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Guantanamo Gazette

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Tid, Sun Tempi. Weather Forecast

Partly cloudy
Hi~gh tie- 1: 33pm A-over bay.
Low tide- 7:59pm Winds SE 14 kis.
SW1Ak6e --- 6:48am Bay cond. 2-4 ft.
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Lo 89---7 The Navy'z. onty shoAe-b ed daity

Vol. 31 No.jj 178 U.S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba NWednesday, September 15. 1976,



Ford to make first campaign trip with speech at his alma mater

WASHINGTON (AP)--Fres. Gerald we're still losing 25 to 50 per cent
Ford makes his first campaign trip odf all the Medicaid money that's
of the fall today. fle'll head to supposed to be for good health care."
Ann Arbor, Mich., 'and give a speech Medicaid helps pay for health care
at his alma mater, the University for qualified senior citizens.
of Michigan. Thetrip follows crit- Recent investigation by a Senate
~icism yesterday from Democratic subcommittee has documented inpresidential nominee, Jimmy Carter, stances of unneeded and duplicated
'who said the President's stay-at- >health exams and laboratory work
home campaign strategy was an at- which the government pays for.
temptpto keep his'record away from Senate investigators. estimated' at
public' scrutiny. ' least a quarter and perhaps as much
Carter anrd his running mate, , ''as half of the $l5 billion spent
Walter qndale, 'also attacked the ,annually on Medicare is wasted.
Ford administration yesterday for '~Carter said, "The Republican adits handling of the Medicaid system."'' ministration has just not provided
Carter, looking ahead, to his debates~ tough, competent management to
,- wth Ford, said in Phoenix, Ariz., 'make our scarce health' dollars go
that he'll raise with Ford the is- In his interview yester ay, Ford have the capability and will to main- to help patients or to prevent dissues of aging :and' health care. said he will use his Michigan, h tain it." < 'doetc ease. This is a national disgrace."
The President defended his stay- speech to review hi's record, and he "We'll also talk about doetcCarter said he also wanted to ask~
at-home strategy yesterday, saying promised some, surprise es. 'problems, jobs; home ownership, bet- Ford 'at. their debate why he voted that as long~ as the Democratic-con- Questioned in the Oval Office by' ter' health, crime' control, more re- . against Medicare when in Congress.
trolled Congress is in session he reporters' in New York who used a creation, better education. Then
'has to "make sure it doesn't go off long-distance television hookup, we'll point'to some of the things At the other end of the sun belt
the deep end." 'the President gave this' as the we should do~ in foreign policy."" in Pinell~as Park, Fla., Carter's
Ford said in an interview, "When thrust of his upcoming speech, Ford said this will be 'the theme running mate, Sen. Walter Mondae,
'we do h an opportunity following "While we've faced some tough prob- 'of his campaign as well once he hits said the Medicaid scandals are the
the time Gongress adjourns, we cer- 7'leMs in the'last twqo' ears: we have the road after Congress ends its result of "a government that is not
tainly< wilbecmpaigning. With' recognized accomiplishments.. We have current session Oct. 2. in charge and rich folks ripping
Cogess in session, it is vitally restored trust' in'the White House,; In Phoenix, Jimmy Carter said, 'of'f senior citizens."'
'important that someone be here to we have turned the economy around; "I'd like' to know why after eight ' Mondale''also said Pres. Ford
check on their activities. and we have achieved peace and we years of a Republican administration, should explain 'what, Mondale 'called 3~V7 W .~"his incredible record of failure" United Auto Workers strike against Ford Motor Co. in dealing with domestic problems,
especially, said Mondale, unemiploy-'
DETROIT (AP)--Some 170,000 Ujnited ers, had extended its contracts with American automakers will remain on ment.
Auto Workers in 22 states are now on Ford of Canada Ltd., 'but parts short- the job pending a settlement at Ford,
strike against 'Ford Motor Co., in the ages were expected to' cause quick ' the UAW's 1976. target for fashioning Republican vice presidential cannation's largest,industrial shutdown shut'downs.' the industry pattern. ona didate Robert Dole 'told the prestiinsi eas.,Industry analysts added a prolonged Even with a speedy settlement ona gious Commonwealth Club of San
The walkout, followed two months of walkout eventually would force the national pact, however, production Francisco yesterday that the
negotiations thatf'ailed to produce an, agreement. on the key union demand at auto supply firms, and they esti- strikes. Local agreements on working what he called "back door" socialfor reduced work tine. For its part, Ford claimed it' offered well over wages estimated at $100 million a eously, but'the union said progress Dole says 'the Democratic'document $1 billion in benefits for the" auto week in North America. on that level has been unusually slow calls for 62 new or extended spendworkers' over 'three years. Another 530,000 auto workers cover- this year with only 14 of 99 bargain- ing programs, which will cost a
W~orers exuberant as they started ed by simi~lar pacts at the other ing units having settled 'so far, minimum of $100 billion.
herfirsdt strike against t'he
40 2bert o auto company' in nine *h l
years, poured out of Ford assebly Monh narrowly wn as12 stte hodpim re
and manuifacturing facilities precisely at 11:59 p.m. EDT la st 'night, the
official deadline. At For~d's giant U(UPI)--Formier U.N'. Ambassador '' ' "term, beating a political unknown in
Roug manufacturing complex ini Daniel Patrick MIoynihan narrowly Minnesota.
Dearorn, Mich., chanting workers defeated U.S. Rep. Bella Abzug last Sen. William P'roxmire easily won
counted down the final minute before~ night for the right to run for'the nmnto nWsosn
the deadline, then walked out. 'Senate as a Democrat from New York.
Pes. Ford said yesterday that a He'll face conservative Republican Inath, poliica 'nedosmnvc Ory i
stie'against the Ford Motor Co. Sen. James Buckley in November. Hthrd nedreetb
wol urt the economy and expressed Mrs. Abzug and Moynihadn headed a ,Rnl egn'oa ayycoyi
hoefor'a last-minute settlement. field of five, but the other three ' the Republican U.S. Senate battle
Mos runion,industry and indepen- were' far hack. ~'and will face "three-term Democratic
de~nt analysts have said a strike at A dozen states. he'ld primaries yes- 'iI Sen. Frank Moss in NIovember.
Fod would not have any significant terday; led by New 'York and DNE ONHNI eaa he-emDmcai
ipact on the economy unless' it ''Massachusetts;'where Sen,. Edward 'moderate challenger for the GOP I eaa he-emDmcai
,drage on beyond four weeks. '' Kennedy 'and House Majority Leader governor's nomination. On the Sen. Howard Cannon won nomination,
Sm140020 Ford workers in Canada Tim O'Neill Jr. both won renomina- Democratic side, the governor's race and former Congressman David Towell
are exetd to be placed on layoff tion. This' was the firs time they was too close to call. :'won the GOP nomination. 'Democ~ratic witbin a ew days. ,The UAW, which had Democratic~ challengers in more ' In North -Carolina, 'former'State Rep. James' Santini had no party opalorpresents Canadian auto work- than a deaeauman Resources Director David position' for. a 'second term, with two Auto dealer Richard Lor'ber leads Flaherty won the GOP 'gubernatorial 'people' trying for the Republican Gitmo residents reminided bya meager 361 votes over Gov. ' nomination in a runoff primary. i nomination.'
byli 'oli hdeiln' Sta'teHouise 'Speaker James Green won r-imntdi

Ofw trn practices Democratic U.S. Senate primary. How- the Dfemocratic nomination, for lieu- Gale McGee' was 'enmntdi ever, 3,111 absentee ballots remain teat governor. Woigwtothvn ofc n unconte an thera goSen. 'Hubert Humphrey, vice presi-~ primary opposition. Guantaniamo Bay is currently in unone n h aecoudg dent under 'Lyndon Johnson, easily ' Primaries were also held in
w.atering condition 'Charlie Three' either way.Coraoysed.
which is the normal' condition for 'With all, of the state's 422 pre- won nomination for another Senate ~ ooaoysedy
the base -- and the Public' Wrks cincts reporting,' Lor1ber had reDepartment wishes to inform new ceived 59,134 votes to Noel's 58,773. Freedoms Foundation deadline nears
residents (and remind others) of 'No date had been set by the state
applicable watering practices election board for counting the ab- The deadline for the 1977 Freedoms Marine Corps, Navy, Air Force, Coast
i 'Carlie Three'. ''sentees. However, a tally is expect- Foundation-Awards. is Oct. 1, 1976. Guard and reserve forces including
Watering lawns, trees, shrubs;' 'ed this week.'' The subject' for this year's awards National Guard and ROTC.
gardens, etc., is permitted only In Vermont, two-term Gov. Thomas 'is Human Goals: Foundations of4 Our Top winners will receive a formal Pfr' 6 to 7 p-m - du'o-in prids of Salmon narrowly won the Democratic ' Heritage. ' written announcement from Freedoms'








Pge2Guantanamo Gazette Wednesday , September >15, 1976

CHAPL COMUNIY DINERbINNER DANCE AT PHI1L-AM CLUB

V Th Prtestnt hap4 Comuniy ~ An anniversary dinner dance will ThPotstne foael ouiyi mark the. celebration of the foundasponsoring adnefoalvlu- tion~ day of the Phi-Am club in Lteer wrkers and their spouses on itmo at the club house commencing CommllTunity today.This dinne at 73pm.Stray. Tickets w i l l b e o te C h p e l p a t i o a n d t o t e a f a hi r d e a a i a l will b at6:30 p.m. All of the t a i r
SunayScoo ate~hrVB .ta through the officers or any member Sd0 the Numbers tocal t fea

Bulltinchers and helpers, all the senior ticet th e ub. Numer tor call9 Aor choir members, the ushers, and all cktar 964ATo909AT
officers of the various organizations
are invited. Each couple is asked SPECIAL Board to bring either a salad, vegetable C~ARIBBEAN NAVAL LODGE oa dessert. The Chapel Nursery There will be a special communiwill be open. cation at Caribbean Naval Lodge

held in the Masonic Apts. bldg.
RADAR RANGE Today's meeting SCOTCH DOUBLES NO-TAP The Navy Exchange is having a sale work in. the first degree. All
on Amana radar range. All ranges Masons are cordially and fraternalThere will be a Scotch Doubles will be offered at10% of. ly invited. NAWKARATE AFFILIATION wiill No-Tap Bowling Tournament this Satpatice from 6 to 8 p.m. at Mar- urdayr at 7:30 paim. You ma~y check MXAE 'CAMR OME blhad Hal. For more information in right up until starting time and MCX ANNOUJNCES SAEOF CAMR OME cl9858 WH. the cost is $5 per couple. RETURNED GOODS
L d t th Sta<~ Te MaineCharmers will meet Friday; the 8IG pim. CUBye SCOU COMITE NEEDS ceed eCrp xcag has re- topic for the meeting is "proper
N O lu wilnin at8pmeetSOT OMITE ED HELP cevdthe items from their Juine diction." Class '1 will' start at
Fo oe ino mationY call 95454 The Cub Scout Committee is in robbMery.ndLdishg ~ * fsion1 at0 12adioas P t 43 o
DWH.urgent need of help for the scout- rings and watces,~ will go on sale eeting ing program~ this year. Due, to the at 9 a~m. Tursday. All merchandise T m ro ' metnhevroation of personnel onl has been reduced to at least half' ROTRDALN DU base this summer, volunteers ar~e price,'and in many cases, more than ROTRDALN DU tA K E r- needed for den mothers, assistant half price. Although these items The roster deadline for the

den mothers and committee members. are new, they are not in new condi- Intercommand Tennis Tournament blhed al. ormoe nfrmtin No experience is necessary, just tion, and, it is for this reason slated for Sept. 18 and 19
Saff 98258 A . interested people willing to there will ne eno' exchanges or is today. All rosters must be
devote some time ,:FrmrWalters at 96265< AWH. ~ "SARI ~DL
Also, boys womissedV Cub Scout AIDODTOIN HUS' ,ue to a requirement by SeaTrain ~ gste~ f du Scu~s Th bos~Summer air conditioning hours to place TRANSINDIANA in drydock for ywill remain in effect until the end repair, the next provisions will mutbe 8 years of age or older arrive in GTMO by barge late ThurstRBTIG- ELMETS 7 nd registration' fee is $2 per boy. of this month' due to energy savings day or early Friday of this week.
Adult are~~~~~ on base to date. 'Ntfcto faalb'iyo Adul fre volunteers in Scouting ar The commander Of the Naval Base Noicaonfav lbltyf Stauthorized the two-week extension pain-n ti CP I patio Fda abuCb Sutp~leas contact Store will be announced over AF'RTS, night from 9unti 1. yesterday based on projections that dio and television. <' ' ~aeDelong, cubmster, t the Naval Base will meet its goal of r
LE RN TO SE / C OC ET96232 W Hi. '15 per cent energy savings this r U I R C O R P A T C A C L E '' ' ~~~~~~~~month. Therefore, air conditioners JNO HI PATC ACLE ewlle LITTLE THEATRE' TO MET may be turned on in offices and There will be no junior choir strin' IQet 8fo. working spaces at 10 a.m. through prcietswekbaueoth
1a-.Fo orinomton 'all" Little Theatr~e will have 'a meet- Sept. 30. '' rcietswekbauefth
95-6 AT ing' tomorrow night at 7:30 Beginning Oct. 1, air condition- workers' banquet.< Choir practice atMoinCete.ers may not be turned on until will be held as usual on Wednesday, Sept. 22.
Binnin ' rocheting classes' will '1 P.M.
bstrigSp.3frmYOU MUS 9 to1 . For more information conserve energy. OPENINGS IN SHELLCRAFT CLASSES
cl9525AT A childwas nearly run overrby a
speed ng' vehicle' Monday, in the' The Caribbean Arts and Crafts SCorinaso Point housing area. Accord- MACRAME CLASS BEG INS Association still has openings in 'caCOEDA ON SAL in the child's, CopsE e'Ihags for the last day 'bus while discharging passengers.' basic macrame to be given by 'To regist Ier call 96290 AT.
tody. Threis a2-35% discount fo aepronel. A~ Base Police spokesman said run for'four weeks commencing BAND AT THE WINDJAMIMER numerous instances of speeding/and tomorrow and will cost $10., HOPIALELITE IVS ETIG asig stopped school~ buses All materials will. be supplied.' The Windjammer Enlisted Club will ihosing areas have been reported For more information call 96248 AT. feature'a stateside band called Thr ilbeamnhymee ting of recently. '"The 'T' Boys" on Wednesday, Friday th ospital Eniste yies Club ~ Git motorists are reminded' that 'and Saturday of this week. The band toorwat 7:30p.m. athe. 1il-Am the. school year is her again and' LAD IgS' SOFTBAL.L will play Wednesday night from 7 to
Clb...o more information ca1 ' that traffic may notpass a school '11, and on Friday and Saturday
98196 AWH.bus frmeithe direction when its Help Wanted: Report for duty at nights from 8 to midnight.
lights are flashi'ng or whie load- Cooper Field~ softball diamond #1 at DIETV NOGNZATION coeigpiaeognztoson played every Sunday and Wednesday club will be doing something differbas -CMNABAS GMO NSTUCTONnight at' 6 an' 8 p.m., Come down exit this Friday night. Friday 'night 576.1 Ofiil ofeah rganiza- ICE CREAM SALE > and enjoy the fun. 'is- set aside to earn badges, which tio soud eviw hi drctiveat If you don't likte home made ice may be earned by dancing on the
inur cmpiace thereih. Ono cream, don't read any further. But SO terqiements ofth drectiveis ifrot do, yo wilwant tobe in ' Desal 'Plant 'before returning to the
tha eah oganzaton ubmt is fontof the Navy Exchange' Saturday, The Socializers Club will: hold its clubhouse orgniztioalocuents (constitu- Sept. 18'at 11la.m. The Protestant ' monthly meeting Monday, tin byasec) oCmNav asee\ Women of the ~Chapel will be selling 8 p.m. All members are advised to want to earn badges or not .'..r
via t ie cmndin h prod es its s~e ome unusual \flavors~ of homemade attend. The club is also opening asked to meet at the clubhouse at supor (uidigeletrciywaerice cream. < ''' their doors 'for anyone who would - 8 p.m.' A workshop will be held as;
et.,wthin 60days fom the date, like t'o join. usual at 7:30 p..
fthdietv'isune(et U.S. NAVAL GUANTAN~AMO BA CAPTAIN'IS CALL BASIC STRETCH & 'SEW LESSONS
the pplcablit ofthe iretiv Catai's Cll illbe eldBasic Stretch & Sew lessons to aa e ad ee to the Staff Judge ta i at 3 w~.ill bhe hidjeld start Sept. "29 from 9-11 a.m. Call
todayat at- 856m. in43 the W85d817.r Nancy Newkirk at 98297 to register

BOWLING EETIG o a totor for more information.
GOLF'TOURNAMENT ADULY' SWIMNIING' LESSONS SLATED 'enU -4 1o 1z 1...........id1 folo w th e- Ament. Reii - DWa. 4
.... h.......................... .... . ti': atiio "'fee for the 'tour l~iiiii~iiii!i~~ii iia i i:; ! !nam eniii:!ii is!il

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Wednesday, September 15, 1976 Guantanamo Gazette Page 3

Conference proposed to end Lebanon war

BEIRUT, Lebanon (AP)--Anxious Leb- of Tripoli and a string of guerrillaanese awaited word yesterday on whe- occupied Christian summer resorts ther or not a proposed tripartite in the mountains east of Beirut.
conference to end their bloody Civil Casualty figures for the past 24 War would materialize. hours compiled from hospital sources The meeting could avert a' final indicated at least 107 killed and military showdown which Syria has 130 wounded. The total death t1oll threatened unless the alliance of of the sectarian conflict now in 2Palestinian guerrillas, and leftest its 18th month has exceded 35,500.
Lebanese Moslems accede to Syrian Pierre Gemayel, the leader of the. demands. Phalange party which fields the larDiplomatic sources said the prop- gest Christian militia in the Civil osal for the crucial meeting came War, left, for Cairo via Damascus from the top-level Arab League med-> yesterday for talks with Pres. Aniwar iation team of several Arab foreign Sadat.
ministers in Damascus. The team "The main interest now is to save suggested 'a meeting by tomorrow of Lebanon and all Arabs from the disLebanon's Pres.-elect Elias Sarkis, aster, which if it continues will not Palestinian leader Yasir Arafat and only wreck Lebanon but. destroy other Syrian Premie~r Abdul Rahman' Khleif- Arabs also," Gemayel said before his awi at:the Lebanese town of Chtoura.< departure from Jounieh, the capital The sources said Syria and Arafat. of the Christian enclave. agreed while Sarkis, .a moderate Lebanon's Moslem Premier Rashid Syrian-backed Christian',was trying Karami arrived in Cairo Monday. It to get th~e 'approval of' the right- was expected Sadat would arrange for wing Lebanese' Christian leaders. the two rival Lebanese leaders to An Arab League 'representative in~ meet..
' Cairo announced yesterday that the, Meanwhile the battling sides conLeague also had called a meeting of tinued to accuse each other of bol'Arab heads of state of Oct. 18 in stering their forces in preparation
the Egyptian capital. That summit for all-out fighting. is expected to last, three days and The Pha'lange' Radio claimed: the woul beprecdedby prearaory Palestinian forces were reinforced moudeetn pfrcdby eg prieprs by 700 fighters who arrived 'at the meetng f Aab oregn initer' *Moslem-controlled Port-of' Tyrie from Oct. 14-16.
'I '>Sources said, however, the Cairo eastern Europe.. meein could be cancelled if Syria The guerrillas'sa'id.S ia was remetiginforcing its intevento force of >~ACIDENT INVESTIGATION: A course in accident invest- ,. continues 'to try 'to impose .a solu- 'an estimated 13
'igation was taught here recently jby Chl4es W. Eiseleh tion and the fighting continues,.akswt ,000, tank s >a5ge Thetnk proosa fore the meetin in 'aug
Jr., head of the Motor Vehicle Safetyi Division at the Theposafrthmein in artillery,r ocket lanche'.an
Naval Safety Center,' Norfolk.. The two week course '. Chtoura was given front page treat- mine sweepe.~
consisted of instruction in proper procedures in on ment by the 'Beirt 'iipress and' became se'e i~nvestigation, crowd control, first aid and 'a subject of discussion throughout
othe "ccident related pr'obiems. Graduates of'the the, embattled' city..
cors re top photo, front row frouAleft, E02 Michael' Fight1ing continued along the ur 'Police o'efi r e
T. Ev~ans, E01 Walte B. Robertso'n, MAC'S Le'slie E. ' ban front dividing Beiru~t and clashes
Watkins EOC Gordon E. Ballard, >NM2 Mark A. Ellio,d and' artillery~ 'duels raged' along the
FTG1Alla G.Beer an Mr.C.W.Eisle, r. ack owother confrontation points, around on crow i ow r from left, are CWO-4 Jim F. 'O'Neal, MR Phili H. th notenMse-hl otct
tlismer, CM2 'ae R. Sharp,. ~MR William D. Hooper, iMi ' JOHANNESBURG, �(uth 'Africa i AP)Jon' G. Bollard, DPCS Charles L. 'Crawfor'd, 'MAI Ronald R. Human Relations Police opened tieon crowds 'it the>
Williams, and EOC Herbert D. Dunkerson,. Bottom photoo, stetnd' ,' 'sa
front rowfromleft are Fire Chief iRo ert C. 'ommer,'' Council established in black Soweto towns'ip yesterday. HTI Juous F. Sandierson, MAI Richardo S. Kennard, A02 on the second day oi - three-d i'
Dave A.Boughton, BMi Larr S. Hedgepath, BT2 Paul E. oavaercnlesbihda stkeptsigtewiegvrGarn ,and~ 2PHAA Scott S.'Ridge. 'Top row from left menvs r nl eta' seda~ t'sk racitsta n p ,hew14. geverle
are CWO4 Jim F. O'Neal, E0i Crawford B. Jackson, BTi base Human Reltions Councdl/Discri- mens's waeia repic es injuedrl AJohn MI. TrmeMI Thomas L. Mills, BM2 Steven D. mination Complaint',Board. he owred rone iurguedin
iiii imyiiii i'i Repnidliie s ;th organii i za The iiiii~i� World, Johan i gi isii eain ig ,~ i






























Cisn Ti Charles F. Britton, MMl Earl L. Shepard, Repniblte ofte'rai black newspaper, said two blacks
and EM Dennis R. Boik. Not picturedarea UT2 Michael tion include:~ were' killed Monday nigl~t wh qtr'ike
D. Henry and MAC Gleorga R. Hayden. (Photos by ' ) Providing a> forum for surfacing upotr attackedhmwi-on
~ and frank 'discussion of real or workers who"'had refused toJi ,the perceived grievances that cut across job boycott 'launched. Monday.' command lines.'' The newspaper said two other blacks one ~i~ hz me berkipdeb te 2) To develop sand share ideas were killed by railway police who U po tpo es Vie nam mem erhip deb te which will foster harmonious Human' opened fire on a group trying to
Relations among personnel attached sabotage a~ railway line Monday knight to local commiands. in~ the segregated city of more than UNTE NTOS ' P-- e Security After meeting for. onie hour and 15 3) Examining incidents and situ- one million located eight miles south
Conilaredyserday't post~pone minutes yesterday, the Security ations where tension and'dissensi'on of Joh'annesburg.
dbte on U.. membeship for Viet,- Council said t'he debate over member- may exists and prpsn corcieMuch of Soweto was reported quiet na ni fe he U..presiden- ship for recently unified Vietnam 'action. Monitoring proposed cor- yesterday and many residents stayed a eec n n an apparent aot was' being postpnied "to a date in rective action and evaluating its in 'their homes to avoid trouble, but to o nAe cnvt.November so tha 'the General Assem- effectiveness. > "police'used tear gas and~ gunfire to
Bye nng" tote question after bly' may discuss the candidacy dur- 4) To assist Co1NavBase by in- try to'disperse crowds in eastern
d has w rm or ing the course of the 31st session. suri'ng base Human Relations policies districts of the township.
DeortcCndidat Jimmy Carter > The Vietn'e'e side has agreed'to and programs ar'e widely disseminated 'A spokesman for the Johannesburg
'as ee ected, counil members this poiio. an nw ttelws e. Chamber of Commerce reported 70 to
evienlyhoe he .S Gvenmnt5)> Advising ComNavBase-of the' 80 per cent of the city's 250,000 omesc. he'efe a th~~anralAs- existing Huma~n Relations climate black workers stayed hone Monday. politca' p resur to maintain a sembly wa reortrdly'inserted at~ and making recommendations for im-' Somie companies reported 70 per cent hrd tne agist Hanoi. the request ofro-U.S.'delegations' provement as necesary. absenteeismn'again yesterday. But
TeFecdeleaton initiated in order, it was said,. to make it '. 6) -To informally monitor effec- others said more blacks reported taepospone'ant wth1 te reported less~ obvious that the postponement tiveness~ of local command equal op- for work than on Monday. on ece of t e names'e,but was being timed to "ut it past the portuni'ty programs and affirmative Transport officials reported an inomdU. . >sources said American election. The Gene'a' Assembly nor- action plans and advise ComNav~ase increase, in the number' of blacks
ofc aase French officials. in naily takes up amembership applica- of areas possibly needing improve- taking trains and buses from Soweto, Pars 'atwe to seek the 'post- tion 'only 'fter the "Security Council ment. 'home of most of Johannesburg's black
poeet ..of~ficials at the U.N. has recommended 'it. The 12-member> group is' chaired workers.
erniAn ' 's by the ComavBasea Chief Staff Officer 'In the Cape Town area, a pamphlet
Sey. of Stt ery A. aisne An ' n informed source said the Soviet with the' CoinNavBase4 Human Resources was circulated in ?-he rail and bus
wa n aislstwek ninhad held out~ for~ liingh P'rogram M!anager as council~ advisor. terminals 'postponing a planned job
U.S.Ambssaor illam crato 'deferment to 'the month 'of November The other ten members represent: 'boycott in that area until next
annunedn ashingto on'da >after' and the United States~ settled'for 'Naval Base, Nava'l Station, Naval Air week. It had been scheduled for
had een irete 'ovt that V e- that in return' for inclusion of 'h "Station, Fleet Training Group. Naval today and tomorrow.
nmsaplctCi for U..mme- eeec t osdraino h Hospital, Dental Clinic, Fleet Comn- ' Information Minister Connie Mulder
a n .N mebe ~ General' Assembly. Other sources ~posite Squadron T'en,' Naval Security told a congress of the ruling NationHanoi h ailed to said the 'United States earlier ha Group Activity, Consolidated Civil- al Party in Pretoria that the racial
acon fo but80Aericans stil1 ian Personnel 'Office and Marine policies against which the boycott"
litda isn ' n action in Viet- insistd on delaying consideration 'arcs ,.is4irce 'ought to' be edefined1
'said t..a..y.deadline.......... iSavfas Disrnto Ci-asplurmal dinocracy inWsta of the
iiiliili lii~iii ~iiiii!!ii iiid " iit n i '!i ma t rs p es n te m pa thid, o spai atit e i� L ....... '11111 aii=,;i Vietnamese said Monday the plaint !]iii: ::J iii, >ilii: 1!1iii3�;1air11 will~~i1 to................... 'b:l h' idiiii~!teiisivi!iiieffortsii!i toi enterii refierred!!iiitoiiiit...by !similar boards of development.!riii� i= e~elt
b )nto/4iis !u isiins with the Unitedi subordinate !commands and will not'i~ "Thei adyantaga of thisi term (plural.
eca4 tal' eu- S'ae~o h psin nnan te cosie dretape l Pr'sonne'l! ' deocrcy i:!i] is that = it does notii! i !in-~~ii!i~ii io & ty Cou- Aiie an contrutio aid iipro = are...... rq it exhaus th ..ha ....n . of dicate any ": col':,r," or negative sepa.............t t~ ld ise thm b~ *97 Pais Peaii :i



re c Sta a ha4 faie o reply' to Vie �ecAelASa'atMO IkI arranle'-f352.
ud ' nm s lst 6 -~ tedAug. 2 'of uly 176. ' abroa as "aart' ateibMulde said









Page 4 Guantanamno Gazette Wednesday, September 15, 1976


Golf course controversial in Gitmio I D A D,11 Sports in brief *0

jEditor's note: the following is 66&%. Monthly fees were raised from
the second in a series of four $9 to $15 and other fees. were raised...........O..S ...... . .....
arti~c~les by the Special Services accordingly. Thenew BTJPERS minimum
~ Indiana University basketball
officer. fees would increase that further to player Steve Green has signed with $25. In golf, as in other areas, the NBA's Indiana pacers. Green The Golf Course is to say the we are going to try and achieve the playe ls easo for Utah and
least, Special Serv.ces' most con.- 100% mark without raising costs pla. d a t te s un ct oA Uth a
oversial activity. The golfers a in Whthsmesishtwea broken wrist put him out of
copanabout the high cost of are going to have to get more people Baseball scores action.
paiga, course where' they ,have out on the course playing golf.
to use #Atro-Turf or a door mat and Golfers are going to have to active- NATIONAL LEAGUELOANE S P)-qurebc
where. a goo drive down the center ly promote golf. Philadelphia 3, Montreal 2 LOff DANGELES hasbeenquaterbc
of the fai y might end up, thanks Specia Services is curently put- New York Meta4, Pittsburgh 3 coeffa ortas beeii' ned to arock ou of bounds. The non- ting together several golf packages Los Angeles 9., Cincinnati 0 boylee'Asooctd Pess bk-f-heweek golfers getisate evrytime they which will allow dollar savngs for Houston 4, Atlanta 3 leby the Arinssoia rs. t.o. a
seea spri r on the greens. all, and will allow beginners to Atlanta 4, Houston 3 le trin Stat ast8 wink. He
Golf pens to be a veypopular learn the game'and see if they want Chicago Cubs 6, St. Louis 3 dio e izona gStteat wee Hed
sportadee though our course to 'continue without any capital at least one thing wrong in that
wil not attract the pros, it is a investment and at a very~ reasonable gm.Dnwrhsy erle
'lot of fun to' pay and is, laid out price. All we need 'f'or a 100~% is ou g tme Danewoeft ays he ollt e
qite w . about 200 golfers playing the course . AMERICAN LEAGUEhe
Another fac of 2life about the year round, which from a population Kansas 'City 2, Chicago White Sox I he was supposed to go to the right.
golf course is thtthas, *over the of approximately 46500 'should 'not be Oakland 4, Minnesota 2' He wound up scoring a touchdown
last few years, ben consistant 'that~ hard. 'Minnesota 4, Oakland 3 on that play.
money' loser. Te new'self-suffici- Watch for' announcements soon con-' New Yorkc'Yankees 8, Cleveland 2 THE WOODLANDS,; Texa (AP)--The
ecy requrent ' drse recently cernintg 'specially priced packages' Baltimore'9 Detroit '7U..PoTniDubeChmoreqir glfco~estobe100%. self- and get out and learn to 'play golf. Milwaukee 3, Boston~ 1 ('10 innings) Us.i Prbens oubiTe Colasnpion
sufficient. This past ,July, course Golfers talk it'up. 'California 6, Texas 4 Tshi beg is oda rnthe Wfouonds feeswer raied y aproxmatly irst, John Newcombe and Jeff Masters play Brian Gottfried and
dhN~f -, ctRaul Ramirez for the Italian' Nicklaus tu n utt e u a ajte r a 11Doubles 'championship. Their title match was interrupted by rain
'CINCINN1ATI,Ohio (UPI)--The "Bear", In the fieldof 50O on the 6,873> because he hasn't won since his after four sets three months ago
who it turns out is humaa after all, yard, par-70 layout are Barber ' victory two years ago. in Rome. They decided to put of f returns to his "den ths 'weekend M~iller, LeeTrevino, Tom Weiskopf, .Trevino and Weiskopf, like the fifth and deciding set until
to tryto re'ai his status. ' Jerry McGee and Ben Crenshaw. Nicklaus and Barber, also have Nov.
JalNckasbgins 'practice 'to- Veteran BruIce Crampton withdrew career winnings of over $1 million.
day at 'hisgl center near Cincin- from the event because of, "personal They figure to provide 'the stiffest (AP)--Oakland A's owner Charlie nati fo he sar' of the four-day problems. "~ challenge to N'icklaus.*, Finley will meet today, with Jerry
~Ohio-'ig Islnd O0pen tomorrow. ' Despite. missing the ,cut last 2McGee also could be a challenger Apstein, the agent for five
A He proved o 'h golfing world week, Nicklaus. remains solid' " if he continues to play as he did' Oakland players who are threatening last week he ishumn b~y ,finally favorite becaus' he played superbly last weekend at 'the World Open. He, to become free agents at the end
missing ' ctafte 105 straight just two weeks ago to win'the World forced Ray Floyd into a sudden 'of the season. It'll mark the
to. .. qualify Serie..s of Golf.' death playoff but 'lost the $40,000 first time Finley'and Apstein confrtefnlto ronds o the H' also designed the 'course and" first' prize by one stroke. tract talks will be discussed for,.
Wol.le tPdnehurst, 'N.C., won the tournament's mnaugural in Crenshaw~ also is rated amng ~the 'pitcher rollie fingers, first
mrig..tefirst time since 1970. 1973. favorites. The ,4ya-ldntv bapseman Gene'Tenance, outfielders
-he ha msed, a cut. 'Barber won te even in 197 and of'A'usti' Texas~, a thre-time 'Joe R>udi and Don Baylor and'shortNik aussas he w~as "disappointed" is the defending champion because NCAA~ chmin fo theUniversity 0f st'op Campy Campaneris.
,,aod lat ee' turn of evets, the tournament was 'o played last T'exas, has two tou vi"ctres "'
ewl biie the favorie on h i year. But the veteran golfer uisn't this year' .
dh=i -c-hance o ~eet ............. -L u ' comeback brings..

















stops tis seas , this will be
~the las Amrica Tournaent apear,~- j '40m fii hr
ane e for Nicklaus. ilire
AlHe's skipping 'the res't'of 'the PGA MONZA, Italy (AP)--The comeback events to play in 'tournaments in of defending world champion Niki 'Australia and Japan.' Lauda in Sunday' s Italian Gran~d Should Nicklaus win, it will 'be Prix brought a record gate of 450 lmhis 61st career tour victory and. .llion lire ($540,000) Italian 2Lambretta inotor scooter, runs good', ' tie him with Arnold Pamr Ben myo wni t urntd Ad se ay~ b'e, '$125. 'Cal LT ' Maddux a, 64543 .D'. Hogan 'has 6'2 tour wins "and Sam Snead oriertan8000 tickets were submitted by....li...be...fo...4. is i front with '84. 'ore an, thega
ng'e . Daisy model 200 B-B. pistol '/CO ' lhog the course. has been 197 gs~andte aot e100mellthe .o ydopping 't n one 'the> ' cartridges, $18$. Call'951036 A~. toughened up from a'par 70, there 17 aeb bu 0 ilo
drop boxes. sV which discriminte slire, ($120,000).
1973 Hoda CB 350, low milage, excel- in by the tour's lesser lights in orfanswhossreported the nbe

coo rntoa-rii ilnt ln condition. Cl 951275 AWH. Monday's qualifying round. Curtis the other Ferrari drivers was'
beacepe.r Test'aff reserves the1 'KSifncmmrilsz lw oe, ford and Any Benled thea 67she oths0,0 manae thou
rgtt ewie any ad it deems 'Jcbe 'omrca hsghe than 100er 000ifer because thouudra6s
necesav sad of yot s maae to rec




















$79 extr~along double bed, includ-th Autodome without tickets, fo aeing solid walnut Mediterrainean, hs atr z' etr viLgsrelac yl,&
~ni n~.style hieadboard, posturepedic mat-~ Chs atr inltes aoiiemn andveilacen. 130 1,0BTaicodtoegood> tress and box spring, roller~ frame, polageAoies reporatchedneol
coniton $00 Cll98250 AWH $125. Call 8515 T con.Aemming olau uhrte eotdpol
or 8113 WH.without caused several million lire Shoulder holser new, $0; Tasco '6' 80-slide rotary trays, $10, will , MOSCOW (AP)--World Chess champion dmaetthAudoein:a
binoculars, r 'O, $25; Htuev 'fit Kodak Carosel or 'other gravity ,Anatoly Karpov and 31 other Soviet structuress by cutting wire fenc-Lng
ber bopttles $.50 ea; large ~' feed slide projector. Call 97155AT. chess masters signed open letters around the' mealamo boe, $2.50 ea. Honda' in the, newspaper Soviets1y Sport several advertising posters.
CB '3,5,$800. Ca'l 98192 AT. 1957 F~ord '2-door, A, V-8, overhauled yesterday condiniing their former

chp~ 1 2utn in June, new paint, new brakes and colleague, Viktor, Korchnoi, for' Sm snb c btf lbc
Hely30 .; calLod la overall excellent condition, will "The, decision of, V. Krochnoi and kicker needed 9524 ' A take best offer. Call 85785 or to betray thie homeland has deeply 85521 AT. 'staggered 'and 'pained me," Karpov Faes1,000 BU air cnditioner, ,said in~ his letter. Korchnoi, the '(UPI)--The Buffalo Bills have 0.
c o bl. Cll 72'0.WH. 196 Olsmoile ecelent'coditon world's No. 2 player, defected J. Simpson back, but they're in pr cPeo i b e C l 7 6 . 1967 Oldmb ile r e e n r c oiner- n" July 27. the market for a fullback and a
Hagaske fo .1 Litr' Opel PS /;rciean 'relnr "it hstagrdmbeuep cekkrfolowing Monday
-~ 8527 rocker, red carpet, two 'lamps. Call tiht has2 slageess' beaue plac kickrfo eniefts16-71. Cal 852 951234'DWH or 99215 AWH. 'despite the current assertions'igts32l osto he ian
and ask forAla WH, orse in ' ' of Kor'chnoi, there were not and Dolphins.
rorm 05B GB.11,000 B'TU Sears Air Conditioner, '.could not~ have been any hinderances Veteran John Leypoldt was given~ ned io ear 2.Ca'll to his creative work in this 'his walking papers. yesterday alad sieb id rs free 17 needs' mioAT ear.$5 country."' ' though the Bills do not har.,e another
cutfeezer~, $5;antiu blue Karpov, whose skill has been ' kicker on their current roster.
dekand chair, 93;'bike rack, wanted' attacked 'by Korchnoi. added that 'Leypoldt missed three field goal
$.50 VLkitchen curtais $10; l'the step taken by Korchnoi 'threat- attempts against Miami and :it Sersbuebocade mtess and box Windshield for Ford Mustang or ens the entire creative future of obviously irritated coach Lrn.u
trinas810 Fie e~-,- r'7i. , I . The Soie Uno',se the '- Thq first qas blckd but Saa
es'tdyb ,$3 one pic e, o ton iail438'T.ba orhoifrm te next Wol' wthe oth iiiai~ier w 'excepti foru thei ~i1ii!i~i;l ii
~. si, z l0-l2 i! $10 'ii ' bmosi eis.Btfdrtin gywokikdte.




s s. ste am/fm, ck, Resonsi~ e yii , upe wietihno Tigra Petrosyii, Mijhil 'Tal nd Vic Wshingtonspent th resi o t spedlakers. $190. a............' it ftoni Vasily Smslov, 'signi~id a separately' the game in Braxton i i sloiiiiThe
~ 1~ t 5~7or85'9 trug m e, .Cal S2 ete totenwpaeiii- Blsd not . have another... fullback..........................
s-i6, BOQ. ' ' rundae 'a 8 ~5 PWHor 9640 i ng Krchno. onthe'rster

7 y ' 'a Ase




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PAGE 1

* Tide, Sun, Temp. Weather Forecast High tide1: 33pm AL,_A over bay. Lo ide-7:59pm Winds SE 14 kta. SWMiA e --6:48am~I Bay cond. 2-4 ft. Sun~e --7:04pm 4 Lowe------75 The Navy' s ontU dhoke-bazed dadiy Vol. 31 No. 178 U.S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Wednesday, September 15, 1976 Ford to make first campaign trip with speech at his alma mater WASHINGTON (AP)--Pres. Gerald Ford makes his first campaign trip of the fall today. He'll head to Ann Arbor, Mich., and give a speech at his alma mater, the University of Michigan. The trip follows criticism yesterday from Democratic presidential nominee Jimmy Carter, who said the President's stay-athome campaign strategy was an attempt to keep his record away from public scrutiny. Carter and his running mate, Walter Mondale, also attacked the Ford administration yesterday for its handling of the Medicaid system. Carter, looking ahead to his debates with Ford, said in Phoenix, Ariz., that he'll raise with Ford the issues of aging and health care. The President defended his stayat-home strategy yesterday, saying that as long as the Democratic-controlled Congress is in session he has to "make sure it doesn't go off the deep end." Ford said in an interview, "When we do hi an opportunity following the time Congress adjourns, we certainly will be campaigning. With Congress in session, it is vitally important that someone be here to check on their activities." In his interview yesterday, IFord said he will use his Michigan speech to review his record, and he promised some surprises. Questioned in the Oval Office by reporters in New York who used a long-distance television hookup, the President gave this as the thrust of his upcoming speech, "While we've faced some tough problems in the last two years: we have recognized accomplishments. We have restored trust in the White House; we have turned the economy around; and we have achieved peace and we have the capability and will to maintain it." "We'll also talk about domestic problems, jobs, home ownership, better health, crime control, more recreation, better education. Then we'll point to some of the things we should do in foreign policy." Ford said this will be the theme of his campaign as well once he hits the road after Congress ends its current session Oct. 2. In Phoenix, Jimmy Carter said, "I'd like to know why after eight years of a Republican administration, United Auto Workers strike against Ford Motor Co. DETROIT (AP)--Some 170,000 United Auto Workers in 22 states are now on strike against Ford Motor Co., in the nation's largest industrial shutdown in six years. The walkout followed two months of negotiations that failed to produce an agreement on the key union demand for reduced work time. For its part, Ford claimed it offered well over $1 billion in benefits for the auto workers over three years. Workers, exuberant as they started *their first strike against the umber-two auto company in nine years, poured out of Ford assembly and manufacturing facilities precisely at 11:59 p.m. EDT last night, the official deadline. At Ford's giant Rouge manufacturing complex in Dearborn, Mich., chanting workers counted down the final minute before the deadline, then walked out. Pres. Ford said yesterday that a strike against the Ford Motor Co. would hurt the economy and expressed hope for a last-minute settlement. Most union, industry and independent analysts have said a strike at Ford would not have any significant impact on the economy unless it dragged on beyond four weeks. Some 14,000 Ford workers in Canada are expected to be placed on layoff within a few days. The UAW, which also represents Canadian auto workGitmo residents reminded of watering practices Guantanamo Bay is currently in watering condition 'Charlie Three' which is the normal condition for the base -and the Public Works Department wishes to inform new residents (and remind others) of applicable watering practices in 'Charlie Three'. Watering lawns, trees, shrubs, gardens, etc., is permitted only from 6 to 7 p.m. during periods of Daylight Savings Time on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. When the states switch to Standard Time', the watering hours are moved up one hour or to 5 until 6 p.m. on those days. Washing of cars is permitted at any hour provided it is done with a hose using a self closing nozzle or by the use of a water bucket. The use of a free flowing hose is prohibited for washing vehicles or for any other purpose. ers, had extended its contract with Ford of Canada Ltd., but parts shortages were expected to cause quick shutdowns. Industry analysts added a prolonged walkout eventually would force the layoff of another 170,000 employes at auto supply firms, and they estimated a strike would result in lost wages estimated at $100 million a week in North America. Another 530,000 auto workers covered by similar pacts at the other American automakers will remain on the job pending a settlement at Ford, the UAW's 1976 target for fashioning the industry pattern. Even with a speedy settlement on a national pact, however, production could be hampered for months by local strikes. Local agreements on working conditions are negotiated simultaneously, but the union said progress on that level has been unusually slow this year with only 14 of 99 bargaining units having settled so farE we're still losing 25 to 50 per cent of all the Medicaid money that's supposed to be for good health care." Medicaid helps pay for health care for qualified senior citizens. Recent investigation by a Senate subcommittee has documented instances of unneeded and duplicated health exams and laboratory work which the government pays for. Senate investigators estimated at least a quarter and perhaps as much as half of the $15 billion spent annually on Medicare is wasted. Carter said, "The Republican administration has just not provided tough, competent management to make our scarce health dollars go to help patients or to prevent disease. This is a national disgrace." Carter said he also wanted to ask Ford at their debate why he voted against Medicare when in Congress. At the other end of the sun belt in Pinellas Park, Fla., Carter's running mate, Sen. Walter Mondale, said the Medicaid scandals are the result of "a government that is not in charge and rich folks ripping off senior citizens." Mondale also said Pres. Ford should explain what Mondale called "his incredible record of failure" in dealing with domestic problems, especially, said Mondale, unemployment. Republican vice presidential candidate Robert Dole told the prestigious Commonwealth Club of San Francisco yesterday that the Democratic platform will lead to what he called "back door" socialism. Dole says the Democratic document calls for 62 new or extended spending programs, which will cost a minimum of $100 billion. Moynihan narrowly wins as 12 states hold primaries (UPI)--Former U.N. Ambassador Daniel Patrick Moynihan narrowly defeated U.S. Rep. Bella Abzug last night for the right to run for the Senate as a Democrat from New York. He'll fade conservative Republican Sen. James Buckley in November. Mrs. Abzug and Moynihan headed a field of five, but the other three were far back. A dozen states held primaries yesterday, led by New York and Massachusetts, where Sen. Edward Kennedy and House Majority Leader Tim O'Neill Jr. both won renomination. This was the first time they had Democratic challengers in more than a decade. Auto dealer Richard Lorber leads by a meager 361 votes over Gov. Philip Noel in Rhode Island's Democratic U.S. Senate primary. However, 3,111 absentee ballots remain uncounted and the race could go either way. With all of the state's 422 precincts reporting, Lorber had received 59,134 votes to Noel's 58,773. No date had been set by the state election board for counting the absentees. However, a tally is expected this week. In Vermont, two-term Gov. Thomas Salmon narrowly won the Democratic Senate nomination, and State Treasurer Stella Hackel won a bitter three-way race for the right to be the first woman to run for governor on a major party ticket in Vermont. She faces Richard Snelling, who easily won the GOP primary. Salmon's win was closer than he expected, and he faces a serious fight in November against Republican Sen. Robert Stafford. In New Hampshire, two-term Gov. Meldrim Thomson easily defeated a DANIEL MOYNIHA moderate challenger for the GOP governor's nomination. On the Democratic side, the governor's race was too close to call. In North Carolina, former State Human Resources Director David Flaherty won the GOP gubernatorial nomination in a runoff primary. State House Speaker James Green won the Democratic nomination for lieutenant governor. Sen. Hubert Humphrey, vice president under Lyndon Johnson, easily won nomination for another Senate term, beating a political unknown in Minnesota. Sen. William Proxmire easily won nomination in Wisconsin. In Utah, political novice Orrin Hatch rode an endorsement by Ronald Reagan to an easy victory in the Republican U.S. Senate battle and will face three-term Democratic Sen. Frank Moss in November. In Nevada, three-term Democratic Sen. Howard Cannon won nomination, and former Congressman David Towell won the GOP nomination. Democratic Rep. James Santini had no party opposition for a second term, with two people trying for the Republican nomination. Gale McGee was re-dominated in Wyoming without having to face any primaryy opposition. Primaries were also held in Colorado yesterday. Freedoms Foundation deadline nears The deadline for the 1977 Freedoms Foundation Awards is Oct. 1, 1976. The subject for this year's awards is Human Goals: Foundations of Our Heritage. Your entry need not be a "letter" as such but may be in essay or poetry form. Entries should be no less than 100 nor more than 500 words in length. If letter style is used the addressee may be any person or organization, real or imaginary. Print or type full name, rank, Social Security number, full military address, service or Reserve component, full address and zip code. Marine Corps, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard and reserve forces including National Guard and ROTC. Top winners will receive a formal written announcement from Freedoms Foundation at Valley Forge on Washington's Birthday, Feb. 22, 1977. Awards will include: $100 U.S. Savings Bond, Series E and the Defender of Freedom award; additional awards of $50 U.S. Savings Bonds, Series E and the George Washington Honor Medal; and Valley Forge honor certificates. Entries must be mailed to: The contest is open to all members Freedoms Foundation, Valley Forge, of the armed forces of the U.S. Army, Pa. 19481

PAGE 2

Guantanamo Gazette Community Bulletin Board Today's meeting OKINAWA KARATE AFFILIATION will practice from 6 to 8 p.m. at Marblehead Hall. For more information call 98258 AWH. BINGO will played at the Staff NCO Club beginhing at 8 p.m. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet. For more information call 95454 DWH. Tomorrow's meeting OKINAWA KARATE AFFILIATION will practice from 6 to, 8 p.m. at Marblehead Hall. For more information call 98258 AWH. BINGO will be played at the Staff NCO Club beginning at 8 p.m. ACOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet. For more information call 95454 DWH. ORBITING ELEMENTS The Orbiting Elements will be playing on the CPO Club patio' Friday night from 9 until 1. LEARN TO SEW/CROCHET Beginning sewing classes will be starting Sept. 28 from 9 11 a.m. For more information call 951265 AT. Beginning crocheting classes will be starting Sept. 30 from 9 to 11 a.m. For more information call 951265 AT. ENCYCLOPEDIAS ON SALE The Encyclopedia Britanica will be on sale at the Navy and Marine Corps Exchanges for the last day today. There is a 25-35% discount for base personnel. HOSPITAL ENLISTED WIVES MEETING There will be a monthly meeting of the Hospital Enlisted Wives Club tomorrow at 7:30 p.m. at the Fil-Am Club. For more information call 98196 AWH. DIRECTIVE ON ORGANIZATIONS A new directive has been issued covering private organizations on base -COMNAVBASE GTMO INSTRUCTION 5760.1. Officials of each organization should review this directive to insure compliance therewith. One of the requirements of the directive is that each organization submit its organizational documents (constitution, bylaws, etc.) to ComNavBase:, via the command which provides its support (building, electricity,, water etc.), within 60 days from the date of the directive's issuance (Sept. 1, 1976). Any questions regarding the applicability of the directive may be addressed to the Staff Judge Advocate -85600, 85432 or 85817. BOWLING MEETING There will be an organizAtional meeting for the Friday Night Specials Bowling League at 2 p.m. Sunday at Marblehead Hall for the purpose of electing officers. Presently three more teams are needed. This is an 8-team, mixed league. Anyone desiring to enter as a team or wanting more information, call Mike Worth at 85600 or 85432 DWH or at 85205 AWH. League bowling will commence at 8:30 p.m. on the Sept. SCOTCH DOUBLES NO-TAP There will be a Scotch Doubles No-Tap Bowling Tournament this Saturday at 7:30 p.m. You may check in right up until starting time and the cost is $5 per couple. CUB SCOUT COMMITTEE NEEDS HELP The Cub Scout Committee is in urgent need of help for the scouting program this year. Due to the heavy rotation of personnel on base this summer, volunteers are needed for den mothers, assistant den mothers and committee members. No experience is necessary, just interested people willing to devote some time to Scouting. For more information call Lynda Hollingsworth at 951027 or Ed. Walters at 96265 AWH. Also, boys who missed Cub Scout Round-up in August may still register for Cub Scouts. The boys must be 8 years of age or older and registration fee is $2 per boy. Adult volunteers in Scouting are free. If you wish to know more about Cub Scouts, please contact Dave Delong, cubmaster, at 96232 AWH. LITTLE THEATRE TO MEET Little Theatre will have-a meeting tomorrow night at 7:30 at Morin Center. YOU MUST STOP A child was nearly run over by a speeding vehicle Monday, in the Corinaso Point housing area. According to the child's mother, who called Base Police, the speeding vehicle passed a stopped school bus while discharging passengers. The bus had its lights flashing. A Base Police spokesman said numerous instances of speeding and passing of stopped school buses in housing areas have been reported recently. Gitmo motorists are reminded that the school year is here again and that traffic may not pass a school bus from either direction when its lights are flashing or while loading or unloading passengers. All residential areas have 15 mph speed limits. ICE CREAM SALE If you don't like home made ice cream, don't read any further. But if you do, you will want to be in front of the Navy Exchange Saturday, Sept. 18 at 11 a.m. The Protestant Women of the Chapel will be selling some unusual flavors of homemade ice cream. U.S. NAVAL GUANTANAMO BAY, BASE CUBA Capt. John H. McConnell Capt. David W. DeCook Co-der ending Officer LCdr. Michelbcherry.Public Affairs Officer J02 J. Arthur Ricio .Reporter J03 Benny itb.Reorter SN Clayton Scott. .Reporter ne G: ta~o Gzett Ispublished according to the lesad regulations for ship and station newspapers oS the Naval Base publicaffair. officer. Printed fivetim eklaty agovement expense a gove n t equipment, the opionsorsaentin ew t that appear herein are not to be constred as of0fi1, as selecting the.vies of CooN so r the p t of the Nav. CHAPEL COMMUNITY DINNER The Protestant Chapel Community is sponsoring a dinner for all volunteer workers and their spouses on today. This dinner will be on the Chapel patio and will begin at 6:30 p.m. All of the Sunday School teachers, V.B.S. teachers and helpers, all the senior choir members, the ushers, and all officers of the various organizations are invited. Each couple is asked to bring either a salad, vegetable or a dessert. The Chapel Nursery will be open. RADAR RANGE SALE AT NEX The Navy Exchange is having a sale on Amana radar range. All ranges will be offered at 10% off. MCX ANNOUNCES SALE OF RETURNED GOODS The Marine Corps Exchange has received the items from their June robbery. These items, consisting of Men's and Ladies' high fashion rings and watches, will go on sale at 9 a.m. Thursday. All merchandise has been reduced to at least half F price, and in many cases, more than half price. Although these items are new, they are not in new condition, and it is for this reason there will ne no exchanges or refunds.' AIR CONDITIONING HOURS Summer air conditioning hours will remain in effect until the end of this month due to energy savings on base to date. The commander of the Naval Base authorized the two-week extension yesterday based on projections that the Naval Base will meet its goal of 15 per cent energy savings this month. Therefore, air conditioners may be turned on in offices and working spaces at 10 a.m. through Sept. 30. Beginning Oct. 1, air conditioners may not be turned on until 1 p.m. All hands are encouraged to conserve energy. MACRAME CLASS BEGINS The Caribbean Arts and Crafts Association announces a class in basic macrame to be given by Jennifer Fenerty. The class will run for four weeks commencing tomorrow and will cost $10. All materials will be supplied. For more information call 96248 AT. LADIES' SOFTBALL Help Wanted: Report for duty at Cooper Field softball diamond. #1 at 6 p.m. on today. This duty consists of cheering for your favorite ladies' softball team. Games are played every Sunday and Wednesday night at 6 and 8 p.m. Come down and enjoy the fun. SOCIALIZERS MEETING The Socializers Club will hold its monthly meeting Monday, Sept. 20 at 8 p.m. All members are advised to attend. The club is also opening their doors for anyone who would like to join. CAPTAIN'S CALL Captain's Call will be held today at 3 p.m. in the Windjammer. GOLF TOURNAMENT There will be a Jack and Jill Golf Tournament Sunday, Sept. 19,beginning at 1 p.m. A catered chicken dinner will follow the tournament. Registration fee for the tournament is $5. Trophies will be awarded to the winners. The cost for the dinner is $3 for adults and $2 for children. Thee will be free beer and sodas. Sign up and pay for the tournament and dinner prior to 7 p.m. today. Page 2 Wednesday September 15, 1976 DINNER DANCE AT PHIL-AM CLUB An anniversary dinner dance will mark the celebration of the foundation day of the Phil-Am club in Gitmo at the club house commencing at 7:30 p.m. Saturday. Tickets to the affair are available through the officers or any member of the club. Numbers to call for tickets are 96241 AT or 90169 AT. SPECIAL COMMUNICATION AT CARIBBEAN NAVAL LODGE There will be a special communication at Caribbean Naval Lodge held in the Masonic Apts. bldg. #800 at 7:30 p.m.today for the purpose of conducting work in the first degree. All Masons are cordially and fraternally invited. CHARMERS TO MEET Charmers will meet Friday; the topic for the meeting is "proper iction." Class 1 will start at 3:00 and class 2 at 4:30 to 6 p.m at 125 Radio Pt. ROSTER DEADLINE DUE The roster deadline for the Intercommand Tennis Tournament slated for Sept. 18 and 19 is today. All rosters must be in the Special Services office at that time. SEATRAIN SCHEDULE Due to a requirement by SeaTrain to place TRANSINDIANA in drydock for repair, the next provisions will arrive in GTMO by barge late Thursday or early Friday of this week. Notification of availability of fresh provisions in the Commissary Store will be announced over AFRTS radio and television. JUNIOR CHOIR PRACTICE CANCELLED There will be no junior choir practice this week because of the workers' banquet. Choir practice will be held as usual on Wednesday, Sept. 22. OPENINGS IN SHELLCRAFT CLASSES The Caribbean Arts and Crafts Association still has openings in both the morning and evening Shellcraft classes. The classes are to begin Sept. 20. The cost is $15. To register call 96290 AT. BAND AT THE WINDJAMMER The Windjammer Enlisted Club will feature a stateside band called "The 'T' Boys" on Wednesday, Friday and Saturday of this week. The band will play Wednesday night from 7 to 11, and on Friday and Saturday nights from 8 to midnight. SWINGERS TO SWING ON FERRY The Gitmo Swingers Square Dance club will be doing something different this Friday night. Friday night is set aside to earn badges, which may be earned by dancing on the ferry at Leeward Point, then at the Desal Plant before returning to the clubhouse. All Swingers planning on making the trip.whether they want to earn badges or not.are asked to meet at the clubhouse at 8 p.m. A workshop will be held as usual at 7:30 p.m. BASIC STRETCH & SEW LESSONS Basic Stretch & Sew lessons to start Sept. 29 from 9-11 a.m. Call Nancy Newkirk at 98297 to register or for more information. ADULT SWIMMING LESSONS SLATED Anyone interested in adult beginners swimming lessons should contact Special Services at 951160 DWH. WATER STATUS YESTERDAY'S FIGURE' AVERAGE CONSUMPTION: 1,200,000 ACTUAL CONSUMPTION: 1,221,000 TOTAL IN STORAGE: 16,146,000

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Wednesday, September 15, 1976 Conference proposed to end Lebanon war UiSNAVALWAE ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION: A course in accident investigation was taught here recently by Charles W. Eisele Jr., head of the Motor Vehicle Safety Division at the Naval Safety Center, Norfolk. The two week course consisted of instruction in proper procedures in on scene investigation, crowd control, first aid and other accident related problems. Graduates of the course are top photo, front row from. left, E02 Michael T. Evans, EO1 Walter B. Robertson, MACS Leslie E. Watkins, EOC Gordon E. Ballard, MM2 Mark A. Elliott, FTGl Allan G. Beer, and Mr. C.W. Eisele, Jr. Back row, from left, are CWO-4 Jim F. O'Neal, MR1 Philip H. Wismer, CM2 Rae R. Sharp, MR1 William D. Hooper, MM2 Jon G. Bollard, DPCS Charles L. Crawford, MAl Ronald R. Williams, and EOC Herbert D. Dunkerson. Bottom photo, front row from left are Fire Chief Robert C. Sommer, HTI Julious F. Sanderson, MAl Richard S. Kennard, A02 Dave A. Boughton, BM1 Larry S. Hedgepath, BT2 Paul E. Gauronski, and PHAA Scott S. Ridge. Top row from left are CWO-4 Jim F. O'Neal, EO1 Crawford B. Jackson, BT1 John M. Tromley, MAl Thomas L. Mills, BM2 Steven D. Chilson, HT1 Charles F. Britton, MM1 Earl L. Shepard, and EM3 Dennis R. Boik. Not picturedare UT2 Michael D. Henry and MAC George R. Hayden. (Photos by FLTAVCENCARIB) U.N. postpones Vietnam membership debate UNITED NATIONS (AP)--The Security Council agreed yesterday to postpone debate on U.N. membership for Vietnam until after the U.S. presidential election in an apparent effort to avoid an American veto. By returning to the question after Press Ford has won a new term or Democratic Candidate Jimmy Carter has been elected, council members evidently hope the U.S. Government will no longer be under domestic political pressure to maintain a hard line against Hanoi. The French delegation initiated the postponement with the reported concurrence of the Vietnamese, but informed U.N. sources said American officials asked French officials in Paris last week to seek the postponement. U.S. officials at the U.N. denied this. Secy. of State Henry A. Kissenger was in Paris last week. U.S. Ambassador William Scranton announced in Washington Monday after a meeting with the President that he had been directed to veto the Vietnamese application for U.N. membership because Hanoi has failed to account for about 800 Americans still listed as missing in action in Vietnam. Democratic nominee Carter said he agreed with Ford's decision to block Vietnam's membership. It had been expected that all members of the 15-nation Security Council except the United States would support Vietnam's application. But the United States is one of five major powers with veto rights over decisions of the council. The others are China, the Soviet Union, France and Britain. After meeting for one hour and 15 minutes yesterday, the Security Council said the debate over membership for recently unified Vietnam was being postponed "to a date in November so that the General Assembly may discuss the candidacy during the course of the 31st session. The Vietnamese side has agreed to this position." The reference to the General Assembly was reportrdly inserted at the request of pro-U.S. delegations in order, it was said, to make it less obvious that the postponement was being timed to put it past the election. The General Assembly normally takes up a membership application only after the Security Council has recommended it. An informed source said the Soviet Union had held out for limiting the deferment to the month of November and the United States settled for that in return for inclusion of the reference to consideration of the General Assembly. Other sources said the United States earlier had insisted on delaying consideration without any deadline. The Vietnamese said Monday they had made extensive efforts to enter into discussions with the United States on the missing men and the American reconstruction aid promised them by the-1973 Paris Peace Agreement. They made public an exchange of six letters between the two governments in the past six months and said the United States had failed to reply to Vietnam's last note, dated Aug. 27. BEIRUT, Lebanon (AP)--Anxious Lebanese awaited word yesterday on whether or not a proposed tripartite conference to end their bloody Civil War would materialize. The meeting could avert a final military showdown which Syria has threatened unless the alliance of Palestinian guerrillas and leftest Lebanese Moslems accede to Syrian demands. Diplomatic sources said the proposal for the crucial meeting came from the top-level Arab League mediation team of several Arab foreign ministers in Damascus. The team suggested a meeting by tomorrow of Lebanon's Pres.-elect Elias Sarkis, Palestinian leader Yasir Arafat and Syrian Premier Abdul Rahman Khleifawi at the Lebanese town of Chtoura. The sources said Syria and Arafat agreed while Sarkis, a moderate Syrian-backed Christian, was trying to get the approval of the rightwing Lebanese Christian leaders. An Arab League representative in Cairo announced yesterday that the League also had called a meeting of *Arab heads of state of Oct. 18 in the Egyptian capital. That summit is expected to last, three days and would be preceded by a preparatory meeting of Arab foreign ministers Oct. 14-16. Sources said, however, the Cairo meeting could be cancelled if Syria continues to try to impose a solution and the fighting continues. The proposal for the meeting in Chtoura was given front page treatment by the Beirut press and became a subject of discussion throughout the embattled city. Fighting continued along the urban front dividing Beirut and clashes and artillery duels raged along the other confrontation points, around the northern Moslem-held port city Human Relations Council established ComNavBase recently established a base Human Relations Council/Discrimination Complaint Board. Responsibilities of the organization include: 1) Providing a forum for surfacing and frank discussion of real or perceived grievances that cut across command lines. 2) To develop and share ideas which will foster harmonious Human Relations among personnel attached to local commands. 3) Examining incidents and situations where tension and dissension may exists and proposing corrective action. Monitoring proposed corrective action and evaluating its effectiveness. 4) To assist ComNavBase by insuring base Human Relations policies and programs are widely disseminated and known qt the lowest level. 5) Advising ComNavBaseof the existing Human Relations climate and making recommendations for iprovement as necessary. 6) To informally monitor effectiveness of local command equal opportunity programs and affirmative action plans and advise ComNavBase of areas possibly needing improvement. The 12-member group is chaired by the ComNavBase Chief Staff Officer with the ComNavBase Human Resources Program Manager as council advisor. The other ten members represent: Naval Base, Naval Station, Naval Air Station, Fleet Training Group. Naval Hospital, Dental Clinic, Fleet Composite Squadron Ten, Naval Security Group Activity, Consolidated Civilian Personnel Office and Marine Barracks. The ComNavBase Discrimination Complaint Board will consider matters referred to it by similar boards of subordinate commands and will not consider direct appeals. Personnel are required to exhaust the Chain of Command before their appeals will be considered by the ComNavBase Complaint Board. For further information see COMNAVBASE GTMO INSTRUCTION 5352.1 of July 19, 1976. of Tripoli and a string of guerrillaoccupied Christian summer resorts in the mountains east of Beirut. Casualty figures for the past 24 hours compiled from hospital sources indicated at least 107 killed and 130 wounded. The total death toll of the sectarian conflict now in its 18th month has exceded 35,500. Pierre Gemayel, the leader of the Phalange party which fields the largest Christian militia in the Civil War, left for Cairo via Damascus yesterday for talks with Pres. Anwar Sadat. "The main interest now is to save Lebanon and all Arabs from the disaster, which if it continues will not only wreck Lebanon but destroy other Arabs also," Gemayel said before his departure from Jounieh, the capital of the Christian enclave. Lebanon's Moslem Premier Rashid Karami arrived in Cairo Monday. It was expected Sadat would arrange for the two rival Lebanese leaders to meet. Meanwhile the battling sides continued to accuse each other of bolstering their forces in preparation for all-out fighting. The Phalange Radio claimed the Palestinian forces were reinforced by 700 fighters who arrived at the ,Moslem-controlled port of Tyre from eastern Europe. The guerrillas said Syria was reinforcing its intervention force of an estimated 13,000 troops and 500 tanks with more tanks, long-range artillery, rocket launchers-and mine sweepers. Police open fire on crowds in Soweto JOHANNESBURG, South Africa (AP)-Police opened fire on crowds in the streets and around railway stations in black Soweto township yesterday on the second day of a three-day strike protesting the white government's racial policies. Several persons were reported injured. The World, Johannesburg's leading black newspaper, said two blacks were killed Monday night when strike supporters attacked homeward bound workers who had refused to join the job boycott launched Monday. The newspaper said two other blacks were killed by railway police who opened fire on a group trying to sabotage a railway line Monday night in the segregated city of more than one million located eight miles south of Johannesburg. Much of Soweto was reported quiet yesterday and many residents stayed in their homes to avoid trouble, but police used tear gas and gunfire to try to disperse crowds in eastern districts of the township. A spokesman for the Johannesburg Chamber of Commerce reported 70 to 80 per cent of the city's 250,000 black workers stayed home Monday. Some companies reported 70 per cent absenteeism again yesterday. But others said more blacks reported for work than on Monday. Transport officials reported an increase in the number of blacks taking trains and buses from Soweto, home of most of Johannesburg's black workers. In the Cape Town area, a pamphlet was circulated in the rail and bus terminals postponing a planned job boycott in that area until next week. It had been scheduled for today and tomorrow. Information Minister Connie Mulder told a congress of the ruling National Party in Pretoria that the racial policies against which the boycott is directed ought to be redefined as plural democracy instead of the present term apartheid, or separate development. "The advantage of this term (plural democracy) is that it does not indicate any color or negative separation concept," Mulder said, adding that the outside understands the idea of ethnic groups without a concept of inferiority or superiority. The term apartheid is interpreted abroad as "apart hate," Mulder said. Page 3 Guantanamo Gazette

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Guantanamo Gazette Golf course controversial in Gitmo Editor's note: the following is the second in a series of four articles by the Special Services officer. The Golf Course is to say the least, Special Services' most controversial activity. The golfers complain about the high cost of playing a course where they have to use Astro-Turf or a door mat and where a good drive down the center of the fairway might end up, thanks to a rock, out of bounds. The nongolfers get irrate everytime they see a sprinkler on the greens. Golf happens to be a very popular sport and even though our course will not attract the pros, it is a lot of fun to play and is laid out quite well. Another fact of life about the golf course is that it has, over the last few years, been a consistant money loser. The new self-sufficiency requirements addressed recently require golf courses to be 100% selfsufficient. This past July, course fees were raised by approximately 66%. Monthly fees were raised from $9 to $15 and other fees were raised accordingly. The new BUPERS minimum fees would increase that further to $25. In golf, as in other areas, we are going to try and achieve the 100% mark without raising costs again. What this means is that we are going to have to get more people out on the course playing golf. Golfers are going to have to actively promote golf. Special Services is curently putting together several golf packages which will allow dollar savings for all, and will allow beginners to learn the game and see if they want to continue without any capital investment and at a very reasonable price. All we need for a 100% is about 200 golfers playing the course year round, which from a population of approximately 6500 should not be that hard. Watch for announcements soon concerning specially priced packages and get out and learn to play golf. Golfers talk it up. -B ARD. Baseball scores NATIONAL LEAGUE Philadelphia 3, Montreal 2 New York Mets 4, Pittsburgh 3 Los Angeles 9, Cincinnati 0 Houston 4, Atlanta 3 Atlanta 4, Houston 3 Chicago Cubs 6, St. Louis 3 AMERICAN LEAGUE Kansas City 2, Chicago White Sox 1 Oakland 4, Minnesota 2 Minnesota 4, Oakland 3 New York Yankees 8, Cleveland 2 Baltimore 9 Detroit 7 Milwaukee 3, Boston 1 (10 innings) California 6, Texas 4 Nicklaus turns out to be human after all CINCINNATI,Ohio (UPI)--The "Bear", who it turns out is human after all, returns to his "den" this weekend to try to regain his status. Jack Nicklaus begins practice today at his golf center near Cincinnati for the start of the four-day Ohio-Kings Island Open tomorrow. He proved to the golfing world last week he is human by finally missing a cut after 105 straight tournaments. Jack failed to qualify for the final two rounds of the World Open at Pinehurst, N.C., marking the first time since 1970 he has missed a cut. Nicklaus says he was "disappointed" about last week's turn of events, but will be the favorite on his course this weekend. All ads will be run one time onl,You must submit your ad each time you want it printed. Ads may be submitted by calling before 4 p.m. :or by dropping it in one of the drop boxes. Ads which discriminate on the basic of race, sex, creed, color or national 'origin will not be accepted. The staff reserves the right to re-write any ad it deems necessary. for sale 10,000 BTU air conditioner, good condition, $100. Call 98250 AWH or 85113 DWH. Shoulder holster, new, $30; Tasco binoculars, 7x50, $25; Hatuey beer bottles, $2.50 ea; large metal ammo boxes, $2.50 ea. Honda CB 350, $800. Call 98192 AT. 650 Triump, chopped; 1962 Austin Healey 3000; call Lobdell at 951247 DWH. Feeders 12,000 BTU air conditioner, price negotiable. Call 97260 AWH. Head gasket for 1.1 Litre Opel engine, fits 1965-71. Call 85527 and ask for Alan DWH, or see in romm 305B, GHB. Wards side by side frost free 17 cuft freezer, $250; antique blue desk and chair, $30; bike rack, $.50; VL kitchen curtains, $10; Sears blue brocade matress and box springs, $100; Ficher price circus train complete, $7; drum set, $7; clock radio alarm $7; tricycle, $3; 20" Sears teddy bear, $3; one piece pink bathing suit, size 10-12, $10; wall hanging string ship, $20; 3 tubes of harder for clear cast, $1; child's typrwriter, $3. Call 96198. G.E. stero system, am/fm, 8 track, turntable, speakers, $100. Call Seitz DWH at 85237 or 85859 AWH room S-109 BOQ. In the'field of 150 on the 6,873 yard, par-70 layout are Barber Miller, Lee Trevino, Tom Weiskopf, Jerry McGee and Ben Crenshaw. Veteran Bruce Crampton withdrew from the event because of "personal problems." Despite missing the cut last week, Nicklaus remains a solid favorite because he played superbly just two weeks ago to win the World Series of Golf. He also designed the course and won the tournament's inaugural in 1973. Barber won the event in 1974 and is the defending champion because the tournament was not played last year. But the veteran golfer isn't given much chance of repeating Lambretta motor scooter, runs good, $125. Call LT Maddux at 64543 DWH. Daisy model 200 B-B pistol w/CO cartridges, $18. Call 951036 A 1973 Honda CB 350, low milage, excellent condition. Call 951275 AWH. 'Jacobsen commercial size lawn mower, $79; extra long double bed, including solid walnut Mediterrainean style headboard, posturepedic mattress and box spring, roller frame, $125. Call 85152 AT. 6 80-slide rotary trays, $10, will fit Kodak Carosel or other gravity feed slide projector. Call 97155AT. 1957 Ford 2-door, AT, V-8, overhauled in June, new paint, new brakes and wheel cylinders in front, good tires, overall excellent condition, will take best offer. Call 85785 or 85521 AT. 1967 Oldsmobile, excellent condition, P/S, P/B; recliner and reclinerrocker, red carpet, two lamps. Call 951234 DWH or 99215 AWH. 11,000 BTU Sears Air Conditioner, needs minor repair, $25. Call 95508 AT. wanted Windshield for Ford Mustang or Chevrolet Impala. Call 85176DWH. UNd 10-speed bicycle in good condition. Call 95384 AT. services Cakes baked and decorated for all occassions. Call 95492 AT. Responsible married couple with no children will house-sit from now through mid-October. Call MS2 Brundage at 85559 DWH or 96140 AWH. because he hasn't won since his victory two years ago. Trevino and Weiskopf, like Nicklaus and Barber, also have career winnings of over $1 million. They figure to provide the stiffest challenge to Nicklaus. McGee also could be a challenger if he continues to play as he did last weekend at the World Open. He forced Ray Floyd into a sudden death playoff but lost the $40,000 first prize by one stroke. Crenshaw also is rated among the favorites. The 24-year-old native of Austin Texas, a three-time NCAA champion for the University of Texas, has two tour victories this year. Although there are six mor PGA stops this season, this will be the last American Tournament appearance for Nicklaus. He's skipping the rest of the PGA events to play in tournaments in Australia and Japan. Should Nicklaus win, it will be his 61st career tour victory and tie him with Arnold Palmer. Ben Hogan has 62 tour wins and Sam Snead is out in front with 84. Although the course has been toughened up from a par 70, there still were 11 sub par rounds turned in by the tour's lesser lights in Monday's qualifying round. Curtis Sifford and Andy Bean led the qualifiers with three-under par 67s. Chess masters sign letters condemming colleague MOSCOW (AP)--World Chess champion Anatoly Rarpov and 31 other Soviet chess masters signed open letters in the newspaper Sovietsky Sport yesterday condemming their former colleague, Viktor Korchnoi, for defecting to Holland. "The decision of V. Krochnoi to betray the homeland has deeply staggered and pained me," Karpov said in his letter. Korchnoi, the world's No. 2 player, defected July 27. "It has staggered me because, despite the current assertions of Korchnoi, there were not and could not have been any hinderances to his creative work in this country." Karpov, whose skill has been attacked by Korchnoi, added that "the step taken by Korchnoi threatens the entire creative future of this chess payerr" The Soviet Union asked the International Chess Federationto bar Korchnoi from the next World Championship series. But federation Pres. Max Euwe has said there is no way to prevent Korchnoi from competing there in his own right. The other 31 chess masters, including former world champions Tigran Petrosyan, Mijhail Tal and Vasily Smslov, signed a separate letter to the newspaper, criticizing Korchnoi. Page 4 ," Wednesday, September 15, 1976 Sports in brief* INDIANAPOLIS (AP)--Former Indiana University basketball player Steve Green has signed with the NBA's Indiana pacers. Green played last season for Utah and St. Louis in the, defunct ABA before a broken wrist put him out of action. LOS ANGELES (AP)--A quarterback Jeff Dankworth has been named college football back-of-the-week by the Associated Press. Dankworth led the Bruins to a 28-10 win over Arizona State last week. He disclosed last night that he did at least one thing wrong in that game. Dankworth says he rolled out to the left at one point, when he was supposed to go to the right. He wound up-scoring a touchdown on that play. THE WOODLANDS, Texas (AP)--The U.S. Pro Tennis Doubles Championship begins today in The Woodlands Texas, 25 miles north of Houston. First, John Newcombe and Jeff Masters play Brian Gottfried and Raul Ramirez for the Italian Doubles championship. Their title match was interrupted by rain after four sets three months ago in Rome. They decided to put off the fifth and deciding set until Nov. (AP)--Oakland A's owner Charlie Finley will meet today with Jerry Apstein, the agent for five Oakland players who are threatening to become free agents at the end of the season. It'll mark the first time Finley and Apstein contract talks will be discussed for pitcher rollie fingers, first baseman Gene Tenance, outfielders Joe Rudi and Don Baylor and shortstop Campy Campaneris. Lauda's comeback brings in 450 million lire MONZA, Italy (AP)--The comeback of defending world champion Niki Lauda in Sunday's Italian Grand Prix brought a record gate of 450 million lire ($540,000) Italian organizers. More than 80,000 tickets were sold, and the gate exceeded the 1975 gate by about 100 million lire, ($120,000). Organizers reported the number of fans who supported Lauds and the other Ferrari drivers was higher than 100,000 because thousands of youths managed to reach the Autodome without tickets, avoiding surveillance by 1,300 policeman and watchmen. Authorities reported people without caused several million lire damage to the Autodome infrastructures by cutting wire fencing around the track and dismantling several advertising posters. Simpson back but fullback and kicker needed (UPI)--The Buffalo Bills have 0. J. Simpson back, but they're in the market for a fullback and a place kicker following Monday nights 30-21 loss to the Miami Dolphins. Veteran John Leypoldt was given his walking papers yesterday although the Bills do not have another kicker on their current roster. Leypoldt missed three field goal attempts against Miami and it obviously irritated coach Lou Saban. Th& first was blocked, but Saban said, "there was nothing wrong with the other two except for the guy who kicked them." Jim Braxton, the club's starting fullback, underwent Knee surgery yesterday and is out for the season. He was injured on the Bill first series Monday night and fullback Vic Washington spent the rest of the game in Braxton's slot. The Bills do not have another fullback on the roster. fAWYFM F 07Aj W Y40 YJAP*Jl