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Gitmo Review

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Gitmo Review
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U.S. Naval Base
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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U.S. Naval Base
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English
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weekly publication

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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University of Florida
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Preceded by:
Sunday Supplement
Succeeded by:
Gitmo Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Gazette
Related Item:
Daily Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Daily Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Bay Gazette
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Indian

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A WEEKLY PUBLICATION U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba February 10, 1963


NIGHT LIFE .IN GUANTANAMO

Night life at Guantanamo... a few short months ago that phrase would have evoked some grumbling and perhaps a little wry humor too. The dependents were gone, and Castro's militia looked suddenly more menacing than ever before. What night life existed was tinged most of the time with a slight nervous strain.


Of course, now, the dependents are back and things have b een reduced to their pugh the streets at night, a certain buzz and humm-a sure sign normality


DOZI - DO YOUR PARTNER - Square dancing is just one of many nightime
* vities that occupy Gitmoites. Dancing is popular on the base.., in this case
nsored by the Naval Base Civic Council. (M. W. Hines PH2)


WHAT A LIFE! -Mr. & Mrs. C. H. Whitmore like to be near the water. They go fishing at least thrice a week. And on this base they're not alone! (M. H. Hines PH2)


proper prospective. You can hear it driving

We can be thankful that the American
way of life has been preserved for us here on foreign soil. There are movies, bowling, beaches, restaurants, ball parks and boats just like they have in the states. If you could slice a typical day into parts, like the proverbial pie, you would find things very little different
here.
The other night we decided to go
roving about the base and see for ourselves how faithfully Gitmo reflected the normal American style of living-and we weren't disappointed at all. Children playing on front lawns, barbecue pits smoking, water sprinklers revolving, plain people sitting in chairs on front lawns-not an unfamiliar scene. And then there was the movie goer headed in his car towards a preferred lyceum or movie; the golfing enthusiast who just had to have some driving practice on the range, the bowlers at their favorite alleys, and the square dance aficionados
plying away at heir hobby.


DUTY BEFORE PLEASURE - All of us are here because of the vigilance of others. (Corley PH3)







Page Two GITMO REVIEW February 10, 1963


WOMAN'S


WORLD

by Jackie Lloyd
"99 New Ideas on Your Money, Job, and Living"-an eye-catching phrase to say the least, and it's on the front cover of the 1963 edition of the Changing Times Family Success Book. Changing Times indeed an excellent magazine, is full of much good-to-know information. In fact, as I picked up this issue, I noted a marker on page 84---"Sports CarsFor the Man Who Never Owned One." Something we should know? I wonder...
There was a time when owning a sports car singled out its owner as "different." However, the above mentionad article tells us about 75,000 sports cars are sold in the U.. S. each year, with every promise of increasing popularity. For the benefit of you who may be thinking of some day purchasing one of these "bugs," here are a couple of thoughts.
First, ownership of a sports car for the lady driver can range from complete ecstasy-you are driving down Sherman Avenue, the top is down, the moon is, up, the stars are out, the breezes are balmy, and your hair needs setting.anyway-to willingness to give the last nut and bolt to your best enemy-'you are dressed for a party, you go to the car, it has started to rain, and the top is down! Push a button and the top goes up? Not for the sports car aficionadothirty minutes to "button on" the top!
If the sports car owner is elastic, it helps. Doors are low arid narrow, and entering can be a challenge,-just as getting out can be a challenge. You slither and twist (I knew that dance had a purpose), but after a few "getting in an getting out" lessons, you will soon become an accomplished "getter-inner" and "getter-outer" (you will have a smaller waistline too!)., For the benefit of future owners, I had considered writing some instructions for the wellmanipulated sports car entrance and exit-should be included with the driver's handbook, thought I-however, instructions must be tested, SO I tested mine. Clear, concise, perect-xcept :for one small thing--I was sitting in! the seat backwards! This is not, hoWever, an irreconcilable error, should you be more: interested in where you have been than where you are going.
Then there is the shifting..,. four speeds forward.,, the manufacturer is


helpful though-heputs the shift pattern on the shift knob. This is fine-I know where reverse is-I just can't get the stick there. Then every once in a while


I discovered I had a clever way of shifting from third into second when I thought I was in fourth. But it really isn't complicate at all, and you will be a graduate of the shift box in no time. At least so I thought. . . The article continues. "For the- sports car owner, gear shifting is an authentic art from. He reveres the fourspeed gear box, mounted next to him on the floor, and often makes small sacrifices to it." Now I find out, to accelerate, I must not step on the gas. I must shift down, build up the engine power, then shift up and zoom on. To slow down, I don't use the brake
-that's ordinary-instead I must shift to a lower gear. And above all, I must not shift by ear-I must use my tachometer! My what? The bubble has burstI'm not a real sports car jockey after all. Anybody for an advanced course in gear shifting ?
Sports cars are economical in a way you may have never guessed. True, you will get more miles to the gallon-but also, when you commissary shop, you will get fewer bags to the car!
Really though, most days I am all for owning a sports car. :It is great fun to skim along the road-the'wind in your face-the sun shining down-getting a tan-waving to your friends-feeling the response of the engine and the maneuverability of the wheel-whipping into parkingless spaces-taking curves without swaying...Yes, I agree with the article, sports cars are here to stay.
"What did you say, dear? You're glad I feel this way.., cross country in June
-three of us-in the.., sports car? ?..a"
(To be coucluded... 2500 miles and five months later).



STORK'S

SCOREBOARD
The following named child was the only one born from the period of JanuAry 30 to February 6, 1963. We would like to extend a friendly welcome, and a Guantanamo smile to the child, and his most happy parents.
The child born during the last week was Howard Hatter Arbogast, �son of Mr. and Mrs. Howard Henry Arbogast. The boy weighed in at 6 lbs. 10 oz. And now, at the end of three innings, the weekly birth scoreboard stands at:


BOYS-6


GIRLS-3


If it's news call 9247
4 _ . . ..


The Constancy of Change
Chief of Chaplains, RADM G. A. Rosso, in a recent issue of NAVY CHAPLAINS BULLETIN said: "By something of a paradox, there is nothing in life so constant as change. The philosophers, in fact, tell us that change, under the formality of motion, is the only unfailing sign and symbol of life. When the creative God cupped the new oceans in His hands and shaped the eternal hills; when He studded the skies with stars and hung the planets there to swirl through space, change had already begun."
All of us live in the midst of change. By changes we grow, we mature, broaden our vision of life. Often we*W to grow in"knowledge or maturity because we are afraid of change and want to retain the familiar. Keeping the- familiar many times gives us the security that we need. For this reason we carry with us items with which we are familiar. The child takes with him a particular toy or even a certain blanket. There is, however, the danger of avoiding any change to the,, point where we avoid progress and growth.
Occasionally change comes abruptly and we find ourselves unprepared and disturbed. But, one of the things that we must learn, particularly in the military service, is that change comes and with it comeh the opportunity for growth in experiences, in fortitude, and in the great adventure of living.
Respectfully,
Clarence E. LeMasters
LT, CHC, USN


'ANYM AN CAN/MAKE A MIST"AKE/BUT NONE
1.UTAfUOO.. WILL.CONTILIE IN II:/ �..Cco


Page Two


February 10, 1963


GITMO REVIEW











* OUR CHILD CARE CENTER


A GOING CONCERN AT GITMO

One of the many features of our island home, and it might be added a much needed service, is the new "Child Care Center."
"What is it? One might call it an advanced baby sitting service. It was organized to serve the parents of Guantanamo, and is
operated under the auspices of the Chaplain's Office.
The Child Care Center is presently located in the old Villa mar movie lyceum. It is a non-profit organization maintained to
offer care for all dependent children ranging in age- from three months to eight years.
In charge of the center is Mrs. Alyce
Maddox, who without a doubt does a terrific job with the children. She has had many years of experience with children of all ages, including two years of kindergarten teaching at the Victory Hill Elementary School. Mrs. Maddox has three assistants to assist her with
e never ending tasks that come up...
everything from changing diapers to preparing nourishing lunches for the some
two dozen children daily.
Mrs. Maddox's work day starts at 7:30
when the first of the children arrive.
From then to 11:15 the children are given pretty much free vent to do what they please-such as coloring pictures or romping about the Center's play ground.
At 11:15 lunch is served. The children
are marched into the washroom, and
then to the table, where they find a well ONE, TWO, THREE - NOW OPEN - Mrs. Alyce Maddox has her little charges well balanced meal awaiting them. trained it seems. A hearty lunch is one of the features at the Center. (Corley PH3)
After eating their lunch, the children take their "nap". This
may last 45 minutes to an hour and a half. For the rest of the
day, until 5:30 p.m. they play both inside and out.
Mr. Maddox and her staff are well equiped to care for our
children. Judging from the happy, healthy smiles on their
faces, the "Center's" adopted waifs like the idea.
Apat on the back to Alyce Maddox and her fine staff.


--- - - --- -- -TUT, TUT, SUCH TEARS -Mrs. Frances Conley and YUM, YUM--Mrs. Cassie Brown's good cooking entices 2-year-old Chris register at Center. (Corley PH3) three little girls. (Corley PH3)


Page Three


February 10, 1963


GITMO REVIEW







Page Four GITMO REVIEW February 10, 1963


JUST BROWSIN' AROUND"


NOW, HERE'S HOW... Junior Coach Steve Mayberry goes over last minute team strategy with his charges. Steve, assisted by Jim Vail and Bob Hendrickson, did a yeoman like job.


FIGHT TEAM FIGHT -That's right, those cheerleaders are boys. Skip Rumble, John Noe, Troy Brankenship, Bill White, Eric Ball, Roger Vail, Reggie Morales, and Jim Engstrom did a fine job at Powder-Puff game. (M. W. Hines PH2)

The Gitmo Gazette's mission is to inform and entertain all hands and to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare and contentment of personnel.
The Gitmo Gazette is published at the Naval Base in accordance with NavExos P35, revised July, 1968 and financed with non-appropriated funds at no cost to the government

RADM J. W. DAVIS------------------------ComNavBase
LCDR J. F. LLOYD-----------------------Officer-Advisor
John ANDREN, JOSN----------------------------Editor
Armed Forces Press Service (AFPS) may not be reprinted without the written permission of Armed Forces Press Service. Material in the paper may not be reprinted unless authorization is obtained from the editor. All photographs herein are official Navy photographs unless otherwise specified. The opinions or statements made in articles published herein are those of the writers and are not in any came to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of COMNAVBASE or of the Navy Department.


GOOD WAY TO RELAX -Our many movie lyceums are popular with young old. (M. W. Hines PH2)


ON THE BALL FOR MS! .... New York Yankees' record homer-belting Roger Maris and President John F. Kennedy team up in the battle against chronic, disabling multiple sclerosis. Roger and the President sign the baseball designated as MS Hope Chest campaign trophy of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. Their aim? A new record in the fight against this disease of young adults which, with related diseases, afflicts an estimated 500,000 Americans. MS is participating in the current campaign of the National Health Agencies.


Keep The BALL Ro1in

Give Thru Your National

Health Agencies


Page Four


February 10, 1963


GITMO REVIEW




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PAGE 1

A WEEKLY PUBLICATION U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba February 10, 1963 NIGHT LIFE IN GUANTANAMO Night life at Guantanamo. ..a few short months ago that phrase would have evoked some grumbling and perhaps a little wry humor too. The dependents were gone, and Castro's militia looked suddenly more menacing than ever before. What night life existed was tinged most of the time with a slight nervous strain. Of course, now, the dependents are back and things have b een reduced to their )ugh the streets at night, a certain buzz and humm-a sure sign normality DOZI -DO YOUR PARTNER -Square dancing is just one of many nightime vities that occupy Gitmoites. Dancing is popular on the base. ..in this case #nsored by the Naval Base Civic Council. (M. W. Hines PH2) WHAT A LIFE! -Mr. & Mrs. C. H. Whitmore like to be near the water. They go fishing at least thrice a week. And on this base they're not alone! (M. H. Hines PH2) proper prospective. You can hear it driving We can be thankful that the American way of life has been preserved for us here on foreign soil. There are movies, bowling, beaches, restaurants, ball parks and boats just like they have in the states. If you could slice a typical day into parts, like the proverbial pie, you would find things very little different here. The other night we decided to go roving about the base and see for ourselves how faithfully Gitmo reflected the normal American style of living-and we weren't disappointed at all. Children playing on front lawns, barbecue pits smoking, water sprinklers revolving, plain people sitting in chairs on front lawns-not an unfamiliar scene. And then there was the movie goer headed in his car towards a preferred lyceum or movie; the golfing enthusiast who just had to have some driving practice on the range, the bowlers at their favorite alleys, and the square dance aficionados plying away at heir hobby. DUTY BEFORE PLEASURE -All of us are here because of the vigilance of others. (Corley PH3)

PAGE 2

Page Two GITMO REVIEW February 10, 1963 WOMAN'S WORLD by Jackie Lloyd "99 New Ideas on Your Money, Job, and Living"-an eye-catching phrase to say the least, and it's on the front cover of the 1963 edition of the Changing Times Family Success Book. Changing Times indeed an excellent magazine, is full of much good-to-know information. In fact, as I picked up this issue, I noted a marker on page 84-"Sports CarsFor the Man Who Never Owned One." Something we should know? I wonder. There was a time when owning a sports car singled out its owner as "different." However, the above mentionad article tells us about 75,000 sports cars are sold in the U. S. each year, with every promise of increasing popularity. For the benefit of you who may be thinking of some day purchasing one of these "bugs," here are a couple of thoughts. First, ownership of a sports car for the lady driver can range from complete ecstasy-you are driving down Sherman Avenue, the top is down, the moon is up, the stars are out, the breezes are balmy, and your hair needs setting~anyway-to willingness to give the last nut and bolt to your best enemy-you are dressed for a party, you go to the car, it has started to rain, and the top is down! Push a button and the top goes up? Not for the sports car aficionadothirty minutes to "button on" the top! If the sports car owner is elastic, it helps. Doors are low apd narrow, and entering can be a challenge-just as getting out can be a challenge. You slither and twist (I knew that dance had a purpose), but after a few "getting in an getting out" lessons, you will soon become an accomplished "getter-inner" and "getter-outer" (you will have a smaller waistline too!). For the benefit of future owners, I had considered writing some instructions for the wellmanipulated sports car entrance and exit-should be included with the driver's handbook, thought I-however, instructions must be tested, so I tested mine. Clear, concise, perfect-except for one small thing-I was sitting in the seat backwards! This is not, however, an irreconcilable error, should you be more interested in where you have been than where you are going. Then there is the shifting. ..four speeds forward. ..the manufacturer is helpful though-he puts the shift pattern on the shift knob. This is fine-I know where reverse is-I just can't get the stick there. Then every once in a while I discovered I had a clever way of shifting from third into second when I thought I was in fourth. But it really isn't complicate at all, and you will be a graduate of the shift box in no time. At least so I thought. ..The article continues. "For the sports car owner, gear shifting is an authentic art from. He reveres the fourspeed gear box, mounted next to him on the floor, and often makes small sacrifices to it." Now I find out, to accelerate, I must not step on the gas. I must shift down, build up the engine power, then shift up and zoom on. To slow down, I don't use the brake -that's ordinary-instead I must shift to a lower gear. And above all, I must not shift by ear-I must use my tachometer! My what? The bubble has burstI'm not a real sports car jockey after all. Anybody for an advanced course in gear shifting ? Sports cars are economical in a way you may have never guessed. True, you will get more miles to the gallon-but also, when you commissary shop, you will get fewer bags to the car! Really though, most days I am all for owning a sports car. It is great fun to skim along the road-the wind in your face-the sun shining down-getting a tan-waving to your friends-feeling the response of the engine and the maneuverability of the wheel-whipping into parkingless spaces-taking curves without swaying. ..Yes, I agree with the article, sports cars are here to stay. "What did you say, dear? You're glad I feel this way. ..cross country in June -three of us-in the. ..sports car ? ?." (To be coucluded. ..2500 miles and five months later). STORK'S SCOREBOARD The following named child was the only one born from the period of January 30 to February 6, 1963. We would like to extend a friendly welcome, and a Guantanamo smile to the child, and his most happy parents. The child born during the last week was Howard Hatter Arbogast, son of Mr. and Mrs. Howard Henry Arbogast. The boy weighed in at 6 lbs. 10 oz. And now, at the end of three innings, the weekly birth scoreboard stands at: BOYS----6 GIRLS----3 If it's news call 9247 Ghaptain's Gon The Constancy of Change Chief of Chaplains, RADM G. A. Rosso, in a recent issue of NAVY CHAPLAINS BULLETIN said: "By something of a paradox, there is nothing in life so constant as change. The philosophers, in fact, tell us that change, under the formality of motion, is the only unfailing sign and symbol of life. When the creative God cupped the new oceans in His hands and shaped the eternal hills; when He studded the skies with stars and hung the planets there to swirl through space, change had already begun." All of us live in the midst of change. By changes we grow, we mature, broaden our vision of life. Often welf to grow in knowledge or maturity because we are afraid of change and want to retain the familiar. Keeping the familiar many times gives us the security that we need. For this reason we carry with us items with which we are familiar. The child takes with him a particular toy or even a certain blanket. There is, however, the danger of avoiding any change to the point where we avoid progress and growth. Occasionally change comes abruptly and we find ourselves unprepared and disturbed. But, one of the things that we must learn, particularly in the military service, is that change comes and with it comeh the opportunity for growth in experiences, in fortitude, and in the great adventure of living. Respectfully, Clarence E. LeMasters LT, CHC, USN ANY M A CA N MA KEA MIGTrA~f(.8UT NONE 3UTFAFOOL. WIL~L. CONTN4E IN IT. Page Two February 10, 1963 GITMO REVIEW

PAGE 3

* OUR CHILD CARE CENTER A GOING CONCERN AT GITMO One of the many features of our island home, and it might be added a much needed service, is the new "Child Care Center." "What is it? One might call it an advanced baby sitting servi ce. It was organized to serve the parents of Guantanamo, and is operated under the auspices of the Chaplain's Office. The Child Care Center is presently located in the old Villa mar movie lyceum. It is a non-profit organization maintained to offer care for all dependent children ranging in agefrom three months to eight years. In charge of the center is Mrs. Alyce Maddox, who without a doubt does a terrific job with the children. She has had many years of experience with children of all ages, including two years of kindergarten teaching at the Victory Hill Elementary School. Mrs. Maddox has three assistants to assist her with e never ending tasks that come up. .. everything from changing diapers to preparing nourishing lunches for the some two dozen children daily. Mrs. Maddox's work day starts at 7:30 when the first of the children arrive. From then to 11:15 the children are given pretty much free vent to do what they please-such as coloring pictures or romping about the Center's play ground. At 11:15 lunch is served. The children are marched into the washroom, and then to the table, where they find a well ONE, TWO, THREE -NOW OPEN -Mrs. Alyce Maddox has her little charges well balanced meal awaiting them. trained it seems. A hearty lunch is one of the features at the Center. (Corley PH3) After eating their lunch, the children take their "nap". This may last 45 minutes to an hour and a half. For the rest of the day, until 5:30 p.m. they play both inside and out. Mr. Maddox and her staff are well equiped to care for our children. Judging from the happy, healthy smiles on their faces, he "Center's" adopted waifs like the idea. AA pat on the back to Alyce Maddox and her fine staff. TUT, TUT, SUCH TEARS -Mrs. Frances Conley and 2-year-old Chris register at Center. (Corley PH3) YUM, YUM -Mrs. Cassie Brown's good cooking entices three little girls. (Corley PH3) Page Three February 10, 1963 GITMO 'REVIEW

PAGE 4

Page Four GITMO REVIEW February 10, 1963 JUST BROWSIN' AROUND" NOW, HERE'S HOW. Junior Coach Steve Mayberry goes over last minute team strategy with his charges. Steve, assisted by Jim Vail and Bob Hendrickson, did a yeoman like job. FIGHT TEAM FIGHT -That's right, those cheerleaders are boys. Skip Rumble, John Noe, Troy Brankenship, Bill White, Eric Ball, Roger Vail, Reggie Morales, and Jim Engstrom did a fine job at Powder-Puff game. (M. W. Hines PH2) The Gitmo Gazette's mission is to inform and entertain all hands and to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare and contentment of personnel. The Gitmo Gazette is published at the Naval Base in accordance with NavExos P35, revised July, 1958 and financed with non-appropriated funds at no cost to the government. RADM J. W. DAVIS------------------------ComNavBase LCDR J. F. LLOYD-----------------------Officer-Advisor John ANDREN, JOSN---------------------------Editor Armed Forces Press Service (AFPS) may not be reprinted without the written permission of Armed Forces Press Service. Material in the paper may not be reprinted unless authorization is obtained from the editor. All photographs herein are official Navy photographs unless otherwise specified. The opinions or statements made in articles published herein are those of the writers and are not in any case to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of COMNAVBASE or of the Navy Department. GOOD WAY TO RELAX -Our many movie lyceums are popular with young old. (M. W. Hines PH2) ON THE BALL FOR MS! ...New York Yankees' record homer-belting Roger Maris and President John F. Kennedy team up in the battle against chronic, disabling multiple sclerosis. Roger and the President sign the baseball designated as MS Hope Chest campaign trophy of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. Their aim? A new record in the fight against this disease of young adults which, with related diseases, afflicts an estimated 500,000 Americans. MS is participating in the current campaign of the National Health Agencies. Keep The BALL Rolling Give Thru Your National Health Agencies Page Four February 10, 1963 GITMO REVIEW