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Gitmo Gazette

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Title:
Gitmo Gazette
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U.S. Naval Base
Place of Publication:
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Publisher:
U.S. Naval Base
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Language:
English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright, Gitmo Gazette. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Preceded by:
Gitmo Review
Succeeded by:
Guantanamo Gazette
Related Item:
Daily Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Daily Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Bay Gazette
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Indian
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Sunday Supplement

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Full Text



WEATHEF CLOUDY


U. S. NAVAL BASE, GUANTANAMO BAY, CUBA


Phone 9-5247


Date JANUARY 10, 1967


WGBY Radio (1340) TV (Ch. 8)


4AID Funds Stden
Adds UpT. 5 . 0
SAIGON (AP) IT WAS ESTIMATED today that -between $22.7 and $27.3 million worth of American ,econo-(hic assistance ..cum6da I ttes del ivered to' Vietnam "was tolen or otherwise divertd" in 1966 by the U.S, Agency for international Development (USAID). "USAID believes that the estimatedO overall losses of 5 to 6 per
cent of U.S. aid goods c.n-i not be regarded as-hllhly unusual in a -l w Ime situation as fomplex as that In- Vletnam, saild astatent issued by Donald G* IcDonald, Director of U.S.
Hid in Safgon.
Associated Press Writers
Fred S. Hoffman aud Hugh A.
Mulligan, reported last Nov' ember after a two-month AP survey that profiteerlng, and corruption were costing American taxpayers at least half a million dollars a day O,.jn Vietnam. They cited nummous examples of stolen or verted goods and currency
)peculat ion.
The U.S. and SVN governments have taken some ns!tpIP
to improve the situation.


Chi Cor Premer Chui


Tres To Block War
TOKYO (AP) .:RED:CHINA'1S RREMIER today tried to pacify dissident elements in order to head off a possible civil war. Communist China's Premier Chou En-Lal was reported today to have called for a.letup in attacks- on five of his Vice Premiers by militant Maoist forces which have created chaos and violence on the mainland.


Panama Riot

QuelledQuickly
PANAMA (AP) A MINOR DEMONSTRATION marked the end of 3rd anniversary -observances
inthe Panama Canal- Zone last
night.
bout .200 demonstrators
surged towardthe Panama Canal zone last night, but National Guardsmen scattered the mob with a hiavy barrage of tear gas grenades. No Injuries or arrests were reported.
The attempted evasion came after an otherwise quiet observance of the third anniversary of the bloody clashes between U.S. forces and Panamanian mobs in January 1964. The demonstrators tried to invade the heavily guarded (continued on page two)


Powell Loses Chairmanship
WASHINGTON (AP),lhe House is expected to vote b/,ni.ght-fall on whether Rep. Adam Clayton Powell retains his seat in Congress.
Fellow Democrats ousted him yesterday as Chairman of the House Education and Labor Committee, an a6tion'which teiggered this exclamation from the veteran Harlem congressman: "Jesus had only one Judas; I have about 120I"
Only hours earlier, he had been confidently telling friends and newspaper "keep the faith, baby!" Yesterday's sidetracking of House Democratic leadership Promise plansseemed to add momentum to the drive by..Re9031licans and some Democratsto bar Powell from his House seat sending an investigation.
Powell and many negro leaders sad racism was behind the attacks on him. (continued'on page two)


Japanese correspondents in Peking said Chou made his plea: fdr : rest ra lt at :one of the continuing high-level meetings of Chairman Mao Tse Tung's purge group in Peking Sunday with Mao's sharptongued wife, Chaing Ching, present.
The faction led by Mao and Defense Minister Lin Piao meanwhile stepped up thetr denunciation of the power roup led by President Liu hao-Chi, Party General Secretary Teng Hsiao-Ping and Tao Chu, a vice premier who until a week ago was regarded as one of Mao's .meci. Chou was quoted as saying he approved criticism of his trio.
Other reports from Peking told of the sudden takeover of the capital's police forces by the ministry of public Security, the virtual kidnaping of Liu's wife, Wang Kuang-Mei, by -Red guards, a demand that 'counter-revolutionaries" be dealt with by law, and hints of possible new worker violence in Shanghai.
In Formosa, where Chiang Kai-Shek keeps a close watch on mainland events with an eye to eventual invasion, the clashes were regarded as a possible curtain raiser to (continued on page two)

WGBY"AM.,Radio iill carry the President'.s-State of.The Union Message at 9:30 tonitei


VATER HARLIE


C






TUESDAY, JANUARY 10, 1967


TOKYO--CIVIL WAR--(Continued from page 1)-Civil War.
This view was shared by western diplomats in London but was not emphasized in Moscow reports from Peking.

PANAMA--DEMONSTRATORS--(Continued from page one)-Canal Zone after a 3-hour rally held by labor and student groups in the Cinco De Mayo Plaza.
The only other incident *caurred toward the end of the rally when someaone tossed a smoke
bomb and the crowd scattered. Rocks were thrown through windows of at least two business houses, but order was quickly restored.
At the end of the _ Aeeting about 200 demonstrators shouting denunciations against President Marco A. Robles made their attempt to enter the Zone.

WASHINGTON (AP) Chinese Nationalistftbassador Chou Sku-Kai said today President Chiang Kai-Shek is ready to return to the mainland if present disorders lead to gemeral chaos in Red China.
The nationalist diplomat said in an interview that the time is drawing near in Red China for outside direction and organization. "That we can provide," he said.
Chou foresees three possible outcomes of the present situation:
----Success of Chairman Mao Tse-Tung and his Defense Minister, Marshal Lin Paio, in suppressing opposition to their rule.--An overthrow of the present hierarchy by the Communist party wing led by President Liu Sho-Chi.
--General chaos resulting from the interplay of the current power struggle as rival leaders purge each other. This would leave 700 million Chinese people virtually leaderless, he predicted.
"That is where we come in," said Chou. "We have been preparing for such a day and we cannot shed our responsibility to the Chinese people."
He said the return of the Nationalistswould be a "political operation carried out militarily." But Chou would not say what .support could be expected from the U.S. in such an eventuallity, he said there would not be a requirement for a large volume of shipping or for manpower. Chou recalled how Chiang arched Wlodj four decades ago and unified China with only a few divisions at his command.

Vox Populi items will not be accepted or forwarded to proper channels unless signed. The name will be withheld upon request.


Ask anyone in Trinidad and he'll tell you
the Pied Piper had a steel band. And eacl, year, during the traditional three-day carnii val, the legend is retold when steel bands draw thousands through the streets in a rhythmic shuffle known as "the Tramp.,'
The Navy also has a steel band which has thrilled millions in over 4,000 performances including two command performances at the White House.
The 10th Naval District Steel Band, as it
is officially known, is under the direction of Chief Musician Robert L. Brown and willW make a three-day tour of the Naval Base on Jan. 12-14. The schedule is as follows:
Thurs. Jan. 12...NAS Lyceum ......... 7:30 PM
Acey-Ducey Club .... 9:30 PM Fri. Jan. 13...NAS LP Lyceum......6:30 PM
CPO Club.... ....... 9:30 PM
Sat. Jan. 14...NsvSta Lyceum .... 6:30 PM
COMO Club.......... 9:30 PM


Make plans now to see and hear one of these outstanding performances by the 10th Naval District Steel Band.


There was a slight mix-up on our part concerning the Baby of the Year's name. The correct name of the baby is Judith Marie and th name of the mother is Barbara JeanMcClure.


GITMO GAZETTE


PAGE 2







PAGE 3 TUESDAY, JANUARY 10, 1967 GITMO GAZETTE

M(ul'l arY. Draft

HINGTON (UPI)(By Louis Cas sel Te only vioient -pposition flared in OklaITARY DRAFT--FROM MOSES TO TODAY. homa, where tenant farmers and Indians parComplusory military service goes back at ticipated in hat Was called "The Green Corn
least to the days of Moses. The bible de- Rebellion."
scribes a massive draft registration carried When World War 11 began in 1939, many Amerout by Moses. It involved "every male, from icans thought this country could remain iso20 years old and upward, all in Ibrael who lated from the conflict. They opposed Presiare able to go forth to war." dent Roosevelt's request for a draft law- to
Conscription came to America with the earl- build up the United States Armed Forces. Afiest settlers. In 1623; the General Assembly ter a bitter national debate, Congress in
of colonial Virginia enacted a draft law 1940 enacted "The Selective Training and authorizing military Commanders to "levy a Service Act." It squeaked through the Rouse
party of men... so many to may be spared with- by a margin of one vote.
out too much weakening of the plantations... The 18,000 men and women who serve without and to employ these mdn against the indians pay as members of Lockl draft boards have when they shall assault us." achieved a remarkable record of scandal-free
George Washington made repeated but futile public service. Although complaints are frepleas to the Continental Congress to enact quently made about lack of uniformity among a draft law to provide manpower for his de- local boards in granting deferments, or about pleted army during the Revolutionary War. He alleged errors in judgement by local boards, wad an early proponent of the Universal Serv- the United Press International survey showed ice concept recently revived by Defense Sec- that most Americans are convinced of the inretary Robert McNamara. tegrity of draft board members. The verdict
"It may be laid down as a primary position of public opinion was summed up by Dr.. Morris
that every citizen Who enjoys the protection Janowitz. Professor of Sociology at the Uniof a free government, owes not only a por- versity of Chicago who has made an extensive tion of his property but even of his personal study of the operation of the draft: he said", l ervice to the defense of it," Washington "Although the autonomy of local boards %qaid. leads to 'considerable variation' between one
During the Civil War, the Union first tried board and another, there is a general feeling
to man its army with volunteers. But by 1863 that local boards have been fair" in applying Congress found it necessary to:resort to con- their own policies among their own regisscription. It enacted the. most detested trants.
draft law in United States history. A married man, in the eyes of the Selectiv..
The law permitted a wealthy man to buy his Service System, is one who took a wife befoi.
way out of the draft, either by hiring a sub- August 27, 1965. Those married since that stitute to go in his place, or by purchasing cutoff date are regarded as single men so far n exemption for $300 in cash. Poor people as their draft elegibility goes. Married )itterly resented the law, and their feelings men--that is, men married before August 27, about it were vented in a bloody draft riot 1965--are supposed to be the last Oxe-A's which swept across New York City in July, called. They are called up only after a 1863. local board has used up all other One-A's in
During four days of rioting, 1,200 persons the 19-26 age group. Some local boards are
were killed. Similar but less bloody draft now drafting married men.
riots took place in Boston, Rutland, Vermont, If a married man has one or more children Portsmouth, New Hampshire, and Wooster, Ohio. to support, he is entitled to a 3-A clatsiThe Confederacy also had a draft law. Ex- fication, which exempts him from the draft.
emptions were granted to men who owned 20 or The number of negroes drafted into the Army more slaves, to teachers, to druggists, and is almost exactly proportional to the number to newspapermen. Wealthy men were allowed to or negroes in the United States' population hire substitutes to serve in their place. of draft-age males. The figure is 12 percent
The United States had no further truck with in both cases. However, negroes are somewhat
draft legislation until World War 1. A draft "overrepresented" in the Army units which are act passed in 1917 was repeatedly challenged on duty in Vietnam- They constitute nearly
in the courts, but its constitutionality was 16 percent of those units.
held. It provided for a lottery system of One reason for this is that negro youths ecting men for service, who lack educational background to qualify
-Under this law, the United States register- for military technical schools have tended to ed 24,000,000 men and drafted 2.8 million. goncentrate in the combat arms where oppor(Continued in next column) tunities are (Continued on page four).






TUESDAY, JANUARY 10, 1967


CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA, (AP) SOUTH AFRI-I CAN Prime [inister Balthazae.J.' Vorster started talks today with Chief Leabua Jonathan,. black Premier of heighboring Lesotho, on fostering friendly relations between the two countries.
It was Vorster's first meeting since he became Premier with the leader of any country and the first time a Prime Minister of Whiteruled South Africa had met the Black Premier of an African Independent country on South African soil.
A few days before his assassination last September Premier Hendrik Verwoerd had met Jonathan in Pretoria, the administrative capital, but at that time Letotho, was not independent. It was granted independence from Britain October 4.

DRAFT--(Cont'd from page 3) greatest for rapid advancement into NCO ranks.
Another reason is that negroes, finding in the military a greater range of non-discriminatory opportunity than they found in peivate employment, are much more likely than white youths to become career soldiers. The first term reenlistment rate for white soldiers is 17 percent; for negroes, It is 45 percent.
A third reason was noted by Whitney Young, head of the Urban League, after his return from a visit to the Vietnam fighting front last summer. He said many young negroes told hrm they had volunteered for combat units because they were tired on being considered inferior and wanted to in his words "show the other guy and themselves that they are men."

SAIGON (AP) A massive American force backed by planes, armor and artillery has launched the biggest offensive of the Vietnam War in an attempt to sweep the Viet Cong out of the jungled "Iron Triangle" 20 to 30 miles north of Saigon.
The objective is to capture a major headquarters complex of the Communists and to clear enemy troops from the tangled forests from which they menace the South Vietnamese capital.
Gen. William C. Westmoreland's command announced the multi-division operation -was launched at dawn Sunday. it said in the first three days 92 Viet Cong have been killed and 16 taken prisoner.
The operation includes evacuation of up to 10,000 Vietnamese peasants living intbe,6lngtime Viet Cong baStion and their resettlement in other local Ities.
Westmoreland meanwhile told newsmen that the enemy changed his military strategy in 1966, but his objective remains the same: "Touiify Vietnam by force as a Communist State." In a year-end review, he said the enemy strength In South Vietnam exceeds 280,000 men, and in-; filtration from North Vietnam has -averaged more t'nan 8,000 men a month.
Other than the drive in the Iron Triangle, no major engagements were reported by the US c6nti nued',n column two)


SAIGON (continued from column one) and South Vietnamese commands.
U.S. headquarters said American Mar took sporadic mortar and small-arms fire their sweep of Thanh Phu Peninsula 55 nmi south of Saigoh in the M6kong Delta. But there has been no contact of any size since the Leatherneckg landed last Friday, and so far only four enemy soldiers have been reported killed and five taken prisoner.
South Vietnamese headquarters rpported 45 Viet Cong killed by government troops in repulsing two attacks on military posts 340 and 348 miles northeast of Saigon.
South Korea'.s Tiger division rpported* Viet Cong killed, 212 captured arid 621 suspects pulled in during operation south of Qul Nhon. The Koreans do not announce their own casualties.
Continuing bad weather once again hampered the U.S. air offensive over North Vietnam, and American pilots flew only 60, strike and reconnaissance missions yesterday.

HONG KONG (AP)(By Forrest Edwards) CHINS FROM CANTON reported today that wall posters attacking Communist Party Chairman Mao TseTung had gone up throughout that South China City and that Canton radio had broaoi,; alerts to his supporters to be ready to'"come to his defense.
Some arrivals said they had seen dozens of anti-Mao posters yesterday and early today before taking the afternoon train to the der and crossing Into Hong Kong. ot claimed there were hundreds of such posters.
They said radio appeals directed Mao's followers to stand ready to "crush the enemies of our great leader."
. There was no way to terify the reports, but iost of the travellers told essentially the same stories.
They said the posters and counter appeals followed a weekend of bloody fighting between pro-Mao Red guards and anti-Mao factory wo ers in which they said several persons w killed, scores hurt, a Canton hospital I smashed and doctors and nurses beaten up.
Thousands of workers reportedly stayed away from their jobs in factories and municipal gas, water and electric plants yesterday. Radio broadest repeated appeals for workers to return to their jobs.
Opponents of Mao In Shanghai, China's ChTef Port, were accused today of resorting to economic warfare in an effort to disrupt Chinese production and finances.

NASSAU (AP) THE PROGRESSIVE LIBERAL PARTY (PLP) tries again today at the polls to wrest control of the Bahamas House of Assembly from the Untied Bahamian Party (UBP).
Progressive Liberal charges striving to
link government officials to gambling, iit-rests provided the fireworks in the camp' for 38 House seats. Economics and racial balance also were issued pondered by the landers, 85 per cent of whom are negroes.


Page 4


GTMO GAZETTE






TUESDAY, JANUARY 10, 1967


Gitmo Basketball
* FMF CONTINUED ITS dominance of the local basketball scene last night by blitzing NSD, 86-25.
They extended their winning streak to 12 with Warren James and Chuck Zadell leading the FMF
scoring with 19 each while George Jonic and Don O'Byrne hit for 14 counters each. Jess Muller
and Duke London accounted for almost all of NSD's points with 11 and 10 markers respectively.
The Marine Barracks continued to remain one game behind FMF by ripping FTG, 93-48. ' Recently added guard Sanchez led the 'Necks' with 26 counters while Moore hit for 20, ,Bill Hill for 16 and "Deke" Staton for 14. Sharing scoring honors for the scrappy Trainers were Jim Bowman
and Milt Hunt with 10 each.
Over on court #2, the VC-10 squad left little doubt in anyone's mind that they were still in the running by holding off Hospital, 52-46. The Tenners, who had built up an impressive 16
point lead with five minutes left, found themselves only six ahead with less than two minutes left. ..They called Len Schmidt back off the bench and he responded by setting up two buckets and picking off three rebounds to put the Tenners safely out in front. Schmidt led the scoring for both teams with 16 while Tenner Jim Nuckols scored 12. Al Foley led the Corpsmen with
15 markers followed by big Bob Van Ellen's 14.
The second game proved just as exciting as Naval Station surprised Security Group by jumping
into a seven point lead and only the hot hand of Jim Miller in the last quarter enabled Security to rescue a 61-49 win.
The Indians, with newcomer Jim Dunn providing surprising backboard strength didn't lose the
lead until the end of the third quarter and were still in close contention until high-scorer Dunn--18 points--and Don Gooch--16 points--fouled out. Security got top-flight performances
from "Bert" Lambert, who got 11 of his 18 points in the second half, and Miller, Who put in
all but two of his 13 points in the last 10 minutes of play.


.Pro Football
LOS ANGE]2S (UPI) AS IF $15,000 per man DETROIT (UPI) FORMER STAR linebacker Joe isn't enough'.incentive, the Green Bay Packers Schmidt may decide tomorrow whether to acdept
and Kansas City Chiefs were given added im- the head coaching job with the Detroit Lions.
petus money to emerge victorious in Sunday's The post became vacant last week when Harry Super Bowl, game at Los Angeles. Gilmer was fired following two straight losIt was announced that the winner would re- ing seasons.
ceive the World Champie . Whip Trophy---an act- Schmidt met the Lion officials for nearly 6 ual sterling silver football mounted on a hours yesterday, but said he wanted more time
triangluar base--20 inches in height. to consider the club's contract offer.

Baseball

S MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA (AP). MINNESOTA.:TWINS' BATTING ace Tony Oliva wants to get an early
start at spring training in hopes of regaining the American League batting crown.
"I'm going to talk with Mr. Griffith next week before I leave for Puerto Rico. I don't know
what he's got on his mind, but I think we can get together," said Oliva yesterday.
"I'd like to sign my contract soon and start spring training with the pitchers and catchers
on February 22nd in Orlando, Florida."
Last year Oliva held out until March before signing, missing two weeks of spring training.
He went bn to post his personal major league low batting avenge of 307 and lost the AL batting
title.
In 1965 he hit .321 enroute to the batting title for the second consecutive year.
Estimates are that Oliva is in the $30,000 bracket now, turned down a 1967 offer of about
$34,000 and wants something in the $40,000 class.
"I've had three good years," the 25-year-old Oliva said. "If I don't make itnow then 'you
might hit a bad year--you never know when one might hit you.. You've got to make if while you
can."
. 02M 1. U Pbl.Lahd Is aco�odrect with the rules and regulations fct ship and station newpper. a sildlood I 3MAYS P-33 mad Ur the drectim IWE V.D. Colln, USN, Public Affairs Officer. The Gl MI 410M t daily Iparp r in eoment expense on government equipment four day. a week. The opinion. . W a Stat to - I sees items 4 o s herein are not to be .oustrued an official or an reflecting the view CMWD o . tlu Nor V zt . ?b GMI C&ZUZ to a member of Armed lForces New Bureau.


GITMO GAZETTE


PAGE 5






TUESDAY, JANUARY 10, 1967


UCLA made it ten in' a row last night by defeating Washington, 83 to 68, tenth ranked Vandeft bilt overcame Southeastern Conference foe Temessee, 65 to 59, while North Texas State broke a 20 _game )issouhi:Val~ey .ioiiktre k- bd def]tinr. iW~ttaState, " 80t .64: -I1., ok top games, Providence dumped Oglethorpe,, 74 t- 57,0, Fibrid_,rcll&4-, p~R:M~ hiuippi., 78 "to Western Kentucky edged East Tennessee State, 63 to 61. Mississippi State needed an eviitife period to beat Auburn, 59 to 55, Louisiana Otate nipped Georgia, 87 to 85, Virginia Tech came from behind to defeat Wake Forest, 82 to 70. Uoja '41pp0, lw" Y1l fa" - 8-fb W. i3psl gained -a 76 to 73 victory over St. Bonwfnture, Indiana downed Minnesota, 83'to 'Go# upset Nebraska, 99 to 87, Iowa State beat Oklahoma State, 54 to 38, and Southern IllMois topped Evansville, 55 to 41.
Top college basketball games tonight include sixth ranked Texas Western against West Texas State, eighth ranked Cincinnati:against Dayton, Boston College-Northeastern, Seattle-Portland Southern Mehtodist-Texas, Syracuse-Cornell, Duke-Clemson, Northwestern-Illinois, Cesi4.t7n-St. Louis, and Kansas State-Missouri.
A first in the history of the United Press International college basketball ratings was recorded yesterday when an Ivy League team crashed the Top Ten. The club is Princeton and the Tigers are ranked ninth on the basis of their eleven to one record thus far. Still holding down the top spot by a wide margin is UCLA with thirty three out of a possible thirty fie first place votes. The two remaining first place nods- belong to second ranked Louisville. North Carolina is third followed by, New Mexico, fourth; Houston, fifth; Texas Western, sixth; Kansas, seventh; Cincinnati, eighth; Princeton, ninth; and Vanderbilt, tenth.

Pro Basketball
qhbest of the National Basketball Association will be on display tonight at San Francisco for the NBA's seventeenth annoal All-Star game. The East squad,' to be coached by former Boston mentor Red Auerbach, has won eleven of the previous sixteen contests and the last four straight. The East got some bad news yesterday when it was revealed that Philadelphia center Wilt Chamberlain may not be able to play because of a leg injury. Auerbach's only comment wa "I quit worryin when T retired." Helping alleviate Auerbach's worries is the fact that chamberlain is sidelined, he will be replaced by a guy named Bill Russell from Boston.


A vice president df theF .N tional Collegiate".Athlitie-Assci&tion:urged. :yesterdi7 that the NCAA:..rtadn its C minus sademic ruling,. .radford.Boatbuobf UCIX calledd the rule -the most imp0rtant:the NCAk has ever enacted because, in Booth's words, "it requires athletes to be Students."
The rule requires athletes to have an equivalent of a 1.6 _grade . average o* of-a possible four when he enters school, and requires him to maintain it throughout his varsity career.
The NCAA, currently meeting in,ouston, is expected to consider six amendments that have bell proposed in an effort to iill or weaken the C-minus ruling.
In other action at the NCAA meeting yesterday, the Rules Committee of the American Football Coaches Association recommended elimination of the "tackle eligible pass play." The recoitmen dation will-be considered next week at the NCAA Rules Committee meeting in Phoenix, Arizona.

Baseball
A7-roup-or cincinati businessmen, led by newspaper publisher Francis Dale, _yesterday took over as the new owners of the Cincinnati Reds. The group replaces Bill DeWitt who will remain with the club for at least one-'year as a consultant.
Latest to return signed contract for the 1967 campaign are National League batting champion Matty Alou with Bittsburgh and slugging first baseman Willie McCovey with San Francisco.
Funeral services were held yesterday for former bi;.league Manager Johnny Kean, who died of a heart attack Friday night at thd age of 55. Keane guided~the St..touis'Cardihals to'a world series championship in 1964 and then took over as manager of the New York Yankees uhttf last May. RA"S!EWE I 6ET A NEW OW 'PL 5EWSEANT � RATES ME!
SWoTS IT FULL OF HaN
45)... .....
6RIE1!


I-A/


PAGE r


GITMO GAZETTE







TUESDAY, JANUARY 10, 1967


FOR SALE
'61 CHEVY, 4-dr., 6-cyl., $650.00, 7739 AT. IM Movie projector, new, $55.00, 7494 AT.

ZENITH 21" TV, new pict. tube, $40, 95325 AT.

'66 DART Station jaon, $2,200, or older car
for equity. Call 90160 anytim.

'52 CUSHMAN motor scooter S60.00, 90160 AT.

Twin stroller, call 90160 Anytime. 9.E. automatic washer, $60, Bath.nette S5.00,
see at L.P. A'pt. 557-A or call 64579 Anytime.

19" PH{YLCC TV, Decca record player 97161 AT.

18-foot casting net, 35323 D-JH/97204 AWjH.

White, male miniature poodle, ,KC rag. 97141. ' 961 MONZA, good condition, n/tires, $625.00,
all LI. Young at 85151 DWH or 7485 Anytime.

'63 PLYMOUTH 7URY, white 2-dr hdtp. V-8, ,..
& P. '. Miss Rockwood 7722 DWH or 7426 AWH

WANTED
Front end parts for Laibretta,Unger 85133 DWH Littlc girl's snowsuit (size 4) 97100 Anytime


Wilver-grey gas tank filler cap. 97312 A 2 H.

Man's silver wedding banS-, 5 si ill diamonds, in Bay Hill area, if found please contact Tnbysk at Base ias. Jransp. Office. Rewd. off Prescription glasses. Call Wagner 95144 AT.

HAVE YOU HEARD?


&The regular meeting Iroup will be held
M at the Special laStage. The meeting
play readinq.


of the tomorrow Services will be


Little Theatre evening at 7:30 Little Theatre followed by a


HAVE YOU HEARD?
The Teen Club Advisory Boatd Meeting scheduled for tomorrow evening has been postponed until next Tuesday, January 17th, at 7:30 PM on the patio of the Teen Club.

All Base couples: Coming this month ...... the open house for the new square dance class. Natch the GAZETTE for further information.

Morin Center is now back in full swing! A new and revised menu offering more flaming dishes will be feature. The Casuals are playing nightly Thursday through Sunday for your dancing and dining pleasure. Although reservations are not required, they are desirable to assure you the table and waiter of your choice.

COMO Club Bingo fans, the GIANT Jackpot, your choice of the camphor chests or the rosewood silver chest, will no this Thursday in "55" numbers. The Junior Jackpot, a General Electric dishwasher, will go in 56 numbers. Many other merchandise prizes from Panama which will go for regular games. Dry your luck at winning one of tiese beautiful gifts for your home, at 3ingo, Thursday evening.

The COMO Club will be featuring another exotic dinner from Chinatown Wednesday evening. All your Oriental favorites will be featured. Egg rolls, shrimp fried rice, chicken chow mein, and pepper steak will be yours for the low price of $2.00.

WEDNESDAY'S LUNCHEON MENU at your COMO Club: Shrimp Gumbo ......................... $.50
Chef's Salad ..... Julienne style .... $.50 Piccadillo ..Served on a bed of rice $.80 Longusta Salad ........................ $.95
The weekly dinner special at the Club will be sliced tenderloin with saunted mushrooms or a half of lobster tail s rved with drawn butter for the low price of 3.90o.

FOR SALE
Refrig/frzr., one do. r, $65.00, '58 CHEVY SW, n/trs, avlble Feb. 4, 96197 or VL 1221-B AT.


PAGE 7


GITMO GAZETTE






TUESDAY, JANUARY 10, 1967


AMMAN, JORDAN (AP) TWO EGYPTIAN AIRMEN claimed last night that President Gamal Abdel Nasser had ordered gas and napalm bombs dropped on towns in Yemen. Cairo called their story a "shameful farce."
The two men, who appeared at a news:-conference in Amman, said they were Capt. Mohamed Abdul Motti Abdo and Capt. Saeed Mohamed Ali Eli Fadeel, both 31. They said they deserted their units in Yemen last June and took -refuge in Saudi Arabia, which has been supporting the Royalist side in Yemen's civil war.
Fadeel said Soviet pilots as well as Egyptians were flying Egyptian bombers and fighters in attacks against Royalist tribesmen.
Royalist sources in Yemen charged Sunday that 12 Ilyushin heavy bombers killed more than 125 persons in a gas attack in Northern Yemen on Saturday.

DETROIT (AP) AMERICAN MOTORS' FUTURE was in new hands today after soft-spoken Robert B. Evans and cigar-chewing Roy Abernathy, bowed out of the auto firm's two top jobs.
Evans, who made headlines last June when he wascitapulted into the AMC Board Chairmanship, resigned yesterday in a surprise move and President Abernathy took an early retirement.
Tall, slender Roy D. Chapin Jr., son of one of the nation's automotive pioneers, was elevated to the Chairman's job and William V. Lunebur was made President of the nation's fourth largest auto company. 'American Motors had been plagued with a variety of woes.in recent months---dec:i.fhi.ng sales, production cutbacks, and red ink on its financial pages--despite the efforts of Evans and Abernathy.
Evans, 57, and Abernathy, 60, will :'remb.i.n on AMC's 'Board of Directors, but the company said both had "stepped aside-' according to plan to give a younger t'eam an opportunity to move the company forward."
Evans said AMC's problems could be solved with a few breaks along the way. He spoke of' plans for jazzed-up cars, hotter engines and more aggressive selling techniques.

ROME - :(AP) A 24-HOUR, NATIONWIDE railway strike brought train service almost to a standstill today in Italy.
The strikers are demanding shorter hours in new labor contracts for 35,000 state railway workers.

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LONDON (AP) GIRLS.WEARINGminiskir.ts':are: getting blue knees in Britain's first big freeze of 1967. More than 100 in thigh-high skirts walked out of classes at Reading College of Technology near London yesterday.
"It's not so bad for the boys in their warm trousers," explained one fashionable, but freezing, young lady. "But we girls in miniskirts found -our '>knees and ]gt9r..tuanihg blue!'
College authorities saida shortage of stokers in the boiler rooms cut the central heating system to quarter power. Ink froze .1.n the college's printing works.

NEW DELHI (AP) A RETIRED INDIAN Army General has directly blamed former Prime Minister Nehru, former Defense Minister Krishna Menon and most of the Indian political hierarchy for India's disastrous showing during the three-week war with Communist'China in 1962.
Lieutenant General B. M. Kaul who was Corps Commander of Indian operation in the ;Noftheast Frontier Agency along China's border says in a new book "The Untold Story".
'Ever since independence most of our leaders believed that we 'attained freedom through nonviolence arid therefore thought that if we could expel a power like the British without the use of arms and violence there was little point in wasting much---even through essentla-l---expenditure on our Armed Forces."
"This idea psychologically played on their minds. "'The impottaric 6f 'the (.-Armed') Services therefore receded and most of their demands were treated as a luxury."
Kaul said Menon was "'larg.ey rresponible for putting Nehru in afearme of mind by which he lookedsceptically at our repeated repre sentations to grant sufficient funds for modernizing the Army and making up its various shortages..
He also said Nehru wrongly believed after reading reports of his ambassadors that the Chinese were not really as strong as -they were ipade out to be because of internal problems including a food shortage, floods and what was thought to be a wave r6f'$d~scOntent against the Chinese regime.
Kaul was relieved of his command following the fighting and Menon was rel-ieved c6f his Defense Portfolio.


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WEATHER CLOUDY U. S. NAVAL BASE, GUANTANAMO BAY, CUBA Phone 9-5247 Date JANUARY 10, 1967 WGBY Radio (1340) TV (Ch. 8) SAID Funds StIMen Adds Up To 5.5%9 SAIGON (AP) IT WAS ESTIMATED today that between $22.7 and $27.3 million worth of American economic assistance comdities delivered to' Vietnam "was W tolen or otherwise divertd" in 1966 by the U.S. agency for international Development (USAID). "USAID believes that the estimated overall losses of 5 to 6 per cent of U.S. aid goods can, not be regarded as h1ghly unusual in a wartime situation as complex as that In Vietnam," said a stateSnt issued by Donald G. %cDonald, Director of U.S. Mid in Salgon. Associated Press writers Fred S. Hoffman add Hugh A. Mulligan, reported last November after a two-month AP survey that profiteering, and corruption were costing American taxpayers at least half a million dollars a day n Vietnam. They cited numous examples of stolen or verted goods and currency speculation. The U.S. and SVN governments have taken some fstepp to improve the situation. Chi Com Premier Chou Tries To Block War TOKYO (,AP) .IRED:CHJNA-S RREMIER today tried to pacify dissident elements in order to head off a possible civil war. Communist China's Premier Chou En-Lai was reported today to have called for a letup in attacks. on five of his Vice Premiers by militant Maoist forces which have created chaos and violence on the mainland. Panama Riot Quelled Quickly PANAMA (AP) A MINOR DEMONSTRATION marked the end of 3rd anniversary observances in the Panama CanalZone last night. bout 200 demonstrators surged toward-the Panama Canal zone last night, but National Guardsmen scattered the mob with a heavy barrage of tear gas grenades. No injuries or arrests were reported. The attempted invasion came after an otherwise quiet observance of the third anniversary of the bloody clashes between U.S. forces and Panamanian mobs in January 1964. The demonstrators tried to invade the heavily guarded (continued on page two) Powell Loses Chairmanship WASHINGTON (AP)lhe House is expected to voteby ni.ght-fall on whether Rep. Adam Clayton Powell retains his seat in Congress. Fellow Democrats ousted him yesterday as Chairman of the House Education and Labor Committee, an action whizich tiggered this exclamation from the veteran Harlem congressman: "Jesus had only one Judas; I have about 120!" Only hours earlier, he had .been confidently telling friends and newspaper "keep the faith, baby!" Yesterday's sidetracking of House Democratic leadership promise plansseemed to add momentum to the drive by.Relicans and some Democratsto bar Powell from his House seat ending an investigation. Powell and many negro leaders sad racism was behind the attacks on him. (continued on page two) Japanese correspondents in Peking said Chou made his plea: fo r: restraint :at : one of the continuing high-level meetings of Chairman Mao Tse Tung's pure group in Peking Sunday with Mao's sharptongued wife, Chaing Ching, present. The faction led by Mao and Defense Minister Lin Piao meanwhile stepped up 'their denunciation of the power group led by President Liu Shao-Chi, Party General Secretary Teng Hsiao-Ping and Tao Chu, a vice premier who until a week ago was regarded as one of Mao's -.men. Chou was quoted as saying he approved criticism of his trio. Other reports from Peking told of the sudden takeover of the capital's police forces by the ministry of public Security, the virtual kidnaping of Liu's wife, Wang Kuang-Mei, by Red guards, a demand that 'counter-revolutionaries" be dealt with by law, and hints of possible new worker violence in Shanghai. In Formosa, where Chiang Kai-Shek keeps a close watch on mainland events with an eye to eventual invasion, the clashes were regarded as a possible curtain raiser to (continued on page two) WGBY AM-Radio will carry the President's State of The Union Message at 9:30 tonite. VATER HARLIE + 4 C 01ifie Rizit

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TUESDAY, JANUARY 10, 1967 TOKYO--CIVIL WAR--(Continued from page 1)-Civil War. This view was shared by western diplomats in London but was not emphasized in Moscow reports from Peking. PANAMA--DEMONSTRATORS--(Continued from page one)--Canal Zone after a 3-hour rally -held by labor and student groups in the Cinco De Mayo Plaza. The only other incident ocurred toward the end of the rally when someone tossed a smoke bomb and the crowd scattered. Rocks were thrown through windows of at least two business houses, but order was quickly restored. At the end of the -;eeting about 200 demonstratorA shouting denunciations against President Marco A. Robles made their attempt to enter the Zone. WASHINGTON (AP) Chinese Nationalistfbbassador Chou Sku-Kai said today President Chiang Kai-Shek is ready to return to the mainland if present disorders lead to general chaos in Red China. The nationalist diplomat said in an interview that the time is drawing near in Red China for outside direction and organization. "That we can provide," he said. Chou foresees three possible outcomes of the present situation: --Success of Chairman Mao Tse-Tung and his Defense Minister, Marshal Lin Paio, in suppressing opposition to their rule. --An overthrow of the present hierarchy by the Communist party wing led by President Liu Sho-Chi. --General chaos resulting from the interplay of the current power struggle as rival leaders purge each other. This would leave 700 million Chinese people virtually leaderless, he predicted. "That is where we come in," said Chou. "We have been preparing for such a day and we cannot shed our responsibility to the Chinese people." He said the return of the Nationalistswould be a "political operation carried out militarily." But Chou would not say what ,support could be expected from the U.S. in such an eventuallity, he said there would not be a requirement for a large volume of shipping or for manpower. Chou recalled how Chiang marched vavloV4 four decades ago and unified China with only a few divisions at his command. Vox Populi items will not be accepted or forwarded to proper channels unless sighed. The name will be withheld upon request. Ask anyone in Trinidad and he'll tell you the Pied Piper had a steel band. And eac year, during the traditional three-day carni val, the legend is retold when steel band draw thousands through the streets in a rhythmic shuffle known as "the Tramp." The Navy also has a steel band which has thrilled millions in over 4,000 performances including two command performances at the White House. The 10th Naval District Steel Band, as it is officially known, is under the direction of Chief Musician Robert L. Brown and willW make a three-day tour of the Naval Base on Jan. 12-14. The schedule is as follows: Thurs. Jan. 12.NAS Lyceum.7:30 PM Acey-Ducey Club.9:30 PM Fri. Jan. 13. .NAS LP Lyceum.6:30 PM CPO Club.9:30 PM Sat. Jan. 14. .NavSta Lyceum.6:30 PM COMO Club.9:30 PM Make plans now to see and hear one of these outstanding performances by the 10th Naval District Steel Band. There was a slight mix-up on our part concerning the Baby of the Year's name. The correct name of the baby is Judith Marie and th name of the mother is Barbara JeanJMcClure. ** *** *** *** ** ***** *wwwwwwww:*r**** ** ***** GITMO GAZETTE PAGE 2

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PAGE 3 TUEADAY, JANUARY 10, 1967 GITMO GAZETTE he M ilitar Draft ..... WASHINGTON (UPI)(IBy Louis Cassel) THE MILo only vipient opposition flared in OklaITARY DRAFT--FROM MOSES TO TODAY. homa, where tenant farmers and Indiana parComplusory military service goes back at ticipated in what Was called "The Green Corn least to the days of Moses. The bible deRebellion." scribes a massive draft registration carried Wheft World War 11 began in 1939, many Amerout by Moses. It involved "every MIale, from cans thought this country could remain iso20 years old and upward, all in Israel who late from the conflict. They opposed Presiare able to go forth to war." dent Roosevelt's request for a draft law'to Conscription came to America with the earlbuild up the United States Armed Forces. Afiest settlers. In 1623, the General Assembly ter a bitter national debate, Congress in of colonial Virginia enacted a draft law 1940 enacted "The Selective Training and authorizing military commanders to "levy a Service Act." It squeaked through the House party of men. so many as may be spared withby a margin of one vote. out too much weakening of the plantations. The 18,000 men and women who serve without and to employ these md against the indians pay as members of loca1 draft boards have when they shall assault us." achieved a remarkable record of scandal-free George Washington made repeated but futile public service. Although complaint are frepleas to the Continental Congress to enact quently made about lack of uniformity among a draft law to provide manpower for his delocal boards in granting deferments, or about pleted army during the Revolutionary War. He alleged errors in judgement by local boards wad an early proponent of the Universal Servthe United Press International survey showed ice concept recently revived by Defense Seethat most Americans are convinced of the inretary Robert McNamara. tegrity of draft board members. The verdict "It may be laid down as a primary position of public opinion was summed up by Dr. Morris that every citizen who enjoys the protection Janowitz. Professor of Sociology at the Uniof a free government, owes not only a porvarsity of Chicago who has made an extensive tion of his property but even of his personal study of the operation of the draft: he said", service to the defense of it," Washington "Although the autonomy of local boards %aid. leads to 'considerable variation' between one During the Civil War, the Union first tried board and another, there is a general feeling to man its army with volunteers. But by 1863 that local boards have been fair" in applying Congress found it necessary to:resort to contheir own policies among their own regisscription. It enacted the most detested truants. draft law in United States history. A married man, in the eyes of the Selectiv. The law permitted a wealthy man to buy his Service System, is one who took a wife befoi way out of the draft, either by hiring a subAugust 27, 1965. Those married since that stitute to go in his place, or by purchasing cutoff date are regarded as single men so far an exemption for $300 in cash. Poor people as their draft eligibility goes. married itterly resented the law, and their feelings men--that is, men married before August 27, about it were vented in a bloody draft riot 1965--are supposed to be the last One-A's which swept across New York City in July, called. They are called up only after a 1863. local board has used up all other One-A's in During four days of rioting, 1,200 persons the 19-26 age group. Some local boards are were killed. Similar but less bloody draft now drafting married men. riots took place in Boston, Rutland, Vermont, If a married man has one or more children Portsmouth, New Hampshire, and Wooster, Ohio. to support, he is entitled to a 3-A classiThe Confederacy also had a draft law. Exfiction, which exempts him from the draft. emptions were granted to men who owned 20 or The number of negroes drafted into the Army more slaves, to teachers, to druggists, and is almost exactly proportional to the number to newspapermen. Wealthy men were allowed to or negroes in the United States' population hire substitutes to serve in their place. of draft-age males. The figure is 12 percent The United States had no further truck with in both cases. However, negroes are somewhat draft legislation until World War 1. A draft "overrepresented" in the Army units which are act passed in 1917 was repeatedly challenged on duty in Vietnam, They constitute nearly in the courts, but its constitutionality was 16 percent of those units. held. It provided for a lottery system of One reason for this is that negro youths electing men for service. who lack educational background to qualify Under this law, the United States registerfor military technical schools have tended to ed 24,000,000 men and drafted 2.8 million. concentrate in the combat arms where oppor(Continued in next column) tunities are (Continued on page four).

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TUESDAY, JANUARY 10, 1967 CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA, (AP) SOUTH AFRI-1 CAN Prime Minister Balthazae.J. Vorster started talks today with Chief Leabua Jonathan, black Premier cf neighboring Lesotho, on fostering friendly relations between the two countries. It was Vorster's first meeting since he became Premier with the leader of any country and the first time a Prime Minister of whiteruled South Africa had met the Black Premier of an African Independent country on South African soil. A few days before his assassination last September Premier Hendrik Verwoerd had met Jonathan in Pretoria, the administrative Capital, but at that time Letotho, was not Independent. It was granted independence from Britbin October 4. DRAFT--(Cont'd from page 3) greatest for rapid advancement into NCO ranks. Another reason is that negroes, finding in the military a greater range of non-discriminatory opportunity than they found in peivate employment, are much more likely than white youths to become career soldiers. The first term reenlistment rate for white soldiers is 17 percent; for negroes, it is 45 percent. A third reason was noted by Whitney Young, head of the Urban League, after his return from a visit to the Vietnam fighting front last summer. He said many young negroes told him they had volunteered for combat units because they were tired on being considered inferior and wanted to in his words "show the other guy and themselves that they are men." SAIGON (AP) A massive American force backed by planes, armor and artillery has launched the biggest offensive of the Vietnam War in an attempt to sweep the Viet Cong out of the jungled "Iron Triangle" 20 to 30 miles north of Saigon. The objective is to capture a major headquarters complex of the Communists and to clear enemy troops from the tangled forests from which they menace the South Vietnamese cap ital. Gen. William C. Westmoreland's command announced the multi-division operation -was launched at dawn Sunday. It said in thefirst three days 92 Viet Cong have been killed and 16 taken prisoner. The operation includes evacuation of up to 10,000 Vietnamese peasants living iknthe. longtime Viet Cong bastion and their resettlement in other local ities. Westmoreland meanwhile told newsmen thatthe enemy changed his military strategy in 1966, but his objective remains the same: "To uify Vietnam by force as a Communist State." In a year-end review, he said the enemy strength in South Vietnam exceeds 280,000 men, and infiltration from North Vietnam has -averaged more than 8,000 men a month. Other than the drive in the Ion Triangle, no major engagements were reported by the US (c6ntinued*'on column two:) SAIGON (continued from column one) and South Vietnamese commands. U.S. headquarters said American Mar' took sporadic mortar and small-arms fire their sweep of Thanh Phu Peninsula 55 nilW south of SaigoA in the M6kong Delta. But there has been no contact of any size since the Leathernecks landed last Friday, and so far only four enemy soldiers have been reported killed and five taken prisoner. South Vietnamese headquarters reported 45 Viet Cong killed by government troops in repulsing two attacks on military posts 340 and 348 miles northeast of Saigon. South Korea.s Tiger division rpportedW Viet Cong killed, 212 captured ad 621 suspects pulled in during operation south of Qul Nhon. The Koreans do not announce their own casualties. Continuing bad weather once again hampered the U.S. air offensive over North Vietnam, and American pilots flew only 60,strike and reconnaissance missions yesterday. HONG KONG (AP)(By Forrest Edwards) CHINE FROM CANTON reported today that wall posters attacking Communist Party Chairman Mao TseTung had gone up throughout that South China City and that Canton radio had broa4UAs alerts to his supporters to be ready to tome to his defense. Some arrivals said they had seen dozens of anti-Mao posters yesterday and early today before taking the afternoon train to the der and crossing into Hong Kong. fOt' claimed there were hundreds of such posters. They said radio appeals directed Mao's followers to stand ready to "crush the enemies of our great leader." .There was no way to terify the reports, but post of the travellers told essentially the same stories. They said the posters and counter appeals followed a weekend of bloody fighting between pro-Mao Red guards and anti-Mao factory wo ers in which they said several persons w killed, scores hurt, a Canton hospital I smashed and doctors and nurses beaten up. Thousands of workers reportedly stayed away from their jobs in factories and municipal gas, water and electric plants yesterday. Radio broadQcst repeated appeals.for workers to return to their jobs. Opponents of Mao in Shanghai, China's Chief Port, were accused today of resorting to economic warfare in an effort to disrupt Chinese production and finances. NASSAU (AP) THE PROGRESSIVE LIBERAL PARTY (PLP) tries again today at the polls to wrest control of the Bahamas House of Assembly from the Untied Bahamian Party (UBP). Progressive Liberal charges striving to link government officials to gambling .idterests provided the fireworks in the camp for 38 House seats. Economics and racial balance also were issued pondered by the landers, 85 per cent of whom are negroes. Page 4 GTM0 GAZETTE

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TUESDAY, JANUARY 10, 1967 Gitmo Basketball EMF CONTINUED ITS dominance of the local basketball scene last night by blitzing NSD, 86-25. They extended their winning streak to 12 with Warren James and Chuck Zadell leading the FMF scoring with 19 each while George Jonic and Don O'Byrne hit for 14 counters each. Jess Muller and Duke London accounted for almost all of NSD's points with 11 and 10 markers respectively. The Marine Barracks continued to remain one game behind FMF by ripping FTG, 93-48. Recently added guard Sanchez led the 'Necks' with 26 counters while Moore hit for .20,,Bill Hill for 16 and "Deke" Staton for 14. Sharing scoring honors for the scrappy Trainers were Jim Bowman and Milt Hunt with 10 each. Over on court #2, the VC-10 squad left little doubt in anyone's mind that they were still in O the running by holding off Hospital, 52-46. The Tenners, who had built up an impressive 16 point lead with five minutes left, found themselves only six ahead with less than two minutes left. .They called Len Schmidt back off the.bench and he responded by setting up two buckets and picking off three rebounds to put the Tenners safely out in front. Schmidt led the scoring for both teams with 16 while Tenner Jim Nuckols scored 12. Al Foley led the Corpsmen with 15 markers followed by big Bob Van Ellen's 14. The second game proved just as exciting as Naval Station surprised Security Group by jumping into a seven point lead and only the hot hand of Jim Miller in the last quarter enabled Security to rescue a 61-49 win. The Indians, with newcomer Jim Dunn providing surprising backboard strength didn't lose the lead until the end of the third quarter and were still in close contention until high-scorer Dunn--18 points--and Don Gooch--16 points--fouled out. Security got top-flight performances from "Bert" Lambert, who got 11 of his 18 points in the second half, and Miller, who put in all but two of his 13 points in the last 10 minutes of play. Pro Football LOS ANGEE S (UPI) AS IF $15,000 per man DETROIT (UPI) FORMER STAR linebacker Joe isn't enough.incentive, the Green Bay Packers Schmidt may decide tomorrow whether to acdept and Kansas City Chiefs were given added imthe head coaching job with the Detroit Lions. petus money to emerge victorious in Sunday's The post became vacant last week when Harry Super Bowl.game at Los Angeles. Gilmer was fired following two straight losIt was announced that the winner would reing seasons. ceive the World Champiership Trophy---an actSchmidt met the Lion officials for nearly 6 ual sterling silver football mounted on a hours yesterday, but said he wanted more time triangluar base--20 inches in height. to consider the club's contract offer. Baseball MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA (AP). MINNESOTA:.TWINS' BATTING ace Tony. Oliva wants to.get ah early start at spring training in hopes of regaining the American League batting crown. "I'm going to talk with Mr. Griffith next week before I leave for Puerto Rico. I don't know what he's got on his mind, but I think we can get together," said Oliva yesterday. "I'd like to sign my contract soon and start spring training with the pitchers and catchers on February 22d in Orlando, Florida." Last year Oliva held out until March before signing, missing two weeks of spring training. He went bn to post his personal major league low batting average of 307 and lost the AL batting title. In 1965 he hit .321 enroute to the batting title for the second consecutive year. Estimates are that Oliva is in the $30,000 bracket now, turned down a 1967 offer of about $34,000 and wants something in the $40,000 class. "I've had three good years," the 25-year-old Oliva said. "If I don't make it*,now then 'you might hit a bad year--you never know when one might hit you. You've got to make ifwhile you can." Sh GAZET is publisbd In accordance with the rules and regulations tor ship and station nevpapers a. litmad is ED=S P-35 And mder the direction IRDK V.D. Collins, USN, Public Affair. Officer. Th. GITHD CSSEE in a doily paper. printed at goezaont expese an Boren equipment four days a oeek. The opinion, or stateassts i i s aperin heaen are not to be construed an official or as reflecting the ew. o CGIIA S or the avy Dpartn t. The Gll GAZETE is a ober of Arned Force. New Bure. PAGE 5 GITMO GAZETTE

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TUESDAY, JANUARY 10, 1967 UCLA made it ten in a row last night by defeating Washington, 83 to 68, tenth ranked Vandey. built overcame Southeastern Conference foe Tenmessee, 65 to 59, while North Texas State broke a 20 game .1Missouri"Va1ley .loising. trekklby defi7&ting W1shitA'State, 80.t.64' : T?: m O kr top games, Providence jumped Oglethorpe,, 74 t6 57,, F2bridaroll~d pea:Miipi., 78'th 63 Western Kentucky edged East Tennessee State, 63 to 61. Mississippi State needed an evattime period to beat Auburn, 59 to 55, Louisiana Otate.nipped Georgia, 87 to 85, Virginia Tech came from behind to defeat Wake Forest, 82 to 70. AAWra s4pp## pptj1t6a' 687 f. DP'aul gained a 76 to 73 victory over St. Bondenture, Indiana downed Minnesota, 83tto 'G, kages upset Nebraska, 99 to 87, Iowa State beat Oklahoma State, 54 to 38, and Southern Ilasis topped Evansville, 55 to 41. Top college basketball games tonight include sixth ranked Texas Western against West Texas State, eighth ranked Cincinnati.against Dayton, Boston College-Northeastern, Seattle-Portland Southern Mehtodist-Texas, Syracuse-Cornell, Duke-Clemson, Northwestern-Illinois, CraigtonSt. Louis, and Kansas State-Missouri. A first in the history of the United Press International college basketball ratings was recorded yesterday when an Ivy eague team crashed the Top Ten. The club is Princeton and the Tigers are ranked ninth on the basis of their eleven to one record thus far. Still holding down the top spot by a wide margin is UCLA with thirty three out of a possible thirty five first place votes. The two remaining first place nodsbelong to second ranked Louisville. North Carolina is third followed by, New Mexico, fourth; Houston, fifth; Texas Western, sixth; Kansas, seventh; Cincinnati, eighth; Princeton, ninth; and Vanderbilt, tenth. Pro Basketball qWe best of the National Basketball Association will be on display tonight at San Francisco for the NBA's seventeenth annual All-Star game. The East squad, to be coached by former Boston mentor Red Auerbach, has won eleven of the previous sixteen contests and the last four straight. The East got some bad news yesterday when it was revealed that Philadelphia center Wilt Chamberlain may not be able to play because of a leg injury. Auerbach's only comment wa "I quit worryin when I retired." Helping alleviate Auerbach's worries is the fact that Chamberlain is sidelined, he will be replaced'by a guy named Bill Russell from Boston. A vice president df the. 5N4tional Collegiat"Athletie-Ass6ciation::urged :yesterday that the NCAA.ratain its C-.minus academic ruling. Bradford.LBoth.cof DDLAiER called the rule 'the most important:the NCAA has ever enacted because, in Booth's words, "it requires athletes to be Students." The rule requires athletes to have an equivalent of a 1.6 _grade. average :oat of-a possible four when he enters school, and requires him to maintain it throughout his varsity career. The NCAA, currently meeting in,Houston, is expected to consider six amendments that have bel proposed in an effort to 'kill or weaken the C-minus ruling. In other action at the NCAA meeting yesterday, the Rules Committee of the American Football Coaches Association recommended elimination of the "tackle eligible pass play." The recommendation will-be considered next week at the NCAA Rules Committee meeting in Phoenix, Arizona. Baseball A"group-ot Cincinnati businessmen, led by newspaper publisher Francis Dale, yesterday took over as the new owners of the Cincinnati Reds. The group replaces Bill DeWitt who will remain with the club for at least one-year as a consultant. Latest to return signed contract for the 1967 campaign are National League batting champion Matty Alou with Dittsburgh and slugging first baseman Willie McCovey with San Francisco. Funeral services were held yesterday for former big.league Manager Johnny Kean, who died of a heart attack Friday night at thd age of 55. Keane guided .the St.ouisiCardihals to a world series championship in 1964 and then took over as manager of the New York Yankees uht i last May. PATS!EVR TIME I GET A NEW OUR SUPHY SERGEANT SPM CAMELH RED BON MAES ME! 400TS fT FULL OF HCLES PAGE 6 GITMO GAZETTE

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TUESDAY, JANUARY 10, 1967 FOR SALE '61 CHEVY, 4-dr., 6-cyl., 5650.00, 7739 AT. GP M Movie projector, new, $55.00, 7494 AT. ZENITH 21" TV, new pict. tube, $40, 95325 AT. '66 DART Station 4auon, $2,200, or older car for equity. Call 90160 anytime. '52 CUSHMAN motor scooter 160.00, 90160 AT. Twin stroller, call 90160 Anytime. 9.E. automatic washer, $60, Bath. netta S5.00, see at L.P. Apt. 557-A or call 64579 Anytime. 19" PHYLCC TV, Decca record plaJer 97161 AT. 18-foot casting net, 25323 Dh'H/97204 AhH. hite, male miniature poodle, %KC rag. 97141. t 961 MONZA, good condition, n/tires, $625.00, all LI. 'oung at 85151 DWH or 7485 Anytime. '63 PLYMOUTH -URY, white 2-dr hdtp. V-8, A.Q. & P.;. Miss Rockwood 7722 DWH or 7426 AWH WANTED Front end parts for Lamibretta,Unger 85133 DWH Little girl's snowsuit (size 4) 97100 anytime ST 11Tver-grey gas tank filler cap. 97312 A H. Man's silver wedding band, 5 saill diamonds, in Bay Hill area, if found please contact Inbysk at Base ras. 2ransp. Office. 7ewd. off. Prescription glasses. Call Wagner 95144 AT. HAVE YOU HEARD? Whe regular meeting of the Little Theatre 3roup will be held tomorrow evening at 7:30 M at the Special Services Little Theatre Stage. The meeting will be followed by a play reading. HAVE YOU HEARD? The Teen Club Advisory Boatd Meeting scheduled for tomorrow evening has been postponed until next Tuesday, January 17th, at 7:30 PM on the patio of the Teen Club. All Base couples: Coming this month.,the open house for the new square dance class. Watch the GAZETTE for further information. Morin Center is now back in full.swing! A new and revised menu offering more flaming dishes will be feature. The Casuals are playing nightly Thursday through Sunday for your dancing and dining pleasure. Although reservations are not required, they are desirable to assure you the table and waiter of your choice. COMO Club Bingo fans, the GIANT Jackpot, your choice of the camphor chests or the rosewood silver chest, will no this Thursday in "55" numbers. The Junior Jackpot, a General Electric dishwasher, will go in 56 numbers. Many other merchandise prizes from Panama which will go for regular games. Try your luck at winning one or these beautiful gifts for your home, at 3ingo, Thursday evening. The COMO Club will be featuring another exotic dinner.from Chinatown Wednesday evening. All your Oriental favorites will be featured. Egg rolls, shrimp fried rice, chicken chow mein, and pepper steak will be yours for the low price of $2.00. WEDNESDAY'S LUNCHEON MENU at your CCMO Club: Shrimp Gumbo .$.50 Chef's Salad .Julienne style .$.50 Piccadillo .Served on a bed of rice $.80 Longusta .alad. $.95 The weekly dinner special at the Club will be sliced tenderloin with saunted mushrooms or a half of lobster tail s rved with drawn butter for the low price of $3.90. FOR SALE Refrig/frzr., one do,:r, $65.00, '58 CHEVY SW, n/trs, avlble Feb. 4, 96197 or VL 1221-B AT. PSST/-AH @ HIRTFU/LL O' KEEPY'60/N'i SLAM TH' DOOR IN THOSE GREAT HER FACE, PAPP." BIG EMPTY' AH ISTOO EV'ES IS TENDERHEARTED TO KINDA EAT WHILE SHE'S CREEPV'fl WITHIN' 6URPf-NOW WE'LL GO I'VE CHANGED AH GOTTA BROKE MY MIND!. WAIT A IFWE DON'T I'LL ADOPT WHOLE GET RID HIm, HOUR, OF HIM, INSTANTCV!. BEFO' INSTANTLY!! DINNERC PAGE 7 GITMO GAZETTE

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TUESDAY, JANUARY 10, 1967 AMMAN, JORDAN (AP) TWO EGYPTIAN AIRMEN claimed last night that President Gamal Abdel Nasser had ordered gas and napalm bombs dropped on towns in Yemen. Cairo called their story a "shameful farce." The two men, who appeared at a news conference in Amman, said they were Capt. Mohamed Abdul Motti Abdo and Capt. Saeed Mohamed Ali Eli Fadeel, both 31. They said they deserted their units in Yemen last June and took ;refuge in Saudi Arabia,which has been supporting the Royalist side in Yemen's civil war. Fadeel said Soviet pilots as well as Egyptians were flying Egyptian bombers and fighters in attacks against Royalist tribesmen. Royalist sources in Yemen charged Sunday that 12 Ilyushin heavy bombers killed more than 125 persons in a gas attack in Northern Yemen on Saturday. DETROIT (AP) AMERICAN MOTORS' FUTURE was in new hands today after soft-spoken Robert B. Evans and cigar-chewing Roy Abernathy, bowed out of the auto firm's two top jobs. Evans, who made headlines last June when he was catapulted into the AMC Board Chairmanship, resigned yesterday in a surprise move and President Abernathy took an early retirement. Tall, slender Roy D. Chapin Jr., son of one of the nation's automotive pioneers, was 6levated to the Chairman's job and William V. Luneburg was made President of the nation's fourth largest auto company. American Motors had been plagued with a variety of woes in recent months---decli. 'i.ng sales, production cutbacks, and red ink on its financial pages--despite the efforts of Evans and Abernathy. Evans, 57, and Abernathy, 60, will :-rembi.n on AMC's Board of Directors, but the company said both had "stepped aside according to plan to give a younger team an opportunity to move the company forward." Evans said AMC's problems could be solved with a few breaks along the way. He spoke ofplans for jazzed-up cars, hotter engines.and more aggressive selling techniques. ROME.;(AP) A 24-HOUR, NATIONWIDE railway strike brought train service almost to a standstill today in Italy. The strikers are demanding shorter hours in new labor contracts for 35,000 state railway workers. LONDON (AP) GIRLS.WEARING'miniskrts are: getting blue knees in Britain's first big freeze of 1967. More than 100 in thigh-high skirts walked out of classes at Reading College of Technology near London yesterday. "It's not so bad for the boys in their warm trousers," explained one fashionable, but freezing, young lady. "But we girls in miniskirts found our .knees and 190gturUni.ig blue!" College authorities saida shortage of stokers in the boiler rooms cut the central heating system to quarter power. Ink froze .i~n the college's printing works. NEW DELHI (AP) A RETIRED INDIAN Army General has directly blamed former Prime Minister Nehru, former Defense Minister Krishna Menon and most of the Indian political hierarchy for India's disastrous showing during the three-week war with Communist China in 1962. Lieutenant General B. M. Kaul who was Corps Commander of Indian operation in the ;Northeast Frontier Agency along China's border say s in a new book "The Untold Story". 'Ever since independence most of our leaders believed that we attained freedom through nonviolence and therefore thought that if we could expel a power like the British without the use of arms and violence there was little point in wasting much---even through essetlal.--expenditure on our Armed Forces." "This idea psychologically played on their minds. YThe importance 6f the (.Armed') Services therefore receded and most of their demands were treated as a luxury." Kaul said Menon was "Y'argety rresponsible for putting Nehru in aframe of mind by which he lookedsceptically at our repeated repre sentations to grant sufficient funds for modernizing the Army and making up its various shortages." He also said Nehru wrongly believed after reading reports of his ambassadors that the Chinese were not really as strong as they were made out to be because of internal problems including a food shortage, floods and what was thought to be a wave r6f*idscbntent against the Chinese regime. Kaul was relieved of his command following the fighting and Menon was relieved c6f his Defense Portfolio. Miff lAERADBAA0NI $1ttIW 0NIOTOFltE M~uI 0NU.T PILOT FLqINS -7--W LINAOgRW? IF I LOSE ANOTHER SV" CAMEL,00179)PLq5E1iWAD blt KILL ME. f 96 PAGE 8 GITMO GAZETTE


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