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Guantanamo Gazette

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Guantanamo Gazette
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U.S. Naval Base
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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U.S. Naval Base
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English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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University of Florida
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Gitmo Gazette
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Daily Gazette
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Guantanamo Gazette
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Guantanamo Daily Gazette
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Guantanamo Bay Gazette
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Monda


ins narrow


parliamentary


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an telev puter pr from a r


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the soe have a liament to the

cratic wind u ner, Fa


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erence on the civil resigned covered a
t with French Foreign Schmidt g De Guirangaud, then tion with that Frdnce "could policies h the United States for sonalitv.


Bundestag e�ects tn

57, a former defens nister, succeeded fe orat Willy Brandt a two years ago. Bra fter a close aide wa an East German spy. ined international a his successful econo nd sometimes haughty

who aimed to regal the Christian Democ der the late Chancel


Social
8.9 per
conser- A A

Konrad Adenauer, took office as govand ernor of the Roman Catholic-dominated receive state of Rhineland-Palatinate in vote. 1969 as the youngest of 10 West cial- German state executives. He has no slim experience in international politics t, a a fact cited frequently by Schml ,con- The two party leaders en sized
domestic policy in thecampaign but Party differed little on the major issues. up with Both Schmidt and Kohl focused on oreign continued economic growth in West er's Germany, which has one of the soundlose est economies in the West. They
called for continued reduction in
dish unemployment, which stood at 3.9 per ists cent in September, and further curbs eign, on inflation, now running at about rva- four per cent annually.
Schmidt favored a continuation of on a budget-trimming, tax-hike program s, he launched in late 1975. Kohl or called for even deeper cuts in the and budget and new tax inc ....e fo seats business.
ouse In foreign affairs, both supported i major- close ties with the United States, he a strong U.S.-led westernn alliance
and a united western Europe with
se and a joint foreign and economic policy. flow Kohl said West Germany should put as more emphasis on a "United Europe" andt policy and accused Schmidt of neas un- glecting the European Common Market
in favor of detente and trade with atten- the Soviet bloc. mic The challenger said he would bar- I per- gain harder with the East and would seek to impose trade sanctions in
.n the an effort to stop the shooting along rats the barbed-wire border between the lor two Germanys.


"iculture job


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World News Digest

DETROIT (AP)--Talks between the United Auto Workers and the Ford Motor Co. are to resume today. The two sides met late yesterday after holding separate sessions earlier in the day, leading to hopes the 20-day-old strike may end soon. One union source said only the "finishing touches"'remain to be put on a new contract. The strike affects some 170,000 Ford workers in 22 states.

MANILA (AP)--The head of the International Monetary Fund says the world's economy is recovering after what he terms "the most severe recession in four decades. Johannes Witteveen makes the comment in remarks prepared for a joint meeting of the fund and the World Bank in Manila today. World Bank Pres. Robert McNamara and Philippine Pres. Ferdinand Marcos are also to address the opening session. Witteveen noted that production in the industrialized nations has picked up and that inflation has come down from the high levels of the two previous years. He calls these developments "encouraging."
(AP)--Rescue teams using bulldozers and wearing masks worked late into the evening in Baja, Calif., digging through tons of debris to reach victims of Hurricane Liza.


ecy. Earl gning beT raised by .e made about


for him to leave the government. Among the latest are U.N. Ambassador William Scranton, Wisconsin Gov. Patrick Lucey, and Democratic Sens. Herman Talmadge and Edward Kennedy.
Speaking to reporters in Casper, Wyo., yesterday, Pres. Ford's 20year-old son, Steve, said the kind of language and thought that went into Butz' remarks "don't belong in the Ford administration.
The furor raised by Butz' remarks about blacks isn't the first time his sense of humor has gotten him in trouble.
The 67-year-old Butz became head of the Agriculture Department in 1971, and has earned a certain amount of attention for his penchant for telling jokes, sometimes, appropriately, of the so-called barnyard variety.
Although he likes to tell slightly off-color yarns, few have had the public impact of the one causing the current flap, a comment in which he referred to blacks as "coloreds" and to their supposed sexual and bathroom preferences in vulgar and derogatory terms.
At least once before, Butz has
been ordered by Pres. Ford to apolo-


gize for his humor. That came in November 1974 after he made a joke mocking Pope Paul VI's position on birth control, "He no playa dagame, he no maka da rules."
Butz had attempted to explain that joke, but Ford found the explanation inadequate, summoned Butz to the Oval Office, and ordered an apology "to any and all individuals who may have been offended."
Other samples of Butz' humor included the story of the Southern Baptist preacher who bought a used car, then discovered he didn't have the vocabulary to operate it. Also the story of the merry widow who was the talk of her church congregation. After one Sunday sermon the minister said, "I'm glad to see you here; I prayed for you all night." She re-


plied, "Why didn't you call? I'd have been there in 10 minutes."
In addition to being a self-styled comic, Butz is a well-schooled agriculture expert.


A native of Lafayette, Ind., he is a graduate of Purdue University where he received a PH. D. degree. He served as a'research fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington in 1944-45, was a professor of agriculture at Purdue and was assistant secretary of agriculture under Pres. Eisenhower.


After leaving the Agriculture
Department in 1957, Butz became dean of agriculture at Purdue, serving there until chosen as agriculture secretary by Pres. Nixon in 1971.
Butz' tenure has figured in a variety of controversies over the past few years, centering on operation of the Food Stamp Program, grain sales to the Soviet Union and rising food prices, particularly meat.

Butz at one time indicated he would leave office at the end of 1971, but earlier this year he hinted he would like to stay on if Pres. Ford is reelected.

He said he would hate to see the gains of the past few years in allout production and a market-oriented program wiped out by forces wanting a return to strict government controls and high farm subsidies.


con.


























Board


FRIENDSHIP-DAY VOLUN"


American FriE ~Ilkna for


begin at approx Tuesday. We re: to take addition for this class.


EDUCAT 101 IS CONDU(

Educatio to negotia lege cours The facult


! unable rations


VICES OFFICE


SURVEY

ces is attempting seminar type cole offered on base. arrive on Gitmo s to give all-day Assignments


would be given until next visitation and final examinations. This an- would increase amount of courses za- available to personnel on base. M. Request anyone interested in parw- ticipation fill out the below form
and bring or send it to the Education Services Office within five
days. No telephone calls, please.


Level of classes desired:


is Associates Bachelor's
Master's -Doctorate

t Major field desired:

__Liberal Arts
Education
Human Behavior
_Social Work
Natural Science/Pre-Medicine
- Engineering
Electrical/Electronic w Mechanical E- Civil
__Other Engineering
Business Adm/Personnel
Other
Occupational Education
Accounting/Finance
Architecture
)nal _Horticulture/Agriculture/Wild
Life Mgt./Forestry


Rate Work
_ USN__USMC CIV


FIGURES


1 200,000 : 1,400,000 18,915,000


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Monday, October 4, 1976 Guantanamo Gazette Page 3


Schlesinger disagrees

with Chinese premier


FTC weekly ship schedule






DATE OF TRAINING DATE OF
SHIP HULL NO. COMMANDING OFFICER ARRIVAL LIAISON OFFICER DEPARTURE

USS Lexington CVT 16 Capt. T.F. Rush Oct. 3 Capt. Sharpe Oct. 8, 1976 USS Richard E. Byrd DDG 23 Cdr. R.L. Goodwin, Jr. Sept. 23 Lt. Hicks Oct. 22, 1976 USS Tattnall DDG 19 Cdr. R.G. Guilbault *Oct. 9 LCdr. Houk Nov. 10, 1976 USS Robert A. Owens DD 827 Cdr. J.R. Seeley Sept. 9 LCdr. Snead Oct. 8, 1976
USS Compass Island AG 153 Cdr. R.R. Johnson Oct. 1 Lt. Eklof Oct. 14, 1976 NEW YORK (AP)--Chinese Premier
USNS Mosopelea T-ATF 158 Capt. H.A. Pouttu *Oct. 4 Lt(j.g.) Mergen Nov. 5,,1976 Hua Kuo-Feng told former U.S. Secy.
*Schedued toarriveof Defense James Schlesinger that * e to awar between the United States and the Soviet Union is inevitable,
*..- Time Magazine says in this week's
A mericans laigjobs inPanama CnlZone issue.
n eaariag on.Schlesinger, a critic of detente, disagreed with Hua, the magazine
PANAMA CANAL ZONE, Panama (AP)-- "If someone stays here and tnen is a growing resentment of Americans said.
Americans working for the Panama finds himself replaced by a among Panamanians, Time said editor Jerrold Schecter Canal Zone Company, faced with the Panamanian later he could be either "The atmosphere has changed," accompanied Schlesinger during his prospect that Panama will take over too old or not have updated job said Morton Goodman of the Canal recent three-week tour of China. an increasing share of running the skills in order to get a job," said' Zone public relation department Schecter reported that Premier 553-square-mile zone, are leaving Bright. He said he would be moving "I don't think it's a healthy at- Hua warned SchlesingerI that the heir jobs in record numbers. to Atlanta, Ga., in November. His mosphere for bringing up kids any -. United States must maintain *
"The situation is deteriorating wife, the former Carolyn Havey, is more. They see these anti-American naval strength in the Pacific ainst to complete apathy," said Frank from Atlanta. slogans, and murals downtown." a possible Soviet attack. Bright, 33, one of the Americans Bright says he was born in the Earlier, Schlesinger was taken to who has quit and will be going to Panama Canal Zone, that his father Recently, he said, a cab driver the Sino-Soviet frontier, a rare theUnited States to work. "Every- came here in 1923 as a civilian refused to bring his wife from privelege for a foreigner, Time said. one is just sitting around waiting employe of the army. Panama City into the Canal Zone, The Chinese expect a "people's ' for the ax to fall. It's kind of "I just don't see any challenge and Goodman himself was mugged and war" that would pit millions of sickening, but I don't want to be and growth any more," Bright said, robbed on the street, things he Chinese guerrillas against, Soviet the last guy to leave the Canal "It's a gypsy existence, not knowing says didn't happen five or six armor, the magazine said. with-the Associated Press that
-major areas, when Panama wouldnd atspe ref r eb t
take complete control of the zone
and how much land and water in the President's home state of Michigan. zone would be- ceded to Panama im Cate' polls specialist, Patrick
mediately. Caddell, says the Georgian's lead Panama wants full control of the slumped in a poll taken Sept. 21
IA zone -by the end of the century. through 24, at the time of the first
Until full control is won by -Ford-Carter debate and following the Panama, the Panama Canal Company controversial Playboy interview.
would turn an increasing number of But Caddell says Carter now holds a American~ held jobs over to Panaman- 51-42 per cent lead over the ians. under a new treaty. President based on a nationwide sur-':
The Panama Canal Company has vey of 1,000 voters in late
about 3 ,8o American employes and September.
is owned and operated by the U.S. He said Carter has made dramatic Defense Department. gains in Illinois and Michigan, the
American employes are worried - (UPI)--Seeking to counter a Time two major industrial states where
they may be out of jobs soon. Magazine poll showing Jimmy Carter his showing was poorest in previous Carter spent the day in his
Many of them are using their vaca- and Pres. Ford running even, Carter's polls. According to Caddell, Carter Plains, Ga., home where he met four
tions to go to the states and look campaign yesterday released its own now holds a 51-42 per cent lead in hours with former Defense Secy.
for jobs, one high-level Canal poll, which showed Carter building Michigan, whereas on Sept. 2, he was James Schlesinger yesterday.
Company official said, his lead and outpacing Ford in the behind 47-to-42 per cent. Carter and Schlesinger did not
talk with reporters.. But a spokesman says the meeting was set up be-'
cause Schlesinger "is the first
l~i , ,a :m - I : " I: . .American to be in China since Mao's
Bishop returns from self-imposed exile for talks AmrcntbeiChasneMo'
death and his insight would certainly be invaluable."
SALISBURY, Rhodesia (A)--Black an umbrella group formed out of considered necessary to a peaceful The meeting was also viewed as
nationalist leader Bishop Abel several separate nationalist groups. transition from white to black rule an indication that Carter is considMuzorewa returned home after more "He said he would probably meet in Rhodesia. ering taking a more conservative than a year in self-imposed exile his main rival, Joshua Nkomo, today, Bishop Muzorewa was to meet yester. line when he meets Ford in their yesterday to take part in talks on apparently for futher talks on merg- day with the 69-man national execu- foreign policy debate in San, a new constitution leading to ing'their two factions to present a tive. He is expected to face press- Francisco on Wednesday. majority rule for Rhodesia. more unified black front at the ure from the body to reject some of Pres. Ford is preparing for the The bishop was met by cheering constitutional convention. the proposed terms for the confer- most extensive trip of his campaign, black Rhodesians giving the black Nkomo heads the moderate domestic ence. highlighted by his debate with power salute. A' estimated 8,000 wing of the ANC and has directed the On Saturday, all provicial commit- Carter. persons lined streets leading from nationalist effort inside Rhodesia tees of his ANC wing rejected terms It is evident that the controversy the airport to the black township of while Bishop Muzorewa has been in- of the deal offered to and accepted stirred by Agriculture Secy. Earl Highfield as the small, bespectacled, volved with the guerrilla war being by Rhodesian Prime Minister Ian Butz' uncomplimentary remarks about bishop was driven in a roofless waged from bases in neighboring Smith last month in talks with black voters is weighing heavily on Mercedes Benz limousine at the head countries. Kissinger. the Ford campaign. But in o..Asst.. Secy. of Staes for ' C 7 The nationalsts want the interim Machester, N.H., yesterday, Ford's
Muzrew wlcoedAmeica popo 'frianAffair Wila Schaufee government to be dominated by blacks. running; mate, Bob Dole, said it is
sal fo a ner ...goe..en to and British Frign Ofic Minste The bishop also faces a challenge too . eal odtrin.fteBt
pav te wy or lak rlewitin Ted, Rowlands:have, already met with for ,control of his faction from issu wil be a.iailtytoth
tw yar. uth tlda ew cn black Presidents seretse, Taa of Robert Mugabe, iwho la lamt Republican ticket.
fernc tathehoedoterasects .Botswana, Samora Machel of Mozam- leadership of .thousands of guerril- After taig comuin.ih.i of eny ofStte enr A.' b'i: que,: Jus Nyeree of Tanzania las in neighboring Mozambique, and 'wife., Betty, at morning church serKisige'spec panfo Rodsa and Kenneth Kaunda of Zambia.i the Rev. ,Ndabaningi Sithole, who v! ices, Ford called Secy. of State would b"negotable." ,Those presidents, along, with stood down> from the presidency of Henr .y Kisne toth.Wit Hus
- ' he52yer-ldbiho i hadof Anoln'Prs.Agostinho Neto,! have! the original: ARC in December1974. to help im prepare for his second
th mliat xtralwigofth ctveysupported the Black Nation- to allow Bishop Muzorewa tod:;d:, face-to-face confrontation with
hdsinAfianNtinl eonil, alist Movement. Their support ,is ' organize a short-lived organization. Carter .. ..








4'.. . 4 Guantanamo Gazette Monday, October 4. 1976
Clee foblscore
College foBrett and Madlock win titles

MIDWEST
. 4Ab ay S. 1., ochste Teh 7 Adran 8, enea 0KANSAS CITY (AP) -- Hal McRae of
flySt. Rchester Tech 7 Adrian 28, Genevathe Kansas City Royals apparently
ight 35, elaware Valley 0 Akron 34, Indiana St. 7 has some hard feeling about his
rst , Bowdoin 7 Albion 16, Alma 7 teammate George Brett winning the
y21, ...0Allegheny 35, John Carroll 14 American League batting title.
ston College 17, Navy 13 Arizona 27, Northwestern 15 McRae was Brett's closest pursuer
own 13, Princeton 7 Ball St. 20, Dayton 13. going into the Royals' 5-3 loss C.W. Post 17 Bucknell 6 Benedictine, Kan. 31, Friends 7 yesterday to the Minnesota Twins aiforia, Pa. 10, Lock Haven 0 Bethel, Kan. 20, SW. Kan. 0 on the final day of the regular 'C5nisius 21, RPI 13 Bowling Green 31, Wsn. Mich. 28 season. Brett belted three hits,
rnegie-Melloin 51, berlin 17 Buena Vista 30, William Penn 7 one of them a controversial inside Clarion 25, West Liberty 8 Central 33, Wartburg7 the park homer that gave him the Columbia 14, Penn 10 Cent. Methodist 10, Ottawa 6 title, with a .333 average to Dartmouth 45, Holy Cross 7 C. Michigan 26, Illinois St. 7 McRae's .332. elaware 18, Temple 16 Central St. 24, Tennessee St. 18 McRae contended that Minnesota E. 8troudsburg 27, Kutztown 13 Chicago,56, Marquette 15 outfielder Steve Brye intentionally Hamilton 13, Tufts 12 Coe 14, Ripon 13 mis-played Brett's hit, on orders Hrvard 37, Boston University 14 Cornell 56, Beloit 7 from Twins' manager Gene Mauch. Ihaca 3, Alfred 3 Defiance 24, Anderson 6 McRae indicated afterwards that A iata 20, Gettysburg 3 Ferris St. 20, Wayne St. 12 he thought racial feeling were beLafayette 44, Wagner 21 Graceland 36, 'Baker 0 hind the play, but refused 'to elab- Following McRae's final at-bat, ittsburgh44, Duke 31 Murray St. 7, Morehead St. 6 orate. McRae is black, Brett is which resulted in a ground-out, ortheastern 53, Amn. Int'l 31 Michigan 31, Wake Forest 0 white. he gestured and shouted at Mauch. Rhode Island 14, Maine 9 UCLA 10, Ohio St. 10 (tie) Brett agreed that he was surpised. Both he and the Twins' manager had Middlebury 3' Williams 0 Nebraska 17, Miami, Fla. 9 to see his blast drop for a hit. He to be restrained. Kent State 4, Air Force 19 Missouri 24, North Carolina 3 too felt that Brye let it fall. Mauch and outfielder Brye say the Millsaps 10, Trinity 9 Kansas 34, Wisconsin 24 ' ' ball was mis-played, accidentally. Maryland 20, Villanova 9 Notre Dame 24, Michigan'St. 6 Rod Carew of the Twins also was North Carolina St. 24, Indiana 21 in the running for the American SOUTH Texas A&M 14, Illinois 7 League batting crown going into the Purdue 42, Miami, Ohio 20 game. He wound up with a .331 averabama St. 21, Morris Brown'15 Ohio U. 34, Toledo 8 age.
A & St. 24, Wsn. Carolina 17 McNeese St. 34, Marshall 9 After the dust cleared, Bill
10 Mssissippi 0 ' ST Madlock of the Chicago Cubs emerge Be ny 19, Thiel 9 as the leading batter in the NationBelune-Cookma 34, Alabama A&M 21 Brigham Young 8, San Diego St. 0 al League. It's his second straight Ca~holic U. 38, Va. C'Wlth 0 California 43, San Jose St. 16 batting-crown.
awba 5, Emory & Henry 7 Carroll, Mont. 16, Rky. if!ain 15 Madlock went into the Cubs' 8-2 cinnati 28, Southern Miss. 21 Cal. Luth. '38, Claremont-Mudd 22 win over the Montreal Expos three aware St. 13, Md.-Esn. Shore 0 Chico St. 51, .sn. Montana 10 points behind Ken Griffey of the 'U 22, The Citadel 3 ' Colorado 45, Drake 24 Cincinnati Reds. But Madlock went
Tennsee 28, Western Ky. 16 Esn. Montana 44,;Simon Fraser 31 four-for-four at the plate to lift aster Ky. 27, Austin Peay 13 Fresno St. 31, Fullerton St. 12 his average to .338. Grif fey went ayetteille St. 10,Va. Coll. 2 Hayward' St. 30,' St. Mary's, Cal. 3 & hitless in two at-bats in the Reds' Florida 28, LSU"23 'ewiL '&Clar'k 20, Pac. Lutheran 6 ll-to-l closing win over the Florida A&M 16, Howard 14 Lon each St. 17, Pacific, Cal. 14 Atlanta Braves. He wound up with a loridA"St. 20, Kansas St. 10 Monta 28, Weber St. 25 336 mark. 'Fr.&Mr 29 Johns Hopkins 14 Montana St. 24, Boise St. 20 CardnerWebb 49, Liberty Baptist '20 New Mexico 33, Colorado St. 20 'Town,'Ky. 14, Northwood 14 Nev.-Reno 57, MontanaTech 7 i~a Tech 35, Virginia 14Orgn7, thS.9
VMI , Furman 3' Oregon Coll.34 s.Oeo14 A r n g t hi f na ' m u William d Coar 27, Va. Poly. 15 Pacifi e. hit nal t m e up
. Virginia '9, Richmond 6 'yPuget15 3' Humboldt St. 0 Vanderbilt 24, 'Tulane >13 Redlands 31, USIU 14 Abu hi fna ataAao .... : 7"(" About his final at-bat, Aaron J,
U S C, 5 5 I o w 0:;; i ,
SOUTHWEST said he wasn't thinking "anything in Wyoming 13, Arizona 10 particular." He says he thought Angelo S.3'8, New Mexico 2'4 Washington St. 45, Idaho 6 about the same thing that entered
St~ Washington 38,. Minnesota 7
Ahis mind the first time he batted
Arkansa 46,TCU 1 ~ 'Ak. 14Pacific 17, Long Beach St. 14intemjrgtngah.
ASthe majors, getting a hit. Arkansas St. 44, NW Louisiana 24 He was given' a standing ovation aylor 18, S. Carolina 17 s inef by the 7,000 fans each time he
eas 46, Howard Payne stepped to the plate. Harding 20, Henderson 15
NE Okla. 1, Langston 10 (tie) (AP)--Ilie Nastase won a four-day Oklahoma St. 16, N. Texas St. 10 international tennis tournament in Ouachita Bapt. '12, Ark.-Mont. 7 Caracas, Venezuela. He beat Jimmy SE Okla. 34, McMurray. 0 Connors 6-1, 6-3 yesterday, picking Sports scores SW Texas 21, Abilene Chris'tian'16 up $37,000 in 'first prize money. exas 42, Rice 15 Bjorn Borg was third, and Adriano Tex.-Arlington 23, W. Tex. St. 21 Pamatta fourth.
Tulsa 32, New Mexico St. 7 SCORES FROM YESTERDAY Oklahoma 24, Iowa St. 10 JUNIOR FLAG FOOTBALL SCORES Utah 38, Texas El-Paso 14 XIn the NFL Dolphins 14, Lions 12 Los Angeles 31, Miami 28 Red Devils 6, Colts 0 New England 48, Oakland 17.
': MILWAUKEE (AP)- storied play- Dallas 28, Seattle 13 (Ig of mI aKEE la gu-e b storieds pla- Baltimore 42, Tampa Bay 17 . ing of major league baseball's all- Cincinnati 45, Cleveland 24 time home run king Hank Aaron has St. Louis 27, New York Giants 21 T T edd , 755 home r us, 3,771 hits Chi c g 33 " , g or an s

3and 2,297 RB's after it began. Houston 31, New Orleans 26 Ao Fr M It ended where it started, in Ml- Denver 26, San Diego 0 Allads berun one time o .1971 FordMustang, blue, 302 cuin waukee, where the Brewers were los- B 5 K .. ..
5-2: M to the D.trit Bffalo 50, Kansas City 17 Y'u must submit your ad each time engine; 3 speed, excellent condi- ing 5-2 yesterday to he DetroiPhiladelphia 14, Atlanta 13 you want it printed. Ads may be tion, $2,000. Call 85501 DWR or Tigers. , B 2, D 14 submitted by calling before 4 p.m. 952246 AWH. ...Aaron broke in with the Milwaukee Gan Fray24 , e o 4 6 ': - ,.. . . San Francisco 17, New York Jets 6 or by dropping it in one of the Braves in 1954, and went to Atlanta drop boxes. Ads which discriminate 1967 Buick Electra, price negoti- with the Braves in 1966. He came NATIONAL LEAGUE BASEBALL
on the basis of race, sex, creed, able. Call 96263 AWH. back to Milwaukee and the Brewers Cincinnati 11, Atlanta 1
color or national origin will not in 1975, after having broken Babe Philadelphia 2, New York Mets I l~e accepted.. The staff reserves ' ' Ruth's career home run mark of 714. Chicago Cubs 8, Montreal 2 the right to re-write any ad it lost The 42-year-old Aaron stepped to San Diego 3, Los Angeles 2 One ladies watch, blackface and the plate for the final time in the Pittsburgh 1, St. Louis 0 (1st game) fe band, withdsixth inning, with runners at second Pittsburgh 1, St. Louis 0 (2nd game) oon face. Waltham rand . Lost urs and third, lashed a hard grounder onih t beachers. t Cprs into the hole between shortstop and AMERICAN LEAGUE BASEBALL day bnght beind bleachers at Cooper third base, and Tigers' shortstop Minnesota 5, Kansas City 3 Wooden magazine rack, $10: hand mix- Field. If found, please call Jerry Manuel was only able to get California 1, Oakland 0 er, $5: bathroom cabinet,$lO, Call 824A.a glove on the ball, knocking it Bostpn 3, Baltimore 2 in 15 innings 951247 DWH or 90294 after 6:30 p.m., an e down. Aaron was safe at first, and Tea 3,CicgWht So0
:w an ted - -.. - ----- A. ....-- -- -- -Te a 3, Chicago White Sox 0
a... run scored. Brewers manager Dtot5 iwue SuveorCB60, :5 wtt ii 2'3[ channel,'Nee 5 o 0018mtoccl tr, lx Grammas then replaced Aaron Cevelndi t New Yorake Yake < JBtanc:vr A'lmost'new. $90 '- 'i~ wi 0 rycth a pinch runner so he coUld end CevanatewYrYnes
Cal il a'9551DW o 544 WE inversa l tread Call' ETN 2 Ese hicareer wih .a hit . two games, postponed--rain K '' ''14 a t9013 . ' A~aron has yet to annouce his XBA Exibition



193Hiia ~O,$8. al859 'eves ': future plan. "Apparently he' s
stlldciig between front-ofie Ccao9,Mluke8 AW adas frBob, rodmc M25 W bbst frworkig mothr. oesfomMlake nd rm Hockey Exhibitions
Inatsad up call '90297 EPY ' .Alatawhre.e.ese...' Buffalo 4, Philadelphia 0 192CeyCsom.1 ikptuk Evan:s!Poit.i ' Looking ackn sats hs 23-yeare New York Rangers 3, Washington 1 caerao.ay ehsn e Detroit 7,, l nesota North Stars
celn od ion ithnwC grets. He says he just wants "to . ....
r~a4o, 4,e~lm~le, $2100. Call ca~cs deoratd fo alloccaions be ememeredas acompetesall- Pihtburg S8, .t.LLuiss o .' Call 85649. d 'o playca~n?. "b'r er asaCmlt ~ - Chi~o~o Blackhawks 6, Boston 5


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Weather Forecast Cloudy with scattered rain showers. Winds N 4-6 knots. Bay conditions 1-3 feet. namo Bay, Cuba Monday, October 4, 1976 chmidt wins narrow election ese unristian leaner saia yesterday his forces will fight to the death to force Palestinian guerrillas out of mountain postions above Beirut. Pierre Gemayel, leader of the Phalange Party, called the Palestinians "bandits, assassins, thieves and criminals." He said the Lebanese civil war could be "the tomb of Palestine," referring to the guerrillas' goal of forming a Palestinian homeland out of territory now held by Israel. Gemayel's statement increased fears that the current two-day lull in the civil war will be short-lived. "After the letdown, the showdown," headlined the Beirut Weekly Newspaper this morning. Guerrillas used the sudden halt in the offensive by Christians and Syrian forces in the mountains to reinforce their defenses at the resorts of Aley and Bhamdoun. The two towns, 10 and 12 miles from Beirut, are the last positions World News Digest DETROIT (AP)--Talks between the United Auto Workers and the Ford Motor Co. are to resume today. The two sides met late yesterday after holding separate sessions earlier in the day, leading to hopes the 20-day 'old strike may end soon. One union source said only the "finishing touches" remain to be put on a new contract. The strike affects some 170,000 Ford workers in 22 states. MANILA (AP)--The head of the International Monetary Fund says the world's economy is recovering after what he terms "the most severe recession in four decades." Johannes Witteveen makes the comment in remarks prepared for a joint meeting of the fund and the World Bank in Manila today. World Bank Pres. Robert McNamara and Philippine Pres. Ferdinand Marcos are also to address the opening session. Witteveen noted that production in the industrialized nations has picked up and that inflation has come down from the high levels of the two previous years. He calls these developments "encouraging." (AP)--Rescue teams using bulldozers and wearing masks worked late into the evening in Baja, Calif., digging tn-ough tons of debris to reach victims of Hurricane Liza. Lebanese Moslem leftist allies on the strategic Beirut-Damascus Highway. Christians who hold positions to the north and west have vowed to "liberate" the towns. A powerful Syrian armored force is poised on the eastern outskirts of Bhamdoun, threatening to blast through and join up with the Christians. Christian fighters halted an uphill assault on Aley on Friday after suffering heavy casualties. Kamal Jumblatt, overall Lebanese leftist leader, arrived in Paris yesterday to talk with French leaders about setting up an international conference on the civil Jumblatt met with French Foreign Minster Louis De Guirangaud, then told newsmen that France "could intervene with the United States for it (America) to put pressure on Syria and Israel so that peace returns to Lebanon." ONN, West Germany (AP)--Chancellor mut Schmidt, surviving a strong servative trend, was projected by ional television as the narrow ner of Germany's parliamentary action yesterday. he second German television netk said its computer projection, ed on returns from a representae sampling of 291 of the nation's ,000 polling stations, gave hmidt's ruling coalition of Social ocrats and liberals a 50-48.9 per nt lead over Helmut Kohl's consertive Christian Democrats. Radical parties of the left and ght and independents would receive ss than one per cent of the vote. The projection meant the socialt-liberal bloc would have a slim 1-245 majority in Parliament, a fty loss of 20 seats to the conrvative opposition. Schmidt's Social Democratic Party uld lose 17 seats and wind up with 3, and coalition partner, Foreign nister Hans-Dietrich Genscher's ee Democratic Party, would lose ree and hold 38. Kohl hoped the Sept. 19 Swedish election, in which the Socialists were ousted after a 44-year reign, was indicative of a new conservatism in western Europe. In a campaign that centered on personalities more than issues, 3,244 candidates from four major parties and 30 minor parties and other groups ran for the 496 seats in the Bundestag, the lower house of the German Parliament. A majority of the Bundestag elects the chancellor. Schmidt, 57, a former defense and finance minister, succeeded fellow Social Democrat Willy Brandt as chancellor two years ago. Brandt resigned after a close aide was uncovered as an East German spy. Schmidt gained international attention with his successful economic policies and sometimes haughty personality. Kohl, 46, who aimed to regain the popularity the Christian Democrats enjoyed under the late Chancellor Butz considers resigning from agr WASHINGTON (AP)--Sources in the Ford administration and campaign office say Agriculture Secy. Earl Butz has considered resigning because of the controversy raised by a derogatory statement he made about black voters. There has been no direct word from Butz yet, but an increasing number of political leaders are calling for him to leave the government. Among the latest are U.N. Ambassador William Scranton, Wisconsin Gov. Patrick Lucey, and Democratic Sens. Herman Talmadge and Edward Kennedy. Speaking to reporters in Casper, Wyo., yesterday, Pres. Ford's 20year-old son, Steve, said the kind of language and thought that went into Butz' remarks "don't belong in the Ford administration." The furor raised by Butz' remarks about blacks isn't the first time his sense of humor has gotten him in trouble. The 67-year-old Butz became head of the Agriculture Department in 1971, and has earned a certain amount of attention for his penchant for telling jokes, sometimes, appropriately, of the so-called barnyard variety. Although he likes to tell slightly off-color yarns, few have had the public impact of the one causing the current flap, a comment in which he referred to blacks as "coloreds" and to their supposed sexual and bathroom preferences in vulgar and derogatory terms. Ar least once before, Butz has been ordered by Pres. Ford to apologize for his humor. That came in November 1974 after he made a joke mocking Pope Paul VI's position on birth control, "He no playa dagame, he no maka da rules." Butz had attempted to explain that joke, but Ford found the explanation inadequate, summoned Butz to the Oval Office, and ordered an apology "to any and all individuals who may have been offended." Other samples of Butz' humor included the story of the Southern Baptist preacher who bought a used car, then discovered he didn't have the vocabulary to operate it. Also the story of the merry widow who was the talk of her church congregation. After one Sunday sermon the minister said, "I'm glad to see you here; I prayed for you all night." She reKonrad Adenauer, took office as governor of the Roman Catholic-dominated state of Rhineland-Palatinate in 1969 as the youngest of 10 West German state executives. He has no experience in international politics, a fact cited frequently by Schmi The two party leaders eliiphNRized domestic policy in the campaign but differed little on the major issues. Both Schmidt and Kohl focused on continued economic growth in West Germany, which has one of the soundest economies in the West. They called for continued reduction in unemployment, which stood at 3.9 per cent in September, and further curbs on inflation, now running at about four per cent annually. Schmidt favored a continuation of a budget-trimming, tax-hike program he launched in late 1975. Kohl called for even deeper cuts in the budget and new tax incentives for business. In foreign affairs, both supported close ties with the United States, a strong U.S.-led ,western alliance and a united western Europe with a joint foreign and economic policy. Kohl said West Germany should put more emphasis on a "United Europe" policy and accused Schmidt of neglecting the European Common Market in favor of detente and trade with the Soviet bloc. The challenger said he would bargain harder with the East and would seek to impose trade sanctions in an effort to stop the shooting along the barbed-wire border between the two Germanys. iculture job plied, "Why didn't you call? I'd have been there in 10 minutes." In addition to being a self-styled comic, Butz is a well-schooled agriculture expert. A native of Lafayette, Ind., he is a graduate of Purdue University where he received a PH. D. degree. He served as research fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington in 1944-45, was a professor of agriculture at Purdue and was assistant secretary of agriculture under Pres. Eisenhower. After leaving the Agriculture Department in 1957, Butz became dean of agriculture at Purdue, serving there until chosen as agriculture secretary by Pres. Nixon in 1971. Butz' tenure has figured in a variety of controversies over the past few years, centering on operation of the Food Stamp Program, grain sales to the Soviet Union and rising food prices, particularly meat. Butz at one time indicated he would leave office at the end of 1971, but earlier this year he hinted he would like to stay on if Pres. Ford is reelected. He said he would hate to see the gains of the past few years in allout production and a market-oriented program wiped out by forces wanting a return to strict government controls and high farm subsidies. -baed da 1/

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Page 2 IL ~. ~-, Today's meeting* EXERCISE from 6 to 8 p.m. For m( information call Leonard Gobert at 90126 AWH. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets toni For more information call 85697 A GITMO COIN CLUB meets in quouse hut 1817 behind the old elementary school at 7:30 p.m. For more info mation call Ed Kindley at 97283 A Qprow's meeting THE SURE LOSERS WEIGHT REDUCING CLUB will meet at 7 p.m. For mor information call Joanne Frandsen at 951197. BOY SCOUTS will meet in the Bo Scouts Hut, 6th St., Villamar at 7:30 p.m. For more information call Sharon Fox at 64462, GITMO BAY BRIDGE CLUB meets at 7 p m. at the COMO Club. Call Ji Cossey at 85149 AWH. The club i open to all base residents. BINGQ will be played at the CP Club beginning at 81p.m. ,_,NeYCLOPEDIA BRITANNICA SALESMAN NOW ON BASE There is an Encyclopedia Britan nica representative now on base. Savings are offered of at least per cent on the all new Britannic 3. For more information call 98234 AWH. NAVY EXCHANGE/COMMISSARY ADVISORY BOARD TO MEET The Navy Exchange/Commissary Ad visory Board meeting will be held today at 1:30 p.m. in the McCalla Administration Building. NURSERY SCHOOL BOARD TO HOLD MEETING The Nursery School Board will 1 a meeting at 3 p.m. on Friday at nursery school. All board memb and alternates are to attend. UMIGATION CHAMBER WILL BE OPEN The fumigation chamber will be open Friday from 7:30 am. to 3:30 p.m. to receive articles fo: fumigation. These articles may b picked up on the following Tuesda between the hours of 1 and 3 p.m DEER PARK ZOO COMMITTEE WILL MEET TOMORROW The Deer Park Zoo Committee wi meet tomorrow at 5B East Bargo a 7 p.m. All interested persons a cordially invited to attend. OPENINGS FOR BOWLING LEAGUE Anyone, group or department, i terested in starting a bowling 1 gue, now is the time. There are openings for leagues. Times are 6 p.m. on Tuesdays and Wednesday Eight lanes are available for each league. If interested call MMC Kayser at 95306/95318 DWH or 95473 AWH. NOTICE TO ALL AMANA RADAR RANGE OWNERS If your range is in need of a light bulb or needs servicing, please contact the Navy Exchange tail store at 85461. FRIENDSHIP-DAY VOLUNTEERS ore The Cuban-American Friendship committee is looking for volunte to help with entertainment and f ght. Persona wishing to help with ent T. tainment may call Lt Oakes at 85 at DWH or Mr. Lien at-85326 9 H. F ry those who want to assist with f on rfor the event, please call SKC T. Walton at 85552 DWH or Lt Pope at 64220 DM11. Cuban-American Friend ship Day 1976 is tentatively ache uled for Dec. 6. G a, MEN S GOLF ASSOCIATION MEET There will be a meeting of the Men's Golf Association at 8 p.m )y today in the golf course lounge. Election of new officers will be held and all members are urged to attend this very important meeting. Any males 18 and older who would like to join the association are invited to attend. 0 GOLF ASSOCIATION TO SPONSOR POINT TOURNEY COLUMBUS DAY On Columbus Day, Oct. 11, the Men's Golf Association will sponsor na "Point Tourney" open to all golfers with an estimated handicap. 20 Full handicap to be used and played ca as they appear on the card: Hole in One Double Eagle. Eagle Birdie Par Bogey 15 12 8 6 4 2 points points points points points points Trophies to be awarded to the three highest point totals. Playoff to be held in case of ties, The entry fee is $3. Make your own foursome. All foursomes must sign up and tee off before 10 a.m. There will be free soda and beer in the clubhouse for entrants, Sign up at the pro shop, NEW SCHEDULE FOR GITMO SELF DEFENSE CLUB The Gitmo Self Defense Club practice meetings at Marblehead Hall will be held as follows: Tue-Wed Sunday 6-8 pm. 4-6 p.m. A new class will begin Tuesday. New members are welcome. For information call 85638, ask for Byron. U.S. NAVAL GUANTANAMO BAY, BASE CUBA *aztt Capt., John H. McConnell Capt. Daid W. DeConk Naval BaseNaaStio commander Cmanding Officer LCdr. Michael Cherry.Public Affairs Officer JO1 Bill Broo.e.Editor WN2 Mike Senft .Reporter JO3 Benny Smith,.Reporter J03 Roy Griggs.Reporter SN Clayton Scott.Repor ter The GuantanamocGrotteciAspublished according to the uls and regulations for ship ad station newapapers or the Naval Base public affais officer. Printed five times weekly at government eese. on government equipment, the opinions or statements in news items chat appear herein.aenot to be construed as offici. or as reflect inthge iews cf CouNccacco ViLlamar area. He said if the top crust or coat of the roof is penetrated in any way the polyurethane will not stop moisture from being absorbed by the foam underneath. In addition to decreasing water resistance, puncturing the polyurethane covering decreases the ability of the roof to dissipate heat. The end result is that the roof covering will not reach its normal life span. The housing officer said disciplinary action will be taken against the parents of those children caught in the act of throwing objects on the new roofs. NON-U.S, WIVES TO HOLD MEETING The Non-U.S. Wives Club will hold a meeting at the new clubhouse at 7 p.m. Sunday. MONDAY NIGHT MEN'S EARLY HANDICAP LEAGUE TO MEET The Monday Night Men's Early Handicap League will hold an organizational meeting today at 5:15 p.m. at the bowling alley, League bowling will begin at 6 p.m. HAM AMATEUR CLUB TO MEET All base hams and future hams are requested to meet at the clubhouse today at 7:30 p.m. This meeting is to elect officers and reestablish the club. All equipment and material must be returned to the club at this time. For further information contact Art Borland at 95554 AWH. MCB-1 ISSUES SAFETY WARNING MCB-1 would like to advise all parents to keep their children off the boxes containing the storage shed material. These boxes are now in the housing areas and could present a safety hazard to small children. AMERICAN NATIONAL BANK CHANGES NAME As of today, the American National Bank will be changing its name to Fidelity American Bank N.A., Tidewater. You will be receiving additional information in the near future. You may continue to use your American National Bank checks. The bank hours will be changing on a trial basis as follows: Daily (except Wednesday) 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Wednesday 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and reopens from 4 to 6 p.m. Also, the bank once again has money ordered 7n stock. 85676. It is suggested that you place the alternate number in your telephone directory along with the primary number. All persons registered in the American Red Cross Adult Learn to Swim class are asked to report to the Enlisted pool rather than the Villamar pool. The first class will begin at approximately 6:15 p.m. Tuesday. We regret we are unable to take additional registrations for this class. EDUCATION SERVICES OFFICE IS CONDUCTING SURVEY Education Services is attempting to negotiate for seminar type college courses to be offered on base. The faculty would arrive on Gitmo every 4 or 6 weeks to give all-day weekend seminars. Assignments would be given until next visitation and final examinations. This would increase amount of courses available to personnel on base. Request anyone interested in participation fill out the below form and bring or send it to the Education Services Office within five days. No telephone calls, please. Level of classes desired: Associates Bachelor's Master's Doctorate Major field desired: Liberal Arts Education Human Behavior Social Work Natural Science/Pre-Medicine Engineering Electrical/Electronic Mechanical Civil Other Engineering Business Adm/Personnel Other Occupational Education Accounting/Finance Architecture Horticulture/Agriculture/Wild Life Mgt./Forestry Name Rate Work Phone_ USN USMC CIV Community Bulletin Board 0 WATER STATUS YESTERDAY'S FIGURES TARGET CONSUMPTION: 200,000 ACTUAL CONSUMPTION:418 000 TOTAL IN STORAGE:p 181915,000 L:>5--

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Monday, October 4, 1976 Guantanamo Gazette FTG weekly SHIP USS Lexington USS Richard E. Byrd USS Tattnall USS Robert A. Owens USS Compass Island USNS Mosopelea *Scheduled to arrive ship schedule DATE OF TRAINING DATE OF HULL NO. COMMANDING OFFICER ARRIVAL LIAISON OFFICER DEPARTURE CVT 16 Capt. T.F. Rush DDG 23 Cdr. R.L. Goodwin, Jr. DDG 19 Cdr. R.G. Guilbault DD 827 Cdr. J.R. Seeley AG 153 Cdr. R.R. Johnson T-ATF 158 Capt. H.A. Pouttu Oct. 3 Sept. 23 *Oct. 9 Sept. 9 Oct. 1 *Oct. 4 Capt. Sharpe Lt. Hicks LCdr. Houk LCdr. Snead Lt. Eklof Lt(j.g.) Mergen Oct. Oct. Nov. Oct. Oct. Nov. 8, 1976 22, 1976 10, 1976 8, 1976 14, 1976 5, 1976 Americans leaving jobs in Panama Canal Zone PANAMA CANAL ZONE, Panama (AP)-Americans working for the Panama Canal Zone Company, faced with the prospect that Panama will take over an increasing share of running the 553-square-mile zone, are leaving heir jobs in record numbers. W0 "The situation is deteriorating to complete apathy," said Frank Bright, 33, one of the Americans who has quit and will be going to the United States to work. "Everyone is just sitting around waiting for the ax to fall. It's kind of sickening, but I don't want to be the last guy to leave the Canal Zone either." Washington and Panama have been negotiating a new treaty for the U.S.-controlled Panama Canal Zone for about 10 years. The current round of negotiations have been stalled for about four months, but they are expected to get under way again shortly after the U.S. presidential elections if Gerald Ford wins re-election and after Jan. 1, if Democratic candidate Jimmy Carter wins. Panamanian Foreign Minister Aquilino Boyd said in an interview with the Associated Press that agreement is lacking in only two major areas, when Panama would take complete control of the zone and how much land and water in the zone would be ceded to Panama immediately. R Panama wants full control of the zone by the end of the century. Until full control is won by Panama, the Panama Canal Company would turn an increasing number of American-held jobs over to Panamanians.under a new treaty. The Panama Canal Company has about 3,800 American employes and is owned and operated by the U.S. Defense Department. American employes are worried they may be out of jobs soon. Many of them are using their vacations to go to the states and look for jobs, one high-level Canal Company official said. "If someone stays here and tnen finds himself replaced by a Panamanian later he could be either too old or not have updated job skills in order to get a job," said Bright. He said he would be moving to Atlanta, Ga., in November. His wife, the former Carolyn Havey, is from Atlanta. Bright says he was born in the Panama Canal Zone, that his father came here in 1923 as a civilian employe of the army. "I just don't see any challenge and growth any more," Bright said. "It's a gypsy existence, not knowing what's going to happen to you from one day to the next. I was in the states not long ago and things look pretty good in private industry there." Resignations of American employes pf the Canal Zone are up 50 per cent this year over the average for 1973-75, according to figutes from the zone's personnel department. A study of the problems said 224 Americans have quit so far this year. Some of the Americans say there is a growing resentment of Americans among Panamanians. "The atmosphere has changed," said Morton Goodman of the Canal Zone public relation department "I don't think it's a healthy atmosphere for bringing up kids any more. They see these anti-American slogans, and murals downtown." Recently, he said, a cab driver refused to bring his wife from Panama City into the Canal Zone, and Goodman himself was mugged and robbed on the street, things he says didn't happen five or six years ago. "We're lacking an atmosphere of getting together," Goodman said. Panamanians and Americans used to talk easily about relations between Panama and the Canal Zone, he said. "Now you have to be overly polite so you don't offend someone," Goodman said. "You have to watch what you say. We used to have freer exchange." Goodman said he plans to go back to the states, but that he is stilling looking for a job. (UPI)--Seeking to counter a Time Magazine poll showing Jimmy Carter and Pres. Ford running even, Carter's campaign yesterday released its own poll, which showed Carter building his lead and outpacing Ford in the President's home state of Michigan. Carter's polls specialist, Patrick Caddell, says the Georgian's lead slumped in a poll taken Sept. 21 through 24, at the time of the first Ford-Carter debate and following the controversial Playboy interview. But Caddell says Carter now holds a 51-42 per cent lead over the President based on a nationwide survey of 1,000 voters in late September. He said Carter has made dramatic gains in Illinois and Michigan, the two major industrial states where his showing was poorest in previous polls. According to Caddell, Carter now holds a 51-42 per cent lead in Michigan, whereas on Sept. 2, he was behind 47-to-42 per cent. Bishop returns from self-imposed exile for talks SALISBURY, Rhodesia (AP)--Black nationalist leader Bishop Abel Muzorewa returned home after more than a year in self-imposed exile yesterday to take part in talks on a new constitution leading to majority rule for Rhodesia. The bishop was met by cheering black Rhodesians giving the black power salute. An estimated 8,000 persons lined streets leading from the airport to the black township of Highfield as the small, bespectacled bishop was driven in a roofless Mercedes Benz limousine at the head of a half-mile-long motorcade. Muzorewa welcomed American proposals for an interim government to pave the way for black rule within two years. But he told a news conference that he hoped other aspects of Secy. of State Henry A. Kissinger's peace plan for Rhodesia would be "negotiable." The 52--year-old bishop is head of the militant external wing of the Rhodesian African National Council, an umbrella group formed out of several separate nationalist groups. He said he would probably meet his main rival, Joshua Nkomo, today, apparently for futher talks on merging their two factions to present a more unified black front at the constitutional convention. Nkomo heads the moderate domestic wing of the ANC and has directed the nationalist effort inside Rhodesia while Bishop Muzorewa has been involved with the guerrilla war being waged from bases in neighboring countries. U.S. Asst. Secy. of States for African Affairs William Schaufele and British Foreign Office Minister Ted Rowlands have already met with black Presidents Seretse Khama of Botswana, Samora Machel of Mozambique, Julius Nyerere of Tanzania and Kenneth Kaunda of Zambia. Those presidents, along with Angolan Pres. Agostinho Neto, have actively supported the Black Nationalist Movement. Their support is considered necessary to a peaceful transition from white to black rule in Rhodesia. Bishop Muzorewa was to meet yesterday with the 69-man national executive. He is expected to face pressure from the body to reject some of the proposed terms for the conference. On Saturday, all provicial committees of his ANC wing rejected terms of the deal offered to and accepted by Rhodesian Prime Minister Ian Smith last month in talks with Kissinger. The nationalists want the interim government to be dominated by blacks, The bishop also faces a challenge for control of his faction from Robert Mugabe, who lay claim to leadership of thousands of guerrillas in neighboring Mozambique, and the Rev. Ndabaningi Sithole, who stood down from the presidency of the original ANC in December 1974 to allow Bishop Muzorewa to organize a short-lived organization. Page 3 Schlesinger disagrees with Chinese premier NEW YORK (AP)--Chinese Premier Hua Kuo-Feng told former U.S. Secy. of Defense James Schlesinger that war between the United States and the Soviet Union is inevitable, Time Magazine says in this week's issue. Schlesinger, a critic of detente, disagreed with Hua, the magazine said. Time said editor Jerrold Schecter accompanied Schlesinger during his recent three-week tour of China. Schecter reported that Premier Hua warned Schlesinger that the United States must maintain it naval strength in the Pacific against a possible Soviet attack. 4V Earlier, Schlesinger was taken to the Sino-Soviet frontier, a rare privelege for a foreigner, Time said. The Chinese expect a "people's war" that would pit millions of Chinese guerrillas against Soviet armor, the magazine said. The Chinese are also relying on land mines and tunnels where entire populations of towns could go underground, it said. The magazine said Chinese leaders took pains to express to Schlesinger their scorn of U.S. Secy. of State Henry A. Kissinger. They denounced detente as "appeasement" causedlVy "Munich mentality," Time said, and Foreign Minister Chiao Kuan-Hua cited a Russian proverb, "When you dance with a bear, keep your axe handy." Carter spent the day in his Plains, Ga., home where he met four hours with former Defense Secy. James Schlesinger yesterday. Carter and Schlesinger did not talk with reporters. But a spokesman says the meeting was set up because Schlesinger "is the first American to be in China since Mao's death and his insight would certainly be invaluable." The meeting was also viewed as an indication that Carter is considering taking a more conservative line when he meets Ford in their foreign policy debate in San. Francisco on Wednesday. Pres. Ford is preparing for the most extensive trip of his campaign, highlighted by his debate with Carter. It is evident that the controversy stirred by Agriculture Secy. Earl Butz' uncomplimentary remarks about black voters is weighing heavily on the Ford campaign. But in Machester, N.H., yesterday, Ford's running mate, Bob Dole, said it is too early to determine if the Butz issue will be a liability to the Republican ticket. After taking communion with his wife, Betty, at morning church services, Ford called Secy. of State Henry Kissinger to the White House to help him prepare for his second face-to-face confrontation with Candidates prepare for debate Monday, October 4, 1976 Guantanamo Gazette

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Page 4 EAST College football score Albany St. 17, Rochester Tech 7 Albright 35, Delaware Valley 0 Amherst 42, Bowdoin 7 Army 21, Stanford 20 Boston College 17, Navy 13 Brown 13, Princeton 7 C.W. Post 17, Bucknell 6 California, Pa. 10, Lock Haven 0 Canisius 21, RPI 13 Carnegie-Mellon 51, Oberlin 17 Clarion 25, West Liberty 8 Columbia 14, Penn 10 Dartmouth 45, Holy Cross 7 Delaware 18, Temple 16 E. 8troudsburg 27, Kutztown 13 Mamilton 13, Tufts 12 Harvard 37, Boston University 14 Ithaca 3, Alfred 3 Juniata 20, Gettysburg 3 Lafayette 44, Wagner 21 Pittsburgh 44, Duke 31 Northeastern 53, An. Int'l 31 Rhode Island 14, Maine 9 Middlebury 3, Williams 0 Kent State 24, Air Force 19 Millas 10, Trinity 9 Maryland 20, Villanova 9 SOUTH Alabama St. 21, Morris Brown 15 aplchian St. 24, Wsn. Carolina 17 Auburn 10, Mississippi 0 BethIany 19, Thiel 9 Bethune-Cookman 34, Alabama A&M 21 Catholic U. 38, Va. C'Wlth 0 Catawba 35, Emory & Henry 7 Cincinnati 28, Southern Miss. 21 Delaware St. 13, Md.-Esn. Shore 0 ECU 22, The Citadel 3 / E. Tennessee 28, Western Ky. 16 Eastern Ky. 27, Austin Peay 13 Fayetteville St. 10, Va. Coll. 2 Florida 28, LSU 23 Florida A&N 16, Howard 14 FloridA St. 20, Kansas St. 10 Fr. & Mar. 29, Johns Hopkins 14 Gardner-Webb 49, Liberty Baptist 20 G'Town, Ky. 14, Northwood 14 G> rgia Tech 35, Virginia 14 VMI 17, Furman 3 William & Mary 27, Va. Poly. 15 W. Virginia 9, Richmond 6 Vanderbilt 24, Tulane 13 SOUTHWEST Angelo St. 38, E. New Mexico 24 Arkansas 46, TCU 14 Ark.-Pine Bluff 28, S. Ark. 14 Arkansas St. 44, NW Louisiana 24 Baylor 18, S. Carolina 17 E. Texas 46, Howard Payne 0 Harding 20, Henderson 15 NE Okla. 10, Langston 10 (tie) Oklahoma St. 16, N. Texas St. 10 Ouachita Bapt. 12, Ark.-Mont. 7 SE Okla. 34, McMurray 0 SW Texas 21, Abilene Christian 16 Texas 42, Rice 15 Tex.-Arlington 23, W. Tex. St. 21 Tulsa 32, New Mexico St. 7 Oklahoma 24, Iowa St. 10 Utah 38, Texas El-Paso 14 Guantanamo Gazette MIDWEST Adrian 28, Geneva 0 Akron 34, Indiana St. 7 Albiono 16, Alma 7 Allegheny 35, John Carroll 14 Arizona 27, Northwestern 15 Ball St. 20, Dayton 13 Benedictine, Kan. 31, Friends 7 Bethel, Kan. 20, SW, Kan. 0 Bowling Green 31, Wsn. Mich. 28 Buena Vista 30, William Penn 7 Central 33, Wartburg 7 Cent. Methodist 10, Ottawa 6 C. Michigan 26, Illinois St. 7 Central St. 24, Tennessee St. 18 Chicago 56, Marquette 15 Coe 14, Ripon 13 Cornell 56, Beloit 7 Defiance 24, Anderaon 6 Ferris St. 20, Wayne St. 12 Graceland 36, Baker 0 Murray St. 7, Morehead St. 6 Michigan 31, Wake Forest 0 UCLA 10, Ohio St. 10 (tie) Nebraska 17, Miami, Fla. 9 Missouri 24, Morth Carolina 3 Kansas 34, Wisconsin 24 Notre Dame 24, Michigan St. 6 North Carolina St. 24, Indiana 21 Texas A&M 14, Illinois 7 Purdue 42, Miami,dOhio 20 Ohio U. 34, Toledo 8 McNeese St. 34, Marshall 9 WEST Brigham Young 8, San Diego St. 0 California 43, San Jose St. 16 Carroll, Mont. 16, Rky. M'Tain215 Cal. Luth. 38, Claremont-Mudd 22 Chico St. 51, Wan. Montana 10 Colorado 45, Drake 24 Eao. Montana 44, Simon Fraserl31 Fresno St. 31, Fullerton St. 12 Hayward St. 30, St. Mary's, Cal. 3 Lewis & Clark 20, Pac. Lutheran 6 Long Beach St. 17, Pacific, Cal. 14 Montana 28, Weber St. 25 Montana St. 24, Boise St. 20 New Mexico 33, Colorado St. 20 Nev.-Reno 57, Montana Tech 7 Oregon 27, Utah St. 9 Oregon Coll. 34, Esn. Oregon 14 Pacific, Ore. 9, Idaho Coll. 6 Puget Sound 37, Humboldt St. 0 Redlands 31, USIU 14 USC 55, Iowa 0 Wyoming 13, Arizona 10 Washington St. 45, Idaho 6 Washington 38, Minnesota 7 Pacific 17, Long Beach St. 14 Sports in brief (AP)--Ilie Nastase won a four-day international tennis tournament in Caracas, Venezuela. He beat Jimmy Connors 6-1, 6-3 yesterday, picking up $37,000 in first prize money. Bjorn Borg was third, and Adriano Panatta fourth. JUNIOR FLAG FOOTBALL SCORES Dolphins 14, Lions 12 Red Devils 6, Colts 0 ('I All ads will be run one time only. You must submit your ad each time you want it printed. Ads may be submitted by calling before 4 p.m. or by dropping it in one of the drop boxes. Ads which discriminate on the basis of race, sex, creed, color or national origin will not le accepted. The staff reserves the right to re-write any ad it deems necessary. for sale Wooden magazine rack, $10: hand mixer, $5: bathroom cabinet,$10. Call 951247 DWH or 90294 after 6:30 p.m. 1971 Ford Mustang, blue, 302 cu,in engine, 3 speed, excellent condition, $2,000. Call 85501 DWH or 952246 AWH. 1967 Buick Electra, price negotiable. Call 96263 AWH. lost One ladies watch, black face and band, with diamond chip. No numbers on face. Waltham brand. Lost Thursday night behind bleachers at Cooper Field. If found, please call 85294 AT. wanted Surveyor CB2600, 5 watt, 23 channel, Need 350 or 40OX18 motorcycle tire, CB transceiver. Almost new. $90, universal tread. Call ETN2 Elsey Call Bill at 95451 OWN or 95414 AWNH. at 90113 A. 1973 Honda CL100, $280. Call 85559 AWN and ask for Bob, room M205. 1972 Chevy Custom 10 pickup truck. Excellent condition, with new CB radio, 44,(00 miles, $2,100. Call 85501 )WH. services Will babysit for working mothers. Infants and up. Call 90297, EPY Evans Point. Cakes decorated for all occasions. Call 85649. Monday, October 4, 1976 Brett and Madlock win titles KANSAS CITY (AP)-Mel McRae of the Kansas City Royalsaapparently has some hard feeling about his teammate George Brett winning the American League batting title. McRae was Brett's closest pursuer going into the Royals' 5-3 loss yesterday to the Minnesota Twins on the final day of the regular season. Brett belted three hits, one of them a controversial inside the park homer that gave him the title, with a .333 average to McRae's .332. McRae contended that Minnesota outfielder Steve Brye intentionally mis-played Brett's hit, on orders from Twins' manager Gene Mauch. McRae indicated afterwards that he thought racial feeling were behind the play, but refused to elaborate. McRae is black, Brett is white. Brett agreed that he was surpised to see his blast drop for a hit. He too felt that Brye let it fall. ( Following McRae's final at-bat, which resulted in a ground-out, he gestured and shouted at Mauch. Both he and the Twins' manager had to be restrained. Much and outfielder Brye say the ball was mis-played, accidentally. Rod Carew of the Twins also was in the running for the American League batting crown going into the game. He wound up with a .331 average. (W After the dust cleared, Bill Madlock of the Chicago Cubs emerged as the leading batter in the National League. It's his second straight batting-crown. Madlock went into the Cubs' 8-2 win over the Montreal Expos three points behind Ken Grif fey of the Cincinnati Reds. But Madlock went four-for-four at the plate to lift his average to .338. Grif fey went hitless in two at-bats in the Reds' lr-to-l closing win over the Atlanta Braves. He wound up with a .336 mark. Aaron gets hit final time up MILWAUKEE (AP)--The storied playing of major league baseball's alltime home run king Hank Aaron has ended, 755 home runs, 3,771 hits and 2,297 RBI's after it began. It ended where it started, in Milwaukee, where the Brewers were losing 5-2 yesterday to the Detroit Tigers. Aaron broke in with the Milwaukee Braves in 1954, and went to Atlanta with the Braves in 1966. He came back to Milwaukee and the Brewers in 1975, after having broken Babe Ruth's career home run mark of 714. The 42-year-old Aaron stepped to the plate for the final time in the sixth inning, with runners at second and third. He lashed a hard grounder into the hole between shortstop and third base, and Tigers' shortstop Jerry Manuel was only able to get a glove on the ball, knocking it down. Aaron was safe at first, and a run scored. Brewers manager Alex Grammas then replaced Aaron with a pinch runner so he could end his career with a hit. Aaron has yet to announce his future plans. Apparently he's still deciding between front-office offers from Milwaukee and from Atlanta where he resides. Looking back at his 23-year career, Aaron says he has no regrets. He says he just wants "to be remembered as a complete ballplayer." About his final at-bat, Aaron said he wasn't thinking "anything in particular." He says he thought about the same thing that entered his mind the first time he batted in thewmajors, getting a hit. He was given a standing ovation by the 7,000 fans each time he stepped to the plate. Sports scores SCORES FROM YESTERDAY In the NFL Los Angeles 31, Miami 28 New England 48, Oakland 17 Dallas 28, Seattle 13 Baltimore 42, Tampa Bay 17 Cincinnati 45, Cleveland 24 St. Louis 27, New York Giants 21 Chicago 33, Washington 7 Houston 31, New Orleans 26 Denver 26, San Diego 0 Buffalo 50, Kansas City 17 Philadelphia 14, Atlanta 13 Green Bay 24, Detroit 14 San Francisco 17, New York Jets 6 NATIONAL LEAGUE BASEBALL Cincinnati 11, Atlanta 1 Philadelphia 2, New York Mets 1 Chicago Cubs 8, Montreal 2 San Diego 3, Los Angeles 2 Pittsburgh 1, St. Louis 0 (1st game) Pittsburgh 1, St. Louis 0 (2nd game) AMERICAN LEAGUE BASEBALL Minnesota 5, Kansas City 3 California 1, Oakland 0 Bostpn 3, Baltimore 2 in 15 innings Texas 3, Chicago White Sox 0 Detroit 5, Milwaukee 2 Cleveland at New York Yankees two games, postponed--rain NBA Exhibition Chicago 96, Milwaukee 83 Hockey Exhibitions Buffalo 4, Philadelphia 0 New York Rangers 3, Washington 1 Detroit 7, Minnesota North Stars 2 Pittsburgh 8, St. Louis 4 Chi.ceo Blackhawks 6, Boston 5 N A -w Zt_