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Guantanamo Gazette

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Title:
Guantanamo Gazette
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U.S. Naval Base
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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U.S. Naval Base
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English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright,Guantanamo Gazette. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Gitmo Gazette
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Guantanamo Gazette
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Guantanamo Daily Gazette
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Tide, Suin, Temp. Weather Forecast

idA Mostly clear to Hig ftide- 6:57p partly cloudy.
owtdII25p Winds SE- 10 to


e~ - -7:i8p a Bay cond. l-3ft.


Vol. 31 No. 16? U.S. Naval Base , Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Monday, August 30, 1976




Candidates ace-use each other of 'flipflops'


George McGovern, the South Dakota
Deortwho led the party to its W orld Ne s Digest worst presidential election defeat N w
in history four years ago, announced OCEANSIDE, Calif. (AP)--Coroner' s his support for Carter and running officials in Oceanside, Calif., say mate Walter Mondale. an autopsy has turned up no concluBut c~oeritsai th naton lsosive evidence about the cause of Bdeat ofovr forme telviio child-als
owes a "permanent debt" to independ-detoforrtlvionclent candidate Eugene McCarthy. star Mary Anissa Jones. At< first, McGovern is president of the authorities said they suspected an Americans. for Democratic Action, overdose of barbiturates was reL: which has endorsed the Carter- sponsible for the death during the Mondale ticket while warning that _ ___weekend of the 18-year-old actress, (TJPI)--Pres. Gerald Ford and his voters should not support McCarthy. interview in Vail, Colo., Mrs. Ford who portrayed Buffy on the 1960s
Demcratic rival, Jimmy Carter, Vice Pres. Nelson Rockefeller said the election race will be hard TV series "'Family Affair." Of ficihave accused each other of doing said during the weekend the national fought, but she believes the Presi- als say further studies will be "flipflops in their pre-campaignl Republican. platform does not reflect dent will beat Jimmy' Carter. She ' necessary to determine the cause of ~appearanlces. the 'views of Pres. Ford. Speaking also said she expects the Demnocrats death.
Carte ws quoted yesterday as in'New'H'ampshire Satur~day, to 'use Ford's pardon of former Pres.
'g Fodhd "done aflipflop" " Rockefeller said Republican moder- Richard Nixon as a campaign issue. (UPI)--Police in New Zealand say
popoing a $1.5 billion program ates probably would ntid run on the ' Mrs. Ford is scheduled to begin demonstrators opposing the visit of~ 1 doule national park and recrea- platform, which is generally con- ' campaigning for 'her husband next the American 'nuclear-powered cruiser tio facilities. At Rapid' City, servative. The vice-president added weekend with'addresses to church Truxton knocked down a 100-foot SDlast night,~ Ford called the document ,does not represent his '~groups in Chicago and Waukegan, Ill. high radio antenna yesterday. The 'Carer "th'e biggest flip'flopper I views either. 'In the interview, she promised to antenna linked a U.S. Antarctic base
know."First Lady Betty 'ord says she'll' continue working for passage of the with headquarters in New Zealand. A
On te way homenfpm his vacation campaignin for her husband 'as his Equal Rights Amendment,~ and to get spokesman says the loss 'of the--I
inViColo., Ford went into a wife, bitt niot on the issues. In an a woman on the Supreme Court. antenna has not cut off communica30-mnut priatemeeing n Rpidtions with the Antarctic base'at Cit~y wiheublican leaders from Viti identified McMurdo Sound. 0oth an outh Dakota, M~ontaa and- u n c i e t
W5yomn. H e told te gathering, Sabiotaget ruleu .un ac i e t LOS ANGELES (AP)--William and
"W aeto win from NewYork to E' mily Harris face sentencing in Los Caliorna fro Texas to' Maine. WASHINGTON (A)--The Pentagon Fayetteville, N.C.; Jean Perrin, Angeles Superior Court today. But I'm redy win and eager to go." said yesterday Air Force inviesti- Bristol, Pa. their attorney says he'll first
odFaihfu~l geyser put on a dis- gators that flewt Greenlad andi At Sonderstromn, Greenland: lstLt. move for a retrial on multiple
play for Pres. Fodin the middle England to probe the crashes of 'wo Leo D. Sullivan, pilot,"'North'Haven, grounds of prejudice, involving the<
of s at Yelowtone National Air Force C-141< transpo~rts have 'CoJnn.; lstLt. Glenn F. Bialke, co- tiljdeadjr. TeHrie
kof a se And as acknowledge- ruled out sabota~ge. A total of 39 pilot, Sauk Rapids, Minn.; 2ndLt. were convicted Aug. 9' on kidnap and~
mnt, the President said future gein- persons, most of them American mnil- Jeffrey T. Wilson, navigator, robbery charges. They face possible erati19 shoul ' ave a better chance itary men, died ini the crashes. Midd1leton, Wis.; T~gt. Garland B. 'life sentences. to see the boniulgifts that na- Bot'h planes were from 'th 438th Peer, fl ight engineer, Browns Mills, ture hashbestowe on America. Militar~y'Airlift W"ing head'quarter'ed "N.J.; SSgt. Carlos M. Perez, flight PASADENA, Calif. (AP.)--A landingTo that end said pninpogra which he called complee ly different crcum~stances Robert 'E. 'Jones, Portland, Ore.;- touchdown site to be safe for a
' u w outright to wilcome afterus."( is not even being inyestigated." Springs, Colo.; George W. Johnson, as "U~topia," is about 4,000 miles
ruwh. -~b h hu ~ utTh mn cd'tei a civilian, hometown unknown; ,Elvin from where the Viking-One robot'
"W l aithful, Ford comp1iented gator lookin for th onboard 'G. U'nderd'ahl,'a ci'vilian, hometown ldaoyi odutn Pesac
th ainlPrk Service on its~ flight recorders in hopes of pin- uni~known. Eight Danish citizens and tests on the Ma'rtian soil.
efiiec.pointing the causes o~f the acci- oe U.S. citizen's names were wiithCarer' statement. was issued in~< dents. He said it will be four or 'held at request of next of kin. )-eiadtcPlis a- byJ his"news secretar", five days before the investigations Listed by the Air Force among the PHILADELPHIA ,(UPI)-eia eet
Jod Powell The statement said are complete. survivors of' the crash in Greenland iyes working on a theory that poison For"s 'belated capag 'ronise can- The first plane was carryingg ' wer 2ndLt. Rihr J<. Moken,a nay- gas caused the Phila~delphia nt cover up past administr~ation. op - group of Americzans from New Jersey 'igator, from Milltown, N.J.; a civ- 'Legionnaires Disease" which has pston~ to increased matching fed- back to the U.S air base at ilian passenger, Alfred, Jones, an claimed' 28 lives, say they will exerlfnsto, states ad local parks Mildenhall, Hnglad. All 18< persons employe of'a government contractor; amine hair samples from victims.
proras.abar vrekilled we the "icrf' an'ns ainl hs Results are not expected until later
Caeee is iPlnspeangam 'o wentedonr in athu~nderstorm near names were not available. bothwek
a ekfsechmkn n cm eebrugh, England. '
pinn.The other plane-was, on a flight S uh K r a eiv d s ie
Catrwn ane >all in his race down t~he west coast of Greenland S u h K r a fishing b a eiv d sie
frtepesienc 'yesterday~. Sen. from Thuk~le Base'to Sonderstrom and
21 of'the 19 passengers an~d eight--otKoeis Nrhoeasppslfr prL e ad hg sco lbus crewmen died. < SEOUL, Korea (UPI)--ot oe s NrhKra ~pooa o eaa
The follo'ing, fsal mesures, Leard Point 'high co'-pi4lot, 'Edgewater Paqrk, N.J.; Korean waters during 1coo students wlbetansported lstLt., David A. Lynch, co-pi~lot, The incident reportedly occurred as The 'broadcast of a commentary in
viathe7 ~m.fery hi yer.Tons Rivert, N.J; ,lsttt. Wilam G. the ship'he'aded for its homeport of the Communist Party newspaper Rodong
Th tdents will be picked up at martin , co-piot Baldwin, N~.J.; Kosung, about 10,5 m~iles northeast of Shinmun, monitored here yesterday,
thir hoes on the Leeward side by Capt. Robert A. Eigenrauch, naviga-~ Seoul. ' ''said the U.S.-led U.N. -Command had
anNStasportation bus beginning tor, Valley Cottage, N.Y.; Cap~t. There is no 'immediate indication already agreed to the proposal,
a6:5adn deliered to the ferry Kenneth M. Burkhart, navigator whether N~orth,1Korea naval craft which was discussed at a Military
ladig inie to atch the 7 a.m. 'Labertville, N.J.; Maj.' Alessandro fer.Corona, navigator, Holland, Pa.;' But the incident appears likely Panmunjomn on Saturday.
Upnaial at the Winwar ~err y 'gn.r 'icoodmeNY T. Cl n flgh en t heighten. already high tensions '' However, UNC officials said then
th stu -- -- _-11 _1-Tn-ts,-N -T, resulting from the'murder of two








Page 2 Guantanamo Gazette Monday, August 30, 1976



1f-HIGH HOLY DAY SERVICES SPECIAL INTEREST ROSTERS .Base personnel of the Jewi.sh Speci'al Services needs the names,
1 '00faith interested inparticipating phone numbers, and commands of all' Community in High Holy Day Services are re-~ the presidents and vice presidents quested to contact Mr. or Mrs. of Gitmo's special interest groups,. Gordon at 952260 or Mr. Drexi at This way, Special Services can act 85848 prior to Sept. 7. as a central contact point for perBultnBARREL BOAT RACE sonnel interested in joining clubs and activities of Gitmo. Help
There will be a barrel boat race Special Services help you! Keep the Bo rdatll1s.m., Sept. 4 at the old Special Services special interest: B a ferry landing.'Al barrel opn- group roster updated. Call Special toon boats must be homemade. All Services at 951160 DWH.
racers must sign up at the ferry
landing before 10:45 a.m. Prizes
will be awarded. LADIES' HANDICAP BOWLING MEETING TOMORROW

ToaysMetigPINO CRRETLITTLE THEATRE AUDITIONS There will be an organizational The Little Theatre announces meeting of the Tuesday afternoon Special Services has pianos auditions for variety show 3. Need- Ladies'Handicap Bowling League EXERISLE from 6 to 8 p.m. For more available for rent. For more in- ed are singers, mtuscians, and other tomorrow at 10 a.m. at Marbleinformation call Leonard Cobert at formation on types and rental, talented persons. Auditions will be ha al -1iebi r re 90126 AWI!. ' prices, contact~ the Special Services Sept. 3 at Mrin Center at 7:30 p.m. to attend. For futher information
A-LCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets to-' isue desk at 95393 DIWH. Hours of For more information call Mike call Ann at 95572. night. For more information call operation: Muziko at 85717. 85697 AT.
GITMO COIN CLUB meets in, the quon-~ 10 a.m. - 9 panm. weekdays PUERTO RICAN COOKING LESSONS Gosh, Audrey, set hut 1817 behind the old elemen- 8 a.m. - 9 p.m. weekends yuko o' tary school at 7:30 p.m. For more i you o ' t
ifraion call Reggie Tullis at NAVSTA RECREATION MEMBERS The Pulerto Rican Cooking Lessons crepui a y our 97256 AW or E~d Kindley at 97283 AT. COMMITTEE MEETING. have been canceled and will resume Reulcno > Sept. 7 from 9-11 a.m. This will be a Democrat. . ,There will be E: meeting of NavSta the last cooking lessons, no more just voting is Tomorro~ recreation committee' members Sept. will be scheduled due to transfer. teipotn 1, at 1:301 p.m. in the Special For more information call 951044.0 thing!
GUANTANAMO BAY SELF DEFENSE CLOB Services conference room.
will pactice f'rom 6 to 8 p.m. at ADMIRAL'S CUP INFORMATION

OKINAWA KRTE AFFILIATION will MARINE, EXCHANGE CHRISTMAS TOYS Pesn lfrmAmn SDot
~practice from 6 to 8 'p.m. at Mar- TeMin EcaghsstrdtoServices and Communications de~blehad all Fo moe iforatin Th MaineExcang ha strte tosiring to participate in the upcall 925AWH. mpeifrain receive Christmas toys a'nd to allow coming Admiral's Cup matches should
TH SR LSRS WEGH REDUCING everyone 'the opportunity to take contact Ltjg Delalney 'at 85620 DWH or p CLUBwl me at 7 p~m. For more full advantage of teir layaway 95446 AWH.
inoraion. call Jloanne Frandsen programs, these toys ill be placed
at9117 on. sale today. Included will be -BRWI TOPME IN BOYSOT will meet in teBoy gaebccewheel goods,BR NETOPMEIG
Scot Ht, th t., Villaar 'at 7:30 stuffed toys "books, rockers, toy'BoneTop3wl tr ee- Ltl h ar n o ne
p.m. For mor iform~ation call '.chests, and variety~ of pre-sch~ool BrgowniSept 2 at thewil Srt e- Ltl h ar n o ne
ShrnFxa 642 os hut. Girls are to ride the bus to' next production '7 M heY BRDG CLUBmeets at 'the hut and parents should pick up Snr enti 754 A~m at th OM lb.' Call Jim R & R TRIPS TO0 JAMAICA ', thea girls at 4'p.m. For more infor- By Snr enti
Cosse t819AH The club is' mat'ion call 98276 or 97280 AT. Tryouts for Blithe Spirit, open t all base~ residents. ,In the past personnel were Guantanamo Bay Little Theatre's
BING wil be played atthe PO 'o vst'" on/next production be held
cl m' t~8'permitted o vit Jamaica onR&R AFTER HOURS DENTAL WORKwl
Clbbgniga P p.m. via MAC' fliht on 'Thursday 'and re- todayy through Wednesday from 7-9 p.m.
turn on the MAC fli'gh on Mon~day.< Begoinning Sept. 1, all personnel atj Normn Center. while in ~a liberty sta'us. Based requiring' after normal working The play is aNn hilarious farce by CHILDE' SWM EA FORMS ,on a 'recommendation~ by EPTO to hourss dental treatment will report Noel Coward and features a cast of SWIMTEAMComNavBase it wa determined this 'to the emer'gen'cy 'room at the Naval five women and two men. When Charles
Paetso hide 6-8 years was not legal in 'that the period 'Hospital for suchJ' treatment. Emer- Condomine decides to hold a> seance old 'h r interested in t~hem, of~ absence exceeds the mnaximnum~ gency treatment will be 'available for the purpose of getting some
jiigasimntemare asked to' length of timse' authorized for from 4.30 p~m. to 6:30 a.m. on trickss 'of the trade" for his new cotcMr Clarke at the Windjammer liberty, which is 96 hours. "' weekdays and'all day on weekends book, little does he realize that
swmigpoo oa apnd Friday' Theref ore, in the' future, per- and holidays. All care previously he is. indeed 'stirring up some high
en'~to p~. Fr ' sonn -1 who go to Jamnaica on R1&R available 'at the Dental Clinic ' spirits -- his first wife, who
regsrto ad information frmThurday-to Monday wi4ll be re'- 'after normal working hours will be passed over" seven years previously.
Qquired to take7 leave and must have available at thie hospital. '~ The resulting complications involvcl 901.leave paper's in their possession ' ing himself, his first wife and his to board th flight. 'A NOTE zFROM THE PRINTER present wife provide some'of the funniest scenes in theatrical hi's'~Please be advised that our tele-' tory.
4.~KLADI ES/SOUBALL 'LEAGUE MEETING phone'numbers hayve been. changed The acting roles include Charles,
AR B~ A & RAFS NW 'he'r'gniztio~La metin fo '.due to the installment of new base a wry,' bookish, confused, wifeCAIBA RSS9CA E h ranztoa etn o the telecommunication equipment. dominated man of. 35-50; his first
ASRLGYCASLadies'Softbal1 League will be held Our newly assigned business nlum~- wife, Elvira, a high-spirited, atLeciagro soethng-difernt Sept. 2; at 3:30 p.m. in te Special be'rs are 85196 (publication manage- tractive, willful, and capricious
mq. q~n tQt eCe~ib~ean Services conference room. ment) and 85561 (prtod-uction). yugwmno O"5; i rsn
Ars&Crafts workshop 'Sept. 13 /' ''' wife, Ruth,. a smart-looking, 'pracan le'ar ho t o set up your own NAVY EXCHANGE JOB OPENINGS LADIES' COMO LEAGUE MEETING tical, somewhat dominating woman of
hoocoe Atolg case il heNvyEchne a tefolw- Te aie'OM eau wl4me 35-45; Madame Arcati, a strikingly
heog startling wil 1The Navy Eevhany Monas ing folwJh dis OGLau ilme bizarre, energetic medium aged 45afernoofr 10 weeks. Fog joeob openings: a full time gene- at the COMO Club tomorrow at 2 p.mn. &5; Dr. and Mrs. Bradman, two per-'
inomtFoo o eitr more ral office clerk in the Food Ser- Everyone wanting to bour1 please fectly normal middle-aged neighbors,
Kri at 90263e call vices Office at the McCall'a Admiis- attend this meeting. For more in- and the mousey maid, Edith, who
tration building; a full time and' formation call Carol PriL~a at performs her' duties at a slow galpart tine 'sale clerk, in. the main '952285 or. Pat Wood at 95318 DWH or ME' ASSOCIATION~ MEETING RealSleop.~pocrmn' 954 WI
Retal Sorelals a rocuemet 9542 WH.The tryouts are open to any base Ther wil beameetin.g of the order clerk on a temporary basis. COMM IS~SARY TO CLOSE 'AO DY resident, and prospective actors
Me' Gl sscato n h3gl4ormre8 ft.to plase call 'may come to any or all of the t;yout
corelug at 8 p.m. tomorrow 85348'The Commissary Store is scheduled times. Rehearsals will take place Also at 7 9m here will be a ,, to be closed on. Sept. 4, in obser- 'three evenings a week, 'Monday, chippn contest, entry fee is ~ U. S.NVLGANACBY vance, of Labor Day. Ifr the Seatrain TEuesday, and Thursday. The play is 50( 'an arz for' the winner. ' BASE ~ CUBA' shipment 'of produced arrives on scheduled to be performed the end of All memer are urgedi'to attend ,," Friday, as scheduled, the Commis- October. ad an maes 18 or' over that would ''sary Store will be-open for the Many, many people are still needed liet onte~ association are sale of produce only. from 10 a.m. 'for backstage work, such as lights,
invtedtoattnd tol1 p.m. Saturday Upon confirma- properties, sets, sound, etc. No
'tion of the' Seatrain arrival'date experience is necessary. Interested wide dissemination of the Comnmis- people are urged to contact the 2'Capt. Joh H. McConnell Capt David W. DCook ,sary Store opening and closure director, Sandra Bernst~n, at


JOSa B -o~ Saith Station , -ttn








Monday, August 30, 1976 Guantanamo Gazette Page 3

Bill Griffin.-ends 30 year career in Gitmo
I By J01 J. Arthu..r Riccid' school and returned to Gitmo during 'to landscape the grounds around
Guantanamo Bay residents 'will soon the summer of '41 for summer employ- their new home in Florida and travel
\ mising a piece of the rock with ment. His job was building the pre- around the States visiting theirOC he departure of Bill Griffin. On sn a ees osn nt n fu agtr n aiis Aug. 29 Griffin turns the magical Villamar which, ironically are now Golf' will also play a big role in age of'55 tor goveLnment seirvie being replaced. the Griffin's retirement years. employes. Hie can retire after working Their house is surrounded by three 30 yars,30 yars hat s, o woringgolf courses and with a handicap of 7 iGio.The summer over, Bill once again ih of h a" wocnps
There is more to the story of Bill left the rock, to return to school that up?
Griffin than just retirement, there and later join the Army. After his BiladElyGfineveunt hitc of~thee ears, oe mnthanamo for good tomorrow, no doubt, is history. The witnessing of the Army hitth tear inre yhars, eyes Thet Guantanamo Naval Base change in size and seven days, ". ..but who's~count- finste ev eidwl ei both in buildings and population, ing?", he again returned ,to Gitmo thenmmos they ebhd ll to i from 250 people in 1936 to more than in April 1946 to show off hirs child thihers Tityeassno 6,000 people today. From the Sunday bride, the former Emily Westcott. drives to Caimanera and Boqueron and Bill says he felt like "the man who only a long time, but a life. The th eeigof Cuban friends, that came to dinner" about staying in Griff ins' are a --piece of the rock. didn't work on the base, to the se- ,Gitmo because ". . .it was not my in- Adoamgs..vycn i. curing of the water in 1964 and the tention 'to make a 'life out of it. erection on the fence line forcing Althought I didn' t have anything the separation of American and Cuban definite in mind. 'I had just left friends. '' 'the Army and was touching 25 years Bill Griffin' s "in' 'country" life old." Bill figured the'd'ecisi~on to started on Christmas Day, 1935, when 'go back to school' or to work had to lhe and his mother left San Diego on be'made. It was during this Gitmo the transport ship 'TSS Ghaumont to vaction when Bill visited his father join his father, who"was working as ,,at the transit shed and the ,Supply a chief boatswain's mate in Gitmo. officer offered him a'job., The 8th 'Bill 'was in' the eighth grade at this' of 'May, 1946, is when it all started. time and while in' Gitn'o, completed ''As Bill 'said, "The day I leave, I' his high school years. He graduated will have been working here for 30 in May 1,940 first in his class, , years, three months and 23 days... after all,'he was 'the only senior. but who's countng"'' '~That same mnth, 'Bill left and Bill's ~plans call f'or an active Wnt

Guerrillas accept Arab League plan

'RETIREMENT: Above: Bill Griffin works on some last minute paperwork before BEIRUJT, Lebanon (AP)-A top country from which the Palestinians' his retirement, 'after 30 years in Gitmo, as director, receipt-control/exPalestinian leader said yesterday can 'operate freely against, Israel. pediting branch, Supply Department. Below right: Griffin ponders retirethe guerrillas a ccept an Arab League The Christians want to, restrict and ment and leaving'Gitno. Below left: A specially made Gitmo plaque was prepilan for wihdawal of both disarm the Palestiian guerrillas sented to Billiand Emily Griffin ,at a special luncheon last Friday. Christian and Palestinian forces in Lebanon.
fothe mountain front east of Syria joined in on the Christian cl a e f c s tr l in a if r a Bert tat' threatens to, become the side because Assad does not want Cl a e f c s tr lin a io n a
netmao battle of the Lebanese 'Lebanon controlled by' radicals who WSIGO A)-lrdeCevr War. WSIGO A)-lrdeCevr Artill'ry exchanges continued in could drag him into another M~ideast former information minister of the thown ains alson fhigtiang Wr Black Panthers, said yesterday, "If tows. her wa alo fghtngit's the wil f 'the Lord that I go' along the line dividing Beirut, Three Americans killed wopioIll g opio.
mosty ht-an-ru rais ad motarCleaver, appearing on NBC-TV's Shelling byboth sides. % "Meet thie Press," attributed h'is reHopita officials estimated more in guerrilla am uhsigned attitude to his conversion to
thn10 persons were killed in 24 aniuhChristianity.
hours."I'll do whatever work the Lord TEHRAN, Ir'an (AP?-- olice pressed brings to me," he added, whether it "ithdrawalfo the mountain the~ search> for six gunmen yesterday 'is writing, lecturing or criticizing
areas must be rn ually b~alanced,"~ as Iraniian nighbors made condolence po'liticianIs, although he said he had' ELDUGECLEAVER Sa lah 'Khal'a sai 'na interview. '~visits 'to the wi~dows and children of 'no political ambitions~ of his own. He is second to Yai Aafat in the "three Calif ornians k Itmust inove not only ' gunmen an 'adri'ver jumped ovr a '"'I think I' will get a fair day in or previously 'extolled. "My conclufLorces, bu' Syrians, wall into a waiting ca after kil- court and I'll be vindicated." sion is that it leaves a lot to be Lebae .rightists an~d leftists as ' ling th three Americans in less Black Panther Bobby Sutton was 'desired," he said yesterday.
wel," e sid.thani a minute Saturday with a bar- '.killed in the April 6, 1968 shootZing. The Black Panthers' activities,
The Christian leade rship has re- rage of machine-gun fire.j , Cleaver and~ two police officers were especially their "excessive" langufused the, mutual plack sugstd The government said~ ante ca wounded. ' ''age, "scared a l'ot of people," by AaLeague mediator Hssan ,the terrorists had~ used to ambush Cleaver jumped bail and fled the Cleaver said.
SbiKhl.Te Christians demand the Americans wa's left a~t the scene country, returning only last *Now he says "There has been a slow
aoesdedPalestinian wi.thdr cnedng the mountain area '18 the car contained papers 'proving As he has been doing lately, he range of freedom" since the days of
mies east of' Beirut traditionally 'the killers belonged to the~ same expressedd disillusionent with the Emancipation Proclamation.~
ha een4'Christian and ,should, remain Islamic Marxist group blamed for
S.the assassination of three, U.S. T r e n ree o & t n g tae s o
ThePalstnians, aided by leftist military officers since 1973. T r e n r e e h p o n g ta e s o Mole forces, have been engaged Saturday's victims were senior insoadcatllery exchanges with ,emp~loyes of Rockwell International ANKARiA, Turkey (AP') -Turke~y and 'caglayangil said "Greece has Christa militias in the mountains Corp., a Vmaj or military' contractor, Greece will soon decide' wen and failed to acheive ',any of the obsine Au. 1, when the' 'alestinian assigned to a secret' electronic, where to begin negotiations for a j ectives it expected from taking the reugeecam ofTi Za ' , ,fell to p roject for th'e Irniann Air Force,~ political, solution to their mutual case to~the Security Council." He
Chistian attakers. according' to officea 'details re- ''problems, Turkish Foreign Minister 'pointed out 'the Security Council
Neither sid ''s 'cored territor- leased yesterdayb Iranian offi- Ibsan Sabri Caglayangil said yester-~ did not charge Turkey with endangia gainsp bu Christia's have vowed cials. NBC News said they were in- day. ' ''ering peace and security in the area a masive attac unles 'the stalling a haif,4illion-dolar in- In an exclusive interview with as' claimed by Greece and did not Paetnaspl u.telligence-gathering system. the Turkish daily "Tercuman," order. Turkey 'to halt its research
Khl ef for Damascus yesterday Autoneiics Groups, a Rockwell ~ Caglayangil said Turco-Greek dis- activities in, the Aegean. to dics his peac'e plan, the division in Anaheim, 'Calif., id4enti- putes, including claims over the fouth i ie months with Syrian~' fied 'the dead'as' William C.. ' Aegean continental shelf'and the
leaes Te Syrian attitude is' Cottrell Jr. of. Los Gatos; Robert Cyprus question, should be taken up Toast masters conducting crca eas f Syria withdraws ' R. Krongard of~ Sunnyvale; and, one at a time in 'such nego tiations,
eesoe oit toops from ~ Donald G. Smith o~f Yorba Linda.' All 'but that the talks should Jeventually
Lbnnte< Christians would face a years old and lived cover all points of conf 1 ct.m'esi drv
m ' ,Cottrell Letstsoesmen hae accused the Krongard three.. urgent in nature," the foreign minChitinsde' of stal~ing& to gaini Persian neighbors visited the V ister said. ',The Gitmo'Toastmasters are contim unti re,select Eias Sarkis 'bereaved









Guantanamo Cazeitt Monday August 30, 1976


Nebraska pre-season choice e O R-,Federation Cup won

(Al')--(Thc Nebraska TCornhu'~kers total points. Points bases on f r U S g i
a re the p r-se!ason choice to de- 20-19-18-17-16-15-14-13-1l2-11-10- PHILADELPHIA (Al')--Rosemary
throne defunding champion >Oklahoma 9-8-7-6--5-4-3-2-1: Casals and Billie Jean King scored and prevent the Sooners fromn - .7 ,63 obe icoyoe nin an unprecedeated third con- I1. Nebraska (25) 10-2-0 961 Aus7ralia-sEonnles vioagovean sec~utive National College Football 2. Michigan (10) 8-2-2 1918 Mrs. Kerry Melville Reid yesterday, title. 3. Arizona State (7) 12-0-0 780 giving the United States the
Ia nationwide Associated Press 4. Ohio State (3) 11-1-0 749 Federation Cup for the first time pol1 of 59 sports writers and 5. Oklahoma (6) 10-1-0 68- AEALSOGSFO ETRA since 1969. broadcasters, nine different teams 6. Alabama (3) 11-1-0 624 BAEAL CRE RMYSEDY -Mrs. Reid beat Miss Casals 1-6, earned at least one vote for the 7. Texas (3) 10-2-0 610 NATIONAL LEAGUE 6-3, 7-5 and in the singles matches number-one spot. Nebraska, which 8. Southern Cal (2) 8-4-0 517 Cincinnati 6, Philadelphia 5 tc set the stage for the doubles. finished ninth a year ago, received 9. Pitt (1) 8-4-0 416 (15 innings) -In the deciding doubles match,
25 fis-place ballots and 961 of 10. Penn State 9-3-0 348 Los Angelos 2, New York Mets 1I the Americans took the opening set a possble 1,180 points. 11. Notre Dame 8-3-0 319 Pi1ttsburgh 3, San Francisco 2, when Mrs. Reid ran off court to
Nbaka--coach Tou. Osborne says 12. Maryland 9-2-1 211 - (11 innings) retrieve a shot and backhanded it
h has mixed feelings about the 13. Arkansas 10-2-0 193 Chicago Cubs 3, Atlanta 2 into the net. The Americans broke number-one& ranking. Hie says "ijt's 14. Texas A&M 10-2-0 136 Houston 6, St. Louis 0 Mrs. Reid's service again in the mic that -people feel we're a 15. Califoria 8-3-0 121 Montreal 3, San Diego 0 second set to take a 5-to-3 lead. good tear nd, hopefully, where 16. Georgia 9-3-0 108 -With Miss Casals serving in the there's that kid f confidence 17. UCLA 9-2-1 1l01 AMERICAN~ LEAGUE final game, the Americans conceded there might be some reason for 18. Florida 9-3-0 102 Boston 15, Kansas City 6 only one point before winning the otms 19. Kansas 7-5-0 -37 California 5, N~ew York Yankees 4 natch.
But onth there hand, he says, 20. Miami of Ohio - 11-1-0 32 (11 innings) The American team, five time "a numbe-ce ranking leads to -Texas 11, Baltimore 0 winners of the event, won the great epctatons ." and he adds>, Other receiving vctes in the Cleveland 7,ininesota 4 $40,000 first prize. The Australians,
"ho e w'ea good4 as people pre-season poll, listed al!phabeti- Chicago White Sox 2, Milwaukee 0 -who have won the cup seven times,
thn we ar. cally: Air~ Force, Arizona, Baylor, Oakland 2, Detroit 1 (12 innings) collected $20,000 dollars.
Boston College, Colorado, East
The follwin is the top 20 Carolina, Georgia Tech, Louisiana EXIBITION FOOTBALL SCORES FROM
-tems in the Asociated Press State, M~ichigan State, Minfnesota, YESTEDAY - -Solomoni wins Pro Tennis
pr-esr olg ootball poll, Mississippi', 1ii sojri, lortest firs-nlacr fo-vn ense a ~, ~i5.Sate1, a~ig 6otes in parent- -Carolina, Oklahoma State, Stanford, Oa~ad 4 ~ racso17Championship in B so he~eS seasn reord fr 197 and TenneseeTexasTechTuls. Seatle BROOKLINE, 16 ROass.E,(Mss. --P) aroldl Solomon beat Haul Ramirez, 4-6,
6-,62,75 last night to
A izona State a dB ih m Y ugf vrdreach the finals of the $125,000
4 U.S. Pro Tennis Championships

Edtrs note. Te following is Williams is ranked ninth in the Only BYU is given a chance of pre- outside Boston.
th hrd in a eries, sizing up nation in rushing. He gained 1,300 venting the Sum Devils fromn winning In beating Ramirez for the third collg footal. - yards and scored nine touchdowns. - a seventh league title in eight - time without a loss this year,
4 Jefferson was 21st in reception. -years. Solomon exploited the Mexican' s (UI-Io of the most balanced- Kush knows he' wlneed exper- Arizona State should have the erratic backhand and poor serving coleg fotball offne in the -ience on offense if-te Sn Devils power to -bull it way thircugh the - during the two-hour, 37-minute nato si n tefohlsfthe ar keep alive thi 13game > rest of the WAC and1 non-conference contest. Rok Monais at TmeArz, wnin streak, longs curr-ent - oppDonent- 5-Sooon, a 24-year-old from the
an rooUth staring among the nations' major Arizona must- be rated a close - Maryland surburbs of Washington,
Bot crzn 1tt coleg -tea-s. third in the WAG and the Eockies. -will meet defending champion Bjortn
Youg opeth-i- sron rnnig us says 'W play UCLA in our- The Wildcats have the best kicker- Borg in tonight'-s final.
adpsiggmswlgiethe -- first gaine, so itwo' take us - in the 'area in Lee Pistor, who Borg, seeking his third straight
defense tiet auebfr -h long to find out whr we stand. booted 35 conversions and 15 field' U.S. pro title, drubbed Eddie Dibbs,
shwdw fo t e WetenAthetic The feelingistat thebest --- goals last season. --7-6, 6-2, 6-1, earlier yesterday.
Cofrnettetelst weekend quarterback c- the Rocies is B ut Arizona has lost most of its Borg had trouble at the outset
iOcober. Brigham Young junior 'ifNielsen. starting-offensiv backfield and of his match with Dihbs, the 25Arion Stt coc FrakKsh -- The sixr-fiv basketba-I guard- m nay not have the scoring punch - year-old former University of
hsaraymd onmaodecision, -turned-quarterba c didn' tget into to stay with the others. Miami star seeded-seventh here.
naig uio eni pru s his action until late Sproul- beas-esa etrrne tfinfal 20 mintes Nielsen passed 14,600 yards, ranking seventh B-.e too command whle- outscoring
tha hs thr sgnlcllr.pas'sed for two touchdows anid, set- natEionally. But Degan was pressured- Dih-s 7'-1 in the tie-breaker
Spou shrd tme wihunor up a game-winni'ng field goal w ih- into 21 i-ntecerons and Utah'~s of the first set. Then he jumped
Fe-otne-last seasn Te two three more completions. offensive l before a thunderstorm inundated A an 1 tochdows Bu itwsSru 61 pe cent of his tosses for - The Ues wil have troublt puh- - Longwcod's clay center court, inwoldteSn-vl to a 1-t- nearly 1,500 yards and> 10 touch- ing out Co-lorado -tate or New terrupting the match for one hour 14:ie~ta owlvitor ovr dwns Iexio fr furh spot in te con- 'and /,0 'minutes-. Nerak adanme tw rtigSnio -tailback Jeff Blanc had - ference. Wyoming and 1'exas-E 1Pasonaioaly Hapl orSru and only a so-so season, missing g1,000 will bttle t~o-stay out of the - Giraham t play i
Kuhtetp 4-vr split end "yards rushing by jus 1>-yards he- l eague basement. - -- Joh Jfesn, retun along with. cause of injuies. He also caught Uth State and Air Force, both >Wo1 - 'f seio fulbc "ast Fredi 15 passes for ;15'6 yards ad scored unkniow quantities, look- lke the Word eries ofGolf Wilas 11 touchdowns. b - est independents. And Boise -State
_ - with 2,000 yard passer Greg Stern, - AKRON, Ohio, (AP)--David Graham S should dominate. te division-two cautiously negotiated the twin
-, --- - teams again., hazards of a chilly wind and 52 arsof water in three-under-par
-- -Sports 'in brief 69 an scre a covnig fourstroe vitoryyesterday i h
-WASH'IINGTON< (AP)-- - e Washington storm-delayed American Golf Classic.
- ~ ~ 4 - -Resins acquired center-t'ackle - The-globe-trotting Australian,
-Dave Thompson from the Tampa Bay who walks the world's fairways
Al d ill. bernoe- ieol Buccaneers yesterday in exchange with a peculiarly stiff, almost
You ust ubmt you a ech time -Honda C L-4-50, prc ngotiable. - -for a 1977 draft choice. Thomipson, military stride, scored his second
you~~ wati rne.Ad a e Cl ark at 85183 DJH. a si-yea veteran who was a~sec'ond victory of the season and won. his submtte by allng bfort 4 ~m.round selection for Detroit in way into next week' rich World orbydrppngitinon o~f te >Avocado electric ange, $120,-an 1 ,971, probably will be used immed- Series of Golf with a 274 total.
drop boxe. Ad hc iciinate white GE washing machine, used, i lately as the saaper on punts. -That put Graham, wh1o has won
on th bsisofrac, sxcred, $35. Gall 951265 AT. - - -He'll replace Pete Solverson, titles on four- continents, writes a
coo -rntoa orn wl not - 'Washington's -only other center on column for a golf 'magazine and is bb - acetd. Tesaff reervesthe wated punts, who.suffered a knee injury :a master club maker, a distant 14
rih ore-wrieay m d it dems - Saturday night ini the R'edskin's under par on the north course at
.necesswadnry. e god on 38-7 victory over the New York Jets. 'the Firestone Country Club, a
-iin Cal1 856004DWHo 97214 --7,105-yard layout that meanders fo sl AHask fo Phil -oiron. KANSAS CITY (AP-Defensive back -ove~r and around the lakes and
-Kerry Reardon- has announcedpln stemthtakupheT crws 47Ceypnel truc, g~oo codi Woman to 1babysit in my home- fi-.~ to come out ofretiemjent adplas Rsrastatmkir.-th ucaaa
tin.Cal 558AW. as erwekfor tw hldrt'n for the Kanss Citxy Chiefs. Reardon, -It was -that water, which served Cal 955-A who -missed the fin-al six games of as -a soggy grave for any would-be '73 ~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ls se10 Hoda ned iorr-1 q.qnwth> u lle~d hnmstring, challengers: and Graham's careful




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Tide, Sun, Temp. Weather Forecast Hitide :5 Mostly clear to 6:57pm 0At partly cloudy. uow-75 'tdztudinaE-J1z tt O t id& :5 p -6:45pm U~ ..12 kts. e -7 :1 8 p B a y c o n d .l3 f t --------89 The. Nv sn~ ho'te.-b adcit Vol. 31 No. 167 U.S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Candidates accuse each other of 'flipflops' (UPI)--Pres. Gerald Ford and his Democratic rival, Jimmy Carter, have accused each other of doing "flipflops" in their pre-campaign appearances. Carter was quoted yesterday as saying Ford had "done a flipflop" .proposing a $1.5 billion program double national park and recreation facilities. At Rapid City, S.D., last night, Ford called Carter, "the biggest flipflopper I know." On the way home from his vacation in Vail, Colo., Ford went into a 30-minute private meeting in Rapid City with Republican leaders from North and South Dakota, Montana and Wyoming. He told the gathering, "We have to win from New York to California, from Texas to Maine. I'm ready, willing and eager to go." Old Faithful geyser put on a display for Pres. Ford in the middle of a speech at Yellowstone National Park yesterday. And as acknowledgement, the President said future generations should have a better chance to see the bountiful gifts that nature has bestowed on America. To that end, said Ford, as a bicentennial gift, space devoted to urban and national parks, wildlife refuges, recreation facilities and historic sites should be doubled. He proposed the $1.5 billion expansion program which he called "Our own gift outright to those who will come after us." Interrupted by the hourly eruption I Old Faithful, Ford complimented the National Park Service on its efficiency. Carter's statement was issued in Plains, Ga., by his news secretary, Jody Powell. The statement said Ford's belated campaign promise cannot cover up past administration opposition to increased matching federal funds to states and local parks programs. Carter is in Plains preparing for a week of speech-making and campaigning. Carter won a new ally in his race for the presidency yesterday. Sen. Leeward high school bus schedule announced Due to an ever increasing demand for the Naval Station's two utility boats, plus stringent personal and fiscal measures, Leeward Point high school students will be transported via the 7 a.m. ferry this year. The students will be picked up at their homes on the Leeward side by an NAS transportation bus beginning at 6:45 and delivered to the ferry landing in time to catch the 7 a.m. ferry. Upon arrival at the Windward ferry landing the students will be met by a special school bus and transported to the school. In the afternoon the students will be taken to the ferry landing in time to catch the 3:30 ferry. They will be met by the NAS bus on arrival at Leeward. Elementary students will have the same system as last year whereas the same bus will pick them up on the Leeward side and deliver them to the elementary school and make the return trip in the afternoon. George McGovern, the South Dakota Democrat who led the party to its worst presidential election defeat in history four years ago, announced his support for Carter and running mate Walter Mondale. But McGovern said the nation also owes a "permanent debt" to independent candidate Eugene McCarthy. McGovern is president of the Americans for Democratic Action, which has endorsed the CarterMondale ticket while warning that voters should not support McCarthy. Vice Pres. Nelson Rockefeller said during the weekend the national Republican platform does not reflect the views of Pres. Ford. Speaking in New Hampshire Saturday, Rockefeller said Republican moderates probably would not run on the platform, which is generally conservative. The vice-president added the document does not represent his views either. First Lady Betty Ford says she'll campaign for her husband as his wife, but not on the issues. In an Victims identified WASHINGTON (AP)--The Pentagon said yesterday Air Force investigators that flew to Greenland and England to probe the crashes of two Air Force C-141 transports have ruled out sabotage. A total of 39 persons, most of them American military men, died in the crashes. Both planes were from the 438th Military Airlift Wing headquartered at McGuire Air Force Base, N.J. The accidents happened within hours of each other. In announcing the investigators' preliminary conclusions, a Pentagon spokesman said "It appears to be completely different circumstances in which they crashed, and sabotage is not even being investigated." The spokesman said the investigators are looking for the onboard flight recorders in hopes of pinpointing the causes of the accidents. He said it will be four or five days before the investigations are complete. The first plane was carrying a group of Americans from New Jersey back to the U.S. air base at Mildenhall, England. All 18 persons aboard were killed when the aircraft went down during a thunderstorm near Peterborough, England. The other plane was on a flight down the west coast of Greenland from Thule Base to Sonderstrom and 21 of the 19 passengers and eight crewmen died. The following is a list, as provided by the Air Force, of the victims. At Peterborough, England: Capt. John P. McNally, pilot, Worchester, Mass.; Capt. Leslie C. Brissette, co-pilot, Edgewater Park, N.J.; lstLt. David A. Lynch, co-pilot, Toms River, N.J.; lstLt. William G. Martin, co-pilot, Baldwin, N.J.; Capt. Robert A. Eigenrauch, navigator, Valley Cottage, N.Y.; Capt. Kenneth M. Burkhart, navigator, Labertville, N.J.; Maj. Alessandro Corona, navigator, Holland, Pa.; MSgt. Richard M. Cleven, flight engineer, Woodmere, N.Y.; TSgt. Gaston J. Vargas, flight engineer, Kendall Park, N.J.; SSgt. Harry R. Dempsey, flight engineer, Plainenge, N.J.; SSgt. John H. Blackley, loadmaster, Ridgefield, N.J.; SSgt. Glenn K. Haberbush, loadmaster, Union, N.J.; Capt. Dale C. Johnson, co-pilot, Norwalk, Conn.; Maj. Edwin C. Payne, crewmember, McGuire AFB, N.J.; Capt. Charles Barlow, Pope AFB, N.C.; Capt. Dlan Melton, Fayetteville, N.C.; TSgt. Bruce Kearns, interview in Vail, Colo., Mrs. Ford said the election race will be hard fought, but she believes the President will beat Jimmy Carter. She also said she expects the Democrats to use Ford's pardon of former Pres. Richard Nixon as a campaign issue. Mrs. Ford is scheduled to begin campaigning for her husband next weekend with addresses to church groups in Chicago and Waukegan, Ill. In the interview, she promised to continue working for passage of the Equal Rights Amendment, and to get a woman on the Supreme Court. Fayetteville, N.C.; Jean Perrin, Bristol, Pa. At Sonderstrom, Greenland: lstLt. Leo D. Sullivan, pilot, North Haven, Conn.; lstLt. Glenn F. Bialke, copilot, Sauk Rapids, Minn.; 2ndLt. Jeffrey T. Wilson, navigator, Middleton, Wis.; TSgt. Garland B. Peer, flight engineer, Browns Mills, N.J.; SSgt. Carlos M. Perez, flight engineer, Puerto Rico; TSgt. Patrick F. Quinn, loadmaster, unknown city in New Jersey; SSgt. Charlie J. Bass, loadmaster, Rougemont, N.C.; TSgt. Leslie Foster, Crossville, Tenn.; Capt. Robert E. Jones, Portland, Ore.; TSgt. Terry B. Ohumeiss, Colorado Springs, Colo.; George W. Johnson, a civilian, hometown unknown; Elvin G. Underdahl, a civilian, hometown unknown. Eight Danish citizens and one U.S. citizen's names were withheld at request of next of kin. Listed by the Air Force among the survivors of the crash in Greenland were 2ndLt. Richard J. Moken, a navigator, from Milltown, N.J.; a civilian passenger, Alfred Jones, an employe of a government contractor; and four Danish nationals whose names were not available. World News Digest OCEANSIDE, Calif. (AP)--Coroner's officials in Oceanside, Calif., say an autopsy has turned up no conclusive evidence about the cause of death of former television childstar Mary Anissa Jones. At first, authorities said they suspected an overdose of barbiturates was responsible for the death during the weekend of the 18-year-old actress, who portrayed Buffy on the 1960s TV series "Family Affair." Officials say further studies will be necessary to determine the cause of death. (UPI)--Police in New Zealand say demonstrators opposing the visit of the American nuclear-powered cruiser Truxton knocked down a 100-foot high radio antenna yesterday. The antenna linked a U.S. Antarctic base with headquarters in New Zealand. A spokesman says the loss of the antenna has not cut off communications with the Antarctic base at McMurdo Sound. LOS ANGELES (AP)--William and Emily Harris face sentencing in Los Angeles Superior Court today. But their attorney says he'll first move for a retrial on multiple grounds of prejudice, involving the trial judge and jury. The Harrises were convicted Aug. 9 on kidnap and robbery charges. They face possible life sentences. PASADENA, Calif. (AP)--A landingsite for the Viking-Two Mars probe will be chosen today, after project scientists look at a series of pictures sent back yesterday from the orbiting spacecraft. They're hoping the phots will show the touchdown site to be safe for a landing on Friday. The site, known as "Utopia," is about 4,000 miles from where the Viking-One robot laboratory is conducting life-search tests on the Martian soil. PHILADELPHIA (UPI)--Medical detectives working on a theory that poison gas caused the Philadelphia "Legionnaires Disease" which has claimed 28 lives, say they will examine hair samples from victims. Results are not expected until later in the week. South Korean fishing boat believed seized SEOUL, Korea (UPI)--North Korea is believed to have seized a South Korean fishing boat carrying a 23man crew. Officials in Seoul say the vessel apparently was captured today when it inadvertently moved into North Korean waters during a dense fog. The incident reportedly occurred as the ship headed for its homeport of Kosung, about 105 miles northeast of Seoul. There is no immediate indication whether North Korean naval craft opened fire in capturing the ship. But the incident appears likely to heighten already high tensions resulting from the murder of two U.S. Army officers by North Korean security guards on Aug. 18. This came at the truce village of Panmunjom during a tree trimming dispute. As a followup to the killings, a U.S. naval task force that includes the carrier Midway was sent to waters off Korea. There is no indication how close the naval craft were to the scene of the latest incident. North Korea's proposal for separating North Korean and United Nations Command guards in the truce village of Panmunjom is a reasonable step to prevent a minor clash "which may expand into a war," according to the official North Korean Central News Agency. The broadcast of a commentary in the Communist Party newspaper Rodong Shinmun, monitored here yesterday, said the U.S.-led U.N. Command had already agreed to the proposal, which was discussed at a Military Armistice Commission meeting in Panmunjom on Saturday. However, UNC officials said then it would be passed on to lowerlevel meetings between staff members from both sides. Saturday's meeting was the third called by the U.N. Command to demand punishment of North Korean guards who killed two U.S. Army officers in the truce zone. The News Agency also chargedyesterday the U.S. nuclear submarine Pollack had "sneaked" into South Korean waters. Sabotage ruled out in accidents MTonday, August 30, 1976

PAGE 2

Monday, August 30, 1976 I. 3 Today's Meeting EXERCISE from 6 to 8 p.m. For more information call Leonard Gobert at 9026 AWH. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets tonight. For more information call 85697 AT. GITMO COIN CLUB meets in the quonset hut 1817 behind the old elementary school at 7:30 p.m. For more information call Reggie Tullis at 97256 AWH or Ed Kindley at 97283 AT. Tomorrow GUANTANAMO BAY SELF DEFENSE CLiB will practice from 6 to 8 p.m. at Morin Center. OKINAWA KARATE AFFILIATION will practice from 6 to 8 p.m. at Marblehead Hall. For more information call 98258 AWH. THE SURE LOSERS WEIGHT REDUCING CLUB will meet at 7 p.m. For more information call Joanne Frandsen at 951197. BOY SCOUTS will meet in the Boy Scout Hut, 6th St., Villamar at 7:30 p.m. For more information call Sharon Fox at 64462. GITMO BAY BRIDGE CLUB meets at 7 p.m. at the COMO Club. Call Jim Cossey at 85149 AWH. The club is open to all base residents. BINGO will be played at the CPO Club beginning at 8 p.m. CHILDREN'S SWIM TEAM FORMS Parents of children 6-8 years old who are interested in them joining a swimming team are asked to contact Mr. Clarke at the Windjammer swimming pool today and Friday anytime between 3 to 6 p.m. For registration and information call 90117. CARIBBEAN ARTS 6, CRAFTS NEW ASTROLOGY CLASS Locking ror something -different in Gitmo. Come to the Caribbean Arts & Crafts workshop Sept. 13 and learn how to set up your own horoscope. Astrology classes will be starting at 1-3 p.m. every Monday afternoon for 10 weeks. For more information or to register call Kris at 90263 AWH. MEN'S GOLF ASSOCIATION MEETING There will be a meeting of the Men's Golf Association in the golf course lounge at 8 p.m. tomorrow Also at 7 p.m. there will be a shipping contest, entry fee is 500, and a prize for the winner. All members are urged to attend and any males 18 or over that would like to join the association are invited to attend. NAUTICAL LANTERN NEW HOURS Effective yesterday, the Nautical Lantern began new operating hours. The hours are: Sun. 10 a.m. -12 n.m. -6 -9 p.m. Mon. Closed Tue. thru Fri. 11:30 a.m. -1 p.m. 6 -9 p.m. Sat. 6 -9 p.m. PIANOS FCR RENT Special Services has pianos available for rent. For more information on types and rental prices, contact the Special Services issue desk at 95393 DWH. Hours of operation: 10 a.m. -9 p.m. weekdays 8 a.m. -9 p.m. weekends NAVSTA RECREATION MEMBERS COMMITTEE MEETING There will be a meeting of NavSta recreation committee members Sept. 1, at 1:30 p.m. in the Special Services conference room. MARINE EXCHANGE CHRISTMAS TOYS The Marine Exchange has started to receive Christmas toys and to allow everyone the opportunity to take full advantage of their layaway program, these toys will'be placed on sale today. Included will be games, bicycles, wheel goods, stuffed toys, books, rockers, toy chests, and a variety of pre-school toys. R & R TRIPS TO JAMAICA In the past personnel were permitted to visit Jamaica on R&R via N1AC flight on Thursday and return on the MAC flight on Monday. while in a liberty status. Based on a recommendation by BPTO to ComNavBase it was determined this was not legal in that the period of absence exceeds the maximum length of time authorized for liberty, which is 96 hours. Therefore, in the future, personnel who go to Jamaica on R&R from Thtirsday' to Monday will be required to take leave and must have gave papers in their possession to board the flight. LADIES'SOFTBALL LEAGUE MEETING The organizational meeting for the Ladies' Softball League will be held Sept. 2, at 3:30 p.m. in the Special Services conference room. NAVY EXCHANGE JOB OPENINGS The Navy Exchange has the following job openings: a full time general office clerk in the Food Services Office at the McCalla Administration building; a full time and part time sale clerk in the main Retail Storel also a procurement order clerk on a temporary basis. For more information please call 85348. Community Bulletin Board HIGH HOLY DAY SERVICES Base personnel of the Jewish faith interested in participating in High Holy Day Services are requested to contact Mr. or Mrs. Gordon at 952260 or Mr. Drexl at 85848 prior to Sept. 7. BARREL BOAT RACE There will be a barrel boat race at 11 a.m., Sept. 4 at the old ferry landing. All barrel or pontoon boats must be homemade. All racers must sign up at the ferry landing before 10:45 a.m. Prizes will be awarded. LITTLE THEATRE AUDITIONS The Little Theatre announces auditions for variety show 3. Needed are singers, muscians, and other talented persons. Auditions will be Sept. 3 at Morin Center at 7:30 p.m. For more information call Mike Muziko at 85717. PUERTO RICAN COOKING LESSONS The Puerto Rican Cooking Lessons have been canceled and will resume Sept. 7 from 9-11 a.m. This will be the last cooking lessons, no more will be scheduled due to transfer. For more information call 951044. ADMIRAL'S CUP INFORMATION Personnel from Admin, SRD, Port Services and Communications desiring to participate in the upcoming Admiral's Cup matches should contact Ltjg Delaney at 85620 DWH or 95446 AWH. BROWNIE TROOP MEETING Brownie Troop 3 will start meeting on Sept. 2 at the Girl Scout hut. Girls are to ride the bus to the hut and parents should pick up the girls at 4 p.m. For more information call 98276 or 97280 AT. AFTER HOURS DENTAL WORK Beginning Sept. 1, all personnel requiring after normal working hours dental treatment will report to the emergency room at the Naval Hospital for such treatment. Emergency treatment will be available from 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 a.m. on weekdays and all day on weekends and holidays. All care previously available at the Dental Clinic after normal working hours will be available at the hospital. A NOTE FROM THE PRINTER Please be advised that our telephone numbers have been changed due to the installment of new base telecommunication equipment. Our newly assigned business numbers are 85196 (publication management) and 85561 (production). LADIES' COMO LEAGUE MEETING The Ladies' COMO League will meet at the COMO Club tomorrow at 2 p.m. Everyone wanting to bowl please attend this meeting. For more information call Carol Price at 952285 or Pat Wood at 95318 DWH or 95342 AWH. COMMISSARY TO CLOSE LABOR DAY( The Commissary Store is scheduled to be closed on Sept. 4, in observance of Labor Day. If the Seatrain shipment of produce arrives on Friday, as scheduled, the Commissary Store will be open for the sale of produce only from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. Upon confirmation of the Seatrain arrival date wide dissemination of the Commissary Store opening and closure will be made through the POD, AFRTS, and the Gitmo Gazette. CHARMERS CLASS MEETING Charmers will meet at the COMO Club Pool Sept. I from 7 to 9 p.m. On the agenda will be, fingernails and 'ardrobe check, etiquette, swimming and pot luck dinner. For more information call Miss Tweet at 85276. SPECIAL INTEREST ROSTERS Special Services needs the names,* phone numbers, and commands of all the presidents and vice presidents of Gitmo's special interest groups, This way, Special Services can act as a central contact point for personnel interested in joining clubs and activities of Gitmo. Help Special Services help you' Keep the Special Services special interest: group roster updated. Call Special Services at 951160 DW. LADIES'HANDICAP BOWLING MEETING TOMORROW There will be an organizational meeting of the Tuesday afternoon Ladies' Handicap Bowling League tomorrow at 10 a.m. at Marblehead Hall. All members are urged to attend. For futher information call Ann at 95572. Gosh, Audrey, you know I don't care if you're a Republican or a Democrat ... Just voting is the important thing! Little Theatre announces next production By Sandra Bernstein Tryouts for Blithe Spirit, Guantanamo Bay Little Theatre's next production, will be held today through Wednesday from 7-9 p.m. at Morin Center. The play is an hilarious farce by Noel Coward and features a cast of five women and two men. When Charles Condomine decides to hold a seance for the purpose of getting some "tricks of the trade" for his new book, little does he realize that he is indeed stirring up some high spirits -his first wife, who "passed over" seven years previously. The resulting complications involving himself, his first wife and his present wife provide some of the funniest scenes in theatrical history. The acting roles include Charles, a wry, bookish, confused, wifedominated man of 35-50; his first wife, Elvira, a high-spirited, attractive, willful, and capricious young woman of 20-35; his present wife, Ruth, a smart-looking, practical, somewhat dominating woman of 35-45; Madame Arcati, a strikingly bizarre, energetic medium aged 4565; Dr. and Mrs. Bradman, two perfectly normal middle-aged neighbors, and the mousey maid, Edith, who performs her duties at a slow gallop. The tryouts are open to any base resident, and prospective actors may come to any or all of the tryout times. Rehearsals will take place three evenings a week, Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday. The play is scheduled to be performed the end of October. Many, many people are still needed for backstage work, such as lights, properties, sets, sound, etc. No experience is necessary. Interested people are urged to contact the director, Sandra Bernstdin, at 99152 AWH for more information or come to one of the tryout evenings. WATER STATUS YESTERDAY'S FIGURES AVERAGE CONSUMPTION 1,200,000 ACTUAL CONSUMPTION 1,259,000 TOTAL IN STORAGE: 17,556,000 ...~MS 5Y Capt. John H. McConnell Capt. David W. DeCook Naal Base av.al Station Commander Comanding Officer LCdr. MichaelCherry.Public Affairs Officer JO2 J. Arthurt Riedo. Reporter JO3 Benny Smith.Reporter S N Clayton Scott .Repor'ter e'e .Ca t pblised according to the rles ad regulations for sh ip and station newspapers as outlined in NA XOS P-3 and under h of theV naval Base publiceaffas officer. Pod five times weekly at gaenment expense on gove.ent equipment, te opinion that appear herein are not to be construed as officil -,or as reflecting teveso : thaDpartment of -!ha Navy. Guantanamo Gazette Page 2 f FE JUS. NAVAL BASE GUANTANAMO BAY, CUad

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Bill Griffin ends 30 year career in Gitmo Bv J02 J. Arthur Riccio Guantanamo Bay residents will soon missing a piece of the rock with he departure of Bill Griffin. On Aug. 29 Griffin turns the magical age of 55 tor government service emoloyes. He can retire after working 30 years, 30 years that is, of workin in Gitmo. There is more to the story of Bill Griffin than just retirement, there is history. The witnessing of the Guantanamo Naval Base change in size both in buildings and population, from 250 people in 1936 to more than 6,000 people today. From the Sunday drives to Caimanera and Boqueron and the meeting of Cuban friends, that didn't work on the base, to the securing of the water in 1964 and the erection on the fence line forcing the separation of American and Cuban friends. Bill Griffin's "in country" life started on Christmas Day, 1935, when he and his mother left San Diego on the transport ship USS Ghaumont to join his father, who was working as a chief boatswain s mate in Gitmo. Bill was in the eighth grade at this time and while in Gitmo, completed his high school years. He graduated in May 1940 first in his class, after all, he was the only senior. .That same month, Bill left and nt back to the States for prep school and returned to Gitmo during the summer of '41 for summer employment. His job was building the present day Defense Housing units in Villamar which, ironically are now being replaced. g g The summer over, Bill once again left the rock to return to school and later join the Army. After his Army hitch of three years, one month and seven days, ".but who's.counting?", he again returned to Gitmo in April 1946 to show off his child bride, the former Emily Westcott. Bill says he felt like "the man who came to dinner" about staying in Gitmo because ".it was not my intention to make a life out of it. Although I didn't have anything definite in mind. I had just left the Army and was touching 25 years old." Bill figured the decision to go back to school or to work had to be made. It was during this Gitmo vaction when Bill visited his father at the transit shed and the Supply officer offered him a job. The 8th of May, 1946, is when it all started. As Bill said, "The day I leave, I will have been working here for 30 years, three months and 23 days. but who's counting?" Bill's plans call for an active retirement life, he and Emily plan to landscape the grounds around their new home in Florida and travel around the States visiting their four daughters and families. Golf will also play a big role in the Griffin's retirement years. Their house is surrounded by three golf courses and with a handicap of eight "off the mat", who can pass that up? Bill and Emily Griffin leave Guantanamo for good tomorrow, no doubt, with tears in their eyes. The friends they leave behind will be in the memories they hold close to their hearts. Thirty years is not only a long time, but a life. The Griffins' are a --piece of the rock! Adios amigos.vaya con dios. Guerrillas accept Arab League plan BEIRUT, Lebanon (AP)-A top Palestinian leader said yesterday the guerrillas accept an Arab League plan for withdrawal of both Christian and Palestinian forces from the mountain front east of Beirut that threatens to become the next major battle of the Lebanese War. Artillery exchanges continued in the mountains around Christian towns. There was also fighting along the line dividing Beirut, mostly hit-and-run raids and mortar shelling by both sides. Hospital officials estimated more than 110 persons were killed in 24 hours. "Withdrawal from the mountain areas must be mutually balanced," Salah Khalaf said in an interview. He is second to Yasir Arafat in the Palestine Liberation Organization, where he is known as Abu Iyyad. *It must involve not only estinian forces, but Syrians, Lebanese rightists and leftists as well," he said. The Christian leadership has refused the mutual pullback suggested by Arab League mediator Hassan Sabri Kholi. The Christians demand a one-sided Palestinian withdrawal, contending the mountain area 18 miles east of Beirut traditionally has been Christian and should remain so. The Palestinians, aided by leftist Moslem forces, have been engaged in sporadic artillery exchanges with Christian militias in the mountains since Aug. 12, when the Palestinian refugee camp of Tai Zaatar tell to Christian attackers. Neither side has scored territorial gains but Christians have vowed a massive attack unless the Palestinians pull out. Kholi left for Damascus yesterday to discuss his peace plan, the fourth in five months, with Syrian leaders. The Syrian attitude is crucial because if Syria withdraws even some of its troops from Lebanon the Christians would face a long and bloody battle in the mountains. Leftist spokesmen have accused the Christian side of stalling to gain time until Pres.-elect Elias Sarkis visits Damascus next week and obtains fresh assurances of support from Syrian Pres. Hafez Assad. More than 13,000 Syrian troops in Lebanon have been actively backing the Christian side in the fighting, which began 17 months ago as a civil war between Lebanese Christians and Moslems. The Palestinians joined the leftist Moslems to protect the guerrillas' bases in Lebanon, the last Arab country from which the Palestinians can operate freely against Israel. The Christians want to restrict and disarm the Palestinian guerrillas in Lebanon. Syria joined in on the Christian side because Assad does not want Lebanon controlled by radicals who could drag him into another Mideast War. Three Americans killed in guerrilla ambush TEHRAN, Iran (AP)--Police pressed the search for six gunmen yesterday as Iranian neighbors made condolence visits to the widows and children of three Californians killed in an urban guerrilla ambush. Iranian authorities said five gunmen and a driver jumped over a wall into a waiting car after killing the three Americans in less than a minute Saturday with a barrage of machine-gun fire. The government said another car the terrorists had used to ambush the Americans was left at the scene in a Tehran suburb. Officials said the car contained papers proving the killers belonged to the same Islamic Marxist group blamed for the assassination of three U.S. military officers since 1973. Saturday's victims were senior employes of Rockwell International Corp., a major military contractor, assigned to a secret electronic. project for the Iranian Air Force, according to official details released yesterday by Iranian officials. NBC News said they were installing a half-billion-dollar intelligence-gathering system. Autonetics Groups, a Rockwell division in Anaheim, Calif., identified the dead as William C. Cottrell Jr. of Los Gatos; Robert R. Krongard of Sunnyvale; and Donald G. Smith of Yorba Linda. All three were 43 years old and lived with their families in Iran. Cottrell had two children and Krongard three. Persian neighbors visited the bereaved widows in accordance with local custom. Other visitors included John Wilson, a former U.S. Embassy military attache who now heads the local Rockwell office. Barring photographers and newsmen from the homes, authorities said the widows were in a state of shock. In previous killings here, U.S. Army LtCol. Lewis Hopkins was slain in 1973 and Air Force LtCols. Paul R. Schaffer and Jack R. Turner in May 1975. RETIREMENT: Above: Bill Griffin works on some last minute paperwork before his retirement, after 30 years in Gitmo, as director, receipt-control/expediting branch, Supply Department. Below right: Griffin ponders retirement and leaving Gitmo. Below left: A specially made Gitmo plaque was presented to Bill and Emily Griffin at a special luncheon last Friday. Cleaver faces trial in California WASHINGTON (AP)--Eldridge Cleaver, former information minister of the Black Panthers, said yesterday, "If it's the will of the Lord that I go to prison, I'll go to prison." Cleaver, appearing on NBC-TV's "Meet the Press," attributed his resigned attitude to his conversion to Christianity. "I'll do whatever work the Lord brings to me," he added, whether it is writing, lecturing or criticizing politicians, although he said he had no political ambitions of his own. Cleaver, who faces trial in Oakland, Calif., on charges stemming from a shoot-out with police, said, "I think I will get a fair day in court and I'll be vindicated." Black Panther Bobby Sutton was killed in the April 6, 1968 shooting. Cleaver and two police officers were wounded. Cleaver jumped bail and fled the country, returning only last November after seven years abroad. As he has been doing lately, he expressed disillusionment with ELDRIDGE CLEAVER Algeria, Cuba and other "dictatorial" Third World countries he stayed in or previously extolled. "My conclusion is that it leaves a lot to be desired," he said yesterday. The Black Panthers' activities, especially their "excessive" language, "scared a lot of people," Cleaver said. Now he says "There has been a slow evolution with a wider and wider range of freedom" since the days of the Emancipation Proclamation. Turkey and Greece hope to negotiate soon ANKARA, Turkey (AP) -Turkey and Greece will soon decide when and where to begin negotiations for a political solution to their mutual problems, Turkish Foreign Minister Ihsan Sabri Caglayangil said yesterday. In an exclusive interview with the Turkish daily "Tercuman," Caglayangil said Turco-Greek disputes, including claims over the Aegean continental shelf and the Cyprus question, should be taken up one at a time in such negotiations, but that the talks should eventually cover all points of conflict. "It would be best to take up the Aegean issue first since it is more urgent in nature," the foreign minister said. The Aegean continental shelf dispute intensified when Turkey dispatched a seismic research vessel last month to contested waters of the Aegean. Direct negotiations between the two NATO-member countries were recommended by a United Nations Security Council resolution last week after Greece brought the case there in the hope of securing withdrawal of the Turkish ship from the Aegean. Caglayangil said "Greece has failed to acheive any of the objectives it expected from taking the case to the Security Council." He pointed out the Security Council did not charge Turkey with endangering peace and security in the area as claimed by Greece and did not order Turkey to halt its research activities in the Aegean. Toastmasters conducting membership drive The Gitmo Toastmasters are conducting there annual membership drive. If you are interested, now is the time to find out what toastmastering is all about. The next meeting will be at the Nautical Lantern, formerly the Marine Family Restaurant, Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. It will be a visitors meeting and everybody is invited to attend. You don't have to join and you don't need a sponsor. For further information contact Pat Brooksbank at 85335. Guantanamo Gazette Monday, August 30, 1976 Page 3 oor, -,mom

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Guantanamo Gazette Nebraska pre-season choice (AP)--ThLe Nebraska Cornhuskers Ire the pre-season choice to dethrone defending champion Oklahoma and prevent the Sooners from winning an unprecedented third consecutive National College Football title. In a nationwide Associated Press poll of 59 sports writers and broadcasters, nine different teams earned at least one vote for the number-one spot. Nebraska, which finished ninth a year ago, received 25 first-place ballots and 961 of a possible 1,180 points. Nebraska coach Tor Osborne says he has mixed feelings about the number-one ranking. He says "it's nice that people feel we're a good team and, hopefully, where there's that kind of confidence there might be some reason for optimism. But on the other hand, he says, "a number-ce ranking leads to great expectations," and he adds, "I hope we're as good as people think we are." The following is the top 20 teams in the Associated Press pre-seascn college football poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, season record for 1975 and total points. Points bases on 20-19-18-17-16-15-14-13-12-11-109-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. Nebraska (25) Michigan (10) Arizona State (7) Ohio State (3) Oklahoma (6) Alabama (3) Texas (3) Southern Cal (2) Pitt (1) Penn State Notre Dame Maryland Arkansas Texas A&M California Georgia UCLA Florida Kansas Miami of Ohio 10-2-0 8-2-2 12-0-0 11-1-0 10-1-0 11-1-0 10-2-0 8-4-0 8-4-0 9-3-0 8-3-0 9-2-1 10-2-0 10-2-0 8-3-0 9-3-0 9-2-1 9-3-0 7-5-0 11-1-0 961 918 780 749 683 624 610 517 416 348 319 211 193 136 121 108 101 102 37 32 Other receiving vctes in the pre-season poll, listed alphabetically: Air Force, Arizona, Baylor, Boston College, Colorado, East Carolina, Georgia Tech, Louisiana State, Michigan State, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma State, Stanford, Tennessee, Texas Tech, Tulsa. BASEBALL SCORCES FROM YESTERDAY NATIONAL LEAGUE Cincinnati 6, Philadelphia 5 (15 innings) Los Angelos 2, New York Mets 1 Pittsburgh 3, San Francisco 2, (11 innings) Chicago Cubs 3, Atlanta 2 Houston 6, St. Louis 0 Montreal 3, San Diego 0 AMERICAN LEAGUE Boston 15, Kansas City 6 California 5, New York Yankees 4 (11 innings) Texas 11, Baltimore 0 Cleveland 7,Minnesota 4 Chicago White Sox 2, Milwaukee 0 Oakland 2, Detroit 1 (12 innings) EXIBITION FOOTBALL SCORES FROM YESTERDAY Oakland 14, San Francisco 9 Seattle 17, San Diego 16 Arizona State and Brigham Young favored Editor's note: The following is the third in a series, sizing up college football. (UPI)--Two of the most balanced college football offenses in the nation sit on the foothills of the Rocky Mountains, at Tempe, Ariz., and Provo, Utah. Both Arizona State and Brigham Young hope their strong running and passing games will give the defenses time to mature before the showdown for the Western Athletic Conference title the last weekend in October. Arizona State coach Frank Kush has already made one major decisic naming junior Dennis Sproul as hiE starting quarterback. Kush picked Sproul because he's a better runner than his other signalcaller. Sproul shared time with junior Fred Mortenser last season. The tw passed for a combined 1,953 yards and 12 touchdowns. But it was Sprc who led the Sun Devils to a 17-to14 Fiesta Bowl victory over Nebraska and a number two rating nationally. Happily for Sproul and Kush the top receiver, split end John Jefferson, returns along with senior fullback "fast" Freddie Williams. All ads will be run one time only You must submit your ad each time you want it printed. Ads may be submitted by calling before 4 p.m. or by dropping it in one of the drop boxes. Ads which discriminate on the basis of race, sex, creed, color or national origin will not bt accepted. The staff reserves the right to re-write any ad it deems necessary. for sale '47 Chevy panel truck, good condition. Call 95558 AWH. '73 SL-100 Honda, needs minor repair work, price negotiable. Contact Baer at GRB, "A" Complex, room M-216. Two VW, '(3 sunroof, '61 Karmann Ghia, excellent condition, best offer. Call 85785 DWH or 951134 AWH. '67 Chevy 6 cylinder engine, A/T, five good tires, reworked starter, very reliable. Can be seen at Trailer Park #14 or call 90275 AWH. Williams is ranked ninth in the nation in rushing. He gained 1,300 yards and scored nine touchdowns. Jefferson was 21st in reception. Kush knows he will need experience on offense if the Sun Devils are to keep alive their 13-game winning streak, longest current string among the nation's major college teams. Kush says, "We play UCLA in our first game, so it won't take us long to find out where we stand." The feeling is that the best quarterback in the Rockies is Brigham Young junior Giff Nielsen. The six-five basketball guardturned-quarterback didn't get into action until late in the fourth game trailing New Mexico 14-0. In the final 20 minutes, Nielsen passed for two touchdowns and set up a game-winning field goal with three more completions. During the season, he completed 61 per cent of his tosses for nearly 1,500 yards and 10 touchdowns. Senior tailback Jeff Blanc had only a so-so season, missing 1,000 yards rushing by just 16-yards because of injuries. He also caught 15 passes for 156 yards and scored 11 touchdowns. Honda CL-450, price negotiable. Call Mark at 85183 DWH. Avocado electric range, $120, and white GE washing machine, used, $35. Call 951265 AT. wanted Will buy wooden fence in good condition. Call 85600 DWH or 97214 AWH ask for Phil Doiron. Woman to babysit in my home fi. days per week for two children Call 95558 AWH. A janitor is needed to -vork part time at the Day Care Center. Interested persons can apply either at tha center or by calling 95405 AT. services Will babysit in my home for school children. Call 952205 AT. Troy-Bilt roto tiller for hire, gardens, flower beds, etc. Call 95498 AWH. Only BYU is given a chance of preventing the Sun Devils from winning a seventh league title in eight years. Arizona State should have the power to bull its way through the rest of the WAC and non-conference opponents. Arizona must be rated a close third in the WAC and the Rockies. The Wildcats have the best kicker in the area in Lee Pistor, who booted 35 conversions and 15 field goals last season. But Arizona has lost most of its starting offensive backfield and may not have the scoring punch to stay with the others. Utah has a top returning quarterback in junior Pat Degan, who passed 1,600 yards, ranking seventh nationally. But Degan was pressured into 21 intercertions and Utah's offensive line doesn't look any better. The Utes will have trouble pushing out Colorado State or New Vexico for fourth spot in the conference. Wyoming and Texas-El Paso will battle to stay out of the league basement. Utha State and Air Force, both unknown quantities, look like the best independents. And Boise State with 2,000 yard passer Greg Stern, should dominate the division-two teams again. Sports in brief WASHINGTON (AP)--The Washington Redskins acquired center-tackle Dave Thompson from the Tampa Bay Buccaneers yesterday in exchange for a 1977 draft choice. Thompson, a six-year veteran who was a second round selection for Detroit in 1971, probably will be used immediately as the snapper on punts. He'll replace Pete Solverson, Washington's only other center on punts, who suffered a knee injury Saturday night in the Redskin's 38-7 victory over the New York Jets. KANSAS CITY (AP)--Defensive back Kerry Reardon has announced plans to come out of retirement and play for the Kanses City Chiefs. Reardon, who missed the final six games of last season with a pulled hamstring, retired in July of this year to devote his attention to his insurance business. DENVER (UPI)--Veteran golfer Sandra Palmer captured the National Jewish Open at Denver by two shots yesterday. Palmer, who collected $7,000 for her second 1976 title, had five birdies in a row and then sank a 20-footer on the final hole to finish with a 67 for and a threeday total of 206. Monday August 30, 1976 Federation Cup won for U.S. again PHILADELPHIA (AP)--Rosemary Casals and Billie Jean King scored a 7 5, 6-3 doubles victory over Australia's Evonne Goolagong and Mrs. Kerry Melville Reid yesterday, giving the United States the Federation Cup for the first time since 1969. Mrs. Reid beat Miss Casals 1-6, 6-3, 7-5 and in the singles matches to set the stage for the doubles. In the deciding doubles match, the Americans took the opening set when Mrs. Reid ran off court to retrieve a shot and backhanded it into the net. The Americans broke Mrs. Reid's service again in the second set to take a 5-to-3 lead. With Miss Casals serving in the final game, the Americans conceded only one point before winning the match. The American team, five time winners of the event, won the $40,000 first prize. The Australians, who have won the cup seven times, collected $20,000 dollars. Solomon wins Pro Tennis Championship in Boston BROOKLINE, Mass. (AP)--Harold Solomon beat Raul Ramirez, 4-6, 6-2, 6-2, 7-5, last night to reach the finals of the $125,000 U.S. Pro Tennis Championships outside Boston. In beating Ramirez for the third time without a loss this year, Solomon exploited the Mexican's erratic backhand and poor serving during the two hour, 37-minte contest. Solomon, a 24-year-old from the Maryland surburbs of Washington, will meet defending champion Bjorn Borg in tonight's final. Borg, seeking his third straight U.S. pro title, drubbed Eddie Dibbs, 7-6, 6-2, 6-1, earlier yesterday. Borg had trouble at the outset of his match with Dibbs, the 25year-old former University of Miami star seeded seventh here. However, the 20-year-old Swede apparently was just warming up. He took command while outscoring Dibbs 7-1 in the tie-breaker of the first set. Then he jumped to a 3-0 lead in the second set before a thunderstorm inundated Longwrod's clay center court, interrupting the match for one hour and LO minutes. Graham to play in World Series of Golf AKRON, Ohio (AP)--David Graham cautiously negotiated the twin hazards of a chilly wind and 53 acres of water in three-under-par 69 and scored a convincing, fourstroke victory yesterday in the storm-delayed American Golf Classic. The globe-trotting Australian, who walks the world's fairways with a peculiarly stiff, almost military stride, scored his second victory of the season and won his way into next week rich World Series of Golf with a 274 total. That put Graham, who has won titles on four continents, writes a column for a golf magazine and is a master club maker, a distant 14 under par on the north course at the Firestone Country Club, a 7,105-yard layout that meanders over and around the lakes and streams that make up the Tuscarawas Reservoir. It was that water, which served as aLsoggy grave for any would-be challengers and Graham's careful avoidance of trouble that were the keys to his victory. Lou Graham, former U.S. Open champion and no relation to David, made the only major challenge with birdies on the 16th and 17th to close to within three shots. But Lou, playing three holes in front of David, lashed his second shot into the water on the 18th and had to sink a 12-foot putt to save par five. iii ol Kft