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Sunday Supplement

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Sunday Supplement
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U.S. Naval Base
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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U.S. Naval Base
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English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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University of Florida
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Indian
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Gitmo Review
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Gitmo Gazette
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Guantanamo Gazette
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Daily Gazette
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Guantanamo Gazette
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Guantanamo Daily Gazette
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meit


-A VOICE OF TrHE PEOPLE

VOL. I1, NO. 3 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba January 27, 1963



P T-A HOLDS FIRST MEETING SINCE RETURN

The first Parent Teachers Association meeting since the
return of the dependents was held Tuesday, January 22, at
the William T. Sampson open air pavilian.
The meeting was called to order by PTA president R. P.
Jeffrey, Capt., USN, and a timely invocation was delivered by
E.J. Dunn, LCDR ChC.
*The first speaker of the evening before a capacity crowd was '*ear Admiral James W. Davis, Commander Naval Base. Admiral Davis pledged his full support for the base PTA.
The guest speaker of the evening was Mr. T. Kelly, principal -2
of the Victory Hill elementary school. Mr. Kelly substituted for
Mr. Murphy who was suddenly hospitalized. .
The theme of Mr. Kelly's speach centered around the child,
and what effect the evacuation has had upon his scolastical
standing?
Mr. Kelly pointed out that our school system has a fine
teaching staff, and that they are doing wonders to gain the lost ground of schooling that the child missed during the "crisis".
In his closing remarks, Mr. Kelly emphasized the need for
parents to work with the teachers in inspiring the children to
study hard, and to keep away from distraction while in study. LET'S HELP THE CHILD Mr Tim Kelly is seen delivering
A question and answer period was held, with Mr. Kelly "E' EPTECID r i el sse
A qustin ad aswe peiod as eld wih M. Klly talk on schooling the children lost during evacuation period. answering queries from the parents. After the meeting, refreshments were served on the High School patio. This was the first PTA meeting of the new year, and the first
Remember parents, the next PTA meeting will be February since before the recent "crisis
26. Please reserve the evening for PTA.


* N.H.A. Campaign Opens
This month marks the 7th annual Federal Service Campaign
for our National Health Agencies. The President has urged all
Federal personnel, military and civilian, to respond generously ... ..:...:....:
to the campaign representing 10 voluntary health agencies.
Support to the health agencies alleviates human suffering and hastens the day when, through research and education, man
will conquer the dread diseases of mankind.
This campaign seeks support for the American Cancer So-
ciety, American Heart Association, Arthritis and Rheumatism Foundation, Muscular Dystrophy Association of America, National Association for Mental Health, National Association for Retarded Children, National Multiple Sclerosis Society, National Society for Crippled Children and Adults, National Society for the Prevention of Blindness and the United Cerebral Palsy Association.
Capt. Richard. P. Jeffrey, Naval Base Supply Officer, has been
chosen Chairman of this fund drive.
Although there is no dollar goal established for our command, RERAM ALJ ESW DVCONVAE i

&ur eal oalis 10% prtiipaton.shown making initial contribution to National Health Agencies
For a brighter, healthier tomorrow, give now so that you fund drive. Capt. R. P. Jeffrey, CO NSD, Fund Chairman, is may receive later. shown accepting.







Page Two SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT January 27, 1963


A BITTER POTION! -New CPO's attempt to down concoction derived from various forms of sludge of non-alcoholic nature. New Chief at far right won the contest and was awarded with a special "punishment" by the court.


MAY I HELP YOU- Miss Sue Sennott, Red Cross Field Director for the Guantanamo area assists James R. Russik, USMC. Miss Sennott assumed her duties January 1.



Welcome Miss Sennott"

January 1, 1963 not only marked the first day of the new year, but a turnover in our local Red Cross Office.
Miss Beryl Thrombley who had acted as Field Director for the Guantanamo area the previous 20 months, has left us and is on orders to serve in West Germany.
Miss Thrombley's place was taken by Miss Sue Sennott, who came to Guantanamo from Beale Air Force Base, California. Miss Sennott is on a 18 month tour of duty here.
She has been active in Red Cross work since 1946. Of the many jobs and undertakings with which Miss Sennott has been charged number the training of the Gray Ladies, aiding personnel financially, counciling, and communications between personnel and their families in the States.
Miss Sennot was scheduled to take over in November, but due to the "crisis", she was unable to assume her duties until the 1st of this month.

The Gitmo Gazette's mission is to inform and entertain all hands and to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare and contentment of personnel.
The Gitmo Gazette is published at the Naval Base in accordance with NavExos P35, revised July, 1958 and financed with non-appropriated funds at no cost to the government.

RADM J. W. DAVIS------------------------ComNavBase
LCDR J. F. LLOYD-----------------------Officer-Advisor
John ANDREN, JOSN----------------------------Editor
Armed Forces Press Service (AFPS) may not be reprinted without the written permission of Armed Forces Press Service. Material in the paper may no the reprinted unless authorization is obtained from the editor. All photographs herein are official Navy photographs unless otherwise specified. The opinions or statements made in articles published herein are those of the writers and are not in any case to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of COMNAVBASE or of the Navy Department.


ENSIGN MAKES CHIEF -Standing at attention in front of a Kangaroo Court at the Chief's Club is one of the few Ensigns who have made Chief Petty Officer. His name: George T. Ensign Jr., newly appointed Chief Storekeeper stationed at the Naval Supply Depot.


Winner.

to be

chosen

soon

The editor of the Gitmo Gazette has received well over 300 names for the "name the paper contest."

We are offering a $20.00 Navy Exchange gift certificate to the person submitting the winning name.

The contes names are n being judged, ant the winner will be announced in the February 3 issue. The winner's picture will also appear in the "new Sunday paper."


STORK'S SCOREBOARD
The following named children have been born from the period December 22, 1962, to January 22, 1963. We would like to extend a friendly welcome, and a Guantanamo smile to each of the children listed below.
Joseph Eugene Kite son of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Dale Kite, born 12/24/62; James Franklin Bartoe Jr. son of Mr. and Mrs. James F. Bartoe, born 1/8/63; Mayra de la Caridad Siaca, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Rafael Siaca Jr. born 1/10/63; Warren Walte*W Friendly, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Walter Friendly born 1/18/63; Lisa Anne Langford daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Langford, born 1/17/63.
BOYS------------------3 GIRLS-----------------2


Page Two


January 27, 1963


SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT






Page .Three


JaurO7F 93SUDYSPLMN


PUT PURPOSE INTO YOUR LIFE
Chaplain G. H. Sargent

Some have said the ultimate in confusion would be a termite living in a yo-yo top. It would be the ultimate in futility as well. A termite in a yo-yo would be in a whirling maze, a world that goes no-where, moves incessantly,
and stays on the same string.

Many people live in a tiny world of
their own bounded by their own interests,
irling at a maddening rate, going nowhere, sliding always on the same
string. This type of living produces a sense of futility for there is no purpose
in such a life.

We say we are just average with no
great talents but does this prevent us from having a purpose in life? Following World War I there was unveiled on the campus of one of our midwestern universities an unusual memorial tablet.
It was erected in memory of a graduate of that university who was definitely
termed "an average man."'

During his undergraduate days he
took part in a number of university activities, but he never won a prize or an election to an important office. He went out for football each year, but
*ver played on the first team. His grades 1 eraged B minus, and he was not eligible for any major honors.
During the War he served in the medical corps, and met his death trying to rescue a wounded man. His friends erected a memorial tablet at his Alma Mater with the following inscription: "He played four years on the scrubs, but
he never quit."
That young man built into himself
an ability which promised to make up for the limitations in his endowment.
He taught himself to make his hardest struggle when he was beaten. We was an earthen vessel. Life for him had a
purpose, a meaning.


WOMAN'S


WORLD

by Jackie Lloyd
Newpaper photos made us momentary heroes (Nancy Rucker, Sam Roehl, Georgia Bernocco, Barbara O'Connell, Clara Wood, Susan and Jerry Work to name only a few of the evacuees who hit the Norfolk print). . . first-hand accounts. by new Guantanamo authors Irvin Shaw, Barbara Mollard, Paul Adams (and there must have .been others) told our moving story, ably and realistically, to local stateside press

(Oklahoma, Virginia, Florida to be specific)... thrilling mid-December homecomings overshadowed above and beyond the traditionally happiest of holidays... and evacuation tales replaced sea-stories at every Gitmo gathering. After these confused, eventful, notorious months, I wondered-could Guantanamo ever go back to normal?
You still may be living out of a crashkit-an abundance of winter clothes may hang in your closet while your summer clothes are in storage-your car may have residence in the States-but whether you realize it or not, normalcy is returning to Guantanamo.
No sooner had Bel Graves stepped off the Geiger than the Prot. church choir was organized and able to present a Christmas Eve service equal to any past Christmas Eve service. Jean Baker efficiently gathered up her Girl Scouts, and calendars went on sale before the new year, just as they have gone on sale every year at that time. Jerri Krepela and helpers vigorously worked to put the Trading Post back into shape in order that new Guantanamo arrivals might benefit from its services (imagine the amount of rental equipment shipped out with household goods!). Captain Richard Jeffrey successfully launched the first post-evacuation PTA meeting last Tuesday evening. January 19 held forth with NEGDF, and hurray' we're still here! The schools are reestablished--and the elementaryites again excel for Mr. Kelly. At this point I'm beginning to wonder--did we ever really leave?
The nurses no longer are the only women with tans--Doris Baker, Grace Gill and many others look so nice with a healthy Gitmo glow. We recognize our friends by the cars they drive--Special Service rentals once again label the


very-soon-to-depart or the very-recentlyarrived. The name "Dempsey" is as before synonymous with golf and horseback riding, as is "JoAnn DiBella" with that Saturday morn favorite, "Teen Time."


Even our changes represent a resumption of normalcy. With the arrival of Admiral James W. Davis as new Commander Naval Base, we see the Navy's rotational system continuing in Guantanamo just as in every other part of the Navy. Kitty Williams and: Carol Winkler arrived with their new babesin-arms, exemplifying confidence in Guantanamo and a "life-goes-on-asusual" philosophy.
Our bay continues to be the bluest, our sunsets the most breathtaking, our royal palms the most stately and graceful. Lizards still lounge lazily on the louvres, and traffic travels at a tender twenty miles per hour. Fortunately some things will never, never change.
On the serious side, the cactus curtain grows thicker and higher--the militia look down from their watch on the Kittery Beach hill--arid the news and its writers never cease to remind us of the importance of the area in which we live. Some day.. some things ... we know will have to change. And when they do, Naval Base Guantanamo, and all the people in connection with it, will have been every vital chapter in this history of changing times. In the meantime, however, we pick up from whence we leftan example to-all that we at Guantanamo are able to adjust and adapt!


Flora & Fauna At Gitmo
by Roger Whitcomb, J03
Despite the semi-arid climate here on the Naval Base, plant and animal life are abundant and diversified. For the amateur wildlife enthusiast, identifying them can be interesting and much fun.
Many different varieties of trees can be found here. Of the trees native to the base, only the Cuban mahogany is of significant size. A few of them are still standing although many have been cut for their beautiful wood. Many other trees native to Cuba and other West Indian islands have been transplanted to the base. Among them number the Royal, coconut and dinner palms, iignum vitae, grape tree and mangrove. The Royal Poinciana, named for M. de Poinci, a former governor of the French West Indies, has been Widely planted. In May and June their bare branches become a mass of flame-colored blossoms. Other trees of great size include the banyan, several species of rubber tree and the Spanish laurel.
One could easily survive on the base by dint of all thle exotic fruits alone. In addition to several varieties of mangoes, there is the avocado, papaya, banana,


orange, grapefruit, sweet-sop (a kind of sugar apple), guava and pomegranate. There are many varieties of cacti, of course, which flourish in all uncultivated areas (Continued Page Four)


KNOW OF ANY

NEWS CALL 9247


January 27, 1963


SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT








The New York Yankees were crowned World Baseball Champs just as they were in 1961. The bombers earned this title by defeating Mr. Coumatos' San Francisco Giants, the Natio League Pennant winners, in the best of seven World Serie games. The leading batters were Tommy Davis of the L.A. Dodgers with .346 and Pete Runnels of the Boston Red Sox at .326. Willie Mays of the S. F. Giants led the National League in Home Runs with 49, Harmon Killebrew of Minnesota led the American League with 48. The Runs Batted In Leaders were Tommy Davis of Los Angeles in the National League with 153, Killebrew of the Twins led the American League with 126.
The leading pitcher with the best percentage in the National League was Bob Purkey of the Cincinnati Reds 23-5 .821. American League's best was Ray Herbert, Chicago White Sox 20-9 .690. Most wins by a National League hurler, Don Drysdale, L.A. Dodgers 25-9. Ralph Terry of the N.Y. Yankees in the American League 23-12. Earned Run leader in the Senior Circuit was Sandy Konfax, L. A. Dodgers 2.54 and Hank Aguirre, Detroit Tigers in the Jr. circuit with 2.21.
The Atlanta Crackers of the International League won the Jr. World Series.
In Collegiate Baseball the Conference Champs are listed:


DANGER: KEEP OUT -WILD ANIMAL! - One of Gitmo's many wild beasts is seen at the Naval Base zoo. Our zoo may not be as large as San Diego's, but in time, who knows? FLORA & FAUNA CONT'D.
The wild animal life on the base is more varied than you would think at first glance. Many of you have certainly seen our small vhite-tail deer, similar in size and appearance to the Florida variety. There is a large tre-dwelling native rodent called the jutia. With brown fur, and about the size of an o'possum, the jutia has the 'possum's long bare tail, but aside from that feature more nearly resembles the woodchuck. The jutia is eaten and esteemed a delicacy by many Cubans.
A species of boa constrictor, the Maja, reaches a length of ten feet or more. The Maja is non-poisonous and harmless to man as are the other smaller snakes found- on the base. Cuba, by the way, has no poisonous snakes.
The iguana is a common sight, the larger ones found mainly in the crevices of the coral cliffs. The giant tarantula and the small but deadly Black Widow spider are present at Gitmo, as is the less poisonous scorpion. Bites from these, insects, however, are uncommon.
Crocodiles are sometimes sighted in the river and in the mangrove labyrinths of the Upper Bay but they are undoubtedly not so common now as in the days when they gave the town of Caimanera its name.
For those of you who want to read up on the abundant bird life on the base, there is a fine book in the library called "Field Guide of Birds of the West Indies," by James Bond. I highly recommend it.


by George Thomson

Professional and Amateur sports thrived (luring 1962, so before we close the sports history book foi last year let us reminisce just for a moment as our '62 champions pass in review.


Atlantic -Wake Forest Big Eight - Missouri Big Ten - Illinois. Mid American- Western Michigan
Missouri Valley- Bradley

Pro Basketball Champs: NBA- Boston Celtics

ABL -Cleveland Pipers


College Basketball: Atlantic Coast
Wake Forest Big Five-UCLA Big Eight - Colorado Big Ten -Ohio State

Ivy - Yale Mid Atlantic - Hofstra

Mid American
Bowling Green


Yankee Conference - Vermont Mid Atlantic - Gettysburg NCAA - Michigan

Southern - West Virginia Southwest - Texas


AAU - Bartlesville Okla., Oilers
Women - Nashville Business College



Missouri Valley- Cincinnati NCAA - Cincinnati NIT - Dayton Southwest - Kentucky & Mississippi State tied
Southern - West Virginia Southwest - SMU & Texas
Tech (Tied) g

Yankee - Massachusetts


The National Football League's Player of the Year was the Green Bay Packers fullback Jim Taylor. The Championship teams were the Green Bay Packers in the Western Conference and the New York Giants in the Eastern. In the American Football League the Dallas Texans were champs.
In the Collegiate Ranks:
Atlantic Coast - Duke Atlantic - Delaware Big Eight- Oklahoma Missouri Valley - Tulsa Big Six -So. California Southeast - Mississippi
Big Ten - Wisconsin Southern-- VMI
Ivy - Dartmouth Southwest - Texas
Mid American - Western -New Mexico
Bowling Green Yankee - New Hampshire
On the boxing scene, Sonny Liston dethroned Floyd Patterson for the Heavyweight title. Harold Johnson is the Light Heavyweight King. The Middle Weight co-champions are Paul Pender and Dick Tiger. Emile Griffith the Welterweight King; Carlo Ortiz the Lightweight Champ; Davey Moore Featherweigls Champ; Eder Jofre is the Bantamweight titleholder and Flyweight Champion Masahika Harada of Japan'regained his title from Pone Kingpitch of Thailand.
(To be continued next week)


Page Four.


January 27, 1963


SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT




Full Text

PAGE 1

.unda mef at A VOICE OF 'THE PEOPLE VOL. II, NO. 3 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba January 27, 1963 T HOLDS FIRST MEETING SINCE RETURN The first Parent Teachers Association meeting since the return of the dependents was held Tuesday, January 22, at the William T. Sampson open air pavilian. The meeting was called to order by PTA president R. P. Jeffrey, Capt., USN, and a timely invocation was delivered by E. J. Dunn, LCDR ChC. The first speaker of the evening before a capacity crowd was Wear Admiral James W. Davis, Commander Naval Base. Admiral Davis pledged his full support for the base PTA. The guest speaker of the evening was Mr. T. Kelly, principal of the Victory Hill elementary school. Mr. Kelly substituted for Mr. Murphy who was suddenly hospitalized. The theme of Mr. Kelly's speach centered around the child, and what effect the evacuation has had upon his scolastical standing ? Mr. Kelly pointed out that our school system has a fine teaching staff, and that they are doing wonders to gain the lost ground of schooling that the child missed during the "crisis". In his closing remarks, Mr. Kelly emphasized the need for parents to work with the teachers in inspiring the children to study hard, and to keep away from distraction while in study. A question and answer period was held, with Mr. Tim K t sh it ing ei eriod answering queries from the parents. After the meeting, refreshments were served on the High School patio. This was the first PTA meeting of the new year, and the first Remember parents, the next PTA meeting will be February since before the recent "crisis." 26. Please reserve the evening for PTA. N. H. A. Campaign Opens This month marks the 7th annual Federal Service Campaign for our National Health Agencies. The President has urged all Federal personnel, military and civilian, to respond generously to the campaign representing 10 voluntary health agencies. Support to the health agencies alleviates human suffering and hastens the day when, through research and education, man will conquer the dread diseases of mankind. This campaign seeks support for the American Cancer Society, American Heart Association, Arthritis and Rheumatism Foundation, Muscular Dystrophy Association of America, National Association for Mental Health, National Association for Retarded Children, National Multiple Sclerosis Society, National Society for Crippled Children and Adults, National Society for the Prevention of Blindness and the United Cerebral Palsy A -_ninftCapt. Richard P. Jeffrey, Naval Base Supply Officer, has been chosen Chairman of this fund drive. Although there is no dollar goal established for our command, REAR ADMIRAL JAMES W. DAVIS, COMNAVEASE, is our real goal is 100%1o participation.shown making initial contribution to National Health Agencies For a brighter, healthier tomorrow, give now so that you fund drive. Capt. R. P. Jeffrey, CO NSD, Fund Chairman, is may receive later. shown accepting.

PAGE 2

Page Two SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT January 27, 1963 A BITTER POTION! -New CPO's attempt to down concoction derived from various forms of sludge of non-alcoholic nature. New Chief at far right won the contest and was awarded with a special "punishment" by the court. MAY I HELP YOU -Miss Sue Sennott, Red Cross Field Director for the Guantanamo area assists James R. Russik, USMC. Miss Sennott assumed her duties January 1. "Welcome Miss Sennott" January 1, 1963 not only marked the first day of the new year, but a turnover in our local Red Cross Office. Miss Beryl Thrombley who had acted as Field Director for the Guantanamo area the previous 20 months, has left us and is on orders to serve in West Germany. Miss Thrombley's place was taken by Miss Sue Sennott, who came to Guantanamo from Beale Air Force Base, California. Miss Sennott is on a 18 month tour of duty here. She has been active in Red Cross work since 1946. Of the many jobs and undertakings with which Miss Sennott has been charged number the training of the Gray Ladies, aiding personnel financially, counciling, and communications between personnel and their families in the States. Miss Sennot was scheduled to take over in November, but due to the "crisis", she was unable to assume her duties until the 1st of this month. The Gitmo Gazette's mission is to inform and entertain all hands and to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare and contentment of personnel. The Gitmo Gazette is published at the Naval Base in accordance with NavExos P35, revised July, 1958 and financed with non-appropriated funds at no cost to the government RADM J. W. DAVIS------------------------ComNavBase LCDR J. F. LLOYD-----------------------Officer-Advisor John ANDREN, JOSN-----------------------------Editor Armed Forces Press Service (AFPS) may not be reprinted without the written permission of Armed Forces Press Service. Material in the paper may no the reprinted unless authorization is obtained from the editor. All photographs herein are official Navy photographs unless otherwise specified. The opinions or statements made in articles published herein are those of the writers and are not in any case to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of COMNAVBASE or of the Navy Department. ENSIGN MAKES CHIEF -Standing at attention in front of a Kangaroo Court at the Chief's Club is one of the few Ensigns who have made Chief Petty Officer. His name: George T. Ensign Jr., newly appointed Chief Storekeeper stationed at the Naval Supply Depot. Winner to be chosen soon The editor of the Gitmo Gazette has received well over 300 names for the "name the paper contest." We are offering a $20.00 Navy Exchange g if t certificate to the person submitting the winning name. The contest names are no being judged,and the winner will be announced in the February 3 issue. The winner's picture will also appear in the "new Sunday paper." STORK'S SCOREBOARD The following named children have been born from the period December 22, 1962, to January 22, 1963. We would like to extend a friendly welcome, and a Guantanamo smile to each of the children listed below. Joseph Eugene Kite son of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Dale Kite, born 12/24/62; James Franklin Bartoe Jr. son of Mr. and Mrs. James F. Bartoe, born 1/8/63; Mayra de la Caridad Siaca, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Rafael Siaca Jr. born 1/10/63; Warren Walte W Friendly, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Walter Friendly born 1/18/63; Lisa Anne Langford daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Langford, born 1/17/63. BOYS------------------3 GIRLS-----------------2 Page Two SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT January 27, 1963

PAGE 3

Page Three January 27, 1963 SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT S 3kaptlain's Comer PUT PURPOSE INTO YOUR LIFE Chaplain G. H. Sargent Some have said the ultimate in confusion would be a termite living in a yo-yo top. It would be the ultimate in futility as well. A termite in a yo-yo would be in a whirling maze, a world that goes no-where, moves incessantly, and stays on the same string. Many people live in a tiny world of their own bounded by their own interests, whirling at a maddening rate, going where, sliding always on the same string. This type of living produces a sense of futility for there is no purpose in such a life. We say we are just average with no great talents but does this prevent us from having a purpose in life? Following World War I there was unveiled on the campus of one of our midwestern universities an unusual memorial tablet. It was erected in memory of a graduate of that university who was definitely termed "an average man." During his undergraduate days he took part in a number of university activities, but he never won a prize or an election to an important office. He went out for football each year, but *ver played on the first team. His grades eraged B minus, and he was not eligible for any major honors. During the War he served in the medical corps, and met his death trying to rescue a wounded man. His friends erected a memorial tablet at his Alma Mater with the following inscription: "He played four years on the scrubs, but he never quit." That young man built into himself an ability which promised to make up for the limitations in his endowment. He taught himself to make his hardest struggle when he was beaten. We was an earthen vessel. Life for him had a purpose, a meaning. WOMAN'S WORLD by Jackie Lloyd Newpaper photos made us momentary heroes (Nancy Rucker, Sam Roehl, Georgia Bernocco, Barbara O'Connell, Clara Wood, Susan and Jerry Work to name only a few of the evacuees who hit the Norfolk print). ..first-hand accounts by new Guantanamo authors Irvin Shaw, Barbara 'Mollard, Paul Adams (and there must have 'been others) told our moving story, ably and realistically, to local stateside press (Oklahoma, Virginia, Florida to be specific). ..thrilling mid-December homecomings overshadowed above and beyond the traditionally happiest of holidays. and evacuation tales replaced sea-stories at every Gitmo gathering. After these confused, eventful, notorious months, I wondered---could Guantanamo ever go back to normal? You still may be living out of a crashkit-an abundance of winter clothes may hang in your closet while your summer clothes are in storage-your car may have residence in the States-but whether you realize it or not, normalcy is returning to Guantanamo. No sooner had Bel Graves stepped off the Geiger than the Prot. church choir was organized and able to present a Christmas Eve service equal to any past Christmas Eve service. Jean Baker efficiently gathered up her Girl Scouts, and calendars went on sale before the new year, just as they have gone on sale every year at that time. Jerri Krepela and helpers vigorously worked to put the Trading Post back into shape in order that new Guantanamo arrivals might benefit from its services (imagine the amount of rental equipment shipped out with household goods!). Captain Richard Jeffrey successfully launched the first post-evacuation PTA meeting last Tuesday evening. January 19 held forth with NEGDF, and hurray' we're still here! The schools are reestablished-and the elementaryites again excel for Mr. Kelly. At this point I'm beginning to wonder-did we ever really leave? The nurses no longer are the only women with tans-Doris Baker, Grace Gill and many others look so nice with a healthy Gitmo glow. We recognize our friends by the cars they drive-Special Service rentals once again label the very-soon-to-depart or the very-recentlyarrived. The name "Dempsey" is as before synonymous with golf and horseback riding, as is "JoAnn DiBella" with that Saturday morn favorite, "Teen Time." Even our changes represent a resumption of normalcy. With the arrival of Admiral James W. Davis as new Commander Naval Base, we see the Navy's rotational system continuing in Guantanamo just as in every other part of the Navy. Kitty Williams and Carol Winkler arrived with their new babesin-arms, exemplifying confidence in Guantanamo and a "life-goes-on-asusual" philosophy. Our bay continues to be the bluest, our sunsets the most breathtaking, our royal palms the most stately and graceful. Lizards still lounge lazily on the louvres, and traffic travels at a tender twenty miles per hour. Fortunately some things will never, never change. On the serious side, the cactus curtain grows thicker and higher-the militia look down from their watch on the Kittery Beach hill-arid the news and its writers never cease to remind us of the importance of the area in which we live. Some day. ..some things. ..we know will have to change. And when they do, Naval Base Guantanamo, and all the people in connection with it, will have been every vital chapter in this history of changing times. In the meantime, however, we pick up from whence we leftan example to all that we at Guantanamo are able to adjust and adapt! Flora & Fauna At Gitmo by Roger Whitcomb, J03 Despite the semi-arid climate here on the Naval Base, plant and animal life are abundant and diversified. For the amateur wildlife enthusiast, identifying them can be interesting and much fun. Many different varieties of trees can be found here. Of the trees native to the base, only the Cuban mahogany is of significant size. A few of them are still standing although many have been cut for their beautiful wood. Many other trees native to Cuba and other West Indian islands have been transplanted to the base. Among them number the Royal, coconut and dinner palms, lignum vitae, grape tree and mangrove. The Royal Poinciana, named for M. de Poinci, a former governor of the French West Indies, has been widely planted. In May and June their bare branches become a mass of flame-colored blossoms. Other trees of great size include the banyan, several species of rubber tree and the Spanish laurel. One could easily survive on the base by dint of all the exotic fruits alone. In addition to several varieties of mangoes, there is the avocado, papaya, banana, orange, grapefruit, sweet-sop (a kind of sugar apple), guava and pomegranate. There are many varieties of cacti, of course, which flourish in all uncultivated areas (Continued Page Four) KNOW OF ANY NEWS CALL 9247 January 27, 1963 SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT

PAGE 4

The New York Yankees were crowned World Baseball Champs just as they were in 1961. The bombers earned this title by defeating Mr. Coumatos' San Francisco Giants, the Nation League Pennant winners, in the best of seven World Serie* games. The leading batters were Tommy Davis of the L. A. Dodgers with .346 and Pete Runnels of the Boston Red Sox at .326. Willie Mays of the S. F. Giants led the National League in Home Runs with 49, Harmon Killebrew of Minnesota led the American League with 48. The Runs Batted In Leaders were Tommy Davis of Los Angeles in the National League with 153, Killebrew of the Twins led the American League with 126. The leading pitcher with the best percentage in the National League was Bob Purkey of the Cincinnati Reds 23-5 .821. American League's best was Ray Herbert, Chicago White Sox 20-9 .690. Most wins by a National League hurler, Don Drysdale, L. A. Dodgers 25-9. Ralph Terry of the N. Y. Yankees in the American League 23-12. Earned Run leader in the Senior Circuit was Sandy Konfax, L. A. Dodgers 2.54 and Hank Aguirre, Detroit Tigers in the Jr. circuit with 2.21. The Atlanta Crackers of the International League won the Jr. World Series. In Collegiate Baseball the Conference Champs are listed: W DANGER: KEEP OUT -WILD ANIMAL! -One of Gitmo's many wild beasts is seen at the Naval Base zoo. Our zoo may not be as large as San Diego's, but in time, who knows ? FLORA & FAUNA CONT'D. The wild animal life on the base is more varied than you would think at first glance. Many of you have certainly seen our small white-tail deer, similar in size and appearance to the Florida variety. There is a large treb-dwelling native rodent called the jutia. With brown fur, and about the size of an opossum, the jutia has the 'possum's long bare tail, but aside from that feature more nearly resembles the woodchuck. The jutia is eaten and esteemed a delicacy by many Cubans. A species of boa constrictor, the Maja, reaches a length of ten feet or more. The Maja is non-poisonous and harmless to man as are the other smaller snakes found on the base. Cuba, by the way, has no poisonous snakes. The iguana is a common sight, the larger ones found mainly in the crevices of the coral cliffs. The giant tarantula and the small but deadly Black Widow spider are present at Gitmo, as is the less poisonous scorpion. .Bites from these. insects, however, are uncommon. Crocodiles are sometimes sighted in the river and in the mangrove labyrinths of the Upper Bay but they are undoubtedly not so common now as in the days when they gave the town of Caimanera its name. For those of you who want to read up on the abundant bird life on the base, there is a fine book in the library called "Field Guide of Birds of the West Indies," by James Bond. I highly recommend it. by George Thomson Professional and Amateur sports thrived (luring 1962, so before we close the sports history book for last year let us reminisce just for a moment as our '62 champions pass in review. Atlantic -Wake Forest Big Eight -Missouri Big Ten -Illinois Mid American -Western Michigan Missouri Valley -Bradley Pro Basketball Champs: NBA -Boston Celtics ABL -Cleveland Pipers College Basketball: Atlantic Coast Wake Forest Big Five -UCLA Big Eight -Colorado Big Ten -Ohio State Ivy -Yale Mid Atlantic -Hofstra Mid American Bowling Green Yankee Conference -Vermont Mid Atlantic -Gettysburg NCAA -Michigan Southern -West Virginia Southwest -Texas AAU -Bartlesville Okla., Oilers Women -Nashville Business College Missouri Valley -Cincinnati NCAA -Cincinnati NIT -Dayton Southwest -Kentucky & Mississippi State tied Southern -West Virginia Southwest -SMU & Texas Tech (Tied) Yankee -Massachusetts The National Football League's Player of the Year was the Green Bay Packers fullback Jim Taylor. The Championship teams were the Green Bay Packers in the Western Conference and the New York Giants in the Eastern. In the American Football League the Dallas Texans were champs. In the Collegiate Ranks: Atlantic Coast -Duke Atlantic -Delaware Big Eight -Oklahoma Missouri Valley -Tulsa Big Six -So. California Southeast -Mississippi Big Ten -Wisconsin Southern -VMI Ivy -Dartmouth Southwest -Texas Mid American -Western -New Mexico Bowling Green Yankee -New Hampshire On the boxing scene, Sonny Liston dethroned Floyd Patterson for the Heavyweight title. Harold Johnson is the Light Heavyweight King. The Middle Weight co-champions are Paul Pender and Dick Tiger. Emile Griffith the Welterweight King; Carlo Ortiz the Lightweight Champ; Davey Moore Featherweigl Champ; Eder Jofre is the Bantamweight titleholder and Flyweight Champion Masahika Harada of Japan regained his title from Pone Kingpitch of Thailand. (To be continued next week) Page Four January 27, 1963 SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT


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