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Guantanamo Gazette

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Title:
Guantanamo Gazette
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U.S. Naval Base
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Publisher:
U.S. Naval Base
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Language:
English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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University of Florida
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Copyright,Guantanamo Gazette. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Gitmo Gazette
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Daily Gazette
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Guantanamo Gazette
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Guantanamo Daily Gazette
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Guantanamo Bay Gazette
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Indian
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Sunday Supplement
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Tide, Sun" Tmp. Weaher Forecast

Partly to mostly
hc LtA2.5 pm a t A cloudy. Isolated


SW ---- :26pm 121 nosUa
et----:28pmconditions 1-3
Lw------73 1The Navy6oq 40e-ase d a feet
Vol. 31 No. 91 U S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Wednesday, May 12, 1976







Primaries indicate long struggle still ahead


(UPI)--President Ford won one from Virginia. Humphrey got seven per cent~ of the Ronald Reagan, but lost in Nebraska. Ford'collected a solid 56 per vote. Kennedy got four per cent. Democratic front-runner Jimmy cent of the vote to win in West Reagana and Ford have now split Carter lost to Senator Frank Church Virginia. He went to bed before the one dozen primaries they have in Nebraska, but won by a slim learning tha.t Reagan beat him faced each other in. But Reagan margin in Connecticut. by a margin of 53 per cent to 47 continues to lead in the delegate There were no clean sweeps on per centin Nebraska. There was count. He has 423-to-334 for the either side in yesterday's round no Republican primary in Connect- President. It takes 1,130 delegate of presidential primaries. icut. votes to win the Republican nomPesident Ford beat Ronald Nebraska was Idaho Senator Frank ination. President Ford Reagan in West Virginia to end the Church's first primary, and four former California governor's winning weeks of campaigning produced a Carter has now won 12 of 15 priat four. But Reagan turned narrow victory for him. He got maries and has more than twice as BITER PTT---Nbraska had t b a
aund and beat Ford in Nebraska 39 p -er. cent of the vote to 37 per many national convention delegates bitt ER fo-ersk t h adet be a
ell ahead of him in thea, cent for Carter. as any of challengers. Carter has bitt. mrilfort hea rf e eg n t. t national convention The Nebraska ballot had the 598 delegates. Chrc n erask--by the thinnest were far behind Church and Carter. place finish in Connecticut. Nebraska.
of maginsin bth' cases.
Despit hi lde toenter
eer piay, Catrws not' on
th alo i es iriARMED FORCES WEEK '78
proaby ecas stt aw requires
that... cv t deeat :be unpegen materhw the presiden-HOR A MIC


Favrit sn Snatr obert
Byrd allacerby aeorge Wallace by a On August 4, 1790, Congress passmarginonietoe in West ed 'and George Washington signed a bill authorizing th~e construction
of "ten boats" to guard the coastline against smugglers. Since the
U.S. Navy didn't come into existence until 1798, theCoast Guard
It served as~the nation's only navy f 25 eight years. A'
In the beginning, the Coast
Guard was known as the Revenue


Marine and later the Revenue



W ord ew D ge tGuttr ;S ervice.n 1915 it woas .:.
4o'The CoastoGuard has a fleet of
250"ships, 160 aircraft and more
-CWsGemany (UPI)--GermnA than 2,000 small craft. Approxi4W c a' obepoded inthe mately 37,000 military and 6,000 a S. miliary civilian personnel' serve in seaA a F e e est- going, aviation and shoreside
ion in M last night, tearing assignments.
th le of h aeed' ber, Search and rescue is the Coast
Thstaio said his target. appar Guard'sbest known mission. The
qnl-a h adio buldings P- <''''Coast' Guard responded to 70,000 Sa tearnorlgsath calls for assistance and saved ,osiblt te atac onth stat- 4,200 persons from death last"yar
ionwsconnecedtoprote over Over 140,600otfe pe r yo w ear.' the eathof n uran uerrllahelped ,and $280 million worth of found property was saved.
Missions of 'the Coast Guard in0ON WG UPI)--Afen> talks with clude life saving, icebreaking, VWendunion officalsin law enforcement, aids to navigation,
Muih h resident of the United marine environmental protection, Ato Workr says the company has port safety, recreation boating
rue u oubus, Ohio as the site safety, marine law enforcement and
prp pant. Leonard commercial vessel safety.
Wodock says he'was told the price Vessels and aircraft patrol the 0' th pln 'a to0 hgh. coasts of Alaska,~ the Pacific Northwest and New England. They mainOG KG new Chinese tain surveillance of foreign, fishhe Soviet Union has ing activities and have a role in
ee.n ryn ot "infiltratilon and the conservation of ocean resources.
epnin insoutheast Asia since AMany foreign nations are requesting
U.S. r e fromIndochina. infomation about the U.S. Coast
a ba n Peking the premier Guard. Foreign countries are askstonl cnnedi w1ht he called ing about what and how missions are te Kelns"cheming activities." <> performed, about equipment, vessels,
--P'rs~fet "poe ' training and',organization.' The sindabilyseda testrctur- in 1975, >md through the U.S.
Departnent of Defense, to' c "onduct
adrsoigispoe to release surveys in Iran, Jordan, Saudi
up Ao $3. milio ingvrmn Arabia and the Barbados.
fus f mon The Coast Guard in Gitmo has
p c billets for three officers and






























;ay,


will severe


next Thursing and ev i fered, with*'
6 students formation or elley Grizz-







Wednesday, May 12, 1976 Guaentanamo Gazette Page 3






























Children in grades three to six yesterday had the chance to see their parents at work. Top left: Carla Bascara and her friend Sharon Walters, both sixth graders, learned about money from Master Chief B:ascara at disbursing. Bottom left: Sixth grader Carol Carson learned about a dictating machine from her mother Joyce Carson. Top center: Master Chief Gill and daughter Lisa, fourth grade, discussed administration of the hospital. Top right: Third grader Ashley Hooper helped her mother Sheila Hooper with the filing at the hospital,



.....Children .on the Job"





Youngsters visit parents at work


Jonan ~ea MeiterananThird through sixth graders of USS John King.
the W.T. Sampson Elementary School Some of the students found their~ K yesterday had' chance to see and dad's work interesting, while other ~'get involved with their parents' students, as in the case, of Carol Strong earthquake reported in Greece work. N~ot all: the students got 'Carson, found her mother's wr the opportunity to visit with more exciting. Carol is in the their dad or mom, since some of sixth grade. Mrs. Carson works at the jobs turned out to be too the Naval Hospital. ZAKINTHOS, Greece (AP)--A strong where there were no reports of sensitive, too dangerous or
earthqke struck last night off casualties or damage. impossible, as in the case of the HMCM Donald Gill was visited by this isand inr the Ionian Sea, and Buildings shoo throughout the dads at Fleet Training Group who his daughter Lisa of the fourth police reported thousands of people Ionian islands the Coast . oftha nsra:eapct O . Authorities said the tremor was Zakinthos police advised residents poens, thtayad'h oshe adishetraived aoetho "the afermath' of the quake that to remain in the open during the Guard came to the rescue. RMCM running a hospital, but so far deastated -otheastern Ita&ly last night in case of other tremors. 'Grall and RHMC Ross, among others, we haven't dazzled her." Lisa 41 rsynigh, leaving nearly Police and army rescue teams escorted these children to such nevertheless kept herself busy a thousand persons dead. were placed on alert. places as the transmitter site, learning something of her dad.'s Tbe dare MetorcagiualSerwre The Ionian quake registered W6.25I receiver site, ComNavBase briefing job while helping him file papers saidno daethe open-endedRichter scale, room and the visiting destroyer in the cirulonr file. ported frm yesterday's tremor. compared with 6.9 for the quake m eported the quakes epicenter last Thursday in~ Italy. in the Ion ianki Sea betweenuGreece Western Greece is an earthquakea d about 240 miles prope zu undreds of persons
w o hens were killed insa quake there in Discrimination still evident in unions
Italian officials reported the 1956.
quake jolted st southern Italian Last December a tremor left about city of "Tarato and rattled tal 2,000 homeless and 'many are' still WASHINGTON (AP)--Government efforts referral unions, such as those in buidings as far north as Nap'les, living 'in temporary shelters. to wipe out alleged racial and sex the construction and trucking discrimination in the nation's industries that refer workers building trades and trucking unions directly to employers through such are ineffective, the U.S. Civil means as hirin ihalls. Rights Commission said yesterday.
Shooting speee results in three deaths Despite numerous federal 1, court decisions and go e n General George Brown, programs, these unions "continue i to restrict the employment oppor- chairman ies, KNO E, Tenn. A.)--. man took surrendered to him within minutes. tunities of minorities and women,"
a rle from a bo"x and began fir- No charges were filed immediately. the commission said. It called s eas rpeaksd armeds ing at ra m into lunchtime "I was walking beat across Gay for stricter enforcement measures. f f crowd on te city's min" business Street and heard the shots," street yetray. Three persons Lewi's said.' "There were five or In a 291'-p'age report, the commis- "This year, in the time' traditionwere kild rid two otes were six' of' them. I ran across' the sion made'15 recommendations for ally' set aside1:for Americans to wounded befoe the gunman srrend-, street 'and the man surrendered to strengthening federal employment 'honor the men and women of our eeatoiissi.me." " opportunity programs. Most dealt ' armed forces, we of 'the armed'forces
"hman wa ust standing there The deadicludedtwo women and~ with the Off ice of Federal Contract reverse this practice of 26 years turning around wth the gun," she' a man, police said. The dead were Compliance Programs, a Labor Depart- 'and salute America. sad "I~t sounded "like a bomb not identified. ''merit agency which polices 'the It is fitting and proper that we was going of f. Weyan back in a Mrs. Van'dergriff, who was 'nicked employment practices of the more hnrAeiai hs20hanvr str.Everybd wa screamingg" on the rgtleg by a 30-30 'rifle' ta 0,0 opne on sary of its'birthday--a country so s-aid Mrs. Rosco Vandergriff~, onie bullet, said she was with her government business.' "dedicated to the defense and 'of the inured. Husband when the shooting began. preservation of the basic rights of
Parla Jaes Lewis >said the Mrs. Vazidergriff was treated 'fo'r " 'The report noted that the' agency's the individual that it commands the gun'an, ient







P1age 4 Guantanamo Gazette-, Wednesday, May 12, 1976








by'



Mike Grogan

If whenever she picked up a wedge
ALouise Herrin could have forgotten
Wy what it feels like to shank the J ball....
If Ann Hicks could have forgotten
about the second nine holes ...If the; wind~ and bugs could have
'forgotten this is G.......
If my aunt had wheels she'd be
a teacart.
All in all, nothing really
unexpected happened in the Ladies'
A, Glf Campinship thtwent onl
from Tuesday through, Thursday
last Those who fared well in ast week's Ladies Golf Championship are from has taken ownership of the tourney left to right: Shirley Kania, Eleanor Murray, Connie Schwrtz, Elaine much as Nicklaus has the Masters. M~cConnell (four- time It was another disappointment Ann averaged 7 1/3 more strokes for Louise, who seems to make a per day on the backside than she habit of coming in'second. But, .. did on the front. .. b what made it even more frustrating There were side tournaments that, F for her was the fact that nobody went along with the main event.
in the tournament shot particular- Connie Schwirtz came in best among ly good golf. Sure, the winds the 9-hole players and Shirley were heavy and the gnats happened Kania was the 9-hole, low-net be run i18,000 Whirlpool A/C, $100; to choose that week to be in full champ. Val Karcher actually shot only. Yu t submit your ad each 12,000 BTU Fedders A/C, $75; force to drive the golfers the best golf over the three days
it to be printed. Ads 10000 B A/C $75 dingy, but it was the best oppor- of 18-hole competition--according
ma esbitdby 'calling 951144 All ini good condition. Call 'tunity Louise had had to dethrone to her handicap, anyway. She
orbydopi h i criminte 95406 AT. Elaine, who colo wo atinal rign wil nt neotiale.Call95139. ctu lly plsing to the indomniall accepted.' table Mrs. Mc~onnell is no dis- SHORT PFUTTS: 'The men's scratch "'~ddr C grace. She is, far and away the tournament will be held on. the forsal FedrAC2,00BU 15 immon best lahdy golfer on base with a first two weekendsiJue Th
hide-a-bed $200; Early American 'handicap that the biggest percentage 72-hole tournament will be'flighted
4 den runabout, goodfor fish- Barco lounger recner, $100; GE of golfers of either sex would to give all players a shot at a
on sta; 95 de o clothes ddKenmore wash- like to have; Se also holds the trophy. Sign up at the golf course
boar 17moel, '$350 or be'st offer. ing machine, $50, in good conditionn< course record for ladies, having ... .The first Men's Association
, or, 751 AWH. avaiable June 9, Kitchen Aid dish- put together an even par 72 in meeting was held last night. More
t rs~ ~~washer,~ $125, available June 10; 1974. This year Elaine once 'on that later... Guy "Killer" Teague
On-tid ntrstin1'X20 9 herpanel drapes, $38; gold again played well enough to win 'shot one of the best handicap
pontoo eoa ite an5 all safet drapes $3widtkh i sulatedn,8" despite the high scoring and came rounds ever seen on Gitmo. Saturday rnv'4nmdm e n n' al, -surape2 , $30; dar green inuated57 out 8 strokes ahead of Louise. 'morning he fired a 79, or a ne't 58 sqpe nt Levn 'Gamo 195108 AT.es '" '20 Cal 8572 It seemed possible that Ann ' with'his 21 handicap, the first time Hicks,whose games steadying, < 'he has broken 80. His greencard

197 PotiacGrand Prix' all elec 1967 Chevy Biscayne, 6 cyl., three but not quite there, 'could make 'will look .a bit different next<
titlt whe el, power steerin, speed manuial, new paint, valve job,' a respectable shoing; and she month... .And, don't forget the onin, tape, ti hitch, $1,700. ' W '"'


good wr *ngA1974 Suzuki TM 125', used very little, 'J m i a S A g s




1963 tolkswagen goJa torkieg firstll ecause of their own celebra'ondition, new buflea include, Co ons saidi t cmheduledfr Juy i26, the fChe 's. 27or or callray 9501 dIGTN aac A)-r ate te Cucn Revolution Cstred


Castro would most likely come in It was not clear why the May 24 197 Honda MR11 lsinor,? cycle, sre/tilegal $17,00. Call August to coincide with 'Jamaica' s date was rejected. bes o , f .Cl 5597 AWH. 85526 DW or928AH independence anniversary, a member A 'male "wh ~ ' ' ' of the ruiling Peoples' National f Crban ,mtrss, $10 playpen, A aewie unclipped, poode. Party (PNP) said. 0 OR
$1;wle,$;infant carrier, Answers to Marvy. Call 989.Security Minister Keble Munn told X ,, Jamaica's 'ouse recently five botte wrme, $1 vaorierJamaican, policemen traveled to Cuba ; wanted earlierr this year duriing the visit rotisse moto for g l $2; Person to mow law in Center 'Bargo Trd te..P
16l.bowln gl,b 10; fash, for May" ony'il a top 'ollr r rdaut compare Cuban and
attahmen fo Poari camya Jamaican security measures.
c~e e ~ Must 'furnish' own mwer and gas Prime' Minister Michael~ Manley



1" color 'V,$100; exhaust fan Lead inquantities of10 lbs. or thep $0tw-spe fan with stand, higher. Will pay 10 per pound.' island located' just off' the NATIONAL LEAGUJE
$5, brbath $15; exr Call 95325 DWH, or 97,264 AWM and southeast tip of Cuba. IPhiladelphia 9, San Diego 1 aie lou e aecner csk for Vance. Manley invited Castro to visit Atlanta 8, New York 7
f$5 tb ester, $25;, drapery -' 'an giea Jamaica during his trip to Cuba ,Chicago,4, �San Francisco 0


Baby5? chckns rabbit an guinea : "� ;': igsic Cal a'110 AT.7T2 last July. A tentative date for Cincinnati 6, Pittsburgh 0 pigs Cal 8367AT.Castro's visit had been placed for Los Angeles 4, St. Louis 0
rmoe 4ede sue Pi amp foand fc May'24, Jamaica's labor day. Houston 5, Montreal 3
s ek~er 50;l work Hours 8a~m. to 12' no, AEIALA
am C'd tpaes $150 4- , ,� y"'Cnatlr eb ~ ''Cleveland 4, 'Boston'3
Kansas City 6, Minnesota 3
cryse with a oum pa s ati~ 85187 Bal'timore 5, Milwaukee 2
14~~~i can ofrnhn 'cat-,qnodq with o4 -,, il ne-year- Texas 6A Chicag S





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PAGE 1

Tide, Sun, Temp. Weather Forecast 'liz Partly to mostly kh tde'9!22pm 10 0A. &A-AL cloudy. Isolated w btide 12:5lpm UUI.m showers. Wind SE Ae--626am i~ 12-13 Knots. Bay SL~fl4t--7:28pm4 conditions 1-3 LOW---73 The Nv' n sot-bazdedhg 85 feet Primaries indicate long struggle still ahead (UPI)--President Ford won one from Ronald Reagan, but lost in Nebraska. Democratic front-runner Jimmy Carter lost to Senator Frank Church in Nebraska, but won by a slim margin in Connecticut. There were no clean sweeps on either side in yesterday's round of presidential primaries. President Ford beat Ronald Reagan in West Virginia to end the former California governor's winning streak at four. But Reagan turned around and beat Ford in Nebraska stay well ahead of him in the for national convention agates. On the Democratic side, Jimmy Carter beat Morris Udall in Connecticut and lost to Frank Church in Nebraska--by the thinnest of margins in both cases. Despite his pledge to enter every primary, Carter was not on the ballot in West Virginia. probably because state law requires that convention delegates be unpledged no matter how the presidential preference or "beauty contest" balloting turns out. Favorite son Senator Robert Byrd clobbered George Wallace by a margin of nine to one in West World News Digest .UNICH, West Germany (UPI)--German ice say a bomb exploded in the parking lot of the U.S. military American Forces Network Radio station in Munich last night, tearing the leg off the alleged bomter. The station said his target apparently was the radio buildings. Police say they are not ruling out the possibility the attack on the station was connected to protests over the death of an urban guerrilla found hanged in her cell Sunday. BONN, W.G. (UPI)--After talks with VW executives and union officals in Munich, the president of the United Auto Workers says the company has ruled out Columbus, Ohio as the site of its proposed plant. Leonard Woodcock says he was told the price of the plant was too high. HONG KONG (UPI)--The new Chinese premier charges the Soviet Union has been carrying out "infiltration and expansion" in southeast Asia since the U.S. departure from Indochina. At a banquet in Peking the premier strongly condemned what he called the Kremlin's "scheming activities." WASHINGTON (AP)--President Ford signed a bill yesterday restructuring the Federal Election Commission and restoring its power to release up to $3.8 million in government funds for money-starved U.S. presidential candidates. Ford, who said he opposes some provisions of the bill, will be the chief beneficiary. He has a pending request for S1.4 million in matching funds before the commission. His Republican challenger, Ronald Reagan, has requested $6C3,000. Among other presidential contenders, Jimmy Carter is on the books for $520,000 and Morris Udall for $386,000. Virginia. Ford 'collected a solid 56 per cent of the vote to win in West Virginia. He went to bed before learning that Reagan beat him by a margin of 53 per cent to 47 per cent in Nebraska. There was no Republican primary in Connecticut. Nebraska was Idaho Senator Frank Church's first primary, and four weeks of campaigning produced a narrow victory for him. He got 39 per cent of the vote to 37 per cent for Carter. The Nebraska ballot had the names of 11 Democrats on it, among them Hubert Humphrey and Edward Kennedy.who finished third and fourth respectively. But, they were far behind Church and Carter. Humphrey got seven per cent of the vote. Kennedy got four per cent. Reagan and Ford have now split the one dozen primaries they have faced each other in. But Reagan continues to lead in the delegate count. He has 423-to-334 for the President. It takes 1,130 delegate votes to win the Republican nomination. Carter has now won 12 of 15 primaries and has more than twice as many national convention delegates as any of challengers. Carter has 598 delegates. Next is Udall with 205. That's just three ahead of now-withdrawn candidate Henry Jackson, whose hopes to revive his campaign vanished with his thirdplace finish in Connecticut. President Ford BITTER PILL--Nebraska had to be a bitter pill for the President. He was miles ahead of Reagan in two sets of newspaper polls conducted in the last week of April, and he went all out to try to erase the memory of last week's Indiana loss with a midwestern victory in Nebraska. ARMED FORCES WEEK'76 HONOR AMERICA On August 4, 1790, Congress passed and George Washington signed a bill authorizing the construction of "ten boats" to guard the coastline against smugglers. Since the U.S. Navy didn't come into existence until 1798, the Coast Guard served as the nation's only navy for eight years. In the beginning, the Coast Guard was known as the Revenue Marine and later the Revenue Cutter Service. In 1915 it was given its present name. The Coast-Guard has a fleet of 250 ships, 160 aircraft and more than 2,000 small craft. Approximately 37,000 military and 6,000 civilian personnel serve in seagoing, aviation and shoreside assignments. Search and rescue is the Coast Guard's best known mission. The Coast Guard responded to 70,000 calls for assistance and saved 4,200 persons from death last year. Over 140,000 other persons were helped and $280 million worth of property was saved. Missions of the Coast Guard include life saving, icebreaking, law enforcement, aids to navigation, marine environmental protection, port safety, recreation boating safety, marine law enforcement and commercial vessel safety. Vessels and aircraft patrol the coasts of Alaska, the Pacific Northwest and New England. They maintain surveillance of foreign fishing activities and have a role in the conservation of ocean resources. Many foreign nations are requesting Ninformation about the U.S. Coast Guard. Foreign countries are asking about what and how missions are performed, about equipment, vessels, training and organization. The Coast Guard responded to requests in 1975, made through the U.S. Department of Defense, to conduct surveys in Iran, Jordan, Saudi Arabia and the Barbados. The Coast Guard in Gitmo has billets for three officers and 16 enlisted men. Guantanamo's Coast Guardsmen are assigned to Fleet Training Group. Through 200 years of progress, the united States Coast Since 1954 the Coast Guard's Guard has remained dedicated to the high standards of mission in Citmo has been supplepreparedness needed to safeguard our country. In war menting the approximately 80 ship and peace, the Coast Guard is a vital link in the natriders at FTG. The Coast Guard work of defense that guarantees the security of ourtnaperforms the same training jobs as tion. Navy men on ships. They contribute to the total readiness of an effective wartime naval force.

PAGE 2

Guantanamo Gazette Community Bulletin Board MEETINGS TODAY OKINAWA KARATE AFFILIATION will practice from 6 to 8 p.m. at Marblehead Hall. For more information call 98258 AWH, BINGO will be played at the Staff NCO club beginning at 8 p.m. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet. For more information call 95454 DWH. TOMORROW GUNATANAMO BAY SELF DEFENSE CLUB will practice at the Child Day Care Center at 6 p.m. OKINAWA KARATE AFFILIATION will practice from 6 to 8 p.m. at Marblehead Hall. For more information call 98285 AWH. EXERCISE from 6 to 7 p.m. For more information call Leonard Gobert at 90126 AWN. BINGO will be played at the Windjammer beginning at 8 p.m. SPECIAL SERVICES MEETING There will be a meeting tomorrow in the Special Services Conference Lounge for anyone interested in participating in billiards. table tennis, checkers or dominoes. For further information call Special Services at 951160. FIL-AM CLUB The Fil-Am Club will have a pot, luck/polish the rock this Saturday. All members are encouraged to come and to lend a helping hand. HIGH SCHOOL MEETING W.T. Sampson High School will hold a meeting of all the parents of the present junior class students to explain procedures for senior year planning. Parents are encouraged to attend this important meeting to be held tomorrow in the bandroom adjacent to the chapel at the school, at 7 p.m. SPECIAL SERVICES TENNIS Special Services will host an inter-command tennis tournament this Saturday and Sunday beginning at 9 a.m. There will be singles and doubles matches with a double elimi-> nation in both sets to determine the winner. The final day for entry is tomorrow before 4 p.m. Schedules can be picked up Friday after 1 p.m. at the Special Services office. For more information call Special Services at 951160. U.S NAVAL BASE GUANTANAMO BAY, CUBA olazttt Cat Jiohn H. McConnell Capt. FrankiWakns ComanderComanding Officer Ldri. mchaelCherry.Public Affairs Officer J3 Bob Hitchcock.ditor A2 Bave Clarke.:. ::?ht'grah JOSA Clay WilliEs.Reporter Th GuntaamGazette is pblishedaccordinB oh :ul~ousax rguton for ship andsainn ppr a lined in NAo S P-35ad under the direction of the Naal Bae public affair. officer. Printed fiems, _5, ,,klyBt government epese o goernen equpmntth opinsor, SBUO,,, 5,s in -item that appear herein are notobecs sfficial or as reflecting the ews of CowavBase or the Department of the Navy. AVIATION BALL The annual Aviation Ball will be held at Leeward Point BOQ on Saturday, May 22 from 7 p.m. to midnight. All NAS and VC-10 officers and NayBase aviators and their guests are invited. The cost is $7.50 per person. For reservations call Lt. Alger at 64397 or 64398. REVLON MAKEUP AND SKIN ANALYSIS There will be complimentary makeup and skin analysis with free fragrance samples at the Navy Exchange tomorrow through Saturday. MARINE FAMILY RESTAURANT NOTE The Marine Family Restaurant will be closed. Thursday for lunch only. REVLON TENNIS TOURNAMENT A follies type tennis tournament will be held Saturday at 5:30 p.m. The sign-up sheet for the Revlon Tennis Tournament is outside of the Raquet Club, non-members of the club are eligible although there is an age restriction diue to the bar. There will be prizes, food, and a cash bar. For further information call Carol West at 95332 or Revlon rep-. resentive Marlene Laxon at 85578. CRAFT SALE This Saturday there will be a craft sale in front of the Navy Exchange. Proceeds are for the benefit of the Nursery School. Featured will be knitted and crocheted items, macrame, potted plants, stuffed toys, shell jewelry, T-shirts and much, much, more. Hours are from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. CHECK YOUR LIGHTS The base police remind all motorists that proper lighting equipment on your car is a necessary safety requirement. Several cars have been observed at night without adequate head and tail lights. The base police will be conducting safety checks to make certain all base vehicles have minimum safety equipment. ADVANCED SCUBA COURSE There will be an advanced open water scuba course starting Wednesday, May 19 at the EM pool. In order to sign up for this course, you must be an open water diver and have had 20 dives. To register or for more information, call 95325 or 97264 AWH. FLAVOR OF THE MONTH The commissary will feature a "flavor of the month" premium ice cream. The first flavor to be featured is premium mocha. PRACTICE BOMBING AND STRAFING Practice bombing and strafing will be conducted on the Hicacal target from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. today through Friday. For your safety, the Conde and Hicacal Beach areas between Saint Nicolas and Caracoles Points, and all of the upper bay north of Caracoles and Granadillo Points will be off limits. For further information contact the Special Services Marina, ComNavBase duty officer or base police, TREASURE AND TRIVIA SHOP SALE JCK AND JILL TOURNAMENT The Treasure and Trivia Shop will A Jack and Jill golf tournament t have a sale on men's clothing, This will be held this Sunday at the sale will begin next Tuesday and golf course beginning at 1 p.m. continue on Friday and will feature A cookout will follow the tour50 per-cent off on all men's items. nament. Sign up at golf pro shop. The hours for Treasure and Trivia are 8:30 to 11:30 am. Tuesdays and M-16 REQUALIFICATION CLASSES Fridays, All Navy personnel desiring to YARD SALES requalify with the M-16 rifle should call Chief Beelman at the There will be a yard sale at 13 Naval Station rifle range at 98105 Paola Pt. beginning at 9 am,, endClasses will be conducted on oning at noon this Saturday. Items day, ay 24; Tuesday, May 25;and featured are a Harley Davidson cyWednesday, 'ay 26 commencing at 8 cle, remote contol TV console, rea.m The course for qualification frigerator Ethan Allen table and will be fired on Wednesday, ay 26, bench, boy's bike, A/C, etc. for more information call 5347. NAS AIRCRAFT DISPLAY A teachers pre-pack-out yard sale The Naval Air Station will hold will be held Saturday from 9 a. w. to open house and place several airnoon at 318 Radio Point. Items feacraft on static display. Everyone tured are mirrors, hampers and is invited to visit the NAS main many imports all priced for quick hangar on Saturday from to 4 p.m. saleA Call 85539 forcfnore informsCROCHE CLQALIFICTO EINCLSE Aliayoesnnldsiigt A two-family yard sale will be RE L TE I held at 33368 and C Kittery Beac1, The Caribbean Arts and Crafts Saturday from 9a.m. to 2 P.M. Association announces a beginner's Assorted clothing, appliances, cercrochet class starting next Thurnamics, boat and auto parts, many day, May 20, Both morning and ev other household items. ning classes will beoffered, with,* registration limited to 6 students A yard sale will be held at 1206 per class. For more information or CB Saturday from 10 a 9m. to 2 P.M. to register, contact Shelley GrizzItems included are a canopy bed, ard at 98156 AT. Early American rug, curtains, baby carriage, misc, toys, books., REEF RAIDERS PICNIC and children's clothing. The Reef Raiders will hold a steak and dog picnic this Sunday at WindPO ADVISORY BOARD mill Beach. This is free to all members and their families, Call in There will be a meeting of the your reservations by Thursday to Dor CPO Advisory Board this Friday McGee at 951163, et at the beach beginning at 1 p.m. in the CPO Club. at 9 amm. for the dive and stay afterwards for a picnic. PHOTO CLUB MEETING There will be a meeting of the Photo Club this Friday at 7 p.m. in the Photo Hobby Shop located behind the Ceramic Shop. This will be the last meeting for charter membershippe toa For siote information call Bill Wiley at 99176 AWH. SHIP TO VISIT HAITI developing nations The USS Meredith will visit PortNAIROBI, Kenya (AP)--Japan called Au-Prince, Haiti this week-end. Inon oil producers and industrial terested personnel should submit apcountries yesterday to participate proved Recreation Travel Request in a $1-billion emergency relief (NAVBASE GTMO Form 4650/1(7-74)) to program for developing countries BPTO no later than 11 a.m. this Thurwith severe balance-of-payments sdaydeficits. Legislator Toshio Kimura, head of the Japanese delegation, also pledged his nation to give $50 million GITMO BAY MUSEUM TO OPEN SAT. to the International Fund for AgriThe Naval.Base Museum will be open cultural Development. this Saturday in honor of Armed ForKimura, former Japanese foreign ces Week from 12 to 3 p.m. minister received warm applause from delegates attending the fourth United Nations Conference on Trade and Development when he said The MIDWAY BOOTHS FOR 1TH OF JULY developed countries and the developing countries who are in a positThe Bicentennial is approaching. ion to do so should make even greAll organizations and clubs interter endeavors to complement the ested in having a booth on the midstrenuous efforts of developing way on our nation's 200th birthday countries facing balance of payments are asked to call Chief Gwaltney at difficulties." 85556. Japanese sources said Kimura was reerring to estimates that poor GITMO SWINGERS TO DANCE countries will face a foreign-exchange shortage of about $40 billThe Gitmo Swingers Square Dance ion in 1976, including $1 to $3 Club will hold its monthly meeting billion for which no financing apand will dance Saturday night at pears available. 7*30 in the club hall. Under the program proposed by Kimura the $1 billion fund would BLOOD SHORTAGE AT HOSPITAL be used to finance imports of developing countries on concessional The Naval Hospital Blood Bank is or grant terms. Foreign exchange currently experiencing a shortage thus saved could be used for agriof "B+" and "B-" blood, cultural development. Anyone having either of these two blood types and who wishes to donate blood is asked to contact the ABSENTEE Naval Hospital at 95444 and leave your name and phone number. MASONS MEETING There will be a special communcation at Caribbean Naval Lodge held in Masonic Apts. #800 at 7:30 p.m. today for the purpose of conducting work in the first degree. All Masons are cordially and fraternally invited to attend. Page 2 Wednesday, May 12, 1976

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Wednesday, May 12, 1976 Children in grades three to six yesterday had the chance to see their parents at work. Top left: Carla Bascara and her friend Sharon Walters, both sixth graders, learned about money from Master Chief Bascara at disbursing. Bottom left: Sixth grader Carol Carson learned about a dictating machine from her mother Joyce Carson. Top center: Master Chief Gill and daughter Lisa, fourth grade, discussed administration of the hospital. Top right: Third grader Ashley Hooper helped her mother Sheila Hooper with the filing at the hospital, "Children on the Job" Youngsters visit parents at work Ionian Sea -Mediterranean Strong earthquake reported in Greece ZAKINTHOS, Greece (AP)--A strong earthquake struck last night off this island in the Ionian Sea, and police reported thousands of people fled into the streets. Authorities said the tremor was 'the aftermath" of the quake that devastated northeastern Italy last Thursday night, leaving nearly a thousand persons dead. The Greek Meteorological Service said no damage or casualties were reported from yesterday's tremor. reported the quakes epicenter s in the Ionian Sea between Greece and Italy and about 240 miles west of Athens. Italian officials reported the quake jolted the southern Italian city of Taranto and rattled tall buildings as far north as Naples, where there were no reports of casualties or damage. Buildings shook throughout the Ionian islands and Peloponnesus, southern Greece. Zakinthos police advised residents to remain in the open during the night in case of other tremors. Police and army rescue teams were placed on alert. The Ionian quake registered 6.25 on the open-ended Richter scale, compared with 6.9 for the quake last Thursday in Italy. Western Greece is an earthquakeprone zone. Hundreds of persons were killed in a quake there in 1956. Last December a tremor left about 2,000 homeless and many are still living in temporary shelters. Shooting spree results in three deaths KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP)--A man took a rifle from a box and began firing at random into a lunchtime crowd on the city's main business street yesterday. Three persons were killed and two others were wounded before the gunman surrendered, authorities said. "The man was just standing there turning around with the gun," she said. "It sounded like a bomb was going off. We ran back in a store. Everybody was screaming," said Mrs. Rosco Vandergriff, one of the injured. Patrolman James Lewis said the gunman, identified by police as Robert Daniel Patty, 43, Knoxville, Red Cross. + The Good Neighbor. surrendered to him within minutes. No charges were filed immediately. "I was walking beat across Gay Street and heard the shots," Lewis said. "There were five or six of them. I ran across the street and the man surrendered to Third through sixth graders of the W.T. Sampson Elementary School yesterday had a chance to see and get involved with their parents' work. Not all the students got the opportunity to visit with their dad or mom, since some of the jobs turned out to be too sensitive, too dangerous or impossible, as in the case of the dads at Fleet Training Group who had to be at sea. For the children who couldn't be with their parents, the Navy and the Coast Guard came to the rescue. RMCM Grall and RMC Ross, among others, escorted these children to such places as the transmitter site, receiver site, ComNavBase briefing room and the visiting destroyer WASHINGTON (AP)--Government efforts to wipe out alleged racial and sex discrimination in the nation's building trades and trucking unions are ineffective, the U.S. Civil Rights Commission said yesterday. Despite numerous federal laws, court decisions and government programs, these unions "continue to restrict the employment opportunities of minorities and women," the commission said. It called for stricter enforcement measures. In a 291-page report, the commission made 15 recommendations for strengthening federal employment nnnt titv noarams. Most dealt me. "opruiyporm.MS el The dead included two women and with the Office of Federal Contract a man, police said. The dead were Compliance Programs, a Labor Departnot identified. meant agency which polices the Mrs. Vandergriff, who was nicked employment practices of the more on the right leg by a 30-30 rifle than 100,000 companies doing bullet, said she was with her government business. husband when the shooting began. Mrs. Vandergriff was treated for The report noted that the agency's her wound at the scene. The stiffest civil rights stick--the fourth person wounded in the inthreat to withhold federal contracts cident was hit in the arm. from companies that discriminate Louis Russell, manager of the against minority and female workers Kress Store where some of the crowd --had been invoked against only six sought refuge, said he was inside construction contractors as of last the store when the shooting began. July. "I heard one shot--at least it sounded like a shot," Russell said. Under the law, government contract"When I heard the second, I knew ors are required to submit affirmit was a shot and I hit the active action programs. Further, floor." contractors whose related unions Russell said a man stumbled fail to meet those goals, would through the front door and shouted, be ineligible to bid for govern"I've been shot. Call an ambulance." meant projects. The victim fell to the floor The report by the six-member with a bullet wound in the chest. commission headed by Arthur S. Me was dead on arrival at a hospital. Flemming focused on the so-called USS John King. Some of the students found their dad's work interesting, while other students, as in the case of Carol Carson, found her mother's work more exciting. Carol is in the sixth grade. Mrs. Carson works at the Naval Hospital. HMCM Donald Gill was visited by his daughter Lisa of the fourth grade. According to the master chief, "(she). .learned something of the administrative aspects of running a hospital, but so far we haven't dazzled her." Lisa nevertheless kept herself busy learning something of her dad's job while helping him file papers in the circular file. referral unions, such as those in the construction and trucking industries that refer workers directly to employers through such means as hiring halls. General George Brown, chairman of Joint Chiefs, speaks for armed forces "This year, in the time traditionally set aside for Americans to honor the men and women of our armed forces, we of the armed forces reverse this practice of 26 years and salute America. It is fitting and proper that we honor America in this 200th anniversary of its birthday--a country so dedicated to the defense and preservation of the basic rights of the individual that it commands the loyalty and support of its own people and captures the imagination and respect of peoples in countries not so dedicated to individual rights. We of the military take pride in America. In America's goals of maintaining peace and preserving freedom lies our inspiration to serve. In this Armed Forces Week 1976, on behalf of all the men and women of the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard, I join Americans, of all origins, in honoring and paying tribute to the greatest nation in the world." Discrimination still evident in unions Guantanamo Gazette Page3

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Wednesday, May 12, 1976 4 T Those who fared well in last week's Ladies Golf Championship are from left to right: Shirley Kania, Eleanor Murray, Connie Schwirtz, Elaine McConnell (four-time winner of the championship), Louise Herrin and Val Karcher. All ads will be run one time only. You must submit your ad each time you want it to be printed. Ads may be submitted by calling 951144 or by dropping them in one of the drop boxes. Ads which discriminate on the basis of race, sex, creed, color' or national origin will not be accepted. for sale 14' wooden runabout, good for fishing for longusta; 9.5 Evinrude outboard 1972 model, $350 or best offer. Call 85849 DWH, or 97151 AWH. One-third interest in 10'X 20' pontoon boat with 25 hp, 1975 Evinrude engine and all safety equipment. Leaving Gitmo, must sell. Call 951081 AT. 1970 Pontiac Grand Prix, all electric, tilt wheel, power steering, air conditioning, seat cruise control, AM/FM stereo 8-track tape, trailer hitch, $1,700. Call 95413 AT. 1963 Volkswagen, good working condition, new muffler included, $500. Leave a message at 95465 for Ms. Pryor, or call 951001, ext. 211 AWH. 8'X 16' barrel boat, price negotiable. Call 952205 AT. 1975 Honda MR 17q Flsinore cycle, best offer. Call 95597 AWH. Crib and mattress, $10; playpen, $10; walker, $5; infant carrier, $1; baby bathtub, $1; electric bottle warmer, $1; vaporizer, $1.50; Playtex nursery set, $2; rotisserie motor for grill, $2; 16 lb. bowling ball, $10; flash attachment for Polaroid camera, $2. Call 96281 AWH. 21" color TV, $100; exhaust fan, $20; two-speed fan with stand, $25; bird bath, $15; extra size lounge recliner chair, $75, tube tester, $25; drapery fabric. Call 951103 AT. One Fender super six amp and speakers, $525; 1 Harmony 420 amp and speakers, $150; 1 custom Kasino Concert II 4-channel pa system with 2 column speakers, $650; 3 microphone stands with goosenecks, $18; 1 Realistic hi/low imp. microphone, $25; 2 Electrovoice 670 EV microphones, $55 each; beginners electric guitar, $35; 1 1966 Chevrolet carry all van, $550. Call 951048 AWH. Boy's 27" 3-speed bike, $35; child's rocker, $5; portable car bed, $5. Call 99187 AT. 18,000 BTU Whirlpool A/C, $100; 12,000 BTU Fedders A/C, $75; 10,000 BTU Whirlpool A/C, $75. All in good condition. Call 95406 AT. Used lawn mower for parts, price negotiable. Call 951039. Fedder A/C 23,500 BTU, $175; Simmons hide-a-bed,, $200; Early American Barco lounger recliner, $100; GE clothes dryer, $75 and Kenmore washing machine, $50, in good condition, available June 9; Kitchen Aid dishwasher, $125, available June 10; 19 sheer panel drapes, $38; gold drapes with insulated lining, 84"x 72", $30; dark green insulated drapes, 60"x50", $20, Call 85728 AT. 1967 Chevy Biscayne, 6 cyl., three speed manual, new paint, valve job, tires, excellent mechanical condition, $750. Call 85526 DWH or 98238 AWH. 1974 Suzuki TM 125, used very little, excellent condition and ready for track, $600. See Robert or Randy Aslund, or call 85517 DWE. CB Surveyor #2300 with antenna, down to 1.0 on SWR, $85. Call 85470 or 85680 and ask for Penguin. 55 Chevy, 327 c.i., 400+ hp, street/strip legal, $1,700. Call 85526 DWH or 98238 AWH. A male, white, unclipped poodle. Answers to Marvy. Call 98196. wanted Person to mow lawn in Center Bargo for May only. Will pay top dollar. Must furnish own mower and gas. Call 95508 AT. Lead in quantities of 10 lbs. or higher. Will pay 10t per pound. Call 95325 DWH or 97264 AWE and ask for Vance. Baby chickens, rabbits and guinea pigs. Call 85367 AT. Position for general office work. Hours 8 a.m. to 12 noon, weekdays. Contact Mr. Parekh at 85187. services 11-year-old girl will babysit anywhere, anytime. Call 98295 AT. found Wallet at Brandon Field last Wednesday night. Owner please call 951039 to identify. OFF THE MAT by Mike Grogan If whenever she picked up a wedge Louise Herrin could have forgotten what it feels like to shank the ball. If Ann Hicks could have forgotten about the second nine holes. If the wind and bugs could have forgotten this is Gitmo. If my aunt had wheels she'd be a teacart. All in all, nothing really unexpected happened in the Ladies' Golf Championship that went on from Tuesday through Thursday last week, for Elaine McConnell has taken ownership of the tourney much as Nicklaus has the Masters. And that means that Louise Herrin is Elaine's Tom Weiskopf. It was another disappointment for Louise, who seems to make a habit of coming in second. But what made it even more frustrating for her was the fact that nobody in the tournament shot particularly good golf. Sure, the winds were heavy and the gnats happened to choose that week to be in full force to drive the golfers dingy, but it was the best opportunity Louise had had to dethrone Elaine, who ended up winning the championship for the fourth year in a row. Actually, losing to the indomitable Mrs. McConnell is no disgrace. She is far and away the best lady golfer on base with a handicap that the biggest percentage of golfers of either sex would like to have. She also holds the course record for ladies, having put together an even par 72 in 1974. This year Elaine once again played well enough to win despite the high scoring and came out 8 strokes ahead of Louise. It seemed possible that Ann Hicks, whose game is steadying, but not quite there, could make a respectable showing; and she would have if she hadn't been required to play the back nine. S Ann averaged 7 1/3 more strokes per day on the backside than she did on the front. There were side tournaments that went along with the main event. Connie Schwirtz came in best among the 9-hole players and Shirley Kania was the 9-hole, low-net champ. Val Karcher actually shot the best golf over the three days of 18-hole competition--according to her handicap, anyway. She was the 18-hole, low-net winner with a handicap score of 218, or an average net score of 71 per day. SHORT PUTTS: The men's scratch tournament will be held on the first two weekends in June. The 72-hole tournament will be flighted to give all players a shot at a trophy. Sign up at the golf course .The first Men's Association meeting was held last night. More on that later. .Guy "Killer" Teague shot one of the best handicap rounds ever seen on Gitmo. Saturday morning he fired a 79, or a net 58 with his 21 handicap, the first time he has broken 80. His green card will look a bit different next month. .And, don't forget the Jack and Jill this Sunday. Tee off at 1 p.m. Castro plans visit to Jamaica in August KINGSTON, Jamaica (AP)--Prime Minister Fidel Castro of Cuba is expected to visit Jamaica the first week in August, sources said yesterday. Castro would most likely come in August to coincide with Jamaica's independence anniversary, a member of the ruling Peoples National Party (PNP) said. Security Minister Keble Munn told Jamaica's House recently five Jamaican policemen traveled to Cuba earlier this year during the visit of Canada's Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau to compare Cuban and Jamaican security measures. Prime Minister Michael Manley of Jamaica has yet to formally announce when Castro might visit the English-speaking Caribbean island located just off the southeast tip of Cuba. Manley invited Castro to visit Jamaica during his trip to Cuba last July. A tentative date for Castro's visit had been placed for May 24, Jamaica's labor day. giveaway Six cans of cat food with one-yearold spayed female cat. Excellent table manners. Tolerant of children, indifferent towards women, responsive to men. Eats from a can of cat food with her paw. Reknowned lizard killer. Needs a good home by June 22nd. Call 95320 AT. 20' pipe for a TV or CB radio antenna. Call 952230 AWH. A party source said that Castro was unlikely to make the trip in July because of their own celebration scheduled for July 26, the date the Cuban Revolution started. It was not clear why the May 24 date was rejected. NATIONAL LEAGUE Philadelphia 9, San Diego 1 Atlanta 8, New York 7 Chicago,4, San Francisco 0 Cincinnati 6, Pittsburgh 0 Los Angeles 4, St. Louis 0 Houston 5, Montreal 3 AMERICAN LEAGUE Cleveland 4, Boston 3 Kansas City 6, Minnesota 3 Baltimore 5, Milwaukee 2 Texas 6, Chicago 5 Detroit 4, New York 3 Oakland 6, California 4 STANLEY CUP TITLE SERIES Montreal 2, Philadelphia 1 (Canadiens lead series, 2-0) WHA PLAYOFFS Houston 4, New England 3 (series tied) NBA PLAYOFFS Cleveland 83, Boston 78(Celtics lead) ABA CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES Denver 118, New York 110(New York leads Page 4 Guantanamo Gazette