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Guantanamo Gazette

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Guantanamo Gazette
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Partly cloudy
High tide.-2:39pm with showers.
Low' tide-- 9: lpm~ Winds Se 8-12
SunAZe --- 6:48am< knots. Bay cond,
.Sw2ngt ---- 7:03pm 2-4 feet.
Hi~gh ---88 1
1 o --- 75 The Navyl.6 onty sho.'te-baured daily
Vol. 31 Nol. 179 U.S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba ',Thursday, September 16, 1976




Kennedy collides with Bordelon

WASHINGTON CM') --The Navy announ- 8-foot splits in the deckhouse. one >-ced yesterday that the aircraft car- 4-foot split forward of the refuel-~ rier John F. K~ennedy and the des- ing station and damage to winches. 4ntroyer' Bordelon collided during a' Both ships continued on thir'own refueling operation 100 niles north power after the collision, the Navy of Scotland Tu~iesday night. said.
There were no fatalities, hut six The Kennedy was involved in a colBordelon crewmen w ere injured, two lision in the Mediterranean last seriously, a -Navy spokesman said. November, with eight killed and 4 There were no injuries to crewmen others injured.
aboard the Kennedy, the Navy said. The ship thatolided with the GITMO~'S WATERSHIP: The USS Abatan has been doing some- aquatic acrobatics -The top of Bordelon' s forward- carrier then wa the cruiser Be2lkn p, for the pst week. With PWD pumping out some 'of the four and ~a half mil- stack was crushed and its forward and it was the Bordelon which towed lionm glons of water that she normally holds, the Abatan started floating and after masts and equipment arep the- Belknap to safety after the collast week showing about two and a half feet of her-haull which is normally damaged along with a sonar room and lision. undere water. The Abatan isjcurrently being refilled and slgtly raised. The Abatap, is exetdto be back to- normal in her bed explosives and there were no fires I
omuwihnafew days. Contrary to rumor control reports, the Abatan on either ship. -two week stike
iin nodnger of floating-away. (Photo by FLTAVCENCARIB) - The Kennedy's damage included two DETROIT (AP)--The United Auto
Workers reportedly are gearing for
Pre. ord opens campaign by listing goals asrk fa es w ek
against E'ot -Motor Company. A UAWi
source inDe-it said yesterday
ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP)--Pres. Ford medium-priced holmes by up to 50 per -that uni hrgainers feel both formally began his election campaign cent, and would order the Department sides are far apart and are not ye'sterday, tick-ing offis list of of Housing and Urban Development to Isure how-to get the stalled conAmerica's goals, ranging from jobs expedite' implementation of a new tractz-neqtiations resumed. and hones for all -who, want them to program under which mortgage pay-~ He sa - dn serious bargaiing is a foreign policy that will keep the ments are lower~in the, early years -expected to resume until Monday, at
-peace. #' "-of hone ownership, and rise gradu- the earliest, and that both s-ides
In a- speech prepared for delivery ally with family income, expect the strike to go into Octoat his almua mate, the University of -He said he-'would find way s to use br M4ichigan, F>ord said he would ask the the tax systemnto help familiesThwakubyFds17,0 people to trust proving the economy, achieving peace Ford's jobs goal would absorb the,, ',-,Ford says auto output has been hal-and rest~orinmg confidence in the two 'million usually added to the' -e.
Wht House la'bqr force each year, and -would re- The union strike fund is at a
If elete, the Pesident told dtuce unempl&ofi'ent by 500,000. That -jobfo-nyn wh wi~ants ona, home -forn-severalyasasuc a ownership for every family that tion means a drop in the~ jobless . tellect to lead the nation, and to One major issue dividing the two wan~ts iut, quality education, strong -rate of only six-tenths of a per show that he deserves election after sides is a union demand for 12 more anti measuresr, affordable - cent. 'The unemployment rate was restorigpost-Watergat~e confidence paid days off each year. Ford has health 'care and'a policy designed to 7.9 per cent of the labor, force in in the White House. - offered-up to five. Other disputed keep America out of foreign con- August. I'- n an address to the Michigan, issues involve wages, pensions,
-flicts. -.' On foreign policy,,Ford said thea - AFL-CIO in Dearborn, Ford's health care insurance and suppleUnited States seeks no Hie also said he would' recommend -alliances and working for Middle ing representatio .nt-ix. --reduced down payments on lower and East- peace. H -~ouse record. T presidential can
rival in Chicag
Kissinger ends talks with iNycrere '"-sterday

DAR,-ES-SALAAM, Tanzania (AP)-- TanzanianPres. Julius Nyerere said the urgency of-the Kis'singer mis- h yestrdy he was "less hopeful than sion.s I wa before" that U.S. Secy. of Kissinger is scheduled to net Stt lir Kissinger would be able with 6 F-ig r-ule in Southern-Africa capital, Pretoria, this weekend. and head-off-a race war between the-regioni's ruling whites and its black NATO -group mieets for' ma'oritvy.- -Iilyerere said he would consider it hour with Pres. ,Ford a niracle if Premier Ian Smith of
Rhodesia accepts majority black rule WASHINGTON. (AP)--NATO Secy. Gen. in white-run. Rhodesia within the Joseph Lun said tdm e q of 'th tal.s. N e . sa i countries. - P i: =' z: 4 i i:~ i, ! SW i: 'i Y ' ................................................. .......... ......... :; < , : :;............. x ?:"'" """ = " 7 : ?: : . . . WI [ r U
h , til w 'no 'ready to dismiss ' ii ii i~ The NiA TO ,iiL~iiiii groepi ! i ha i bee vi si,,ting , $I i '~ii~ ii!ii !3 i !' ~"iil$]i~ii iii i ~~ '!iii qi~iiii '! i iii!!!i3i! i ii si, i, ,:~~~iLil >iA ,4 i th s f 11 s o issin er ">in the United States. ... sincei Sunday, i.... il iii !i !!=I ~ iY! iiiiii iJ!iiii{11= ea e s i g'i nissio to Africa iiiand goesi on !I toii Canada ii!1iii(i beforeilii re-l Ii !i!iiii!i !ii i) i: i!il:iii~~iii
is d g r sa b r d e n " o turning to Brussels.' -. .... . .. ... . . . ............. ..........
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Page 2 Guantanamo Gazette Thursday, Septemuber 1t6, 1976 .. .DIRECTIVE ON ORGANIZATIONS HAPEL COMUNITY DINNER

A new directive has been issued ro es u
.......coverng privat organizations on u, n-Jnity be -- COMNAVEASE GTMO IN~STUCTPION~ spn ridiner for al1 volua-0 560.1.Officials of each organiza e workersand .... pouses on.....
C m u i t ion shou ud. reiew t i directive t dod n er Thus dinner ipiance therewith. Oe of wlbe on the hapel patio and uuuin......... inbegencomplia.ce and'~e

the requirements of the directive is wllbegin at 6.30 p.m. A-11 of"the that each organization submit its Sunday school teachers, VABV teachers and helpers, all the seniqr
'or , byiaws, etc.t CoNa.sit.. choir members, the ushers, and all "t b s ... officers of the various organizations via the command which provides its a ive Ec ol i asked support (building, electricity, water,o b ing iter a suple is aske Bo r 7etc.), within 60 days from the date o bring either a salad, vegetable Board "�o ............of the directive's issuance (Sept. or a dessert. Te Chapel Nursery
1, 1976). Any questions regarding i1bopn
the applicability of the directive
may be addressed to the Staff Judge DINNER DANCE AT PHIL-AM CLUB Advocate - 85600, 85432 or 85817. an r i d :,i: "-PORTRAIT"PHOTOGRAPHIER: RETURNS An....ann. .iversary dinner dance giIl
OWIN'G mark the celebration of the founda" ili ... ..... ~~~~BOWLING MEETING ; :. ... ....
MEETI � �:�'�- :tion :day of. the Phil-Ai club in GrA TANAMO BAY SELF DEFENSE CLUB Mr. Dick Aufenger of Aufenger ..... dam o f the Phil-Am club e o cin will practice at the Child' Dny care Studios, Norfolk, Va., will make a There will be an organizational Center at 6 p.m. 'return visit toGtoSept.. 24 1 meeting for "the Frday Night Specials at 7:30 p.m. Saturday. Tickets 'OKINAWA KARATE AFFILIATION will through 27 for the purpose of< taking Bowling League at 2 p. m. Sunday ~ to the affair are available
practice from 6 to 8 p.m. at Mr portrait photographs. at Marblehead Hall for the purpose through the officers or any member 'blehead Hall. Fo~r more information Mr. Aufenger's visit this time last of electing officers. Presently of the club. Numbers to call' for call 9b8258 i4wyear enabled many Gitmo residents to three more teams are needed. This tickets are 96241 AT or 90169 AT. EXERCI fro 6to 7 p.m, For give a gift at Christmas that only is an 8-team, mixed league. Anyone re i on call Leonerd at they can give> -n a portrait, and desiring to enter as a team or 90126 AWH. many stateside grandparents had the' wanting more information, call Mike ICE CREAM SALE BINGO will beplayed at th>e Wind. opportunity to light upthe yule-, Worth at 85600 or 85432 DWH or at If you don't like home made ice tide season with beautiful full c - 85205 AWH. League bowling will cream, don't read any further. But jammeu dbe~u ing watt8o pem.
..r portraits of their name sakes. commence at 8:30 p.m. on the Sept. if you do, you will want to be in Gitmo residents are reminded there 24. front of the Navy Exchange 'Saturd . HA -I will be a $15 sitting fee for each Sept. 18 at 11 a.m. The Proteta W ESNLsitting. Th fee will be used in Women of he Chael wi bh ose ng The Capel Nursery is in need the purchase price of a sale of more TCH DOUBLES NO-TAP some unusual flavors of homemade
of wkers.' This includes super- than $15. Ts fee will be consia SotchDoubles ice cream. visng the' children in'the Nursery e No-Tap Bowling Tournament this Satduring the Sunday services and at Mr. Aufeger will be taking photos urday at 7:30 p.m. Yout'ay check various times during the week. For from-the th through 27th. The in right up until starting time and OPENINGS IN SHELLCRAFT CLASSES more information call the Nursery number t-.oul to make an appont"ple aager a90207 AT. is 8589 Due th t' dima$ pe c- l. The Caribbean Arts and Crafts of the devices of Mr. Aufenger r Association still has openings in '' the upoming holiday season, it i CUB SCOUT COMMITTEE NEEDS HELP both the morning and evening Shell' R' ED CROSS LEW CLASS advisable to call early. 'craft classes. The classes areto

SThe Amjerican Red Cross is offering The Cub ScbW,omitee is'in begin Sept. 20. >Th'e cost is $15.
anadul' learn-to swim class b~eginning STEC AN E LSSES. urgent need of help for the scout- To register call, 96290 AT..
ct. Sat illnr'pool. The Bs t a Sing program this year. Due to the
classes will be heldi each eveningi Srth n e classes will heavy rotati-on of personnel on' BAND AT THE WI NDJAMMER 6tAso c start Sept. 2-from 9to 1 a.m. base this summer, volunteers are" fro 6to8. A scod las or mopre inf rmatipn call Nancy New- needed for',den mothers, assistant ''The Windjammer Enlisted Club will
wllbegin 0ct. 18. Participants ' irkat 9829 den mothers and committee members. feature a stateside band called
intecn piriod ifas th~ea so sre No experience is necessary, 'just '"The"'T' Boys" ontomorrow>,
the scono. EerioOPEDh A A... interested 'people willing to and Saturday of this week. The band Reis> nat thare efrs ieor ths classes.' devote some time to' Scouting. For 'will play Wednesday' night from' 7' to' Reise a heRd rosofie r Encyclopedia Britannica sales will "more information ca~Lll 'Lyn-da''' 11, and, on F'riday 'and -Saturday> call 95434. be held at the Marine Corps Exchange Hollingsworth at 951027 or Ed. nights from 8 to midnight.
th-rough Saturday. These'are being Walters 'at 96265: AWE. PRICE BREAKER PROGRAM offered at a 25 'to 35 per cenit dis- Also,,, boys' whomissed Cub Scout SWINGERS TO 'SWING ON FERRY
Itha ee hepliyof cme- county i 1ound-up-in Augusbt"may still re-'
ial hsoes th pic ceta n ites gister for Cub; Scouts. The boys The Gitmo Swingers Square Dance
cilstoest pi~c etai itms COOKING' CLASS must be~ 8 years of'age or older club will be doing somethin'g'differopopular merchandise at below the ' ~ and registration fee> is $2 per boy. ent tomorrow night . Tomorrow night ~normal markup or sell the items at Mama Ellie's cooking class for' Adult'volunteers in Scouting are is set aside to earn' badges; which st to indce business. These men (ladies invited to) will begin 'free. If you wish to know more may be earned'by dancing on the items have been called loss leaders Tursday at 6:30 p.m. 'There will about Cub Scouts, please contact ferry 'at Leward Point, then at t in trade. 'The Navy Exchanges have 'be fie classes in all. Fr more Dave Delong, cubmaster, at " esal Plant before returning to the joined the program an 4'thi's system information 'call Mama Ellie at 85863. 96232 AWE.'cuhse AlSwnrspaig with a pogram called piece breakers. on' main he Allp S .wg her planin
The Navy Exchange in Guantanamo will JO P want to h earn badges h eotrtarey put these specialsp into effect 'this JOLPNNSITTLE THEATRE TO MEET akt to eta thde clu'no.e ae
eekand will have special signs. and ecretary is needed at Old Do- 8 pm 'mwork athop will be hel as "41t e ix months general >Little Theatre will have a meet- 8sa p am 'A 3 wokp wllm.hlda its require. Must ing tonight at 7:30 at Morin Center. usala 7 :3 p.>,:. tails and figures. ORBITING ELEMENTS e~rred. Hour
Moda ' YOU MUST'STOP ... The'Obiting Elements'will be> playing on the CPO Club patio'tomorrow
A child was nearly run over by a night from 9 until 1. speediLng vehicle Monday, in the
Corinaso Point housing area. Accord-' LEARN TO SEW/CROCHET ingto the' child's mother, who
called Base Police, the speeding Beginning sewing classes will be vehicle passed a stopped school starting Sept. 28 from 9 bus while discharging passengers. 1..a.m. For more information call The bus had its lights flashing. 951265 AT.
A Base Police spokesman said
numerous instances 4of 'speeding and Beginning crocheting classes' will , passing of stopped school buses be starting 'Sept.' 30' from in housing 'areas have been reported ~9 to 11 a.m. For 'more information recently; ' 'call 951265 A.
Gitmo motorists are~ reminded th~at
the school year is here again and ENCYCLOPED'IAS 'ON SALE that traffic may not pass a school ' '
bus from either direction when i't The Encyclopedia Britanlicawill lights are> flashing or; while load- 'be on' sale at the Navy and Marine ing or unloading passengers. Corps' Exchanges for the last day l residentia l areas have> 15 mph today. There is a 25-35 per cent speed limits. discount for base personnel.
SOC IALIZERS MEETING HOSPITAL ENLISTED WIVES MEETING

The Sociaizers Club will hold its There will be a monthly meeting of >monthly 'meeting Monday, Sept. 20 .at teHsia nitdWvsCu
attend ' als opening,.- Club. ,For mre in "forato c



CHRES TO MEET ETRASFGJE~








Thursday September 16, 1976 Guantanamo Gazette Page 3

'Ah,~ fo ay at the Beach'J

Editor's note: Guantan1am Is Company "L"'Mari'nes, the local Naval Security
*WGr~oup D.etachmient, took to the hills Tuesday morning for field training.
Company "L" Marines, unlike most Marines, don't get' much time for feld
training an~d this was a special training program for them. The following articlee, wrte by J03 Bob jHouse, tells the story of the day of trining;
firing 'pistols, a three mile forced march, riflerxy, a briLef sessions in.
the tear gas chamber, and a cookcout at Windmill Beach. Photos were taken by
PH Scott Ridge. Ah,~ for a short lark through the meadow ith
your, friends. Notice the
Wowoe, woe is me an~d you, ~ Hark, a short stop at the V.C. camp look of happiness and'
stuck here in Gitmo with nothing to for a breather and to doctor 'their enthusiasm on the face
d.feet. of the> Marine lading th~e
Whtventure might we take to do. the A few short lecture sessions and left column.
trick, then back into the heat.
4lpehp a walk t a beachsJAde '
picnic. Finally on the firing. line with~ their trusty M-16, ~
Oh ut. a p inc sounds so humdrum, fire for effect and keep the firing
what could be added to' make it more line clean.
fu'?Pack up, mount up, finally a >irde on
Maybe some training 'and a~ hike in, a truck,
full gear ' maybe they'll forget the tear gas
woul dd more taste to that first with any luck.


And so it began on uesday morn, But ld ukaprnl os'
su oethan wam hear, ''Me thinks me feet hurt!
Led by th~e gallant 'LCol. NIorm Huddy,' for it's on to~ the' chamber, to shed And then lo and behold, they took to the boonies for a day a. tear. as if by nm&gic, a Navy>
with their buddies. 'It's not so bad, you won't die from Corpsmnan appears to mend ' ~ the gas, the wounds and off er morFirs stop, surely thie pistol range, and when it's over,'on the'way to al guidance. Oh well,
W smal arms practice sh~ouldn't sound the picnic alas. pain builds" character.
strange.
So what if it's too dark to see,' Finally they arrive on the beach at
that's not a, question for you an~d Windmill,
me. hot dogs,, hamburgers, and a beer
with a ch~All? 'e rile rne is t'he next stop of T'wasn't so bad, it was sometbing
curse, to do, _1
after a detor through the hills, it but forx those wh~o are bored, woe be
coul hav ben wose.unto you.


Jb bocoitted as strike ~evnds n.Sopn o rSre

JOHNNSBUGSouth Africa (AP)-- West Afia The secretary will come
Many olore, or ixed race, South to South Africa later in. the mission.Sopn o re~e
Africans 1egan bycotting jobs in iThere were conflicting reports over spite during thedr liiike,
Cape Town yesteday as' blacks ended th~e number of persons killed in Sow~- the'Marines take tin t
a three-day strike in the Soweto eto since the job boycott was laua-' discus th days activitoqwnship of Jo'annesburg that the cbhec Monday.1 >'The World, a leading ties' ad pan for fitre
Ch~amber of Commerce said had ser- black newspaper reported at .least' recreational gatherings

A spokesman for the >Chambe~r of police gunfire-.;
Commarce> said between 60 and 90' per Poli>ce described the newspaper recen of the 250,000 black workers ports as "nonsense," saying only'
frmthe segregated Scowet township three blacks' had b ' en killed since
staydaayt frmteir jobs duing Monday, two' bypolice and a third
testie wihas called to pr- by fellow te i kiings by p olic in ric' three-mont racial uph.eaval.~ there "is a tremendous effort y~
Te actions came a,.S. Secy. :of police to underplay the situation."
Stt Henr A. Kissinger wsin Tan- two-da strike in< Cape Town
zana fr ameetn ' ith Pes. Julius on th Southern Coast appeared to
N ereat th startof. aiplomiatic be getting off to aslow sart, possttle tha Kissige hps will. sibly because of confusion over when hepcalm blck-white' differences in it is to begin. Pamphlets ciculated
Souh Afrca" Rho'desia and South- in bus andrail stations Tu~esday sayinig it w4as to be put of from this
weekunti net wek. iflery has. long been a' K arami - stipe any ofr Cape> Town's etmtdfvrt atm o
200,000 colored' workers sayed spotsmen~ and M~arines, of po er way from< work yesterday the and now to add a little "
first time~ mixed
Karmiof efcie poer and fur- and large nanufactures..

splt n tiswarton ation. Howve,aspoesmanfor'-te Cape
Kypss in the si-an~ cabinet Town C'hamber of Comnerc 'said a
shfed tfomrPes. Camille survey of a cross section of pu toverall'attendance rates
leader. at between 60 'nd'80 percent with
Fr ih' ralignment cam only 100 per cent turnouts in some cases.
egtdybeoehe is to stp"By and large, c~ommerc~e is donan tunoer power to Pes. seriously affetted," he said. Iowteralesn
elect>< Elias. auspktome -cooredworkrs re 'for the gas' masks, time
seresofPrsienia dcres> tratn 't'sasr fa hoia- to 'shed a few tears beonth esufl wreboadcas by The Johannesburg Chamber of Com- fore heading to the picPhlneRd o oeaed' by>'the mercer spokesman said' the> strike nic for hotdogs, hamburg.
CrsinPryconrlln th here did> have serious effect, ers, and> beer.4
othe mai miltia"and if 'these boycotts continue it
Karmi enuncd etra Fran- will have a mor seious affect."
jieh4 goenmn 'reshhfflenwhich Viking-2 airm fa~ils due to faulty switch
strippeda hi falefcie power iud 'among' emloyr toward Sow-'
i a 'a"bn e eti strik wh ' o also staged a otrhevr'aea," ei~ai> propuSlsiouj ! aborato ry iin"Pa1adena, rotate its scoop back toiii iiiiooi~i7.aIii iil iiiii!Bii l =ii cks lil i m ii e up'iipei iiliii cent ill that conclusion a t- ''>the'digging position. Then thei~i ii~i : iiiiiii!i!i :Ii!Ii!Il~ii~i~ i~~I� =! iii~ii~l i i '"!iiiii!:i~ ii.i~iiiiiiii utiiiiiiiiiii~iii! ii pnly tar . i xa ii ng pho og ap s en 'ac 5 OO it sh ke itip bby.on i o n i < ilorceil!i!ii!iii!i~i!:~iiii !ii� I~iiiI!IIiIi~ l ! ~ i ii1i3? !]!ii!!i thl ii; l ol ' i1!iiii fom~i!Iii:i Siiiqilii iiilii iiii!i!i i!1i%< ato iiiiiiiiii~i]ii iiiiilii c4 i s i iht iiiii~li! fro th !redJia etiT 111c11r1t nts int 1os tio fo du pin in
- i,'le ' ouiho s owe..the hoe a1 the end of the..to a funnel.
i !lii! ! iii! ! i~ !ii~il i: iii %S O~i ii;i i !!iltit e!p ' iil~i i e s bu!i lii r giiii iii tooki�iii klli ila i]ii iil-il~i liiiii .................. iiiiaiiii boyc , < i i/�i li i an i arm!!< :wa~I~ s1l,uck ii i tiht it u l c c e t st s w n t k o n i a l
.... :iii ';il esteii~~iiiii~ r dii! y.! ...o.u s de don.S tu.y......he a m be s

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Page 4 i juantamo Gazette Thursday, September 16, 1976

Faily corral worthy of discussion B RkMuhammad Ali spars

Editor'~s note: the following is which are not possible due to the wih to ch kn er*
the hid n aseie offdr ize and condition of the herd. 03'"
articles by the Special Services Construction of the 'fence is being KIAMESHA LAKE, N,Y. (AP)--Heavyofficer". ivestigated and once plans are weight championV Muhammad Ali 'finalized we can look 'to' the plann- accepted the challenges of two Th unaaoBycmuiying of the new herd. The fence spectators and briefly toyed with,
has a rataher'substantia; population may require some self snd fomyetra his 28 co titere
of riders, horse lovers and would volunteer labor, and it does, its perations frhsSept. 2 il
be ri~ders. Therefore, the family ~worth it to ali riders, would be defense against challenger Ken
0 riders and horse lovers to pitch Norton. ,corral and our herd is worthy of M n.Ater sparring for seven rounds discussion. n.AMERICAN LEGU with Rodney Bobick and Randy
The i of the self sufficeie- New York Yankees 2; Cleveland 0mpact will Karateiarena Stevens and then working on both
cey requirements wilbe minimal T **Baltimore 1, Detroit 0 the speed and 'heavy bags,' Ali was
and hopefully short term. The only o en in Virg ini'a Boston 2, Milwaukee 1 engaged in some banter with the rquirement is that th hrefr O Texas 4, Chicago White Sox 3 &crowd. It was the first'a cook
boa'rding horses be equal to the a ~~Washington (AP)--International '. California 2, Kansas City 1 ,on the hotel staff and then a guest
cost'and ,the stab~les 'be at least < Karate master and teacher Jhoon Oakland 5, Minnesota 2 'challenged the boxing champ.
60% self 'sufficient.~ What this Rhee says an arena built exclusively ' 'The cook and Mli'sparred for
mWzean is that' th current price for karate matches will open tomor-~ NATDIONAL LEAGUE about two minutes and then, when the of boarding horse will go tip row in Falls Church, Va. Pittsburgh 7, Philadelphia 2 ~ guest also challenged" him, Ali to $70. 'Rhee says the openings will fea- Cincinnati 4 Los Angeles 3 dubbed 'the 'man "'the 'white hope"
At the same tim ~a ne ease. ture ~a full contact' karate'nmatch 'St.; Louis '7, New Yor~k Mets 0 and invited him into the 'ring. . will be available ' thse wanting between two world-rajnked lightweights St. Louis New York Mets 1 a ~ "If yo'u ain't got 'endurance," to co-lease a horse. Tis will f in the Korean forml o~f karate called Chicago Cubs 2, Montreal 0 warned the champ, "you better
allow up to thre pepe to co-leae. Tae Kcwon Do. The Participants will '~Houston 4, Atlanta 3 'have insurance."
a horse. at a toa oft $70. Those, be Thee ,protege Mike Coles, and San'Francisco 2, San Diego I1~ "I'm an insurance salesman,"
who have been sharing, ahrse Reggie Moten, who is an instructor ' ,said the guest, Rich Joselit of'
peviousymyce in and 'convert from rival school. CND U OKY e ok
the ne lase. ''pefully, both'iof' Little leaguers~ between eight and "Team Canada 5, Czechioslovakia'4 Joselit, 'celebrating his 23rd
these price increases will be 14. years old will take part in the "'birthday, 'is a former golden glover,
nullifed in the near future due 'other matches at 'the openingg' Rhee ' ~ ' n ~who boxed as a sub-novice in the
-'to cost decrease associated with 'has formed the league 'from students ~ o t ij ' 17 lvscmeiin ewp toth 'dra. 'at his schools in Maryland and ' the full three inutes with Ali,
is hecostruptivement plannedigna NEW YORK (AP)---The four American who sparred without headgear.
to prvd a0 ace fec su.It involves teams representing Basketball Association teams being As time ran out, Ali did his ofpsu. 'Alexandria, Annandale and Falls absorbdb h B ahhscm utmr wndv ntemdl Thsyasture will provide feed and Church 'in Virginia, Bowie, Hyatts-rbdb th Aeahascm cuoayswn iv inhe idl
ahal their enviroment for the '; le through with a $2 million payment, of the ring and was counted out.
hr.Te' patur~e will decrease Hieigt' Keingtoaryand Madthl Dstic the biggest chunk of the entry an
fedosts by approximately 30%. of Columbia. fee. NBA Commissioner'Larry 0' Gottried a Ramirez wi~n
Theaddi'ion of 'the pasturea will, Rhee says he 'hopes the 500-seat Brien says,'that clears' the final
also allow long rane plnning to arena can eventually be expanded legal obstacle to their admission. Italian doubles title
inceae te iz anqulit o te t hndl wathe ops wllbeThe four teams, Denver, 'Indiana, HOUSTON (AP)--Briani Gottfried hrea t recorad za ~o imprtovemndte whath hiwel re oe w ll bes San Antonio, and then New York ' and Raul Ramirez won the doubles is ro posil. He~ ofm ,'hC'h- ee ls ora te weekl bouts. Mets, will participate in a board tteo h tla pnTni
aI igss a' 'H E'~'httemrilat of governors meeting 'today tilionh ~ai OpnTni
Thr r hng uha iding ar~e more exciting than boxing, and if ~ Tournament in Hoton las night,
events, 'weekend rates. daily working o~n setting up 'a franchised Chicago. ' 'four months after the first four
rentals on weekendAs etc. world'blackbelt league to prove BALTIMORE (AF)'--The Baltimore sets of the match were played.
his point. Orioles have taken another name. The Gottfried-Ramirez'duo battoff their list of unsigned ,players. 'led the team of John Newcombe
Pitcher Ross Grimsley came 'to terms and Geoff Masters on even terms
for this year and next. Still unn-" in Rome last May, 'but the match
s'ig~edby he riols ae Ru'g " was called of f because of darkness.
"'s'' ,.~ ~Jackson, Bo'bby Grich and pitcher' When they resumed in Houston,
a'~2 2Wayne Garland. 'Gottfried and Ramirez made short 2' 2a~ a ' work of Newcombe and Masters,
Ala ' wll 'be run one time> only 12 x~ 12 carpet cushion, $ 10; call HAMILTON,~ Berm~ud'a (AP)--Third' 'winning t~he fin'l ~set~ 6-3 for a
Yo utsbmi~t your ad each time' '85401 AW. seeded Cliff Richey has'advanced 7-6, '5-7, 6-3, 3-6, 6-3 victory.
you want it printed. Ads mnay be ~to the quarter-finals ofr Bermuda The match coincided with the~
ubmitted biycaliin biere '4p.m. Grand Prix Tennis Tournament opening round of the $100,000 U.S. or by droppig i~t ian one of the 65 0 Triumph chopped; 1962 Austin with a 6-0, 6-3 victory over' South 'Professional Doubles Championships dro boxs. Ads which disriminae H'iealey 3000; call Lobdell at' Afrcian Deon Jbiubert. Richey's'i oso.Sewo Stewart and
on tebasico race, sex, creed,. 951247 DWH. ''''opponent 'in the quarter-finals will F~red McNair, seeded third i'n the colo nor national orn wil~lnot 'b'e Chile's Alvaro F'illol who upset' tournament,. whipped Lito Alvarez
be acped. The staff reserves the '''~a eight-seeded Ray Rizffels of of Argentina and T~om Gorman of Knight tore-wr'te any ad it deems Bab crib, fair. condition, $25. Australia. 'Seattle, '3-6, 6-'3, 6-1.W 1ecssry Cal 0156 AT.~ ATLAANTA (AP)--Australia's Wendy St. I Louis Car'dinals after

for ale B' atenna, 1'02 inch fiberglas with Turmbull has upset third-seeded
o m otorycle helmets, excellent mount for'-car, $20. Call 90107 AWE. Rosie Casals in the opening round frevgn ply s
'ondiin. Cal 85600 DWRJ or ' ' 'of the Women's National' Indoor fe g n lyr
988 A.1970 Ford 'LTD station wagon, good Tennis Championship in Atlanta. The
condition, $1500;' Scuba tank, 'price scores were 4-6, 7-6, 6-2. 'The ST. LOUIS AP)--Major League Lambretta scooter bodies, engines ~negotiable.a Cal l85798 DWH or winners included Dianne Fromholtz baseball owners, beware.
an pats, including storage lockers 952260 AWH. 'of Australia, Francoise Diirr of St. Louis' Cardinal Pres. August and repair' manuals parts book, France and Carrie Meyer of 'a A. Busch Jr. is after free-agent
and supplier address, $200 takes it 'Frost free refrigerators, whiite,'4 Indianapolis. '. 'players "who could bring the
al. all, 9Y L AT. years old, $100;. living room chair, Cardinals the' pennant" and he hopes green, $5 or best' offer; round baby to, have $3'nmilli'on or $4 million Shoulder holster, new, $30; Tasco walker, $5. Call 97208 AT.C n d to lure them to his fold.
binoculars, 7x50, $25; Hatiney beer T eam Ca a a wins The 77-year-old brewery owner
btles. $2:50 each; Large metal ' - Pro-Classic golf clbs 1,3,4,5, anucdh ilakteta'
amoboxes, $2.50'ea. Honda CB550, wod,2-9 irons, putter, wedges board of directors next week for
$80.Cal 812 T.and~ bag, pull cart; CB TRC-24C, Hockey tournam ent the money to Igo after the expected
o aC ,' ' 4 inch weatherproof speaker, auto players who will be available
1973Hond CB 50,low milage,' excel- 'antenna; 15 gal, aquarium, 2 pumps', ti al
letcniin al917 WW. light.. Call 96230 AT. MONTREAL ('UPI)--Team Caniada won '"I'm going to 'be the highest the Canada Cup Hockey Tournament 'bidder without question if the
'97 mobile excellentt condition, SERVICES '''in Montreal last night, with a 5-4 boardd passes my recommendations ~
P/,P/; recliner an reclner overtime victory over Czechoslovakia' Busch said.
rcerdcarpet, tw lap.Cl esponsible married 'couple 'with no in game two of the best-of-three 'Busch said the team wants a
9524DHor 9921[5 WH.' childrenn will huestfrom now championship series.rih-addpwr ite na
A ' through 'id-October. Call Ms2 Although' the Canadians scored on right-handed relief'pitcher. Alth1 72 Honda CB 350 vary cood condi B rundage at 85559 I)WH or 96140 AWE. their first two shots of the game, ough'he mentioned no names, Busch
toh-rs handlbars, helmet. '' ' they eventually had to 'come from indicated such players as out$550 Cal 9264AT.Cakes decorated for~ all occassions. behindd to earn t~he victory. fielder' Joe Rudi and pitcher
'Call 85649 AT. The Canadians trailed 4-~3 in Rollie Fingers of the Oakland A's B050 T ed e dder A/C, $85 di 5,iz000-u rckaalbl o the 'third period, but Bill Barber were among those he 'had in mind.
Tined AC$5 du iePiku truck. Called hauling sent the game into sudden-death 'Cardinal G'eneral Manager Bing,
airline anmlcg,$5. Call and moving. Cal95569 DWH or' w~hen he scored with just ove'r two 'Devine said that uder present
95036 AWH.,' 85443 ' ' ' minutes remaining. Darryl Sittler draftt rules, th Cardinals could
found the net with the game-winner sign no more. than two of the availin ReaIII% ~i~ii /ii ,, i iiii;)i' i!ii::ants. The majors )iii i i!i ii 11i7i , ll at e r c 'a e/recorder, ' >iii i~ii~~iii~~i?(;i per i!!iiiiil!!i] i od.iiiii i iiiiiiii~ ilili[i� ii~ ii~i i i ' 'ol ila s ia l , re-entryiliii~ draft fori
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Tide, Sun, Temp. Weather Forecast Partly cloudy Hig~h te-2:39pm A with showers. Low tide--9:Olpm xi xAui a~~ Winds Se 8-12 Swttoise --6:48am IU z knots. Bay cond, SUM et ---7:03pm 2-4 feet. High ---88 Te ay. nL h.t.0). tda-t Low---75Th ayzol hebddiy Vol. 31 No. 179 U.S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cubs Thursday, September 16, 1976 I.i ,4 Kennedy collides with Bordelon 1+ GITMO'S WATERSHIP: The USS Abatan has been doing some aquatic acrobatics for the past week. With PWD pumping out some of the four and a half million gallons of water that she normally holds, the Abatan started floating last week showing about two and a half feet of her -hull which is normally under water. The Abatan is currently being refilled and has settled down to her original position with the exception of the stern which is still slightly raised. The Abatan is expected to be back to normal in her bed of mud within a few days. Contrary to rumor control reports, the Abatan *is in no danger of floating away. (Photo by FLTAVCENCARIB) Pres. Ford opens campaign by i ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP)--Pres. Ford formally began his election campaign yesterday, ticking off his list of America's goals, ranging from jobs and homes for all who want them to a foreign policy that will keep the peace. In a speech prepared for delivery at his alma mater, the University of Michigan, Ford said he would ask the people to trust him, but added that "trust must be earned." He said he has earned trust by improving the economy, achieving peace and restoring confidence in the White House. If elected, the President told his audience, his goals will be a job for anyone who wants one, home ownership for every family that wants it, quality education, strong anticrime measures, affordable health care and a policy designed to keep America out of foreign conflicts. Ford said his campaign would deal in "specifics, not smiles; performance, not promises." But he spoke mostly in general terms and most of his proposals were familiar. Ford said he had an "immediate goal" of two and a half million new jobs every year, with emphasis on youth and minority employment. He also said he would recommend reduced down payments on lower and medium-priced homes by up to 50 per cent, and would order the Department of Housing and Urban Development to expedite implementation of a new program under which mortgage payments are lower in the early years of home ownership, and rise gradually with family income. He said he-would find ways to use the tax system to help families "who choose to send their children to nonpublic schools," and to help with the cost of college education. Ford's jobs goal would absorb the, two million usually added to the labor force each year, and would reduce unemployment by 500,000. That would still mean high unemployment for several years, as such a reduction means a drop in the jobless rate of only six-tenths of a per cent. The unemployment rate was 7.9 per cent of the labor. force in August. On foreign policy, -ford said the United States seeks no special advantage for itself in the current effort by Secy. of State Henry A. Kissinger to settle racial conflicts in Southern Africa., He said a new Ford administration would continue to work toward a Strategic Arms Limitation Agreement and build relations with China, at the same time maintaining European alliances and working for Middle East peace. Kissinger ends talks with Nyerere WASHINGTON (AP)--The Navy announced yesterday that the aircraft carrier John F. Kennedy and the destroyer Bordelon collided during a refueling operation 100 miles north of Scotland Tuesday night. There were no fatalities, but six Bordelon crewmen ere injured, two seriously, a Navy spokesman said. There were no injuries to crewmen aboard the Kennedy, the Navy said. The top of Bordelon's forward stack was crushed and its forward and after masts and equipment are damaged along with a sonar room and torpedo magazine. It said there was no damage to explosives and there were no fires on either ship. The Kennedy's damage included two sting goals intended to refute the notion of some critics that he lacks the intellect to lead the .nation, and to show that he deserves election after restoring post-Watergate confidence in the White House. in an address to the Michigan AFL-CIO in Dearborn, Ford's Democratic opponent, Jimmy Carter, characterized the economic policies of the Ford and Nixon administration as mistake-ridden. Absent from Carter's labor speech was any reference to the current auto workers' strike against Ford Motor Co., which has its headquarters in Dearborn. Walter Mondale calls Pres. Ford's campaign kick-off address a mislead-' ing representation House record. T presidential can rival in Chicag Yesterday i DAR-ES-SALAAM, Tanzania (AP)-Tanzanian Pres. Julius Nyerere said yesterday he was "less hopeful than I was before" that U.S. Secy. of State Renry Kissinger would be able to negotiate a peaceful transition to le'sk rule in Southern Africa and head-off a race war between the region's ruling whites and its black maj ority. Nyerere said he would consider it a niracle if Premier Ian Smith of Rhodesia accepts majority black rule in white-run Rhodesia within the two-year time limit desired by blacks. Nyerare's statements came at the end of a day of talks between himself and Kissinger, who arrived in Tanzania Tuesday to begin a round of meetings with black and white leaders from the southern part of the continent. Both Nyerere and Kissinger withheld a final judgement on the outcome of their talks. Nyerere said he still was not ready to dismiss the usefullness of Kissinger's peace-seeking mission to Africa. Kissinger said there had been "no change" in his view that a fullscale race war could be avoided in Southern Africa. Some members of the American diplomatic party suggested Nyerere might be making pessimistic statements in order to impress whites in South Africa and Rhodesia with the urgency of the Kissinger mission. Kissinger is scheduled to meet with.South Africa's Prime Minister John Vorster in the South African capital, Pretoria, this weekend. NATO group meets for hour with Pres. Ford WASHINGTON (AP)--NATO Secy. Gen. Joseph Lun said yesterday he does not think the Soviet Union will reach an agreement with the United States in the current Strategic Arms Limitation Talks until after the U.S. election in November. "I think the Soviet Union is waiting for the election and its result," Luns told reporters at the White House after an hour-long meeting with Pres. Ford and the permanent representatives of the 15 NATO countries. The NATO group has been visiting in the United States since Sunday and goes on to Canada before returning to Brussels. Luns said he and-the 15 NATO ambassadors discussed a wide range of topics with Ford, including the economic situation, the Middle East, Spain, Portugal and the Chinese political situation since the death of Chairman Mao Tse-Tung. 8-foot splits in the deckhouse. one 4-foot split forward of the refueling station and damage to winches. Both ships continued on their own power after the collision, the Navy said. The Kennedy was involved in a collision in the Mediterranean last November, with eight killed and 48 others injured. The ship that collided with the carrier then was the cruiser Belknap, and it was the Bordelon which towed the Belknap to safety after the collision. UAW geared for two week strike DETROIT (AP)--The United Auto Workers reportedly are gearing for a strike of at least two weeks against Ford Motor Company. A UAW source in Det-oit said yesterday that union bargainers feel both sides are far apart and are not sure how to get the stalled contract negotiations resumed. He said no serious bargaining is expected to resume until Monday, at the earliest, and that both sides expect the strike to go into October. The walkout by Ford's 170,000 union employees began Tuesday night. Pickets were out in force yesterday at Ford plants in 22 states. Ford says auto output has been halted. The union strike fund is at a record $175 million, enough to last four months. One major issue dividing the two sides is a union demand for 12 more paid days off each year. Ford has offered up to five. Other disputed issues involve wages, pensions, health care insurance and supplemental unemployment benefits for laid-off workers. In a speech yesterday before the Michigan AFL-CIO Convention in Dearborn, UAW Pres. Leonard Woodcock said he would not allow the strike to be used as an election issue. He said politics and union business do not mix.

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Page 2 /'i)~i Today's meeting GUANTANAMO BAY SELF DEFENSE CLUB will practice at the Child Day Care Center at 6 p.m. OKINAWA KARATE AFFILIATION will practice from 6 to 8 p.m. at Marblehead Hall. For more information call 98258 AWH. EXERCISE from 6 to 7 p.m.For mbre information call Leonard at 90126 AWH. BINGO will be played at the Wind. jammer beginning at 8 p.m. WORKERS NEEDED AT CHAPEL The Chapel Nursery is in need of workers. This includes supervising the children in the Nursery during the Sunday services and at various times during the week. For more information call the Nursery manager at 90207 AT. RED CROSS LEARN-TO-SWIM CLASS The American Red Cross is offering an adult learn-to swim class beginning Oct. 5 at Villamar pool. The classes will be held each evening from 6 to 8. A second class will begin Oct. 18. Participants in the first class may remain for the second period if they so desire. There is no charge for these classes. Register at the Red Cross office or call 95434. PRICE BREAKER PROGRAM It has been the policy of commercial stores to price certain items of popular merchandise at below the normal markup or sell the items at cost to induce business. These items have been called loss leaders in trade. The Navy Exchanges have joined the program and this system with a program called price breakers. The Navy Exchange in Guantanamo will put these specialty into effect this week and will have special signs and Guantanamo Gazette DIRECTIVE ON ORGANIZATIONS PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHER RETURNS Mr. Dick Aufenger of Aufenger Studios, Norfolk, Va., will make a return visit to Gitmo Sept. 24 through 27 for the purpose of taking portrait photographs. Mr. Aufenger's visit this time last year enabled many Gitmo residents to give a gift at Christmas that only they can give -a portrait, and many stateside grandparents had6 the opportunity to light up the yuletide season with beautiful full color portraits of their name sakes. Gitmo residents are reminded there will be a $15 sitting fee for each sitting. This fee will be used in the purchase price of a sale of more than $15. This fee will be considered on each individual sitting. Mr. Aufenger will be taking photos from the 24th through 27th. The number to call to make an appointment is 85389. Due to the demand of the services of Mr. Aufenger for the upcoming holiday season, it is advisable to call early. STRETCH AND SEW CLASSES Basic Stretch and Sew classes will start Sept. 29 from 9 to 11 a.m. For more infqrmatkion call Nancy Newkirk at 98297 AT. ENCYCLOPEDIA SALES AT MCX Encyclopedia Britannica sales will be held at the Marine Corps Exchange through Saturday. These are being offered at a 25 to 35 per cent discounts COOKING CLASS Mama Ellie's cooking class for 'men (ladies invited too) will begin Thursday at 6:30 p.m. There will be five classes in all. For more information call Mama Ellie at 85863. JOB OPENINGS _Asecretary is needed at Old DoThursday, September 16, 1976 CHAPEL COMMUNITY DINNER L Community Bulletin Board BOWLING MEETING There will be an organizational meeting for the Friday Night Specials Bowling League at 2 p.m. Sunday at Marblehead Hall for the purpose of electing officers. Presently three more teams are needed. This is an 8-team, mixed league. Anyone desiring to enter as a team or wanting more information, call Mike Worth at 85600 or 85432 DWH or at 85205 AWH. League bowling will commence at 8:30 p.m. on the Sept. 24. SCOTCH DOUBLES NO-TAP There will be a Scotch Doubles No-Tap Bowling Tournament this Saturday at 7:30 p.m. You may check in right up until starting time and the cost is $5 per couple. CUB SCOUT COMMITTEE NEEDS HELP The Cub Scout ,Committee is in urgent need of help for the scouting program this year. Due to the heavy rotation of personnel on base this summer, volunteers are needed for den mothers, assistant den mothers and committee members. No experience is necessary, just interested people willing to devote some time to Scouting. For more information call Lynda Hollingsworth at 951027 or Ed. Walters at 96265 AWH. Also, boys who missed Cub Scout Round-up in August may still register for Cub Scouts. The boys must be 8 years of age or older and registration fee is $2 per boy. Adult volunteers in Scouting are free. If you wish to know more about Cub Scouts, please contact Dave Delong, cubmaster, at 96232 AWH. LITTLE THEATRE TO MEET Little Theatre will have a meeting tonight at 7:30 at Morin Center. YOU MUST STOP 2 A child was nearly run over by a speeding vehicle Monday, in the Corinaso Point housing area. According to the child's mother, who called Base Police, the speeding vehicle passed a stopped school bus while discharging passengers. The bus had its lights flashing. A Base Police spokesman said numerous instances of speeding and passing of stopped school buses in housing areas have been reported recently. Gitmo motorists are reminded that the school year is here again and that traffic may not pass a school bus from either direction when its lights are flashing or while loading or unloading passengers. All residential areas have 15 mph speed limits. SOCIALIZERS MEETING The Socializers Club will hold its monthly meeting Monday, Sept. 20 at 8 p.m. All members are advised to attend. The club is also opening their doors for anyone who would like to join. CHARMERS TO MEET Charmers will meet tomorrow, the topic for the meeting is "proper diction." Class 1 will start at 3:00 and class 2 at 4:30 to 6 p.m at 125 Radio Pt. klUVUUU~~e -OJUUV, Q44U .l A new directive has been issued The ProtestantC Community covering private organizations on base -COMNAVBASE GTMO INSTRUCTION sponsoring a dinner for all volun 5760.1. Officials of each organizat oda ehsadnner tion should review this directive to insure compliance therewith. One of will be on the Chapel patio and the requirements of the directive is will begin at 6:30 p-m. All of the that each organization submit its Sunday School teachers, V.B.S. teaorganizational documents (constituchormeers, the uhes nol tion, bylaws, etc.) to ComNavBasel, via the command which provides its officers of the various organizations support (building, electricity, waterare invited. Each couple is asked etc.), within 60 days from the date to bring either a salad, vegetable of the directive's issuance (Sept. or a dessert. The Chapel Nursery 1, 1976). Any questions regarding will be open. the applicability of the directive may be addressed to the Staff Judge DINNER DANCE AT PHIL-AM CLUB Advocate -85600 85432 or 85817 WATER STATUS YESTERDAY'S FIGURE! AVERAGE CONSUMPTION: 1,500,00 ACTUAL CONSUMPTION: 1,546,000 TOTAL IN STORAGE: 16,223,000 An anniversary dinner dance will mark the celebration of the foundation day of the Phil-Am club in Gitmo at the club house commencing at 7:30 p.m. Saturday. Tickets to the affair are available through the officers or any member of the club. Numbers to call for tickets are 96241 AT or 90169 AT. ICE CREAM SALE If you don't like home made ice cream, don't read any further. But if you do, you will want to be in front of the Navy Exchange 'Saturd Sept. 18 at 11 a.m. The ProtestaW Women of the Chapel will be selling some unusual flavors of homemade ice cream. OPENINGS IN SHELLCRAFT CLASSES The Caribbean Arts and Crafts Association still has openings in both the morning and evening Shellcraft classes. The classes are to begin Sept. 20. The cost is $15. To register call 96290 AT. BAND AT THE WINDJAMMER The Windjammer Enlisted Club will feature a stateside band called "The 'T' Boys" on tomorrow, and Saturday of this week. The band will play Wednesday night from 7 to 11, and on Friday and Saturday nights from 8 to midnight. SWINGERS TO SWING ON FERRY The Gitmo Swingers Square Dance club will be doing something different tomorrow night .Tomorrow night is set aside to earn badges, which may be earned by dancing on the ferry at Leeward Point, then at t Desal Plant before returning to the clubhouse. All Swingers planning on making the trip.whether they want to earn badges or not.are asked to meet at the clubhouse at 8 p.m. A workshop will be held as usual at 7:30 p.m. ORBITING ELEMENTS The Orbiting Elements will be playing on the CPO Club patio-tomorrow night from 9 until 1. LEARN TO SEW/CROCHET Beginning sewing classes will be starting Sept. 28 from 9 11 a.m. For more information call 951265 AT. Beginning crocheting classes will be starting Sept. 30 from 9 to 11 a.m. For more information call 951265 AT. ENCYCLOPEDIAS ON SALE The Encyclopedia Britannicawill be on sale at the Navy and Marine Corps Exchanges for the last day today. There is a 2535 per cent discount for base personnel. HOSPITAL ENLISTED WIVES MEETING There will be a monthly meeting of the Hospital Enlisted Wives Club ,today at 7:30 p.m. at the Fil-Am Club. For more information call 98196 AWH.

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Thursday September 16, 1976C 'Ah, for a Day at the Beach' Guantanamo Gazette .Editor's note: Guantanamo's Company "L" Marines, the local Naval Security Group Detachment, took to the hills Tuesday morning for field training. Company "L" Marines, unlike most Marines, don't get much time for field training and this was a special training program for them. The following article, written by J03 Bob House, tells the story of the day of training; firing pistols, a three mile forced march, riflery, a brief session in the tear gas chamber, and a cookout at Windmill Beach. Photos were taken by PHAA Scott Ridge. Woe, woe, woe is me and you, stuck here in Gitmo with nothing to do. What venture might we take to do the trick, Alack, perhaps a walk to a beachside picnic. Oh, but a picnic sounds so humdrum, what could be added to make it more fun? Maybe some training and a hike in full gear, would add more taste to that first cold beer. And so it began on Tuesday morn, Company "L" took awalk with the sun more than warm. Led by the gallant LCol. Norm Huddy, they took to the boonies for a day with their buddies. First stop, surely the pistol range, small arms practice shouldn't sound strange. So what if it's too dark to see, that's not a question for you and me. The rifle range is the next stop of course, after a detour through the hills, it could have been worse. Hark, a short stop at the V.C. camp for a breather and to doctor their feet. A few short lecture sessions and then back into the heat. Finally on the firing line with their trusty M-16, fire for effect and keep the firing line clean. Pack up, mount up, finally a ride on a truck, maybe they'll forget the tear gas with any luck. But lady luck apparently doesn't hear, for it's on to the chamber, to shed a tear. It's not so bad, you won't die from the gas, and when it's over, on the way to the picnic alas. Finally they arrive on the beach at Windmill, hot dogs, hamburgers, and a beer with a chill. T'wasn't so bad, it was something to do, but for those who are bored, woe be unto you. Ah, for a short lark through the meadow with your friends. Notice the look of happiness and enthusiasm on the face of the Marine leading the left column. Me thinks me feet hurt' And then lo and behold, as if by magic, a Navy Corpsman appears to mend the wounds and offer moral guidance. Oh well, pain builds character. Jobs boycotted as strike ends JOHANNESBURG, South Africa (AP)-Many colored, or mixed race, South Africans began boycotting jobs in Cape Town yesterday as blacks ended a three-day strike in the Soweto township of Johannesburg that the Chamber of Commerce said had seriously hurt business. A spokesman for the Chamber of Commerce said between 60 and 90 per cent of the 250,000 black workers from the segregated Soweto township stayed away from their jobs during the strike, which was called to protest killings by police in South Africa's three-month racial upheaval. The actions came as U.S. Secy. of State Henry A. Kissinger was in Tanzania for a meeting with Pres. Julius Nyerere at the start of a diplomatic shuttle that Kissinger hopes will help calm black-white differences in South Africa, Rhodesia and SouthKarami stripped of powers BEIRUT, Lebanon (AP)--Christian Pres. Suleiman Franjiah announced a government reshuffle yesterday that stripped Moslem Premier Rashid Karami of effective power and further poLarized the Christian-Moslem split in this war-torn nation. Key posts in the six-man cabinet shifted to former Pres. Camille Chamoun, a top rightest militia leader. Franjish's realignment came only eight days before he is to step down and turn over power to Pres.elect Elias Sarkas, also a Christian. A series of Presidential decrees on the reshuffle were broadcast by Phalange Radio, operated by the Christian Party controlling the other main militia. Karami denounced yesterday Franjieh's government reshuffle which stripped him of all effective power and described it as a "stab in the back." Karami, contacted by phone, described the changes as a "coup." He said they are aimed at destroying the chances for successful transfer of power to Pres-elect Sarkis. He was in Cairo for talks with Egyptian president Anwar Sadat. "The changes are unconstitutional and groundless," Karami said. "They clearly show Franjieh's bad intentions against our current peace efforts in Cairo and Damascus." West Africa. The secretary will come to South Africa later in the mission. There were conflicting reports over the number of persons killed in Soweto since the job boycott was launched Monday. 1The World, a leading black newspaper, reported at least 16 persons killed, all but two from police gunfire. Police described the newspaper reports as "nonsense," saying only three blacks hgd been killed since Monday, two by police and a third by fellow blacks. World editor Percy-Qoboza charged there "is a tremendous effort by police to underplay the situation." The two-day strike in Cape Town on the Southern Coast appeared to be getting off to a slow start, possibly because of confusion over when it is to begin. Pamphlets circulated in bus and rail stations Tuesday saying it was to be put off from this week until next week. Many of Cape Town's estimated 200,000 colored workers stayed away from work yesterday, the first time mixed race people in that area have joined the protests against the government's racial separation policies. Their absences hit the docks, the building industry, bread and milk deliveries and large manufacturers. However, a spokesman for the Cape Town Chamber of Commerce said a survey of a cross section of business put overall attendance rates at between 60 and 80 per cent with 100 per cent turnouts in some cases. "By and large, commerce is not seriously affected," he said. "I suspect some colored workers are treating it as a sort of a holiday." The Johannesburg Chamber of Commerce spokesman said the strike here did have a serious effect, "and if these boycotts continue it will have a aore serious affect." He predicted a hardening in attitude among employers toward Soweto strikers who also staged a three-day boycott in August. "Some employers, including those who were initially to some extent sympathetic, are thinking in terms of doing without black workers or replacing them with people from other areas," he said. Blacks make up 71 per cent of the South African labor force, but only those from Soweto township eight miles south of Johannesburg took part in the boycott that ended yesterday. Stopping for a brief respite during their jiike, the Marines take tike' to discuss the days activities and plan for future recreational gatherings. Riflery has long been a favorite pastime for sportsmen and Marines, and now to add a little difficulty.wear a gas mask. And now the real reason for the gas masks, time to shed a few tears before heading to the picnic for hotdogs, hamburgers, and beer. Viking-2 arm fails due to faulty switch PASADENA, Calif. (AP)--Scientists say a faulty switch caused a mechanical arm on Viking-Two's lander to stop working after delivering a Martian soil sample to a minilaboratory. Mission controllers at the jet propulsion laboratory in Pasadena, California drew that conclusion after examining photographs sent back from the red planet. The pictures showed the hoe at the end of the arm was stuck with its dirt collector upside down. Viking project manager Jim Martin says the automatic switch believed to have caused the snag seems to be inoperative, but that scientists can compensate for its functions. Scientists say the arm will be ordered to rotate its scoop back to the digging position. Then the scoop must shake its pebbly contents into position for dumping into a funnel. Scientists won't know until early Saturday whether the arm obeys. Page 3 1

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Page 4 Family corral worthy of discussion Editor's note: the following is the third in a series of four articles by the Special Services officer. The Guantanamo Bay community has a rather substantia; population of riders, horse lovers and would be riders. Therefore, the family corral and our herd is worthy of discussion. The impact of the self sufficeiency requirements will be minimal and hopefully short term. The only requirement is that the charge for boarding horses be equal to the cost and the stables be at least 60% self sufficient. What this mean is that the current price of boarding a horse will go up to $70. At the same time a new lease will be available for those wanting to co-lease a horse. This will allow up to three people to co-lease. a horse at a total of $70. Those who have been sharing a horse previously may come in and convert the new lease. Hopefully, both of these price increases will be nullified in the near future due to cost decreases associated with planned improvements to the corral. The first improvement planned is the construction of a fence to provide 100 acres of pastur. This pasture will provide feed and a heal their enviroment for the herd. The pasture will decrease feed costs by approximately 30%. The addition of the pasture will also allow long range planning to increase the size andquality of the herd, the record improvement, which is not possible. There are things such as riding events, weekend rates. daily rentals on weekends etc. Guantamo Gazette which are not possible due to the Oize and condition of the herd. Construction of the fence is being investigated and once plans are finalized we can look to the planning of the new herd. The fence may require some self snd volunteer labor and it does, its worth it to all riders, would be riders and horse lovers to pitch in. Karate arena to open in Virginia Washington (AP)--International Karate master and teacher Jhoon Rhee says an arena built exclusively for karate matches will open tomorrow in Falls Church, Va. Rhee says the openings will feature a full contact karate match between two world-ranked lightweights in the Korean form of karate called Tae Kwon Do. The Participants will be Rhee protege Mike Coles, and Reggie Moten, who is an instructor from a rival school. Little leaguers between eight and 14 years old will take part in the other matches at the opening. Rhee has formed the league from students at his schools in Maryland and Virginia. It involves teams representing Alexandria, Annandale and Falls Church in Virginia, Bowie, Hyattsville, Kenington and Marlow Heights in Maryland, and the District of Columbia. Rhee says he hopes the 500-seat arena can eventually be expanded to handle what he hopes will be bi-weekly, or even weekly, bouts. He feels that the martial arts are more exciting than boxing, and working on setting up a franchised world blackbelt league to prove his point. F W All ads will be run one time only You must submit your ad each time .you want it printed. Ads may be submitted by calling before 4 p.m. or by dropping it in one of the drop boxes. Ads which discriminate on the basic of race, sex, creed, color or national origin will not be accepted. The staff reserves the right to re-write any, ad it deems necessary. for sale 2 motorcycle helmets, excellent condition. Call 85600 DWH or 98285 AT. Lambretta scooter bodies, engines and parts, including storage lockers and repair manuals, parts book, and supplier address, $200 takes it all. Call 97j2 AT. Shoulder holster, new, $30; Tasco binoculars, 7x50, $25; Hatuey beer bottles, $2.50 each; Large metal ammo boxes, $2.50 ea. Honda CB550, $800. Call 98192 AT. 1973 Honda CB 350, low milage, excellent condition. Call 951275 AWH. 1967 Olsmobile, excellent condition, P/S, P/B; recliner and reclinerrocker, red carpet, two lamps. Call 951234 DWH or 99215 AWH. 1972 Honda CB 350, very cood condition, hi-rise handlebars, helmet. $550. Call 96264 AT. 10,500 BTU Fedders A/C, $85; 5,000 BTU Fedders A/C $35; medium size airline animal cage, $15. Call 951036 AWH. Four Realistic speakers, $300 or best offer; 8-track player/recorder, $50; assortment of 8-track tapes, S3 ea. Call 95569 DWH or 85443AWH. Two light blue velvet occasional living room chairs, good condition, $50; must sell as set. Call 96167 AWH. 2 Khaki uniforms, permanent press, gabardine, shirts size small, trousers size small. 32W, 32L, like new condition, $15; call 95349 AT. 12 x 12 carpet cushion, $ 10; call 85401 AWH. 650 Triumph chopped; 1962 Austin Healey 3000; call Lobdell at 951247 DWH. Baby crib, fair condition, $25. Call 90156 AT. CB antenna, 102 inch fiberglas with mount for car, $20. Call 90107 AWH. 1970 Ford LTD station wagon, good condition, $1500; Scuba tank, price negotiable. Call 85798 DWH or 952260 AWH. Frost free refrigerator, white, 4 years old, $100; living room chair, green, $5 or best offer; round baby walker, $5. Call 97208 AT. A-J Pro-Classic golf clubs, 1,3,4,5, woods, 2-9 irons, putter, wedges and bag, pull cart; CB TRC-24C, 4 inch weatherproof speaker, auto antenna; 15 gal. aquarium, 2 pumps, light. Call 96230 AT. SERVICES Responsible married couple with no children will house sit from now through mid-October. Call MS2 Brundage at 85559 0WH or 96140 AWH. Cakes decorated for all occassions. Call 85649 AT. Pick-up truck available for hauling and moving. Call 95569 DWH or 85443 AWH. lost A black cat wearing a brown collar in the Corinaso Point area, GTMO tag #0398. If found call 85109 AT. A reward is being offered for a tool box left at the dump late last Friday. Call. 97279 or 90252 AWH. *B ARWD AMERICAN LEAGUE New York Yankees 2, Cleveland 0 Baltimore 1, Detroit 0 Boston 2, Milwaukee 1 Texas 4, Chicago White Sox 3 California 2, Kansas City 1 Oakland 5, Minnesota 2 NATIONAL LEAGUE Pittsburgh 7, Philadelphia 2 Cincinnati 4 Los Angeles 3 St. Louis 7, New York Mets 0 St. Louis New York Mets 1 Chicago Cubs 2, Montreal 0 Houston 4, Atlanta 3 San Francisco 2, San Diego 1 CANADA CUP HOCKEY Team Canada 5, Czechoslovakia 4 Sports in brief NEW YORK (AP)--The four American Basketball Association teams being absorbed by the NBA each has come through with a $2 million payment, the biggest chunk of the entry fee. NBA Commissioner Larry 0' Brien says that clears the final legal obstacle to their admission. The four teams, Denver, Indiana, San Antonio, and then New York Mets, will participate in a board of governors meeting today in Chicago. BALTIMORE (AP)--The Baltimore Orioles have taken another name off their list of unsigned players. Pitcher Ross Grimsley came to terms for this year and next. Still unsigned by the Orioles are Reggie Jackson, Bobby Grich and pitcher Wayne Garland. HAMILTON, Bermuda (AP)--Third seeded Cliff Richey has advanced to the quarter-finals of Bermuda Grand Prix Tennis Tournament with a 6-0, 6-3 victory over South Afrcian Deon Joubert. Richey's opponent in the quarter-finals will be Chile's Alvaro Fillo who upset eight-seeded Ray Ruffes of Australia. ATLANTA (AP)--Australia's Wendy Turmbull has upset third-seeded Rosie Casals in the opening round of the Women's National Indoor Tennis Championship in Atlanta. The scores were 4-6, 7-6, 6-2. The winners included Dianne Fromholtz of Australia, Francoise Durr of France and Carrie Meyer of Indianapolis. Team Canada wins Hockey tournament MONTREAL (UPI)--Team Canada won the Canada Cup Hockey Tournament in Montreal last night with a 5-4 overtime victory over Czechoslovakia in game two of the best-of-three championship series. Although the Canadians scored on their first two shots of the game, they eventually had to come from bellind to earn the victory. The Canadians trailed 4-3 in the third period, but Bill Barber sent the game into sudden-death when he scored with just over two minutes remaining. Darryl Sittler found the net with the game-winner at the 11:33 mark of the extra period. Gil Perreault and Phil Esposito scored for Canada in the first period, and Bobby Clark notched the other goal midway through the third period to give Canada a temporary 3-2 lead. Canada finished first in the round robin portion of the tournament and earned a total of $150,000 or $6,000 per man. Thursday, September 16, 1976 Muhammad Ali spars with two challengers KIAMESHA LAKE, N,Y. (AP)--Heavyweight champion Muhammad All accepted the challenges of two spectators and briefly toyed with them yesterday as he continued preperations for his Sept. 28 title defense against challenger Ken Norton. After sparring for seven rounds with Rodney Bobick and Randy Stevens and then working on both the speed and heavy bags, Ali was engaged in some banter with the crowd. It was then first a cook on the hotel staff and then a guest challenged the boxing champ. The cook and Ali sparred for about two minutes and then, when the guest also challenged him, Ali dubbed the man "the white hope" and invited him into the ring. "If you ain't got endurance," warned the champ, "you better have insurance." "I'm an insurance salesman," said the guest, Rich Joselit of New York. Joselit, celebrating his 23rd birthday, is a former golden glover, who boxed as a sub-novice in the 1970 gloves competition. He went the full three minutes with Ali, who sparred without headgear. As time ran out, Ali did his customary swan dive in the middle of the ring and was counted out. Gottfried and Ramirez win Italian doubles title HOUSTON (AP)--Brian Gottfried and Raul Ramirez won the doubles title of the Italian Open Tennis Tournament in Houston last night, four months after the first four sets of the match were played. The Gottfried-Ramirez duo battled the team of John Newcombe and Geoff Masters on even terms in Rome last May, but the match was called off because of darkness. When they resumed in Houston, Gottfried and Ramirez made short work of Newcombe and Masters, winning the final set 6-3 for a 7-6, 5-7, 6-3, 3-6, 6-3 victory. The match coincided with the opening round of the $100,000 U.S. Professional Doubles Championships in Houston. Sherwood Stewart and Fred McNair, seeded third in the tournament, whipped Lito Alvarez of Argentina and Tom Gorman of Seattle, 3-6, 6-3, 6-1. 1 St. Louis Cardinals after free agent players ST. LOUIS (AP)--Major League baseball owners, beware. St. Louis Cardinal Pres. August A. Busch Jr. is after free-agent players "who could bring the Cardinals the pennant" and he hopes to have $3 million or $4 million to lure them to his fold. The 77-year-old brewery owner announced he will ask the team's board of directors next week for the money to go after the expected players who will be available this fall. "I'm going to be the highest bidder without question if the board passes my recommendation," Busch said. Busch said the team wants a right-handed power hitter and a right-handed relief pitcher. Although he mentioned no names, Busch indicated such players as outfielder Joe Rudi and pitcher Rollie Fingers of the Oakland A's were among those he had in mind. Cardinal General Manager Bing Devine said that under present draft rules, the Cardinals could sign no more than two of the available free agents. The majors will hold a special re-entry draft for the free agents Nov. 4. Busch said the Anheuser-Busch, Inc., board has had the money to buy the players. "I happen to have built this brewery up to a 35-million barrel operation, so AnheuserBusch has plenty of dough and they should be willing to go along with this," he said.


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