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Guantanamo Gazette

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Title:
Guantanamo Gazette
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U.S. Naval Base
Place of Publication:
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Publisher:
U.S. Naval Base
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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Copyright,Guantanamo Gazette. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Preceded by:
Gitmo Gazette
Succeeded by:
Daily Gazette
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Guantanamo Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Daily Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Bay Gazette
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Indian
Related Item:
Sunday Supplement
Related Item:
Gitmo Review

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Tide, Sun, Temp. / Weather Forecast

Hig htide10: 6pm artly cloudy f~Lw tie 410: p6m t mostly clear. S wse -- 7:23am We d inds S 8-12 n. net--- :21pm knos.Ba
05 t u conditions 1-2
'w----- 71 The Navy .6 oney shoke-b eddaity~ feet.
Volue 31, No. 2 33 U.S. Naval Base, Guantanamo> Bay, Cuba Tuesday, December 7, 1976




Gitmo residents gather for Cuban-American Friendship Day







CUBAN'-AMERICAN FRIENDSHIP DAY Gitmo residents gathered at Phillips Park yesterday to
celebrate the eighth annual Cuban-American Friendship Day. Highlight of the activities was presentation of a 45 year service pin to a Cuban employe of the Ship Repair Department. The San~ Juan, Puerto Rico, banid "1Us" provided music for dancing and listening entertainment."Ml Long lines formed when the highlight of the menu was ready to be served, roast pig. Also featured was steamship round, fried chicken, rice, black beans, red beans, plantain chips, tamales, salad, rolls, plus hamburgers and hot dogs for the children. (Photos by FLTAVCENCARIB)





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You're 4 Good Mn Ford welcomes Italian Prime Minister Andreotti


,WASHINGTON (UFI)--Pres. Ford, the White House. Offfi_Ial- -said no Chalie Bro n shed led endng moth f nar ecls'inother-similar sate ,visits >ar~e schedCharie Bow~n sche uled endng amont of ear ecluion before Jimmy Carter' s inaugurawelcomed Italian Prime Mnister A M ' uled, "You'rei A Good Man, Charlie Giulio Andreotti to the United tion Jan. 20.
Brown", a musical comedy based on States yesterday with assurances gPres. Ford said yesterday he plans he comic strip "Peanuts" by that the two countries will remain -to remain active in the Republican arfles Schulz, will be presented united in defense and purhsuit of Party after he leaves office. He ~-by the Guanitanamo. Bay Little Theatre world peace. said he will not sit on the sideThursday through Saturday at the Ford said, "We are friends, we are lines. Ford made his statement at Mforin Center International Rooem. allies." Ford stood beside Andreotti $1. 50 for children. Phone reserva- crisp weather on the< White House National Committee. News Secy. Ron tions may be made by calling 952250 lawn-; Nessen said the President's future 1AT The President said, 'We have worked plans do not include running for any together and solved problems togeth- office. er. IWe will do so in the future.
O'Neill chose~n to succeed Few countries have so special a place .Colem an rejects air in the hearts of the American
people."
After similar expressions of b g r p s l
Albert as House Speaker friendship by Andreotti, the two men b g r p s l moved to the Oval Office to begin night. In his toast to Andreotti, WASHINGTON (UPI)--Transportation talks that U.S. officials said would Ford noted Italy's economic and Sc.WlimClmnhsrjce WASHINGTON (AP)--House Democrats focus on Italy's severe economic


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Tuesday, December 7, 1976 Guantanamo Gazette Page 3


ODU spring semester, to begin Gitmo

The Guantanamo Bay extension of Course descriLptions will be availOld Dominion Un ersity will present able at the library next week. o programs for the spring semest- Each academic course costs $26
the Academic Program, which per semester hour. The bounty D il o g ue
fer : a variety of three a n r f our� ..... oiu rses �r atnge in ':cost from $15 to l Yl. l l' � > . ..+ - .
cedit hour college courses, and $30 per course.
the Bounty Program,. which includes Military personnel are eligiFle Ian1y curses of geneal interest for tuition assistance amounting to (not for credit, just for fun). 75 per cent of the cost of the acaThe academic courses for the demic courses under the tuition aid
spring 1977 semester are algebra program. Tuition assistance ap112, English 101 (at Leeward), 'plicat ons should be submitted in- Dear Editor,
physics 102, principles of manage- mediately. If you are interested
ment' 325, Spanish 101, and stage in this aid, see your education of- At the present there is a winter slow pitch softball league. It is the
craft on Mondays and Wednesdays. ficer. result of the efforts of many people to have a recreation program and as
On Tesdays and Thurs'ays the Registration for both programs it turned out willing to pay for it out of their own pockets.
classes are children 's literature will be Jan. 8 and 9. If you want The position of Special Services was if this program was desired they 425, English 102, oral interpreta- to pre-register or if you have any would help in the organization of it only, there would and could not be
tion 201,' principles of real estate questions, you may contact Nancy any financial help as it was not in this year's budget.
319, general psychology 201, Spanish Held at the OD office (in the A total of 12 teams entered the league, each team paying $100 to enter.
102 and trigonometry 113. library) from noon to 1 p.m. on As $1,320 was needed, Special Services stated they would make up the $120
> - ,. Tuesdays and Thursdays or most short. .
The bounty courses are career de- mornings at 85652 On Leeward side Both softball fields are in need of repairs. The rains have caused
velopment, consumer slaw, conver- contact Gae Cherry between noon ruts, holes, rocks everywhere, and bases are in need of replacement. When sational Spanish, figure drawing, a - and I'p.m. on Wednesdays phone teams placed their complaints of field conditions, Special Services used findingyour way back, shell talk, 64398.' For more iformation on the the old Gitmo reasoning, the fields are no worse than last year and beeffective writing, the pre-school Bounty Program contact Sue Law, sides there are worse fields at other bases and commands, so "play ball."
child, and house plants. phone 85700. ' The first weekend of league play there were two serious injuries, one
,, ' shoulder separation and one damaged knee. One or both of these injuries was the direct result of field conditions. Not only are these two players Court faces more death penalty cases lost to their teams for ;the next two to three months but also to their
commands.
In n usined to-pgeopinion, Does Special Services not owe a responsibility to its public in recreathe court ruled the improper exclu- " Na te si' I have bee. attached to Gitmo for two and one half years and have seen n o improvements to the softball fields, and if existing Gitmo attitudes voicing reservations about capital exist nor will my relief. punishment was sufficient for re4 versal. 'The court held that poten- Name withheld tial jurors must be thoroughly
questioned about their stand on the Dear Editor,
death penalty, and found to be irrevocably opposed to it, before The letter to the editor concerning winter softball and Cooper Field they can be excluded. facilities is a two part question. The first of which; the paying for The decision also strikes down the winter softball I feel is "a cheap shot", the second, the playing conthe death
WSHINGTON (PI)--The U.S. Supreme As for condemned killer Gary The two injuries noted in the above letter are regrettable as are any
Co dealt' with the death penalty Gilmore, he missed his date with personal 'injuries and corrective action on the fields have been taken when
again yesterday in two separate death' in U-tah yesterday because of areas of safety and playing effectiveness are discovered. In this incases. the temporary say issued by the stance, all bases have been replaced: on three fields and one of the ruts
From Texas came the case of Robert Supreme Court last week. corrected. The other rut identified was to have been corrected on Dec. 3
Excel-'White, who, like Gary Gilmore The Supreme Court has given Utah prior to this weekend's games, 'but rain prohibited corrective action. All
in Utah, wants his scheduled execu- until 5 p.m. today to submit'argu- coaches willjbe advised of this hazard.'
tion to take place. meats as to why Gilmore should be Cooper Field is not an ideal playing surface and'there is-only so much
nyesterday's ruling, with allowed to-die as he wishes, that can be done to improve'conditions. The fields are dragged frequently
Jstice Wi'liami R'ehnquist dissent- B ut even in' his' isolation cell at and an effort attorneys will have time topre- the second delay of his scheduled Cooper Field would be nice but the initial and maintenance costs would be
pre formal appeal of his case. execution.> 'exorbitant. Planting grass would have similar fiscal drawbacks plus the
White was originally scheduled to Acting through his attorney, fact that Cooper Field does not grow grass very successfully.
in te electric chair Friday, Gilmorereleased an'ope" letter to ' With the limited staff available to the Special Services sports directnd wrote the court nearly two weeks his mother, asking her to disas- or, it is essential that the personnel utilizing the field point out
asking it to ignore his attor- sociate herself 'from the NAACP Legal specific problem areas and if possible, propose a method of correcting
ey ples. e as been on death Defense Fund, which'is pressing his them.
owfor a l e ortwo years, appeal. Gilmor' told his mother When rumors concerning a winter recreation softball season were investivicted of murderig three persons that he agrees wit-h the' sentence gated by Special Services it was determined there was in fact a large
duiring a $60 robbery. and added that dying 'ain't no big group of people who desired to play recreational softball. It was made clear to all interested parties at that time that the Special Services a separate development, the '' budget, already in a deficit position, did not allow Special Services to ics voted six-t-three to over- New ing begins fund am additional softball season. SpecialServices offered to coordiu the death penaltymeted out to nate a season, provide what equipment it could and maintain the fields as
cniced murderer Curfew Davis in while waders met well a~s possible. ofpsecietaswshdteabvwsagn
aeorgia'When' the meeting of prspective teams was held'the above was again
pointed out and several options proposed to cut the costs; eg: the teams

ichard tries' to convene BEIRUT (AP)--New fighting between would provide volunteer umpires for the games; thereby, reducing the cost Moslems and Christians broke out 'to almost nothing or having one paid umpire at each game which would cut in southern Lebanon yesterday, as the cost in half. ' The teams voted to play regulation rules with two paid leaders of both sides met in Beirut umpires and divide the costs bEtween the teams.
for the first time,-in six months. It must be pointed ouit that this is a recreational season in addition to GENVA -hode n conference' in the nothrn city of Tripoli, the diverseand continuing Special Servicesathletic program, and it is in
chairn Ivorichard tried to con-' 20 persons were reported killed in that way no different than golf, bowling, sailing or any other of the ec
ea fu1 plenary session in a bloody battle between rival P.al- reational activities for which participants pay for their own recreation.
yesterday, but the talks estinian guerrillas. At a cost approximately $5 per person for 22 games of softball it is
ygot bogged -in an ex- also very inexpensive recreation.'
reover last Special Services does have a responsibility to provide a safe place for weeeRoman Artillery duels and sporadic the public to participate in sports. The new sports director will confighting were reported ne th tinuously be working to upgrade the facilities, however, in a climate Stae, poses o austere funding where sports are. competing for financial support not
nd whi delegation flredas te presence in the area of e only with the other recreational programs but also with mission essential
Rcard tid to find some common Syrian-dominated Arab peace fo~rce. requirements it will be a- continual- process.
grond frngotiations on setting The outburst came as Pales-tinian I
guerrillas and Syria reportedly T.D. Hardin Tearguments erupted as Riichard r eached an agreement on th guerri- Lt. USN
,pae to flyback to L~ondo lla refusal to surrender heavy' Special Services officer
fo e consultations with Bitish weap s. This would, avert a threat-' -!
'a- n --to brea - e -e1 showdown with - -_ he yriAdomi-





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Eastern~~;=i Diiso W, L lf rnh i th tir an the Begl deea thei Newi York/iiiiii!7
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N..Gat 0 0Okad ledyasrdo aig adCnintils.912o ika 522
Philadelphi 3 1 0 the playoffs, amassed their highest ; .... ii~, ii i!, 1 ii).i 7i i ;i /i %ii ii
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Sa rnic h ie of thi wee's i Albny-ha 63,O'!!i S. Vermon 6 OT S ,Van JseSt 63, B.m a lv 5 NewOrlans4 9 0 he rosFoobal Cntet i D..oi 73, Dse.mark8 Tech Bap' 71 Butler 63, Loyol (Cicamgo)6 Atat oke.Dctrmse n fte Jmson9,MoeedS.8 eri nv 1,OkadUi.4



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Tide, Sun, Temp. Weather Forecast High tide 10: 36pm 4h. Partly cloudy Low tide 4:l7pm "g to mostly clear. SuVt e -7:23am r iKg Winds S 8-12 h ----86 all, U 02;tutt Iconditions 1-2 Low------71 The Nav' on ko-baed da feet. Volume 31, No. 233 U.S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Tuesday, December 7, 1976 Gitmo residents gather for Cuban-American Friendship Day CUBAN-AMERICAN FRIENDSHIP DAY: Gitmo residents gathered at Phillips Park yesterday to celebrate the eighth annual Cuban-American Friendship Day. Highlight of the activities was presentation of a 45 year service pin to a Cuban employee of the Ship Repair Department. The San Juan, Puerto Rico, band "Us" provided music for dancing and listening entertainment. Long lines formed when the highlight of the menu was ready to be served, roast pig. Also featured was steamship round, fried chicken, rice, black beans, red beans, plantain chips, tamales, salad, rolls, plus hamburgers and hot dogs for the children. (Photos by FLTAVCENCARIB) I You're A Good Man Charlie Brown scheduled ending welcomed "You're A Good Man, Charlie Giulio A Brown", a musical comedy based on States y he comic strip "Peanuts" by that the arles Schulz, will be presented united i by the Guantanamo Bay Little Theatre world pe Thursday through Saturday at the Ford s Morin Center International Room. allies." Tickets are $2 for adults and at state $1.50 for children. Phone reservacrisp we tions may be made by calling 952250 lawn. AT. The PrE O'Neill chosen to succeed Albert as House Speaker WASHINGTON (AP)--House Democrats have chosen Thomas O'Neill to succeed Carl Albert as speaker of the House. O'Neill, of Massachusetts, ran unopposed. He'll be succeeded as majority leader by Jim Wright of Texas, who defeated California's Phillip Burton by one vote at yesterday's caucus. O'Neill had made it known that he'd prefer his successor to be almost anyone else but Burton, who had been viewed as the favorite. In an emotional speech, O'Neill told fellow-Democrats that, as speaker, he intends to assure that Congress remains a co-equal partner in government with the White House. He cited unemployment and the economy as the nation's most overriding challengers. And, concluding his speech, he said, "You have given me a trust. When I lay the gavel down, I want to walk out and have you say, 'He kept the trust.' O'Neill's formal election by the full House in January is considered automatic. Ford welcomes Italian Prime Minister Andreotti NGTON (UPI)--Pres. Ford, a month of near seclusion, Italian Prime Minister Andreotti to the United yesterday with assurances e two countries will remain in defense and pursuit of ace. aid, "We are friends, we are Ford stood beside Andreotti e ceremonies in sunny but ather on the White House esident said, "We have worked .and solved problems togethwill do so in the future. tries have so special a place Learts of the American similar expressions of ip by Andreotti, the two men > the Oval Office to begin night In his toast to Andreotti, hat U.S. officials said would Ford noted Italy's economic and Italy's severe economic political woes, but expressed con* and Communist political fidence in the nation's ability to ere, two subjects that went recover from its problems. oned in the outdoor speeches. Andreotti is the first major forent and Mrs. Ford hosted a eign leader to visit Ford since the inner for Andreotti last President lost his bid to stay on at rer begins series of meetings PLAINS, Ga. (AP)--Pres.-elect Jimmy Carter travels to Atlanta today to begin a series of meetings with prospects for cabinet posts in his administration. The meetings will continue in Washington later in the week. Carter already has named Cyrus Vance as his choice for secretary of state and Atlanta banker Thomas Lance for budget director. Carter would not give any names on his list of other potential cabinet members. But this weekend an aide said attorney John Doar and Minnesota Congressman Bob Bergland were among the prospects. It's been reported that Doar is being considered for attorney-general and Bergland for agriculture secretary. Carter said yesterday he is not yet convinced there should be a tax cut next year. Carter made the statement one day after Lance said a tax cut was virtually certain. Carter talked to reporters after voting in the election for mayor of his hometown of Plains, Ga., in which his brother, Billy, was a candidate. The voters of Plains spoke yesterday and said they did not want Billy Carter as their mayor. And so, by a vote of 90-71, they turned down his second bid for the post. Carter says he isn't disappointed he lost, and he will try again in two years. the White House. Officials said no other similar state visits are scheduled before Jimmy Carter's inauguration Jan. 20. Pres. Ford said yesterday he plans to remain active in the Republican Party after he leaves office. He said he will not sit on the sidelines. Ford made his statement at a White House meeting with the executive committee of the Republican National Committee. News Secy. Ron Nessen said the President's future plans do not include running for any office. Coleman rejects air bags proposals WASHINGTON (UPI)--Transportation Secy. William Coleman has rejected proposals to require air bags in cars. Coleman suggested instead a twoyear demonstration project beginning in 1978 and affecting only a relatively small number of cars. Coleman said he was convinced that the use of air bags is a good idea, but he feared the public would reject the concept if it were forced on the consumer. He said, "I believe that a demonstration program will increase significantly the chance that passive restraints will ultimately prove acceptable, and I am convined that their potential safety benefits warrant this action." Coleman proposed that at least two automobile manufacturers sign contracts with the government under which they will offer for sale beginning in Sept. 1978 a combined total of 500,000 air-bag-equipped cars, 250,000 to be available in each of the two years. That compares to sales for 1976 of 10-million automobiles.

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Page 2 Today's meetings THE SURE LOSERS WEIGHT REDUCING CLUB will meet at 7 p.m. For more information call Pat Wayne at 98223, Loretta Siers at 90212 or Beverly Ferreira at 951051. CUB SCOUTS will meet in the Cub Scout's Hut, 6th St., Villamar at 7:30 p.m. For more information call Pat Smith at 97168. GITMO BAY BRIDGE CLUB meets at 7 p.m. at the COMO Club. Call Jim Cossey at 85149 AWH. The club is open to all base residents. .L LGuantanamo Gazette ,L Community Bulletin Board Tuesday, December 7, 1976 Tomorrow's meetings BIMGO wjIi a. i s .d he NCO Club beginning at 8 p.m. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet. For more information call 95454 DWH. GITMO SELF DEFENSE CLUB will meet at Marblehead Hall 6-8 p.m. CHURCH OF CHRIST BIBLE CLASS will meet at 7 p r ,-, further information call 90108 or 97191 AT. CATHOLIC CHOIR PRACTICE will be held in the base chapel at 8 p.m. Anyone interested is encouraged to atter.d. Clubs and Organizations REEF RAIDERS Attention all Reef Raiders. At 4 p.m. Sunday, there will be a picnic for all members and their families at the big cabana at Windmill Beach. Married couples are asked to bring a covered dish and single people are asked to bring snacks. Beverages will be provided. Diving may be done before or after the picnic. For further information, contact Dora McGee at 951163. CIVIC COUNCIL The Civic Council will hold a meeting on Dec. 16 at 7:30 p.m. at the Caribbean Arts and Crafts building. This is a very important meeting as a vote will be taken to amend the constitution. All members are urged to attend. People in housing are invited to attend. For futher information, call Judy Goodbar at 90251. TEEN CLUB The Teen Club is looking for volunteers, both adults and teenagers to help clean, decorate, and repair the club. For father information, call the director Steve Yerran at 96235. In January 1977, the Teen Club will feature new activities such as pool and ping pong tournaments. There will also be basketball tournaments, shuffleboard lessons, and one or two dances a month. The Teen Club will provide the activity if you will provide the people. CPO ADVISORY BOARD The CPO Advisory Board will meet tomorrow at 1 p.m. in the topside lounge of the CPO Club. This will be a very important meeting, as a new advisory group chairman will be elected. All commands are reminded that approval has been received to implement the procedure of selecting one advisory group representative for each 25 CPOs or fraction thereof assigned. Implementation of this procedure is encouraged prior to tomorrow's meetings. HOSPITAL ENLISTED WIVES The Hospital Enlisted Wives Club will meet Thursday at 7:30 p.m. at the home of Judy Hamilton, Corinaso Point 5. There will be a cookie swap at the meeting. FIL-AM CLUB To usher in the holiday season, the FIL-AM Club will hold a preChristmas dinner dance on Dec. 11 at 7:30 p.m. The music will be provided by Orbiting Elements. Tickets to the affair are available by calling 85410 DWH, 90183 or 90169 AWH. CARIBBEAN NAVAL LODGE There will be a special communication at Caribbean Naval Lodge held in Masonic Apts. Bldg. 800 at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow night for the purpose of conducting work in first degree. All Masons are cordially invited to attend. NAUTICAL LANTERN The Nautical Lantern will have an all you can eat special Friday night. Featured will be fried chicken. The price for the meal will be $3.25 for adults, $1.50 for children under 10. OFFICERS HAIL AND FAIRWELL U.S. Naval Station quarterly "hail and fairwell" party for all departing and arriving officers and civilian equivalents will be held Dec. 13 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the COMO Club patio. All those interested in attending are asked to make reservations with CWO Finister no later than Thursday. OFFICIALS ASSOCIATIONThe monthly meeting of the Guantanamo Bay Officials Association will be held in the Officials Hut Dec. 8. All members are required to attend. The Officials Association currently has openings for new officials. Anyone desiring to become an official, scorer or timekeeper are invited to attend our next meeting. For further information, call Bill Newcomer at 85438 DWN or 951035 AWH. LA LECHE LEAGUE The La Leche League will meet Dec. 8 at 7:30 p.m. at Nob Hill 68B. This month's topic will be baby arrivals, the family and the breast fed baby. All interested women are invited to attend and babies are always welcomed. For more information, call Ann Thompson -at 90195 AT. LAFRA PARTY The Ladies Auxiliary of the Fleet Reserve Association is having a Christmas party for all FRA and LAFRA children Dec. 12 at 4 p.m. at. the Fleet Home. Please bring a gift for your child to the Fleet Home no later than Dec. 11 for Santa to present at the party. For more information, call Pat Bartley at 99148 or Pat Capps at 96291 AT. FRA SUPPER Branch and Unit 100 FRA will hold an old-fashioned home-made chili supper with all the trimings on Dec. 10 from 5-7 p.m. at the Home on Sherman Avenue for members and guests. Call Pat Capps at 96291 before Monday for tickets or pick up at FRA Home. OFFICERS WIVES CLUB The Naval Station Officers Wives Club will have a night coffee today. For more information or to register, contact Ellie O'Neal at 85863. LADIES GOLF ASSOCIATION The ladies Golf Association will sponsor a bow net tournament Sunday. It will be open to all base residents. Tee off time will be between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. Entrance fee is $2 per person. Special notices FBPO NOTE Mail orderlies and base personnel desiring to pick up registered mail can do so from 7:30 a.m. -to 4 p.m. Monday thru Friday. This is due to the renovation of the registered mail cage. LIVE FIRING Live firing will be conducted on the Hicacal target today thru Thursday from noon to 9 p.m. and again on Friday from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, the firing will be from 7 a.m. until 10:30 a.m. For your safety, the Conde and Hicacal Beach areas between St. Nicolas and Caracoles Points, and all of the upper bay north of Caracoles and Granadillo Points will be off limits. For futher information, contact the Special Services Marina, ComNavBase duty officer or Base Police. CHRISTMAS PLANNING COMMITTEE There will be a meeting of the Christmas Activities Planning Committee on Dec. 10 at 9:30 a.m. in the Fleet Training Group auditorium. All committee members as well as representatives of base organizations and clubs planning any Christmas related activities are urged to attend. For more information contact LCDR Skinner at 85842 DWH. NEX OPEN AFTER DEFEX Due to the defex, the Navy Exchange will open approximately one hour after the sounding of the all clear alarm on Dec. 11. CRUTCHES AND CANES RETURNABLE Crutches and canes are reusable. Members of the community who have these items and nc longer need them are requested to return them tc the hospital. By reissuing crutches and walking canes to other patients, money can be saved which is badly needed for other medical supplies. PROTESTANT SUNDAY SCHOOL PROGRAM The Protestant Sunday School Christmas program will be at the base chapel on Dec. 12 at 7 p.m. Practice for the program will be held tomorrow from 9 to 10:30 a.m. at the chapel. Parents are requested to be prompt in bringing their children to ensure a smooth and timely practice. JOB OPENING There is a job opening for a bookkeeper typist at Marine Barracks Club system, experienced preferred. Apply at the Staff NCO Club. LATER STATUS YESTERDAY'S FIGURES TARGET CONSUMPTION: 1,3L0,000 ACTUAL CONSUMPTION: 1,440,000 TOTAL IN S URAGF: 17,877,000 KINGSTON MAC FLIGHTS Due to maximum passenger loading, there will be no excess baggage allowed on the Dec. 13, 16, 17, 20 and 23 MAC flights to Kingston, Jamaica. All personnel traveling on these flights will be authorized 88 pounds of baggage. No excess baggage weight will be accepted at BPTO during flight check-in. To avoid delays during the flight checkin process, all personnel are requested to comply with t-e above and check-in as .ary as possible. RETURNED MAIL BAGS All mail orderlies are asked to please check your spaces and return all mail bags to the Fleet Branch Post Office as soon as possible. MAC TO INSPECT PACKAGES The Military Airlift Command has announced that all packages, baggage and carry on luggage are subject to search and will be screened by metal detectors at all MAC terminals. Any baggage, including wrapped Christmas packages will be inspected. Although care will be taken in all cases not to damage packages wrapped for Christmas, it is recommended that packages containing metal items or packed in boxes using large industrial staples not be wrapped until arrival at their final destination. EDUCATIONAL BENEFITS A Master of Science in Engineering through independent study is being offered by the University of Alabama. For further information, contact J.T. Savoia at 85553 DWH in the ESO office. Commissary-ExcLange NEX CHILDREN'S HOUR The Navy Exchange will host a children's hour at the retail store Dec. 18 from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. Children from ages 6 through 17 only will have this hour to do their Christmas shopping with out their parents. There will be many items under $5, especially featured for your convenience. Gifts such as jewelry, wood products, pipes, perfume, wallets and-key guards, are just a few presents for you to choose from. So, oys and girls, come on down to your Navy Exchange and take advantage of this opportunity to buy Christmas gifts for your loved ones. This is your hour. U.S. NAVAL GUANTANAMO BAY, BASE .CUBA CapiJohn H. Mchonnell Capt. Davi .De ao Cander Commading officer LCdr. Mchael Cherry .Publicefar fie JO1 Bill Bro.a .Editor N2 Mike Seaft. Reporter Jo 3 Clayton Scott .Reporter TheGucanam Gazette is published according to the thsd e lar i sft hipeN a nd 11 ried In waVXeS P;35 adw nert ircto ora,11 ui 3 ffai rs .3 fit0, printed I. r a:.I. ." .E e. .S_-n equpmntth oininsor taemntsinas-I ed ther ppar erinare*o t becostuedasof

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Tuesday, December 7, 1976 The Guantanamo Bay extension of Old Dominion University will present o programs for the spring semest, the Academic Program, which Wfers a variety of three and four credit hour college courses, and the Bounty Program, which includes many courses of general interest (not for credit, just for fun). The academic courses for the spring 1977 semester are algebra 112, English 101 (at Leeward), physics 102, principles of management 325, Spanish 101, and stage craft on Mondays and Wednesdays. On Tuesdays and Thursdays the classes are children's literature 425, English 102, oral interpretation 201, principles of real estate 319, general psychology 201, Spanish 102 and trigonometry 113. The bounty courses are career development, consumer's law, conversational Spanish, figure drawing, finding your way back, shell talk, effective writing, the pre-school child, and house plants. Course descriptions will be available at the library next week. Each academic course costs $26 per semester hour. The bounty courses range in cost from $15 to $30 per course. Military personnel are eligible for tuition assistance amounting to 75 per cent of the cost of the academic courses under the tuition aid program. Tuition assistance applications should be submitted immediately. If you are interested in this aid, see your education officer. Registration for both programs will be Jan. 8 and 9. If you want to pre-register or if you have any questions, you may contact Nancy Held at the ODU office (in the library) from noon to 1 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays or most mornings at 85652. On Leeward side contact Gale Cherry between noon and 1 p.m. on Wednesdays, phone 64398. For more information on the Bounty Program contact Sue Law, phone 85700. Court faces more death penalty cases 55WJEIif"White 9WRMIMM WASHINGTON (UPI)--The U.S. Supreme Court dealt with the death penalty again yesterday in two separate cases. From Texas came the case of Robert Excel White, who, like Gary Gilmore in Utah, wants his scheduled execution to take place. But in yesterday's ruling, with Justice William Rehnquist dissenting, the high court ordered a temporary stay in White's execution so his attorneys will have time to prepare a formal appeal of his case. White was originally scheduled to ie in the electric chair Friday, nd wrote the court nearly two weeks ago asking it to ignore his attorney' s pleas. He has been on death row for a little over two years, convicted of murdering three persons during a $60 robbery. In a separate development, the justices voted six-to-three to overturn the death penalty meted out to convicted murderer Curfew Davis in Georgia. Richard tries to convene full plenary session GENEVA (UPI)--Rhodesian conference chairman Ivor Richard tried to convene a full plenary session in Geneva yesterday, but the talks quickly got bogged down in an exchange of bitter charges over last weekend's murders of three Roman Catholic missionaries. Open hostility between the black and white delegations flared as Richard tried to find some common ground for negotiations on setting up an interim government. The arguments erupted as Richard prepared to fly back to London for more consultations with British officials on how to break the current impasse. The white delegation told a news conference that the three German missionaries, including one nun, were killed by black terrorists. But black nationalist leaders Robert Mugabe and Joshua Nkomo said the ambush was sprung by government agents disguised as guerrillas. In an unsigned, two-page opinion, the court ruled the improper exclusion of a single potential juror for voicing reservations about capital punishment was sufficient for reversal. The court held that potential jurors must be thoroughly questioned about their stand on the death penalty, and found to be irrevocably opposed to it, before they can be excluded. The decision also strikes down the death penalty sentence given another Georgia inmate, George Street. Street had appealed to the high court on the same grounds as Davis. His case was remanded to the Georgia Supreme Court for consideration in light of the David decision. As for condemned killer Gary Gilmore, he missed his date with death in Utah yesterday because of the temporary stay issued by the Supreme Court last week. The Supreme Court has given Utah until 5 p.m. today to submit arguments as to why Gilmore should be allowed to die as he wishes. But even in his isolation cell at the Utah State Prison Hospital, Gilmore could not stay silent about the second delay of his scheduled execution. Acting through his attorney, Gilmore released an open letter to his mother, asking her to disassociate herself from the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, which is pressing his appeal. Gilmore told his mother that he agrees with the sentence and added that dying "ain't no big deal." New fighting begins while leaders met BEIRUT (AP)--New fighting between Moslems and Christians broke out in southern Lebanon yesterday, as leaders of both sides met in Beirut for the first time in six months. In the nothern city of Tripoli, 20 persons were reported killed in a bloody battle between rival Palestinian guerrillas. Artillery duels and sporadic fighting were reported near the border with Israel, which opposes the presence in the area of the Syrian-dominated Arab peace force. The outburst came as Palestinian guerrillas and Syria reportedly reached an agreement on the guerrilla refusal to surrender heavy weapons. This would avert a threatened showdown with the Syrian-dominated peace-keeping force. A possible flaw in such a compromise is that it gives the guerrillas time to move heavy arms toward the Israeli border and threatens a new outburst. Israel has openly built up its tank and heavy weapon equipment along the border in the last two weeks. ODU spring semester to begin Dear Editor, At the present there is a winter slow pitch softball league. It is the result of the efforts of many people to have a recreation program and as it turned out willing to pay for it out of their own pockets. The position of Special Services was if this program was desired they would help in the organization of it only, there would and could not be any financial help as it was not in this year's budget. A total of 12 teams entered the league, each team paying $100 to enter. As $1,320 was needed, Special Services stated they would make up the $120 short. Both softball fields are in need of repairs. The rains have caused ruts, holes, rocks everywhere, and bases are in need of replacement. When teams placed their complaints of field conditions, Special Services used the old Gitmo reasoning, the fields are no worse than last year and besides there are worse fields at other bases and commands, so "play ball." The first weekend of league play there were two serious injuries, one shoulder separation and one damaged knee. One or both of these injuries was the direct result of field conditions. Not only are these two players lost to their teams for the next two to three months but also to their commands. Does Special Services not owe a responsibility to its public in recreation to provide a safe place to participate. I have been attached to Gitmo for two and one half years and have seen no improvements to the softball fields, and if existing Gitmo attitudes exist nor will my relief. Name withheld Dear Editor, The letter to the editor concerning winter softball and Cooper Field facilities is a two part question. The first of which; the paying for the winter softball I feel is "a cheap shot", the second, the playing condition is serious but not enough information is supplied to really respond; eg: who in Special Services, a large organization, told the writer that "the fields are as good as last year." I did not know that it was policy to print lettersawith the name withheld. (Editor's note: Policy is not to print anonymous letters. Upon specific request with reasonable justification the Gazette will withhold names.) Given the above, the following is the response: The two injuries noted in the above letter are regrettable as are any personal injuries and corrective action on the fields have been taken when areas of safety and playing effectiveness are discovered. In this instance, all bases have been replaced on three fields and one of the ruts corrected. The other rut identified was to have been corrected on Dec. 3 prior to this weekend's games, but rain prohibited corrective action. All coaches will be advised of this hazard. Cooper Field is not an ideal playing surface and there is only so much that can be done to improve conditions. The fields are dragged frequently and an effort is made to keep the game fields as free of rocks as possible. Constructive ideas for improving the field will always be considered on the basis of feasibility, practicality and cost. Astro turf for Cooper Field would be nice but the initial and maintenance costs would be exorbitant. Planting grass would have similar fiscal drawbacks plus the fact that Cooper Field does not grow grass very successfully. With the limited staff available to the Special Services sports director, it is essential that the personnel utilizing the field point out specific problem areas and if possible, propose a method of correcting them. When rumors concerning a winter recreation softball season were investigated by Special Services it was determined there was in fact a large group of people who desired to play recreational softball. It was made clear to all interested parties at that time that the Special Services budget, already in a deficit position, did not allow Special Services to fund an additional softball season. Special Services offered to coordinate a season, provide what equipment it could and maintain the fields as well as possible. When the meeting of prospective teams was held the above was again pointed out and several options proposed to cut the costs; eg: the teams would provide volunteer umpires for the games; thereby, reducing the cost to almost nothing or having one paid umpire at each game which would cut the cost in half. The teams voted to play regulation rules with two paid umpires and divide the costs between the teams. It must be pointed out that this is a recreational season in addition to the diverse and continuing Special Services athletic program, and it is in that way no different than golf, bowling, sailing or any other of the recreational activities for which participants pay for their own recreation. At a cost of approximately $5 per person for 22 games of softball it is also very inexpensive recreation. Special Services does have a responsibility to provide a safe place for the public to participate in sports. The new sports director will continuously be working to upgrade the facilities, however, in a climate of austere funding where sports are competing for financial support not only with the other recreational programs but also with mission essential requirements it will be a continual process. T.D. Hardin Lt. USN Special Services officer We help RedCross. The Good Neighbor. h elp,. Gitmo Dialogue Guantanamo Cazette Page

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Page 4 Sports scores SCORES FROM YESTERDAY NATIONAL3FOOTBALL LEAGUE Oakland 35, Cincinnati 20 NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE Montreal 1, Cleveland 0 Sports standings NFL AMERICAN CONFERENCE Eastern Division W P-Baltimore 10 P-New England 10 Miami 6 N.Y. Jets 3 Buffalo 2 Central Division Pittsburgh 9 Cincinnati 9 Cleveland 9 Houston 5 Western Division X-Oakland 12 Denver 8 San Diego 6 Kansas City 4 Tampa Bay 0 NATIONAL CONFERENCE Eastern Division W X-Dallas 11 Washington 9 St. Louis 9 N.Y. Giants 3 Philadelphia 3 Central Division X-Minnesota 10 Chicago 7 Detroit 6 Green Bay 4 Western Division X-Los Angeles 9 San Francisco 7 New Orleans 4 Atlanta 4 Seattle 2 X-Clinched division P-Clinched playoff sp L 3 3 7 10 11 4 4 4 8 1 5 7 9 13 L 2 4 4 10 10 2 6 7 9 3 6 9 9 11 title pot All ada will be run one time only. You must submit your ad each time you want it printed. Ads may be submitted by calling 951144 before 4 p.m. or by dropping it in one of the drop boxes located at the Navy Exchange and Flagship Mess. Ads which discriminate on the basis of race, sex, creed, color or national origin will not be accepted. The staff reserves the right to rewrite any ad it deems necessary. for sale Sansui AU-2900 receiver amplifier; Dekorder reel to reel 7100; Marantz casette carrying cases for home or car; ladies Timex watch; square shooter camera; Instamatic 10 pocket camera; Canon TX camera with flash and carrying case; camera holder; Argus Carefree camera. Call 85566 DWE or 85559 AWH and ask for Andy. 1955 Ford, runs good, needs some work, $60; four deep chrome wheels, $60. Call 90188 AT. 1973 Chevrolet BelAir, 350 engine, automatic, power steering, $1500 or best offer. Call 85433 DWE or 98153 AWH. Long dress, never worn, size nine. Call 99276 AT. Sears five-one zoom lens movie camera. Call 97283 AT. 1974 Opel, AM/FM, 8-track stereo, 20,000 miles, $2000. Call 951237 DWN or 95363 AWE. One set of Kawasaki mirrors, fits G3 trail bike, $10; one pair of child's swim fins, new, $11; decorated fish net, $2 a yard; assorted boy's and girl's jackets. Call 95304 DWH or 95574 AWH. German fooseball table, excellent condition. Call 85203 DWE or see in room M202 GHB. Guantanamo Gazette Tuesday, December 7, 1976 Sours takes three heats in motor cross Raiders defeat Bengals 35-20 (AP)-The Oakland Raiders dropped the Cincinnati Bengals into a three-way tie for the AFC Central Division lead with a 35-20 win last night. The loss gave the Bengals a 9-4 record, the same as the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Cleveland Browns. It may leave Cincinnati out of the playoff pictures. Pittsburgh, Super Bowl victors for the last two years, can wrap up the division title with a win over the Houston Oilers Saturday. Oakland quarterback Ken Stabler tore apart the Cincinnati defense, completing 16 of 20 passes for 217 yards. Stabler lobbed four TD passes to improve his league leading total to 27. Stabler hit tight end Dave Casper for two TD passes, of 24 and three yards, in the first quarter; bombed a 42-yarder to Cliff Branch in the third and rounded out the effort with a sevenyard scoring pass to Fred Biletnikoff in the final quarter. Oakland, already assured of making the playoffs, amassed their highest point total of the season against the Bengals, who had the best AFC Doc kter wins contest The winner of this week's Pick the Pros Football Contest is D.P. Dockter. Dockter missed one of the 14 games played between Saturday and last night. Dockter will receive a choice of four different prizes donated by Special Services and qualifies for the Pro-PlayOffs Grand Prize. Two 9 x 12 carpets, one is short green shag, the other is blue green, $50 each; Amana radar range, $325. Call 90267 AT. 1970 Pontiac Bonneville, fully loaded, $1700 or best offer; portable black and white TV, $75; speed reading machine, with books, $5. Call 96167 AT. Men's 10 speed 26" bike, $50; ladies' 10 speed 26" bike, $60 or both for $100; stereo cabinet, $30 or best offer; clarinet with case $75. Call 97150 AWH. Pontoon boat, 8 x 18; 1975 25 HP Johnson motor and 9.5 Evinrude motor and many extras, $1400. Call 951180 AT. 1966 Chevy van, new tires, radio, $550. Call 64340 DWE or 951184 AWE. 12,000 BTU A/C, $110; two 10,000 BTU A/Cs, $175 or all for $250; Pioneer CTF 2121 dolby casette tape deck with walnut cabinet, $180. Call 85410 DWE or 95398 AWR. Chrysler vehicles, all orders require 90 days. For more information on Chrysler products, contact John Stockton at 95568 AT. serviCes Will babysit in my home for working mothers. Call 90161 AT. lost Small brown coin purse. Lost at ice machine across from Mini-Mart Sunday evening. Reward offered. Call 95446 AT. wanted 24 x 1 3/8 bicycle tube. Call 97211 AWH or 951247 DWH. pass defense until they confronted Stabler. Cincinnati can win the division title only if the Steelers lose and the Bengals defeat the New York Jets Sunday. The Browns' only hope comes if they beat the Kansas City Chiefs Sunday and both Pittsburgh and Cincinnati lose. The Guantanamo Bay Moto Cross Club raced Sunday and in the 0-100cc class the first, second and third heats went to Tim Sours. Sours' 100cc Honda was in top shape and eliminated all competition, scoring a total of 1200 points. Scott Souza came in second in all three heats on his 90cc Kawasaki, placing a total of 900 points. Ott on his 70cc Honda placed third with 250 points. With the likes of competition in the 101-125cc class, the class was combined with the 251-Open class into the 126-250cc class. This resulted in a very close race between Ben Story's 250 Suzuki and Phil Grudiniski on his 125cc Yamaha. Story accumulated 1100 points for taking the second and third heats. Grudiniski took the first heat and came in second and third in the remaining heats, coming away with 1000 points for the day. If anyone is interested in participating in the club or just want' to make a trial run, call Dale atW 96112 or Rick at 952262. College basketball scores Chicago St. 80, Lewis 77 Colorado 89, Jacksonville 72 E. Montana 87, Black Hills St. 62 Regis Colo. 93, N. Colorado 79 W. New Mexico 67, E. New Mexico 58 Albany-Phar 63, S. Vermont 60 OT Morris 73, Denmark Tech 71 Jamestown 93, Moorehead St. 89 N. Dakota 75, Cal-Irvine 68 San Francisco U. 100, Houston 85 Bethany Nazarene 74, MacMurry 50 Huron Colo. 79, Mayville St. 76 Mississippi St. 78, SW. Louisiana 72 NW. Louisiana 70, Centenary 67 Oklahoma Chris. 78, Wayland Bapt. 66 Roger Williams 91, Franklin Pierce 52 St. Joseph, Ind. 93, Franklin 77 SW. Okla. 96, Panhandle 69 Tenn. Tech 91, Stetson 89 Texas 66, Southern Cal. 61 Austin Peay 81, Old Dominion 76 OT Jackson St. 63, Miles Col. 40 Jacksonville St. 85, Shorter 71 Kearney 72, Peru 70 Liberty Bapt. 90, Bowie St. 85 McNeese St. 75, U. of S. Alabama 74 Mississippi 78, S. Dakota 70 Pan-American 82, S. Mississippi 65 Radford 67, King Coll., Tenn. 65 Texas Luth. 64, SW. Texas 60 USAO 76, Lubbock Chris 62 W. Kentucky 75, Delta St. 72 OT Wis.-Park. 62, Neb.-Omaha 58 Wis. Pltvl 73, Wis.-Stevens Pt. 61 Louisiana St. 100, Samford 89 Hardia-Simmons 108, Tex.-Arlington 90 Birmingham-Sou. 88, Talladega Col 79 California, Pa. 80, Wash.&Jeff. 71 Davis & Elkins 84, Shepherd 80 Edinboro 99, Alliance 85 .Gannon 88, Allegheny 70 Iowa 90, Bradley 77 Lenoir Rhyne 39, Guilford 37 DOT Midwestern St. 62, Okla. Bapt.J57 Minnesota 96, N. Michigan 50 Mississipi Col. 89, Letourneau 61 Montevallo,70, Spring Hill 52 Mt. Mary 84, Nebraska-Wesl. 60 GBRA to host 'holiday fun' The Guantanamo Bay Racing Association plans to host "holiday fun" for people from ages one through 15. This "fun" will be two and three wheel tricycle and bicycle competition, (people power only). This event is tentatively scheduled for the afternoon of Jan. 2, 1976. A place for these events will be announced at a later date. Competition will take place on a mini dragstrip, with competition simular to the bi-monthly G.B.R.A. events held at Oceanview. Trophies will be presented to the winners. Anyone interested can call 97279 or 99221 anytime or 951265 and 99115 after working hours. C. Michigan 90, Wittenberg 75 Baltimore 69, Frostburg St. 45 Benedict 115, Claflin 85 Middlebury 61, Plattsburgh St. 58 Pfieffer 80, Atlantic Chris. 74 San Jose St. 63, Ball St. 56 Butler 63, Loyola (Chicago) 62 Detroit Univ. 113, Oakland Univ. 45 Kentucky 66, Indiana 51 N. Carolina 81, Michigan St. 58 Wisconsin 68, DePaul 66 Villanova 69, American Univ. 60 N. Texas St. 87, Kansas St. 83 Long Beach 68, Southern Methodist 67 Marquette 78, W. Michigan 53 Iowa 90, Bradley 77 Kansas 79, Oral Roberts 69 Salisbury S. 79, Loyola Balti. 74 Rutgers 97, Lehigh 73 Seton Hall 104, Canisuis 76 Michigan 97, Vanderbilt 76 S. Illinois 63, NE. Oklahoma 61 Minnesota 96, N. Michigan 50 Holy Cross 123, Buffalo Univ. 89 Randolph-Macon 65, Shippensburg St. Louisville 89, Virginia 60 Radford 67, King 65 Virginia St. 105, Livingstone 77 W. Virginia Wes1. 95, Salem 73 N. Mexico St. 68, Texas-El Paso 58 Oregon St. 76, Weber St. 73 EXHIBITIONS Idaho 56, Australia Nationals 51 Northland 63, Norway Nationals 56 TOURNAMENT McDonald Invitational Citadel 87, Presbyterian 78 UPI Poll announced NEW YORK--The UPI-board of coaches' college basketball ratings with won-lost records through games of Saturday, Dec. 4, and number of first place votes in parentheses: W L Michigan (22) 2 0 Marquette (16) 1 0 UCLA 3 0 Nevada-Las Vegas (1) 3 0 Kentucky 2 0 Alabama 4 0 Arizona 4 0 San Francisco 4 0 North Carolina 2 1 Cincinnati 3 0 Notre Dame 3 0 Indiana 3 0 Tennesse 2 0 Wake Forest 4 0 Maryland 3 1 Louisville 1 1 Washington State 3 0 Southern Illinois 3 0 Oregon 2 1 Clemson 4 0 IAir


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