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Gitmo Review

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Gitmo Review
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U.S. Naval Base
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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U.S. Naval Base
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English
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weekly publication

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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University of Florida
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Copyright, Gitmo Review. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Preceded by:
Sunday Supplement
Succeeded by:
Gitmo Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Gazette
Related Item:
Daily Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Daily Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Bay Gazette
Related Item:
Indian

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A WEEKLY PUBLICATION U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba February 24, 1963



NAVAL SUPPLY CORPS:1795-1963

Naval history from 1795 to the present time is built around the magnificient support provided by the Supply Corps of the U. S. Navy, its officers, men and civilian employees.


From the early four-masted wooden men-of-war to the Polaris


NSD REFRIGERATION BUILDING - Provides the means to keep our foods and liquids cold and fresh.


NSD FUEL FARM - Fuel is a vital commodity, whether
. t be for ships, planes or otherwise. Another service of our
Naval Supply Corps to the fleet.


WE EAT WELL AT GITMO - The Commissary Store is always crowded, and why not? NSD sees to it that the food keeps rolling in to us, fresh and ready for the table.


Missile Program, the Supply Corps has provided the support in ships, planes, equipment, clothing, materials, food and pay to help foster the greatest instrumentality dedicated to peace the world has ever known-THE UNITED STATES NAVY. Navy business is conducted throughout the world from Japan to Manhattan and from Brooklyn to Saigon by representatives of the Supply Corps. Purchases range from minute technical spare parts to whole locomotives or aircraft carriers and from baby shoes to intricate data computers. A visit to a supply activity or navy exchange is in itself evidence of the broad scope of purchasing done by Supply Corps personnel. Purchasing is only the initial step in bringing to the men of the Navy and/or their families required or desired items. These items must be shipped, offloaded, identified, cataloged, and stocked before they can be issued or sold. The tasks of the Supply Corps are many and varied and here at Guantanamo their efforts and accomplishments can be observed by all of us.
More often than not it is only when a fresh shipment of vegetables or milk hasn't come in on time that we realize how dependent Guantanamo is on the Supply Corps. Yet, these lapses occur rarely. Like one's heartbeat or breathing, you don't have to think about it very often. What finer tribute can there be!


NO PROBLEM HERE -The shelves in the Navy Exchange aer filled to -overflowing, thans to the prompt and efficient work of our Naval Supply Corps. It's easy to forget how our cigarettes, soap, etc. are provided for us.







Page Two GITMO REVIEW Febiuary 24, 1963


WOMAN'S


WORLD

by Jackie Lloyd
The psychologists tell us the formation of an individual's character and personality occurs within the first seven years of life. The ground work is laid during those years, and the time thereafter sets the mold, adds the "extra" qualities, and develops further those characteristics already founded. The people who work with our small children, therefore, are extremely imporxnt. We pointed out a few weeks ago Guantanamo's "little people" could have no:better start in the outside world than under the able guidance of Louise McNeal and her teachers at the nursery school. But what of those other formative years and the people who help mold them. I decided Mr. Tim Kelley was. the next person to see.
Mr. Kelley, who- is in his second successful year as elementary school principal,has an enviable following amongst his teachers and students. "He is not only an excellent principal and teacher," one teacher volunteered to me the other day, "but he also possesses, that very fine quality of being able to praise us our good points as well as point out fairly our deficiencies." When I asked a couple young elementaryites in the neighborhood why they liked Mr. Kelley so well... "Because he is nice, even though he makes us do our work," said one'little boy. "Because he means what he says, and will let us 'fight out' our fights," said another.,
Mr. Kelley has his Bachelor's Degree from State Teachers College in Massachusctts and his Master's Degree from Boston University. He began his _teachig career in Randolph, Massachusetts

The Gitmo Gazette's mission is. to inform and entertain all .hands and to serve as a positive. factor in, promoting the efficiency, welfare and contentment of personnel. The Gitmo Gazette/is: Published at the Naval Base .in accordance with NavExos P35, revised July, 1.958 and financed with non-appropriated funds at no cost to the� government.
RADM J. W. DAVIS :,_ComNavBase LCDR J,. F. LLOYD ,: Officer-Advisor Roger WHITCOMB, JO3-------...Editor
Armed Forces Press Service (AFPS) may not be: reprinted without the written permission of Armed �Forces Press Service. Material in the :paper may not be reprinted unless authorization is obtained from the editor. All photographs herein are official" Navy photographs unless otherwise


,;pecified..
The opinions or statements made in articles published herein are those of the writers and a'c not in any case to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of Commander Naval Base or of the Navy Department.


in 1953. In 1955 he became a part of the overseas teaching program in Nuremberg, Germany and the following year he was advanced to a principal teacher status.
"What is the difference between a principal and principal-teacher? I.: asked. "In this capacity," Mr.. Kelley explained, "you are, as the name implies, a'teaching principal with such collateral duties as mainspeaker for the PTA, school nurse, counselor, janitor, etc." In 1957, he went to southern France, where he was school.principal and teacher of four grades. "Youcan't imagine the number of books I had piled on my, desk," he told me. In 1959 he returned to'Boston University for his Master's. There was one more tour in France, this .time with a full-time principalship, and then. he came to Guantanamo.
What is the most important single feature in a good school? "The people in it," was his reply. "The physical set-up of a school of:course can make teaching procedures either easier or more difficult, but it is the talented, people who are dedicated and have a philosophy. of purpose that really co.un."
"We have an excellent staff of elementary teachers," continued Mr. Kelley. "and before you ask me what makes a good teacher, I would like to point out to my way of thinking there is no such thing as a 'teacher type.' I believe children should have an opportunity inschool to meet as many different:personalities'. as possible, so long as-those personalities set a good example and have the respect of their students."
Why did this athletic young, man:, choose 'teaching" as a profession? "Education is exciting-it encompasses philosophy, human relations, psychology, knowledgeof every kind-I believe teaching is a way of life that keeps one intellectually honest."
Mr. Kelley feels strongly about chil-dren working to their capacity, -a sentiment with which I agree wholeheartedly. "Children should not be askedto work beyond their ability, but .just as !imPortant, 'they should be made tro: achieve that output and efficiency of :which they are capable. In these problematical times, �we as teachers must insure that every good mind and talent is developed to its fullest. Our nation needs able people, and we in the schools cannot put up with lazy minds nor" lackadaisical attitudes. By means of a: reliable testing: system, we are able to ascertaihiwhat:


a child' can do."
Yes; those first school years are per-, haps more important'than�many of us have realized-and aren't we at Guantanamo fortunate that people such as Louise McNeal, Tim Kelley and their dedicated teachers think so too?


Ghcttci's orrner

WASHINGTON and LINCOLN
Chaplain G.H. SARGENT
February is a happy month for Americans, in that it bringsus within the influence: of two of our most famous men. They are not ours properly alone, but a universal possession. And they are a universal possession because they commend our democracy both in its rise and progress to the mind and heart of humanity.
Today all the citizens of our Country may well remember that the greatness of Washington and Lincoln has not been created by orators and that their influence in the history of liberty was not due to the fact that one was our first President and that the other risked everything to preserve the union of the natio They triumphed because they had th* ' loftiest courage and because of the sheer weight of their moral manhood.
The preparedness of Washington and Lincoln was, first and last, a moral and a spiritual discipl!ne, 'to which their other gifts in peace- and war were submitted. They teach us that we are not a nation merely by reason of territorial possessions, common law and language. We are a nation when one and all are prompted by identical motives and directed toward identical ends. We can never hope to agree on all questions. " But in the love ofjustice, of law, of freedom under law,- of individual right and its balancing by .public welfare, wemust g iee if we are to maintain and extend the heritage of which we boast. WashingLon:and Lincoln taught us we must have Lve of spiritual values and of moral courage and character if we are to keep the prizes we have won.

STORK'S
SCOREBOARD
'The following named children were born from the period February 13 to February 18, 1963. We would like to extend a friendly welcome, and a Guantanamo smile to the children, and their most happy parents.
Diane Lynn Erickson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Lauren Erickson; born Feb. 14. Diane weighed in at 8 lbs.
Daniel Joseph Evans, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Edmund Evans Jr.; born Feb. 14. Daniel weighed .in at 7 lbs. 4 ounces.


Cynthia MariePyne, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Edward Pyne; born Feb. 15. Cynthia weighed in at 8 lbs/
4 ounces.
And at the end of five innings, the


scoreboard stands at:
BOYS- .-..7


GIRLS- 7


GITMO REVIEW


February 24, 1963


Page Two









ART WORLD FLOURISHES AT GUANTANAMO

Yes, the world of art is a reality here on the Naval Base. The devotees are surprisingly large in number and growing all the time. Almost anywhere one goes on.the base these days, he is liable to see people hard at work behind easels, with charcoals, water colors, oils, and the like. Perhaps it's the climate, or on the other hand, a much more likely explanation-we have scads of talented people here. One of the most important reasons for this interest is the presence on the base of a very remarkable woman-Mrs. Vera Richardson. Vera, along with her husband, Mr. C. T. Richardson, a federal- ::.. .... employed civilian, and seven (yes, that's right-seven) daughters, has been at Gitmo for two years. During most of those months, Vera always had an urge to found an art class-a dream finally realized a couple months before the October crisis. That she is qualified for such an undertaking is beyond question. We suggest you make a trip out to Morin Center Community Auditorium during the Art Exhibition (March 5-10)and find
t for yourselves. ....
* Her "students" are as enthusiastic
about her as she is with them. Her art class meets Monday evening at the Victory Hill School, and in addition there is a "laboratory" session on Saturdays in the out-of-doors. The class is sponsored by the Naval Station Special Services
Office.
Many of the students' creations will be
on display at the exhibition for all to A PICTURE OF CONCENTRATION- Students of Mrs. Vera Richardson's Monday see and perhaps buy. night art class focus attention on subject at hand while blackboard shows them how.




















STEVEDORING FOR NSD Detachment Sierra offloads a United Fruit vessel at the Naval Supply Depot. Those cartons of milk won't have a chance to spoil between the ship and NSD's refrigeration unit.

MAYBE A LITTLE MORE HERE Mrs. Vera Richardson
shows weekly art class the whys and wherefores of tempera
painting.
% .... ... ... = !i is iiii...............


LOOKING DOWN PIER CHARLIE CAUSWAY-Thog these pipes flows the oil needed by the ships of the Atlantic LOOKING at Supply Depot from the air. Fleet.


Page Three


February 24, 1963


GITMO REVIEW










GOLF TRICKSTER'TO VISIT


Golf's most exciting personality, Paul Hahn, considered by all the experts as the world's greatest combination of golfer, trick shot artist, comedian and instructor will present his full one-hour routine at the Gtmo Golf Driving on Sunday, March
3 at 2 p.m.
If you watched the handsome Houdini of the Links in the past, you know that his is an act that has to be seen to be believed. If you haven't, then the only way you can believe what you've heard about him is to go out and watch.
When Hahn pulls out his tricks from the bag weighing 90 pounds, you'll see a shotmaker hitting with the accuracy of a Ben Hogan. But where the stars of golf hit their precision-like shots with scientifically-engineered clubs, Hahn Will be placing the ball 240 yards down the fairway with a collection of zany clubs that look funny-and are.
His clubs have rubber shafts made of garden hose. They're swivel jointed. They weigh ten pounds and have shafts six feet long as compared to the average driver of 42 inches.
Where the stars measure their stances so that they hit the ball with their feet placed the same way on every shot, you'll see Hahn hitting off tees a yard high on one shot, kneeling to hit the ball on another, balancing on one foot to hit a third, standing with one foot on a folding chair for another, hitting three balls, -one after another, as they swing before him. No. matter how, and from where, he hits the ball, you'll see a shot traveling 230 to 250 yards straight down the fairway.
As he hits the ball, even in his famous double action series of hitting a dozen balls in succession with a club in each hand, you'll also hear a comedian cast in the mold of Bob Hope. Hahn is a funny fellow, and he's one guy whose talking doesn't bother his shotmaking. He hits the ball with his mouth open and the words pouring out.
That doubleaction series of shots is something to watch. 'Twelve balls are teed up in line. He holds a club in each hand. Then, swinging alternately forehand and backhand. Hahn hits 12 straight one-handed shots in succession. Each travels perfectly down the fairway. It's something to awe the average golfer who has trouble enough hitting one ball with two hands on the club.


CHIEFS THANK UPSHUR - The USNS UPSHUR w
one of the four ships that evacuated our dependents laW October. When the UPSHUR paid its regular call to the base last week, the Chief Petty Officers' Club decided it would be a nice gesture to fete the officers and crew of that fine ship. Friday, Feb. 15 was set aside as "UPSHUR Day" at the club. "Happy Hour" prevailed for the UPSHUR, and as the picture above indicates, it was a pleasant experience for one and all.


Relaxation at Morin Center
If a person were asked to describe Morin Center, he might say that it is a "friendly retreat" M,orin Center is mor ethan a recreational center for the family or the single person. . . in all reality it is an evening's entertainment.
To begin the night off right, the family can dine in the very congenial and comfortable dining room. Besides the setting, the dining conditions at Morin Center offer prompt service and budget-wise prices. If one wishes, there is a tap room in which a cool, refreshing beverage can be enjoyed in comfort.
Then what is better after a dinner than to see a movie? Just outside of the dining room there is a spacious open-air movie lyceum. With a refreshment counter near-by.. the movie lyceum is a pleasant way to top off a typical evening's entertainment at Morin Center.
In the near future, Morin Center will have an added attration for the public. From March 6 thru 10, the "Center" will host the Little Theatre Players in their production of "Blithe Spirit"... to be held in the Center's Community Auditorium. Also, in connection with the Little Theatre production, there will be an art exhibit at the Center.


February 24, 1963


Page Four


GITMO REVIEW




Full Text

PAGE 1

_ ET A WEEKLY PUBLICATION U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba February 24, 1963 NAVAL SUPPLY CORPS:1795 -1963 Naval history from 1795 to the present time is built around the magnificient support provided by the Supply Corps of the U. S. Navy, its officers, men and civilian employees. From the early four-masted wooden men-of-war to the Polaris NSD REFRIGERATION BUILDING -Provides the means to keep our foods and liquids cold and fresh. NSD FUEL FARM -Fuel is a vital commodity, whether .t be for ships, planes or otherwise. Another service of our Naval Supply Corps to the fleet. WE EAT WELL AT GITMO -The Commissary Store is always crowded, and why not? NSD sees to it that the food keeps rolling in to us, fresh and ready for the table. Missile Program, the Supply Corps has provided the support in ships, planes, equipment, clothing, materials, food and pay to help foster the greatest instrumentality dedicated to peace the world has ever known-THE UNITED STATES NAVY. Navy business is conducted throughout the world from Japan to Manhattan and from Brooklyn to Saigon by representatives of the Supply Corps. Purchases range from minute technical spare parts to whole locomotives or aircraft carriers and from baby shoes to intricate data computers. A visit to a supply activity or navy exchange is in itself evidence of the broad scope of purchasing done by Supply Corps personnel. Purchasing is only the initial step in bringing to the men of the Navy and/or their families required or desired items. These items must be shipped, offloaded, identified, cataloged, and stocked before they can be issued or sold. The tasks of the Supply Corps are many and varied and here at Guantanamo their efforts and accomplishments can be observed by all of us. More often than not it is only when a fresh shipment of vegetables or milk hasn't come in on time that we realize how dependent Guantanamo is on the Supply Corps. Yet, these lapses occur rarely. Like one's heartbeat or breathing, you don't have to think about it very often. What finer tribute can there be! NO PROBLEM HERE -The shelves in the Navy Exchange aer filled to overflowing, thans to the prompt and efficient work of our Naval Supply Corps. It's easy to forget how our cigarettes, soap, etc. are provided for us. .,T, -"p

PAGE 2

GITMO REVIEW February 24, 1963 WOMAN'S WORLD by Jackie Lloyd The psychologists tell us the formation of an individual's character and personality occurs within the first seven years of life. The ground work is laid during those years, and the time thereafter sets the mold, adds the "extra" qualities, and develops further those characteristics already founded. The people who work with our small children, therefore, are extremely important. We pointed out a few weeks ago Guantanamo's "little people" could have no better start in the outside world than under the able guidance of Louise McNeal and her teachers at the nursery school. But what of those other formative years and the people who help mold them. I decided Mr. Tim Kelley was the next person to see. Mr. Kelley, who is in his second successful year as elementary school principal, has an enviable following amongst his teachers and students. "He is not only an excellent principal and teacher," one teacher volunteered to me the other day, "but he also possesses that very fine quality of being able to praise us our good points as well as point out fairly our deficiencies." When I asked a couple young elementaryites in the neighborhood why they liked Mr. Kelley so well. .."Because he is nice, even though he makes us do our work," said one'little boy. "Because he means what he says, and will let us 'fight out' our fights," said another. Mr. Kelley has his Bachelor's Degree from State Teachers College in Massachusctts and his Master's Degree from Boston University. He began his teaching career in Randolph, Massachusetts The Gitmo Gazette's mission is to inorm and entertain all hands and to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare and contentment of personnel. The Gitmo Gazette is published at the Naval Base in accordance with NavExos P35, revised July, 1958 and financed with non-appropriated funds at no cost to the government. RADM J. W. DAVIS ComNavBase LCDR J. F. LLOYD Officer-Advisor Roger WHITCOMB, J03 -------Editor Armed Forces Press Service (AFPS) may not be reprinted without the written permission of Armed Forces Press Service. Material in the paper may not be reprinted unless authorization is obtained from the editor. All photographs herein are official Navy photographs unless otherwise specified. The opinions or statements made in articles published herein are those of the writers and ac not in any case to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of Commander Naval Base or of the Navy Department. in 1953. In 1955 he became a part of the overseas teaching program in Nuremberg, Germany and the following year he was advanced to a principal teacher status. "What is the difference between a principal and principal-teacher? I asked. "In this capacity," Mr. Kelley explained, "you are, as the name implies, a teaching principal with such collateral duties as mainspeaker for the PTA, school nurse, counselor, janitor, etc." In 1957, he went to southern France, where he was school principal and teacher of four grades. "You can't imagine the number of books I had piled on my desk," he told me. In 1959 he returned to Boston UniversIty for his Master's. There was one more tour in France, this time with a full-time principalship, and then he came to Guantanamo. What is the most important single feature in a good school? "The people in it," was his reply. "The physical set-up of a school of course can make teaching procedures either easier or more difficult, but it is the talented people who are dedicated and have a philosophy of purpose that really count." "We have an excellent staff of elementary teachers," continued Mr. Kelley. "and before you ask me what makes a good teacher, I would like to point out to my way of thinking there is no such thing as a 'teacher type.' I believe children should have an opportunity in school to meet as many different personalities as possible, so long as those personalities set a good example and have the respect of their students." Why did this athletic young man choose teaching as a profession? "Education is exciting-it encompasses philosophy, human relations, psychology, knowledge of every kind-I believe teaching is a way of life that keeps one intellectually honest." Mr. Kelley feels strongly about children working to their capacity, a sentiment wsth which I agree wholeheartedly. "Children should not be asked to work beyond their ability, but just as important, they should be made to achieve that output and efficiency of which they are capable. In these problematical times, we as teachers must insure that every good mind and talent is developed to its fullest. Our nation needs able people, and we in the schools cannot put up with lazy minds nor lackadaisical attitudes. By means of a reliable testing system, we are able to ascertaiix what a child can do." Yes, those first school years are perhaps more important than many of us have realized-and aren't we at Guantanamo fortunate that people such as Louise McNeal, Tim Kelley and their dedicated teachers think so too? GhaplaiTn's Goner WASHINGTON and LINCOLN Chaplain G. H. SARGENT February is a happy month for Americans, in that it brings us within the influence of two of our most famous men. They are not ours properly alone, but a universal possession. And they are a universal possession because they conmend our democracy both in its rise and progress to the mind and heart of humanity. Today all the citizens of our Country may well remember that the greatness of Washington and Lincoln has not been created by orators and that their influence in the history of liberty was not due to the fact that one was our first President and that the other risked everything to preserve the union of the natio They triumphed because they had thW loftiest courage and because of the sheer weight of their moral manhood. The preparedness of Washington and Lincoln was, first and last, a moral and a spiritual discipline, to which their other gifts in peace and war were submitted. They teach us that we are not a nation merely by reason of territorial possessions, common law and language. We are a nation when one and all are prompted by identical motives and directed toward identical ends. We can never hope to agree on all questions. But in the love of justice, of law, of freedom under law, of individual right and its balancing by public welfare, we must agree if we are to maintain and extend the heritage of which we boast. WashingLon and Lincoln taught us we must have love of spiritual values and of moral courage and character if we are to keep the prizes we have won. STORK'S SCOREBOARD The following named children were born from the period February 13 to February 18, 1963. We would like to extend a friendly welcome, and a Guantanamo smile to the children, and their most happy parents. Diane Lynn Erickson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Lauren Erickson; born Feb. 14. Diane weighed in at 8 lbs. Daniel Joseph Evans, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Edmund Evans Jr.; born Feb. 14. Daniel weighed in at 7 lbs. 4 ounces. Cynthia Marie Pyne, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Edward Pyne; born Feb. 15. Cynthia weighed in at 8 lbs 4 ounces. And at the end of five innings, the scoreboard stands at: BOYS-----7T GIRLS-----7 Page Two

PAGE 3

YhART WORLD FLOURISHES AT GUANTANAMO Yes, the world of art is a reality here on the Naval Base. Th e devotees are surprisingly large in number and growing all the time. Almost anywhere one goes on the base these days, he is liable to see people hard at work behind easels, with charcoals, water colors, oils, and the like. Perhaps it's the climate, or on the other hand, a much more likely explanation-we have scads of talented people here. One of the most important reasons for this interest is the presence on the base of a very remarkable woman-Mrs. Vera Richardson. Vera, along with her husband, Mr. C. T. Richardson, a federalemployed civilian, and seven (yes, that's right-seven) daughters, has been at Gitmo for two years. During most of those months, Vera always had an urge to found an art class-a dream finally realized a couple months before the October crisis. That she is qualified for such an undertaking is beyond question. We suggest you make a trip out to Morin Center Community Auditorium during the Art Exhibition (March 5-10) and find t for yourselves. *Her "students" are as enthusiastic about her as she is with them. Her art class meets Monday evening at the Victory Hill School, and in addition there is a "laboratory" session on Saturdays in the out-of-doors. The class is sponsored by the Naval Station Special Services Office. Many of the students' creations will be on display at the exhibition for all to A PICTURE OF CONCENTRATION Students of Mrs. Vera Richardson's Monday see and perhaps buy. night art class focus attention on subject at hand while blackboard shows them how. STEVEDORING FOR NSD Detachment Sierra offloads a United Fruit vessel at the Naval Supply Depot. Those cartons of milk won't have a chance to spoil between the ship and NSD's refrigeration unit. MAYBE A LITTLE MORE HEREMrs. Vera Richardson shows weekly art class the whys and wherefores of tempera painting. LOOKING DOWN PIER CHARLIE CAUSWAY -Through these pipes flows the oil needed by the ships of the Atlantic Page Three February 24, 1963 LOOKING at Supply Depot from the air. Fleet. GITMO REVIEW

PAGE 4

GOLF TRICKSTER TO VISIT N EGolf's most exciting personality, Paul Hahn, considered by all the experts as the world's greatest combination of golfer, trick shot artist, comedian and instructor will present his full one-hour routine at the Gtmo Golf Driving on Sunday, March 3 at 2 p.m. If you watched the handsome Houdini of the Links in the past, you know that his is an act that has to be seen to be believed. If you haven't, then the only way you can believe what you've heard about him is to go out and watch. When Hahn pulls out his tricks from the bag weighing 90 pounds, you'll see a shotmaker hitting with the accuracy of a Ben Hogan. But where the stars of golf hit their precision-like shots with scientifically-engineered clubs, Hahn will be placing the ball 240 yards down the fairway with a collection of zany clubs that look funny-and are. His clubs have rubber shafts made of garden hose. They're swivel jointed. They weigh ten pounds and have shafts six feet long as compared to the average driver of 42 inches. Where the stars measure their stances so that they hit the ball with their feet placed the same way on every shot, you'll see Hahn hitting off tees a yard high on one shot, kneeling to hit the ball on another, balancing on one foot to hit a third, standing with one foot on a folding chair for another, hitting three balls, one after another, as they swing before him. No. matter how, and from where, he hits the ball, you'll see a shot traveling 230 to 250 yards straight down the fairway. As he hits the ball, even in his famous double action series of hitting a dozen balls in succession with a club in each hand, you'll also hear a comedian cast in the mold of Bob Hope. Hahn is a funny fellow, and he's one guy whose talking doesn't bother his shotmaking. He hits the ball with his mouth open and the words pouring out. That doubleaction series of shots is something to watch. Twelve balls are teed up in line. He holds a club in each hand. Then, swinging alternately forehand and backhand. Hahn hits 12 straight one-handed shots in succession. Each travels perfectly down the fairway. It's something to awe the average golfer who has trouble enough hitting one ball with two hands on the club. CHIEFS THANK UPSHUR -The USNS UPSHUR w one of the four ships that evacuated our dependents laW October. When the UPSHUR paid its regular call to the base last week, the Chief Petty Officers' Club decided it would be a nice gesture to fete the officers and crew of that fine ship. Friday, Feb. 15 was set aside as "UPSHUR Day" at the club. "Happy Hour" prevailed for the UPSHUR, and as the picture above indicates, it was a pleasant experience for one and all. Relaxation at Morin Center If a person were asked to describe Morin Center, he might say that it is a "friendly retreat" Morin Center is mor ethan a recreational center for the family or the single person. ..in all reality it is an evening's entertainment. To begin the night off right, the family can dine in the very congenial and comfortable dining room. Besides the setting, the dining conditions at Morin Center offer prompt service and budget-wise prices. If one wishes, there is a tap room in which a cool, refreshing beverage can be enjoyed in comfort. Then what is better after a dinner than to see a movie? Just outside of the dining room there is a spacious open-air movie lyceum. With a refreshment counter near-by. ..the movie lyceum is a pleasant way to top off a typical evening's entertainment at Morin Center. In the near future, Morin Center will have an added attraction for the public. From March 6 thru 10, the "Center" will host the Little Theatre Players in their production of "Blithe Spirit". ..to be held in the Center's Community Auditorium. Also, in connection with the Little Theatre production, there will be an art exhibit at the Center. February 24, 1963 Page Four GITMO REVIEW


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