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Guantanamo Gazette

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Guantanamo Gazette
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U.S. Naval Base
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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U.S. Naval Base
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English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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University of Florida
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Copyright,Guantanamo Gazette. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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:Te, Sun, Temp. Weather aForecast
Partly to mostly
Hig gie :7mA. cloudy. Isolated
td 1.howers Winds SE
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7 28pmconditions 1-3
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Vol..31 No..90 U.S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Tuesday, May 11, 1976




NebraskaWest Virginia i"





Ford looks for needed win

WASHINGTON (AP)--President Ford, his record of accomplishments in hoping to rebound from four straight office justifies a full four-year primary losses to Ronald Reagan, is term and will win him the nominoptimistic about his chances in ation.
today's Nebraska and West Virginia That's a theme the President primaries, but feels both will enunciated while campaigning be a "close fight," his spokesman in Nebraska last Saturday and said yesterday. Sunday and is part of a new Press Secretary Ron Nessen also strategy devised by advisers in the announced Ford w nll make two wake of the four straight primary campaign trips to Michigan this defeats.
week instead of one, as aides Another strategy session was considered the possibility that scheduled yesterday, with Ford Reagan's momentum and Democratic meeting with his campaign advisers crossover votes could deal the Rogers Morton and Stuart Spencer and President a damaging defeat in his White House Chief of Staff Richard >2> home state on May 18. Cheney.
It had previously been announced Throughout the campaign, Reagan that Ford -would be in the Detroit .-has stressed the issue that the area tomorrow. Nessen said the United States has become militarily President will return to Michigan inferior to the Soviet Union.
on Saturday and Sunday, following Ford again answered that criticism a day of campaigning in Kentucky yesterday in a speech at the Washingand Tennessee on Friday. ton Monument commemorating Armed The only firm stop on the weekend Forces Week.
:' . Michigan visit is the annual "Today our defenses are strong, tulip festival in Holland Saturday and we will keep them strong," he .afternoon. 'said. "Not strong for the sake' 1Ford originally had planned to of war--but strong for the sake of .campaign in Arkansas. on Saturday, peace."
but decided to skip that state He said'the nation is developing AIR FORCE PERSONNEL have many duties to perform. in favor of a more concentrated new weapons such as the BI bomber, Besides their primary mission of providing air power effort in Michigan. the Trident submarine d2ssile, the
for the defense'of the nation, they perform many The President's advisers feel Cruise missile and a new tank.
people (and in our case animal) oriented projects. Reagan has a edge difficult to "The weapons we hold today, and
Captain Arnold Williams of the Air Force Veterinary overcome in such southern states those we plan for the future,
Clinic is responsible for the health of Gitmo's as Arkansas. give America a mighty power," he animals and :people. ' Nessen again told his morning said. "But with such power comes press briefing that Ford expects a mighty responsibility. We must to win on the first ballot at the never forget the purpose for , .>. .GOP convention in Kansas City, which our arsenal is intended.
"When the balloting starts, the "That purpose is not to terrify President will have more than the the weak, toprovoke armed confron1',130 votes needed," Nessen said. tation nor to lay claim to that '' Reagan currently leads Ford in which is not ours," Ford said.. committed delegates 387 to 314, "Our purpose is to defend freedom
'iM E FOC with 328 uncommitted. and to maintain a foundation of Asked the basis of Ford's 'con- strength on which a better and fidence, Nessen said, "He believes more peaceful world can be built."



W>EEK1976


HONOR AMERICA House passes bill


TE ED STATES AIR FQRCE be- hunters. They have helped people .. ; &; ;
e separate military department during floods, snowstorms, forest to raise bonuses W orld N ... D.gest
in when the National Security fires, tornadoes, hurricanes, W . Ne s Digest Act'wa aproved, 'but the Air Force droughts and other disasters.. can techinically trace its heritage Gitmo 'has only -three permanently
bcto the Wrighat 'Brothers' first assigned Air Force personnel, but' f r WASHINGTON (AP)--Senate Majority light n 903. . they provide us with invaluable. for s Leader Mike Mansfield said the

Today, Air FYorce operations are, services. Captain (AFVC) ArnoldSeaepoblwilsndllek inducted in the air andouter R. Williams, Master Sergeant WASHINGTON (AP)--More and bigger debating on how best to keep an btt bsic' job rmans . ...Kennie C. Haynes and' Staff " i bonuses to attract and keep special- eye on U.S. intelligence agencies.
space; bu their. ...... job. ....r....em...ains.. .. ..... . . . . . Mansf eld said yester ay he thin s
he same. The Air' Force serves the Sergeant Ron D. Stamer are respon- ly trained nuclear submarine officers Ma.il s
nie tts y7cq ihigm- sible for food inspection services; .in the Navy were approved yesterday te w b a l of s m
rnitd States b e ac sni the control of Zoonoses, ' by the House. on the m H .ai h dut pora du es They . ..maintain d d contagious diseases that can be On a 322-27 vote, the House sent a vote will come early. tene aerospceate 'p acy; ere >spread from animals to man, such to the Senate a bill to increase The Senate is expected to set up

tack; furni' tactical air as rabies; looking after the the present one-time $15,000 a new intelligence committee, but upport for ground forces; provide government owned working dogs, bonus for nuclear submarine officers whether it will have the power to esearch, development, testing Deer Park,the horses at the who' sign up for another four years maintain meaningful watch on the and eniern o$aelts special Services Corral and caring 'to $20,000. ' 'intelligence agencies remains to nd conduct research, development, for depepnents' pets.i ' It also would authorize a new be seen. podution and testing required ' Capt. Williams is the first e- ' 'one-time $3,000 bonus for young
the acii1tion of aerospace manently assigned military veter-. 'officers to enter nuclear-submarine WASHINGTON (AP)--A Senate panel inarian here. 'Williams, Haynes . service and an annual bonus up is set to begin three days of sytes.and' Siamer' are attached to the ' to $4,000 for serving on nuclear .public hearings into an alleged The primary mission of the Air aval Hospital,'but the Vet Clinic submarines. 'military' meat fraud involving ce is to deter war. .The aim is supported by Special Services. Backers of the bill told the ' millions of dollars. Florida
6x ain1 eur' po-cy '.'Th Air Force men are +part of the -+,House the' Nav is,.-losing. the "...Democrat Lawton Chiles, chairman ...
s ed t r e c e o c i n t h a t ' 1 0 7 1 s t M e d c a l s e r i e S q u a d r n '. .. .:tir a n e d G o f f i c e r s .t o p r v a e .. .."" , : .. . ... , o f t e o v e r n m e n t o p e r a t i o n s
r te t e~~ c ri y~ of th..t.d '.I U under Head quarters Command in '.. industry at a rate that would force' subco mitte cond cti the...probe,.
S t~ a~ .,a... ..nsi ere vi a WVatiangt o i D.C. The 1O7lst has ,it .to.take some submarines out of sYs Ary mea ins ec or got
''! is it7est. 210-.personl :assigned ;to+. servc in 1980 for 'lack of� per- "'�,-thousands of .dollars" in bribes ..
ir F rcas a s been .. .ctive sc t er d all... over the..world. . at so e... . . ,and other favors for appro vi g
um itr'a e f rt f r ma y 0d fferen t operatn g oca in s ' . :The' House Armed Se rvces- C ommt - inferio mea fo il t r
rs. Thy av ~roidd heir Personnel are stationed atNv te estimates that bonuses would cnuptio. Fou prsn orfoe
esore oasitcvlathor- ba.. ! 5ses' overseas " , Marineibase s, ' . cost $4i.5, million next year, an iid Army meat inspectors were scheduled
s d rin di as rs ...dctin Navy rese rch.ase and va io s.ha th cos woul.. d rise to' . :to testify before the panel yes- . .
s ~ r h ~ ~ o ~ n d a d o t n .othe r pl'a c as esin O . .. $6.7at th milli o u in : 1980.. .erday







Page 2 Guainta~iii Gazette Tuesday, May 11, 197b


if nl CLUB WIVES LUNCHEON- James Earl Ray

The Officers Wives Clu will be C u tg h t w
20~ at the -COMO Club sponsored by the
Corhmunity ~~Marine Barracks Wives. Cocktails C u t s y u ly will begin at 11:30 a.m. with lunch
being served at 12 noon. The guest
Bulltinspeaker will be Captain Steve Wood, plea must stand assistant judge advocate for COMNAVBASE. He will speak on the topic
"Women and the Law". For reserva- CNINAI()-JmsErRa'
Bo r-tl ione lBarb Fields. aNo-95372 bid to overturn his guilty plea GAeDne t9521 ocne in the slaying of civil rights C llations will be accepted after Tues- leader Martin Luther King Jr. was day, May 18. --rejected yepterday by the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.
NEW LOCATION FOR NURSERY SCHOOL The court said Ray's contention that he anticipated a reopening of
The base nursery school has moved his case "is at best highly
MEETNGSto their new location at Marina Foint implausible." METNSJACK AND JILL TOURNAMENT in the old elementary school annex. "It is, more likely that he simply TODAY Jck nd il 'glf ounamnt The phone number remains the same.* reasoned that a shrewd attorney willY A~ helad J1il Suda atl thnaent might find a way to overturn his wil be hTMd BAYs MUSEUM TO OPEhSA conviction regardless of the golf course beginning at 1 p .m. GTOBYMSU TO PE SAvoluntariness- of the plea," the EXERCISE from 6 to 7 p.m, For A cookout will follow the tour-corsadirjetnRys
more information call Leoniard Gobert nament. Sign up at golf pro shop. The Naval Base Mus eum will be open corsadirectnRy' at 90126 AWH. this Saturday in honor of Armed For- -appeal for a new trial. GUANTANAMO BAY SELF DEFENSE CLUB M-16 REQUALIFICATION CLASSES ~ces Week from 12 to 3 p~m. Ine Lvno n, Rysaitorheys willaskth will practice at the Child Day, Care I.. Supremesourt toi evwiewas the Center at 6 p.m.. - All Navy personnel desiring to U.S appeal.rttorviw h OKIAWAKAAI~AYFLITIO wil. requalify with~ the M-16 rifle -SHIP TO VISIT HAITI -The unanimous decision concluded practice from 6 to 8 p.m. at: Mar- should call Chief Beelman~ at thethtUSDirctJdeRbt blehead Hall. For more information Naval Station rifle, range at 98105, The USS Meredith will visit Port- thtU,.DsritJdeRbr call 98258 AWH. �- Classes will be conducted on Mon- 7 Au-Prince, Haiti this week-end. In- B. McRae of Memphis, Tenn., was _SURE LOSERS WEIGHT -REDUJCING CLUB day, -May 24;- Tuesday, May 25;and terested personnel-should submit ap- correct in 'February 1975 when he
will meet at Quonset Hut 211A behind Wednesday, May 26 commencing at 8 proved Recreation Travel Request refused an appeal after a hearing W the old-'elemnentary school at 7 p.m. a.m.- The course for qualification~ (NAVEASE GTMO Formi 4650/1(7-74)) to on the events that led -to Ray's For more information call Joanne will be fired on Wednesday, May 26, EPTO no later than 11 a.m. this Thur- March 10, 1969, guilty plea in Frnde at9197-d Shelby County, Tenn.
Framds atCRF DISPLAY day Ray is serving a 99-year prison
BOY SCOUTS will meet in the Boy term.-Scout Rut', 6th Street, Villamar The Naval Air Station will-hold ADVANCED CERAMIC PAINTING Another of Ray's attorneys, at7:30 p.m. For more information open house and place several air- CJSE O E aye did notatall c ote Kingai call Sharoni Fox at 64462. craft on static display, Everyone CASST EI a i o aal ho igi GITMO BAY' BRIDGE CLUB meets at is invited'to visit the NAS main Seilercsisofin da Memphis, Tenn., on April 4, 1968.
-7 p ,m. at the COMO Club. -Contact hangar on Saturday from 1 to 4 p ,m. -~~ca SrieisofinadncLesar argued that former defense Jim Cossey at 85149 ANN. The club -d ceramic painting classes to begin attorney P'ercy Foreman-coerced K is open to all base-residents, CARIBBEAN ARTS ANDn-CRAFTS today. 11 There will be both a -Ray into a -guilty plea and thatBIGwilb ledathCP morning and evening class. The fee Ray had been framed. However,
Club be iing aeatteP 8'pm SOITO OME is '$9. For more information or to -Leser -said he -had no information
BASE ATHLETIC COM4MISSION will SOITINT ET- register call -Marion~ McGuire at about who actually shot King. meet ini the Special-'Services con- The -Caribbean Arts and Crafts -951211. ference room -at 3:30 pi.m. For more Association will meet tomorrow information call 95448 DWH. at 17B Granadillo Point starting at REEF RAIDERS PICNIC - Four p a e crash
7 p~m. Anyone interested is urged The Reef Raiders will hold a steak
CROCHET CLASS TO BEGIN to attend this meeting. , and dog picnic this Sunday at WindThe Caribbean Arts and Crafts. YBOH O mill Beach. This is free to all victims identified
Ascainannounces aqeinrs MDWYBOH O TH OF JULY 'members- and their families.* Call in
crochet class starting netThurS_. - your reservations by Thursday to DorE
day, May 20. Both morning and eve- The Bietnili prahn. McGee at 951163. Meet at the beach as. U.S. citizens, n -ing classes wil1l be offered, with All organizations and clubs inter- at 9 a.m. for the dive and stay afregistration~ limited- to 6 students ested in having a booth on the-mid- -terwards. f or a picnic, MADRID, Spain (AP)--Four foreigners
pr class. For more information or way 'on our nation 's 200th birthday -identified by- the Boeing Aircraft
to~ register, contact Shelley Grizz- ar~e asked to -call Chief Gwaltney at Company yesterday as Americans, were
-ard at 98156 AT. 85556. P io j. reported killed in the crash of an

ZOOUNERNEWMAAGMEN GTM SINGRSTODANE rion ofii lis Iranian Air Force 747 cargo jet in ~OO NDE NE MAAGEENTGITM S~NGES, O DNCESpain Sunday. Toorw releease o il h GtoSwnes qae ac Sixteen persons were aboard the Tom~r, te eer1'rk Zo wil he ito ~inersSqareDace refuse to re as plane, an official Iranian news be under the new management of the Club will hold its monthly meeting agency report said, and Spanish
~Deer Park Zoo - Committee. Special and will dance -Satttrdav night at p,-olice said all died in the crash. Services has Welinquished. its; re- 7 -30 in the club hall. Pa t rBoeing identified the Americans sponsiili yjforthe Zoo. Mrs, Pa t -otra aboard the plane as Paul Hardman,
Saron Sc - le is the new zoo kee- BLOOD SHORTAGE AT HOSPITAL LSAGLS(P-TeFdrl44, pilot instructor, of Ft. Worth,
perand with the help of the base Burea ofGLE Pi ) h FeTx.dobrtWranl3flh
veterinarianr Williams, she will The Naval Hospital Blood Bank is Bueuo risons refuses to re- Tx;RbrWisn53flgh
cae fcr Committee wishes to thank the of "B+" and 'B-" b lood., authorities- for a June 1 trial Townsend, 45, 'mechanic, of Lancaster,
Gtocommunit fo alitheir efforts Anyone having 'either of thes two in Los Angeles, her prosecutor Calif. -All were employed by Boeing
adwilling onatiLons to keep the blood types and who wishes to'do- ai yesterday. -n tIaineian eancylstd
Zoo open.-. -Through your help they - nate blood -is asked to contact the Deputy District Attorney Sam TeIainnw gnylse
maycontinue to keep it open. Your Naval Hospital at 9-5444' and leave- Mayerson said he would urge the Iraia milhtar oc pers snelhtw children thank you too. -your name and phone number. - judge in Miss Hearst's case -toIrnamitrypsoeltw
proceed with the kidnap, assault Iranian women and two Iranian
MEN'IS GOLF ASSOCIAT ION MASONS MEETING - - and robbery trial of her codef end- - civilian men.
ants, Symbionese Liberation Army The plane was one of five 747's Amen's golf association is being -There. will be a special commun- members William and Emily Harris. bought by the- Iranian government
formed, The first organizational cation at Caribbean Naval Log The three,~ who traveled together by Boeing and converted, to military meetings will be held tonight at8 held in Masonic Apts. #80at73 as fugitives, are scheduled to ---use. It was on a flight from Iran
- -All male golfers are welcom~e. - p.m. op Wednes~day- forthe purpose --have a pretrial hearing~ tomorrow.~ to the -United States -when it crashed
- : -- 'of condtig or'i the first -"I have made the request that - 60 miles 'southwest of Madrid.
degee Al Maon are cordiall --ncgwr'Patricia be available for the -Villagers reported seeing the big
- U US. NAVAL -GUANTANAMO BAYS tra onJn ,an ewr
--CUBA adgrer ally Masnsvae coratdial. ia nJn 1 ewr plane explode while flying at a
-~ nd ratrnalyinvtedto tted. turned down by the Bureau of low altitude during a torrential
- - Prisons," Mayerson said. rainstorm. Rescue workers reported Miss Hearst, convicted of recovering completely charred bodies ADVANCED SCUBA COURSE bank robbery in-San Francisco last from the wreckage.
- March 20, is under temporary sen- -Police had first reported 17 perThere will be 'an advanced open tence at the -San.Diego -sons aboard the plane,~ but the water scuba course string tomorrow Metropolitan Correctional Center Iranian news agency-listed only 16. Ct.JbH.M~C,...l1 C-t :- .Wti. at the EM4 pool. In order to sign up for -90 days of diagnostic-tests. - The crash was the-second for a
Co-oder4 C-for -tis cureb&an-oe That period will end about July 25 -Boeing 747 sinc~ethe jumbo jet
-ate dieindhv a 20 -lives, but coud be exedd nter9








Tuesday, May 11, 1976 Cu anamo Gazett Page 3




, ush defends CIA use of journalists


WASHINGTON (AP)--CIA Director representative of a news organizaGeorge Bush defended yesterday tion.
the agency's continued use of Bush said that any news organizacertain part-time journalists tion concerned about the CIA's overseas who sell their: work to use of unaccredited journalists
American news organizations, could simply issue press credent- considers minimum
"I don't think the agency should lals to everyone who works for them
be prohibited from using that sort A staff member ofthe Intelligence
of person," Bush told reporters. Committee has said that many news txf
In a luncheon appearance before executives would also qualify as laws rich
the Washington Pre'ss Club, Bush "unaccredited." But Bush said he
also stopped' short of seconding was uncertain whether CIA use of WASHINGTON (AP)--The Senate
FBI Director Clarence Kelly s news executives would violate the Finance Committee is considerin
public apology to the American agency's own guidelines. However, a measure which could force nearly public for FBI intelligence abuses he appeared" to rule out CIA use i00,000 more well-to-do Americans
in the past. of two types of news executives-- to pay a minimum federal tax.
Bush repeated previous statements editors and publishers--because The minimum tax, enacted in 1969,
that "I abhor the things that were of the prominent role they play in is currently paid by about 55,000
wrong." But when asked if he the reporting process. of the nation's wealthiest persons.
would apologize replied, "I don't The one hypothetical example It imposes a 10 per cent levy, on
feel that;I have to say anymore that Bush cited of a reporter top of regular income taxes, on
about it." who still could be on the agency certain large deductions known as
Bush's comments about the agency's payroll was that of a writer who 1 "preferences." But the first
continued use of American journa- sells "a cooking column once a $30,000 of preferences are exempt.
lists came two weeks after the year" to an American publication. GEORGE BUSH Finance Committ'Le Chairman
Senate Intelligence Committee said . Russell B. Long, D-La., said that
that the CIA still maintains con- by eliminating the $30,000 ex'tacts with about 25 journalists. Pana a emption and raising the minimum
The committee said that a seem- ' tax rate to 14 per cent, 154,000
ingly blanket statement by Bush U.S. will retain right to defend canal persons would be forced to pay
ling out future relationhips the tax.
th any full-time or part-time
ws correspondent accredited SAN ANTONIO, Texas (AP)-The the defense of the canal is a Long's plan would bring an
by any U.S. news organization United States will retain in any continuing right--and is fundamen- estimated $700 million to $800 affected less than half the treaty with Panama its right to tal to any treaty negotiated." million into the treasury each
approximately 50 journalists defend the Panama Canal from either Clements assailed recent "cam- year.
wokin thm w e CA incite internal or external takeover, paign rhetoric" that implied the The House has already approved
ccredited. Deputy Secretary of Defense United States is negotiating to a stiffer change in the minimum
An unaccredited' journalist is William Clements said yesterday. give away the canal, tax law that would raise an extra
one who has not been issued press .Clements said the right of the "There are those now who are $1.3 billion annually.
credentials identifying him as a United States to "participate in publicly charging that the Long's committee is expected to treaty negotiations now under way vote on his proposal Tuesday.
with Panama are some sort of During a committee meeting Friday, 'giveaway' and that we are engaged it appeared'the bill had the votes in them because we' re somehow afraid to pass.
of threats of force," Clements said.
any"This is simply not true," he Last week the Internal Revenue Cr M t0 heTexas Association of Service reported that 244 0cat ...... h~s![. t ng 0. ~nInsurance Agents. Americans wit adjusted gross WASHINGTON (AP)--Democratic his time trying to win over un- Former California Governor income over $200,000 paid no
front-runner Jimmy Carter, man- committed delegates and party Ronald Reagan, who is challenging income tax in 1974. Another
euvering to close party ranks leaders. President Ford for the Republican 3,053 persons with income between
behind his 'presidential candidacy, Last week, the 'candidate won presidential nomination, made 'those $50,000 and $200,000 also paid
has arranged a private meeting a number of endorsements, includ- accusations in campaign addresses, nothing.
with AFL-CIO President George 'ing that of United Auto Workers " "We are 'negotiating with Panama Tax experts say these people reMeany. President Leonard Woodcock. because it is in our own best duce their taxable income to zero
The two men, who talked on the Meany, who controls the AFL-CIO's interest to do so. We want to by deducting such expenses as intelephone but who have never met, 'political activities, has met with make sure the canal remains open 'terest, state and local taxes and will get together Friday in Meany's all Democratic'presidential can- for the commerce of the world and property depreciation.. They also office across Lafayette Park from didates except,'Alabama Gov. George 'that 'it is efficiently operated ''benefit' from a lower tax rate on
the' White House. " ' "Wa'llace. Meany has'said all but on anondiscriminatory basis at capital gains, which are increases
An aide to the. 81-year-old Wallace are acceptable 'to labor. " reasonable prices," he said. in the value of investments.
br leader,' confirming the Nevertheless, eany and most' of
rangements yesterday, said Carter the old-line labor leaders, oo the initiative" in setting particularly in' the building
up the s.ession. The aide said trades, have been cool to Carter.
only thot thef two would "get ', ' ''a'
together an ta. Now, however, the union leaders Ford un d ide d O e election c on
"There'll be are becoming reconciled t at on
and eany will have nothing Carter victory ato the Democratic to say afterward," said the aide, convention, especially since his
AFL-CIO spokesman Al Zack. victory in the Pennsylvania WASHINGTON (A)-Mary Louise Republican congressional leaders
Why? Beause the AFL-C.IO is primary, where the candidate over- Smith, chairman . of the Republican today on what to do about the
eutranl and is taking no position came the opposition of the old-line National Committee, said she campaign legislation that is at 'ntilafter the conventions," ' unions and the party organization. recommended to President Ford' the White House for action May
Zack said.'' In recent weeks, MeanT has. told ''at a White House meeting 'yester- 17.'
4Until recently, Carter'has por- "~his political'strategists that the 'day that he sign the bill to Mrs. Smith said in'1a telephone trayed himself as an outsider 'AFL-CIO would back' Carter if he ' restructure the Federal Election interview after the meeting that not beholden to any of the'trad- became the'nominee. But Meany' Commission. she did not know which way Ford
itional powers'in the Democratic also said support would be keyed ' The President has been seeking 'was leaning but "I recommended that
'party. But, since the Pennsylvan- to an acceptable clarification advice from a variety of political he sign it."
ia~ primary, he 'has spent much. of of Carter's stand 'n labor issues, officials and will confer with She said that, while she felt therp

were "some shortcomings" that
Congress could address later, "I
9y b oThbelieve this s the way to go now.




Old' loiebrarny becomesS re
My feeling is that we needto get
4 on with this election." school classroom The delay in correcting constituureere tional flaws in the law establishIing the Federal Election Commission
h is; holding up large sums of money
this oo was t e c t m at for sorely pressed presidential




by Mrs. Stoweaddinstructor atscandidates Guantanamo's N~ursery School, whencadats





aboutse
e w asedhow The FEC has been without many of the 'ne' school. its powers since March 22 as a reTh e colis,of~ course, the sult of a Supreme Court ruling that
ibrary of the old elementary its six members were not constituschoolat warina Poirst. t~ fionally authorized because they
ool- a th1 lirr 1f r 't-e ' were coei na l appintes Th,






ree. and-for-.e'ar-oi of the pening measure wol corc that "







>Page G anamo Gazette










a 'x-~ Doug Drewry

AAl.,d ill be run one 'time 1963 VW, god working conditiIon, new 0ny 'o must subit your ad each mufflerr inluded., $500. Leave a
tie want it to be printed. Ad message at95465 DWH for Ms. Pryor,
ma b sbite aby calling'9 4 calwLi.b eun,. 959510 The 'big event of the year was 9. Joe Shier (182.3) five 200s.
orb upping tem inp on fte ext. 211 AWH at hand last week for all Gitno 1.Jh enr(8.)69wt
drpboe. Ads which dicimnt men bowlers,. the annual roll-off three '200s.
onteb&is of race,'sex, creed, , 0C.f.ClSpturgt re- for ComTen competition, a stepping 11. Bill Roberts (180.4) 626 series
coo-rnatioanal origins will not zer, $130; .8;Yxll ' blue and white. stane to All Navy. with five 200s.
beac'eped.. oval braided rug, $30. Call 952267 Thirty bowlers competed for the 12. Chuck Dittmar (180.0) 606 series AT, * two' six-man team toiTen qualifying with four 200s. fo positions. All the bowlers wish Brenda Taylor, the only female in
0 BfF~~1rs ICf 35;Sea~s 1964 Chevy wagon, good Gitmo trans- to thank the base commands for, the competition, will represent the
a0,00g BT ed sACn, $50; 19ar2 portation, $300; 1971 Honda CT90KZ their support of this event, women. She averaged almost 160. The Kednmr Bahn mahie $50; Cal9219or2 'trail, runs great, with some new Representatives for ComTen comne two teams Gitmo is sending to Hond mus 10,e30. al by21 or~ spr16t, 30 enysbs from NavSta CommiBCT, Supply, ~ Roosevelt Roads, P.R. this year
se a G 1Cmut el b My 6, bze saw, $15; picnic table, $5, Comptroller and the COMO Club. averaged 185 f or the' 24 games.
comlet 644 Det, orG, AAWC5 HAS, Ote'amad ncld Ste Doug Drewry, R.J. Morrison, Al Hall hM~oals play scol opeeDt FC AC A h and Bruce Johnstone are returning wihd a of tos $10; carpet pad- Highchair, $10,; crib with new matt- Hospital. from last year when our team, placed di g f r b room, bedoom or din.- ie s $ 5 el c r c H o r sw p r; J m Oorato and myself: fought it third, won' three individual trophies
in re,$; ag ubelavs canister vacuumn cleaner with all ~ out' for first place down to 'the and placed a man on the All-Comlen
mde ins Sanwtflwek, o$3siz attachments;'portable TV stand which 'last game. 'I started the opening team. This year some of the team
Seaschldsshes wek ld sze holds up to a 27Y" TV. Call 90195 series with a~ 684 series to take is thinking All Navy and expects to
1, $; bue 'velvet pillow cover, ' T. the early lead. Jim passed me win the ComTen Team Event.
$2 hree pieces onyx fruit, $4;' 'p ATte.eod a it h
ne lastic photo holders, $~1 each; hel' p of athe send . da ih s the t Bantams take notice: The Bantam
newel ofo aaa 664on series Jadies wanse Bowling League Banquet will be held~ nhiew gld ca do nd' ri4g, sell s wante $20 ~series was a 615; 1 lucked out with from 12'to 3 p.m. on Saturday,W sweht yelwdoul sth0,el fod $20.., Starter for 1963 Plymouth Valiant, a '631. other positions were May 15, at the CPO Club Pool. The set handbpa'nted wosd, andnk cases, 225 cu. in engine. Call 90187 AT. equally close: Al Hall, Vic Baylosis time change~ is due to the Little tedwoo, pnk issae ' ' 'and Bruce Johnst'one were within League games at 5 p.m. on Saturday.

' odran9 acin on bx 5 Piano tuner, Call 85728 AT. ten pins of each other, fighting All bantams and their parents who
Cal 9698.for the final position on the ' indicated' they would like to attend
Hihcar 3 o in,$;ty Barrel. boat or pontoon boat, must 'first team. ''are *encouraged to come.
cal,$3; rai,$;4pees b ngo odiin al932 RESULTS: Juniors take notice: The Junior wodncnse,$3; kitchen wal DHo 59 WFrtTa:Bowling League's Dinner/Dance will clock, $3; misc.' toys, mostly~ dolls 1' Doug Drewry (194.1') 684, 631, be held Thursday, May 13', at the and ifants toys; golf. clubs, $4; Large cage to raise .a rabbit in. 605 series with eleven 200s CPO Topside Lounge. Dinner will bicyce $1. e at DH301 ocal Call Ronnie Andrew at 85709 DWH or, 2. Jim Onorato (192.5) 662', 615 be served at 6:30 p.m. 'Hank call1 'fe ~,85559 AWH. series with 'eight 200s. Stence will be playing music dura3. R.J. Morrison (189.0) six 200s. ing dinner and 'for the dance after1970 Gremi ,3sed ieo Lead in quantities of ten lbs, or ". Ro Bege'171 i 0s wards. The dance will end at 11 p.m.
'3ls runsped $,0, 'widll' higher, will' pay 10 cents per flb. 4. RoneBeagdwin'(187) 631 2Oserie All juniors and their guests are
vals , 'l,'0 a~lCall 95325 DWH' or 97264 AWH and 5.Dl odi 147 3 eis welcome to come. The Topside '95431 afte 2 'P.'M. ask for Vance.'' with three 200s. -Lounge will be open at 6 p.m..
6. Al Hall (183.2) 605, 604 with Junior League: Teresa Martin ~,1971 brown Mnte Carlo with white Ba'bysitter for two children, ages Isix 200s. 180/470, Jerry Hall 489 and David vinyl roof, powe disc brakes, pov eight 'ana ten for'the~ summer, Turn- Second Team: Christensen 202 game.
wersteig huoai rn. x ey. or 'Kittery beach area i.n their 7. Vic Baylosis (183.1) four 200s. '' Bantam League: Todd Christensen
cellnt ondtio, $,00. Cll a hoe. all95243 WR.8. Bruce Johnstone"(182.8) four '176/307, Angela Freeman 239 series
t89 AT. i~nP'0O ~3 t m. Cl 52~3A~ 200s. 'and Teni Houghtling 122 game.
Auto hobby shop attendant, equal
1972 yellow Nova, 2-door 'sedan in opportunity employment, $2 .46 'per excellent condition, black interior hour, Call Special Services atLo a S ft ll c re wihmatching carpet, A/C, heatin~g, 95ocl4ofbal.co e
serig, auito tras., new hoses, oud' 'SATURDAY, MAY 8:
blsadolcage, available in -~NavSta Blue 8, NavSta White 1
Juy 200 im Call 85264. Paro rsrpinwr rm __High School 11, NavSta Red "A" 7 glasses with tinted lens at ferry W ewr ,Scrt ru yadn nHS Cncama A Marine Barracks "Red" 10, Hospital Tw Wtrswth wheels slug pat.- ,CO's office. "'~3
NavSta Red "B" 11, NAS Leeward 4
ten oo Vantenna& contrac:-- FIG 10, NavSta White Galley 8 tor tyewel barrow; rawn mower Package containing boy's baseball law chis n one chise lounge; glove and baseball at coin~ machine SUNDAY, 'MAY 9:
9'l'genrug; pole lamp; auto- across from Mini-Mart. Found Satur- Marine Barracks Red 18, Nvt mtv ain~vrietyof colors; Aday morning. ,To '\claim call LNIDoiron NATIONAL LEAGUE: W 'L GB llavSta Red "B" 10, AFTRTS 2'
'lwomisc sizes. Call 85350 at 85600 or 85432 DWH, East NSLead1,Hsia
A. services ''Philadelphia 15 7 -- Marine Barracks Gold 6', NavSta ~96 Ip g .~ ',r, A/C ra 'New York 18 10 -- White 5
1965iou Cornet g poe A s, Hosean-o Pittsburgh ' 15 9 1 High School 12', FIG 7 tio, toweansteig poe brakegi e s, 00.s Call stove cleaning weekends, St. Louis 12 15 5 1/2 NavSta Blue 14, Security Group 8 auo rn.,33V ngn,$0. al874or 85231 D4WH. 'C~hicago 11 16 6 1/2
Call' ''15 aa Montreal 9 15 7 A elo e

FeddersAC 22.000 BTU in good giveaway'Ws A w lo e conition, $100 or best offer. 'Six cans of cat'food with a one- Cincinnati 15 10 -Clafer 6 .m. 870 or can be ' year-.old female cat,~ Has been spy Los Angeles '16 11 -seat17 orinas Pioint. ed' Excellent tal anrTl Houston 14 14' 2 1/2 VolkIsw agenl erant of children, indifferent to- SaDig13 321/
ou~iterwars'wmen/~esot~ivea mn! ats San Francisco 9 17 6 1/2Am rc Thre iecs meica Turite wrdswoenreposivtomen Ets Atlanta 8. 18 '71/2 to A m rc
Lugag, 35 Ereka type- from 'a can of cat 00o wit h~er paw.
bie,$5.Cll950 Ahome by June 22. Call 95320 AT. Los'Angeles'4, St. Louis 3 Woodcock, president of the United Automobile Workers of America, spid
17750 Kawasai $20 or' best 'Four'black female kittens, six-weeks- AMERICAN LEAGUE: W L GB yesterday he believes the decision offer. 1al 64237 AT, old, give to good home only Call East b~y West Germany's Volkswagen auto 952262 AT. Ne ok1 - manufacturer to establish an

ta p~e> 'orca wih Oue lac fmae s ~, ' Milwaukee 10 7 3 American plant'may cause Japanese 8 rcktpepayrfo arwth Oe lckfmaeshper,3years ~,Detroit 10 9 4 rivals to consider-following suit.
Qa 4chneli, $0; ~olo~r TV anten- old pay'ed~good watchog Needs Cleveland 10 12 51/2 Noting that Toyota and Nissan have"
n ,$1;baby bathtub, $5; cid~'s home with los of loe Cal 952262~ 'Baltimoe 9' 13 6 1/2 completed previously inconclusive
crset prcengoiable, tobaby AT.6'stn' 14 8 1/2 studies on assembling cars in the
wlers prc negotiable. Cal WetUnited States, he told the Associated 9719 AT.Texs 15 7 -- Pres:' "They may now reconsider




Full Text

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Tide, Sun, Temp. Weather Forecast Partly to mostly cloudy. Isolated H h~tfde-17:07pm showers. Winds SE d :O2pm 12-14 knots. Bay e conditions 1-3 .ft--7:28pm 4,-fet f85 eet. ow -1 N .-73 The90U ..Na l e,' uantan mo aty Vol. 31 No. 90 U.S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cubs Tuesday, May 11, 1976 Nebraska-West Virginia Ford looks for needed win AIR FORCE PERSONNEL have many duties to perform. Besides their primary mission of providing air power for the defense of the nation, they perform many people (and in our case animal) oriented projects. Captain Arnold Williams of the Air Force Veterinary Clinic is responsible for the health of Gitmo's animals and people. *ARMED FORCES WEEK '1976 HONOR THE UNITED STATES AIR FORCE became a separate military department in 1947 when the National Security Act was approved, but the Air Force can technically trace its heritage back to the Wright Brothers' first flight in 1903. Today, Air Force operations are conducted in the air and outer space; but their basic job remains the same. The Air Force serves the United States by accomplishing important duties. They maintain general aerospace supremacy; defend the United States from aerospace attack; furnish tactical air support for ground forces; provide research, development, testing and engineering for satellites; and conduct research, development, production and testing required for the acquisition of aerospace systems. The primary mission of the Air Force is to deter war. The aim of our national security policy is the deterrence of actions that threaten the security of the United States and areas-considered vital to its interests. The Air Force has also been active in humanitarian efforts for many years. They have provided their resources to assist civil authorities during disasters, conducting searches for downed and lost AMERICA hunters. They have helped people during floods, snowstorms, forest fires, tornadoes, hurricanes, droughts and other disasters. Gitmo has only three permanently assigned Air Force personnel, but they provide us with invaluable services. Captain (AFVC) Arnold R. Williams, Master Sergeant Kennie C. Haynes and Staff Sergeant Ron D. Stamer are responsible for food inspection services; the control of Zoonoses, contagious diseases that can be spread from animals to man, such as rabies; looking after the government owned working dogs, Deer Park, the horses at the Special Services Corral and caring for dependents' pets. Capt. Williams is the first permanently assigned military veterinarian here. Williams, Haynes and Stamer are attached to the Naval Hospital, but the Vet Clinic is supported by Special Services. The Air Force men are part of the 1071st Medical Service Squadron under Headquarters Command in Washington, D.C. The 1071st has 210 personnel assigned to it scattered all over the world at 60 different operating locations. Personnel are stationed at Navy bases overseas, Marine bases, Navy research bases and various other places. WASHINGTON (AP)--President Ford, hoping to rebound from four straight primary losses to Ronald Reagan, is optimistic about his chances in today's Nebraska and West Virginia primaries, but feels both will be a "close fight," his spokesman said yesterday. Press Secretary Ron Nessen also announced Ford will make two campaign trips to Michigan this week instead of one, as aides considered the possibility that Reagan's momentum and Democratic crossover votes could deal the President a damaging defeat in his home state on May 18. It had previously been announced that Ford would be in the Detroit area tomorrow. Nessen said the President will return to Michigan on Saturday and Sunday, following a day of campaigning in Kentucky and Tennessee on Friday. The only firm stop on the weekend Michigan visit is the annual tulip festival in Holland Saturday afternoon. Ford originally had planned to campaign in Arkansas on Saturday, but decided to skip that state in favor of a more concentrated effort in Michigan. The President's advisers feel Reagan has an edge difficult to overcome in such southern states as Arkansas. Nessen again told his morning press briefing that Ford expects to win on the first ballot at the GOP convention in Kansas City. "When the balloting starts, the President will have more than the 1,130 votes needed," Nessen said. Reagan currently leads Ford in committed delegates 387 to 314, with 328 uncommitted. Asked the basis of Ford's confidence, Nessen said, "He believes House passes bill to raise bonuses for submariners WASHINGTON (AP)--More and bigger bonuses to attract and keep specially trained nuclear submarine officers in the Navy were approved yesterday by the House. On a 322-27 vote, the House sent to the Senate a bill to increase the present one-time $15,000 bonus for nuclear submarine officers who sign up for another four years to $20,000. It also would authorize a new one-time $3,000 bonus for young officers to enter nuclear-submarine service and an annual bonus up to $4,000 for serving on nuclear submarines. Backers of the bill told the House the Navy is losing the trained officers to private industry at a rate that would force it to take some submarines out of service in 1980 for lack of personnel. The House Armed Services Committee estimates that bonuses would cost $4.5 million next year, and that the cost would rise to $6.7 million in 1980. his record of accomplishments in office justifies a full four-year term and will win him the nomination." That's a theme the President enunciated while campaigning in Nebraska last Saturday and Sunday and is part of a new strategy devised by advisers in the wake of the four straight primary defeats. Another strategy session was scheduled yesterday, with Ford meeting with his campaign advisers Rogers Morton and Stuart Spencer and White House Chief of Staff Richard Cheney. Throughout the campaign, Reagan has stressed the issue that the United States has become militarily inferior to the Soviet Union. Ford again answered that criticism yesterday in a speech at the Washington Monument commemorating Armed Forces Week. "Today our defenses are strong, and we will keep them strong," he said. "Not strong for the sake of war--but strong for the sake of peace." He said the nation is developing new weapons such as the B1 bomber, the Trident submarine aftssile, the Cruise missile and a new tank. "The weapons we hold today, and those we plan for the future, give America a mighty power," he said. "But with such power comes a mighty responsibility. We must never forget the purpose for which our arsenal is intended. "That purpose is not to terrify the weak, to provoke armed confrontation nor to lay claim to that which is not ours," Ford said. "Our purpose is to defend freedom and to maintain a foundation of strength on which a better and more peaceful world can be built." World News Digest WASHINGTON (AP)--Senate Majority Leader Mike Mansfield said the Senate probably will spend all week debating on how best to keep an eye on U.S. intelligence agencies. Mansfield said yesterday he thinks there will be a lot of statements on the matter. He said he doubts a vote will come early. The Senate is expected to set up a new intelligence committee, but whether it will have the power to maintain meaningful watch on the intelligence agencies remains to be seen. WASHINGTON (AP)--A Senate panel is set to begin three days of public hearings into an alleged military meat fraud involving millions of dollars. Florida Democrat Lawton Chiles, chairman of the government operations subcommittee conducting the probe, says Army meat inspectors got "thousands of dollars" in bribes and other favors for approving inferior meat for military consumption. Four present or former Army meat inspectors were scheduled to testify before the panel yesterday.

PAGE 2

Page 2 Cc MEETINGS TODAY EXERCISE from 6 to 7 p.m, For more information call Leonard Gobert at 90126 AWH. GUANTANAMO BAY SELF DEFENSE CLUB will practice at the Child Day Care Center at 6 p.m. OKINAWA KARATE AFFILIATION will practice from 6 to 8 p.m. at Marblehead Hall. For more information call 98258 AWH. SURE LOSERS WEIGHT REDUCING CLUB will meet at Quonset Hut 211A behind the oldelementary school at 7 p.m. For more information call Joanne Frandsen at 951197. BOY SCOUTS will meet in the Boy Scout Hut, 6th Street, Villamar at 7:30 p.m. For more information call Sharon Fox at 64462. GITMO BAY BRIDGE CLUB meets at 7 p.m. at the COMO Club. Contact Jim Cossey at 85149 AWH. The club is open to all base residents. BINGO will be played at the CPO Club beginning at 8 p.m. BASE ATHLETIC COMMISSION will meet in the Special Services conference room at 3:30 p.m. For more information call 95448 DWU. CROCHET CLASS TO BEGIN The Caribbean Arts and Crafts Association announces a beginner's crochet class starting next Thursday, May 20. Both morning and evening classes will be offered, with registration limited to 6 students per class. For more information or to register, contact Shelley Grizzard at 98156 AT. ZOO UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT Tomorrow, the Deer Park Zoo will be under the new management of the Deer Park Zoo Committee. Special Services has irelinquished.its responsibility forthe Zoo. Mrs. Sharon Schlagle is the new zoo keeper and with the help of the base veterinarian,Dr. Williams, she will care for Lte weirare of the animals. The: committee wishes to thank the Gitmo community for alltheir efforts and willing donations to keep the Zoo open. Through your help they maycontinue to keep it open. Your children thank you too. MEN'S GOLF ASSOCIATION A men's golf association is being formed. The first organizational meeting will be held tonight at 8. All male golfers are welcome. U.NAVAL GUANTANAMO BAY, BASE CUAA (61I2AI t immunity bulletin Board Guantanamo Gazette Frr) r I IXIZ if w n i JACK AND JILL TOURNAMENT A Jack and Jill golf tournament will be held this Sunday at the golf course beginning at 1 p.m. A cookout will follow the tournament, Sign up at golf pro shop. m-16 REQUALIFICATION CLASSES All Navy personnel desiring to requalify with the M-16 rifle should call Chief Beelman at the Naval Station rifle range at 98105. Classes will be conducted on Monr day, May 24; Tuesday, May 25;and Wednesday, May 26 commencing at 8 a.m. The course for qualification will be fired on Wednesday, May 26, NAS AIRCRAFT DISPLAY The Naval Air Station will hold open house and place several aircraft on static display. Everyone is invited to visit the NAS main hangar on Saturday from 1 to 4 p.m. CARIBBEAN ARTS AND CRAFTS ASSOCIATION TO MEET The Caribbean Arts and Crafts Association will meet tomorrow at 17B Granadillo Point starting at 7 p.m. Anyone interested is urged to attend this meeting.MIDWAY BOOTHS FOR 4TH OF JULY The Bicentennial is approaching. All organizations and clubs interested in having a booth on the midway on our nation's 200th birthday are asked to call Chief Gwaltney at 85556. GITMO SWINGERS TO DANCE The Gitmo Swingers Square Dance Club will hold its monthly meeting and will dance Saturday night at 7*30 in the club hall. BLOOD SHORTAGE AT HOSPITAL The Naval Hospital Blood Bank is currently experiencing a shortage of "B+" and "B-" blood., Anyone having either of these two blood types and who wishes to donate blood is asked to contact the Naval Hospital at 95444 and leave your name and phone number. MASONS MEETING There will be a special communcation at Caribbean Naval Lodge held in Masonic Apts. #800 at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday forthe purpose of conducting work in the first degree. All Masons are cordially and fraternally invited to attend. ADVANCED SCUBA COURSE 1c rj" % V AThere will be an advanced open water scuba course starting tomorrow Cat JtH.a~ttI CtC. ~~kt, at the EM pool. In order to sign up N~Sta for this course, you must be an open water diver and have had 20 dives, To register or for more information, J03 ob itc ho. Ojf. oEditorcall 95325 DWH or 97264 AWH. S DCla wle. Photgapher JSSA Clay USSAit,,. .Rpotr Th Guantamo aete .ublshed according t te of the Naval Base public affairs officer. Printed five times wekly at goement opense on government equipment, the opinions or that appear herein are not o onsre official or as reflecting the Views of CodavBase or the Deparmentfthe Navy. CIVIC COUNCIL TO MEET The Civic Council will meet at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday at the Arts and Crafts Workshop. The public is cordially invited to attend. Tuesday, May 11, 1976 The Officers Wives Club will be having a luncheon on Thursday, May 20 at the COMO Club sponsored by the Marine Barracks Wives. Cocktails will begin at 11:30 a.m. with lunch being served at 12 noon. The guest speaker will be Captain Steve Wood, assistant judge advocate for COMNAVBASE. He will speak on the topic "Women and the Law". For reservations call Barb Fields at 95372 or Gale Dineen at 951201, No cancellations will be accepted after Tuesday, May 18. NEW LOCATION FOR NURSERY SCHOOL The base nursery school has moved to their new location at Marina Point in the old elementary school annex. The phone number remains the same, GITMO BAY MUSEUM TO OPEN SAT, The Naval Base Museum will be open this Saturday in honor of Armed Forces Week from 12 to 3 p.m. SHIP TO VISIT HAITI The USS Meredith will visit PortAu-Prince, Haiti this week-end. Interested personnel should submit approved Recreation Travel Request (NAVBASE GTM Form 4650/1(7-74)) to BPTO no later than 11 a.m. this Thursday. ADVANCED CERAMIC PAINTING CLASSES TO BEGIN Special Services is offering advanced ceramic painting classes to begin today. There will be both a morning and evening class. The fee is $9. For more information or to register call Marion McGuire at 951211. REEF RAIDERS PICNIC The Reef Raiders will hold a steal' and dog picnic this Sunday at Windmill Beach. This is free to all members and their families. Call in your reservations by Thursday to Dorn McGee at 951163. Meet at the beach at 9 a.m. for the dive and stay afterwards for a picnic. Prison officials refuse to release Patty for trial LOS ANGELES (AP)--The Federal Bureau of Prisons refuses to release Patricia Hearst to state authorities for a June 1 trial in Los Angeles, her prosecutor said yesterday. Deputy District Attorney Sam Mayerson said he would urge the judge in Miss Hearst's case to proceed with the kidnap, assault and robbery trial of her codefendants, Symbionese Liberation Army members William and Emily Harris. The three, who traveled together as fugitives, are scheduled to have a pretrial hearing tomorrow. "I have made the request that Patricia be available for the trial on June 1, and we were turned down by the Bureau of Prisons," Mayerson said. Miss Hearst, convicted of bank robbery in San Francisco last March 20, is under temporary sentence at the San Diego Metropolitan Correctional Center for 90 days of diagnostic tests. That period will end about July 25 but could be extended another 90 days if the prison requests more time. "They have authorized her release only for short periods of time during this diagnostic study," said Mayerson. The prosecutor said he received a letter from prison authorities approving Miss Hearst's appearance at tomorrow's hearing. 0-CU WIVES LUNCHEON James Earl Ray Court says guilty* plea must stand CINCINNATI (AP)-James Earl Ray's bid to overturn hisiguilty plea in the slaying of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. was rejected yesterday by the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. The court said Ray's contention that he anticipated a reopening of his case "is at best highly implausible." "It is more likely that he simply reasoned that a shrewd attorney might find a way to overturn his conviction regardless of the voluntariness of the plea," the court said in rejecting Ray's appeal for a new trial. One of Ray's attorneys, Robert I. Livingston, said he will ask the U.S. Supreme Court to review the appeal. The unanimous decision concluded that U.S. District Judge Robert B. McRae of Memphis, Tenn., was correct in February 1975 when he refused an appeal after a hearing on the events that led to Ray's March 10, 1969, guilty plea in Shelby County, Tenn. Ray is serving a 99-year prison term. Another of Ray's attorneys, James H. Lesar, contended that Ray did not fatally shoot King in Memphis, Tenn., on April 4, 1968. Lesar argued that former defense attorney Percy Foreman coerced Ray into a guilty plea and that Ray had been framed. However, Lesar said he had no information about who actually shot King. Four plane crash victims identified as. U.S. citizens MADRID, Spain (AP)--Four foreigners identified by the Boeing Aircraft Company yesterday as Americans, were reported killed in the crash of an Iranian Air Force 747 cargo jet in Spain Sunday. Sixteen persons were aboard the plane, an official Iranian news agency report said, and Spanish police said all died in the crash. Boeing identified the Americans aboard the plane as Paul Hardman, 44, pilot instructor, of Ft. Worth, Tex.; Robert Wilson, 53, flight engineer, of Zenith, Wash.; William Townsend, 45, mechanic, of Lancaster, Calif. All were employed by Boeing and stationed in Tehran. The Iranian news agency listed the other occupants as eight Iranian military personnel, two Iranian women and two Iranian civilian men. The plane was one of five 747's bought by the Iranian government by Boeing and converted to military use. It was on a flight from Iran to the United States when it crashed 60 miles southwest of Madrid. Villagers reported seeing the big plane explode while flying at a low altitude during a torrential rainstorm. Rescue workers reported recovering completely charred bodies from the wreckage. Police had first reported 17 persons aboard the plane, but the Iranian news agency listed only 16. The crash was the second for a Boeing 747 since the jumbo jet went into service in 1970. LAST WEEK'S WATER FIGURES Water produced: 11,469,000 Water consumed: 10,948,000 In storage: 18,469,000 Water gain: 521,000 (in gallons)

PAGE 3

Tuesday, May 11, 1976 dush defends WASHINGTON (AP)--CIA Dir George Bush defended yeste the agency's continued use certain part-time journali overseas who sell their wo American news organization "I don't think the agenc be prohibited from using t of person," Bush told repo In a luncheon appearance the Washington Press Club, also stopped short of seco FBI Director Clarence Kell public apology to the Amer public for FBI intelligenc in the past. Bush repeated previous s that "I abhor the things t wrong." But when asked if would apologize replied, feel that I have to say an about it." Bush's comments about th continued use of American lists came two weeks after Senate Intelligence Commit that the CIA still maintai tacts with about 25 journa The committee said that ingly blanket statement by ling out future relation *th any full-time or par ws correspondent accredi by any U.S. news organizat affected less than half th approximately 50 journalis working for the CIA, since of them were "unaccredited An unaccredited journali one who has not been issue credentials identifying hit Guan anamo Gazette CIA use of journalists ector representative of a news organizerday tion. a of Bush said that any news organizasts tion concerned about the CIA's rk to use of unaccredited journalists s. could simply issue press credenty should ials to everyone who works for them hat sort A staff member of the Intelligence rters. Committee has said that many news before executives would also qualify as Bush "unaccredited." But Bush said he ending was uncertain whether CIA use of y' s news executives would violate the ican agency's own guidelines. However, ue abuses he appeared to rule out CIA use of two types of news executives-tatements editors and publishers--because :hat were of the prominent role they play in he the reporting process. I don't The one hypothetical example more that Bush cited of a reporter who still could be on the agency e agency us payroll was that of a writer who journasells "a cooking column once a year" to an American publication. he Ctee said ens conalists. anama a seemBush U.S. will retain right to defend canal hips t-time ted ion e ts many [." st is d press m as a SAN ANTONIO, Texas (AP)-The United States will retain in any treaty with Panama its right to defend the Panama Canal from either internal or external takeover, Deputy Secretary of Defense William Clements said yesterday. Clements said the right of the United States to "participate in Carter will meet with George Meany WASHINGTON (AP) --Democratic front-runner Jimmy Carter, maneuvering to close party ranks behind his presidential candidacy, has arranged a private meeting with AFL-CIO President George Meany. The two men, who talked on the telephone but who have never met, will get together Friday in Meany's office across Lafayette Park from the White House. An aide to the 81-year-old qbor leader, confirming the rangements yesterday, said Carter 4ook the initiative" in setting up the session. The aide said only that the two would "get together and talk." "There'll be no photographers, and Meany will have nothing to say afterward," said the aide, AFL-CIO spokesman Al Zack. Why? "Because the AFL-CIO is neutral and is taking no position until after the conventions," Zack said. Until recently, Carter has portrayed himself as an outsider not beholden to any of the traditional powers in the Democratic party. But, since the Pennsylvania primary, he has spent much of Old library becomes nursery school classroom "I like it, it's really great--all this room," was the comment made by Mrs. Stower, instructor at Guantanamo's Nursery School, when she was asked how she felt about the 'new' school. The new school is, of course, the library of the old elementary school at Marina Point. Monday was the first day of school at the library for the three and four-year-olds of the nursery school. According to Mrs. Pola of the nursery school, there is still a lot of work left to be done in the building, but in time it will all be done. So, if the little one came home yesterday telling you stories of a new school, it's true.finally. his time trying to win over uncommitted delegates and party leaders. Last week, the candidate won a number of endorsements, including that of United Auto Workers President Leonard Woodcock. Meany, who controls the AFL-CIO's political activities, has met with all Democratic presidential candidates except Alabama Gov. George Wallace. Meany has said all but Wallace are acceptable to labor. Nevertheless, Meany and most of the old-line labor leaders, particularly in the building trades, have been cool to Carter. Now, however, the union leaders are becoming reconciled to a Carter victory at the Democratic convention, especially since his victory in the Pennsylvania primary, where the candidate overcame the opposition of the old-line unions and the party organization. In recent weeks, Meany has told his political strategists that the AFL-CIO would back Carter if he became the nominee. But Meany also said support would be keyed to an acceptable clarification of Carter's stand on labor issues. the defense of the canal is a continuing right--and is fundamental to any treaty negotiated." Clements assailed recent "campaign rhetoric" that implied the United States is negotiating to give away the canal. "There are those now who are publicly charging that the treaty negotiations now under way with Panama are some sort of 'giveaway' and that we are engaged in them because we're somehow afraid of threats of force," Clements said. "This is simply not true," he told the Texas Association of Insurance Agents. Former California Governor Ronald Reagan, who is challenging President Ford for the Republican presidential nomination, made those accusations in campaign addresses. "We are negotiating with Panama because it is in our own best interest to do so. We want to make sure the canal remains open for the commerce of the world and that it is efficiently operated on a nondiscriminatory basis at reasonable prices," he said. Page 3 Finance Committee considers minimum tax laws for rich WASHINGTON (AP)--The Senate Finance Committee is considering a measure which could force nearly 100,000 more well-to-do Americans to pay a minimum federal tax. The minimum tax, enacted in 1969, is currently paid by about 55,000 of the nation's wealthiest persons. It imposes a 10 per cent levy, on top of regular income taxes, on certain large deductions known as "preferences." But the first $30,000 of preferences are exempt. Finance Committee Chairman Russell B. Long, D-La., said that by eliminating the $30,000 exemption and raising the minimum tax rate to 14 per cent, 154,000 persons would be forced to pay the tax. Long's plan would bring an estimated $700 million to $800 million into the treasury each year. The House has already approved a stiffer change in the minimum tax law that would raise an extra $1.3 billion annually. Long's committee is expected to vote on his proposal Tuesday. During a committee meeting Friday, it appeared the bill had the votes to pass. Last week the Internal Revenue Service reported that 244 Americans with adjusted gross income over $200,000 paid no income tax in 1974. Another 3,053 persons with income between $50,000 and $200,000 also paid nothing. Tax experts say these people reduce their taxable income to zero by deducting such expenses as interest, state and local taxes and property depreciation. They also benefit from a lower tax rate on capital gains, which are increases in the value of investments. Ford undecided over election commission WASHINGTON (AP)--Mary Louise Smith, chairman of the Republican National Committee, said she recommended to President Ford at a White House meeting yesterday that he sign the bill to restructure the Federal Election Commission. The President has been seeking advice from a variety of political officials and will confer with Mrs. Stower's nursery school class in the library of the old elementary school at Marina Point. Republican congressional leaders today on what to do about the campaign legislation that is at the White House for action May 17. Mrs. Smith said in a telephone interview after the meeting that she did not know which way Ford was leaning but "I recommended that he sign it." She said that, while she felt there were "some shortcomings" that Congress could address later, "I believe this is the way to go now. My feeling is that we need to get on with this election." The delay in correcting constitutional flaws in the law establishing the Federal Election Commission is holding up large sums of money for sorely pressed presidential candidates. The FEC has been without many of its powers since March 22 as a result of a Supreme Court ruling that its six members were not constitutionally authorized because they were congressional appointees. The pending measure would correct that by having the President name the commission members. But it also adds other provisions that have aroused controversy. Presidential Press Secretary Ron Nessen said Ford had discussed with Mrs. Smith the long-range political effects on the two-party system that might result from the new legislation.

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PeGuantanamo Gazette ASSIFIED All ads will be run one time only. You must submit your ad each time you want it to be printed. Ads may be submitted by calling 951144 or by dropping them in one of the drop boxes. Ads which discriminate on the basis of race, sex, creed, color' or national origin will not be accepted. for sale 10,000 BTU Fedders A/C, $35; Sears Kenmore washing machine, $50; 1972 Honda CB 100, $300, Call 96211 or see at GP 13C, must sell by May 16, "McDonalds" play school, complete with bag of toys, $10; carpet padding for bathroom, bedroom or dining area, $4; large umbrella vase made in Spain with flowers, $30; Sears, childs shoes, week old, size 12, $5;' blue velvet pillow cover, $2; three pieces onyx fruit, $4; new plastic photo holders, $1 each; new two carat diamond ring, ladies, white gold, cost $40, sell for $20; set yellow double sheets and cases, $4; hand painted wood, pink tissUe holder and matching round box, $5, Call 96198. High chair, $3; toy piano, $3; toy cradle, $3; radio, $5; 4 pieces wooden canister, $3; kitchen wall clock, $3; misc, toys, mostly dolls and infants toys; golf clubs, $40; bicycle, $10. See at DH301 or call 95431 after 2 p.m. 1970 Gremlin-X, 3 speed, wide o'vals, runs good, $1,000, Call 95431 after 2 p.m. 1971 brown Monte Carlo with white vinyl roof, power disc brakes, por wer steering, automatic trans., excellent condition, $2,000. Call at 98196 AT. 1972 yellow Nova, 2-door sedan in excellent condition, black interior with matching carpet, A/C, heating, radio, with rear speakers power steering, auto. trans., new hoses, belts and oil change, available in July, $2,000, firm. Call 85264. Two VW tires with wheels slug pattern; color TV antenna ; contractor type wheel barrow; lawn mowerF lawn chairs and one chaise lounge; 9'x12' green rug; pole lamp; automotive paint,variety of colors; plywood, misc, sizes, Call 85350 'AT. 1965 Loage Coronet wabn, A/C, radio, power steering, power brakes, auto. trans., 383-V8 engine, $500. Call 85152 AWH. Fedders A/C, 22,000 BTU, in good condition, $100 or best offer, Call after 6 p.m. 85790 or can be seen at 167A Corinaso Point. Three pieces American Tourister Luggage, $35; Eureka typewriter, $25; man's 10 speed, 26" bike, $35. Call 95402 AT, 1972 750 Kawasaki, $200 or best offer. Call 64237 AT, 8 track tape player for car with Quad 4 channel, $50; color TV antenna $15; baby bathtub, $5; child's car seat, price negotiable, two baby walkers, price negotiable. Call 97195 AT. One portable B/W TV, 18" screen, Can be seen at 264A Villamar or call 951189, 1972 Honda CL-100 M/C.too end just overhauled, $300. Call 64251 DWH or 95369 AWH. 12 string guitar Dutch Egmond, $75. Call 951197 AT. 1963 VW, good working condition, new muffler included, $500. Leave a message at 95465 DWH for Ms. Pryor, call will.be returned, or 951001, ext. 211 AWH. 20 cu. ft. Cold Spot upright freezer, $130; 8 'x11 blue and white oval braided rug, $30, Call 952267 AT, 1964 Chevy wagon, good Gitmo transportation, $300; 1971 Honda CT90KZ trail, runs great, with some new spare parts, $300; Penny's best sabre saw, $15; picnic table, $5. Call 64245 DWH, or 9535 5AWH. Highchair, $10; crib with new mattress, $15; electric Hoover sweeper; canister vacuum cleaner with all attachments; portable TV stand which holds up to a 27 TV. Call 90195 AT. wanted Starter for 1963 Plymouth Valiant, 225 cu. in engine. Call 90187 AT. Piano tuner. Call 85728 AT. Barrel. boat or pontoon boat, must be in good condition. Call 95312 DWH or 85294 AWH. Large cage to raise a rabbit in. Call Ronnie Andrew at 85709 DWH or 85559 AWH. Lead in quantities of ten lbs, or higher, will pay 10 cents per lb. Call 95325 DWH or 97264 AWH and ask for Vance. Babysitter for two children, ages eight and ten for the summer, Turnkey or Kittery beach area in their home, Call 952243 AWH. Auto hobby shop attendant, equal opportunity employment, $2.46 per hour, Call Special Services at 95449., found Pair of prescription wire frame glasses with tinted lens at ferry landing on NAS. Can claim at NAS CO's office. Package containing boy's baseball glove and baseball at coin machine across from Mini-Mart, Found Satur'day morning. Tohclaim call LN1Doiron at 85600 or 85432 DWH, services House and stove cleaning on weekends, Call 85734 or 85231 DWH. giveaway Six cans of cat food with a oneyear-old female cat. Has been spayed. Excellent table manners. Tolerant of children, indifferent towards women, responsive to men. Eats from a can of cat food with her paw. The big event of the year was at hand last week for all Gitmo men bowlers, the annual roll-off for ComTen competition, a stepping stone to All Navy. Thirty bowlers competed for the two six-man team tomTen qualifying positions. All the bowlers wish to thank the base commands for their support of this event. Representatives for ComTen come from NavSta Comm/BCT, Supply, Comptroller and the COMO Club. Other commands include SatCom Det, FTG, AAWC, NAS and the Hospital. Jim Onorato and myself fought it out for first place down to the last game. I started the opening series with a 684 series to take the early lead. Jim passed me up on the second day with the help of a 664 series. Jim's last ,series was a 615; I lucked out with a 631. Other positions were equally close: Al Hall, Vic Baylosis and Bruce Johnstone were within ten pins of each other, fighting for the final position on the first team. RESULTS: First Team: 1. Doug Drewry (194.1) 684, 631, 605 series with eleven 200s 2. Jim Onorato (192.5) 662, 615 series with eight 200s. 3. R.J. Morrison (189.0) six 200s. 4. Ron Beagles (187.1) six 200s. 5. Dale Goodwin (184.7) 631 series with three 200s. 6. Al Hall (183.2) 605, 604 with six 200s. Second Team: 7. Vic Baylosis (183.1) four 200s. 8. Bruce Johnstone (182.8) four 200s. NATIONAL LEAGUE: East Philadelphia New York Pittsburgh St. Louis Chicago Montreal West Cincinnati Los Angeles Houston San Diego San Francisco Atlanta Reknowned lizard killer. Needs a good Monday's resulthome by June 22. Call 95320 AT. Los Angeles 4, St. Four black female kittens, six-weeksold, give to good home only Call 952262 AT. One black female shepherd, 3 years old, spayed) good watchdog. Needs home with lots of love. Call 952262 AT. AFRTS Sports Schedule Tonight on FM 103--Bos. Celtics at Cleve. Cavaliers, 8 p.m. At 9:35 pm. the N.Y. Nets vs. Denver Nuggets will be joined in progress. Tomorrow night the Phoenix Suns will be at the Golden State Warriors at 8:23 p.m. AMERICAN LEAGUE: East New York Milwaukee Detroit Cleveland Baltimore Boston West Texas Kansas City Minnesota Oakland Chicago California W I 15 7 18 10 15 9 12 15 11 16 9 15 15 16 14 13 9 8 10 11 14 13 17 18 GB 1 5 1/2 6 1/2 7 2 1/2 2 1/2 6 1/2 7 1/2 Louis 3 W L GB 15 6 -10 7 3 10 9 4 10 12 5 1/2 9 13 6 1/2 6 14 8 1/2 15 7 -11 9 3 11 10 3 1/2 13 13 4 8 11 5 1/2 10 17 7 1/2 Monday's resultsMinnesota 5, Kansas City 4, 10 innings Chicago 7, Texas 6, 11 innings Oakland 6, California 3 Kegler's Korner By Doug Drewry 9. Joe Shier (182.3) five 200s. 10. John Renner (181.5) 619 with three 200s. 11. Bill Roberts (180.4) 626 series with five 200s. 12. Chuck Dittmar (180.0) 606 series with four 200s. Brenda Taylor, the only female in the competition, will represent the women. She averaged almost 160. The two teams Gitmo is sending to Roosevelt Roads, P.R. this year averaged 185 for the' 24 games. Doug Drewry, R.J. Morrison, Al Hall and Bruce Johnstone are returning from last year when our team placed third, won three individual trophies and placed a man on the All-ComTen team. This year some of the team is thinking All Navy and expects to win the ComTen Team Event. Bantams take notice: The Bantam Bowling League Banquet will be held from 12 to 3 p.m. on Saturday, May 15, at the CPO Club Pool. The time change is due to the Little League games at 5 p.m. on Saturday. All bantams and their parents who indicated they would like to attend are encouraged to come. Juniors take notice: The Junior Bowling League's Dinner/Dance will be held Thursday, May 13, at the CPO Topside Lounge. Dinner will be served at 6:30 p.m. Hank Stence will be playing music during dinner and for the dance afterwards. The dance will end at 11 p.m. All juniors and their guests are welcome to come. The Topside Lounge will be open at 6 p.m. Junior League: Teresa Martin 180/470, Jerry Hall 489 and David Christensen 202 game. Bantam League: Todd Christensen 176/307, Angela Freeman 239 series and Teri Houghtling 122 game. Local Softball Scores SATURDAY, MAY 8: NavSta Blue 8, NavSta White 1 High School 11, NavSta Red "A" 7 PWD Leeward 3, Security Group 2 Marine Barracks "Red" 10, Hospital 3 NavSta Red "B" 11, NAS Leeward 4 FTG 10, NavSta White Galley 8 SUNDAY, MAY 9: Marine Barracks Red 18, NavSta 2 NavSta Red "B" 10, AFTRTS 2 NAS Leeward 10, Hospital 1 Marine Barracks Gold 6, NavSta White 5 High School 12, FTG 7 NavSta Blue 14, Security Group 8 UAW welcomes Volkswagen to America BONN, West Germany (AP)--Leonard Woodcock, president of the United Automobile Workers of America, said yesterday he believes the decision by West Germany's Volkswagen auto manufacturer to establish an American plant may cause Japanese rivals to consider following suit. Noting that Toyota and Nissan have completed previously inconclusive studies on assembling cars in the United States, he told the Associated Press: "They may now reconsider their studies." But he cautioned that "the yen is not as strong as the Deutsche mark" in relation to the U.S. dollar, referring to foreign exchange fluctuations that helped increase the cost of German-produced Volkswagens in the United States and caused cheaper Japanese products to draw ahead on the American market. i -77-7-' -I Page 4 Tuesday, May 11, 1976


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