Citation
Sunday Supplement

Material Information

Title:
Sunday Supplement
Creator:
U.S. Naval Base
Place of Publication:
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Publisher:
U.S. Naval Base
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright, Sunday Supplement. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Related Items

Preceded by:
Indian
Succeeded by:
Gitmo Review
Related Item:
Gitmo Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Gazette
Related Item:
Daily Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Daily Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Bay Gazette

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text











-.Y-A VOIGE OF-cTHE PEOPLE


VOL. II, NO. 1


U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba


January 13, 1963


ADMIRAL DAVIS TAKES COMMAND


"ADM J. W. Davis, USN, new Commanding Officer, is welcomed aboard Guantanamo ;Naval'Base by RADM E. J. O'Donnell.


~CONEST
0 NEED $20? Here's an easy way to get At. All you have to do is to think od a new name for the "Sunday Supplement." We are offering a $20.00 Navy Exchange gift certificate to the person submitting the winning name. There must be at least 100 entries before the
-.wnner will be announced.
Watch your daily Gazette for entry nks. Send all entries to: Editor, Gitmo
:azette, Box 22. Deadline for the contest is midnight, Wednesday, January 16, 1963-only three more days left. The winner will be announced in the January 20 issue.


IN THIS ISSUE

Page 2 -Woman's World
Chaplain's Corner Page 3- Pan Departs
In the spirit of giving. Page 4- HoLiday Entertainment Page 5 -"Gifts for Gitmo"
Dependents Return Page 6- Sports Roundup


The Public Information Office is striving to gather more local news for dissemination by all of our media (WGBY Radio-TV and Gitmo Gazette). Call the Public Information Office when you have a newsworthy item of happenings around the base.


CHANGE OF


COMMAND CEREMONIES

RADM J. W. Davis, USN, became our 14th Commander Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, in colorful change of command ceremonies held here on the golf course, December 22.

Hundreds of riffled sailors and Marines passed in review, three squadrons of jets flew overhead, there were two gun salutes, and the Naval Base Band provided traditional marching music as Admiral Davis relieved RADM Edward J. O'Donnell, USN, who had been at this post for the past two years.

Upon taking command RADM Davis told an audience of aproximately 500 sailors, Marines and women that he was "sure Guantanamo would carry on in the same way it did under the wise leadership of Admiral O'Donnell."

Admiral Davis took over this vital base in the Caribbean after serving on the staff of the Supreme Allied Commander, Atlantic Fleet, Norfolk, Virginia for 30 months.

Admiral O'Donnell reported to Washington, D. C. for duty in the Department of Defense.

Admiral Davis is entitled to wear the American Defense Service Medal with Bronze "A"; the American Campaign Medal; the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal with three engagement stars; the World War II Victory Medal; and the National Defense Service Medal.

Rear Admiral Davis is married to the former Miss Ruth Steele of Fort Totten, New York. They are the parents of two daughters: Mrs. E. R. York of Selma, North Carolina, and Miss Nina E. Davis now attending the University of North Carolina.


IF IT'S NEWS.., GALL 924?







Page Two SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT January 13, 1963


WOMAN'S


WORLD

by Jackie Lloyd
Calling CQ, calling CQ... and so began each of the approximately three. thousand phone patches run by Guantanamo's .ham radio operators during the evacuation. This gallant group of men made it possible for many families to be reunited, if by voice only, thereby helping to lessen many a tension and anxiety. Ham operators always have served the Guantanamo community above .and beyond the call of duty; the evacuation, however, was truly their greatest performance!
A talk with aficionados such as Chief C. E. Youmans and First Class Pharmacist Mate R. W. Gingell can convince even the most unradio-minded individual (already we are in the space age and I still can't understand wave lengths and frequencies!) that here is a hobby fun to try. And wives Betty and Rochelle are just as enthusiastic as their husbands! "It is very rewarding �to be able to help in time of need," Bety explained, "and this is a hobby that'aImily can do together." "Betty and I are working for our licenses," Rochelle added. "When our husbands go on sea duty, we will be able to talk to them!" What are the requirements to obtain a license? First, an operator must be able to send and receive code at thirteen words per minute. Second, he must pass a test on basic electronics and FCC regulations. With sufficient texts, time and equipment, a license can be achieved in about four months.
(Continued next column)

U. S. NAVAL BASE
GUANTANAMO BAY, CUBA
The Gitmo Gazette's mission is to inform and entertain all hands and to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare and contentment of personnel. The Gitmo Gazette is published at the Naval B~ase in accordance with NavExos P35. revised July, 1958 and financed with non-appropriated funds at no ceost to the government. RADM J. W. DAVIS ...ComNavBase LCDR J, F. LLOYD __Officer-Advisor Bill WEDERTZ, J03------Editor
Armed Forces Press Service (AFPS) may not be reprinted without the written permission of Armed Forces Press Service. Material in the paper-i may. not be reprinted unless authorization is Obtained from the editor. All photographs herein


are official Navy photographs unless otherwise specified.
The opinions or statements made in articles published herein are those of the writers and are not in any case to 'be construed as official 'or as reflecting the views of the Commanding Officer or of the Navy Department.
$ * *


WOMAN'S WORLD (Cont'd)
How much money for equipment? "With the purchase of government surplus, you can go on the air for as little as twenty-five dollars," Chief Youmans told'me. My glance toward his fabulous set must have indicated disbelief "Well, you can spend a great deal more," he grinned.
Chief Youmans has had a ham radio. station since 1948 in such various places as West Palm Beach, Trinidad, Tokyo and Maryland. How does Guantanamo differ from the other places? "We have a greater demand for our services," was' his reply. Does he have advice for prospective subscribers?-"Only - that we can't guarantee contact. Sometimes people don't understand this." To prove this statement, Rochelle told her:Nashville story. "One night 'Gin' had an emergency call-he tried for six hours to contact Nashville-to no avail. Finally, he and our friend gave up.'Then, the next day when 'Gin' was trying to reach another part of the country, wouldn't you know it, he couldn't get anything but. .. Tennessee!"
One of the most interesting sidelights of ham operating are the QSL cards. These are sent out as confirmation of contact after operators have spoken to each other for the first time. Chief Youmans has a stack of cards thatwould: make an IBM machine take- a deep breath-from such far-away places-as Poland, Bolivia, Australia, France (this one was in braille), Greenland, Ghana West Africa, and. ad infinitum. There are cards from even submarines and airplanes! "We estimate five dollars per month for stamps and cards," Betty told me.
The services of ham radio are free and done completely on the operator's own time. Three stations for the single men are maintained at Bay Hill, Leeward Point, and the Marine Barracks. Ham operating is a worldwide fraternity with participants from all walks of life. There are clubs, publications (women have their own sections in these publications), awards and conferences.
During the evacuation "Gin" moved his radio set into the pharmacy, and was off to a great start with four-hundred-and-twenty-five calls to his credit. Lt. Glare Potter placed some two hundred calls. "But let us say this," both Chief Youmans and "Gin" were quick to point out, "Never would we have accomplished these calls if it had not been for the


willing assistance of our stateside operators.'"7.
L oks.to me like another example of teamwork and cooperation, with us at Guantanamo enjoying the benefits.

(Continued to Page Six)


CHAPLAIN'S
CGORNER-


S


CHAPLAIN G. H. SARGENT
EASY DOES IT
As our modern living becomes more intricate and involved it gathers weight and speed until it sometimes seems like a.' monster we have created but can't control. Everywhere the tension tightens, life becomes so filled with anxiety that the big question is not so much how to succeed as how to keep one's soul alive.
A French writer traveled to America in 1830 to study the American, whom he classified as "a new breed of man on the earth." The French visitor the restless aggressiveness of our people. "The American," he said, "is so restless. he has even invented a chair, calecrocking chair, in which he can 'move while he sits."
If this French observer could see us now, he would be forced to revise upward his conclusions, as the tempo has mounted.
A careful and consistent cultivation of a relaxed mental attitude is important in reducing tension. Athletes know that trying too hard throws them off their timing.
A man who had coached several championship college basketball teams told me that he attributed a part of his success to the fact that he was able to teach his players how to relax. Out of his experience, he told me, he had discovered that the fine coordination which characterizes the great men of sport is attained by the principle of "taking the game in stride, remembering tha, e* does it."
Just so we in playing the game of life do need to practice mental relaxalation. And we have gone a long way toward such relaxation when we begin to take the game of life in stride, and to remember-that "easy does it."
This is a lesson that has been taught by the sages of all ages. Turning, to the wisest guide book of them all we read, "In quietness and confidence shall be your strength."


Ideas are funny things. They won't work unless you do.

Remember-the only difference between stumbling blocks and steppingstones the way you use them. � ,

Actually there's only a slight difference


between keeping your chin up and sticking your neck out, but it's worth knowing.


January 13, 1963


Pa ge Two


SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT







January 13, 1963 SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT Page ThrQQ


PFC Stephen Handley is shown with the' ageless "Satchmo". "Dream Along With Me". Popular Perry Como featured Right L/CP Louis Ekuczarski looks on. such names as Dorthey Collins, Jean Carroll, Senor Wences the Peter Genero Dancers and the Ray Charles Singers.



H OLIDAY ENTERTAINME NT


Ed Sullivan at Gitmo obviously pleased with the show.


Connie Francis and Carol Lawrence were popular hits in the Sullivan Show. Here they are seen belting out a duet number.


SULLIVAN, COMO

TROUPES ENTERTAIN

December turned out to be a starstudded month for military and civilian personnel of the Naval Base. Leading off the parade-of-stars was Perry Como and his troupe, followed by Ed Sullivan and his cast of entertainers. Closing out. the holidays season were two smaller groups; the Eaglairs and "Chasing the Gloom."
Perry Como arrived on the Naval Base December 4, and presented his first four shows at the Naval Station Movie Lyceum. Concluding these performanced his troupe did two additional shows for the Marines on the line, followed by presentations at Leeward Point, the Sea Bee area and the Naval Base Hospital. From the moment Perry first walked on the stage until the end of his final performance, the crowd was his. With Mr. Como's effortless singing ability and completely relaxed attitude the tension that had been taunt a few days before became lax and almost forgotten. His first song set the tone for his entrie visit--one of informality and relaxation. Teamed up with Mr. Como were more big name stars, including comedienne Jean Carroll and ventriloquist Senor Wences, both showed us why they are tops in the field. Singer Dorothy Collins with all of her obvious sincerity in her
(Continued to Page Four)


"The Fontaines", Bobby and Dad, Frank Fontaine, entertain the troops. Bobby is in the Marine Corps and was stationed here during the crisis.


Jack Carter and "Mr. Wigbee".


January 13, 1963


Page Threq


SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT







Page Four SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT January 13, 1963


PAN BEGINS SEA JOURNEY INUII. The yacnht 'AN aeparts uantanamo 'Naval Base after an emergency stop-over here. Inset: Master Ulf Enar Azen, and wife, Gunila, relax aboard the PAN just before their departure.


"PAN" DEPARTS



This giant U. S. Naval Base in the Caribbean has been the haven for many distressed and crippled vessels in the surrounding sea for many years.
The helpful hand again was extended by U. S. Navy here when on December 21, 1962, a 77 year old yacht named PAN of Danish ancestry was brought into the base
1k- ;nv kwnr a #pdelflii1tip 9 ___________42____


aiLt z-lviua i; ,u unaAAV oa -2" miles from the base.
The yacht was enroute from Kingston, Jamaica, to Washington D. C., at the time. The PAN was found seaworthy on January 2, 1963, when she got underway to continue her northern journey. The voyage was short lived as she returned to Guantanamo Bay on January 3 with a broken coupling on the propeller shaft, having sailed only 15 miles from the base. She departed the Naval Base again on the afternoon of January 4 after repairs were made to her shaft.
Her original distress call came on December 21, 1962, when during heavy seas the vessel's caulking gave way and she began to ship water more rapidly than could be handled. She also experienced difficulty in her electrical wiring system making navigation extremely hazardous.
The Master of the vessel, Ulf Enar Azen, requested immediate assistance. The U. S. Navy here, who have on many occasions assisted vessels of all sizes and vintage in need of help, responded


quickly.
A Navy sea going tug was dispatched as the first call was received at the Naval headquarters. Within a few hours, the PAN with her crew of four were safely docked at the Naval Base.
Master Ulf Enar Azen and his lovely wife, Gunila, both of Stockholm, Sweden, along with two Jamaican crew members, were hosted by Navy personnel during their unexpected Christmas in Guantanamo Bay.
The PAN was built in Odense, Denmark in 1886 as a revenue, cutter. She was converted in 1911 to a double ended Gaff Ketch which is her present classification. It was reported that the vessel weighs approximately 42 tons and is now 60 feet long after her conversion.
The PAN departed "Gitmo" the second time on January 4 and continued to sail northward to Washington, D. C., where the ship will be turned over to its owner Commander Richard T. Theobold of 3606 Norton Place, Washingotn 16, D. C. It was reported that Commander Theobold
(Continued to Page Six)


IN THE SPIRIT OF GIVING,
On Christmas Eve, a group of six smalW children rode through the Naval Base housing areas singing Christmas carols. In the spirit of Christmas, some of the people being entertained, gave the children candy and even some loose change.
The carolers were composed of three boys and three girls, aging from 8 to 12. Their names: Winified and Anita Lewis, Martha Gualt, Michael Heaberlin and Bobby and John Noll.
Early Christmas morning young John Noll appeared at the Naval Base Hospital. He strode up to the Master-atArms desk and said, "My name is John Noll. Me and some of my friends were out singing Christmas songs last night, some of the people gave us this stuff." John handed a parcel to veteran corp* man, Warren Williams, HM1, and coW tinued, "We would like to give this to all of the patients in the hospital that didn't have too nice a Christmas. Would you please see that they get this?"
John then thanked Williams and left. Upon open the sack, Williams found it full of candy, and in the envelope was $2.00 in loose change.
The patients would like too thank all of these children for their thoughtfulness and true Christmas spirit.

HOLIDAY ENTERTAINMENT
(Continued from Page Three)
singing and actions, backed up by the Peter Genero dancers and the Ray Charles singers all helped to give our holiday season the zestful beginning that carried us through the entire month of December.
As December was nearing its end Ed Sullivan and his variety troupe broug] new life into the old year. Louis "Satc mo" Armstrong and his band, Connie Francis, Jack Carter, Carol Lawrence and Frank Fontaine were among the performers who appeared with the show.
Jack Cater presented a fascinating comedy monologue. Carol Lawrence, who created the role of Maria in the Broadway musical, "West Side Story," and recently played a dramatic role on Broadway in "Night Life" sang several numbers.
Among the show's highlights were Connie Francis and Carol Lawrence singing a medley to the audience. There selections all had "You" in the title and included "It Had To Be You" and "You Made Me Love You." Miss Francis also


sang a solo medley of country and western songs. Jack Fontaine presented his famous comedy routine about an Irish sweepstakes winner, backed up by his son Bob, a 20 year old Marine who was temporarity station here during the crisis.


Page Four


SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT


January 13, 1963







Janiiirv ig. 1968 SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT Page Five


DEPENDENTS


RETURN


UNLOADING A PLANE full of "Gifts for Gitmo", from the people of Houston,
Texas are men of the Naval Base.


".GIFTS FOR GITMO"

"Gifts for Gitmo" was dramatically
executed on December 21, with the arrival of a plane-load of presents collected by civic and military groups of Houston, Texas-including the Navy League, The American Legion, The American Red Cross and the Houston Chamber of
Commerce.
The project was spearheaded by Bob
Byron of KPRC Radio and TV Station
Houston. Once the project was made W blic other groups took up the cause.
The gifts were gathered through Monday, December 17 and airlifted to the base by Naval Reserve planes and crews.
Many gifts were distributed to single men E-5 and below right at the plane and the remainder at the old Community
Auditorium on Marina Point.
The gifts included books, wrist watches, pen and pencil sets, basketballs, horseshoe, volleyball and badmitten sets.
The people of Houston sent the following Christmas greeting:
"We hope you accept this gift as a
symbol that you are not forgotten. Someone at home appreciates you, thanks you, wishes you the happiest holiday season, Wd hopes you will soon be back home. od luck... and God bless you."
The fact the idea was initiated in
the first place and carried through in such magnificent completion is a tribute to all of the fine people who made it
possible.


2,200 ARRIVE

FOR HOLIDAYS
by Steve LeShay, JOSN
All the ingredients were there: smiles, tears, joy, relief, expectation to make the USNS GEIGER's arrival in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, Friday, December 14, 1962, "the news story of the year." For aboard that ship were 400 dependents hastily evacuated last October during the outset of the Cuban crisis.
From the moment the signal tower on McCalla Hill hoisted the flags "seen around the world" (pennant flags spelling out "Welcome home, dependents" in the international code of signals)-until the vessel docked at Pier Bravo, the ordeal of waiting became clearly visible on all faces, it was hard to believe that it was just two months ago that the dependents


HOME AT LAST! Lee Ward, IC2, hugs his wife, Glenda, after her arrival aboard a MSTS plane here on December 11.


HAPPILY REUNITED is CDR Andrew J. Rucker, with his wife, Nancy, their two daughters, "Candy" and Lynn and son, Charles, after their return flight from the States.


AW DAD, WHAT ABOUT ME? George W. K. Stewart, DT2, welcomes back his wife, Bernice, and Danny, their 10-monthold son, as hey arrive aboard the USNS GEIGER on December 14.

left Gitmo. No one expected to have a very merry Christmas then. The GEIGER's arrival with its "Special Christmas gift" to Gitmo helped change all that.
We remember all too clearly that day the USNS UPSHUR departed Gitmo with hundreds of evacuees aboard. Their faces lining the rails mirrored the best of America-shining hope and faith that things would turn out' for the best. On the day the GEIGER sailed into Guantanamo Bay, that faith and hope was justified.
Escorted by tugs streaming jets of red, white and green water, jets soaring overhead, and helicopters hovering nearby, the ship was first sighted at 2:06 p.m. At precisely that moment the sun broke through the overcast sky. As the ship neared the dock, children leaned over rails hoping to get a glimpse of "Daddy." Wives shaded their eyes and waved frantically when they spotted their loved ones.
On the pier, the scene was bedlam, but organized bedlam, as husbands strained their eyes searching the rails of the ship; bands struck up lively tunes, cameras buzzed and clicked, friends and husbands waved banners reading: "Hi Honey, Dinner's Defrosting," "Welcome Back to Bachelor Flat," and "Don't Worry Kids, Santa Will Find You."
And sure enough as the first wife and child hastened down the gangplank Santa Claus was on hand to welcome them back too.
This reporter can not express the sheer joy which overwhelmed him watching the happiness of families being reunited once again. It was impossible to take the entire picture into one panoramic view... as each wife and child hurried off the
(Continued to Page Six)


Page 'Five


SU NDAY SUPPLEMENT


J .-in i ' ir v I1S,. 19 6 f







Page Six SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT January 13, 1963


Welcome everyone to Guantanamo Bay's Sports year 1963. It's our belief at the Naval Station Special Services Department that sometime during the year a sports event will appear on our yearly sports calendar that will interest you, either as a spectator or as a participant. Of course, to those who are more athletically inclined, this sports year will be like most others, moving along from one sports event to another as the year progresses.
Now underway, here on the Naval Base, is basketball, the No. 2 fall sport, being enjoyed by nine teams which comprise the Basewide League. The Naval Hospital is the defending champion and unless Glen Fitch and the long shooting Medics can be stopped they look to be the base's best in '63, although MCB-7 was the pre-season champion, defeating the Naval Security Group in the final pre-season. Basketball season should be completed by the first of March.
During basketball season, tennis and horseshoe pitching will get underway with tennis pre-season commencing on the 14th of February and the horseshoe pitchers getting into action on the 15th of February. Singles and doubles tournaments will be afforded participants in both events.
Immediately following basketball, Cooper Field will be ready for the commencement of the 1963 baseball season, which this year will see two park improvements, one being the installation of drinking fountains in either dugout and new restroom facilities adjacent to the right field foul line. An item that has been needed at Cooper Field for many'years is now a reality. MCB-4 are the defending champs here, but it will be up to MCB-7 to uphold the winning SeaBee tradition as SeaBee teams have been crowned champions for the past three seasons.

Volleyball will make it's appearance on the sports scene in mid-March. This year it's being planned to have all league volleyball games played on court at Marblehead Hall, located behind the gymnasium.

Softball will follow baseball on our sports picture, and should be better than ever this year, with the additional lighting now being installed by the Public Works Center. Softball is usually participated in by more athletes than any other event on the sports calendar. De-


fending champions here are "The Old Chiefs", winners in both 1961 and 1962. It's doubtful they'll be around this year however, their ace hurler, Bill Hutto, having returned to Pensacola. Ken Gossett and his Naval Station Indians look like the team to beat in '63.
Football, the No. 1 fall sport, enjoyed by mililons in the USA, will by the final major sport on the Naval Base sports calendar. The Marine Barracks, have been football champs here the past three seasons, and on the strength of that alone, must be considered the team to beat in '63.
The year 1963 will also see three track & field meets being held here, the first one on the 26th of January at Cooper Field.
The Enlisted Men's Swimming Pool at the Recreation Center will be the site of three Basewide Swimming meets, with the first one being held in midMarch.
Marine Barracks and MCB-8 were cowinners of last year's track & field meet held at the SeaBee athletic area, and MCB-4 the swimming title holders in sports year '62.
Boxing which took over the sports entertainment picture during the crisis, will continue on a regular basis if enough interest is shown.
Bowling and golf, of course, are year round activities that flourish here, as well as yachting, horseback riding, roller skating, bicycling and boating.
Rifle and pistol meets will be held throughout the year. Chief John Ketzler of the NavSta Armory is the gent to contact for further info here.
Improvements made in 1962 to our sports facilities, which we shall enjoy during '63 are the night lighted driving range, the par three golf course, and our new bowling palace with adjacent gymnasium and outdoor basketball, volleyball and handball courts.
Sports year '63 is already off to a good start, with the visit of the very popular N. Y. Yankee sportscaster, Mel Allen, last Thursday.
Everyone on the Naval Base is encouraged by this sportswriter to avail themselves of one or two or as many of these activities as he can comfortably enjoy. Good clean healthy sports entertainment is yours for the asking here at Gitmo.
Enter and enjoy, you'll be glad you did.


by Chief George Thomson


R. W. Gingell Bob Mahoney
Troy Loftis Clare Potter C. E. Youmans Leeward Point Bay Hill Marine Barracks MCB4 & 7


KGABH KG4BQ KG4BJ KG4BA KG4CY _4 KG4AA KG4AN KG4AM KG4AE


PAN DEPARTS
(Continued from Page Four)
purchased the vessel and had made a& rangements for its journey to Washington from Jamaica. Master Azen reported, however, that he may stop at Miami if the weather is not suitable or if he encourters any more difficulties.
It was a happy crew that set sdil on January 4 from Guantanamo Bay, knowing that the U. S. Navy was available to provide assistance in time of need for themselves and others who may in the future need help on the high seas.


DEPENDENTS RETURN
(Continued from Page Five)
ship... as each family was reunited, an individually wonderful human drama unfolded.
A little girl in a green dress caliW toddling down the last few steps of the gangplank. She wore a look of complete bewilderment in her tear-filled eyes. She looked from side to side for her daddy and it wasn't until a chief petty officer came pushing through the crowd and scooped her up into his arms that she finally gave way to her emotions. She burst into tears as she affectionately clung to her father's neck.
A young sailor burst into tears as he saw his wife and family for the first time in two months.
A mother carrying her newborn baby carefully made her way down the gangplank.
A woman leading two toy French poodles followed her.
Children of all ages pointing and shouting "Daddy" and "there he is" also paraded down the walk.
A husky teenager carrying a baskets Christmas gifts above his head followe
Mother after mother, wife after wife, child after child came down those last few steps into outstretched arms as Guantanamo families were happily brough together again.


WOMAN'S WORLD
(Continued from Page Two)
Writer's note: Guantanamo ham operators and their call signs are as follows:


Page Six


SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT


January 13, 1963




Full Text

PAGE 1

A VOICE OF THE PEOPLE SVOL. II, NO. 1 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba January 13, 1963 ADMIRAL DAVIS TAKES COMMAND ADM J. W. Davis, USN, new Commanding Officer, is welcomed aboard Guantanamo Naval Base by RADM E. J. O'Donnell. ~~CONTES NEED $20? Here's an easy way to get %it. All you have to do is to think f a new name for the "Sunday Supplement." We are offering a $20.00 Navy Exchange gift certificate to the person submitting the winning name. There must be at least 100 entries before the winner will be announced. Watch your daily Gazette for entry nks. Send all entries to: Editor, Gitmo *'!zette, Box 22. Deadline for the contest is midnight, Wednesday, January 16, 1963-only three more days left. The winner will be announced in the January 20 issue. IN THIS ISSUE Page 2 -Woman's World Chaplain's Corner Page 3Pan Departs In the spirit of giving. Page 4 -Holiday Entertainment Page 5 -"Gifts for Gitmo" Dependents Return Page 6Sports Roundup The Public Information Office is striving to gather more local news for dissemination by all of our media (WGBY Radio-TV and Gitmo Gazette). Call the Public Information Office when you have a newsworthy item of happenings around the base. CHANGE OF COMMAND CEREMONIES RADM J. W. Davis, USN, became our 14th Commander Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, in colorful change of command ceremonies held here on the golf course, December 22. Hundreds of riffled sailors and Marines passed in review, three squadrons of jets flew overhead, there were two gun salutes, and the Naval Base Band provided traditional marching music as Admiral Davis relieved RADM Edward J. O'Donnell, USN, who had been at this post for the past two years. Upon taking command RADM Davis told an audience of aproximately 500 sailors, Marines and women that he was "sure Guantanamo would carry on in the same way it did under the wise leadership of Admiral O'Donnell." Admiral Davis took over this vital base in the Caribbean after serving on the staff of the Supreme Allied Commander, Atlantic Fleet, Norfolk, Virginia for 30 months. Admiral O'Donnell reported to Washington, D. C. for duty in the Department of Defense. Admiral Davis is entitled to wear the American Defense Service Medal with Bronze "A"; the American Campaign Medal; the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal with three engagement stars; the World War II Victory Medal; and the National Defense Service Medal. Rear Admiral Davis is married to the former Miss Ruth Steele of Fort Totten, New York. They are the parents of two daughters: Mrs. E. R. York of Selma, North Carolina, and Miss Nina E. Davis now attending the University of North Carolina. IF IT'S NEWS.CALL 9241

PAGE 2

Page Two SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT January 13, 1963 WOMAN'S WORLD by Jackie Lloyd Calling CQ, calling CQ. ..and so began each of the approximately three' thousand phone patches run by Guantanamo's ham radio operators during the evacuation. This gallant group of men made it possible for many families to be reunited, if by voice only, thereby helping to lessen many a tension and anxiety. Ham operators always have served the Guantanamo community above and beyond the call of duty; the evacuation, however, was truly their greatest performance! A talk with aficionados such as Chief C. E. Youmans and First Class Pharmacist Mate R. W. Gingell can convince even the most unradio-minded individual (already we are in the space age and I still can't understand wave lengths and frequencies!) that here is a hobby fun to try. And wives Betty and Rochelle are just as enthusiastic as their husbands! "It is very rewarding to be able to help in time of need," Betty explained, "and this is a hobby that7 a~family can do together." "Betty and I are working for our licenses," Rochelle added. "When our husbands go on sea duty, we will be able to talk to them!" What are the requirements to obtain a license? First, an operator must be able to send and receive code at thirteen words per minute. Second, he must pass a test on basic electronics and FCC regulations. With sufficient texts, time and equipment, a license can be achieved in about four months. (Continued next column) U. S. NAVAL BASE GUANTANAMO BAY, CUBA The Gitmo Gazette's mission is to inform and entertain all hands and to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare and contentment of personnel. The Gitmo Gazette is published at the Naval :ae in accordance with NavExos P35 revised July. 1958 and financed with non-appropriated funds at no cost to the government. RADM J. W. DAVIS ComNavBase LCDR J. F. LLOYD Officer-Advisor Bill WEDERTZ, J03 ---------Editor Armed Forces Press Service (AFPS) may not be reprinted without the written permission of Armed Forces Press Service. Material in the paper: may not be reprinted unless authorization is obtained from the editor. All photographs herein are official Navy photographs unless otherwise specified. The opinions or statements made in articles published herein are those of the writers and are not in any case to be construed as official or as reflectin-. the views of the Commanding Officer or of the Navy Department. * WOMAN'S WORLD (Cont'd) How much money for equipment? "With the purchase of government surplus, you can go on the air for as little as twenty-five dollars," Chief Youmans told me. My glance toward his fabulous set must have indicated disbelief ... "Well, you can spend a great deal more," he grinned. Chief Youmans has had a ham radio station since 1948 in such various places as West Palm Beach, Trinidad, Tokyo and Maryland. How does Guantanamo differ from the other places? "We have a greater demand for our services," was his reply. Does he have advice for prospective subscribers? "Only that we can't guarantee contact. Sometimes people don't understand this." To prove this statement, Rochelle told her Nashville story. "One night 'Gin' had an emergency call-he tried for six hours to contact Nashville-to no avail. Finally, he and our friend gave up. Then, the next day when 'Gin' was trying to reach another part of the country, wouldn't you know it, he couldn't get anything but. ..Tennessee!" One of the most interesting sidelights of ham operating are the QSL cards. These are sent out as confirmation of contact after operators have spoken to each other for the first time. Chief Youmans has a stack of cards that would make an IBM machine take a deep breath-from such far-away places as Poland, Bolivia, Australia, France (this one was in braille), Greenland, Ghana West Africa, and ad infinitum. There are cards from even submarines and airplanes! "We estimate five dollars per month for stamps and cards," Betty told me. The services of ham radio are free and done completely on the operator's own time. Three stations for the single men are maintained at Bay Hill, Leeward Point, and the Marine Barracks. Ham operating is a worldwide fraternity with participants from all walks of life. There are clubs, publications (women have their own sections in these publications), awards and conferences. During the evacuation "Gin" moved his radio set into the pharmacy, and was off to a great start with four-hundred-and-twenty-five calls to his credit. Lt. Clare Potter placed some two hundred calls. "But let us say this," both Chief Youmans and "Gin" were quick to point out, "Never would we have accomplished these calls if it had not been for the willing assistance of our stateside operators." Looks to me like another example of teamwork and cooperation, with us at Guantanamo enjoying the benefits. (Continued to Page Six) CHAPLAIN'S CORNER p CHAPLAIN G. H. SARGENT EASY DOES ITAs our modern living becomes more intricate and involved it gathers weight and speed until it sometimes seems like a monster we have created but can't control. Everywhere the tension tightens, life becomes so filled with anxiety that the big question is not so much how to succeed as how to keep one's soul alive. A French writer traveled to America in 1830 to study the American, whom he classified as "a new breed of man on the earth." The French visitor the restless aggressiveness of our people. "The American," he said, "is so restless he has even invented a chair, callecW rocking chair, in which he can move while he sits." If this French observer could see us now, he would be forced to revise upward his conclusions, as the tempo has mounted. A careful and consistent cultivation of a relaxed mental attitude is important in reducing tension. Athletes know that trying too hard throws them off their timing. A man who had coached several championship college basketball teams told me that he attributed a part of his success to the fact that he was able to teach his players how to relax. Out of his experience, he told me, he had discovered that the fine coordination which characterizes the great men of sport is attained by the principle of "taking the game in stride, remembering that e does it." Just so we in playing the game of life do need to practice mental relaxalation. And we have gone a long way toward such relaxation when we begin to take the game of life in stride, and to remember that "easy does it." This is a lesson that has been taught by the sages of all ages. Turning to the wisest guide book of them all we read, "In quietness and confidence shall be your strength." Ideas are funny things. They won't work unless you do. Remember-the only difference between stumbling blocks and steppingstoneso the way you use them. Actually there's only a slight difference between keeping your chin up and sticking your neck out, but it's worth knowing. Page Two SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT January 13, l96s

PAGE 3

January 13, 1963 SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT Page Thr~~ PFC Stephen Handley is shown with the' ageless "Satchmo". "Dream Along With Me". Popular Perry Como featured Right L/CP Louis Ekuczarski looks on. such names as Dorthey Collins, Jean Carroll, Senor Wences the Peter Genero Dancers and the Ray Charles Singers. HOLIDAY ENTERTAINMENT Ed Sullivan at Gitmo obviously pleased with the show. Connie Francis and Carol Lawrence were popular hits in the Sullivan Show. Here they are seen belting out a duet number. SULLIVAN, COMO TROUPES ENTERTAIN December turned out to be a starstudded month for military and civilian personnel of the Naval Base. Leading off the parade-of-stars was Perry Como and his troupe, followed by Ed Sullivan and his cast of entertainers. Closing out. the holidays season were two smaller groups; the Eaglairs and "Chasing the Gloom." Perry Como arrived on the Naval Base December 4, and presented his first four shows at the Naval Station Movie Lyceum. Concluding these performanced his troupe did two additional shows for the Marines on the line, followed by presentations at Leeward Point, the Sea Bee area and the Naval Base Hospital. From the moment Perry first walked on the stage until the end of his final performance, the crowd was his. With Mr. Como's effortless singing ability and completely relaxed attitude the tension that had been taunt a few days before became lax and almost forgotten. His first song set the tone for his entrie visit-one of informality and relaxation. Teamed up with Mr. Como were more big name stars, including comedienne Jean Carroll and ventriloquist Senor Wences, both showed us why they are tops in the field. Singer Dorothy Collins with all of her obvious sincerity in her (Continued to Page Four) "The Fontaines", Bobby and Dad, Frank Fontaine, entertain the troops. Bobby is in the Marine Corps and was stationed here during the crisis. Jack Carter and "Mr. Wigbee". Page Three January 13, 1963 SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT

PAGE 4

Page Four SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT January 13, 1963 FAN BEGIN3 SEA JURUNEY NRTH. The yacnt PAIN departs Uuantanamo iNaval Base after an emergency stop-over here. Inset: Master Ulf Enar Azen, and wife, Gunila, relax aboard the PAN just before their departure. "PAN" DEPARTS This giant U. S. Naval Base in the Caribbean has been the haven for many distressed and crippled vessels in the surrounding sea for many years. The helpful hand again was extended by U. S. Navy here when on December 21, 1962, a 77 year old yacht named PAN of Danish ancestry was brought into the base after having experienced dimcuities 42 miles from the base. The yacht was enroute from Kingston, Jamaica, to Washington D. C., at the time. The PAN was found seaworthy on January 2, 1963, when she got underway to continue her northern journey. The voyage was short lived as she returned to Guantanamo Bay on January 3 with a broken coupling on the propeller shaft, having sailed only 15 miles from the base. She departed the Naval Base again on the afternoon of January 4 after repairs were made to her shaft. Her original distress call came on December 21, 1962, when during heavy seas the vessel's caulking gave way and she began to ship water more rapidly than could be handled. She also experienced difficulty in her electrical wiring system making navigation extremely hazardous. The Master of the vessel, Ulf Enar Azen, requested immediate assistance. The U. S. Navy here, who have on many occasions assisted vessels of all sizes and vintage in need of help, responded quickly. A Navy sea going tug was dispatched as the first call was received at the Naval headquarters. Within a few hours, the PAN with her crew of four were safely docked at the Naval Base. Master Ulf Enar Azen and his lovely wife, Gunila, both of Stockholm, Sweden, along with two Jamaican crew members, were hosted by Navy personnel during their unexpected Christmas in Guantanamo Bay. The PAN was built in Odense, Denmark in 1886 as a revenue, cutter. She was converted in 1911 to a double ended Gaff Ketch which is her present classification. It was reported that the vessel weighs approximately 42 tons and is now 60 feet long after her conversion. The PAN departed "Gitmo" the second time on January 4 and continued to sail northward to Washington, D. C., where the ship will be turned -over to its owner Commander Richard T. Theobold of 3606 Norton Place, Washingotn 16, D. C. It was reported that Commander Theobold (Continued to Page Six) IN THE SPIRIT OF GIVING. On Christmas Eve, a group of six smalW children rode through the Naval Base housing areas singing Christmas carols. In the spirit of Christmas, some of the people being entertained, gave the children candy and even some loose change. The carolers were composed of three boys and three girls, aging from 8 to 12. Their names: Winified and Anita Lewis, Martha Gualt, Michael Heaberlin and Bobby and John Noll. Early Christmas morning young John Noll appeared at the Naval Base Hospital. He strode up to the Master-atArms desk and said, "My name is John Noll. Me and some of my friends were out singing Christmas songs last night, some of the people gave us this stuff." John handed a parcel to veteran corp man, Warren Williams, HM1, and coW tinued, "We would like to give this to all of the patients in the hospital that didn't have too nice a Christmas. Would you please see that they get this?" John then thanked Williams and left. Upon open the sack, Williams found it full of candy, and in the envelope was $2.00 in loose change. The patients would like too thank all of these children for their thoughtfulness and true Christmas spirit. HOLIDAY ENTERTAINMENT (Continued from Page Three) singing and actions, backed up by the Peter Genero dancers and the Ray Charles singers all helped to give our holiday season the zestful beginning that carried us through the entire month of December. As December was nearing its end Ed Sullivan and his variety troupe broug new life into the old year. Louis "Satc mo" Armstrong and his band, Connie Francis, Jack Carter, Carol Lawrence and Frank Fontaine were among the performers who appeared with the show. Jack Cater presented a fascinating comedy monologue. Carol Lawrence, who created the role of Maria in the Broadway musical, "West Side Story," and recently played a dramatic role on Broadway in "Night Life" sang several numbers. Among the show's highlights were Connie Francis and Carol Lawrence singing a medley to the audience. There selections all had "You" in the title and included "It Had To Be You" and "You Made Me Love You." Miss Francis also sang a solo medley of country and west ern songs. Jack Fontaine presented his famous comedy routine about an Irish sweepstakes winner, backed up by his son Bob, a 20 year old Marine who was temporarity station here during the crisis. Page Four SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT January 13, 1963

PAGE 5

Januir u. l9~8 SUNI)AY SUPPLEMENT Page Five DEPENDENTS RETURN UNLOADING A PLANE full of "Gifts for Gitmo", from the people of Houston, Texas are men of the Naval Base. "GIFTS FOR GITMO" "Gifts for Gitmo" was dramatically executed on December 21, with the arrival of a plane-load of presents collected by civic and military groups of Houston, Texas-including the Navy League, The American Legion, The American Red Cross and the Houston Chamber of Commerce. The project was spearheaded by Bob Byron of KPRC Radio and TV Station Houston. Once the project was made blic other groups took up the cause. The gifts were gathered through Monday, December 17 and airlifted to the base by Naval Reserve planes and crews. Many gifts were distributed to single men E-5 and below right at the plane and the remainder at the old Community Auditorium on Marina Point. The gifts included books, wrist watches, pen and pencil sets, basketballs, horseshoe, volleyball and badmitten sets. The people of Houston sent the following Christmas greeting: "We hope you accept this gift as a symbol that you are not forgotten. Someone at home appreciates you, thanks you, wishes you the happiest holiday season, nd hopes you will soon be back home. od luck. ..and God bless you." The fact the idea was initiated in the first place and carried through in such magnificent completion is a tribute to all of the fine people who made it possible. 2,200 ARRIVE FOR HOLIDAYS by Steve LeShay, JOSN All the ingredients were there: smiles, tears, joy, relief, expectation to make the USNS GEIGER's arrival in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, Friday, December 14, 1962, "the news story of the year." For aboard that ship were 400 dependents hastily evacuated last October during the outset of the Cuban crisis. From the moment the signal tower on McCalla Hill hoisted the flags "seen around the world" (pennant flags spelling out "Welcome home, dependents" in the international code of signals)-until the vessel docked at Pier Bravo, the ordeal of waiting became clearly visible on all faces, it was hard to believe that it was just two months ago that the dependents HOME AT LAST! Lee Ward, IC2, hugs his wife, Glenda, after her arrival aboard a MSTS plane here on December 11. HAPPILY REUNITED is CDR Andrew J. Rucker, with his wife, Nancy, their two daughters, "Candy" and Lynn and son, Charles, after their return flight from the States. AW DAD, WHAT ABOUT ME? George W. K. Stewart, DT2, welcomes back his wife, Bernice, and Danny, their 10-monthold son, as hey arrive aboard the USNS GEIGER on December 14. left Gitmo. No one expected to have a very merry Christmas then. The GEIGER's arrival with its "Special Christmas gift" to Gitmo helped change all that. We remember all too clearly that day the USNS UPSHUR departed Gitmo with hundreds of evacuees aboard. Their faces lining the rails mirrored the best of Arnerica-shining hope and faith that things would turn out for the best. On the day the GEIGER sailed into Guantanamo Bay, that faith and hope was justified. Escorted by tugs streaming jets of red, white and green water, jets soaring overhead, and helicopters hovering nearby, the ship was first sighted at 2:06 p.m. At precisely that moment the sun broke through the overcast sky. As the ship neared the dock, children leaned over rails hoping to get a glimpse of "Daddy." Wives shaded their eyes and waved frantically when they spotted their loved ones. On the pier, the scene was bedlam, but organized bedlam, as husbands strained their eyes searching the rails of the ship; bands struck up lively tunes, cameras buzzed and clicked, friends and husbands waved banners reading: "Hi Honey, Dinner's Defrosting," "Welcome Back to Bachelor Flat," and "Don't Worry Kids, Santa Will Find You." And sure enough as the first wife and child hastened down the gangplank Santa Claus was on hand to welcome them back too. This reporter can not express the sheer joy which overwhelmed him watching the happiness of families being reunited once again. It was impossible to take the entire picture into one panoramic view. as each wife and child hurried off the (Continued to Page Six) Page Five SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT Janua-ry 13S. 196:1

PAGE 6

Page Six SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT January 13, 1963 by Chief George Thomson Welcome everyone to Guantanamo Bay's Sports year 1963. It's our belief at the Naval Station Special Services Department that sometime during the year a sports event will appear on our yearly sports calendar that will interest you, either as a spectator or as a participant. Of course, to those who are more athletically inclined, this sports year will be like most others, moving along from one sports event to another as the year progresses. Now underway, here on the Naval Base, is basketball, the No. 2 fall sport, being enjoyed by nine teams which comprise the Basewide League. The Naval Hospital is the defending champion and unless Glen Fitch and the long shooting Medics can be stopped they look to be the base's best in '63, although MCB-7 was the pre-season champion, defeating the Naval Security Group in the final pre-season. Basketball season should be completed by the first of March. During basketball season, tennis and horseshoe pitching will get underway with tennis pre-season commencing on the 14th of February and the horseshoe pitchers getting into action on the 15th of February. Singles and doubles tournaments will be afforded participants in both events. Immediately following basketball, Cooper Field will be ready for the commencement of the 1963 baseball season, which this year will see two park improvements, one being the installation of drinking fountains in either dugout and new restroom facilities adjacent to the right field foul line. An item that has been needed at Cooper Field for many years is now a reality. MCB-4 are the defending champs here, but it will be up to MCB-7 to uphold the winning SeaBee tradition as SeaBee teams have been crowned champions for the past three seasons. Volleyball will make it's appearance on the sports scene in mid-March. This year it's being planned to have all league volleyball games played on court at Marblehead Hall, located behind the gymnasium. Softball will follow baseball on our sports picture, and should be better than ever this year, with the additional lighting now being installed by the Public Works Center. Softball is usually participated in by more athletes than any other event on the sports calendar. Defending champions here are "The Old Chiefs", winners in both 1961 and 1962. It's doubtful they'll be around this year however, their ace hurler, Bill Hutto, having returned to Pensacola. Ken Gossett and his Naval Station Indians look like the team to beat in '63. Football, the No. 1 fall sport, enjoyed by mililons in the USA, will by the final major sport on the Naval Base sports calendar. The Marine Barracks, have been football champs here the past three seasons, and on the strength of that alone, must be considered the team to beat in '63. The year 1963 will also see three track & field meets being held here, the first one on the 26th of January at Cooper Field. The Enlisted Men's Swimming Pool at the Recreation Center will be the site of three Basewide Swimming meets, with the first one being held in midMarch. Marine Barracks and MCB-8 were cowinners of last year's track & field meet held at the SeaBee athletic area, and MCB-4 the swimming title holders in sports year '62. Boxing which took over the sports entertainment picture during the crisis, will continue on a regular basis if enough interest is shown. Bowling and golf, of course, are year round activities that flourish here, as well as yachting, horseback riding, roller skating, bicycling and boating. Rifle and pistol meets will be held throughout the year. Chief John Ketzler of the NavSta Armory is the gent to contact for further info here. Improvements made in 1962 to our sports facilities, which we shall enjoy during '63 are the night lighted driving range, the par three golf course, and our new bowling palace with adjacent gymnasium and outdoor basketball, volleyball and handball courts. Sports year '63 is already off to a good start, with the visit of the very popular N. Y. Yankee sportscaster, Mel Allen, last Thutsday. Everyone on the Naval Base is encouraged by this sportswriter to avail themselves of one or two or as many of these activities as he can comfortably enjoy. Good clean healthy sports entertainment is yours for the asking here at Gitmo. Enter and enjoy, you'll be glad you did. PAN DEPARTS (Continued from Page Four) purchased the vessel and had made a rangements for its journey to Washington from Jamaica. Master Azen reported, however, that he may stop at Miami if the weather is not suitable or if he encourters any more difficulties. It was a happy crew that set sail on January 4 from Guantanamo Bay, knowing that the U. S. Navy was available to provide assistance in time of need for themselves and others who may in the future need help on the high seas. DEPENDENTS RETURN (Continued from Page Five) ship. as each family was reunited, an individually wonderful human drama unfolded. A little girl in a green dress caiW toddling down the last few steps of the gangplank. She wore a look of complete bewilderment in her tear-filled eyes. She looked from side to side for her daddy and it wasn't until a chief petty officer came pushing through the crowd and scooped her up into his arms that she finally gave way to her emotions. She burst into tears as she affectionately clung to her father's neck. A young sailor burst into tears as he saw his wife and family for the first time in two months. A mother carrying her newborn baby carefully made her way down the gangplank. A woman leading two toy French poodles followed her. Children of all ages pointing and shouting "Daddy" and "there he is" also paraded down the walk. A husky teenager carrying a basket Christmas gifts above his head followed. Mother after mother, wife after wife, child after child came down those last few steps into outstretched arms as Guantanamo families were happily brough together again. WOMAN'S WORLD (Continued from Page Two) Writer's note: Guantanamo ham operators and their call signs are as follows: R. W. Gingell Bob Mahoney Troy Loftis Clare Potter C. E. Youmans Leeward Point Bay Hill Marine Barracks MCB4 & 7 KGABH KG4BQ KG4BJ KG4BA KG4CY KG4AA KG4AN KG4AM KG4AE Page Six SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT January 13, 1963


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E3HAGRLNT_P88HR3 INGEST_TIME 2015-12-03T22:12:54Z PACKAGE AA00031597_00056
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES