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Guantanamo Gazette

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Guantanamo Gazette
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Vol. 31 ...89 U.S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Monday, Ma 10, 1








Kissinger promises

World News Digest'

contnue sup ortMADRID (AP)-An Iranian Air Force 747 jumbo f jet that crashed
near Madrid yesterday killed all
of Israel by U.S. ta oeo h itm a v 17 persons aboard. Police now say

been Americans. Witnessessath
BALTIMORE, Maryland (AT) -U.S. plane was flying at low altitude
Secretary of State Henry Kissinger in a rainstorm when it was rocked,
yesterday that continuation by an explosion.
e tatus quo in the Middle
Is ael in ngatin iththe i WASHINGTON (AP)-The' importance Aas. inth adged,a s wThr the l of, the May 18th Michigan primary se no u imo easoltions" ewl to: Gerald Ford's fight against Netherip theUnitdtas. no Morris Udall Ronald Reagan became apparent
aneth e usied p ttes nor icat yesterday when aides added a secan Mitde Eatt eme nher ll dat ond Michigan visit to'the Ford RatMder, "Tr settldemenegosai.ons schedule. Ford already planned between t e rish wil n et-m a trip to his home state Wednesually hav to live in peace," Udall accuses Fiord o 'shabby' poiisday. Nwhe's going back SaturKissinger said. o day as well.
~The secretary made th1e statement CIAO(P-omrIln
in. a speech prepared for the' con- ~ NEW HAVEN, Conn '(AP)-rRep. Morris legislation promptly. "I've got GovernO Ott o rner--clonisdi gregatio ofBtimore'sa Chizuk U~dall yestrday acused President a third of a million dollars ,Gvro toKre-cnitdi
AmnSnggeafter bed was given. Ford of~ delaying apovlo a new sitting down\ there," the Arizona a bribery~ case while a federal a distinguised, leadership' aad. federal elections commission in' Democrat said at the rally at judge--died of lung cancer in
Teapa nc wa' s Kissinger 's order to~ hamper Ford's political Yale University's law school. Chicago yesterday at the age of 'Ii a e~i giop i opoi~t~'"I'm like a fellow outside a 67. Family friends 'say they six weeksad i first as sec- "I can come to no other conclu-. bank--te oney is there, but I wlo ntinafuel theiental'ton retaryi~ a snggue. He made~ no sion~ than he's sitting on thdi-- can't get t~o it. 'It's shameful." o~i 'fl rs~nilpro direct rfene to his Jewish bill to 'help himself in th-Kd'ia 1 oteHavrdfi f~
bacgrun, uthespok e warmly , race (May '18)," Udall told a rally ''~ar School profesor' whom' Richard of Jews fo hei qualitiess of while~ campaigning for tomorrow's Nbcon 'fired in October 1973 as fath and vision." '' Democratic 'primary in Connecticuxt.' special Watergate prosecutor, Repeating the Ford Administration's Congress has~ sent Ford legisla-' appeared with Udall at the rally
",,cmmten t tesurvival and tioi reconstitu.t'ing the Federal 'and said the nation~ needs moralW e tV r i a
seuiyo-IreKissinger asked Election Commissionl, which the , leadership. w s
th mr nJews community U.S. .Supreme Couirt had ruled was "Government, having become as
to sppot-doliy o increased' unconstitutionally appointed. ' big and important as it is, the
~n arou~a4'the e commission's legal problem has ~most important thing is to~ makean N bu ak dayed'disbursal of federal match- :sure it is not being run as a oinin t te $ blloning campaign funds to several ' ripoff but as a trust," Cox said.' Id el has reevd in American ' Democratic presidential contenders 'Connecticut Democrats hold their
aidsice tsfonding, Kissinger and Ford's challenger for' the first presidential primary tomorrow m y h lp F r addd that' Isae can continue~ to ~GOP nomination, former California under intricate procedures thatma he p F r coun on U.S. support. "We have Gov. Ronald Reagan. eventually will determine how 'the proose $4.1 bilio for the "It' is a. shabby, hypocritical state's 51 delegates vote on the ' NEW YORK (AP)-President Ford~ next toyars for te ,Jerusalem thing he is doing,"'IUd'all -said f 'irst ballot at the national has a chance to regain the goenet e sae.of 'Ford's failure 'to sign the ' Democrat nominating convention, momentum in his race 'for the
Republican presidential nomination
if he 'scores, well in primary
contests tomorrow in Nebraska and
Y I West Virginia.
In each state 'dn registeredd
Republicans 'will 'be permitted to
either the President or challenger
I ' Ronald Reagan.
A ) M E. d AFord's campaign manager, Rogers
H N A M EICAC.B. Morton,~ blamed Ford's losses .in Indiana and Texas on conser"onor America" is this yea' "As we begin th bservance of only victory in armed conflicts, vative Democrats 'and Independents Ared Force Wee theme. l Armed Forces Week let us pause but also victory in the fields who casts ballots' for Reagan in the mltrfocsthle world ove for a few moments torflect upon of medicine, 'education, economics, Republican primary. Each state
11l pay 'rbueto the nato on the meaning of thunfr you sociology, disaster relief, civil determines whether to allow members is20hannivrsay. Are wear. It is my fir blief that works and technology. of one' party to vote in the other's Fore Dy has been~ extended 'into the men and women in uifor ar~e the primary.
a weklog bsrvacefrm ay true people of peace, it'is yu The Army has a global mission ' Ford campaigned Saturday in
8 o 5 hs ea.who are making the' personal sac- concentrated mainly in Europe, Nebraska, where he was born, but
Armd orc .ay was iuguated~ rifices fo~r this great country of K~orea and the United States. It " has made no campaign appearances on ugst 1,194 wein Scretary ours in order to provide for its maintains 16 active Army divisions , in West Virginia. He stayed in of Defense Loui Johnston,'with ~ defense. During~ the past 200 8 Army National Guard divisions Washington yesterday. Peidn Hry S. ruman's appQv-. years there hay' been 'times when 'and 12 Army Reserve training , With a small number of Republican al anone tethird Saturday' the uniform was not toopopular 7 divisions, Under a security 'delegates at stake, neither state
iMaisto be 'eignated.'rm ' even with our own 'coun trymen, yet, assistance" program, the Army helps primary would have attracted
FreDa .'"Thi was done afer "you~ continued to serve them~. America's' allies attain adequate much attention had it no't'been
efrswre ade in1947 to con- Armned Forces Week occurts this year military capabilities to defend for Reagan's'recent string of
'oidtet e earate observances when~ American military people are their freedom. ~"victories in Texas, Indiana,
oth nyAir Force, Navy and fighting nowhere, but remain'as '' 'Alabama and Georgia.
MaieCrs edy aver to confront those ' The United States Armiy is the Until his loss in Indiana, Ford
Prsi tT n i 'd apres- 'who challenge our freedom. For the finest in the world.' It continues had been considered invulnerable
idnilpolmto h ollow- le~period of '8-15 May le s oo to protect and preserve our govern- in the agricultural Midwest-Ia Sa'iyday America. 'let us hono ouseve. ment, its institutions and people,. nldn ersk-wieRaa V.er voyn gudng ed Nebraska lea mon et teNai 'h iydri)-is20 e ....... a ...o.c.nedtofficrs a re put......... tomor.....w's. outcome............ in..dout........
e c a e o m d:n ~ :: ' P 0 e ........th..... .......... most.......... current ..... .. The..... Nebraska..... primary........ inclu......................es.....















ye a utes ncldeoot l grwt .n.............'.nationa.convention

V V. zv emcatS ' Aednt : . ... .. '




















g the working morning parents, the children ven 'an evaluation sheet

rten through second
1. go to school as usual rning. Children particthe work program will ool in the regular afterith questions about on the Job" should call tary school at 95465 or




ribor dispute


?in nation


aid. The walkoutS from economic provisions7 ng conditions. York, 20,000 members
-B of the Service Employational Union continued
-old strike of apartment The doormen, porters, erators and security seeking a $50-a-week aone-year contract. Lanies range from $180 week.

-out by' 60,000 members
-ted Rubber Workers ;into its fourth week Against' the big four of the lustry--Goodyear, Goodrich, and Uniroyal.

icipal issues of the strike
-es and cost-of-living Talks between the union :one officials resume :leveland.
.e in the Midwest, talks sume in Arlington Heights,
Vy as the4 .13-state s41., -








Monday, May 10, 1976 Guantanamo Gazette Page 3



Tle late I Edgar HooverS


Kelly criticizes Hoover for FBI abuses .ic.ms.


vicim ofamus
WASHINGTON CAP)-Information re- In Fulton,, Mo., Saturday, FBI
garding contacts between members Director Clarence Kelley issued aon m u t i tp
of Congress and foreign officials public apology for past FBI mis- OlEEW~AUii~E
was picked up by FBI wiretaps deeds. For the first time he acand bugs and forwarded to Pres- knowledged that FBI officials had MONTEJURRA, Spain (AP)-Terrorists idents Johnson and Nixon, accord- abused their power and .subtly shot into a crowd of 5,000 chanting ing to a Senate Intelligence criticized his predecesor, the Carlists, killing one and injuring Committee staff report. late J. Edgar Hoover, for allowing three, yesterday as they scrambled
The 79-page report released the abuses. upward through mud and boulders
yesterday stressed that none of "We need to make it clearly to a mountaintop rally and Roman
the legislators was the direct understood that we recognize WITH ROOSEVELT Catholic mass.
target of electronic eavesdropping errors and have learned -from them," The violence, blamed by rally
but instead they were overheard Kelly said in a speech fori a lec- leaders on right extremists, was the
throughh the bureau's coverage ture series at Westminster College. wrtsc ls ic h et
of certain foreign establishments He said some of the abuses of of Spain's longtime-ruler Francisco
in Washington," probably embassies. power occurred "chiefly during the Franco, 5. 1/2 months ago.
twilight of Mr. Hoover's admin- The gunmen, hidden in the mounThe report cited the eaves- istration." tain mists, fired two bursts at
dropping as an> example of a sit- The Senate committee document random into the front ranks of uation in which "even properly traced the 'FBI's-u'se of wiretaps marchers hiking to the top of
authorized electronic surveillances and bugs from 1940 to 'the present, Montejurra Mountain-to pay ,
directed aginst foreign targets... describing in detail a number of homage to Carlist war dead,- the
may result in possible abuses previously reported cases, includ- rally leaders said.
'nvolving American citizens." ing the wiretapping of reporters Carlist leader Prince Carlos , The report did not name any of and government officials during WITH TRUMAN Hugo De Borbon Para, walking
the legislators or foreign offic- the Kennedy and Nixon administra- some 50 yards behind the wounded,
ials involved. tions. left the procession after the
The report on electronic surveil- Other individuals and groups ambush. His Dutch wife, Princess
lance is one of 13 volumes being named in the report as targets Irene, climbed on to the top,
issued by the committee in sup- of. electronic surveillance in the however, to celebrate Communion
port of its report on domestic - past include' the Jewish Defense~ near the snipers' roost.
spying. ,-League, the Communist Party U.S.A., The Carlists, Spain's oldest the Southern Leadership Conferen~ce, political party, date from 1833 Dr. Martin Luther King, the when Don Carlos, brother of King. Student Nonviolent Coordinating Ferdinand VII, opposed succession:Committee, Studen~ts for a Democrat- - of -the king's daughter to the ic Society, and-theKu Klux Klan. ' IH ,EHOWRthrone of Spain. Today they still Eavesdroppin maeil..seek to place Don Carlos' descenBeirut calm after EemesdropCongres m aia firsovt dant, Prince Carlos Hugo, on the mee s tof h oon& Wast firs throne in place of King Juan sntot M heon o6 n White.u se a Carlos De Borbon, Franco's chosen

election. of inqes March 1966 inresidnt that successor.
re ues from th consant t keep arlists fought on the side of theasF BI shd actonsn e o epr Franco during the 1936-39 civil daes of thei sofreign war, but have since turned' to

nr siceais) of these cornt socialism. Cries of "Carlismsenois) n mng cmn , w Socialism" and "workers selfsenators a cnressme, -o- management" were' mixed with calls

a BEIRUT, Lebanon intereot AP)-A precarious accoherinpobr eateo.utd for liberty and amnesty f or polmostJohnson felt that many of the itical prisoners during the 90-
yesterday, a~ day after the violence- protests against his Vietnam polic- WITH KENNEDY. miinu~te climb.-ridden election of a new president, ie, particularly' hearings in the The 46-year-old Prince Carlos but civil war continued in nearby Senate, had been generated e Hugo, ordered out of Spain for mountains with sporadic mortar foreign officials, the memo said. illegal political activity in
and machine gun fighting. "As a result of the President's -1968, slipped across the border
* Police said 78 persons were killed request, the FBI prepared ,a -,from France for the annual march nd 130 wounded in the clashes chronological summary--based in --with the knowledge of the governO etween Moslems and, Christians,' part on existing electronic ment." He was surrounded by body mostly beforee dawn. Fourteen bodies suvi~n~-ftec~at guards as word of the injuries from earlier combat were also dis- each senator, representative or swept down the struggling line
covered 'in Beirut suburbs and hill sVf mbrwocmuiaewthof. march.
towns, they added. selected foreign 'es- abishments The -shooting followed two weekend
Fig'hting ws fiercest'-in the - during the period July 1', 1964- bomb attacks .in the restive
Christian town of Zagharta and' to March- 17, 1966," the reotsaid. - WITH JOHNSON "northern Basqu~e region where
Moslem Tripoli, 60 mUiles north of 1arlists count their main strength.
Beirut where private aries traded Near San Sebastian' a 19-year-old rocket propelled' grenades, mortar - youth died while trying to place
shells and machine gun bullets, a bomb at an- industrialist's home,
security officials said. police reported.
St'illa, leftist groups showed $ bl ir is vwibE1 A'In Madrid, the government freed
signs of reconsidering their $1 bllin i pice. for defense pact three leftist leaders,' including positions and indicated a willing- . . ' Communist economist Ramon Tamames ness to support president-elect but left in prison Communist labox
Elias 'Sarkis provided political organizer Marcelino Camacho and and' economic refor programs are ANKARA, Turkey (AP)-Future defense bases and arms. The bases were three other top leftist leaders.
initiated without delay. -pacts between theUnited States and closed late July as a result of
"Regardless of indications to Turkey willbe virtually ruled out the U.S. arms embargo.
mh ongrry it is certain we if the U.S. Congress rejects a In March, Secretary of State Std reo m n s n ig aremovngsteadily toward' a, $1 billion defeneagreement between Henry Kissinger 'announced theStd reo m n s n ig
settlement," said a leftist the two NATO allies, Premier United States had agreed to
spokesman Suleyman Demirel warned yesterday. supply Turkey with $1 billion in crlmefi'h- ing program
"We are waitingfor a gesture The 52-year-old premier .also military aid over four yeas in
-from Sarkis,' to clarify his pos- disclosed. in 'an interview that. the return for reopening -the bases.
ition and 'intentions "regarding Soviet Union has pledged '$1 billion A' similar agreement for- $700 WASHINGTON CAP)-An independent~ demanded reformations (reforms), in easy-term credits to fund Turk- million is pending with Greece. - study of the government's multisecurity plans and st-atus of the ish development and industrial However,, congressional approval billion-dollar crime-fighting
Palestinian resistance movement projects. " - for both appears unlikely. 'It is - program concludes it has -accomplishfor which we have sacrificed so Turkey, which lies on Russia's not yet known when Congress will ed little and should be abolished.
much." ', - southern border, has been a'key vote. "The nation is in no better
The spokesman insisted all element-in the American policy I American critics in Congress position today than it was when
leftis groups oppose foreign of containment of the Soviet Union say Turkey should not receive. aid the Omnibus Crime Control and ,
intervenon i the Lebanese - since cold war days. The Turks as long as there is no settlement Safe Streets Act of 1968 was encivil .a and said the new have a standing army of half a of the Greek-Turk, conflict of acted," says the report, a draft
Christian pesdent will 'have million' , largest among European Cyprus. copy of which was obtained by
to "assdrt his power in his own NATO members, and'26'U.S. military If the agreement is rejected...," t
right." Sarkis was Syria electronic surveillance stations Demirel said, "It should be better Crime has increased and no caddate 'fo- tHe npeidency a which monitor Soviet activities. nt to have it... it would be solutions to the crime problem
to ~en te'wy~fo inceasd emarg 1<,.4 moth ago,, because... - a!i!greement along thes, .lnes or -Tefcsoftetuywas-the �
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PAGE 1

Suniemp. High tde-6:12pm Low tide--11:15am Sunrvaie---6 26am Sun6ie----7:27pm H 9h-----85 Low--73 Vol. 31 No. .89 The Navy's1only sho'te-boigd da&Dy U.S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Weather Forecast Mostly clear to partly cloudy. Some shower activity in area. Wind SE 14 K. Bay conditions 1-3 feet. Kissinger promises continued support of Israel by U.S. BALTIMORE, Maryland (AP)-U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger ed yesterday that continuation he status quo in the Middle t dwarfs all of the risks facing Israel in negotiations with the Arabs. But, he added, "There will be no imposed solutions." Neither the United States nor any other outside power will dictate a Middle East settlement, he said. Rather, "There should be negotiations between the parties that will eventually have to live in peace," Kissinger said. The secretary made the statement in a speech prepared for the congregation of Baltimore's Chizuk Amuno Synagogue after he was given a distinguished leadership award. The appearance was Kissinger's second spech to a Jewish group in six weeks and his first as secretary is a synagogue. He made no direct reference to his Jewish background, but he spoke warmly of Jews for their "qualities of faith and vision." Repeating the Ford Administration' s commitment to the survival and security of Israel, Kissinger asked the American Jewish community to support a policy of increased U.S. military strength around the 1r pointing to the $6 billion rael has received in American aid since its founding, Kissinger added that Israel can continue to count on U.S. support. "We have proposed $4.1 billion for the next two years" for the Jerusalem government, he stated. Udall accuses Ford of 'shabby' politics NEW HAVEN, Conn. (AP)-Rep. Morris Udall yesterday accused President Ford of delaying approval of a new federal elections commission in order to hamper Ford's political opponents. "I can come to no other conclusion than he's sitting on thatbill to help himself in the--fichigan race (May 18),Udall told a rally while campaigning for tomorrow's Democratic primary in Connecticut. Congress has sent Ford legislation reconstituting the Federal Election Commission, which the U.S. Supreme Court had ruled was unconstitutionally appointed. The commission's legal problem has delayed disbursal of federal matching campaign funds to several Democratic presidential contenders and Ford's challenger for the GOP nomination, former California Gov. Ronald Reagan. "It is a shabby, hypocritical thing he is doing," Udall said of Ford's failure to sign the legislation promptly. "I've got a third of a million dollars sitting down there," the Arizona Democrat said at the rally at Yale University's law school. "I'm like a fellow outside a bank--the money is there, but I can't get to it. It's shameful." Archibald Cox, the Harvard Law School professor whom Richard Ntxon fired in October 1973 as special Watergate prosecutor, appeared with Udall at the rally and said the nation needs moral leadership. "Government, having become as big and important as it is, the most important thing is to make sure it is not being run as a ripoff but as a trust," Cox said. Connecticut Democrats hold their first presidential primary tomorrow under intricate procedures that eventually will determine how the state's 51 delegates vote on the first ballot at the national Democrat nominating convention. HONOR AME "Honor America" is this year's Armed Forces Week theme. All military forces the world over will pay tribute to the nation on its 200th anniversary. Armed Forces Day has been extended into a week-long observance from May 8 to 15 this year. Armed Forces Day was inaugurated on August 31, 1949 when Secretary of Defense Louis Johnston, with President Harry S. Truman's approval, announced "the third Saturday in May is to be designated 'Armed Forces Day."' This was done after efforts were made in 1947 to consolidate the separate observances of the Army, Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps. President Truman issued a presidential proclamation the following February proclaiming Saturday, May 20, 1950, as the first Armed Forces Day. For 25 years the third Saturday in MIay has been set aside to recognize United States armed forces. Spcretary of the Navy, J. William Middendorf II, sent an Armed Forces Day statement to the Navy, but the message has significant meaning for all services. He states: "As we begin the observance of Armed Forces Week, let us pause for a few moments to reflect upon the meaning of the uniform you wear. It is my firm belief that the men and women in uniform are the true people of peace, it is you who are making the personal sacrifices for this great country of ours in order to provide for its defense. During the past 200 years there have been times when the uniform was not too popular even with our own countrymen, yet, you continued to serve them. Armed Forces Week occurs this year when American military people are fighting nowhere, but remain as ready as ever to confront those who challenge our freedom. For the period of 8-15 May let us honor America, let us honor ourselves." Each day of this week the Gazette will pay tribute to each of the military services. Today we honor the United States Army. The Army during its 200 years of service has performed many tasks hat have contributed, and con7tinue to contribute, to the welfare of the nation. The Army's duties include not only victory in armed conflicts, but also victory in the fields of medicine, education, economics, sociology, disaster relief, civil works and technology. The Army has a global mission concentrated mainly in Europe, Korea and the United States. It maintains 16 active Army divisions, 8 Army National Guard divisions and 12 Army Reserve training divisions. Under a security assistance program, the Army helps America's allies attain adequate military capabilities to defend their freedom. The United States Army is the finest in the world. It continues to protect and preserve our government, its institutions and people. To keep up with the changing times and an all-volunteer force, the Army is giving more attention to soldier-oriented programs. Officer and noncommissioned officers are provided with the most current leadership techniques and skills. Educational programs are designed to enhance personal and professional growth ad development. World News Digest MADRID (AP)-An Iranian Air Force 747 jumbo freight jet that crashed near Madrid yesterday killed all 17 persons aboard. Police now say that some of the victims may have been Americans. Witnesses say the plane was flying at low altitude in a rainstorm when it was rocked by an explosion. WASHINGTON (AP)-The importance of the May 18th Michigan primary to Gerald Ford's fight against Ronald Reagan became apparent yesterday when aides added a second Michigan visit to the Ford schedule. Ford already planned a trip to his home state Wednesday. Now he's going back Saturday as well. CHICAGO (AP)-Former Illinois Governor Otto Kerner--convicted in a bribery case while a federal judge--died of lung cancer in Chicago yesterday at the age of 67. Family friends say they will continue their battle to obtain a full presidential pardon for Kerner. West Virginia and Nebraska may help Ford NEW YORK (AP)-President Ford has a chance to regain the momentum in his race for the Republican presidential nomination if he scores well in primary contests tomorrow in Nebraska and West Virginia. In each state only'registered Republicans will be pei-mitted to vote in the Republican primary for either the President or challenger Ronald Reagan. Ford's campaign manager, Rogers C.B. Morton, blamed Ford's losses in Indiana and Texas on conservative Democrats and Independents who cast ballots for Reagan in the Republican primary. Each state determines whether to allow members of one party to vote in the other's primary. Ford campaigned Saturday in Nebraska, where he was born, but has made no campaign appearances in West Virginia. He stayed in Washington yesterday. With a small number of Republican delegates at stake, neither state primary would have attracted much attention had it not been for Reagan's recent string of victories in Texas, Indiana, Alabama and Georgia. Until his loss in Indiana, Ford had been considered invulnerable in the agricultural Midwest-including Nebraska--while Reagan was thought to have most of his strength in the South and West. Observers believe Ford had a strong lead in Nebraska last month, but Reagan's recent successes have put tomorrow's outcome in doubt. The Nebraska primary includes both a popularity contest between the major candidates and a vote for delegates to the Republican national convention. I -A'u ay, my L, If Monday Mav 10. 1976

PAGE 2

I, Monday, May 10, 1976W MEETINGS TODAY EXERCISE from 6 to 8 pm. For more information call Leonard Gobert at 90126 AWH. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets tonight. For more information call 95454 DWH. GITMO COIN CLUB meets in the quonset hut behind the elementary school at 7:30 p.m. For more information call Reggie Tullis at 97256 AWH or Ed Kindley at 97283 AT. LITTLE THEATRE will meet at 7:30 p.m. For more information call Steve Brown at 85286 AWH or 85454 DWH. MONDAY NIGHT ODD COUPLES LEAGUE MEET TODAY All members of the Monday Night Odd Couples League are requested to be at Marblehead Bowling Alley by 7:45 p.m, today. AVAITION BALL The annual Aviation Ball will be held at Leeward Point BOQ on Friday night from 7 p.m. to midnight, All NAS and VC-10 officers and NAVBASE aviators and their guests are invited. The cost is $7.50 per person. For reservations contact LT, Alger at 64397 or 64398. DEPUTYY GAME WARDEN MEETING There will be a deputy game wardens meeting at 7 p~m., tonight at the quonset hut, Marina Point SWAP SHELF AT LIBRARY Did you know that the Naval Station Library, located at the corner of Bay Hill Road and Sherman Ave. has a paperback swap section of the library? A person may bring books and trade them for any of a wide variety of books available, There are currently over 800 books on the swap shelves for your selection. ADVANCED CERAMIC PAINTING CLASSES TO BEGIN Special Services is offering advanced ceramic painting classes to begin tomorrow. There will be both a morning and evening class. The fee is $9. For more information or to register call Marion McGuire at 951211. U.S. NAVAL BASE GUANTANAMO BAY, Page 2 CIVIC COUNCIL TO MEET The Civic Council will meet at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, at the Arts and Crafts Workshop. The public is cordially invited to attend. TIE-DYE CLASS TO BEGIN The.Caribbean Arts and Crafts Association is sponsoring a tie-dye class and a batik class to begin May 11 and May 13 respectively. All supplies will be provided. For more information contact Angela Johnstone at 95450 after working hours. ASTROLOGY CLASSES Astrology classes will be held starting today from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m, Each class will be 10 weeks long. For more information call Chris Sharp at 90263 AWH. TENNIS TOURNAMENT SLATED Special Services will host a Tennis Tournament on Saturday and Sunday. The starting time, for each day will be 9 a.m. For furtherinformation or to register call Special Services at 951160. LCdr. Michael Chery.Public Affairs Officr pH2 Dave Clarke .Photographer JO2 Deb Galloway.Reporter JOSA Clay Willims.Reporter The Guantum Gazette Is published according to the ules ad regulations for ship and station newspapers as outlined in NA OS P-35 and under the direction of the Naval Base public affairs officer. Printed five times weekly at govenment0050',ongovernment equipment0, th opiniosoro0statements in oews tem ha appe inarenottob onstreasoff Deartm of thef N .ingtheiews of CNO asBor the Dprtment of Be.0Nvy. SCUBA CLASS STARTING A basic scuba class will begin on Thursday, May 13. Anyone interested should be at the E.M. pool at 6 p.m. Tuesday, May 11, with swim gear and writing material. For further information contact Tim Pierce at 98198 AT. 'Children on the Job' held tomorrow Community Bulletin Board cialist. She added that Gitmo is an ideal setting for the program because of its size. Following the working morning with their parents, the children will be given an evaluation sheet to fill out. Kindergarten through second grades will go to school as usual tomorrow morning. Children participating in the work program will attend school in the regular afternoon session. Anyone with questions about "Children on the Job" should call the elementary school at 95465 or 95330. I NEW COURSE AT ODU Old Dominion University announces a special course, "Criminology 315". This is a three credit course which includes the study of crime, criminals, and society's response to them. The course will be taught by Dr. Leonard Dobrin. Registration dates are, at the Windward Library Saturday, 10 a.m. to noon, and at the Leeward Library from 1 to 3 p.m. Tuition must be paid at the time of registration. Those individuals who are eligible for tuition aid must pay $19.50. Those who are not eligible for tuition aid must pay $78. The classes will be gin June 21, and end July 2. The classes will meet Monday through Friday from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. at the W.T. Sampson High School. for more information call Gale Cherry at 99190. CPO'S INVITED TO LUNCHEON. All Naval Station master, senior, and chief petty officers are invited to attend a luncheon with the commanding officer on Friday, May 14. A cash bar will open at 11:30 a.m. with lunch at 12 p.m. The luncheon will be held. in the CPO dining room. In order to plan the food preparation, reservations for the luncheon must be made by contacting the Career Counselor's Office at 85575 NLT Wednesday, May 12. LAMAZE CHILD BIRTH CLASSES The next session of the Lamaze child birth classes will begin Thursday, May 13 at 7p.m. at the Hospital classroom. Anyone who wishes more information call Judy Hamilton at 85339 AT. (STORY BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS)Cable cars are rolling again in San Francisco and beer is brewing once more at the Budweiser plant in New Jersey, but building service workers are still picketing in New York and 60,000 union rubber workers remain idled by a nationwide strike. In San Francisco, an impromptu champagne party celebrating the end of the 38-day strike was held aboard the first cable car to restore service on Nob Hill. About 1,800 City Building Trade workers struck on March 31 over a proposed $5.7-million pay cut. The 1,900 Municipal Railway Workers honored the picket lines, idling the system's more than 1,000 buses, trollies, streetcars and cable cars. The strike ended early Saturday when labor and city officials reached a compromise agreement to turn the issue of pay cuts over to an 11-member committee to recommend a solution. The recommendations, however, are not binding. About 2,000 acres of San Francisco grass need mowing, 8,000 to 10,000 trees need watering, and 150 to 200 leaks in the city's water system need repair, city officials said. The Anheiser Busch strike in Newark, N.J., ended Saturday when members of Teamsters Local 102 accepted a three-year contract. Details of the pact were not disclosed. About 150 machinists, clerical workers and nurses struck the Newark brewery March 1, and their picket lines were honored by about 1,000 other employees. About 7,000 Budweiser employees in eight other cities remain on strike. A tentative settlement agreement .was reached early Saturday in the five-week strike of 1,700 techniciansand newswriters at the National Broadcasting Co., where salaries now average about $374 a week. Terms of the proposed contract were not disclosed pending a ratification vote by the striking members of the National Association of Broadcast Employees and Technicians (NABET) in New York, Washington, Cleveland, Chicago, Los Angeles "a San Francisco. Voting was expected to be completed by Wednesday and, if approved, the strikers will return to work by next Saturday, the the broken line in the graph shows the amount of fuel alloted for April which also represents the projected 15 per cent reduction. The solid line represents the actual amount of fuel used through April 30. uantanamo Gazette Tomorrow is going to be a special day for many Gitmo youngsters. That's the day children in grades three to six will be going to work with their parents. Through the W.T. Sampson career education program, "Children on the Job," Gitmo youngsters will have the opportunity to gain realistic ideas about work and jobs. This is the first time the program will be tried in Guantanamo Bay, although it has been tried successfully in other places, according to Miss Rosemary DeSisto, the school's career education speSan Francisco sees end to labor dispute as strikes continue elsewhere in nation Gt network said. The walkout resulted from economic provisions and working conditions. In New York, 20,000 members of local 32-B of the Service Employees International Union continued their week-old strike of apartment buildings. The doormen, porters, elevator operators and security guards are seeking a $50-a-week raise and a one-year contract. Current salaries range from $180 to $201 a week. The walkout by 60,000 members of the United Rubber Workers Union goes into its fourth week tomorrow against the big four of the rubber industry--Goodyear, Goodrich, Firestone and Uniroyal. The principal issues of the strike are salaries and cost-of-living clauses. Talks between the union and Firestone officials resume today in Cleveland. Elsewhere in the Midwest, talks were to resume in Arlington Heights, Ill., today as the 13-state strike by 14,000 Teamster drivers, loaders and sorters against United Parcel Service enters its 10th day. A union official indicated that only contract language disputes and seniority issues remain to be settled. Zarb calls for oil price freeze TEHRAN, Iran (AP)--U.S. Energy Administrator Frank Zarb called on the organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) to freeze oil prices through 1976 to stimulate world energy recovery. Zarb issued the call during a news conference followed closed-door meetings with Iranian Minister of Economic Affairs and Finance Hushang Ansari, Jamhid Amuzegar, minister of the interior and chief of the Iranian delegation to OPEC, Manuchehr Eghbal, chief or the state oil company. Zarb has been meeting with Saudi and Iranian otticials prior to OPEC's meeting in Indonesia later this month. However he refused to disclose how the Iranians and Saudis have responded to his proposed oil freeze, 'one allowed ons sed L'-0 L -3 Al*Ar.44vt

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.Monday, May 10, 1976 The late J. Edgar Hoover Kelly criticizes Hoover for FBI abuses WASHINGTON (AP)-Information regarding contacts between members of Congress and foreign officials was picked up by FBI wiretaps and bugs and forwarded to Presidents Johnson and Nixon, according to a Senate Intelligence Committee staff report. The 79-page report released yesterday stressed that none of the legislators was the direct target of electronic eavesdropping but instead they were overheard "through the bureau's coverage of certain foreign establishments in Washington," probably embassies. The report cited the eavesdropping as an example of a situation in which "even properly authorized electronic surveillances directed against foreign targets. may result in possible abuses .involving American citizens." The report did not name any of the legislators or foreign officials involved. The report on electronic surveillance is one of 13 volumes being issued by the committee in support of its report on domestic spying. Beirut calm after election of new president BEIRUT, Lebanon (AP)-A precarious calm settled over most of Beirut yesterday, a day after the violenceridden election of a new president, but civil war continued in nearby mountains with sporadic mortar and machine gun fighting. Police said 78 persons were killed nd 130 wounded in the clashes etween Moslems and Christians, mostly before dawn. Fourteen bodies from earlier combat were also discovered in Beirut suburbs and hill towns, they added. Fighting was fiercest in the Christian town of Zagharta and Moslem Tripoli, 60 miles north of Beirut where private armies traded rocket propelled grenades, mortar shells and machine gun bullets, security officials said. Still, leftist groups showed signs of reconsidering their positions and indicated a willingness to support president-elect Elias Sarkis provided political and economic reform programs are initiated without delay. "Regardless of indications to the contrary, it is certain we are moving steadily toward a settlement," said a leftist spokesman. "We are waiting for a gesture from Sarkis, to clarify his position and intentions regarding demanded reformations (reforms), security plans and status of the Palestinian resistance movement for which we have sacrificed so much." The spokesman insisted all leftist groups oppose foreign intervention in the Lebanese civil war and said the new Christian president will have to "assert his power in his own right." Sarkis was Syria' s candidate for the presidency and his election was widely thought to open the way for increased Syrian participation in efforts under way to bolster security conditions in the country. "The so-called security vacuum will have to be filled by the Lebanese, the Lebanese alone, solely by reuniting the army and beefing up internal security forces," the leftist spokesman added. In Fulton, Mo., Saturday, RBI Director Clarence Kelley issued a public apology for past FBI misdeeds. For the first time he acknowledged that FBI officials had abused their power and subtly criticized his predecesor, the late J. Edgar Hoover, for allowing the abuses. "We need to make it clearly understood that we recognize errors and have learned from them," Kelly said in a speech for a lecture series at Westminster College. He said some of the abuses of power occurred "chiefly during the twilight of Mr. Hoover's administration." The Senate committee document traced the FBI's use of wiretaps and bugs from 1940 to the present, describing in detail a number of previously reported cases, including the wiretapping of reporters and government officials during the Kennedy and Nixon administrations. Other individuals and groups named in the report as targets of electronic surveillance in the past include the Jewish Defense League, the Communist Party U.S.A., the Southern Leadership Conference, Dr. Martin Luther King, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, Students for a Democratic Society, and the Ku Klux Klan. Eavesdropping material involving members of Congress was first sent to the Johnson White House in March 1966 in response to a request from the President "that the FBI should constantly keep abreast of the actions of representatives of these (foreign officials) in making contacts with senators and congressmen," F according to a bureau memo quoted in the report. Johnson felt that many of the protests against his Vietnam policies, particularly hearings in the Senate, had been generated by the foreign officials, the memo said. "As a result of the President's request, the FBI prepared a chronological summary--based in part on existing electronic surveillances--of the contacts of each senator, representative or staff member who communicated with selected foreign establishments during the period July 1, 1964 to March 17, 1966," the report said. WITH ROOSEVELT WITn TRUMAN WITHI1OHNSON $1 billion is price for defense pact ANKARA, Turkey (AP)-Future defense pacts between the.United States and Turkey will be virtually ruled out if the U.S. Congress rejects a $1 billion defense agreement between the two NATO allies, Premier Suleyman Demirel warned yesterday. The 52-year-old premier also disclosed in an interview that the Soviet Union has pledged $1 billion in easy-term credits to fund Turkish development and industrial projects. Turkey, which lies on Russia's southern border, has been a key element in the American policy of containment of the Soviet Union since cold war days. The Turks have a standing army of half a million, largest among European NATO members, and 26 U.S. military electronic surveillance stations which monitor Soviet activities. After Congress imposed an arms embargo 14 months ago, because American weapons were used in the 1974 Turkish invasion of Cyprus, Demirel turned toward the Soviet bloc for trade and economic cooperation. He stopped short of accepting Soviet weapons offers. U.S. government analysts paint a dismal, but vague, strategic picture for the United States if Turkey goes without American bases and arms. The bases were closed late July as a result of the U.S. arms embargo. In March, Secretary of State Henry Kissinger announced the United States had agreed to supply Turkey with $1 billion in military aid over four years in return for reopening the bases. A similar agreement for $700 million is pending with Greece. However, congressional approval for both appears unlikely. It is not yet known when Congress will vote. American critics in Congress say Turkey should not receive aid as long as there is no settlement of the Greek-Turk conflict of Cyprus. If the agreement is rejected.," Demirel said, "It should be better not to have it. it would be very difficult to have another agreement along these lines or along other lines. What is the use of having agreements with the U.S. government because we don't know whether they will be rejected or accepted by Congress." Turning to Greece, Demirel disclosed that the foreign ministers of both countries would meet privately during a NATO ministerial conference in Oslo, May 19. Spanish marchers victims of ambush on mountain top MONTEJURRA, Spain (AP)-Terrorists shot into a crowd of 5,000 chanting Carlists, killing one and injuring three, yesterday as they scrambled upward through mud and boulders to a mountaintop rally and Roman Catholic mass. The violence, blamed by rally leaders on right extremists, was the worst such clash since the death of Spain's longtime ruler Francisco. Franco, 5 1/2 months ago. The gunmen, hidden in the mountain mists, fired two bursts at random into the front ranks of marchers hiking to the top of Montejurra Mountain to pay homage to Carlist war dead, the rally leaders said. Carlist leader Prince Carlos Hugo De Borbon Parma, walking some 50 yards behind the wounded, left the procession after the ambush. His Dutch wife, Princess Irene, climbed on to the top, however, to celebrate Communion near the snipers' roost. The Carlists, Spain's oldest political party, date from 1833 when Don Carlos, brother of King Ferdinand VII, opposed succession of the king's daughter to the throne of Spain. Today they still seek to place Don Carlos' descendant, Prince Carlos Hugo, on the throne in place of King Juan Carlos De Borbon, Franco's chosen successor. Carlists fought on the side of Franco during the 1936-39 civil war, but have since turned to socialism. Cries of "CarlismSocialism" and "workers selfmanagement" were mixed with calls for liberty and amnesty for political prisoners during the 90minute climb. The 46-year-old Prince Carlos Hugo, ordered out of Spain for illegal political activity in 1968, slipped across the border from France for the annual march with the knowledge of the government. He was surrounded by body guards as word of the injuries swept down the struggling line of march. The shooting followed two weekend bomb attacks in the restive northern Basque region where Carlists count their main strength. Near San Sebastian a 19-year-old youth died while trying to place a bomb at an industrialist's home, police reported. In Madrid, the government freed three leftist leaders, including Communist economist Ramon Tamames but left in prison Communist labo organizer Marcelino Camacho and three other top leftist leaders. Study recommends ending crime-fighting program WASHINGTON (AP)-An independent study of the government's multibillion-dollar crime-fighting program concludes it has accomplished little and should be abolished. "The nation is in no better position today than it was when the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 was enacted," says the report, a draft copy of which was obtained by the Associated Press. "Crime has increased and no solutions to the crime problem are on the horizon," it added. The focus of the study was the Law Enforcement Assistance Administration (LEAA), which has disbursed $4.4 billion in grants to communities to help fight crime. "It is the conclusion of this report that the LEAA program should be abolished," the study said. Entitled "Law and Disorder IV," the report was the fourth in a series of studies of the LEAA. '3 Guantanamo Gazette Page 3 WITH KENNEDY

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Guantanamo Gazette Bjorn Borg captures world championship Monday, May 10, 1976 Pro Sports Standings Baseball DALLAS, Tex. (AP)--Sweden's Bjorn Borg overcame three years of frustration in a jittery start yesterday to outduel good friend Guillermo Vilas of Argentina, 1-6, 6-1, 7-5, and 6-1 to capture the World Championship of Tennis $50,000 first place prize, The 19-year-old Borg, idol of the bluejean set on two continents, was runner-up in 1975 and 1974 and pointed his whole season toward the WCT finals. Borg started slowly, missing easy volleys and fell behind to the 23year-old "Bull of the Pampas" before unleashing an incredible streak of near flawless play in the second set. Borg captured eight out of nine games as the tiring Vilas doublefaulted at set point in the second set. The match was marked by marathon baseline rallies. Borg broke Vilas's service in the 11th game of the third set and break point came after the ball had crossed the net 80 times, consuming some three minutes of actual play. Borg aced Vilas on set point. Vilas became unsettled at the beginning of the fatal fourth set when he questioned a linesman's call in the first game, which cost him a service break. Vilas hit the ball toward the linesman, barely missing him and peppered Vilas with his famed two-fisted backhand, Vilas, who has won more than $50,000 the past two years, earned $20,000 as the runnerup, Borg lost to Arthur Ashe in 1975 and to Austalia's John Newcombe in 1974 and each time he won the first set. Ironically, he defeated Vilas yesterday after losing the first set and besides the cash prize earned a Cadillac, a $1,000 wardrobe and a large diamond ring. Indy's first woman having car trouble INDIANAPOLIS Ind. (AP) --Janet Guthrie is the first woman to enter the Indianapolis 500 mile race, but the question is will she ever drive here. For the second day in a row, mechanical problems to her Vollstedt Offenhauser delayed her first drive in practice at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. "That's racing," she shrugged. "I can't really say anything more than that." Miss Guthrie's teammate, veteran Dick Simon, took the car for a test run shortly after yesterdays track opening, Simon, an expert chassis man, wants to check out the car's suspension before turning it over to Miss Guthrie .But as all eyes on pit row and thousands in the grandstand watched, he pulled back into the pits after two laps with a burned piston. The Vollstedt crew took the car back to Gasoline Alley for at least several hours of repairs. On Saturday, a bad clutch hub kept the car in the garage until shortly before the 6 p.m. closing. Then when Simon finally took it out for a few laps, an oil line broke. Baseball NATIONAL LEAGUE: San Francisco 4, Montreal 2 (1st) Montreal 8, San Francisco 0 (2nd) Pittsburgh 5, Atlanta 2 San Diego 4, New York 0 Philadelphia 10, Los Angeles 3 Cincinnati 14i Chicago 2 Houston 10, St. Louis 5 AMERICAN LEAGUE: Chicago 4, Detroit 2 Texas 6, Boston 5 Kansas City 7, Baltimore 4 Minnesota 6, Milwaukee 4 California 3, Cleveland 2 Oakland 4, New York 3 (12 innings) Hockey NHL TITLE-ROUND PLAYOFFS: Montreal 4, Philadelphia 3 (Canadians lead series, 1-0) WHA SEMIFINAL PLAYOFFS: New England 4, Houston 1 (Whalers lead series, 2-1) Basketball NBA SEMIFINAL PLAYOFFS: Boston 94, Cleveland 89 (Celtics lead series, 2-0) Phoenix 133, Golden State 129 (2 -jrinpq Ppip 2vn 2NATIONAL LEAGUE: East Philadelphia New York Pittsburgh St. Louis Chicago Montreal West Cincinnati Los Angeles Houston San Diego San Francisco Atlanta AMERICAN LEAGUE: East New York Milwaukee Detroit Cleveland Baltimore Boston West Texas Kansas City Minnesota Oakland Chicago California W 15 18 15 12 11 9 15 15 14 13 9 8 W 15 10 10 10 9 6 15 11 10 12 7 10 Basketball NBA: (Semi-finals) W Golden State 2 Phoenix 2 Boston 2 Cleveland 0 ABA: (Finals, Best-of-7) New York 3 Denver 1 Hockey NHL: (Finals, Best-of-7) Montreal 1 Philadelphia 0 WHA: (Best-of-7) New England 2 Houston 1 Winner meets Winnipeg fo k/Tovertqmes, series even,s) title. Two quakes hamper rescue in Italy All ads will be run one time only. You must submit your ad each time you want it to be printed. Ads may be submitted by calling 951144 or by dropping them in one of the drop boxes. Ads which discriminate on the basis of race, sex, creed, color or national origin will not be accepted. for sale 1974 Kawasaki, excellent condition, $600 or best offer. Call 64466 and ask for Bell, Hoover electric broom with bags, $10; baby changing table bath, $10; 2drawer locking. film cabinet, $10; VW trailer hitch, $10. Call 95474 AT. 1967 Pontiac Bonneville, good condition; $550, Call 99246 AT. 1956 Chevrolet for parts, best offer; 13' 1/4"x3' 1/4"woodenboat with fiber-B/K naugahyde recliner, $25; large glass coating for best offer; 24" aluminum dog cage, $15. Call girl's bioycle. Call 951139 AT. .952276 AT. 12,000 BTU A/C, $75; 10,000 BTU A/C, $40; 8,000 ETU A/C, needs motor, $20; wall fan, $5; one gallon clear cast never used, $10; circular baby walker, good condition, $5; infant carrier never used, $5. Call 96196 AT or see at GP 13A. Dacor underwater movie camera houseing, never used, $8; pair of "Little Boy Blue" shoes, size 7, 500; pair of girls white shoes, size 10 1/2, 500; lady's white body suit, size 10, 50(,. Singer Zig Zag sewing machine with walnut cabinet, seldom used, $100, available end of May. Call 96264 AT. 1967 Ford Mustang 2+2 289 4 speed. Runs well. Best offer or $600. Must sell by May 11. Call 85506 DWH, ask for Jim Moss. wanted Any Chevrolet, year 70-74. Call 85826 AWH or 85764 DWH. Traveling airline cage for a cat. Call 95474 AT. Set of handle bars for a Honda 100. Call 64466 AWH. Ask for Bell, Blender, $10; bed, $25; living room chair; $10; coffee table and end table, $15; medium sized dog cage, $10. Call 98235 AT. 1975 Honda MR 175 Elsinore cycle, $750. Call 95597 AWH. Whirlpool washing machine, $100 or best offer. Call 97152 AT. An 84" tuxedo sofa, $150; 3'x6' rug, $5; 6'x9' orange and rust rug, $20. Call 95402 AT. services 10-year-old girl will baby-sit any place, any time. Call 98223 AT. found Silver bracelet with "Marcella Havattir inscribed on it. Sixth Street Villamar. Call 95492 after 2:3( p.m. 1osit 4-month-old white, unclipped poodle, Tan ears, male, answers to Marvy. Lost in Villamar area. Call 98196 AWH. UDINE, Italy (AP)-Two more powerful earthquakes shook Italy's northeastern Friuli Province yesterday, leveling houses and a 16th century cathedral. No new casualties were reported, but the death count rose to 755 from last Thursday's quake. The latest tremors, one measuring a strong 5.7 on the Richter scale, hit as soldiers and other rescue workers continued to dig throught the rubble in search of survivors and others killed by the first quake. A total of 44 quakes and tremors have ripped through the area since Thursday. A 15-year-old girl and an 80-yearold woman were dug out of the ruins of nearby Gemona after being buried alive for 51 hours. Both were in serious condition, the woman with leg fractures caused by a falling refrigerator. More than 2,000 persons were injured, about 150,000 left homeless and 30,000 without jobs after Italy's worst earthquake in 61 years. The Thursday night quake measured 6.9 on the Richter, a measure of ground motion as recorded on seismographs. Every increase of one number means the ground motion is 10 times stronger. In populated areas, a measure of 6 can be severe and 7 a major earthquake. International aid for the survivors kept pouring in, including some from the U.S. military. At the Vatican, Pope Paul VI said he felt united with those suffering and said his heart is like a "seismograph in which vibrations of the human passions rebound." Yesterday's tremors, which caught the population at home at night, were also felt in the northern urban centers of Padua, Verona, Venice and Florence. No fresh damage was reported to art treasures. The tremors sent residents of Udine scurrying into the streets, many of them clutching a few pieces of clothing in their arms to put on after they were in the safety of the outdoors. Germans seek release of Rudolf Hess BONN, West Germany (AP) --A crowd of about 500 persons rallied at Bonn's prestigious Beethovenhalle yesterday to hear pleas for the release of Rudolf Hess, Adolf Hitler's former deputy who embarked on a self-appointed peace mission to Britain more than 35 years ago. Ewald Bucher, a former West German justice minister and chairman of the "Freedom for Rudolf Hess" Committee, demanded before the sparingly occupied hall that the three Western powers, the United States, Great Britain and France, do more to pressure the reluctant Soviets into releasing the sole inmate of Berlin's Spandau Prison. His sentiments were echoed by Wolf Ruediger Hess, oldest son of the 83-year-old prisoner sentenced to life during the Nuernberg War Crimes Trials 30 years ago. But neither made firm proposals how to achieve this. Asked after the rally what exactly he expects the Western World War II allies to do about the Russian refusal to release his father, Hess replied "I don't advocate for them to throw open the prison doors, but I come more and more to the conclusion that contrary to their statementsthey are not doing all they can to achieve the release of my father." GB 1 5 6 1/2 7 2 2 6 7 L 7 10 9 14 16 15 10 11 14 13 17 18 L 6 7 9 12 13 14 6 8 10 13 11 16 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 GB 3 4 1/2 1/2 1/2 3 1/2 5 1/2 1/2 GB L 2 2 0 3 0 1 1 2 r the Page 4