear on the Soviet troops. P rt of the problem also may be due to what western diplomats describe as internal bickering in the Soviet-imposed regime of Babrak Karmal.
Where once a western reporter could chat with a soldier about the weather, the European soccer scene and other trivia, there is now only a firm "nyet."
The Russians are keeping to thensleves more and more. At the sane time they're becoming increasingly heavy-handed with
r Afghan allies, even in
*o of western reporters.
Soviet tanks and armored personnel carriers, which had been kept at low profile to avoid antagonizing Afghan civilians, are now taking a more active role in patrolling the streets of Kabul.
increased roadblocks, many manned by Soviet troops or by Afghan soldiers with a Soviet backup group nearby, have sealed off Kabul from the rest of Afghanistan.
Attempts by the Karmal regime to improve its image are also repeatedly dashed, ironically by the Soviets themselves.
The information ministry invited the western press this week to view the alleged horrors of the


previous government and arranged for reporters to visit the Poli Charkhi prison.
Those who went along were met by a pistol-packing Soviet colonel who brushed away all protests from an accompanying Afghan official that the trip was "officially approved" and the reporters were turned back.
The new wariness also applies to many of the estimated 1,500 Soviet civilian "advisers" who accompanied the 85,000 strong invasion force and live at the Kabul hotel in the downtown section of the capital.
UPI reporter Michael Keats, hearing a conversation in halting English between a Russian, an East German and an Iraqi, attempted to join in.
After the UPI reporter introduced
himself, the Russian left immediately. The East German began a diatribe about the distorted image of Afghanistan being reported by the western press, and the Iraqi, whose EJngligh was much better, contented himself to order another beer, which he drank and left.
A similar attempt to strike up a conversation with a group of Russians watching a children's program on Afghan television also came to nothing. But at least they didn't desert their chairs.
That night the clanking of Soviet armored vehicles on the street outside the Kabul Hotel jolted people awake at 4 a.m.


fli}~f~j39th Anniversary

February 4, 1980


IWorld News-Digest


COMPILED (UPI)--President Jimmy Carter said today he has reached a decision on whether to recommend that women be included with men when Congress considers his request for resumption of military draft registration.
But for the moment, his decision remains secrets. He is expected to make it public early this week.
Carter told reporters he had reached a decesion when he and his wife Rosalynn returned to the White House this evening from a weekend at Camp David, Maryland.
Mrs. Carter has come out in favor of registration of women along with men. Since she rarely, if ever, has taken a different position than her husband on public issues, there is widespread belief he will move toward registering women.
One White House aide says the president is "leaning" in that direction.

TEHRAN, Iran (UPI)--Iranian President-Elect Abolhassan Bani-Sadr says he still believes the United States holds the key to the freedom of the American hostages.
But in a Tehran radio broadcast today, Bani-Sadr did not specifically' mention the return of the Shah as a condition for the hostages release.
Tehran radio also said that Bani-Sadr will take the oath of office tomorrow at the hospital where the Ayatollah Khomeini is being treated for a heart condition. Khomeini's doctors say he must stay in the hospital for some time and restrict his political activity.
Meanwhile, reports say 120 people were killed during fighting between
Iranian government troops and Kurdish rebels supported by heavy artillery.

COMPILED (UPI)--The United States and Pakistan ended 12 hours of defense talks yesterday without announcing any new agreement to counter the Soviet presence in Afghanistan.
At a press conference, U.S.'National Security Adviser Zbigniew
Brezezinski and the Pakistani Foreign Affairs Minister read an announcement saying only that consultations will continue between the two governments.
Although the talks left open the possibility that the $400 million U.S. aid package to Pakistan will be delayed. American officials are calling the meetings a "considerable achievement," because the two nations had broken communications less than a year ago.
During a break from the talks today, Brzezinski underlined the U.S. commitment to the area by climbing an observation post and peering over the border into Afghanistan.
Reports are increasing that indicate the end of the Babrak Karmal regime in Afghanistan may be near.
Three weeks ago, the State Department said it had received the unconfirmed reports circulating in Kabul that the Soviet-backed leader was on his way out. But observers now say that in the last four days, Karmal has not been mentioned once on his own state radio station.

COMPILED (UPI)-A videotape made by a hidden camera shows a member of Congress nervously trying to stuff $50,000 into his pockets.
He turns to FBI agents posing as bribe-paying aides to an Arab chief and asks if any of the cash is showing.
The scene is one of dozens that sources say were recorded by the FBI in a stunning two year investigation described as the largest ever involving members of Congress.
Details of the probe began to surface today, implicating one Senator, seven House members and about 20 other public officials in payoffs of nearly $700,000.
Sources say Congressional members accepted several hundred thousand dollars in cash--often in lump sums of $50,000.
Among those investigated were Senator Harrison Williams, Jr., a New
Jersey Democrat. House members include John Jenrette of South Carolina, Richard Kelly of Florida, John Murphy, New York, Frank Thompson, Jr. of New Jersey, and Raymond Lederer, Michael Myers and John Murtha, all of Pennsylvania.
All but Kelly are Democrats.
Sources told UPI late today that the evidence would likely be presented to grand juries in the coming weeks in New York, Newark, Washington and Philadelphia.
Sources say neither Williams nor Murtha actually accepted bribe money and some of the other Congressmen may have taken bribes through aides or other intermediaries. But they say all eight members under investigation made some agreement to trade their influence to thebribe-paying undercover agents.
The question of entrapment, in which suspects are lured into breaking the law, is likely to be a burning question any criminal trials resulting from the FBI investigation.
Justice Depart officials say they are confident that members of Congress will be unable to prove thay were trapped in incriminating circumstances.










F':it~ 2Guatanao Gaett


* OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY is seeking instructors for the spring and summer terms. If you have a Master's degree and aresinterested in teaching at the college level two evenings per week, please call Mary Kelley at 8307 or 952250.

ATTENTION ALL GITMO RESIDENTS 25 persons have shown their desire to form an association for inactive Volunteer Firemen, EMT's and ParaMedics onboard Naval Base Guantanamo Bay. A meeting will be held on Thursday, Feb. 7 at 7 p.m. at Naval Legal Services Branch Office, Bldg 800. This important meeting will be to develope a constitution and bylaws for submission to COMNAVBASE for approval and establishment of this requested association. Transportation can be provided upon request. For further information please call Charles Barbour at 8600 DWH or 951032 AWH.

CPO WIVES CLUB will be having
another bunko party Monday, Feb. 4 at 7 p.m. at the CPO Club. Tickets will be sold at the door, or you can get them from any CPO wives club member.

DO YOU HAVE DIFFICULTY getting your point across in a discussion? Trouble talking to a group? The local chapter of Toastmaster's International may be just what you need. Tuesday evening at
7 p.m. they will hold their regular bi monthly dinner meeting in the Harbor Lights lounge of the CPO Club. If you're interested and would like to attend contact Ace Riviere at 8733 or 95504 during working hours. Come on and join us, you'll enjoy a scrumptious dinner followed by enlightening and invigorating talks.


LIKE TO SEW BUT DON'T HAVE the time to sit down and do it? Well, a few of us would like to start a sewing circle. If interested, please call Pan Lawrence at 97148 AWE or Joy Wetherbee at 90204 AWE.

WINDJAMMER PHONE NUMBERS CHANGED The following chnnges have been made in the Windjammer telephone listings:
Manager's Office 8733 Duty Manager's Office 95504



ad6.Utn 0.. rGazette

Captain John H. Fettermaon Jr.

Naval Station Conmanding officer

Lt . Richard L. Thompson......Public Affairs Officer Ens. Susan Wehrman .... .Asistant Public Affairs officer J DC Bill Reed.;..****.... *..... ** ..........Editor
J02 Brenda X. Sakey .....................COPY ditor
30511 J. Michael Porter ..................... Journalist
305k Paul D. Clifton....................... Journalist
Mr. Canny Kennedy ............... Production Assistant

The uantanan Gazette is published according to the rules and regulations for ship. and station newspapers as out lin ed in NAMEXOS P-35 and nnder the direction of the Nvl Base PuBlic Affairs Officer. Printed five times weekly at govermoent expanse on government equipment at the Navy Publications and Printing Service Branch Off ice, the opinions or statements in news items that appear herein are nct to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of CtONAVBASE or tha Deprtmnent of the navy.


A SPECIAL SERVICES FLEA MARKET will be held on Sunday, Feb. 17 at McCalla Hangar from 12:30 p.m. until all merchandise is-sold. No one will be allowed to set up prior to 12 noon. There will be two sizes of booths to choose form all inside the hnagar; large booths (20x2O) for $3 and small booths (10x20) for $2. You must supply your own tables. Anyone wishing to rent a space may do so by coming by the Special Services Office between 7:30 a.m. and 4 p.m. Monday through Friday or by going to booth #1 the day of the Flea Market. Food may be sold only by people with written permission from the Navy Exchange which must be brought to Special Services with booth is rented.

ANYONE INTERESTED IN BEING an umpire or score keeper for the Guantanamo Bay Youth Athletics Association, please come out to the officials hut located across form the Windjammer on Tuesday, Feb. 12 at 7 p.m. for a very important meeting. If you are interested but are a bit hesitant because you've never done this type of thing, have no fear, the Guantanamo Bay Youth Athletics Association will be holding clinics ot teach how to umpire and keep official score. So, remember, Feb. 12, 7 p.m. at the officials hut.

THE VC-10 ENLISTED WIVES CLUB meeting will be held Wednesday, Feb. 6 at 7:30 p.m. at the VC-10 hut. It's election time so please come and use your vote. All new wives are cordially invited. For more information call 96165.


THE NEX/COMMISSARY ADVISORY Board meeting will be held on Tuesday, Feb. 5, at 10:30 a.m. in the McCalla Admim Conference Room.


community





bulletin board


Couiunity announcements may be called in between 8 and 11 a. *or hand carried to the Public AffairsaOffie. 7:30 a.m., to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday (excluding holidays). Deadline for publication is noon the previous working day. Bonafide emergency announcements will be accepted anytime, Community announcements will be published not more than once a week for a maximum of three weeks and then rewritten, condensed, and included in a daily calendar section during the week of the event. Coercial advertising is prohibit&d although announcements
of available services will be permitted but limited to twice monthly. Announcements for businesses or services requiring command approval may be required to provide proof of a letter of authority. Ads which
discr iminate on the basis of race, sex, creed, color, or national origin will not be accepted. The Public Affairs Staff reserves the right to edit and rewrite all sUbmisions. (AT..nytime/DWB'.During Wokinzg Hours/ AHAfter Working Hours).


Today
Roman Catholic mass, Base Chapel, 11:45 a.m. Drug/Alcohol Education Awareness Workshop, 7-9 p.m. in the Hook.

Tomorrow
Nursery school tuitions are being collected from 4:30 to 7 p.m. A late fee of $1 after 7 p.m.
Roman Catholic Bible Study, Base Chapel, 7:30 p.m.

Roman Catholic mass, Base Chapel, 11:35 a.m.

Church of Christ Bible study, McCalla Chapel, 6:45 p.m. (951035).

Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, East Bargo Old Nursery School building, 7:45 p.m. (8390, 913240).


Wednesday
Al Anon meeting, East Bargo Old Nursery School building, 7 p.m

Guantanamo Bay Duplicate Bridge Club meeting, BOQ Annex, 7 p.m. Take Off Pounds Sensibly meeting, elementary school B-9, 6 p.m. (99197) Jamaican United Fellowship Order of Service prayer meeting, 7:30 p m, church on Bay Hill Road.


EFFECTIVE FEB. 11, the Navy
Exchange Beauty Shop will be open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Monday and will be closed on Wednesdays. These hours are on a trial basis.

THE NAVY EXCHANGE INCOME TAX Service hours will be increased to the following: Wednesday 9 to 11 a.m. and 1 to 4 p.m.; Thursday 9 to 11 a.m.; Friday 1 to 4 p.m.; Saturday 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. These go into effect on Feb. 1. For an appointment or further information call 8828 or 8217.

CASEWORKERS NEEDED - The Red Cross is in need of volunteer caseworkers to replace those rotating to CONUS. No experience is necessary and the only prerequisite is that you have sincere desire to serve your community.
Training classes with subsequent on-the-job training will be conducted. Interested personnel should call 95434 or 8676 DWH for an appointment.

LOS ANGELES Community College is now hiring part time instructors for the upcoming terms. This is a good opportunity to increase your income while gaining teaching experience at the community college level. Anyone interested in teaching English, emergency medical technology, air conditioning and refrigeration mechanics, business, real estate, scuba diving, mathematics, broadcasting, or legal assistance, please call Joanne Middlebrooks at 8307. A college degree is not required to teach vocational/technical courses. There are different requirements for each course, so please contact the LACCO office located behind the downtown lyceum for more information.

CERTIFIED EMT'S! You are needed to share your valuable training and experience with others in your community. Plenty of Gitmo residents would like to become Certified EMT's also, but we need an instructor. If you are interested in teachfng two evenings a week, for eight weeks, making some extra money and sharing your skills with others, please call L.A. Community College at 8307 for more information.

THE BARREL CLUB has recently been given permission to survey some tables and chairs from that location.
If any organization on the Base would be interested in taking these items please contact Ace Riviere at 8733 DWH and arrangements will be made for interested parties to view the items.
Unless claimed by Feb. 4, the items will be disposed of at the town dump on that day.

THE FRA BOARD OF DIRECTORS will be meeting at the FRA home in Morin Center on Wednesday, Feb. 13 at
7 p.m.


THE NAVY LODGE still has openings for the months of Feb. and March. Call 90201 8828 for more information.


several Jan.
or


SPECIAL SERVICES will be giving free swimming lessons. Classes will be held on Monday, Thursday and Fridays at the Villamar Pool. All classes will start on Jan. 31 and will run until Feb. 29. The following classes will be held: Infants- 6 months to I year 1:30 to 2 p.m.
Toddlers - 2&3 years of age 1:30 to 2 p.m.
Adult Beginners- 2 to 3 p.m. Adult Advance Beginners- 3 to
4 p.m.
All interested persons should contact Special Services no later than Jan. 30. For more information or registration contact 951160.

THE ENCYCLOPEDIA SALES REPRESENTATIVE will be at the Navy Exchange from February 5 to the 18th. Navy Exchange customers will reveive a 28% discount. Convenient terms are available.

ATTENTION ARTISTS AND CRAFTSPERSONS The Caribbean Arts and Crafts Workshop will hold it's regular monthly meeting on Feb. 12 at 7 p.m. at the workshop on Marina Point. Al Brake will give a silverwork demonstra- _tion. Diana Groendyke will share slides from the "Crafts Day for .Kids" day last spring. Arts shows and other spring projects will be discussed. All members and interested persons are urged to attend. For more information call Carolyn Dunn at 8462. See you there!



MO VIES,

Downtown - The Frisco Kid, PG McCalla - Slavers, R Marine - Players, PG Leeward - Beyond the Poseidon Adventure, PG
Windjammer- No Movie Post #46 - The Late Great Planet
Earth, PG
Como Club - From Noon Till Three,PG


1:00 General Hospital 1:45 Cartoons 2:00 Ghost and Mrs. Muir 2:30 My Favorite Martian (BW) 3:00 Cannon (BW) 4:00 Cartoons 4:35 Wild Kingdom 5:00 Newswatch 6:00 Hollywood Squares 6:30 Achievement in American Black History
7:00 Wonder Woman
7.:55 Notes of Interest 8:00 Rockford Files 9:00 Dallas (Series Ends) 9:55 The Contenders 10:00 Monday Night Movie: Manhunter 1-1:15 Newswatch Update 11:20 Carol Burnett and Friends 11:45 Bonanza (BW) 12:35 Sign Off

Tuesday Morning 9:00 Electric Company 9:30 Cartoons 10:00 Dusty's Treehouse (BW) 10:30 Mr. Ed (BW) 11:00 Here Come the Brides (BW) 12:00 Green Acres (BW) 12:30 Bob, Carol, Ted, & Alice


Guantanamo Gazette


Page


Monday, February 4, 1980

GOOD NEWS FOR ALL DIVERS! The
Reef Raiders Dive Shack has received and installed the long-awaited new filter system and the shack is once again in full operation. Hours of operation are: weekdays from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. and on weekends and holidays from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and again from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.

DUE TO THE REHAB, the Daycare Center will be unable to provide lunch until further notice. Parents who wish their children to eat lunch at the Daycare Center must provide a bag lunch. Kool-Aid and snacks will still be available, and we have adequate refrigeration for all lunches.


vv


,ID(6







Monday, February 4, 1980


News

For

Todays

Woman





by Jan Bernard
An old West Indian legend has it that earliest man wandered starving through the savannah and was found by a Carib God, "Kabo Tano," who took pity on him. Kabo Tano created a huge tree, on which hung all the food and fruits he needed to satiate his needs--mangoes, coconuts, corn cassava, plums--each man cut a branch, so today food is grown near almost every Caribbean home.

Today with the integration of over seven cultures, the Caribbean
cuisine is exqusite. Let us now experience one of the oldest and for me the ultimate in Caribbean seafood delights--Seafood Boucan.
There is a saying from some of the finer restaurants in the Caribbean that Seafood Boucan cannot be prepared beyond the environs of the Caribb 1. And what masquerades elswhere under this exciting name is merely ish stew. However, to the gourmet, substitution is a necessity when Market is lacking. I have found that improvisation is one of the delights of Seafood Boucan.
This exciting dish was originated by the buccaneers back in the fifteenth century. These filibusters and freebooters were escaped convicts, castaways or political or religious refugees of almost every nation, but mainly these were French, English and Dutch. Before turning pirates, these men lived peacefully in the hills of the islands, where .they hunted in pairs and traded with the locals or foreign ships that pulled into port. When they did take their activitied to sea, they joined forces with the English and French "Letters of Marque" making their activities technically legal. This, of course, was not pleasing to the Spanish and an attempt was made to starve these men out of Spanish owned territory, by killing off the animals they hunted. So, the buccaneers united-into "The Confederacy of the Brethren of the Coast," turned pirates, and got their revenge by plundering Spanish property and killing every Spainard they could.
It is said that in the old days, at the headquarters of these sea
rovers (Fort Oryal, Jamaica), a hearty bowl of Seafood Boucan was served upon their return with treasures from Spanish conquests.
SEAFOOD BOUCAN


lb. conch 2 langoustes
3 small snappers
2 cups shrimp
3 crabs
1 dozen oysters
1 lb. eel

tomato concentrate
4 tomatoes 4*all onions
black pepper
"sred pepper
4 cloves garlic
4 tbs parsley
2 tbs thyme
1 bay leaf
k cub MSG
* Suggested wine:


1. Dress the various fishes and cut into
appropriate portions
2. In a large deep pan, cook onions,
mashed garlic and escallion until
translucent
3. Add sliced tomatoes and remainder of
spices - cook for five minutes on low
fire
4. Layer fish in pot - add boiling water
to level of fish
5. Add tomato concentrate and let simmer
for 15 to 20 minutes
6. Serve in indicidual bowls over steaming hot rice


Chenin Blanc (Inglenook) Cabernet Sauvignon (even though a red wine goes superbly with this meal)


Next week we will have dinner in one of the nations that sets the fashion in the art of good living - France. HOW TO0GET MORE F R 0M YUR RANGE


Here are some general tips that
will help you operate your range with greater efficiency and economy
-- Do not leave your oven or range on when it is not in use and never use it for purposes other than cooking.
-- Whenever possible. use your oven rather than the top of the range. An insulated oven retains heat and is normally on only about one-third of the time it is in use.
-- Plan oven cooking so that more than one dish can be prepared at the same time. Use unoccupied space to , for another meal then refriger46 freeze it.


-- Don't be an "oven peeper." Every time you open the door. significant heat Is lost.
-- Use flat-bottomed, clean utenqsils which fit the heating unit you
are usIng. You won't lose heat to the atmosphere unnecessarily.
-- Pots and pans with tight fitting-lids to retain heat will allow you to cook with lower heat settings.
--Reduce the heat of a surface unit once boiling begins. High heat settings will only make the water evaporate faster.


Serving Wherever

The U.S. Mititary

Presence Is Needed

by PNCM J. L. Bradford
Human Resources Management
Program Manager

Why observe a special month
uniquely for blacks; are not all citizens of the U.S. Americans regardless of color? Why is it necessary to call attention to our citizenry of the many contributions blacks have made in the development of America? The answers to these questions have been obscured until recent years, in the nations past history because of overt racial prejudice and discrimination against persons of color. Unfortunately, some
Americans have been led to believe that blacks contributed nothing noteworthy to the development of America. Afro-American contributions were either lost, stolen or ignored by design until recent years when most Americans experienced a moral re-awakening, which shook their consciousness to a higher level of racial awareness of black people contributions to the American dream.
People of African descent have rightfully been called America's oldens immigrant minority. Yet, until recently, American history books have ignored blacks, or referred only to slavery and have rarely touched upon the individual achievement of black Americans whose contributions in the professions, public service, industry, labor, education, religion, sports and the arts have so enriched the lifestyle of our great nation.




USE

YOUR

HEAD!
IT'S A GOOD
PLACE TO PUT A
MOTORCYCLE HELMET.

A comprehensive study has shown conclusively that repeal of helmet use laws in a number of States resulted in a 30 percent increase in motorcycle fatalities.
Insurance Institute for Highway Safety experts compared fatality and injury rates between States which still require the use of a helmet and States which repealed helmet use laws.
Repeal of helmet use laws in the U.S. dropped the usage from 100 percent down to about 50 percent. The study shows that the repeal of the use laws increased motorcyclist mortality rates by about 38 percent.
In addition, the study's


America is now rediscovering these "lost" notable balck Americans and according them their rightful place in history. Their story is a moving narrative of sacrifice, pain, commitment and accomplishment that spans more than two centuries. It is a story that can help to extned the true spirit of protherhood through understanding across the length and breadth of our country.
February will be a time for all Americans to reflect, be more responsive, and become more aware of individual deeds, contributions, and achievenents of blacks.
This month, beginning Feb. 16
through Feb. 22, TV 8 will feature seven young blacks who will do scripts in memory of a group of prominent black citizens, some famous, others little known, whose personal achievements from colonial times to the present, have been adjudged of importance not only to black Americans but to all Americans.





results show that the mortality rate among unhelmeted riders is almost twice as high as that among helmeted riders.
Before 1967 only three States had motorcycle helmet use laws.
In 1967, Congress passed a
Federal standard for highway safety programs which required the States to have motorcycle helmet use laws in order to qualify for certain safety program and highway funds. However, the financial penalty provisions of the legislations were removed by Congress in 1976, resulting in the repeal of helmet use laws in 26 States by the end of 1978.
The report cites several other motorcycle fatality studies which reflect the fact that head injury rates of riders without helmets are between two and three times greatet than helmeted riders. And, the studies show that among fatally injured riders the difference is even larger. Head injury rates for riders not wearing helmets were between three and nine times greater than for riders wearing helmets.


The International Year of the Child has come to a close, but the Consumer Information Center still has numerous free children's publications that will
serve as a reminder of the spirit of this special year for everyone who is a child, knows a child, or is still a child at heart:
*The Thing the Professor Forgot- a humorous publication with an important message, takes children on a journey in rhyme to learn about the four food groups. Kids are pretty quick to form tastes for favorite and unfavorite foods and sometimes you almost have to make a game of teaching them some basic nutrition information, which this publication does.
Another side of childhood is learning to handle feelings like sadness, guilt, fear, joy and anger. Anger is one of the hardest. Dealing with the Angry Child, from the NationalInstitute of Mental Health, helps parents better understand and deal with children's.
Smokey Bear's Story of the Forest, from the U. S. Department of Agriculture, gets children involved in keeping the forests safe for all of us. Smokey tells just how to go about putting out matches and campfires so you'll know they're really out.
Other'free publications include Children-andTelvisionHelpng Chidren Make Career Plans, Footsteps: A Parenting-Guide, andAPaitnt's Guideto Immunization..
To get any of these publications, write to Consuer Indormation Center, Pueblo, Coo81009.


Captain Gibowicz, Public Works Officer, presented Mr. Lionel Emde, Welder Foreman with Public Works Metal Trades Branch, a 25 year Length-of-Service Award for his many years of dedicated service to the U.S. Government.


Black History


Guantanamo Gazette


Page3








Monday, February 4, 1980


THE SPORTSMAN

By Mark M. Meinero

The World seems headed for two Olympic-type events in 1980. One would be the regularly-scheduled 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow. The other is the U.S.-proposed alternative games for nations angered by the Soviet actions in Afghanistan.
For those who believe sports is trivial, the alternative Olympics is an easy solution. To them, all this talk means.is that a bunch of young Americans won't spend part of the summer in Moscow.
But for those who take athletic competition seriously, a so-called "Free World Games" may be a hard thing to swallow. American athletes have worked hard the last four years preparing for Moscow, and they'll have to be persuaded that the alternative event is worth their effort.
To make a counter-olympics succeed, the U.S. needs the support of several key nations--many of them not among the great world powers. For instance, the African nations of Kenya and Tanzania provide some of the world's finest track athletes. If those countries attend the alternative games, they would lend respectability to them and diminish the Moscow Olympics.
The idea of trying to undercut the Olympics is sad, but if it's going to happen, it's going to happen, and the counter-Olympics should try for the best competition possible--if only to give American athletes something worthwhile for their effort.


Boston Philadelphia New York Washington New Jersey


CENRAL DIVISION


Atlanta
San Antonio Indiana Houston Cleveland
Detroit


GB

1 1/2 14
16 1/2 18 1/2




2 1/2 5 1/2
6
9
17 1/2


WESTERN CONFERENCE
MIDWEST DIVISION


Kansas City Milwaukee Denver Chicago Utah


35 23
29 27 19 36 18 35
18 38


PACIFIC DIVISION


Seattle Los Angeles Phoenix San Diego Portland Golden State


3
11 1/2 12 1/2 22


If a man's clothes are going to start talking before he does, they should say the right things- even-on the fairway.
Fortunately, now there are so many ways to make fashion statements with a sporty air, say fashion experts that


NHL

CAMPBELL CONFERENCE
PATRICK DIVISION
W L
Philadelphia 35 3 NY Rangers 24 21 NY Islanders 24 20 Atlanta 23 22 Washington 13 30


SMYTHE DIVISION


Chicago St. Louis Edmonton Vancouver
Colorado Winnipag


WALES CONFERENCE
NORRIS DIVISION

Montreal 28 Los Angeles 21 Pittsburgh 19 Detroit 20 Hartford 16

ADAMS DIVISION


Fuffalo Boston Minnesota Quebec
Toronto


There are no counties in either Louisiana or Alaska. What other States call counties
are called parishes in Louisiana and divisions in Alaska.








'73 Vega wagon, available AT force i
best offer, present owner is leaving the Rock, for information Classified advertisements ma or offer please call Chuck Bishop carried to the Public A at 8709 DWI. t..oughFriday (excluding the previous working day.A
more than twiceweakly pa
Infant seat, $1; dressing table, prohibited although announce $20; bassinet with pad and skirt, permitted but limited to tw requiring command approval
$5; carriage/stroller, $20; baby f authority. Ads which d swing, $20; baby walker, $7; baby color, or national origin w scales, $1, 64485 AT. reserves the right to edit

'68 Chevy Impala, 307 engine, DHDrn okn or/W very good condition; '72 Maverick, Two Honda 100's CL and CB, bolh 200 cubic inch, new paing job, complete, one with piston, ring good condition, 8801 DWH or chain, battery and cyl. All me, 64294 AWH, ask for Riley. ically sound, do not have expert to get running, both bikes look

Girl's clothes, sizes 0-1, 2, 3 sharp, $390 or best offer, misc and 4; summer and winter maternity eous parts included, 8531 DWH, clothes, sizes 12-16; two nursing AWH. gowns, 97168 AT. '75 Chevy Monza, new tires, exc lent mileage, blue book value
'63 Dodge, runs great, $300, avail- $2350, must sell leaving rock, able Feb. 8, 96160 AT. $1500 firm, 8717 DWH.

Flight bag, Jefferson Computer and '71 Ford Galaxy 500, A/C, p/s, Guide Manuel, plotter, sectional body in good condition, very maps, log book, Aim Manuel Part .dependable' transportation, $70
aviation weather, privite pilots firm, 8114 DWH, 96119 AT. handbook, owners manuel for a Cessna 150, 24"x3 6" color photo of a Bissell carpet sweeper, good Cessna 150 inst panel and other condition, $5; wooden potty materials, $75 firm, 8172 DHW, chair, with tray, like new, $3 for Rick Fele, 8280 AWH..96110 AT.


NBA results

All-star game at Landover, Maryland East 144 West 136 (Overtime)




roundup

FraminghamState 93 Thomas 76 Hofstra 73 L.I.U. 56 Louisville 76 St. John's 71 Stonehill 64 Central Connecticut state 58
Western New England 89 Husson 75 Pacific 65 California-Santa Barbara 60


NHL results


Philadelphia Chicago
Quebec Hartford 5
St. Louis Buffalo Minnesota Edmonton


3 Boston 3(Tie)
4 Toronto 2
5 New York Rangers 4 lew York Islanders 3
4 Detroit 2 3 Vancouver 20 SColorado 2
5 Los Angeles,


ENERGY. We can't afford to waste it.,


LOCAL

BASKETBALL SCORES


season is the knit shirt, according to Burton B. Ruby, president of Jaymar-Ruby, the nation's leading manufacturer of quality slacks and a sportswear innovator.
The knit shirt has been put into silhouettes ranging frmr the classic three-button polo to the rugby-shirt. Color combinations are rich-blue and white, rust and beige, mint and forest green and even raspberry an4 vanilla. With them are sleek, lightweight slacks with details such as topstitching and sidebuckle trimmed waistbands.
These slacks and top from IsymarRuby's Cary Middlecoff line keep a man's looks up to piar. The beige and rust three-button shirt features short sleeves, a rugby collar made from the coordinate slack fabric and a crested J1 signature. The beige slacks have an inlaid waistband with belt loops, rear patch pockets, topstitched slanted front pockets and flared bottoms.
Looking like you could get a holeinone just might make the difference.


isfeds


ny be sent to the Gazette by Guard Mail or hand fairs Office 7:30 d.m., to 4:30 p.m., Monday holidays . Deadline for publication is noon Ads are limited to 40 words and published not er submission. Commercial advertising is ements concerning available services will be wice monthly. Ads for businesses or services may be required to provide proof of a letter iscriminate on the basis of race, sex, creed, ill not be accepted. The Public Affairs Staff tand rewrite all submissions. (AT'-Anytime/ WH-Altar Working Hours.).


.h bikes Igs;
echanrience

cellan90263


Sony stereo receiver, 40 watts per channel, $200; huffy bicycle built for two, $50; 15.7 cu ft. ref irgerator, frost free, $225, all prices negotiable, 8554 DWH, 95537 AWH, ask for Shirley.


Two scuba pro 152 adjustable reserve cal- lJ-valves, reserves are adjustable
from 300 to 600 PSI, valves have
installed tank fill indicators,
brand new, never been used, make
offer, see GMT2 Lemire, USS MOOSp/b, BRUGGER (DD 980).

0 crib with mattress, $45; high
chair, $7; 80' privacy fence, $50;


26" 3 speed bike, needs work, have extra parts, $25; stereo console, needs work, make offer, 98269 AWH, 64258 DWH.


SPORTS


PWD 49 Marine Barracks 45

PWD edged Marine Barracks
49-45 in overtime. PWD blew a first half lwad of 32-16 and let the Marines tie the game at the end of regulation time by a score of 43 all. Leading scorers for PWD were Overton with 14 and Scott with 13. Marines were led by Miles with 14 and Gaston with 10.

NAVSTA White 58 Co. L 40
Russell with 15 points and Hill with 11, led NAVSTA White to their triumph over Co. L 58-40. At half time Whiet was only 4 points ahead but in second half outscored Co. L by 14 points. Tony Long, totaled 20 points, to lead Co. L in scoring.

NAS 45 NAVSTA Blue 38
NAS defeated NAVSTA Blue by a shore of 45-38 in Wednesday night's game. Leading scorers for Blue were Lewis with 10 and Mayes and Whitaker with 8. NAS was led by Warren with 13.



Dacor CGL-24 gusta gun; large Dacor ME43 spear gun; booties, size 7-8 and 8-9; muscellaneous gun parts; butt plates; shock lines; double barb with keeper tips, 952289 AT.

Two Westinghouse A/C, both 10,000 BTU; two Fedders A/C, both 10,000 BTU, 98181 AWH.

Wanted

Old, magazines of all kinds to be used for art projects, 96110
AT.

Conshelf model USD regulator, any year, any condition, 952289 AW.

Actress to be used in local film production, must by 18-35 years old, phone DWH at 95469 or contact DH2 Armstrong or M-202 Gold Hill Barracks, must be willing to work hard.

Outside television antenna, 97253 AT.

Pick up truck in good mechanical condition, 8626 DVR, 951060 AWH,

Giveaway

Mirro-Matic 10 cup glass coffee pot, 96110 AT.


NBA


EASTERN CONFERENCE
ATLANTIC DIVISION


GuantanamO'Gazett6e


Page 4


3'




Full Text

PAGE 1

AT LEAST 27 DEAD IN TAKEOVER OF NEW MEXICO STATE PRISON NEW MEXICO (UPI)--The takeover of the New Mexico State Prison began early Saturday when two guards making a room check surprised two inmates drinking homemade liquor. The inmates beat the guards, the incident quickly spreading into a prison-wide riot. About 1,200 inmates were in the prison when the riot erupted, but officials estimate only 250 were involved in the takeover. About 800 spent last night in tents in a nearby field. 14 hostages. They released three because of injuries, then two more on three occasions to show good faith in negotiations. That left five inside the prison when it was reclaimed today. State police SWAT teams found a grisly scene today when they stormed the riot-torn New Mexico State Prison and took command without firing a shot, 36 hours after convicts seized 14 guards and began a blood bath among themselves. takeover by inmates demanding better conditions turned into a series of reprisals of convictagainst-convict, some mutilated, some burned, one hanged. Authorities say at least 27 inmates, but no hostages, were killed. Nine bodies were recovered and officials searched burned-out cell blocks for others. A state official said searchers had not yet reached an area where a pile of bodies was said to have been The interior of the prison was virtually gutted. All doors and windows were broken, ceilings and walls caved in or bucked from the foundation from the heat of fires. Water from ripped-out drinking fountains stood three to four inches deep. The records room and kitchen were totally burned out. Roman Catholic Arichbishop Robert Snachez toured the building after it was secured. He found only one room untouched, The prisoners originally took What began early yesterday as a the chapel. Guantanamo Gazette", Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Vol. 35 -No. 24 Monday, February 4, 1980 THE SITUATION AFTER ONE MONTH SOVIET TROOPS GROW UNEASY INSIDE AFGHANISTAN CAPITAL CITY by Michael Keats There are more Soviet tanks in the snowbound city of Kabul now and the Russian soldiers are less friendly. After a month in Afghanistan, the strain of resistance to their occupation is obviously beginning to wear on the Soviet troops. Part of the problem also may be due to what western diplomats describe as internal bickering in the Soviet-imposed regime of Babrak Karmal. Where once a western reporter could chat with a soldier about the weather, the European soccer scene and other trivia, there is now only a firm "nyet." The Russians are keeping to themsleves more and more. At the same time they're becoming increasingly heavy-handed with t Afghan allies, even in 1. of western reporters. Soviet tanks and armored personnel carriers, which had been kept at low profile to avoid antagonizing Afghan civilians, are now taking a more active role in patrolling the streets of Kabul. Increased roadblocks, many manned by Soviet troops or by Afghan soldiers with a Soviet backup group nearby, have sealed off Kabul from the rest of Afghanistan. Attempts by the Karmal regime to improve its image are also repeatedly dashed, ironically by the Soviets themselves. The information ministry invited the western press this week to view the alleged horrors of the previous government and arranged for reporters to visit the Poli Charkhi prison. Those who went along were met by a pistol-packing Soviet colonel who brushed away all protests from an accompanying Afghan official that the trip was "officially approved" and the reporters were turned back. The new wariness also applies to many of the estimated 1,500 Soviet civilian "advisers" who accompanied the 85,000 strong invasion force and live at the Kabul hotel in the downtown section of the capital. UPI reporter Michael Keats, hearing a conversation in halting English between a Russian, an East German and an Iraqi, attempted to join in. After the UPI reporter introduced himself, the Russian left immediately. The East German began a diatribe about the distorted image of Afghanistan being reported by the western press, and the Iraqi, whose Engligh was much better, contented himself to order another beer, which he drank and left. A similar attempt to strike up a conversation with a group of Russians watching a children' s program on Afghan television also came to nothing. But at least they didn't desert their chairs. That night the clanking of Soviet armored vehicles on the street outside the Kabul Hotel jolted people awake at 4 a.m. AjjL~fjI39th Anniversary February 4, 1980 -K11 -( n'Y World News Digest COMPILED (UPI)--President Jimmy Carter said today he has reached a decision on whether to recommend that women be included with men when Congress considers his request for resumption of military draft registration. But for the moment, his decision remains secrets. He is expected to make it public early this week. Carter told reporters he had reached a decesion when he and his wife Rosalynn returned to the White House this evening from a weekend at Camp David, Maryland. Mrs. Carter has come out in favor of registration of women along with men. Since she rarely, if ever, has taken a different position than her husband on public issues, there is widespread belief he will move toward registering women. One White House aide says the president is "leaning" in that direction. TEHRAN, Iran (UPI)--Iranian President-Elect Abolhassan Bani-Sadr says he still believes the United States holds the key to the freedom of the American hostages. But in a Tehran radio broadcast today, Bani-Sadr did not specifically' mention the return of the Shah as a condition for the hostages release. Tehran radio also said that Bani-Sadr will take the oath of office tomorrow at the hospital where the Ayatollah Khomeini is being treated for a heart condition. Khomeini's doctors say he must stay in the hospital for some time and restrict his political activity. Meanwhile, reports say 120 people were killed during fighting between Iranian government troops and Kurdish rebels supported by heavy artillery. COMPILED (UPI)--The United States and Pakistan ended 12 hours of defense talks yesterday without announcing any new agreement to counter the Soviet presence in Afghanistan. At a press conference, U.S. 'National Security Adviser Zbigniew Brezezinski and the Pakistani Foreign Affairs Minister read an announcement saying only that consultations will continue between the two governments. Although the talks left open the possibility that the $400 million U.S. aid package to Pakistan will be delayed. American officials are calling the meetings a "considerable achievement," because the two nations had broken communications less than a year ago. During a break from the talks today, Brzezinski underlined the U.S. commitment to the area by climbing an observation post and peering over the border into Afghanistan. Reports are increasing that indicate the end of the Babrak Karmal regime in Afghanistan may be near. Three weeks ago, the State Department said it had received the unconfirmed reports circulating in Kabul that the Soviet-backed leader was on his way out,. But observers now say that in the last four days, Karmal has not been mentioned once on his own state radio station. COMPILED (UPI)--A videotape made by a hidden camera shows a member of Congress nervously trying to stuff $50,000 into his pockets. He turns to FBI agents posing as bribe-paying aides to an Arab chief and asks if any of the cash is showing. The scene is one of dozens that sources say were recorded by the FBI in a stunning two year investigation described as the largest ever involving members of Congress. Details of the probe began to surface today, implicating one Senator, seven House members and about 20 other public officials in payoffs of nearly $700,000. Sources say Congressional members accepted several hundred thousand dollars in cash--often in lump sums of $50,000. Among those investigated were Senator Harrison Williams, Jr., a New Jersey Democrat. House members include John Jenrette of South Carolina, Richard Kelly of Florida, John Murphy, New York, Frank Thompson, Jr. of New Jersey, and Raymond Lederer, Michael Myers and John Murtha, all of Pennsylvania. All but Kelly are Democrats. Sources told UPI late today that the evidence would likely be presented to grand juries in the coming weeks in New York, Newark, Washington and Philadelphia. Sources say neither Williams nor Murtha actually accepted bribe money and some of the other Congressmen may have taken bribes through aides or other intermediaries. But they say all eight members under investigation made some agreement to trade their influence to the. bribe-paying undercover agents. The question of entrapment, in which suspects are lured into breaking the law, is likely to be a burning question any criminal trials resulting from the FBI investigation. Justice Depart officials say they are confident that members of Congress will be unable to prove thay were trapped in incriminating circumstances.

PAGE 2

community bulletin board Community announcements may be called in between 8 and 11 a.m., or hand carried to the Public Affairs Offihe 7:30 a.m., to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday (excluding holidays). Deadline for publication is noon the previous working day. Bonafide emergency announcements will be accepted anytime. Community announcements will be published not more than once a week for a maximum of three weeksaand then rewritten, condensed, and included in a daily calendar section during the week of the event, Cemercial advertising is prohibited although announcements of available services will be permitted but limited to twice monthly. Announcements for businesses or services requiring command approval may be required to provide proof of a letter of authority. Ads which discriminate on the basis of race, sex, creed, color, or national origin will not be accepted. The Public Affairs Staff reserves the right to edit and regrite all submissions. (ATAnytime/DWH-During Working Hours/ AWH-After Working Hours). OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY is seeking instructors for the spring and summer terms. If you have a Master's degree and are interested in teaching at the college level two evenings per week, please call Mary Kelley at 8307 or 952250. ATTENTION ALL GITMO RESIDENTS 25 persons have shown their desire to form an association for inactive Volunteer Firemen, EMT's and ParaMedics onboard Naval Base Guantanamo Bay. A meeting will be held on Thursday, Feb. 7 at 7 p.m. at Naval Legal Services Branch Office, Bldg 800. This important meeting will be to develope a constitution and bylaws for submission to COMNAVBASE for approval and establishment of this requested association. Transportation can be provided upon request. For further information please call Charles Barbour at 8600 DWH or 951032 AWH. CPO WIVES CLUB will be having another bunko party Monday, Feb. 4 at 7 p.m. at the CPO Club. Tickets will be sold at the door, or you can get them from any CPO wives club member. DO YOU HAVE DIFFICULTY getting your point across in a discussion? Trouble talking to a group? The local chapter of Toastmaster's International may be just what you need. Tuesday evening at 7 p.m. they will hold their regular bi monthly dinner meeting in the Harbor Lights lounge of the CPO Club. If you're interested and would like to attend contact Ace Riviere at 8733 or 95504 during working hours. Come on and join us, you'll enjoy a scrumptious dinner followed by enlightening and invigorating talks. LIKE TO SEW BUT DON'T HAVE the time to sit down and do it? Well, a few of us would like to start a sewing circle. If interested, please call Pam Lawrence at 97148 AWH or Joy Wetherbee at 90204 AWN. WINDJAMMER PHONE NUMBERS CHANGED The following changes have been made in the Windjammer telephone listings: Manager's Office 8733 Duty Manager's Office 95504 MWuRtRmIR Gazette Captain John H. Fetterman Jr. Naval Station Commanding Officer Lt. Richard L. Thompson.Public Affaira Officer Ens. Susan Wehrman. Assistant Public Affairs Officer JOC Bill Reed*.********. **.Editor J02 Breda K. Starkey .Copy Editor JcO J. Michal Porcar .Jurnalist JOSA Paul D. Clifton.*.*.Jouralist rs. Genny Kennedy.Production Assistant Theuancnaoa ettcce is published according to the rulns and rculation tfor ship and station newspapers as outlined in HXOSSP-35 and under the direction of the Naval Baee Public Afcairs Officer. Printed five tines weekly at goernment expese ono government equiment atrho Navy Publication, and Printing Sroico Branch Office, the opinions or statements in news items that appear herein are not to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of COAVBASE or the De parttof ohm aNy. A SPECIAL SERVICES FLEA MARKET will be held on Sunday, Feb. 17 at McCalla Hangar from 12:30 p.m. until all merchandise is-sold. No one will be allowed to set up prior to 12 noon. There will be two sizes of booths to choose form all inside the hnagar; large booths (20x20) for $3 and small booths (10x20) for $2. You must supply your own tables. Anyone wishing to rent a space may do so by coming by the Special Services Office between 7:30 a.m. and 4 p.m. Monday through Friday or by going to booth #1 the day of the Flea Market. Food may be sold only by people with written permission from the Navy Exchange which must be brought to Special Services with booth is rented. ANYONE INTERESTED IN BEING an umpire or score keeper for the Guantanamo Bay Youth Athletics Association, please come out to the officials hut located across form the Windjammer on Tuesday, Feb. 12 at 7 p.m. for a very important meeting. If you are interested but are a bit hesitant because you've never done this type of thing, have no fear, the Guantanamo Bay Youth Athletics Association will be holding clinics ot teach how to umpire and keep official score. So, remember, Feb. 12, 7 p.m. at the officials hut. THE VC-10 ENLISTED WIVES CLUB meeting will be held Wednesday, Feb. 6 at 7:30 p.m. at the VC-10 hut. It's election time so please come and use your vote. All new wives are cordially invited. For more information call 96165. THE NEX/COMMISSARY ADVISORY Board meeting will be held on Tuesday, Feb. 5, at 10:30 a.m. in the McCalla Admin Conference Room. EFFECTIVE FEB. 11, the Navy Exchange Beauty Shop will be open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Monday and will be closed on Wednesdays. These hours are on a trial basis. THE NAVY EXCHANGE INCOME TAX Service hours will be increased to the following: Wednesday 9 to 11 a.m. and 1 to 4 p.m.; Thursday 9 to 11 a.m.; Friday 1 to 4 p.m.; Saturday 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. These go into effect on Feb. 1. For an appointment or further information call 8828 or 8217. CASEWORKERS NEEDED -The Red Cross is in need of volunteer caseworkers to replace those rotating to CONUS. No experience is necessary and the only prerequisite is that you have sincere desire to serve your community. Training classes with subsequent on-the-job training will be conducted. Interested personnel should call 95434 or 8676 DWH for an appointment. LOS ANGELES Community College is now hiring part time instructors for the upcoming terms. This is a good opportunity to increase your income while gaining teaching experience at the community college level. Anyone interested in teaching English, emergency medical technology, air conditioning and refrigeration mechanics, business, real estate, scuba diving, mathematics, broadcasting, or legal assistance, please call Joanne Middlebrooks at 8307. A college degree is not required to teach vocational/technical courses. There are different requirements for each course, so please contact the LACCO office located behind the downtown lyceum for more information. CERTIFIED EMT'S! You are needed to share your valuable training and experience with others in your community. Plenty of Gitmo residents would like to become Certified EMT's also, but we need an instructor. If you are interested in teaching two evenings a week, for eight weeks, making some extra money and sharing your skills with others, please call L.A. Community College at 8307 for more information. THE BARREL CLUB has recently been given permission to survey some tables and chairs from that location. If any organization on the Base would be interested in taking these items please contact Ace Riviere at 8733 DWH and arrangements will be made for interested parties to view the items. Unless claimed by Feb. 4, the items will be disposed of at the town dump on that day. THE FRA BOARD OF DIRECTORS will be meeting at the FRA home in Morin Center on Wednesday, Feb. 13 at 7 p.m. calendar Today Roman Catholic mass, Base Chapel, 11:45 a.m. Drug/Alcohol Education Awareness Workshop, 7-9 p.m. in the Hobk. Tomorrow Nursery school tuitions are being collected from 4:30 to 7 p.m. A late fee of $1 after 7 p.m. Roman Catholic Bible Study, Base Chapel, 7:30 p.m. Roman Catholic mass, Base Chapel, 11:35 a.m. Church of Christ Bible study, McCalla Chapel, 6:45 p.m. (951035). Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, East Bargo Old Nursery School building, 7:45 p.m. (8390, 913240). Wednesday Al Anon meeting, East Bargo Old Nursery School building, 7 p.m Guantanamo Bay Duplicate Bridge Club meeting, BOQ Annex, 7 p.m Take Off Pounds Sensibly meeting, elementary school B-9, 6 p.m. (99197) Jamaican United Fellowship Order of Service prayer meeting, 7:30 p.m., church on Bay Hill Road. Guantanamo Gazette 1:00 General Hospital 1:45 Cartoons 2:00 Ghost and Mrs. Muir 2:30 My Favorite Martian (BW) 3:00 Cannon (BW) 4:00 Cartoons 4:35 Wild Kingdom 5:00 Newswatch 6:00 Hollywood Squares 6:30 Achievement in American Black History 7:00 Wonder Woman 7:55 Notes of Interest 8:00 Rockford Files 9:00 Dallas (Series Ends) 9:55 The Contenders 10:00 Monday Night Movie: Manhunter 11:15 Newswatch Update 11:20 Carol Burnett and Friends 11:45 Bonanza (BW) 12:35 Sign Off Tuesday Morning 9:00 Electric Company 9:30 Cartoons 10:00 Dusty's Treehouse (BW) 10:30 Mr. Ed (BW) 11:00 Here Come the Brides (BW) 12:00 Green Acres (BW) 12:30 Bob, Carol, Ted, & Alice Pay. 2 Monday, February 4, 1980 GOOD NEWS FOR ALL DIVERS! The Reef Raiders Dive Shack has received and installed the long-awaited new filter system and the shack is once again in full operation. Hours of operation are: weekdays from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. and on weekends and holidays from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and again from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. DUE TO THE REHAB, the Daycare Center will be unable to provide lunch until further notice. Parents who wish their children to eat lunch at the Daycare Center must provide a bag lunch. Kool-Aid and snacks will still be available, and we have adequate refrigeration for all lunches. THE NAVY LODGE still has several openings for the months of Jan., Feb. and March. Call 90201 or 8828 for more information. SPECIAL SERVICES will be giving free swimming lessons. Classes will be held on Monday, Thursday and Fridays at the Villamar Pool. All classes will start on Jan. 31 and will run until Feb. 29. The following classes will be held: Infants -6 months to 1 year 1:30 to 2 p.m. Toddlers -2&3 years of age 1:30 to 2 p.m. Adult Beginners -2 to 3 p.m. Adult Advance Beginners -3 to 4 p.m. All interested persons should contact Special Services no later than Jan. 30. For more information or registration contact 951160. THE ENCYCLOPEDIA SALES REPRESENTATIVE will be at the Navy Exchange from February 5 to the 18th. Navy Exchange customers will reveive a 28% discount. Convenient terms are available. ATTENTION ARTISTS AND CRAFTSPERSONS The Caribbean Arts and Crafts Workshop will hold it's regular monthly meeting on Feb. 12 at 7 p.m. at the workshop on Marina Point. Al Brake will give a silverwork demonstration. Diana Groendyke will share slides from the "Crafts Day for Kids" day last spring. Arts shows and other spring projects will be discussed. All members and interested persons are urged to attend. For more information call Carolyn Dunn at 8462. See you there! MOVIES Downtown -The Frisco Kid, PG McCalla -Slavers, R Marine -Players, PG Leeward -Beyond the Poseidon Adventure, PG WindjammerNo Movie Post #46 -The Late Great Planet Earth, PG Como club -From Noon Till Three,PG TVN LO(@

PAGE 3

Monday, February 4, 1980 News Today's Woman by Jan Bernard An old West Indian legend has it that earliest man wandered starving through the savannah and was found by a Carib God, "Kabo Tano," who took pity on him. Kabo Tano created a huge tree, on which hung all the food and fruits he needed to satiate his needs--mangoes, coconuts, corn cassava, plums--each man cut a branch, so today food is grown near almost every Caribbean home. Today with the integration of over seven cultures, the Caribbean cuisine is exquisite. Let us now experience one of the oldest and for me the ultimate in Caribbean seafood delights--Seafood Boucan. There is a saying from some of the finer restaurants in the Caribbean that Seafood Boucan cannot be prepared beyond the environs of the Carib.And what masquerades elswhere under this exciting name is merely sh stew. However, to the gourmet, substitution is a necessity when t market is lacking. I have found that improvisation is one of the delights of Seafood Boucan. This exciting dish was originated by the buccaneers back in the fifteenth century. These filibusters and freebooters were escaped convicts, castaways or political or religious refugees of almost every nation, but mainly these were French, English and Dutch. Before turning pirates, these men lived peacefully in the hills of the islands, where they hunted in pairs and traded with the locals or foreign ships that pulled into port. When they did take their activitied to sea, they joined forces with the English and French "Letters of Marque" making their activities technically legal. This, of course, was not pleasing to the Spanish and an attempt was made to starve these men out of Spanish owned territory, by killing off the animals they hunted. So, the buccaneers united into "The Confederacy of the Brethren of the Coast," turned pirates, and got their revenge by plundering Spanish property and killing every Spainard they could. It is said that in the old days, at the headquarters of these sea rovers (Port Oryal, Jamaica), a hearty bowl of Seafood Boucan was served upon their return with treasures from Spanish conquests. SEAFOOD BOUCAN lb. conch 2 langoustes 3 small snappers 2 cups shrimp 3 crabs 1 dozen oysters 1 lb. eel tomato concentrate 4 tomatoes all onions s black pepper s red pepper 4 cloves garlic 4 tbs parsley 2 tbs thyme 1 bay leaf 1 cub MSG Suggested wine: 1. Dress the various fishes and cut into appropriate portions 2. In a large deep pan, cook onions, mashed garlic and escallion until translucent 3. Add sliced tomatoes and remainder of spices -cook for five minutes on low fire 4. Layer fish in pot -add boiling water to level of fish 5. Add tomato concentrate and let simmer for 15 to 20 minutes 6. Serve in indicidual bowls over steaming hot rice Chenin Blanc (Inglenook) Cabernet Sauvignon (even though a red wine goes superbly with this meal) Next week we will have dinner in one of the nations that sets the fashion in the art of good living -France. HOW TO GET MORE FROM YOUR RANGE Here are some general tips that will help you operate your range with greater efficiency and economy -Do not leave your oven or range on when it is not in use and never use it for purposes other than cooking. -Whenever possible. use your oven rather than the top of the range. An insulated oven retains heat and is normally on only about one-third of the time it is in use. -Plan oven cooking so that more than one dish can be prepared at the same time. Use unoccupied space to efor another meal then refrigera r freeze it. -Don't be an "oven peeper." Every time you open the door, significant beat is lost. -Use flat-bottomed, clean utensils which fit the heating unit you are using. You won't lose heat to the atmosphere unnecessarily. -Pots and pans with tight fitting lids to retain heat will allow you to cook with lower heat settings. --Reduce the heat of a surface unit once boiling begins. High heat settings will only make the water evaporate faster. Serving Wherever The U.S. Military Presence Is Needed by PNCM J. L. Bradford Human Resources Management Program Manager Why observe a special month uniquely for blacks; are not all citizens of the U.S. Americans regardless of color? Why is it necessary to call attention to our citizenry of the many contributions blacks have made in the development of America? The answers to these questions have been obscured until recent years, in the nations past history because of overt racial prejudice and discrimination against persons of color. Unfortunately, some Americans have been led to believe that blacks contributed nothing noteworthy to the development of America. Afro-American contributions were either lost, stolen or ignored by design until recent years when most Americans experienced a moral re-awakening, which shook their consciousness to a higher level of racial awareness of black people contributions to the American dream. People of African descent have rightfully been called America' s oldens immigrant minority. Yet, until recently, American history books have ignored blacks, or referred only to slavery and have rarely touched upon the individual achievement of black Americans whose contributions in the professions, public service, industry, labor, education, religion, sports and the arts have so enriched the lifestyle of our great nation. USE YOUR HEAD! IT'S A GOOD PLACE TO PUT A MOTORCYCLE HELMET. A comprehensive study has shown conclusively that repeal of helmet use laws in a number of States resulted in a 30 percent increase in motorcycle fatalities. Insurance Institute for Highway Safety experts compared fatality and injury rates between States which still require the use of a helmet and States which repealed helmet use laws. Repeal of helmet use laws in the U.S. dropped the usage from 100 percent down to about 50 percent. The study shows that the repeal of the use laws increased motorcyclist mortality rates by about 38 percent. In addition, the study's America is now rediscovering these "lost" notable balck Americans and according them their rightful place in history. Their story is a moving narrative of sacrifice, pain, commitment and accomplishment that spans more than two centuries. It is a story that can help to extned the true spirit of protherhood through understanding across the length and breadth of our country. February will be a time for all Americans to reflect, be more responsive, and become more aware of individual deeds, contributions, and achievements of blacks. This month, beginning Feb. 16 through Feb. 22, TV 8 will feature seven young blacks who will do scripts in memory of a group of prominent black citizens, some famous, others little known, whose personal achievements from colonial times to the present, have been adjudged of importance not only to black Americans but to all Americans. results, show that the mortality rate among unhelmeted riders is almost twice as high as that among helmeted riders. Before 1967 only three States had motorcycle helmet use laws. In 1967, Congress passed a Federal standard for highway safety programs which required the States to have motorcycle helmet use laws in order to qualify for certain safety program and highway funds. However, the financial penalty provisions of the legislations were removed by Congress in 1976, resulting in the repeal of helmet use laws in 26 States by the end of 1978. The report cites several other motorcycle fatality studies which reflect the fact that head injury rates of riders without helmets are between two and three times greatet than helmeted riders. And, the studies show that among fatally injured riders the difference is even larger. Head injury rates for riders not wearing helmets were between three and nine times greater than for riders wearing helmets. The. International Year of the Child has come to a close, but the Consumer Information Center still has numerous free children's publications that will serve as a reminder of the spirit of this special year for everyone who is a child, knows a child, or is still a child at heart: *The Thing the Professor Forgota humorous publication with an important message, takes children on a journey in rhyme to learn about the four food groups. Kids are pretty quick to form tastes for favorite and unfavorite foods and sometimes you almost have to make a game of teaching them some basic nutrition information, which this publication does. Another side of childhood is learning to handle feelings like sadness, guilt, fear, joy and anger. Anger is one of the hardest. Dealing with the Angry Child, from the National Institute of Mental Health, helps parents better understand and deal with children's. Smokey Bear's Story of the Forest, from the U. S. Department of Agriculture, gets children involved in keeping the forests safe for all of us. Smokey tells just how to go about putting out matches and campfires so you'll know they're really out. Other 'free publications include Children and Television, Helping Children Make Career Plans, Footsteps: A Parenting Guide, and A Pareit's Guide to Immunization. To get any of these publications, write to Consumer Indormation Center, Pueblo, Colo. 81009. Captain Gibowicz, Public Works Officer, presented Mr. Lionel Emde, Welder Foreman with Public Works Metal Trades Branch, a 25 year Length-of-Service Award for his many years of dedicated service to the U.S. Government. Black History Guantanamo Gazette Page 3

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Page 4 Guantanamo Gazette THE SPORTSMAN By Mark M. Meinero The World seems headed for two Olympic-type events in 1980. One would be the regularly-scheduled 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow. The other is the U.S.-proposed alternative games for nations angered by the Soviet actions in Afghanistan. For those who believe sports is trivial, the alternative Olympics is an easy solution. To them, all this talk means .is that a bunch of young Americans won't spend part of the summer in Moscow. But for those who take athletic competition seriously, a so-called "Free World Games" may be a hard thing to swallow. American athletes have worked hard the last four years preparing for Moscow, and they'll have to be persuaded that the alternative event is worth their effort. To make a counter-olympics succeed, the U.S. needs the support of several key nations--many of them not among the great world powers. For instance, the African nations of Kenya and Tanzania provide some of the world's finest track athletes. If those countries attend the alternative games, they would lend respectability to them and diminish the Moscow Olympics. The idea of trying to undercut the Olympics is sad, but if it's going to happen, it's going to happen, and the counter-Olympics should try for the best competition possible--if only to give American athletes something worthwhile for their effort. NBA NHL If a man's clothes are going to start talking before he does, they should say the right things-even on the fairway. Fortunately, now there are so many ways to make fashion statements with a sporty air, say fashion experts, that with just a few guidelines a man can stay right on course. o 0 / Philadelphia Chicago Quebec Hartford 5 St. Louis Buffalo Minnesota Edmonton 3 4 5 New 4 3 6 5 Boston 3(Tie) Toronto 2 New York Rangers 4 York Islanders 3 Detroit 2 Vancouver 0 Colorado 2 Los Angeles 3 EASTERN CONFERENCE ATLANTIC DIVISION Boston Philadelphia New York Washington New Jersey w 40 38 27 23 22 CENTRAL DIVISIO Atlanta San Antonio Indiana Houston Cleveland Detroit 32 29 26 25 23 14 L 13 14 28 29 32 23 25 28 28 32 40 WESTERN CONFERENCE MIDWEST DIVISION Kansas City Milwaukee Denver Chicago Utah 35 29 19 18 18 PACIFIC DIVISION Seattle Los Angeles Phoenix San Diego Portland Golden State 38 38 35 28 26 16 23 27 36 35 38 16 17 19 29 29 38 GB 1 1/2 14 16 1/2 18 1/2 2 1/2 5 1/2 6 9 17 1/2 5 14 1/2 14 1/2 16 1/2 3 11 1/2 12 1/2 22 For safe '73 Vega wagon, available AT for best offer, present owner is leaving the Rock, for information or offer please call Chuck Bishop at 8709 DWN. Infant seat, $1; dressing table, $20; bassinet with pad and skirt, $5; carriage/stroller, $20; baby swing, $20; baby walker, $7; baby scales, $1, 64485 AT. '68 Chevy Impala, 307 engine, very good condition; '72 Maverick, 200 cubic inch, new paing job, good condition, 8801 DWH or 64294 AWH, ask for Riley. Girl's clothes, sizes 0-1, 2, 3 and 4; summer and winter maternity clothes, sizes 12-16; two nursing gowns, 97168 AT. '63 Dodge, runs great, $300, available Feb. 8, 96160 AT. Flight bag, Jefferson Computer and Guide Manuel, plotter, sectional maps, log book, Aim Manuel Part I, aviation weather, privite pilots handbook, owners manuel for a Cessna 150, 24"x36" color photo of a Cessna 150 inst panel and other materials, $75 firm, 8172 DHW, for Rick Fele, 8280 AWH. CAMPBELL CONFERENCE PATRICK DIVISION W L Philadelphia 35 3 NY Rangers 24 21 NY Islanders 24 20 Atlanta 23 22 Washington 13 30 SMYTHE DIVISION Chicago St. Louis Edmonton Vancouver Colorado Winnipag 22 22 17 16 14 14 WALES CONFERENCE NORRIS DIVISION Montreal Los Angeles Pittsburgh Detroit Hartford 28 21 19 20 16 ADAMS DIVISION Fuffalo Boston Minnesota Quebec Toronto 33 31 23 20 21 18 22 25 28 30 33 18 22 22 24 23 14 14 17 24 26 Two Honda 100's CL and CB, both bikes complete, one with piston, rings, chain, battery and cyl. All mechanically sound, do not have experience to get running, both bikes look sharp, $390 or best offer, miscellancous parts included, 8531 DWN, 90263 AWH. T 13 9 7 7 8 13 9 10 8 8 7 6 9 11 7 10 6 7 10 7 4 PTS. 83 57 55 53 34 57 53 44 40 36 35 62 51 49 47 42 72 69 56 47 46 An important look this season is the knit shirt, according to Burton B. Ruby, president of Jaymar-Ruby, the nation's leading manufacturer of quality slacks and a sportswear innovator. The knit shirt has been put into silhouettes ranging from the classic three-button polo to the rugby shirt. Color combinations are rich-blue and white, rust and beige, mint and forest green and even raspberry anr vanilla. With them are sleek, lightweight slacks with details such as topstitching and sidebuckle trimmed waistbands. These slacks and top from Jaymar-Ruby's Cary Middlecoff line keep a man's looks up to par. The beige and rust three-button shirt features short sleeves, a rugby collar made from the coordinate slack fabric and arrested J signature. The beige slacks have an inlaid waistband with belt loops, rear patch pockets, topstitched slanted front pockets and flared bottoms. Looking like you could get a hole-in-one just might make the difference. Sony stereo receiver, 40 watts per channel, $200; huffy bicycle built for two, $50; 15.7 cu ft. refirgerator, frost free, $225, all prices negotiable, 8554 DWH, 95537 AWH, ask for Shirley. Two scuba pro 152 adjustable reserve '75 Chevy Monza, new tires, excel'J-valves, reserves are adjustable lent mileage, blue book value from 300 to 600 PSI, valves have $2350, must sell leaving rock, installed tank fill indicators, $1500 firm, 8717 DWH. brand new, never been used, make offer, see GNT2 Lemire, USS MOOS'71 Ford Galaxy 500, A/C, p/s, p/b, BRUGGER (00 980). body in good condition, very dependable transportation, $700 crib with mattress, $45; high firm, 8114 OWN, 96119 AT. chair, $7; 80' privacy fence, $50; Bissell carpet sweeper, good condition, $5; wooden potty chair, with tray, like new, $3, 96110 AT. '74 Honda CB 450, $750; girl's 26" 3 speed bike, needs work, have extra parts, $25; stereo console, needs work, make offer, 98269 AWH, 64258 DWH. ENERGY. We can't afford to waste it. LOCAL SPORTS BASKETBALL SCORES PWD 49 Marine Barracks 45 PWD edged Marine Barracks 49-45 in overtime. PWD blew a first half 1wad of 32-16 and let the Marines tie the game at the end of regulation time by a score of 43 all. Leading scorers for PWD were Overton with 14 and Scott with 13. Marines were led by Miles with 14 and Gaston with 10. NAVSTA White 58 Co. L 40 Russell with 15 points and Hill with 11, led NAVSTA White to their triumph over Co. L 58-40. At half time Whiet was only 4 points ahead but in second half outscored Co. L by 14 points. Tony Long, totaled 20 points, to lead Co. L in scoring. NAS NAVSTA Blue 45 38 NAS defeated NAVSTA Blue by a score of 45-38 in Wednesday night's game. Leading scorers for Blue were Lewis with 10 and Mayes and Whitaker with 8. NAS was led by Warren with 13. Dacor CGL-24 gusta gun; large Dacor ME43 spear gun; booties, size 7-8 and 8-9; muscellaneous gun parts; butt plates; shock lines; double barb with keeper tips, 952289 AT. Two Westinghouse A/C, both 10,000 BTU; two Fedders A/C, both 10,000 BTU, 98181 AWH. Wanted Old magazines of all kinds to be used for art projects, 96110 AT. Conshelf model USD regulator, any year, any condition, 952289 AWH. Actress to be used in local film production, must by 18-35 years old, phone DWH at 95469 or contact DH2 Armstrong or M-202 Gold Hill Barracks, must be willing to work hard. Outside television antenna, 97253 AT. Pick up truck in good mechanical condition, 8626 OWH, 951060 AWH. Giveaway Mirro-Matic 10 cup glass coffee pot, 96110 AT. Monday, February 4, 1980 NBA results All-star game at Landover, Maryland East 144 West 136 (Overtime) College basetball roundup Framingham State 93 Thomas 76 Hofstra 73 L.I.U. 56 Louisville 76 St. John's 71 Stonehill 64 Central Connecticut state 58 Western New England 89 Husson 75 Pacific 65 California-Santa Barbara 60 NHL results There are no counties in either Louisiana or Alaska. What other States call counties are called parishes in Louisiana and divisions in Alaska. classifieds Classified advertisements may be sent to the Gazette by Guard Mail or hand carried to the Public Affairs Office 7:30 a.m., to 4:30 p.m., Monday through.Friday (excluding holidays). Deadline for publication is noon the previous working day. Ads are limited to 40 words and published not more than twice weekly per submission. Commercial advertising is prohibited although announcements concerning available services will be permitted but limited to twice monthly. Ads for businesses or services requiring command approval may be required to provide proof of a letter of authority. Ads which discriminate on the basis of race, sex, creed, color, or national origin will not be accepted. The Public Affairs Staff reserves the right to edit and rewrite all submissions. (AP-Anytime/ DWH-During Working Hours/AWH=After Working Hours). _____________________ -4to4


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