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Gitmo Review

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Gitmo Review
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U.S. Naval Base
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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U.S. Naval Base
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English
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weekly publication

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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University of Florida
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Sunday Supplement
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Gitmo Gazette
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Guantanamo Gazette
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Daily Gazette
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Guantanamo Gazette
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Guantanamo Daily Gazette
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Guantanamo Bay Gazette
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Indian

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A WEEKLY PUBLICATION U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba February 17, 1963


WATER CONSERVATION LC DR Heid New Seabee C. 0.

The water supply for the base is not
an unlimited one. Descriminate use of GUANTANAMO BAY, CUBA LCDR C. C. Heid, CEC, USN, relieved CDR A. M. our water should be the aim of all of us. Lalande, CEC, USN, as Commanding Officer of Mobile Construction Battalion SEVEN Water at Guantanamo is everybody's at Change of Command ceremonies held at the Seabee Camp Parade Ground Saturday
*iness... make it your. morning, 9 February.
-------- CDR Lalande, who took comndo
MCB-SEVEN nearly two years ago on the same parade ground, will become Public Works Officer at the Amphibious Base at Little Creek, Virginia. The new Commanding Officer reported to MCB-SEVEN from the Naval Research Laboratory at Washington, D.C., where he had served as Public Works Officer.
LCDR Heid received his commission to Ensign (CEC) in June 1947 after graduating from the Naval Academy. Prior to entering the Naval Service, LCDR Heid attended the Texas College of Mines.
After being commissioned, he attended the Civil Engineer Corps Officer School at Port Hueneme, California, and the Ground General School at Fort Riley,
Kansas.
COMMANDER A. M. LALANDE, CEC, USN, addresses the officers and men of In 1949 and in 1955, LCDR Heid at' bile Construction Battalion -SEVEN as he is relieved as Commanding Officer of tended Rensselaer Polytechnical Institute FB-SEVEN by LCDR C. C. Heid, CEC, USN, in change of command ceremonies held at Troy, N.Y. He Holds B.A. and M.A.
aturday morning, 9 February, at the Seabee Camp Parade Grounds. Degrees in Civil Engineering from RPI.

LEEWARD POINT-OUR OTHER HOME One of the most important facets about the Guantanamo area
is the United States Naval' Air Station, located on Leeward.. Points. Leeward is now the home of VU-10's flying F8U Crusaders. Also many anti-submarine air ships fly into Leeward for various repairs. These planes come from all points in the Caribbean.
Leeward Point is a small compact community. It has all the necessities of life, and then some, to the officers, men and dependents, who call Leeward their home.
"We have everything here, and all of us get along so well wtih one another. Everyone helps everyone else, and we just plain enjoy living over here." So says Mrs. Clara Wood. Mrs. Wood has been stationed at Leeward with her husband, a Navy Chief, for the past 18 months.


In an interview with Mrs. Wood, she goes on to explain the ing structure of Leeward Point. "We have a fine school,
* ich now houses 19 children. These children are in the 1st2nd and 3rd grades. It's a half day session, coming under the immediate supervision of the Victory Hill School. I am fortunate enough to be their teacher." -Continued on Page4 STILL WATERS - Gitmo River at Leeward rolls on.







Page Two GITMO REVIEW February 17, 1963


WOMAN'8


WORLD

byJackie Lloyd
C Haiti-Black'Pearl of the Antillesinvitingly interesting, made even more so by its proximity to Guantanamo and the opportunity such-proximity provides us. A visit to this West Indies isle is a guaranteed-never-to-the-forgotten experience.
How a country can be so beautiful and so poor is difficult to imagine. As you first sight land, you are impressed with the rugged mountains and their varying shades of purples, blues and greys. From the air, you will see a coastline rimmed in frosty white, which in turn is rimmed with brilliant turquose. Little spots of white are dotted upon the Mediterranean-blue bay for the fishing fleet has been out since early morn. The hills are green-not so green as Jamaica's, but greener than Guantanamo's. As you approach Port-au-Prince, you pass directly over the Haitian slums, and may, I say, you have never seen slums' until you see these. As you land, you" will note the temperature and humidity are higher than that whichyou left behind.
At the airport you may see the pilot as he is greeted by "Cowboy", whose job it is to see that incoming planes are "watched out after." "Cowboy" speaks five languages as a result of many years of travel with the merchant marine. He walks with a cane, claims 59 years, looks 79. The pilots say "Cowboy's" limp is worsening, and as you watch the old man hobble away, it is difficult to project a very bright future for him.
As you go about your visit, be forewarned that the filth and proverty may well blind you to the beauty and the sights. The average yearly per capita income in this land of, Voodoo and mystery is only seventy dollars. In addition since Haiti �has been a republic from 1804, she has not benefitted from the establishment of colonial schools, hospitals, dams, factories,� health, standards, etc. as have other countries in the Caribbean. :In Lthis :day of rapidly emerging African :republics, :it is interesting/ to note that Haiti was the first Negro re:public in the New World-so� many years ago! , .


An insight into .Haitian history and the turbulence that has prevailed throughout is evidenced by the fact that ,between 1804 and 1915., Haiti (which is an Indian name meaning "high land") has had two emperors, one king, and twenty-


three presidents. Of this goodly number one was a suicide, four were killed outright five died in .office (not necessarily from natural causes), fifteen were driven into exile, and only one served to the :end of his term. Seven more presidents flickered .on the political scene,, from 1910 to 1915, then finally U. S. Marines were landed to restore order to the terrorized country."
No trip to Port-au-Prince is complete Without a visit to 'the Iron Market. As you peruse the stalls you will discover to your amazement you are leading a parade of vendors.whose wares include anything from hats to maracas, 'with prices as changeable as the wind. But an empty stomach can be a force more driving than any on Madison Avenue, and you will wish momentarily you could buy something from all of them. The market is a sea of black faces-tired, lethargic, brightened only by the prospects of making a sale. Women with baskets on their heads swivelhip their way through the traffic-to the unaccustomed driver, an accident seems inevitable. But everywhere there is an array of color-Lbowls of bright ginghams, gay hats and rugs of straw, native paintirgs with their intense, primitivercolosand everywhere there is a buzz of lazy activity. In so simple an:economic system, what can all these people be doing?
From the Iron Market -you may wish to visit La Belle Creole, and in those few blocks you will move from one type Haiti to another. type. You will see beautiful imported silver, china, crystal, jewelry, native handicrafts, designed with. the American-tourist in mind. The wareS are tempting, but the' prices are not. Meinbergs Wood Factory is another must where you can see the native tradesmen at work. Mr. Meinberg guarantees his merchandise-if something goes wrong, he will right it for you.
As an American tourist,' you will be beseiged more than ever by outstretched palms and querying black faces. Take a
quick look at yourself, then again at the natives who surround you. After the comparison, is it any wonder you do not disappoint the Haitian as the epitome of the rich American ?
As you leave this incredible island and return to your comfortable, wellkept home, I have. a feeling you will do so with: a Slightly heavy heart. You will come away: not only with wooden steak plates and straw hats, but also with a deeper appreciation for the life we are


al so.prone to take for granted, and a hoPe that one- day life as we know it can be extended to more and more peoples of the world.,


If it's news call 9247


Gcih ptitn',S Gorne~

There exists an-Eternal Law in t mind of Our Maker.; There also exists a Natural Law which is in accord with Eternal Law and which- is accepted as being for the ,good of 'the community. 'Any and all humanlaws must be- useful and just.,
It is necessary that laws tending towards the good of the community be observed. They are useful since they serve as safeguards against common dangers, nor is it our privilege to decide
whether or not to obey them.
Just Laws being promulgated for the common good must equally be obeyed. If the law is oppressive to or goes beyond the capabilities of an individual it may still be just if demand for the common good.
May we acknowledge that all law a authority has its source in the supreme law giver, wiChch:is God. "There is no authority that is not from God and the existing authorities are appointed by ,God. Wherefor,, he that, opposes the authority, resisteth 'the ordinance of God, and they that resist purchase to themselves damnation."' (Romans 13)
May :God have .you
A1.F: Mendonsa, LCDR, CHC.



STORK'S

SCOREBOARD
The following named children were born from the period February 7 to February 12, 1963. We would like to extend a friendly welcome, and a Guantanamo smile to the children, and th most happy parents.
Sherri Lynn Keling, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Harvey Keling, born Feb. 7. Sherri weighed in at 6 lbs. 21/2 ounces.
Charles Andrew Finney, son of Mr. arid Mrs. Charles Mack Finney; born. Feb 11. Charles weighed in at 7 �lbs. 8i/2 ounces.
Penny. Lynn Johnston, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Basil Johnston; born Feb.� 12. Penny weighed in at 6 lbs. 6 ounces.
And at the end of four innings, the scoreboard stands at:


BOYS: 7


GIRLS: 5


A contribution to your National Hea * Services is a gift to yourself. Don't sell yourself short now to pay a higher price later.


.February 17, 1963


Page Two


GTOREVIEW









LIFE AT LEEWARD - VARIETY


PLENTY OF SHADE IN THERE - The riding stable at Leeward was built by a man over there.


NOW, LOOK AT THAT - Mrs. Watson, Leeward librarian, shows Mrs. Clara Wood the latest in books. It's open seven days a week.


EVENING SHADOWS - Fishing is always a good way to relax. The folks at Leeward are no exception.


NICE DOG, NICE DOG! -Kahn and Princess are two reasons why our base is so secure. They pack 156 pounds of insurance between them. Their handler is John Bramble, AA. It takes eight months to train K9's. They're excercized every night by the handlers, and consume great quantities of food.


COMPACTNESS IS THE WORD-- The Chapel, Chaplain's Office and Library are all located together. Not a bad idea - learning and God side by side.


Page Three


February 17, 1963


GITMO REVIEW







Pag Four" GITMO.. ... .... REVIEW Februaryi 1, 1963


SOME SPORTING


SYNTAX

by Don MKay
Its been stated that walking is one of the best, if not the consistently best, forms of keeping physically fit. Well, yours truly along with WGBY's Bob Dunphy decided to walk from Windmill Beach to the liight house over by NAS . the hard way. .,. by the seashore. Here is an excersion for the adventuresome.
If you like to partake of rock climbing, this sojourn is your baby, Some of the cliff walls along the shore are 50, 75 and 100 feet high. With climbing angles of up to 90 degrees, you'll find it's a formidable challenge fora day's workout. In fact there's one place that you can't follow the shorelines, and the wall is out of the question., so you swim. When we had a go at it last weekend, there were no sharks or barracuda to be seen in any of the coves.
And the trek along the shoreline isn't just for the hiker, If you're a camera bug, this is a locale where you can take some of the most beautiful seascapes in the business. By all means use color film ... preferably ectachrome for slides. When you go thee, you'll see what I mean. Are you a driftwood collector? There are at least a dozen coves on the shoreline that are literally packed wtih beautiful pieces of driftwood just for the taking.
If you're a shell collector, you'll find an abudance along the whole stretch. But the nice thing about the area is that in each of the really deep inlets one can find schools of fish just begging to be fed. I'd estimate the average weight of these fish to be about two to five

The Gitnio Gazette's mission is to inform and entertaii all hands and to serve as a positive factor in iromoting the efficiency, welfare and contentmeit of personnel. The GiVt Gazette is published at the Naval Base in accordance with NavExos P35, revised July, i958 and financed with non-appropriated funds at no cost to the government. RADM J, W. DAVIS _,_ComNavBase LCDR .1. F. LLOYD O_ fficer-Advisor Roger WHiTCOMB, JO3-,____.-Editor
Armed Forces Press Service (AFPS) may not be reprinted Without :the written. permission of Armed Forces Pres Service. Material in the paper may not be reprinted Unless authorization is obtained from the editor,. All photographs hiereini are Official Navy photographs unless otherwise specified.


The opinions or statements made in articles published herein are those of the writers and are not in any ease to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of Commander Naval Base or of the Navy Departiment.


pounds. After seeing just how hungry these fish really are, it would be safe and sportsmanlike to use a light spinning outfit or even a flyrod.
Now about the trek itself. If's rough
hardly a spot for the ladies unless they're game for a tough hike. A suggestion is that you take along a canteen of water and a light portion of food with you. Don't eat too much or it'll effect the climber in you. Wear a pair of sneakers or heavy rubber-soled shoes. All and all the rock is very withstanding to human weight and does not shale easily. However it does pay to be most cautious. And by all means, don't take on the jaunt by yourself unless you are accustomed to such climbing.
When it's all over with and you've completed the full journey, it can be taken for granted that you are physically fit.
Here's one for you:
The near-sighted pro coach was rapidly losing his temper at his first skull session. "You at the back of the room." he roared, "what's the left tackle's assignment on the fullback counter up the middle?"
"I don't know."
"Well, then, can you tell me what the i igt end does on the halfback run-pass option?"
"I don't know."
"I taught that only yesterday," the coach bellowed. "What were you doing at the time?"
"I was out drinking beer with some friends."
The coach turned purple. "You have the audacity to stand there and tell me that! How do you expect to make the team?"
"Heck, coach, I don't. I'm an electrician, and I just came in here to fix the lights."
To all newcomers: If you're interested in sailing. for the fun of it in Sunfish or Sailfish type craft, we're got just the organization for you. The Gitmo Bay


Yacht Club features- racing for those classes. Why don't you stop downt the yacht club, if you're interested i organizational sailing; that's down by the sailboat locker. There's-usually somebody around working on the boats. They're real nice folks.
Three cheers, hats off and a pat-onthe back for Avery Brundage, president of the International Olympic Committee, and his fellow committee members for starting to do something to clamp down on those countries that have racial discrimination blemishes on their past sporting records. But the big handshake goes to the meft of the IOC for their crusade against thie political cancerthat's feeding on international sports. It's a sorry state -of affairs when a people cannot put together an Olympic team because of political ideologies. However, that is the problem, and irradication that problem is the upcoming chore oW the IOC.

If politics can be ruled out of internati6nal sport, then the United States would benefit handsomely. Most every country that participates in the Olympic Games sends to the games athletes who rely on government subsidy. U.S. athletes do not receive government subsidy. In one sense of the idea, the United States is the only major nation in the world that sends amateur athletes to the games to compete against athletes, of other nations, who in reality are
professionals. Now, if the IOC states that politics and sports cannot 'be directly connected, except for travel fares and lodging, the action would sort of put a kink'in the direct government subsidy program. . . wouldn't it?
In the United States, professional sport is a free enterprise, not a government sponsored project. With oth * countries facing a complete change-over from subsidized sports, the United States wouldn't be effected in any way, nor would a change-over pressure be felt in any athletic circles.


LEEWARD POINT CONTINUED .
LeeWard Point also boasts a fine kindergarten, which is maintained by the people of the Point.
As for the recreation offered the men, women and children, you name it, and they have it. Tennis courts, a swimming pool, ball parks, and two fine clubs. One of the biggest pasttimes is the corral, where most everyone on the point spends some of their off time. They have plenty of, "good old, wide open spaces." Each evening there is a top flight movie playing at the Pt's out-of-doors movie lyceum. Special Services operates a fishing gear locker, where you can putt around the bay, and maybe take a spin down the Guantanamo River, at least as far as the fence. The river is every bit as enchanting as the deepest river in South Africa.
An houriy ferry-boar run enables the enhabitants of the Point tocommute with the mainide, and it is a pleasant half-hour ride.
About the only thing the Pt. does not have is a commissary, but according to some of the WiveS, a Weekly trip to the mnainside is a pleasant change.


.Page .Four.


February 17, 1963


G"ITMO-REVIEW




Full Text

PAGE 1

HE A WEEKLY PUBLICATION U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba February 17, 1963 WATER CONSERVATION The water supply for the base is not an unlimited one. Descriminate use of our water should be the aim of all of us. Water at Guantanamo is everybody's COMMANDER A. M. LALANDE, CEC, U bile Construction Battalion SEVEN as he B-SEVEN by LCDR C. C. Heid, CEC, USN turday morning, 9 February, at the Seabee LCDR Heid New Seabee C. 0. GUANTANAMO BAY, CUBA -LCDR C. C. Heid, CEC, USN, relieved CDR A. M. Lalande, CEC, USN, as Commanding Officer of Mobile Construction Battalion SEVEN at Change of Command ceremonies held at the Seabee Camp Parade Ground Saturday morning, 9 February. CDR Lalande, who took command of MCB-SEVEN nearly two years ago on the same parade ground, will become Public Works Officer at the Amphibious Base at Little Creek, Virginia. The new Commanding Officer reported to MCB-SEVEN from the Naval Resach Laboratory at Washington, D.C., where he had served as Public Works Officer. LCDR Heid received his commission to Ensign (CEC) in June 1947 after graduating from the Naval Academy. Prior to entering the Naval Service, LCDR Heid attended the Texas College of Mines. After being commissioned, he attended the Civil Engineer Corps Officer School at Port Hueneme, California, and the Ground General School at Fort Riley, Kansas. SN, addresses the officers and men of In 1949 and in 1955, LCDR Heid atis relieved as Commanding Officer of tended Rensselaer Polytechnical Institute in change of command ceremonies held at Troy, N.Y. He Holds B.A. and M.A. Camp Parade Grounds. Degrees in Civil Engineering from RPI. LEEWARD POINT -OUR OTHER HOME One of the most important facets about the Guantanamo area is the United States Naval Air Station, located on Leeward Points. Leeward is now the home of VU-10's flying F8U Crusaders. Also many anti-submarine air ships fly into Leeward for various repairs. These planes come from all points in the Caribbean. Leeward Point is a small compact community. It has all the necessities of life, and then some, to the officers, men and dependents, who call Leeward their home. "We have everything here, and all of us get along so well wtih one another. Everyone helps everyone else, and we just plain enjoy living over here." So says Mrs. Clara Wood. Mrs. Wood has been stationed at Leeward with her husband, a Navy Chief, for the past 18 months. In an interview with Mrs. Wood, she goes on to explain the ,ing structure of Leeward Point. "We have a fine school, ich now houses 19 children. These children are in the 1st2nd and 3rd grades. It's a half day session, coming under the immediate supervision of the Victory Hill School. I am fortunate enough to be their teacher." -Continued on Page 4 STILL WATERS -Gitmo River at Leeward rolls on.

PAGE 2

Page Two GITMO REVIEW February 17, 1963 WOMAN'S WORLD by Jackie Lloyd Haiti-Black Pearl of the Antillesinvitingly interesting, made even more so by its proximity to Guantanamo and the opportunity such proximity provides us. A visit to this West Indies isle is a guaranteed-never-to-the-forgotten experience. How a country can be so beautiful and so poor is difficult to imagine. As you first sight land, you are impressed with the rugged mountains and their varying shades of purples, blues and greys. From the air, you will see a coastline rimmed in frosty white, which in turn is rimmed with brilliant turquose. Little spots of white are dotted upon the Mediterranean-blue bay for the fishing fleet has been out since early morn. The hills are green-not so green as Jamaica's, but greener than Guantanamo's. As you approach Port-au-Prince, you pass directly over the Haitian slums, and may I say, you have never seen slums until you see these. As you land, you will note the temperature and humidity are higher than that which you left behind. At the airport you may see the pilot as he is greeted by "Cowboy", whose job it is to see that incoming planes are "watched out after." "Cowboy" speaks five languages as a result of many years of travel with the merchant marine. He walks with a cane, claims 59 years, looks 79. The pilots say "Cowboy's" limp is worsening, and as you watch the old man hobble away, it is difficult to project a very bright future for him. As you go about your visit, be forewarned that the filth and proverty may well blind you to the beauty and the sights. The average yearly per capita income in this land of Voodoo and mystery is only seventy dollars. In addition since Haiti has been a public from 1804, she has not benefitted from the establishment of colonial schools, hospitals, dams, factories, health, standards, etc. as have other countries in the Caribbean. In this day of rapidly emerging African republics, it is interesting to note that Haiti was the first Negro republic in the New World-so many years ago! An insight into Haitian history and the turbulence that has prevailed throughout is evidenced by the fact that between 1804 and 1915 Haiti (which is an Indian name meaning "high land") has had two emperors, one king, and twentythree presidents. Of this goodly number one was a suicide, four were killed outright five died in office (not necessarily from natural causes), fifteen were driven into exile, and only one served to the end of his term. Seven more presidents flickered on the political scene from 1910 to 1915, then finally U. S. Marines were landed to restore order to the terrorized country. No trip to Port-au-Prince is complete without a visit to the Iron Market. As you peruse the stalls you will discover to your amazement you are leading a parade of vendors whose wares include anything from hats to maracas, with prices as changeable as the wind. But an empty stomach can be a force more driving than any on Madison Avenue, and you will wish momentarily you could buy something from all of them. The market is a sea of black faces-tired, lethargic, brightened only by the prospects of making a sale. Women with baskets on their heads swivelhip their way through the traffic-to the unaccustomed driver, an accident seems inevitable. But everywhere there is an array of color-bowls of bright ginghams, gay hats and rugs of straw, native paintiggs with their intense, primitive colorsand everywhere there is a buzz of lazy activity. In so simple an economic system, what can all these people be doing? From the Iron Market you may wish to visit La Belle Creole, and in those few blocks you will move from one type Haiti to another type. You will see beautiful imported silver, china, crystal, jewelry, native handicrafts, designed with, the American tourist in mind. The wares are tempting, but the prices are not. Meinbergs Wood Factory is another must where you can see the native tradesmen at work. Mr. Meinberg guarantees his merchandise-if something goes wrong, he will right it for you. As an American tourist, you will be beseiged more than ever by outstretched palms and querying black faces. Take a quick look at yourself, then again at the natives who surround you. After the comparison, is it any wonder you do not disappoint the Haitian as the epitome of the rich American? As you leave this incredible island and return to your comfortable, wellkept home, I have a feeling you will do so with a slightly heavy heart. You will come away not only with wooden steak plates and straw hats, but also with a deeper appreciation for the life we are all so prone to take for granted, and a hope that one day life as we know it can be extended to more and more peoples of the world. If it's news call 9247 GColplain's Come There exists an Eternal Law in t mind of Our Maker. There also exists a Natural Law which is in accord with Eternal Law and which is accepted as being for the good of the community. Any and all human laws must be useful and just. It is necessary that laws tending towards the good of the community be observed. They are useful since they serve as safeguards against common dangers, nor is it our privilege to decide whether or not to obey them. Just Laws being promulgated for the common good must equally be obeyed. If the law is oppressive to or goes beyond the capabilities of an individual it may still be just if demand for the common good. May we acknowledge that all law an authority has its source in the supreme law giver, which is God. "There is no authority that is not from God and the existing authorities are appointed by God. Wherefor, he that opposes the authority, resisteth the ordinance of God, and they that resist purchase to themselves damnation." (Romans 13) May God have you A. F. Mendonsa, LCDR, CHC STORK'S SCOREBOARD The following named children were born from the period February 7 to February 12, 1963. We would like to extend a friendly welcome, and a Guantanamo smile to the children, and th most happy parents. Sherri Lynn Keling, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Harvey Keling, born Feb. 7. Sherri weighed in at 6 lbs. 21/2 ounces. Charles Andrew Finney, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Mack Finney; born Feb 11. Charles weighed in at 7 lbs. 81/2 ounces. Penny Lynn Johnston, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Basil Johnston; born Feb. 12. Penny weighed in at 6 lbs. 6 ounces. And at the end of four innings, the scoreboard stands at: BOYS: 7 GIRLS: 5 A contribution to your National Heal* Services is a gift to yourself. Don't sell yourself short now to pay a higher price later. February 17, 19.63 Page Two GITMO REVIEW

PAGE 3

LIFE AT LEEWARD -VARIETY PLENTY OF SHADE IN THERE -The riding stable at Leeward was built by a man over there. NOW, LOOK AT THAT -Mrs. Watson, Leeward librarian, shows Mrs. Clara Wood the latest in books. It's open seven days a week. EVENING SHADOWS -Fishing is always a good way to relax. The folks at Leeward are no exception. NICE DOG, NICE DOG! -Kahn and Princess are two reasons why our base is so secure. They pack 156 pounds of insurance between them. Their handler is John Bramble, AA. It takes eight months to train K9's. They're excercized every night by the handlers, and consume great quantities of food. COMPACTNESS IS THE WORD -The Chapel, Chaplain's Office and Library are all located together. Not a bad idea -learning and God side by side. Page Three February 17, 1963 GITMO REVIEW

PAGE 4

Page Four GITMO REVIEW February 17, 1963 SOME SPORTING SYNTAX by Don McKay Its been stated that walking is one of the best, if not the consistently best, forms of keeping physically fit. Well, yours truly along with WGBY's Bob Dunphy decided to walk from Windmill Beach to the' light house over by NAS ...the hard way. ..by the seashore. Here is an excersion for the adventuresome. If you like to partake of rock climbing, this sojourn is your baby. Some of the cliff walls along the shore are 50, 75 and 100 feet high. With climbing angles of up to 90 degrees, you'll find it's a formidable challenge for a day's workout. In fact there's one place that you can't follow the shorelines, and the wall is out of the question. ..so you swim. When we had a go at it last weekend, there were no sharks or barracuda to be seen in any of the coves. And the trek along the shoreline isn't just for the hiker. If you're a camera bug, this is a locale where you can take some of the most beautiful seascapes in the business. By all means use color film. ..preferably ectachrome for slides. When you go there, you'll see what I mean. Are you a driftwood collector? There are at least a dozen coves on the shoreline that are literally packed wtih beautiful pieces of driftwood just for the taking. If you're a shell collector, you'll find an abudance along the whole stretch. But the nice thing about the area is that in each of the really deep inlets one can find schools of fish just begging to be fed. I'd estimate the average weight of these fish to be about two to five The Gitmo Gazette's mission is to inform and entertain all hands and to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare and contentment of personnel. The Gitind Gazette is published at the Naval Base in accordance with NavExos P35, revised July, 1958 and financed with non-appropriated funds at no cost to the government. RADM J. W. DAVIS ComNavBase LCDR J. F. LLOYD Officer-Advisor Roger WHITCOMB, J03------Editor Armed Forces Press Service (AFPS) may not be reprinted without the written permission of Armed Forces Press Service. Material in the paper may not be reprinted unless authorization is obtained from the editor. All photographs herein are official Navy photographs unless otherwise specified. The opinions or statements made in articles published herein are those of the writers and are not in any case to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of Commander Naval Base or of the Navy Department. pounds. After seeing just how hungry these fish really are, it would be safe and sportsmanlike to use a light spinning outfit or even a flyrod. Now about the trek itself. It's rough ...hardly a spot for the ladies unless they're game for a tough hike. A suggestion is that you take along a canteen of water and a light portion of food with you. Don't eat too much or it'll effect the climber in you. Wear a pair of sneakers or heavy rubber-soled shoes. All and all the rock is very withstanding to human weight and does not shale easily. However it does pay to be most cautious. And by all means, don't take on the jaunt by yourself unless you are accustomed to such climbing. When it's all over with and you've completed the full journey, it can be taken for granted that you are physically fit. Here's one for you: The near-sighted pro coach was rapidly losing his temper at his first skull session. "You at the back of the room," he roared, "what's the left tackle's assignment on the fullback counter up the middle ? "I don't know." "Well, then, can you tell me what the iig.t end does on the halfback run-pass option ? "I don't know." "I taught that only yesterday," the coach bellowed. "What were you doing at the time?" "I was out drinking beer with some friends." The coach turned purple. "You have the audacity to stand there and tell me that! How do you expect to make the team?" "Heck, coach, I don't. I'm an electrician, and I just came in here to fix the lights." To all newcomers: If you're interested in sailing for the fun of it in Sunfish or Sailfish type craft, we're got just the organization for you. The Gitmo Bay Yacht Club features racing for those classes. Why don't you stop down t the yacht club, if you're interested V organizational sailing; that's down by the sailboat locker. There's usually somebody around working on the boats. They're real nice folks. Three cheers, hats off and a pat-onthe back for Avery Brundage, president of the International Olympic Committee, and his fellow committee members for starting to do something to clamp down on those countries that have racial discrimination blemishes on their past sporting records. But the big handshake goes to the men of the IOC for their crusade against the political cancer that's feeding on international sports. It's a sorry state of affairs when a people cannot put together an Olympic team because of political ideologies. However, that is the problem, and irradication that problem is the upcoming chore oW the IOC. If politics can be ruled out of international sport, then the United States would benefit handsomely. Most every country that participates in the Olympic Games sends to the games athletes who rely on government subsidy. U. S. athletes do not receive government subsidy. In one sense of the idea, the United States is the only major nation in the world that sends amateur athletes to the games to compete against athletes, of other nations, who in reality are professionals. Now, if the IOC states that politics and sports cannot be directly connected, except for travel fares and lodging, the action would sort of put a kink in the direct government subsidy program. ..wouldn't it ? In the United States, professional sport is a free enterprise, not a government sponsored project. With oth* countries facing a complete change-over from subsidized sports, the United States wouldn't be effected in any way, nor would a change-over pressure be felt in any athletic circles. LEEWARD POINT CONTINUED. Leeward Point also boasts a fine kindergarten, which is maintained by the people of the Point. As for the recreation offered the men, women and children, you name it, and they have it. Tennis courts, a swimming pool, ball parks, and two fine clubs. One of the biggest pasttimes is the corral, where most everyone on the point spends some of their off time. They have plenty of, "good old, wide open spaces." Each evening there is a top flight movie playing at the Pt's out-of-doors movie lyceum. Special Services operates a fishing gear locker, where you can putt around the bay, and maybe take a spin down the Guantanamo River, at least as far as the fence. The river is every bit as enchanting as the deepest river in South Africa. An hourly ferry-boar run enables the enhabitants of the Point to commute with thW mainside, and it is a pleasant half-hour ride. About the only thing the Pt. does not have is a commissary, but according to some of the wives, a weekly trip to the mainside is a pleasant change. Page Four February 17, 1963 GITMO REVIEW


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