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Sunday Supplement

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Sunday Supplement
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U.S. Naval Base
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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U.S. Naval Base
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English

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-A VOIE OF THE PEOPLE

VOL. II, NO. 2 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba January 20, 1963


IS THA' James W. personnel ii held on B. uniforms.


. NICE SI
Ball, Jr., C( medal from commented 20 years ag


Admiral Davis HoldsFirst Inspection


Saturday morning, January 12, 1963, Rear Admiral James W. Davis Commander Naval Base held his first inspection of the Naval Station personnel.

The inspection was held on Bay Hill and marked the first command inspection by our new Naval Base Commander since taking command December 22, 1962.

The inspection party was led by Admiral Davis, followed by Captain George C. Ball, Jr., Commanding Officer Naval Station, and Naval Station Executive Officer L. H. Roark.

The Admiral made a thorough inspection of the ranks, and commented on neatness of individual uniforms. He concluded that on the whole he was well pleased with the over-all appearance of the officers and men.

At the close of the inspection, medals and letters of commendation were awarded, many of which were a direct result of thle-"Cuban crisis". Naval-Station post office personnel received letters of commendation fiom Admiral Davis for outstanding performance of professional duties during the T TIE ROLLED, PROPERLY? -,-Rear. Admiral "crisis" and the heavy Christmas season. Davis, COMNAVBASE, is seen conducting his first nspection since taking command. The inspection was In all, there were 24 medals and awards presented, too ay Hill. The Admiral remarked favorably on the numerous to mention.

CONTEST

Due to the
shortage of entries- in our
"name the paper
co nte st", the
deadline is being
reset and moved
up to midnight
WedneSday, 23
00~.. Jan. .i M.
We are offering
a $20 Navy Exchange gift certificate to the person submitting
t he winn-ing
name. There must
be at least 100
entries before the
{IOOTING - Captain G. C. w in n er is an, NAVSTA, receives rifleman nounced. WELL DONE. - K. Murphy, PCCS, receives a "well done" SAdmiral Davis. Capt. Ball W a t c h your his last rifleman award was daily Gazette for from Admiral Davis. Chief Murphy is in charge of the Post entry blanks. Office Department at the Naval Station. All other members of o. ______- the post office received letters of commendation.











Edd-ie Fisher, Mel Allen Crace Cimo Shores


It was a long holiday period for Gitmoites, lasting long after the departure of Ed Sullivan. Saturday, January 5, saw the arrival of the well-known singing star Eddie Fisher for a one day stand. Eddie had just completed a two week engagement at San Juan and requested to come on the base and entertain.

It was a busy day for the versatile performer, starting at noon with his arrival at McCalla. Adm. J.W. Davis, COMNAVABASE, was on hand to welcome him. That night he apepared at the Naval Station Movie Lyceum, performing for an hour and half. The toughest aspect of show business is appearing before "live" audiences. Eddie proved he's a past master in the business, singing such favorites as "Love Is A Lovely Thing," "Rigth In Your Own Back Yard," "Oh My Papa," and the Spanish version of "Never On Sunday." However, his versatile renditions didn't stop there. One number was a version of "Mack The Knife" in, of all things, Greek.

Eddie's next stop was the Teenage Club. There, he signed autographs and record covers for the teenagers.


Sunday morning, Mr: Fisher paid a visit to the Naval Hospital, helping to boost the morale of those who were unable to attend his performance the preceeding evening.
Eddie made an entertaining appearance on WGBY-TV and was quite frank on the many aspects of his career. Sample: When asked in which medium he most enjoyed workings-pictures, television or live show business--"as long as I have been in this business, I believe that live entertaining is the toughest and, I might add, the most exciting and rewarding... if an audience likes you, they let you know it." This was Eddie's second visit to Gitmo his first being 1953 while serving a two year enlistment in the Army as a Special Services entertainer.
The following week, Mel Allen, one of the country's best sports announcers, paid us a visit, also for a day. The highlight of Mel's stay on the Naval Base was an hour and a half-long appearance on WGBY-TV during which he showed some films on the World Series and commented on just about anything in the sports world.


During his stay, he managed to get in visits to the Naval Hospital and out to MCB-7 where he had lunch with the crewew"

Mel was outspoken, as usual, on sports. Sample comment: "I thought the officiating at the Rose Bowl game was some of the worst I've ever seen." He added that he was referring not to the fairness of the calls, but to the seeming inability of the officials to agree unanimously on anything.



The Public Information Office is striving to gather more local news for di semination by all of our media (WGBW Radio-TV and Gitmo Gazette). Call the Public Information Office when you have a newsworthy item of happenings around the base.

II-.-W----- -- A LL.. .
IF IT'S NEWS CALL 9241

- - .- = :-.=_ .. .. .. . :-,,, .


WHAT ABOUT THE YANKEES ?-Mel Allen, noted Yankees sports announeer, engages in some lively talk with the men of MCB-7 at their chow hall.
The Gitmo Gazette's mission is to inform and entetain all hands and to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare and contentment of personnel.
The Gitmo Gazette is published at the Naval Base in accordance with NavExos P85, revised July, 1958 and financed with non-appropriated funds at no cost to the government.
RADM J. W. DAVIS------------------------ComNavBase
LCDR J. F. LLOYD-----------------------Officer-Advisor
John ANDREN, JOSN----------------------------Editor
Armed Forces Press Service (AFPS) may not be reprinted without the written permission of Armed Forces Press Service. Material in the paper may no the reprinted unless authorization is obtained from the editor. All photograph herein are official Navy photographs unless otherwise specified. The opinions or statements made in articles published herein are those of the writers and are not in any case to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of the Commanding Officer or of the Navy Department.


HEY THERE -Eddie Fisher has them smiling during his recent appearance at NavSta Movie Lyceum. "The melodious one" was a big hit with both young and old.


January 20, 1963


Page Two


SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT







January20, 193ISUNDAISUPPLMENT Pae Thre


WOMAN'S


WORLD

by Jackie Lloyd
Have you read this month's Reader's
Digest book condensation "How the Kremlin Took Over Cuba?" Here is an excellent, comprehensive study of the Soviet takeover of Castro's Cuba during the years 1959-62, and is recommended reading for everyone interested in the affairs of Cuba. The authors, James Monahan and Kenneth 0. Gilmore; visited our Naval Base last May, and in my opinion, they have contributed one of the best writings so far accomplished
on the current Cuban situation.
I had a very pleasant chat with one our charming ladies of the base the
other day. "You can't imagine my embarrassment," said she, "when I caught the toe of those silly new shoes, and down I stumbled, right in front of everyone!" All of which-Reader's Digest and the charming lady-reminds me of a
story.
It is late April, 1962, Washington, D.C.
We are on leave, due to depart for Norfolk in the afternoon. Mr. Gilmore, the same as mentioned above, telephoned for a briefing prior to his trip to Guantanamo the following week. Time is short and Jim suggested lunch. Circumstances beyond our control found us staying at the very fine, traditional SheratonCarlton Hotel. "It won't cost too much,"
said a good friend and long-time D. C, resident. "Just don't eat there! Expensive!"
Mr. Gilmore arrives at 12:00-suggests
lunch at the hotel. But our friend's words


'I3kctptcin 's


COrner
CHAPLAIN A. F. MENDOSA
"Queen of Virtues"
There are many definitions of charity
to be found in our dictionaries. These may include "- --the practice of philanthropy, - -burying wealth with the dead person, - --good works, - heavenly reward for the giver,- -spiritual benevolence, or christian love."


Joining with Saint Paul we would
classify charity as the queen of virtues, S ving God above all things for His sake,
ving our neighbor as ourselves for the
love of God. Charity causes the divine friendship uniting us to God and neighbor in mutual affection.


ring loud in our ears, and we so state. "Time is of essence," Mr. Gilmore assures us, "and the company provides for just such situations. Come on, let's go into the dining room!"
"Into the dining room- He's kidding!" say I to myself. "The Flagstaff Room downstairs maybe-but not the fancy dining room!" Jim and I had taken a peek the evening before. Such elegance!
Maybe I should change my clothes? Mr. Gilmore and Jim could talk while they wait! They are agreeable. I hustle along to our room. What shall TLwear? My good suit? There-that's better!
Mr. Gilmore and Jim stand when I return! It's nice to be a woman! We are greeted in the dining room by the dignified maitre d'hotel. Can he tell the country cousins have come to town? Red carpeting, crystal chandeliers, gleaming silver! A rapid scan of the room revealed a handful of patrons and three times as many waiters!
We are' shown to a table to the far side of the room--Jim and I sit alongside the wall on a velvet, bench-type seat where we can see everything. Mr. Gilmore is across from Jim. The menus are table-sized. Conversation is rapid and interesting. How lucky are we from Guantanamo-to be in an area of worldwide interest. Our individual parts in the affairs of the world may not be earthshaking-however, we are at least a part.
Time flies. We've got to catch that plane. The momentum gains speed and words spill out on top of-eachother. No time for dessert. The check? Oh yes, the check. Guantanamo ceases to be the topic of coversation, and preparations are in order to depart. Jim and Mr. Gilmore rise. Jim is getting us organized.

Through charity we are brought closer to God, our love. Faith involves things not seen, hope concerns that which is not yet possessed but the love of charity centers on that which we do already possess.
True love (charity) brings about a true unselfish friendship, not limited to well-wishing but extending to willing sacrifice. We realize full well that we cannot really add anything to God. We can tend to His greater glory and retain His friendship by practicing the virtue of charity in a most acceptable way.

"He that abideth in charity abideth


in God and God in him."
May God have you.
"SEE YOU IN CHURCH"


"I'll check us out.., you finish the packing.. oh yes, please call Tad Szulc... number on the pad by the-phone. . . tell him..." And as a good and dutiful wife, I am listening intently. Never hdJim received such rapt attention--I'm not missing a word-I know we have to hurry-I'm sliding along the bench in order to get up from the table-but I'm looking at Jim, who is standing now.. suddenly.., where is the bench? I'm on the floor!

There isn't a soul in that lavish dining room that doesn't know I am sitting on the floor. My astonished husband has a momentary delayed reaction-he is still looking at where I was! Mr. Gilmore gallantly isn't looking. The men to our right are chuckling behind their napkins. Jim finally (it's been centuries) offers me his hand. I clamber to my feet. We sprint out. On reaching the door, I glimpse our expressions in a mirror. How funny we look, and yet, not half so funny as those few moments before! I start to giggle.., we all start to laugh as we hurry to the lobby.

Mr. Gilmore and Mr. Monahan visited Guantanamo the following week. We went to the club for dinner, at which time I was given an opportunity.to prove sitting on the floor is not my customary dining out procedure,

P.S. Don't miss January's Reader's Digest!

P.S.S. Note to our charming lady: it happens to all of us!




Know Your America
The U. S. Marine Band has played at every presidential inauguration since Jefferson's time.


The Polars-firing submarine ,Henry Clay (SSBN-625) was launched recently at the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company, Newport News, Va. She is 425 feet long and has a 27-foot, 9-inch beam.


-In 1916 St. Viator (Ind.) defeated Lane College (Chicago) in one of football's highest scoring games, 205-0. Leo Schlick paced the victors by scoring 12 touchdowns and kicking 28 of 29 extra points, for a game-seoring record.


Page Three


January 20, 1963


SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT







Page Four SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT January 20, 1963


by Chief George Thompson

Saturday the 26th, a Track and Field meet will be held at Cooper Field. Anyone is eligible to enter the meet and is most cordially invited. Track events will include the 50 and 100 yard dash; the 220 yard dash; the 440 and the 880 yard runs; the 120 yard low hurdles; the 440 and the 880 yard relays, plus the one and two mile runs.
The Field events include the shotput, discus, hammerthrow, the javelin, the broad jump and the high jumps.
Each entrant is allowed to enter 2 track events and 2 field events, and one relay or an equal equivalent. If heats are necessary they will be run off on Saturday morning.
All entries must be in the Naval Station Special Services Office prior to 1600, the 24th of January. Individual entries may be submited as well as team entries.
Starting time for the meet will of course depend upon the number of entries received, but it is planned to hold as much of the meet as possible under the lights. Winter Softball resumed play Thursday evening and will continue at least until the beginning of the Baseball season, which should be the first week in March.
A fine Boxing card was enjoyed by Gitmo Bay fight fans last Sunday evening. Boxers from the Marine Barracks, Naval Air Station, Leeward Point Security Marines and MCB-7 fought through eight action packed bouts. Proceso Solomon from NAS and Cebu City in the Phillippine Isles and Marshall Davis of the Marine Barracks and Kansas City, Mo., scored the two knockouts of the evening. Solomon scoring his in 1:15 of the second round, Davis KO'd his opponent in 1:18 of the third round. Tommy Hills of Marine Barracks was voted the fighter of the evening for his split decision victory over Paul Becker of the NAS.
The Intercommand Golf Tournament commences the first of February.


STRENGTH AT GITMO - One of the several bunkers is seen-erected since the height of "the crisis". Perhaps you've noticed them as you drive down Sherman Avenue. Constructionmen of MCB-7 are responsible.


"WHAM" -A fiine battle to the finish. Marshall Davis KO's opponent in 1:18 seconds of the third round.


PWC Donates "Crisis" Money

Employees of both military and civilian status at the Public Works Center took up a collection recently among themselves and donated a total of $326.00 to the junior and senior classes of the William T. Sampson High School. The donation was presented on December 19, 1962, by Captain J.D. Burky, C.Oi P.W.C.
The motivation behind the generous donation is to help make up for the money the classes would have made if the "Cuban crisis" had not occurred. Each class received a total of $163.00. The money is to be used by the individual classes as they see fit.


(L-R) Mr. Murphy, Superintendent of Schools, Bob Hendrick-' son, President Junior class, Captain J. D. Burky, Commanding Officer, P.W.C., Skip Rumble, Vice President, Senior class and Mr. L. West, Principle, during grant presentations.


January 20, 1963


Page Four


SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT




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PAGE 1

A VOICE OF THE PEOPLE VOL. II, NO. 2 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba January 20, 1963 A dmiral Davis Holds First Inspection Saturday morning, January 12, 1963, Rear Admiral James W. Davis Commander Naval Base held his first inspection of the Naval Station personnel. The inspection was held on Bay Hill and marked the first command inspection by our new Naval Base Commander since taking command December 22, 1962. The inspection party was led by Admiral Davis, followed by Captain George C. Ball, Jr., Commanding Officer Naval Station, and Naval Station Executive Officer L. H. Roark. The Admiral made a thorough inspection of the ranks, and commented on neatness of individual uniforms. He concluded that on the whole he was well pleased with the over-all appearance of the officers and men. At the close of the inspection, medals and letters of commendation were awarded, many of which were a direct result of the "Cuban crisis". Naval Station post office personnel received letters of commendation from Admiral Davis for outstanding performance of professional duties during the ISTR"crisis" and the heavy Christmas season. James W. Davis, COMNAVBASE, is seen conducting his first crs"anthhevCrimssao. personnel inspection since taking command. The inspection was In all, there were 24 medals and awards presented, too held on Bay Hill. The Admiral remarked favorably on the nmru omnin unifrms.numerous to mention. uniforms. CONTEST Due to the shortage of entries in our "name the paper contest", the deadline is being reset and moved up to midnight Wednesday, 23 Jan. We are offering a $20 Navy Exchange gift certificate to the person submitting the winning 4 name. There must be at least 100 entries before the h IESHOOTING -Captain G. C. winrsaNICE winner is anall, Jr., CO, NAVSTA, receives rifleman nouncedWELL DONE. -K. Murphy, PCCS, receives a "well done" medal from Admiral Davis. Capt. Ball Wa t ch your WELDN. KMupy CSreivsawldo" commented his last rifleman award was daily Gazette for from Admiral Davis. Chief Murphy is in charge of the Post .entry blanks. Office Department at the Naval Station. All other members of the post office received letters of commendation. I

PAGE 2

Eddie Fisher, Mel Allen Grace Citmo Shores I It was a long holiday period for Gitmoites, lasting long after the departure of Ed Sullivan. Saturday, January 5, saw the arrival of the well-known singing star Eddie Fisher for a one day stand. Eddie had just completed a two week engagement at San Juan and requested to come on the base and entertain. It was a busy day for the versatile performer, starting at noon with his arrival at McCalla. Adm. J. W. Davis, COMNAVABASE, was on hand to welcome him. That night he apepared at the Naval Station Movie Lyceum, performing for an hour and half. The toughest aspect of show business is appearing before "live" audiences. Eddie proved he's a past master in the business, singing such favorites as "Love Is A Lovely Thing," "Rigth In Your Own Back Yard," "Oh My Papa," and the Spanish version of "Never On Sunday." However, his versatile renditions didn't stop there. One number was a version of "Mack The Knife" in, of all things, Greek. Eddie's next stop was the Teenage Club. There, he signed autographs and record covers for the teenagers. Sunday morning, Mr: Fisher paid a visit to the Naval Hospital, helping to boost the morale of those who were unable to attend his performance the preceeding evening. Eddie made an entertaining appearance on WGBY-TV and was quite frank on the many aspects of his career. Sample: When asked in which medium he most enjoyed working-pictures, television or live show business-"as long as I have been in this business, I believe that live entertaining is the toughest and, I might add, the most exciting and rewarding. ..if an audience likes you, they let you know it." This was Eddie's second visit to Gitmo his first being 1953 while serving a two year enlistment in the Army as a Special Services entertainer. The following week, Mel Allen, one of the country's best sports announcers, paid us a visit, also for a day. The highlight of Mel's stay on the Naval Base was an hour and a half-long appearance on WGBY-TV during which he showed some films on the World Series and commented on just about anything in the sports world. During his stay, he managed to get in visits to the Naval Hospital and out to MCB-7 where he had lunch with the "crew."1 Mel was outspoken, as usual, on sports. Sample comment: "I thought the officiating at the Rose Bowl game was some of the worst I've ever seen." He added that he was referring not to the fairness of the calls, but to the seeming inability of the officials to agree unanimously on anything. The Public Information Office is striving to gather more local news for di* semination by all of our media (WGB Radio-TV and Gitmo Gazette). Call the Public Information Office when you have a newsworthy item of happenings around the base. +-. IF IT'S NEWS CALL 9247 WHAT ABOUT THE YANKEES?-Mel Allen, noted Yankees sports announcer, engages in some lively talk with the men of MCB-7 at their chow hall. The Gitmo Gazette's mission is to inform and entetain all hands and Lo serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare and contentment of personnel. The Gitmo Gazette is published at the Naval Base in accordance with NayExos P35, revised July, 1958 and financed with non-appropriated funds at no cost to the government. RADM J. W. DAVIS------------------------ComNavBase LCDR J. F. LLOYD-----------------------Officer-Advisor John ANDREN, JOSN _-----------------------------Editor Armed Forces Press Service (AFPS) may not be reprinted without the written permission of Armed Forces Press Service. Material in the paper may no tbe reprinted unless authorization is obtained from the editor. All photograph herein are official Navy photographs unless otherwise specified. The opinions or statements made in articles published herein are those of the writers and are not in any case to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of the Commanding Officer or of the Navy Department. HEY THERE -Eddie Fisher has them smiling during his recent appearance at NavSta Movie Lyceum. "The melodious one" was a big hit with both young and old. January 20, 1963 Page Two SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT

PAGE 3

January 20, 1963 SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT Page Three WOMAN'S WORLD by Jackie Lloyd Have you read this month's Reader's Digest book condensation "How the Kremlin Took Over Cuba?" Here is an excellent, comprehensive study of the Soviet takeover of Castro's Cuba during the years 1959-62, and is recommended reading for everyone interested in the affairs of Cuba. The authors, James Monahan and Kenneth 0. Gilmore; visited our Naval Base last May, and in my opinion, they have contributed one of the best writings so far accomplished on the current Cuban situation. I had a very pleasant chat with one our charming ladies of the base the other day. "You can't imagine my embarrassment," said she, "when I caught the toe of those silly new shoes, and down I stumbled, right in front of everyone!" All of which-Reader's Digest and the charming lady-reminds me of a story. It is late April, 1962, Washington, D.C. We are on leave, due to depart for Norfolk in the afternoon. Mr. Gilmore, the same as mentioned above, telephoned for a briefing prior to his trip to Guantanamo the following week. Time is short and Jim suggested lunch. Circumstances beyond our control found us staying at the very fine, traditional SheratonCarlton Hotel. "It won't cost too much," said a good friend and long-time D. C. resident. "Just don't eat there! Expensive!" Mr. Gilmore arrives at 12:00-suggests lunch at the hotel. But our friend's words t3kcpLn 's o omer CHAPLAIN A. F. MENDOSA "Queen of Virtues" There are many definitions of charity to be found in our dictionaries. These may include "-the practice of philanthropy, --burying wealth with the dead person, --good works, -heavenly reward for the giver, --spiritual benevolence, or christian love." Joining with Saint Paul we would classify charity as the queen of virtues, eving God above all things for His sake, ving our neighbor as ourselves for the love of God. Charity causes the divine friendship uniting us to God and neighbor in mutual affection. ring loud in our ears, and we so state. "Time is of essence," Mr. Gilmore assures us, "and the company provides for just such situations. Come on, let's go into the dining room!" "Into the dining roomHe's kidding!" say I to myself. "The Flagstaff Room downstairs maybe-but not the fancy dining room!" Jim and I had taken a peek the evening before. Such elegance! Maybe I should change my clothes? Mr. Gilmore and Jim could talk while they wait! They are agreeable. I hustle along to our room. What shall T wear? My good suit? There-that's better! Mr. Gilmore and Jim stand when I return! It's nice to be a woman! We are greeted in the dining room by the dignified maitre d'hotel. Can he tell the country cousins have come to town? Red carpeting, crystal chandeliers, gleaming silver! A rapid scan of the room revealed a handful of patrons and three times as many waiters! We are shown to a table to the far side of the room--Jim and I sit alongside the wall on a velvet, bench-type seat where we can see everything. Mr. Gilmore is across from Jim. The menus are table-sized. Conversation is rapid and interesting. How lucky are we from Guantanamo-to be in an area of worldwide interest. Our individual parts in the affairs of the world may not be earthshaking-however, we are at least a part. Time flies. We've got to catch that plane. The momentum gains speed and words spill out on top of eachother. No time for dessert. The check? Oh yes, the check. Guantanamo ceases to be the topic of coversation, and preparations are in order to depart. Jim and Mr. Gilmore rise. Jim is getting us organized. Through charity we are brought closer to God, our love. Faith involves things not seen, hope concerns that which is not yet possessed but the love of charity centers on that which we do already possess. True love (charity) brings about a true unselfish friendship, not limited to well-wishing but extending to willing sacrifice. We realize full well that we cannot really add anything to God. We can tend to His greater glory and retain His friendship by practicing the virtue of charity in a most acceptable way. "He that abideth in charity abideth in God and God in him." May God have you. "SEE YOU IN CHURCH" "I'll check us out. ..you finish the packing. ..oh yes, please call Tad Szulc. .. number on the pad by the phone. ..tell him. .." And as a good and dutiful wife, I am listening intently. Never had Jim received such rapt attention-I'm not missing a word-I know we have to hurry-I'm sliding along the bench in order to get up from the table-but I'm looking at Jim, who is standing now. .. suddenly. ..where is the bench? I'm on the floor! There isn't a soul in that lavish dining room that doesn't know I am sitting on the floor. My astonished husband has a momentary delayed reaction-he is still looking at where I was! Mr. Gilmore gallantly isn't looking. The men to our right are chuckling behind their napkins. Jim finally (it's been centuries) offers me his hand. I clamber to my feet. We sprint out. On reaching the door, I glimpse our expressions in a mirror. How funny we look, and yet, not half so funny as those few moments before! I start to giggle. ..we all start to laugh as we hurry to the lobby. Mr. Gilmore and Mr. Monahan visited Guantanamo the following week. We went to the club for dinner, at which time I was given an opportunity to prove sitting on the floor is not my customary dining out procedure. P.S. Don't miss January's Reader's Digest! P.S.S. Note to our charming lady:it happens to all of us! Know Your America The U. S. Marine Band has played at every presidential inauguration since Jefferson's time. The Polars-firing submarine Henry Clay (SSBN-625) was launched recently at the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company, Newport News, Va. She is 425 feet long and has a 27-foot, 9-inch beam. In 1916 St. Viator (Ind.) defeated Lane College (Chicago) in one of football's highest scoring games, 205-0. Leo Schlick paced the victors by scoring 12 touchdowns and kicking 28 of 29 extra points, for a game-storing record. Page Three January 20, 1963 SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT

PAGE 4

Page Pour SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT January 20, 1963 by Chief George Thompson Saturday the 26th, a Track and Field meet will be held at Cooper Field. Anyone is eligible to enter the meet and is most cordially invited. Track events will include the 50 and 100 yard dash; the 220 yard dash; the 440 and the 880 yard runs; the 120 yard low hurdles; the 440 and the 880 yard relays, plus the one and two mile runs. The Field events include the shotput, discus, hammerthrow, the javelin, the broad jump and the high jumps. Each entrant is allowed to enter 2 track events and 2 field events, and one relay or an equal equivalent. If heats are necessary they will be run off on Saturday morning. All entries must be in the Naval Station Special Services Office prior to 1600, the 24th of January. Individual entries may be submited as well as team entries. Starting time for the meet will of course depend upon the number of entries received, but it is planned to hold as much of the meet as possible under the lights. Winter Softball resumed play Thursday evening and will continue at least until the beginning of the Baseball season, which should be the first week in March. A fine Boxing card was enjoyed by Gitmo Bay fight fans last Sunday evening. Boxers from the Marine Barracks, Naval Air Station, Leeward Point Security Marines and MCB-7 fought through eight action packed bouts. Proceso Solomon from NAS and Cebu City in the Phillippine Isles and Marshall Davis of the Marine Barracks and Kansas City, Mo., scored the two knockouts of the evening. Solomon scoring his in 1:15 of the second round, Davis KO'd his opponent in 1:18 of the third round. Tommy Hills of Marine Barracks was voted the fighter of the evening for his split decision victory over Paul Becker of the NAS. The Intercommand Golf Tournament commences the first of February. STRENGTH AT GITMO -One of the several bunkers is seen-erected since the height of "the crisis". Perhaps you've noticed them as you drive down Sherman Avenue. Construetionmen of MCB-7 are responsible. "WHAM" -A fine battle to the finish. Marshall Davis KO's opponent in 1:18 seconds of the third round. PWC Donates "Crisis" Money Employees of both military and civilian status at the Public Works Center took up a collection recently among themselves and donated a total of $326.00 to the junior and senior classes of the William T. Sampson High School. The donation was presented on December 19, 1962, by Captain J. D. Burky, C.O P.W.C. The motivation behind the generous donation is to help make up for the money the classes would have made if the "Cuban crisis" had not occurred. Each class received a total of $163.00. The money is to be used by the individual classes as they see fit. (L-R) Mr. Murphy, Superintendent of Schools, Bob Hendrickson, President Junior class, Captain J. D. Burky, Commanding Officer, P.W.C., Skip Rumble, Vice President, Senior class and Mr. L. West, Principle, during grant presentations. January 20, 1963 Page Four SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT