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Gitmo Review

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Gitmo Review
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U.S. Naval Base
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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U.S. Naval Base
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English
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weekly publication

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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University of Florida
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Copyright, Gitmo Review. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Preceded by:
Sunday Supplement
Succeeded by:
Gitmo Gazette
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Guantanamo Gazette
Related Item:
Daily Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Daily Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Bay Gazette
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Indian

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A WEEKLY PUBLICATION U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba March 3, 1963



REPRESENTATIVES VISIT BASE


VISITING VIPS - Rep C. E. Gallagher (D-N. J.), Rep M. G. Snyder (R-Ky.), Rep.
John J. Flynt (D-Ga.), Rep. Carl Elliott (D-Ala.), Rep. Stanley Tupper (R-Md.), Rep. K. W. Stinson (R-Wash.), Rep. Robert M. Giaimo (D-Conn.), Rep. Claude Pepper (D-Fla.), Mr. Don Petit (Ass't to Rep. Pepper), RADM J. W. Davis (COMNAVBASE), r. D. J. Watkins (Ass't to Rep. Moorehead), Sen. Robert Byrd (D-W. Va.), and Rep. W. L. Placott (R-Calif.) at the Northeast Gate of the U. S. Naval Base.
(G. E. Corley, PH3)


LITTLE THEATER GROUP REHEARSING
Yes, it's that time again-the season
for good live theater at Guantanamo Bay. If you've noticed a hum of activity in and around the Community Theater at Morin Center these past few weeks, the answer is only too clear: "why, the Little Theater is rehearsing its next
play."
The production this coming week of
Noel Coward's "Blithe Spirit" represents a triumph of sorts for the Guantanamo Bay Little Theater. The play originally went into production three weeks before the 'October missile crisis. But like most very other activity on the Naval Base,
*ings were rather hurridly curtailed.
After the return of the dependents late


A QUIET SATURDAY


AFTERNOON...

It had been an ordinary weekend at Gitmo. . . a time to enjoy, the sun at one's leisure, beside a swimming pool or at the beach. Kittery Beach road was dotted as usual with auto traffic going to and from the Kittery and Windmill Beach areas.

Then suddenly last Saturday evening a car hurtled around aZ sharp curve on the Road adjacent to the Kittery housing area. With a deafening roar it left the highway and came to rest on a dirt hill. And suddenly the peaceful Sunday afternoon put on a mask of tragedy.

The car, a 1951 Buick, with four Cuban base residents inside, was going in excess of 70 miles-an-hour. The driver, Ibrahim Campos, 27, lost control of the vehicle on the curve. It tumbled end over end, rolled over' three times and came to rest on its side. From where the driver lost control to the car's final resting place, it had traveled 420 feet.
(Continued on Page Four)


(Continued on Page Four)


DRIVE SAFELY! !


i E. M. Gibbs, PH2)







Page Two GITMO REVIEW March 3, 1963


WOMAN'S


WORLD

by Jackie Lloyd
One of the most needed dependent facilities at Guantanamo'has finally come into being. The Child Care Center at Villamar Lyceum has been organized, is operating, and shows signs of becoming one of the most vital self-supporting activities on the base.
Mrs. Allyce Maddox is the lady in charge, with a background of child care and teaching, this experienced lady can put to ease the minds of even the most anxious of mothers. Allyce arrived at Guantanamo in March, 1960, and until her .takeover of the Child Care Center, was a kindergarten teacher at Victory Hill. In 1960 she taught on Truk Island when her husband was on duty there, and in 1958-1960 she managed a child care center in the San Francisco area.
Spilled milk, an over-turned plate, a squabble among little friends, and Alice is scarcely rumpled. Her love for children, her easy-going temperment, her desire to serve her community, all make her so right for this new job. Assistant Mrs. Connie Diaz is a most capable helper, and las cubanas Cassy and Juana, cada una hace mias que su parte respectiva.
The day I visited the center, there were thirty-six children as all-day visitors, and at the noon hour, due to a ladies' luncheon, there were fifty-one little charges. The biggest day the nursery has had to date is an attendance of sixty-two. "As our fame spreads, we soon will surpass that number, I'm sure, Allyce told me.
The center is tremendous in size and shines with new white-painted cleanliness. "Government regulations state a

The Gitmo Review's mission is to inform and entertain all hands -and to serve. as a positive factor in promoting the-efficiency, welfare and contentment of personnel. [The Gitmo Review iS- pUblished at the! Naval Base. in accordance, with NavExos :P35,: revised July. 1958 :and:: financed: with non-.appropriated funds at no cost :to the government. ' :i
:RADM J W. DAVIS _::ComNavBase LCDR J. F. LLOYD: , Officer-Advisor


� Armed Forces Press. Servie (AFPS) .,may not. be ~reprinted :without. the :written permission of Armed Forces iPress. Service. Material iin .. .the paper may not be reprinted unless authorization is obtained from the editor. All' photographs herein, are o0fliciail Navy. photographs, unless otherwise s pecified. , . . ii


The opinions or statements made in articles published herein are those of the writers and are not in-any case to e construed as official or as reflecting the views of Commander Naval Base or of the � Navy Department.


child care center must have thirty-five square feet per child," our native Southern California continued. "To give you an idea of the size of our establishment, this means we could take care of twohundred-and-fifty children."
The Lyceum is an excellent location for the center, Situated on a slight hill, the open, building receives every bit of
-Guantanamo's prevailing breezes, and because of the abundance of space, the children can't feel confined under any figment of their little imaginations. There is an indoor play area, an enclosed outside play area, and a playground beyond the building with ample swings, slides, etc.
I was completely taken with the "baby department"-thirteen brand new cribs, new feeding chairs, changing tablesand everything so clean, clean, clean! In addition to "this separate section, there is a dining area where the children are served well-balanced lunches (some mothers claim their children eat better here than at home), a sleeping area with fifty cots for'. afternoon napping, and plenty of shelves for storage of toys and equipment. A new dishwasher assures sterilization of the dishes.
Although the center obtained its initial financial ,support from the.,,Community Fund, it appears certain the new venture will -be on a self-paying basis from now on. Chaplain G. H. Sargent is the Officer in, Charge. Rates are very reasonable, and in this period of curtailed supply of domestic assistance, the center's services, so desperately needed, are gratefully accepted and appreciated by Guantanamo mothers. Later, it is hoped the nursery may be kept open one evening per week to help alleviate the evening baby-sitting problem.
A special note to parents using the center: Mrs. Maddox asks that you please label any bottles, toys, food containers, etc. that accompany your child to the center, thus a certain amount of confusion canbe eliminated. Any questions can be answered by calling 9405.
In my three years at Guantanamo I have been :greatly" impressed With! :the wcay our: community i!:s able to solivei its own problems. :.: .: the :Child :Care :Cetr is:: another :example of just ... ..such a: soKepthese figures in mind ;iii::':::


figured that we have 35,000,000 laws trying to enforce the Ten Commandments?


G(-kctLIhs Gre


"Day of the Ostrich?"


S


Chaplain' E. J. Dunn
The course of events in the Western Hemisphere in latter. years must, indeed, "give us.pause". "Life, liberty and the pursuit:of happiness"-are no longer just words-no longer merely the high sounding but assumed principle by which we live. There is a personal conscious awareness thatlife would be intolerable withoat this guarantee. The frame of reference by which we judge our concept lies in another set of facts by which others live-death or servitude and planned misery.
Moral isolation-whereby people live, eat, and work together but hardly communicate-the philosophy of individua ism, rugged or otherwise, by which extend ourselves only to ourselves o to a chosen few-indifferentism wherein we oblivious of the joy or sorrows of others-these 44re luxuries we can not afford. Those who have indulged themselves and who have survived find themselves pitiful victims of the monster They. created.
We have seen this happen many times. We have. so analyzed the process of "take over" that any high school student can answer the why and how. Yet there is merit in repetition and reminder.
Humanity is no accident but a Creation of God. He had no intention of abandoning us to wander in the desert of time unpiotected from one another. The Law which He gave us is quite simple and practical. The first part of it pertains to our relationship with Him. The second part of the law is given to prevent us from destroying each other. This is called the Moral Law. It governs oua. activity as individuals and as a membi of Society.
It has long been established that we are "our brothers keeper" to the point of being personally concerned. When we abdicate this responsibility by any infraction of this Law of Charity we are proportionately destroying ourselves and the soul of Society., Nor can we absolve ourselves of this responsibility by "contributing" to social organizations any more than we can absolve ourselves of our responsibility to our country simply because we have elected a representative.
By the LaW of God it is incumbent upon us to shed any feeling of indifference, assumption, or selfish individualism in our day to day relationships with others. You and I make up Society and what effects one effects all. To be a intelligently informed, communicativW interested, devout American is not an option but a spiritual mandate.
� a


Page'Two


March 3, 1963


GITMO REVIEW









JUST WONDERIN'

by D. KOZE, JOC
I been doing lots of wondrin' since my last article in October. I don't suppose I was alone in and around Gitmo.
I was "just wonderin'" this past week not what has gone by, but of what is happening around us today. Just last week I attended one of the most heart-warming functions I have ever had the pleasure to attend. It was a Father and Daughter Sweetheart Dance, put on by the Girls Scouts, headed by Mrs. Hawks. To me it just made you forget everything and enjoy the finer things in life...
The sweethearts in this case were our little scouting daughters. The little gals, most of them around 10 to 12 years of age danced with their Daddy and were proud as little peacocks. One of the favorite dances of the evening was the "Hokie Pokie". You never heard of the Hokie Pokie? Ask one of the girl scouts, they have the record. it's really something. You could call it modified twist I suppose. You just throw only one part of your body around at the time though, such as "Put your right arm out. put your right arm in", etc. . . For the Dad who did the best "Hokie Pokie" went a special prize.


URGENT - TO ALL BASE RESIDENTS. A remembrance of the evacuation. (M. W. Hines, PH2)

EVACUATION MOMENTO
As a memento of the recent evacuation, personnel of the Naval Supply depot have obtained an ash tray about six inches square in size upon which the evacuation instructions handed out to our dependents is printed. The tray is ceramic in a white background with grey and red design. Additionally the ash tray is designed to include the name
of the dependent involved.
A sample of this item will be on display
in the Commissary Store commencing 4 March. Order blanks will also be available at the Commissary Store. The cost, including postage, is $4.00. If you desire one of these ash trays fill out an order blank and mail it to the address indicated ereon. Your check or money order ould accompany the order.
It is emphasized that the Naval Supply
Depot has no official connection with these transactions. We are mercly making available to you the information which we obtained as private individuals.
The Red Cross Drive is now underway.
Through the Red Cross you are always there to help those in need. March is Red Cross month, give generously. Some 83,000 servicemen and their families are helped by the Red Cross at military installations and in military medical facilities. About 3,100 emergency welfare messages are transmitted by the Red Cross to relieve the anxieties of service
men and their families.
The Red Cross was instrumental in , providing for families from Guantanamo
hen they arrived in Norfolk at the beginning of the Cuban crisis.
Give from your heart.


KING and QUEEN

of St. VALENTINE
February 14 is always a festive occasion, no matter where you may be. On the day of St. Valentine, the Teen Club was jumping to the sounds of the best in popular recorded music as presented by WGBY's "Rockin' Robin", Bobby Hartz. In this setting, the Junior High crowned its Prince and Princess, Mike Crawford and Lorrie Acker.
On Victory Hill, the Juniors and Seniors were celebrating with the popular musical combo from VU-10, The Renegades. Again, royalty was present. Reigning were King Del Heilman and Queen Patty Bowman. Indeed the Saint of Sweethearts (lid not forget Guantanamo Bay.


KING AND QUEEN. - King Del Heilman and Queen Patty Bowman reign at Sweethearts Dance.
(C. E. Beihl, JOSN)


Showing Dad that they are big girls, the young ladies baked cookies, cakes, etc. . . I know, you should have seen our kitchen the night before when "Sis" was baking her chocolate drop cookies. After "Hoking and Poking" around, Dad's were required to enact various Skits. Hearty laughter prevailed as Dad's gave their impressions of how to get dressed in a hurry, how a little boy reacts to a spanking and showing how a mule kicks his feet in the air (two at a time). As one of the attending fathers, I left the party with a headache after laughing so much, but all-in-all, it was a most enjoyable and relaxing evening.
Think you can't have fun in Gitmo? Think again. All you need is a "Hokie Pokie" record, your daughter and you will have some unforgetable moments.
As Art Linkletter said "Kids are wonderful". . . aren't we all. . . kids that is.


CLEARANCE SALE at Marine Exchange Toyland.
(M. P. Cain, PH3)

Nothing is so strong as gentleness: nothing so gentle as real strength.
Vt * *
The water supply for the base is not an unlimited one. Discriminate use of our water should be the aim of all of us.


Page Three


Mllarch 3, 1963


GITMO REVIEW







Page Four GITMO REVIEW March 3, 1963


by Don McKay
Not too long ago the Naval Station Special Services sponsored a track and field meet that was welcomed with a healthy turnout of personnel. This was good to see because it encourages the occurance of another meet. For all of you who are keeping in training for track and field here are some tips on how to cut down your times and increase your distances in some fields of the track meet.
For distance running, jogging around the base is good for developing wind, but it is not a speedy developer for strength in competition. The best way to become efficient in your running event is to actually compete in the event against other runners and all of you fight against the clock. Actually have somebody there with a stop watch to shout the times to you as you're running. Say, that you're a mile runner, it's good to have pacers to push you on. When yours truly used to run the mile in college, the coach would have a pacer set for every quarter mile. It took time to get used to this other fellow, but in time, he was easy enough to catch. Running against pacers and running against the clock at least three times a weekwith the theory of "let your legs do the running and not your arms or body-a 4:15 mile will be yours. .,. and after that, who knows. It's up to you. Take a look at pictures :or films of the great milers like Beatty, Snell, and the threemile great Halberg, running. They run straining up and down on the whole and their legs are just pulling the track underneath them.
In the field events, lets say that you are shooting the discus. The mistake that most beginning throwers make is to watch the rim of the penalty circle and not to the place that the discus is going. Don't watch your feet. It's, like watching the bat while batting in a baseball game. You'll always miss. When you wind up to throw the disc, don't curl your arm up behind your back; for by doing this you are losing your mechanical advantage of the windup. Keep the arm straight and don't bend it. Bring the arm down on your ,pin around (one only) and release the disc from the front part of your hand; not the back. Your middle finger should actually depress into the rim of the disc' due to your hand's force behind the disc and it's this finger that will act as the spinning factor in the disc's flight. When


the disc is in flight it should make'a high flying arch; not a straight line for the ground. By making this arc, and if the disc is flying flat, it will become like the wing of an airplane-or like a rock skipping on water-and fly further on air currents. It's this high arch that will give you greater distance. But above all develope your delivery style inside that circle. Once you get that, the rest is easy.
The javelin is not a spear, that is, the kind that is used for hunting by some aboriginal tribes. The point of thiowing a javelin is not to kill game but to achieve distance. You don't have to aim it for a bulleye. So, in short, you don't throw it like a spear. When throwing the javelin, the thrower does not "cock" his arm and throw. The experienced thrower keeps the throwing arm stiff, again making the most of a swing-' ing mechanical advantage for deliverly. Releasing the javelin properly is no easy trick. It takes minute coordination between the throwing arm the running motion of the body to obtain maximum distance. First preiequisite is to find which foot you throw off of best. The righthanded thrower usually releases on the left foot while running. He brings the stiff javelin-arm up over his head and pushes against the handle of the javelin; with the "U" area of the thumb and forefinger. While doing this, don't look at the javelin, but at the objective. Feel free to throw your whole body into the launching. The more weight behind the javelin the further it will go. Most javelin throwers usually fall over after a throw.., but behind the white line. In the U. S.-Russian Track meet in 1957, Al Cantrello threw the javelin, fell fiat on his faceafter launching, but the thing went for 289 feet-20 feet into the spectator's area. No one was injured.
The hammer-throw is the hardest event of the field games. It takes more coordination to get distance in the hammer throw than in any other event. If an inexperienced thrower handles the hammer wrong he can seriously injure his back, or what's worse release it at the wrong time and let it fly into the spectat or's area. As for the flight of the hammer, the same rule for the discus applies here. A high arc for greater distance. For serious study into :the art of hammer throwing, it is advisable to locate a coach for on-the-spot training.

If it's news call 9247


Vp


do a lot better.

Don't drive as if you own theroad, drive as if you. own the car.


Page Four


March 3, 1963


GITMO REVIEW


SATURDAY AFTERNOON
(Continued from Page One)
As a result of internal injuries h( received, Alexis Delgado, 27, employed at PWC since 1961, was pronounced dead on arrival at the Naval Hospital.
Campos was also admitted to the Naval Hospital where his condition is considered satisfactory. The ier two occupants, Filiberto Martinez, 33, and Edilberto Aces, 26, were both extremely fortunate, escaping with minor injuries. They have been subsequently released from the hospital.
Speed limits are posted throughout the base. They are there for a reason, being determined, by safety engineers for the safety of all. Observation of speed limits is the responsibility of everyone. It is still true that the life you save may be your own.. DRIVE CAREFULLY!

LITTLE THEATER
(Continued from Page One)
last year, a new target date was set and rehearsals commenced.
Opening night is Wednesday, March 6. The play will run for five nights through Sunday, the 10th. Tickets are just $1.00. Reservations may be obtained by phoning Marion Sandsbury at 9257 during the day. You'd better pick up that phone now, you'll be glad you did.


STORK'S

SCOREBOARDThe following named children were born from the period February 18 to February 20, 1963. We would like to extend a friendly welcome, and a Guantanamo smile to thechildren, and their most happy parents.
Mark Eugene Nicely, son of Mr. an] Mrs. Matt Edward Nicely; born Feb. 1 Mark weighed in at 9 lbs. 1 ounce.
Katherine Mark Riley, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David Fredette Riley; born Feb. 19. Katherine weighed in at 6 lbs. 13 1/2 ounces.
Michelle Rene Baylis, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Elvin Fred Baylis born Feb. 19. Michelle weighed in at 7 lbs. 6 ounces.
Sharon Leigh Bishop, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Dow Biship; born Feb. 20. Sharon weighed in at 8 lbs. 11 ounces.
At the end of six innings, the scoreboard stands at:
BOYS---.- 8 GIRLS-..10

The best way to better your lot is to




Full Text

PAGE 1

A WEEKLY PUBLICATION U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba March 3, 1963 REPRESENTATIVES VISIT BASE VISITING VIPS -Rep C. E. Gallagher (D-N. J.), Rep M. G. Snyder (R-Ky.), Rep. John J. Flynt (D-Ga.), Rep. Carl Elliott (D-Ala.), Rep. Stanley Tupper (R-Md.), Rep. K. W. Stinson (R-Wash.), Rep. Robert M. Giaimo (D-Conn.), Rep. Claude Pepper (D-Fla.), Mr. Don Petit (Ass't to Rep. Pepper), RADM J. W. Davis (COMNAVBASE), r. D. J. Watkins (Ass't to Rep. Moorehead), Sen. Robert Byrd (D-W. Va.), and Rep. .L. Placott (R-Calif.) at the Northeast Gate of the U. S. Naval Base. (G. E. Corley, PH3) LITTLE THEATER GROUP REHEARSING Yes, it's that time again-the season for good live theater at Guantanamo Bay. If you've noticed a hum of activity in and around the Community Theater at Morin Center these past few weeks, the answer is only too clear: "why, the Little Theater is rehearsing its next play." The production this coming week of Noel Coward's "Blithe Spirit" represents a triumph of sorts for the Guantanamo Bay Little Theater. The play originally went into production three weeks before the October missile crisis. But like most every other activity on the Naval Base, things were rather hurridly curtailed. After the return of the dependents late A QUIET SATURDAY AFTERNOON. It had been an ordinary weekend at Gitmo. ..a time to enjoy the sun at one's leisure, beside a swimming pool or at the beach. Kittery Beach road was dotted as usual with auto traffic going to and from the Kittery and Windmill Beach areas. Then suddenly last Saturday evening a car hurtled around a sharp curve on the Road adjacent to the Kittery housing area. With a deafening roar it left the highway and came to rest on a dirt hill. And suddenly the peaceful Sunday afternoon put on a mask of tragedy. The car, a 1951 Buick, with four Cuban base residents inside, was going in excess of 70 miles-an-hour. The driver, Ibrahim Campos, 27, lost control of the vehicle on the curve. It tumbled end over end, rolled over three times and came to rest on its side. From where the driver lost control to the car's final resting place, it had traveled 420 feet. (Continued on Page Four) (Continued on Page Four) DRIVE SAFELY! t E. M. Gibbs, PH2)

PAGE 2

Page Two GITMO REVIEW March 3, 1963 WOMAN'S WORLD by Jackie Lloyd One of the most needed dependent facilities at Guantanamo has finally come into being. The Child Care Center at Villamar Lyceum has been organized, is operating, and shows signs of becoming one of the most vital self-supporting activities on the base. Mrs. Allyce Maddox is the lady in charge, with a background of child care and teaching, this experienced lady can put to ease the minds of even the most anxious of mothers. Allyce arrived at Guantanamo in March, 1960, and until her takeover of the Child Care Center, was a kindergarten teacher at Victory Hill. In 1960 she taught on Truk Island when her husband was on duty there, and in 1958-1960 she managed a child care center in the San Francisco area. Spilled milk, an over-turned plate, a squabble among little friends, and Alice is scarcely rumpled. Her love for children, her easy-going temperment, her desire to serve her community, all make her so right for this new job. Assistant Mrs. Connie Diaz is a most capable helper, and las cubanas Cassy and Juana, cada una hace miis que su parte respectiva. The day I visited the center, there were thirty-six children as all-day visitors, and at the noon hour, due to a ladies' luncheon, there were fifty-one little charges. The biggest day the nursery has had to date is an attendance of sixty-two. "As our fame spreads, we soon will surpass that number, I'm sure, Allyce told me. The center is tremendous in size and shines with new white-painted cleanliness. "Government regulations state a The -Gitmo Review's mission is to inform and entertain all hands and to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare and contentment of personnel. The Gitmo Review is published at the Naval Base in accordance with NavExos P35, revised July, 1958 and financed with non-appropriated funds at no cost to the government. RADM J. W. DAVIS ComNavBase LCDR J. F. LLOYD Officer-Advisor Bill WEDERTZ, J03-----------Editor Armed Forces Press Service (AFPS) may not be reprinted without the written permission of Armed Forces Press Service. Material in the paper may not be reprinted unless authorization is obtained from the editor. All photographs herein are official Navy photographs unless otherwise specified. The opinions or statements made in articles published herein are those of the writers and are not in any case to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of Commander Naval Base or of the Navy Department. child care center must have thirty-five square feet per child," our native Southern California continued. "To give you an idea of the size of our establishment, this means we could take care of twohundred-and-fifty children." The Lyceum is an excellent location for the center. Situated on a slight hill, the open building receives every bit of -Guantanamo's prevailing breezes, and because of the abundance of space, the children can't feel confined under any figment of their little imaginations. There is an indoor play area, an enclosed outside play area, and a playground beyond the building with ample swings, slides, etc. I was completely taken with the "baby department"-thirteen brand new cribs, new feeding chairs, changing tablesand everything so clean, clean, clean! In addition to this separate section, there is a dining area where the children are served well-balanced lunches (some mothers claim their children eat better here than at home), a sleeping area with fifty cots for afternoon napping, and plenty of shelves for storage of toys and equipment. A new dishwasher assures sterilization of the dishes. Although the center obtained its initial financial support from the Community Fund, it appears certain the new venture will be on a self-paying basis from now on. Chaplain G. H. Sargent is the Officer in Charge. Rates are very reasonable, and in this period of curtailed supply of domestic assistance, the center's services, so desperately needed, are gratefully accepted and appreciated by Guantanamo mothers. Later, it is hoped the nursery may be kept open one evening per week to help alleviate the evening baby-sitting problem. A special note to parents using the center: Mrs. Maddox asks that you please label any bottles, toys, food containers, etc. that accompany your child to the center, thus a certain amount of confusion can be eliminated. Any questions can be answered by calling 9405. In my three years at Guantanamo I have been greatly impressed with the way our community is able to solve its own problems. ..the Child Care Center is another example of just such a solution. Life a challenge, not a grind. Keep these figures in mind; Life is 10/ of what we make itAnd 90/ of how we take it! Did you know that some fellow has figured that we have 35,000,000 laws trying to enforce the Ten Commandments? Ghaplain's Gorner "Day of the Ostrich?" S Chaplain E. J. Dunn The course of events in the Western Hemisphere in latter years must, indeed, "give us pause". "Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness"-are no longer just words-no longer merely the high sounding but assumed principle by which we live. There is a personal conscious awareness that life would be intolerable withouit this guarantee. The frame of reference by which we judge our concept lies in another set of facts by which others live-death or servitude and planned misery. Moral isolation-whereby people live, eat, and work together but hardly communicate-the philosophy of individual ism, rugged or otherwise, by which extend ourselves only to ourselves or to a chosen few-indifferentism wherein we oblivious of the joy or sorrows of others-these "re luxuries we can not afford. Those who have indulged themselves and who have survived find themselves pitiful victims of the monster they created. We have seen this happen many times. We have so analyzed the process of "take over" that any high school student can answer the why and how. Yet there is merit in repetition and reminder. Humanity is no accident but a Creation of God. He had no intention of abandoning us to wander in the desert of time unpotected from one another. The Law which He gave us is quite simple and practical. The first part of it pertains to our relationship with Him. The second part of the law is given to prevent us from destroying each other. This is called the Moral Law. It governs ou activity as individuals and as a memb of Society. W It has long been established that we are "our brothers keeper" to the point of being personally concerned. When we abdicate this responsibility by any infraction of this Law of Charity we are proportionately destroying ourselves and the soul of Society. Nor can we absolve ourselves of this responsibility by "contributing" to social organizations any more than we can absolve ourselves of our responsibility to our country simply because we have elected a representative. By the Law of God it is incumbent upon us to shed any feeling of indifference, assumption, or selfish individualism in our day to day relationships with others. You and I make up Society and what effects one effects all. To be a intelligently informed, communicative interested, devout American is not an option but a spiritual mandate. Page Two GITMO REVIEW March 3, 1963

PAGE 3

JUST WONDERIN' by D. KOZE, JOC I been doing lots of wondrin' since my last article in October. I don't suppose I was alone in and around Gitmo. I was "just wonderin' this past week not what has gone by, but of what is happening around us today. Just last week I attended one of the most heart-warming functions I have ever had the pleasure to attend. It was a Father and Daughter Sweetheart Dance, put on by the Girls Scouts, headed by Mrs. Hawks. To me it just made you forget everything and enjoy the finer things in life. .. The sweethearts in this case were our little scouting daughters. The little gals, most of them around 10 to 12 years of age danced with their Daddy and were proud as little peacocks. One of the favorite dances of the evening was the "Hokie Pokie". You never heard of the Hokie Pokie? Ask one of the girl scouts, they have the record. it's really something. You could call it modified twist I suppose. You just throw only one part of your body around at the time though, such as "Put your right arm out. .. put your right arm in", etc. ..For the Dad who did the best "Hokie Pokie" went a special prize. W URGENT -TO ALL BASE RESIDENTS. A remembrance of the evacuation. (M. W. Hines, PH2) EVACUATION MOMENTO As a memento of the recent evacuation, personnel of the Naval Supply depot have obtained an ash tray about six inches square in size upon which the evacuation instructions handed out to our dependents is printed. The tray is ceramic in a white background with grey and red design. Additionally the ash tray is designed to include the name of the dependent involved. A sample of this item will be on display in the Commissary Store commencing 4 March. Order blanks will also be available at the Commissary Store. The cost, including postage, is $4.00. If you desire one of these ash trays fill out an order blank and mail it to the address indicated #ereon. Your check or money order ould accompany the order. It is emphasized that the Naval Supply Depot has no official connection with these transactions. We are merely making available to you the information which we obtained as private individuals. The Red Cross Drive is now underway. Through the Red Cross you are always there to help those in need. March is Red Cross month, give generously. Some 83,000 servicemen and their families are helped by the Red Cross at military installations and in military medical facilities. About 3,100 emergency welfare messages are transmitted by the Red Cross to relieve the anxieties of service men and their families. The Red Cross was instrumental in roviding for families from Guantanamo hen they arrived in Norfolk at the beginning of the Cuban crisis. Give from your heart. KING and QUEEN of St. VALENTINE February 14 is always a festive occasion, no matter where you may be. On the day of St. Valentine, the Teen Club was jumping to the sounds of the best in popular recorded music as presented by WGBY's "Rockin' Robin", Bobby Hartz. In this setting, the Junior High crowned its Prince and Princess, Mike Crawford and Lorrie Acker. On Victory Hill, the Juniors and Seniors were celebrating with the popular musical combo from VU-10, The Renegades. Again, royalty was present. Reigning were King Del Heilman and Queen Patty Bowman. Indeed the Saint of Sweethearts did not forget Guantanamo Bay. KING AND QUEEN. -King Del Heilman and Queen Patty Bowman reign at Sweethearts Dance. (C. E. Beihl, JOSN) Showing Dad that they are big girls, the young ladies baked cookies, cakes, etc. ..I know, you should have seen our kitchen the night before when "Sis" was baking her chocolate drop cookies. After "Hoking and Poking" around, Dad's were required to enact various skits. Hearty laughter prevailed as Dad's gave their impressions of how to get dressed in a hurry, how a little boy reacts to a spanking and showing how a mule kicks his feet in the air (two at a time). As one of the attending fathers, I left the party with a headache after laughing so much, but all-in-all, it was a most enjoyable and relaxing evening. Think you can't have fun in Gitmo? Think again. All you need is a "Hokie Pokie" record, your daughter and you will have some unforgetable moments. As Art Linkletter said "Kids are wonderful". ..aren't we all. ..kids that is. CLEARANCE SALE at Marine Exchange Toyland. (M. P. Cain, PH3) Nothing is so strong as gentleness: nothing so gentle as real strength. *I * The water supply for the base is not an unlimited one. Discriminate use of our water should be the aim of all of us. GITMO REVIEW Page Three Mllarch 3, 1963

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Page Four GITMO REVIEW March 3, 1963 by Don McKay Not too long ago the Naval Station Special Services sponsored a track and field meet that was welcomed with a healthy turnout of personnel. This was good to see because it encourages the occurance of another meet. For all of you who are keeping in training for track and field here are some tips on how to cut down your times and increase your distances in some fields of the track meet. For distance running, jogging around the base is good for developing wind, but it is not a speedy developer fo strength in competition. The best way to become efficient in your running event is to actually compete in the event against other runners and all of you fight against the clock. Actually have somebody there with a stop watch to shout the times to you as you're running. Say, that you're a mile runner, it's good to have pacers to push you on. When yours truly used to run *the mile in college, the coach would have a pacer set for every quarter mile. It took time to get used to this other fellow, but in time, he was easy enough to catch. Running against pacers and running against the clock at least three times a weekwith the theory of "let your legs do the running and not your arms or body-a 4:15 mile will be yours. ..and after that, who knows. It's up to you. Take a look at pictures or films of the great milers like Beatty, Snell, and the threemile great Halberg, running. They run straining up and down on the whole and their legs are just pulling the track underneath them. In the field events, lets say that you are shooting the discus. The mistake that most beginning throwers make is to watch the rim of the penalty circle and not to the place that the discus is going. Don't watch your feet. It's like watching the bat while batting in a baseball game. You'll always miss. When you wind up to throw the disc, don't curl your arm up behind your back; for by doing this you are losing your mechanical advantage of the windup. Keep the arm straight and don't bend it. Bring the arm down on your pin around (one only) and release the disc from the front part of your hand; not the back. Your middle finger should actually depress into the rim of the disc due to your hand's force behind the disc and it's this finger that will act as the spinning factor in the disc's flight. When the disc is in flight it should make a high flying arch; not a straight line for the ground. By making this are, and if the disc is flying flat, it will become like the wing of an airplane-or like a rock skipping on water-and fly further on air currents. It's this high arch that will give you greater distance. But above all develope your delivery style inside that circle. Once you get that, the rest is easy. The javelin is not a spear, that is, the kind that is used for hunting by some aboriginal tribes. The point of throwing a javelin is not to kill game but to achieve distance. You don't have to aim it for a bulleye. So, in short, you don't throw it like a spear. When throwing the javelin, the thrower does not "cock" his arm and throw. The experienced thrower keeps the throwing arm stiff, again making the most of a swinging mechanical advantage for deliverly. Releasing the javelin properly is no easy trick. It takes minute coordination between the throwing arm the running motion of the body to obtain maximum distance. First preequisite is to find which foot you throw off of best. The righthanded thrower usually releases on the left foot while running. He brings the stiff javelin-arm up over his head and pushes against the handle of the javelin with the "U" area of the thumb and forefinger. While doing this, don't look at the javelin, but at the objective. Feel free to throw your whole body into the launching. The more weight behind the javelin the further it will go. Most javelin throwers usually fall over after a throw. ..but behind the white line. In the U. S.-Russian Track meet in 1957, Al Cantrello threw the javelin, fell fiat on his face after launching, but the thing went for 289 feet-20 feet into the spectator's area. No one was injured. The hammer-throw is the hardest event of the field games. It takes more coordination to get distance in the hammer throw than in any other event. If an inexperienced thrower handles the hammer wrorg he can seriously injure his back, or what's worse release it at the wrong time and let it fly into the spectator's area. As for the flight of the hammer, the same rule for the discus applies here. A high are for greater distance. For serious study into the art of hammer throwing, it is advisable to locate a coach for on-the-spot training. If it's news call 9247 do a lot better. Don't drive as if you own the road, drive as if you own the car. Page Four March 3, 1963 GITMO REVIEW SATURDAY AFTERNOON (Continued from Page One) As a result of internal injuries h received, Alexis Delgado, 27, employe at PWC since 1961, was pronounced dead on arrival at the Naval Hospital. Campos was also admitted to the Naval Hospital where his condition is considered satisfactory. The her two occupants, Filiberto Martinez, 33, and Edilberto Aces, 26, were both extremely fortunate, escaping with minor injuries. They have been subsequently released from the hospital. Speed limits are posted throughout the base. They are there for a reason, being determined by safety engineers for the safety of all. Observation of speed limits is the responsibility of everyone. It is still true that the life you save may be your own. DRIVE CAREFULLY! LITTLE THEATER (Continued from Page One) last year, a new target date was set and rehearsals commenced. Opening night is Wednesday, March 6. The play will run for five nights through Sunday, the 10th. Tickets are just $1.00. Reservations may be obtained by phoning Marion Sandsbury at 9257 during the day. You'd better pick up that phone now, you'll be glad you did. STORK'S SCOREBOARD The following named children were born from the period February 18 to February 20, 1963. We would like to extend a friendly welcome, and a Guantanamo smile to the children, and their most happy parents. Mark Eugene Nicely, son of Mr. an Mrs. Matt Edward Nicely; born Feb. 1 Mark weighed in at 9 lbs. 1 ounce. Katherine Mark Riley, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David Fredette Riley; born Feb. 19. Katherine weighed in at 6 lbs. 13/2 ounces. Michelle Rene Baylis, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Elvin Fred Baylis born Feb. 19. Michelle weighed in at 7 lbs. 6 ounces. Sharon Leigh Bishop, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Dow Biship; born Feb. 20. Sharon weighed in at 8 lbs. 11 ounces. At the end of six innings, the scoreboard stands at: BOYS ---8 GIRLS----10 The best way to better your lot is to


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