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Gitmo Review

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Gitmo Review
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U.S. Naval Base
Place of Publication:
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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U.S. Naval Base
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Language:
English
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weekly publication

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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University of Florida
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Copyright, Gitmo Review. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Related Items

Preceded by:
Sunday Supplement
Succeeded by:
Gitmo Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Gazette
Related Item:
Daily Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Daily Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Bay Gazette
Related Item:
Indian

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VOL. II, NO. 4 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo' Bay, Cuba February 3,1963




IT,'S NOW THE GITM0 REVIEW"

Yes, it's now official: the new name for the old Sunday Supplement will henceforth be The Gitmo Review. The winning name
was submitted by 12-year-old Keith Vail, the son of J. W. Vail, a civilian attached to the Naval Supply Depot. The Vail's live at 95-D in Villamar. Keith's -name was only one of some 324 submitted during the approximately three weeks the contest was open to the public. The winning title was chosen by "board of experts" consisting of Mrs. James W. Davis, wife of the Base Commander, Mrs. E. C. Adams, President of the Ellis Field Navy Wives Club, LTJG Gary Schlosser, Base Communication Officer, Chief .H. Brown, Mayor of the Villamar Community Council, and LC DR James F. Lloyd, COMNAVBASE PIO. Young Keith, of course,
ot the $20 check for his winning name.
The board had a difficult time deciding the winner, because ..... . .. .....of the many interesting titles submitted.Soefthmwr
quite colorful, i.e., "The Chockablock," "The Telsar," "Uncle ....Wgby's Mirror," "Uncle Wgby's Rocket," "The Croaker," "The Bullwinkle," "Aladin's Lamp," "The Ant Hill," and "Voice of the Conche," just to name ^a few. But the title that takes the cake was one submitted by Miss Margaret Richardson, 17-yearold daughter of C. T. Richardson, CIV, in charge of the Print Shop. Margaret suggested the title: "The Weekly Pacifier to the People in the Land of Mango Trees (Who are Alergic to Mangoes)." To Miss Richardson goes our special booby prizeone slightly used passion fruit.
The staff of The Gitmo Review would like to thank each and all of you who suggested titles to the "Name the Paper Contest." Your interest in our welfare is heartening.


WHAT A SMILE -Young Keith Vail receives $20 check
from RADM James W. Davis, COMNAVBASE, for winning the
"Name the Paper" contest.
VFW COMMANDER VISITS GUANTANAMO BAY
U.S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay-The National Commander
of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, Mr. Byron B. Gentry, visited this Caribbean outpost Jan. 28, 1963. Mr. Gentry was accompanied on the tour by Brigadier General J. D. Hittle, USMC . (Ret), the VFW Director of National Security and- Foreign Affairs. Also in the party was Rear Admiral John S. McCain,
Jr., the Navy Department's Chief of Information at Washington, D. C.
Mr. Gentry and party toured various areas on the Base. The
tour included Suicide Ridge, big guns and the 24 miles of fenceline dividing the Naval Base from Communist Cuba.


GITMO'S NAUTICAL CHAMPS... Well-deserving champions they are too; winners of the recent Guantanamo Bay Yacht Club races.
Recipients of trophies (L. to R.) are: D. Allen, Hospital; B. Fitzgerald, PWC; D. Krieble, NAS Boat Shed; J.W. Ellis, Master of Ceremonies, FTG; F. Compbell, NAS Training; M. Pauley, PWC and H. Bootsma, NSD.
The trophies were awarded at a dinner held at the Yacht Club Saturday evening, Jan. 26.






GITMO REVIEW


February 3, 1963


NATIONAL HEALTH AGENCIES CAMPAIGN ....________...._"_._


"BINGO... OVER HERE"-.A familiar sight and sound each Monday evening at Morin Center, sponsored by the Naval Base Civic Council. There's.always plenty of money to. be had.. if you're lucky,


MENTAL ILLNESS has struck an estimated .half-million children in the United States. In a new program emphasis, the National. Association for. Mental Health :.is spurring research to.improve ,present methods of treatment, -to discover new- ones, and to find ways to prevent mental illness'in children. The NAMH isparticipating in the current campaign of the National Health Agencies.


The Gitmo.Gazette's mission is to inform and entertain all hands and. to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare and:contentment of personnel.
-The Gitmo Gazette is published at the Naval Base in accordance with NavExos P35, revised July, 1958 and financed with non-appropriated funds at no cost to the government.

RADM J.W. DAVIS------------------------ ComNavBase
LCDR J. F. LLOYD -----------------------Officer-Advisor

John ANDREN, JOSN --------------Editor
Armed Forces Press Service (AFPS) may not be reprinted without the' written permission of Armed Forces Press Service. Material in the paper may no tbe reprinted unless authorization is obtained from the editor. All photographsl herein are official Navy photographs unless otherwise specified. The opinions or statements made in articles published herein are those f the writers and are not in any case 'to be, construed as. official or as reflecting the views of COMNAVBASE or of the Navy Department.


N' 'ROUND THE SECOND TURNliannapolis 500, but .according to the I children) the thrill is there. Co-cart Gitmo. "The sport attraction ..is held on .-the Naval Base driving range.,


ARE YOU READY'? - Looking like four experienced Ferrari, drivers, these men race their 2 -5 horse-powered go-carts, each Sunday. (L-R)-Bill De Florian, Don Walton, Don's son, Wray (hOlding.flags), Ken Wampler and.Breezy .Mors..


Page Two







February 3, 1963 GITMO REVIEW Page Three


WOV7MAN'S-eWORLD



by Jackie Lloyd
Sun dresses, crisp as celery - -shirts
and pants fresh as a detergent ad - smiling faces scrubbed and shining - "good morning, teacher" and seventy plus ."little people" clambered off their busses right to the door of "Louise McNeal's Nursery School," The official name of Guantanamo's pre-school, which is located on Marina point and run by tuition, is Naval Base Nursery School.
However, when said school has been headed by the' same devoted teacher since 1948, whose time and efforts have been responsible for the school's growth ' and well-being, then to my way of thinking, it is and always shall be "Louise
McNeal's Nursery School."
I chose Friday to go to School, and
reminded.Louise, whose sense of humor is as good'as her ability to handle children, that once, as I waited at the bus stop by her school, she had informed me sympathetically I couldn't come in - "You're just too big and too old," said she. Not to miss a chance to have the last word, I was quick to point out that not only was I there, but I was older too!
"Well, keep off the tricycles," she warned.
Fridayjis "Music Day" and therefore

a special day. I had a glimpse of the graduation program, which of course is the climax of the school year. I heard "Eensy Weensy Spider," "This 01' Man,"


and a very special rendition of "Good Morning to Mr. Murphy," who was -in the hospital at that time. Louise told the' children a clever story about alion hunt, a story which all mothers should see and learn - - guaranteed to rid your small child of at least one half-hour's worth_. of 'energy, alI while he is sitting in a chair. Impossible you say? Visit the school and you will see. Louise informed me parents and friends are always welcome visitors. I can assure you, the show is four - star.
Louise, with the help of her very competent and pleasant teachers, (each claimsshe has the smartest, best behaved, most adorable class ) Faye Hendrickson, Lillian Malone, and Joyce Wiggins, runs a well- disciplined school. Vivian is also on hand to help wherever she can, and in her quiet way, is a favorite with the pre-schoolers too. Classes are organized by age groups, two-and-a-half through four. The school is divided into rooms-the "quiet room" where the "work" part of school is done,- the .play area, and three large outside rooms. When it is time to change rooms, the children march quietly and efficienctly from one room to the other. Seventy-two of them-amazing!
The physical set-up of the school is excellent, with fresh air being the keynote. The school is built on an old BOQ foundation, and since it is open, rain can be a problem; however, these days are few, and the rest of the time the children can absorb our beneficial weather right down to their shoestrings-which of course are usually untied! Quantity and quality mark the play equipment-every-


thing in perfect running condition (thank you, Mr. McNeal), and plenty of everything for everyone.,:

"Should I send my .child .to nursery school?" is a frequent.question, Most educators will say nursery school is an individual matter--depending on the child, his home :environment, the school and the teacher. The first two conditions must be answered by the. individual parents, but- so far as *Guantanamo is concerned, the school and teachers are the finest.
"I believe in discipline balanced with a lot of love," Louise told me.-"we at school are often the child's first glimpse of the outside world-the impression must be a good one!" Judging from the busy little people I watched, they could not have been happier with their lot in life. These children are learning classroom discipline, taking of turns, 'sharing of equipment, songs, stories, creative work, cleanliness and good manners. Even a bit of homespun philosophy pops out of the mouths of these babes, such as Scotty Warren's remark aboutiusually happy-go-lucky little Laura Webber as she momentarily refused to be cheered by her classmates and teacher--"She's not sick, she's just plain ol' sad!" said Scotty.
As I was leaving the school, I said to Louise, "Guantanamo's pre-schoolers are lucky little lads and lasses." "But not so lucky as we,"., answered the lady in charge. As I took a goodbye glimpse of these precious little ones, I had to agree. Teaching is truly its own reward!


STORK'S

SCOREBOARD
The following named children have been born from January 22, 1963 to January 30, 1963..We would like to extend a friendly welcome, and a Guantanamo smile to each ..of the children, and-their most happy.parents.,

Donald Eugene Jaszewski Jr.,son of Mr.and Mrs. Donald E. Jaszewski, born .1/22 / 63. Timothy James Landress, son, of Mr. and Mrs. Oris .L. Landress, born 1/23/63. *and last but not. least, Ellen Antonette. Broughton, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.:Larry A. Broughton.
And at the end of two inndings, the scoreboard stands at:-,. BOYS- --5 ,'GIRLS.'---3




if it's news call 9247


Gcupkun, S


G 017flG


"The Rat Race"
by Edward J. Dunn, LCDR, CHC
This term can be well defined as:life in the 1960's. It.seems that we are at the point where it is impossible to live and to work in the allotted 24 hours. There are too many things to do and too many we imangine must be done. The new scientific progressive age with emphasis on speed and ease seems far in advance of our ability to use it properly. Where it should be simplifying life it seems only to create tension.
Trying to gear our human emotions to the new age could be humorous were it not complicated further by current World events. Every day sees some new crisis, and multiplies the apprehension in many heartS.

A1 this exerts a fearful pressure on our interior life, resulting often in confusion, mental fatigue, nervousness, etc.
To counteract the :iimpact we have a


greater need for self-discipline than ever before. Of necessity we must have fixed norms to follow, otherwise we are directed by a bunch of stray impulses.
Since human nature presupposes a body and soul. it follows that both must be developed to achieve and maintain mental health.

To this end an expert gives us four daily exercises to perform in the interest of balance. Nourish, exercise, and develop the body; feed the mind with concentrated work of some kind; elevate the heart in the love of God and fellow man; exercise the will by decision and constancy.,

DID YOU KNOW THAT..,


Approximately 3,000 copies of our English Gitmo Gazette.and 1,500 copies of our Spanish paper are produced daily?
This makes approximately 36,000 impressions run off, on ourmimeograph machines a day-That's over one million a month!-!! "


Page Three


February 3, . 1963


GITMO REVIEW






GITMO REVIEW


K)


February 3, 1963


ED HENDERSON, of Detachment Alfa, breaks tape as he wins 220 yard dash in 24 sec. Henderson was meet's high man with 18 points.


BILL PATTERSON of N.A.S. cdpped 120 yard low hurdles title with time of 16.1. Patterson also won broad jump event with leap of 19' 1/2".


SPORTS
by George Thomson
Ed Henderson, slender 6' 6" Marine, of Detachment Alfa was the outstanding athlete in the Track & Field Meet held at Cooper Field, Saturday 26 January. Henderson, hails from Ohio and has been in Track and Field events while serving with the U. S. Marines. The highlight of his career was when he made the Olympic Trials in 1960.
In the first meet -of the '63 season Henderson won the high jump with a leap of 5' 6", the 100 yard dash in 10.5 seconds, the 220 yard dash in 24 seconds and finished second in the broad jump with a leap 18' 4", good for a total of 18 points.
Henderson's runner-up was Bill Patterson of N.A.S., who won the Broad jump with a 19' " effort, the 120 yard low hurdles in 16:1, and finished third in the high jump, which gave him a point total of 11.
Marines' Detachment Alfa was the meet's high point team witth 58 followed closely by N.A.S. with 44 points. Among the other winners was William Phillips of Detachment Alfa who won the 1 Mile Run in 5:12. Jim Yoder of N.A.S. was runner-up with a time of 5:12. Roger Tufaro of MCB-7 ran third.


Hart Werbeck of MCB-7 with a toss of 36' 4/2" was the shot put winner followed by Leary Purjear of Det. "A". Third was Ron Peterson of MCB-7.
Johnny Smith of Det. "A" won the 50 yard dash in 6:2. Del Heilman running under the High Schools colors was runner-up with 6:3 and Leroy Hunter of N.A.S. with 6:4.5 ran third.
Melvin Foreman of Det. "A" was third best in the broad jump. Ed Elder and Herbie Deas both of Det. "A" came in 2nd and 3rd respectively in the 220 yard dash to give Det. "A" a clean sweep in that event.
Hart Werbeck of MCB-7 threw the Collegiate Discus 108 feet, the best distance of the meet. Eric Robinson of the High School was 2nd at 87 feet and Frank Bertetto of the Hospital was 3rd with 86 feet.
Del Heilman copped his second award of the evening by finishing second in the 100 yard dash in 11.2 seconds. Johnny Smith of Det. "A" finished 3rd in 11.3.
Forest Cobb of Det. "A" threw the hammer 99 ft. to cop that title and set the base record for others to shoot at in future meets. B. P. Harris of N.A.S. with 90 feet was second and Ronald Peterson of MCB-7 third at 86 feet.
Jim Yoder of N.A.S., Lawrence Tregoning of Det. "A" and Richard Pixley


also of Det. "A" came in 1, 2, and 3 respectively in the 2 Mile event.
In the Javelin event Larry Canfield's heave of 138' was the best of the evening. Fredric Dillion of N.A.S. with 132' was second best and Forest Cobb of Det. "A" was the number three thrower at 129' 3/2".
Don Porter of N.A.S. won the 440 yard run in the time of 56 seconds. Herbie Deas of Det. "A" was the runner u in 57 seconds and George Billingsley ol Det. "A" 3rd at 57.4.
Raymond Ortiz the lone VU-10 winner took second place honors in the Low Hurdles event with a time of 17 seconds, John McGrath of N.A.S. at 18.1 was 3rd.
William Dorroh of MCB-7 was the runner-up man in the High Jump and Bill Patterson, N.A.S. was number 3.
Walter Smith of N.AS. won the 880 yard run in 2:05.9, R.C. Sullivan of N.A.S. in 2:18.5 the runner-up and William Phillips of Det. "A" 3rd.
In the 880 yard relay the Marines Det. "A" team ran the best time of 1:41.2. Second and third places went to the N.A.S. teams.
A successful meet from start to finishW was fully enjoyed by everyone in attendance. The next meet about mid April, at Cooper Field.


Page Four




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PAGE 1

&THE I TlAF VOL. II, NO. 4 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba February 3, 1963 IT'S NOW THE "GITMO REVIEW" Yes, it's now official: the new name for the old Sunday Supplement will henceforth be The Gitmo Review. The winning name was submitted by 12-year-old Keith Vail, the son of J. W. Vail, a civilian attached to the Naval Supply Depot. The Vail's live at 95-D in Villamar. Keith's name was only one of some 324 submitted during the approximately three weeks the contest was open to the public. The winning title was chosen by "board of experts" consisting of Mrs. James W. Davis, wife of the Base Commander, Mrs. E. C. Adams, President of the Ellis Field Navy Wives Club, LTJG Gary Schlosser, Base Communication Officer, Chief H. Brown, Mayor of the Villamar Community Council, and LCDR James F. Lloyd, COMNAVBASE PIO. Young Keith, of course, Woot the $20 check for his winning name. The board had a difficult time deciding the winner, because of the many interesting titles submitted. Some of them were quite colorful, i.e., "The Chockablock," "The Telsar," "Uncle Wgby's Mirror," "Uncle Wgby's Rocket," "The Croaker," "The Bullwinkle," "Aladin's Lamp," "The Ant Hill," and "Voice of the Conche," just to name a few. But the title that takes the cake was one submitted by Miss Margaret Richardson, 17-yearold daughter of C. T. Richardson, CIV, in charge of the Print Shop. Margaret suggested the title: "The Weekly Pacifier to the People in the Land of Mango Trees (Who are Alergic to Mangoes)." To Miss Richardson goes our special booby prizeone slightly used passion fruit. The staff of The Gitmo Review would like to thank each and all of you who suggested titles to the "Name the Paper Contest." Your interest in our welfare is heartening. WHAT A SMILE -Young Keith Vail receives $20 check from RADM James W. Davis, COMNAVBASE, for winning the "Name the Paper" contest. VFW COMMANDER VISITS GUANTANAMO BAY U.S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay-The National Commander of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, Mr. Byron B. Gentry, visited this Caribbean outpost Jan. 28, 1963. Mr. Gentry was accompanied on the tour by Brigadier General J. D. Hittle, USMC (Ret), the VFW Director of National Security and Foreign Affairs. Also in the party was Rear Admiral John S. McCain, Jr., the Navy Department's Chief of Information at Washington, D. C. Mr. Gentry and party toured various areas on the Base. The tour included Suicide Ridge, big guns and the 24 miles of fenceline dividing the Naval Base from Communist Cuba. GITMO'S NAUTICAL CHAMPS. Well-deserving champions they are too; winners of the recent Guantanamo Bay Yacht Club races. Recipients of trophies (L. to R.) are: D. Allen, Hospital; B. Fitzgerald, PWC; D. Krieble, NAS Boat Shed; J. W. Ellis, Master of Ceremonies, FTG; F. Compbell, NAS Training; M. Pauley, PWC and H. Bootsma, NSD. The trophies were awarded at a dinner held at the Yacht Club Saturday evening, Jan. 26. 06,19

PAGE 2

GITMO REVIEW February 3, 1963 NATIONAL HEALTH AGENCIES CAMPAIGN "BINGO. OVER HERE" -A familiar sight and sound each Monday evening at Morin Center, sponsored by the Naval Base Civic Council. There's always plenty of money to be had. ..if you're lucky. MENTAL ILLNESS has struck an estimated half-million children in the United States. In a new program emphasis, the National Association for Mental Health is spurring research to improve present methods of treatment, to discover new ones, and to find ways to prevent mental illness in children. The NAMH is participating in the current campaign of the National Health Agencies. The Gitmo Gazette's mission is to inform and entertain all hands and to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare and contentment of personnel. The Gitmo Gazette is published at the Naval Base in accordance with NayExos P35, revised July, 1958 and financed with non-appropriated funds at no cost to the government. RADM J. W. DAVIS------------------------ComNavBase LCDR J. F. LLOYD-----------------------Officer-Advisor John ANDREN, JOSN----------------------------Editor Armed Forces Press Service (AFPS) may not be reprinted without the written permission of Armed Forces Press Service. Material in the paper may no the reprinted unless authorization is obtained from the editor. All photographs herein are official Navy photographs unless otherwise specified. The opin-ions or statements made in articles published herein are those of the writers and are not in any case to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of COMNAVBASE or of the Navy Department. AND THEY'RE COMIN' 'ROUND THE SECOND TURN This may not be the Indiannapolis 500, but according to theW drivers, (men, women and children) the thrill is there. Co-cart racing has caught on at Gitmo. The sport attraction is held every Sunday afternoon on the Naval Base driving range. ARE YOU READY? -Looking like four experienced Ferrari drivers, these men race their 2%-5 horse-powered go-carts each Sunday. (L-R)-Bill De Florian, Don Walton, Don's son, Wray (holding flags), Ken Wampler and Breezy Mortis. Page Two

PAGE 3

February 3, 1963 GITMO REVIEW Page Three WOMAN'S WORLD by Jackie Lloyd Sun dresses, crisp as celery --shirts and pants fresh as a detergent ad -smiling faces scrubbed and shining -"good morning, teacher" --and seventy plus "little people" clambered off their busses right to the door of "Louise McNeal's Nursery School." The official name of Guantanamo's pre-school, which is located on Marina point and run by tuition, is Naval Base Nursery School. However, when said school has been headed by the same devoted teacher since 1948, whose time and efforts have been responsible for the school's growth .Sand well-being, then to my way of thinking, it is and always shall be "Louise McNeal's Nursery School." I chose Friday to go to school, and reminded Louise, whose sense of humor is as good as her ability to handle children, that once, as I waited at the bus stop by her school, she had informed me sympathetically I couldn't come in -"You're just too big and too old," said she. Not to miss a chance to have the last word, I was quick to point out that not only was I there, but I was older too! "Well, keep off the tricycles," she warned. Friday is "Music Day" and therefore a special day. I had a glimpse of the graduation program, which of course is the climax of the school year. I heard "Eensy Weensy Spider," "This 01' Man," and a very special rendition of "Good Morning to Mr. Murphy," who was in the hospital at that time. Louise told the children a clever story about a lion hunt, a story which all mothers should see and learn --guaranteed to rid your small child of at least one half -hour's worth of energy, all while he is sitting in a chair. Impossible you say? Visit the school and you will see. Louise informed me parents and friends are always welcome visitors. I can assure you, the show is four -star. Louise, with the help of her very competent and pleasant teachers, (each claims she has the smartest, best behaved, most adorable class ) Faye Hendrickson, Lillian Malone, and Joyce Wiggins, runs a well -disciplined school. Vivian is also on hand to help wherever she can, and in her quiet way, is a favorite with the pre-schoolers too. Classes are organized by age groups, two-and-a-half through four. The school is divided into rooms-the "quiet room" where the "work" part of school is done, the play area, and three large outside rooms. When it is time to change rooms, the children march quietly and efficiently from one room to the other. Seventy-two of them-amazing! The physical set-up of the school is excellent, with fresh air being the keynote. The school is built on an old BOQ foundation, and since it is open, rain can be a problem; however, these days are few, and the rest of the time the children can absorb our beneficial weather right down to their shoestrings-which of course are usually untied! Quantity and quality mark the play equipment-everything in perfect running condition (thank you, Mr. McNeal), and plenty of everything for everyone. "Should I send my child to nursery school ?" is a frequent question. Most educators will say nursery school is an individual matter-depending on the child, his home environment, the school and the teacher. The first two conditions must be answered by the individual parents, but so far as Guantanamo is concerned, the school and teachers are the finest. "I believe in discipline balanced with a lot of love," Louise told me. "We at school are often the child's first glimpse of the outside world-the impression must be a good one!" Judging from the busy little people I watched, they could not have been happier with their lot in life. These children are learning classroom discipline, taking of turns, sharing of equipment, songs, stories, creative work, cleanliness and good manners. Even a bit of homespun philosophy pops out of the mouths of these babes, such as Scotty Warren's remark about usually happy-go-lucky little Laura Webber as she momentarily refused to be cheered by her classmates and teacher---"She's not sick, she's just plain ol' sad!" said Scotty. As I was leaving the school, I said to Louise, "Guantanamo's pre-schoolers are lucky little lads and lasses." "But not so lucky as we," answered the lady in charge. As I took a goodbye glimpse of these precious little ones, I had to agree. Teaching is truly its own reward! STORK'S SCOREBOARD The following named children have been born from January 22, 1963 to January 30, 1963. We would like to extend a friendly welcome, and a Guantanamo smile to each of the children, and their most happy parents. Donald Eugene Jaszewski Jr. ,son of Mr. and Mrs. Donald E. Jaszewski, born 1/22/63. Timothy James Landress, son of Mr. and Mrs. Oris L. Landress, born 1/23/63. and last but not least, Ellen Antonette Broughton, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Larry A. Broughton. And at the end of two innings, the scoreboard stands at: BOYS-------5 GIRLS-----3 if it's news call 9247 Gkctplain's GC)omer "The Rat Race" by Edward J. Dunn, LCDR, CHC This term can be well defined as life in the 1960's. It seems that we are at the point where it is impossible to live and to work in the allotted 24 hours. There are too many things to do and too many we imangine must be done. The new scientific progressive age with emphasis on speed and ease seems far in advance of our ability to use it properly. Where it should be simplifying life it seems only to create tension. Trying to gear our human emotions to the new age could be humorous were it not complicated further by current world events. Every day sees some new crisis and multiplies the apprehension in many hearts. All this exerts a fearful pressure on our interior life, resulting often in confusion, mental fatigue, nervousness, etc. To counteract the impact we have a greater need for self-discipline than ever before. Of necessity we must have fixed norms to follow, otherwise we are directed by a bunch of stray impulses. Since human nature presupposes a body and soul it follows that both must be developed to achieve and maintain mental health. To this end an expert gives us four daily exercises to perform in the interest of balance. Nourish, exercise, and develop the body; feed the mind with concentrated work of some kind; elevate the heart in the love of God and fellow man; exercise the will by decision and constancy. DID YOU KNOW THAT.I Approximately 3,000 copies of our English Gitmo Gazette and 1,500 copies of our Spanish paper are produced daily? This makes approximately 36,000 impressions run off on our mimeograph machines a day-That's over one million a month! !! Page Three February 3, 1963 GITMO REVIEW

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GITMO REVIEW K) February 3, 1963 ED HENDERSON, of Detachment Alfa, breaks tape as he wins 220 yard dash in 24 sec. Henderson was meet's high man with 18 points. BILL PATTERSON of N.A.S. copped 120 yard low hurdles title with time of 16.1. Patterson also won broad jump event with leap of 19' %2". SPORTS by George Thomson Ed Henderson, slender 6' 6" Marine, of Detachment Alfa was the outstanding athlete in the Track & Field Meet held at Cooper Field, Saturday 26 January. Henderson, hails from Ohio and has been in Track and Field events while serving with the U. S. Marines. The highlight of his career was when he made the Olympic Trials in 1960. In the first meet of the '63 season Henderson won the high jump with a leap of, 5' 6", the 100 yard dash in 10.5 seconds, the 220 yard dash in 24 seconds and finished second in the broad jump with a leap 18' 4", good for a total of 18 points. Henderson's runner-up was Bill Patterson of N.A.S., who won the Broad jump with a 19' % effort, the 120 yard low hurdles in 16:1, and finished third in the high jump, which gave him a point total of 11. Marines' Detachment Alfa was the meet's high point team witth 58 followed closely by N.A.S. with 44 points. Among the other winners was William Phillips of Detachment Alfa who won the 1 Mile Run in 5:12. Jim Yoder of N.A.S. was runner-up with a time of 5:12. Roger Tufaro of MCB-7 ran third. Hart Werbeck of MCB-7 with a toss of 36' 41/2" was the shot put winner followed by Leary Purjear of Det. "A". Third was Ron Peterson of MCB-7. Johnny Smith of Det. "A" won the 50 yard dash in 6:2. Del Heilman running under the High Schools colors was runner-up with 6:3 and Leroy Hunter of N.A.S. with 6:4.5 ran third. Melvin Foreman of Det. "A" was third best in the broad jump. Ed Elder and Herbie Deas both of Det. "A" came in 2nd and 3rd respectively in the 220 yard dash to give Det. "A" a clean sweep in that event. Hart Werbeck of MCB-7 threw the Collegiate Discus 108 feet, the best distance of the meet. Eric Robinson of the High School was 2nd at 87 feet and Frank Bertetto of the Hospital was 3rd with 86 feet. Del Heilman copped his second award of the evening by finishing second in the 100 yard dash in 11.2 seconds. Johnny Smith of Det. "A" finished 3rd in 11.3. Forest Cobb of Det. "A" threw the hammer 99 ft. to cop that title and set the base record for others to shoot at in future meets. B. P. Harris of N.A.S. with 90 feet was second and Ronald Peterson of MCB-7 third at 86 feet. Jim Yoder of N.A.S., Lawrence Tregoning of Det. "A" and Richard Pixley also of Det. "A" came in 1, 2, and 3 respectively in the 2 Mile event. In the Javelin event Larry Canfield's heave of 138' was the best of the evening. Fredric Dillion of N.A.S. with 132' was second best and Forest Cobb of Det. "A" was the number three thrower at 129' 31/2". Don Porter of N.A.S. won the 440 yard run in the time of 56 seconds. Herbie Deas of Det. "A" was the runner u in 57 seconds and George Billingsley oW Det. "A" 3rd at 57.4. Raymond Ortiz the lone VU-10 winner took second place honors in the Low Hurdles event with a time of 17 seconds, John McGrath of N.A.S. at 18.1 was 3rd. William Dorroh of MCB-7 was the runner-up man in the High Jump and Bill Patterson, N.A.S. was number 3. Walter Smith of N.A.S. won the 880 yard run in 2:05.9, R.C. Sullivan of N.A.S. in 2:18.5 the runner-up and William Phillips of Det. "A" 3rd. In the 880 yard relay the Marines Det. "A" team ran the best time of 1:41.2. Second and third places went to the N.A.S. teams. A successful meet from start to finishW was fully enjoyed by everyone in attendance. The next meet about mid April, at Cooper Field. Page Four