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Sunday Supplement

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Sunday Supplement
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Smeit


A VOIGE OF THE PEOPLE


VOL. II NO. 65 U. S. NAVAL BASE, GUANTANAMO BAY, CUBA JUNE 10, 1962


MEMORIAL DAY SERVICES

Memorial Day, .1962, in Guantanamo Bay must have
been like a thousand Memorial Days throughout the U.S. last week.


A WREATH AT SEA-Fleet Reservi over the ide in memory of thosm
The traditional ingredients were there: A military d, a drum and bugle con3 ngentthe Scouts of Amer-. ca, the American Legion
-all of them serving to remind us that Memorial Day is indeed a testimonial to the lifeblood of our nation. Admiral O'Donnell set the keynote, saying: "In-a community where we are dedicated to service, we have to keep this concept alive..."
All of us in Guantanamo should be more keenly aware than most, of the danger, posed against our way of life.,' IAs the bells tolled last
dnesday and five wreaths, ke by one, were placed on a (continued on page 3)


ANA MARIA SURVIVORS RETURN HOME.

A harrowing story of escape, death and 14 days exposure to the elements came to somewhat of a happy ending at the\Base Hospital.
Five survivors of the sunken Dominican ship Ana Maria were released from the Base Hospital and headed south for home, Friday, June 1. The five were brought to the Hospital
early Wednesday morning, May 30. One of the men, Julio Henrique, is from Curacao in the Dutch West Indies, the
rest from the Dominican Republic.
According to the survivors they were tossed about on rough seas for nine days Without water. One man produced a small piece of Aluminum saying it was placed in their mouths under the tongue to. produce moisture, adding the piece of metal was passed among the five. Lsts pass a flowered wreath Prior to being picked up, e buried at sea. two persons, a man and a woman died. Their bodies were kept aboard the skiff by the S..group, hoping they would reach land. But after two days the bodies were weighted and buried at sea. After 14 days in the small skiff, a ..Young boy, Jesus Carmero, shouted to his .. father, "Father, an American airplane is coming." The group had kept their hopes for rescue through little Jesus' insistance that an American ship would spot them and "bring us CocaCola."
PRF ATIO - RDM Eward Manuel_ Carmero said he J.ES O TADon - rADMve Edard- spotted several ships, but
J .O'onelreeie.aM their small boat being hidmonial Day wreath from ship- den by the high seas was nevmates in memory of our departed at the cemetary� en seen. ( continued On p. 2)





PAGE 2


4DAY SUPPLEMENT


S0N DAY, .1962


NOTED GUANTANAMO PEDIATRICIAN LEAVES MANY FRIENDS BEHIND
The Naval Base Hospital will lose the services of Commander Jerome Imburg this July.
Imburg has been the Chief of Dependents' Service and the hospital's pediatrician for th past two years. He, as so many dedicated doctors devoted to the care of children, has earned the trust of the base children through the practice of careful, sincere attention that he gives to them on visits. This tour of duty has been the pediatrician's second here.
The beginning of Dr. Imburg's life as a pediatrician came in 1943. He was selected from the enlisted hospital corpsman ranks by the Navy to study medicine.
Graduating from the Medical College of Virginia in June 1947, he had a year of internship at Touro Infirmary in New Orleans.
But the real beginning of his pediatric . career came when the ex-enlisted man attendIX
ed the Pediatric Residency Training at the
University of Maryland's hospital.
In 1960, Dr. Imburg asked to return to Guantanamo Bay. He left Gitmo in 1955.
Dr. Imburg said, "It's fine for a man with
a family. Remember, I said for a man with a. family." a
Young children are not unfamiliar in Dr. Imburg's life. He and his wife, Julia, 'have two children, Brian, 5 and Elizabeth, 2A0 His wife was a former member of the Navy's Nurse Corps.
All of his time hasn' been spent for
medical care of children, The pediatrician also promotes the educational needs of . children. Dr. Imburg was the president of LUCKY FIVE- Five survivors of the stricken the PTA for the school year of 1961-62. Dominican ship Ana Maria at the Base HospitThe next tour of duty for Dr. Imburg will al shortly before they left for home, They be the U.S. Naval Hospital, Naval Air Stat are, from left to riht. Julio Henrique;
ion, Jacksonville, Florida. Manuel Carmero; Jesus Carmero (child); Julio Motto; and Rafael Farrer.

SURVIVORS CONTINUED.....that a plane or ship would come near enough to see us..oIf not, death," he said.
The five were sighted by a Navy UF Alba tross dispatched from Guantanamo's Air-Se Rescue Group which called for assistance uW on finding the craft. The U.S. Coast Guard immediately dispatched the USCGC Se to pick up the survivors. The. cutter had difficulty in locating the boat due to high seas and the size of the stranded vessel. 4. At one point the cutter spotted the survivors, but had to turn away from them to provide protection for her own small craft.
Rafael Farrer, a crew member of the Ana Maria, said at that time they were shouting and frantically waving their arms thinking the cutter had not seen them.
All five were treated at the Base Hospital


TAKE A DEEP BREATH - Naval Hospital's pedi- for exposure. One man was burned by an atrician, Dr. Jerome Imburg counts the beats emergency 'flare set off to attract attentic of Harry Fisher's heart. The health of the from a passing vessel. Naval Base's children has been Commander Imr- Manuel Carmero summed the feelings of burg's concern for the past two years, five by saying, "Thank God for our lives."




SUNDAY SUPPLEMFW.


Womeu's World
By Jamke. Lloy

Mrs. Charlene Adair and Mrs. Kathleen Steward--known by every woman on the base, if not by name, at least by face. I can think of no spot more frequently visited by all the women of Naval Base Guantanamo than our local commissary store-and a visit is always more pleasant because Mrs. Adair and Mrs. Steward are at the check, out stands.
And small wonder these two ladies are such whizzes with the cash register--Mrs. Adair, a resident of the base for fourteen years, has been employed at the commissary since 1958 (prior to that time she worked for five years at the seamstress shop), and Mrs. Steward is on her second tour not
only at Guantanamo, but with the commissary as well (her first employment was in 1955-56). Both of these ladies have nothing but kind words for Guan, namo and its people. "We like the climate and we like our
stomers. After all, we feel we have a better chance than
-st to see our friends and neighbors here on the base." The States will eventually claim these ladies however, and when that time comes, it will be Arkansas for Mrs. Adair and Indiana for Mrs. Steward.
When did the commissary start employing women? It was in 1955. And this question started off a whole conversation about the commissary in the earlier days. 'eYou have no idea of the improvements that have been made since I arrived in 1948," Mrs. Adair told me. "Fresh milk from the States was unheard of--we had to boil our milk before we could use it. The bread was baked on the base, and it was not wrapped-you simply took a bare loaf off the wooden shelf, paid the cashier, and walked out. Eggs were from the base too, but there were never enough of them. We had to stand in line early in the morning, and then, sometimes we would not be lucky enough to get any. There was no self-service meat counter--we also had to wait in line for our meat. Physically, the commissary was much smaller. There was no fluorecent lighting, no air conditioning, less refrigerated ea. Most of the supplies were delivered by Navy cargo ps; however, twice a month 'Old YFR 1152', or better
nown as the 'Yippee Boat', arrived wth a few fresh supplies from Miami. She was an old San Diego tuna boat and needless to say, could not carry a large cargo. On the other hand, the base had fewer people then, so the small
amounts of eggs, fresh fruits and vegetables were helpful to all.*"
The next time you visit the commissary, try to visualize it as it was before. And as you chat with the efficient, courteous commissary ladies, I hope now you will feel better acquainted with them. These ladies are wonderful assets to a constantly improving organization' In my opinion, we and the commissary are better of r for their presence.


rYOU GET 3%4% INTEREST TO MATURITY
FROM U. S. SAVINGS BONDS. BUY NOW!


GITMO KEGLER AWARDED


TROPHIES FOR EFFORT -Milton K. Forbes, stationed at Gitmo, receives bowling trophies from Corpus Christi, Texas officer. Forbes finished third in the mens' competitions of the South A.lantic Regional Championship with an average of 186.

SERVICES CONTINUED.�... shrine; as the Naval Base
Band played the Navy Hymn; as rifle volleys echoed over the hills; and as the mystical sounds of "Taps" soared up into the skies, all of us
felt at that moment a personal bond with those who have fallen in battle.
One of ttimes overlooks the special significance of our VFW, Fleet Reserve Association, and all those other organizations whose very existence symbolizes our heritage. Memorial was "their" day as we1l. President Robert A. Carr, PN1, of the Fleet Reserve and Mr. Ralph Kemp, President of the American Legion, played important roles in the services.
Some of us attended the service at the cemetary.
Others of us, doubtlessly, (continued on page 4)


-L U LUM JM - -JLJ,& JL '7LJK,.;


PAGE 3


ATTMI.)AV- TTTMV. 10- 1QA2I&


I





* ANDAY SUPPLEMENT


rlwvm Li. --


FROM THE-CHAPLAIN'S DESK

RECIPE FOR WORKING WITH PEOPLE

A few months ago, a commanding officer, speaking to his officers"on Naval leadership gave them a recipe for working with people.
Because every one of us spends much of the' time with people, perhaps it would be well for us to read the following recipe:
Courteous Words instead of sharp retorts; Smiles instead of blank looks; Enthusiasm instead of indifference; Warmth instead of Coldness; .Understanding instead of the closed mind; Attention instead of neglect; Patience instead of irritation; Sincerity instead of sham; Forehandedness instead of surprise; Consideration instead of annoyance; Remembering People instead of forgetting them; Cooperation instead of resistance; Creative Ideas instead of humdrum; Helpfulness instead of hindrance; Giving instead of getting; Appreciation instead of apathy; .Action instead of delay.


NOT IN NAVY - Ted Titcomb, son of LCDR and MRS. E. B. Titcorb, is receiving the God and
Country, Scout award from Chaplain Griffin. This presentation was made at the Protestant Worship Service, Leeward Point, May 27.

SERVICES CONTINUED....paused to take stock of the occas ion. A man, who lived some years ago, -pt it into everlasting immortality:
"...that from these honored dead we take increased de otion to that) cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion
-that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain--that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom--and that goverrnment of the people by' the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth."


by George Thomson

Hello everybody. Here are the highlights from the world of local sports, but first my sports question.
What is the record low score for a full U.S. open golf tournament?
This week's stateside golf tournament will be the U.S. Golf Association Open at the Oakmont Country Club, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, June 14-16.
This sportswriter "Tips the ole Fedora," to: Captain Weber, recently crowned 196 Base Golf Champ ion, and all who receiv awards at Friday evening's banquet.
Tom Forbes, who bowled his way to the All Navy Finals at Pearl Harbor and finished eighth.
Bill Hutto, the winningest softball pitcher on the base, and the CPO softball team for winning the second consecutive Base Softball Championship. Just proves there' s
life in the ole Gents yet. The Chiefs' team trophy will be presented to the GPO Club, Pre-season baseball play begins on Monday, June 18. Anyone desiring to play baseball in the Base League and not now affiliated with a team, contact your recreation officer for information covering your command's team. Naval Station, PC, VU-lO, NAS, Marines, Leeward Point NAS, Hospital and FTG Composite, have teams entered in the league. Sports Quote of the Week: Gus Maucuso, former catcher after watchin the swift Dodger, Willie Davis, run: "A long last baseball may have come up with guy who can steal first'"


JOAO
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- - JUST FOR LAFFS--


Passenger to pilot: How are we doing?
Pilot: We're lost, but we're making good time.

A passenger on a train told a fellow traveler that sh had been in San Jose... Y pronounce that wrong,"'he corrected he "In San Jose, we pronounce J as H. How long were you there?" "From Hune to Huly."


.0TINDAY'. ,JUNE .10 a1962,




Full Text

PAGE 1

Sun aYemen t A VOIGE OF THE PEOPLE VOL. II NO. 65 U. S. NAVAL BASE, GUANTANAMO BAY, CUBA JUNE 10, 1962 MEMORIAL DAY SERVICES Memorial Day, 1962, in Guantanamo Bay must have been like a thousand Memorial Days throughout the U.S. last week. A WREATH AT SEA -Fleet over the side in memory Reservi of thos4 The traditional ingredients were there: A military d, a drum and bugle con#ingent,the Scouts of America, the American Legion --all of them serving to remind us that Memorial Day is indeed a testimonial to the lifeblood of our nation. Admiral O'Donnell set the keynote, saying: "In a community where we are dedicated to service, we have to keep this concept alive." All of us in Guantanamo should be more keenly aware than most, of the danger posed against our way of life. As the bells tolled last dnesday and five wreaths, ne by one, were placed on a (continued on page 3) ANA MARIA SURVIVORS RETURN HOME A harrowing story of escape, death and 14 days exposure to the elements came to somewhat of a happy ending at the Base Hospital. Five survivors of the sunken Dominican ship Ana Maria were released from the Base Hospital and headed south for home, Friday, June 1. The five were brought to the Hospital early Wednesday morning, May 30. One of the men, Julio Henrique, is from Curacao in the Dutch West Indies, the rest from the Dominican Republic. According to the survivors they were tossed about on rough seas for nine days without water. One man produced a small piece of aluminum saying it was placed in their mouths under the tongue to produce moisture, adding the piece of metal I&JL: 4was passed among the five. sts pass a flowered wreath Prior to being picked up, e buried at sea. two persons, a man and a woman died. Their bodies were wkept aboard the skiff by the group, hoping they would reach land. But after two days the bodies were weighted and buried at sea. After 14 days in the small skiff a young boy, Jesus Carmero shouted to his father "Father, an American airplane is coming." The group had kept their hopes for rescue through little Jesus' insistaice that an American ship would spot hFthem and "bring us CocaiCola." PRESNTAION R AD Edard Manujel Camero said he PREE1~ATIN -RAD Edard spotted several ships, but J. O'Donnell receives a Me their small boat being hidmorial Day wreath from ship den by the high seas was nevmates inmemory of our de-s n ne parted at the cemetarye n inu o

PAGE 2

PAGE 2 TODAY SUPPLEMENT IONDAY, JUNE 10. 1962 NOTED GUANTANAMO PEDIATRICIAN LEAVES MANY FRIENDS BEHIND The Naval Base Hospital will lose the services of Commander Jerome Imburg this July. Dj Imburg has been the Chief of Dependents' Service and the hospital's pediatrician for thE past two years. He, as so many dedicated doctors devoted to the care of children, has earned the trust of the base children through the practice of careful, sincere attention that he gives to them on visits. This tour of duty has been the pediatrician's second here. The beginning of Dr. Imburg's life as a pediatrician came in 1943. He was selected from the enlisted hospital corpsman ranks by the Navy to study medicine. Graduating from the Medical College of Virginia in June 1947, he had a year of internship at Touro Infirmary in New Orleans. But the real beginning of his pediatric career came when the ex-enlisted man attended the Pediatric Residency Training at the University of Maryland's hospital. In 1960, Dr. Imburg asked to return to Guantanamo Bay. He left Gitmo in 1955. Dr. Imburg said, "It's fine for a man with a family. Remember, I said for a man with a family." Young children are not unfamiliar in Dr. Imburg's life. He and his wife, Julia, have two children, Brian, 5" and Elizabeth, 21, His wife was a former member of the Navy's Nurse Corps. All of his time hasn't been spent for medical care of children, The pediatrician also promotes the educational needs of children. Dr. Imburg was the president of LUCKY FIVE Five survivors of the stricken the PTA for the school year of 1961-62. Dominican ship Ana Maria at the Base HospitThe next tour of duty for Dr. Imburg will al shortly before they left for home, They be the U.S. Naval Hospital, Naval Air Statare, from left to right Julio Henrique; ion, Jacksonville, Florida. Manuel Carmero; Jesus Carmero (child); Julio Immm Motto; and Rafael Farrer. I TAKE A DEEP BREATH -Naval Hospital's pediatrician, Dr. Jerome Imburg counts the beats of Harry Fisher's heart. The health of the Naval Base's children has been Commander Imburg's concern for the past two years. SURVIVORS CONTINUED,.that a plane or ship would come near enough to see us.If not, death," he said. The five were sighted by a Navy UF Alba tross dispatched from Guantanamo's Air-Se Rescue Group which called for assistance up on finding the craft. The U.S. Coast Guard immediately dispatched the USCGC Seba to pick up the survivors. The.cutter had difficulty in locating the boat due to high seas and the size of the stranded vessel. At one point the cutter spotted the survivors, but had to turn away from them to provide protection for her own small craft. Rafael Farrer, a crew member of the Ana Maria, said at that time they were shouting and frantically waving their arms thinking the cutter had not seen them. All five were treated at the Base Hospital for exposure. One man was burned by an emergency flare set off to attract attenticS from a passing vessel. Manuel Carmero summed the feelings of th five by saying, "Thank God for our lives.1"

PAGE 3

SUNDAY SUPPLEMU Women's WorM By Jackie Lloyd Mrs. Charlene Adair and Mrs. Kathleen Steward-known by every woman on the base, if not by name, at least by face. I can think of no spot more frequently visited by all the women of Naval Base Guantanamo than our local commissary store-and a visit is always more pleasant because Mrs. Adair and Mrs. Steward are at the check-out stands. And small wonder these two ladies are such whizzes with the cash register-Mrs. Adair, a resident of the base for fourteen years, has been employed at the commissary since 1958 (prior to that time she worked for five years at the seamstress shop), and Mrs. Steward is on her second tour not only at Guantanamo, but with the commissary as well (her first employment was in 1955-56). Both of these ladies have nothing but kind words for Guannamo and its people. "We like the climate and we like our stomers. After all, we feel we have a better chance than ost to see our friends and neighbors here on the base." The States will eventually claim these ladies however, and when that time comes, it will be Arkansas for Mrs. Adair and Indiana for Mrs. Steward. When did the commissary start employing women? It was in 1955. And this question started off a whole conversation about the commissary in the earlier days. "You have no idea of the improvements that have been made since I arrived in 1948," Mrs. Adair told me. "Fresh milk from the States was unheard of--we had to boil our milk before we could use it. The bread was baked on the base, and it was not wrapped-you simply took a bare loaf off the wooden shelf, paid the cashier, and walked out. Eggs were from the base too, but there were never enough of them. We had to stand in line early in the morning, and then, sometimes we would not be lucky enough to get any. There was no self-service meat counter-we also had to wait in line for our meat. Physically, the commissary was much smaller. There was no fluorecent lighting, no air conditioning, less refrigerated ea. Most of the supplies were delivered by Navy cargo ips; however, twice a month 'Old YFR 1152', or better nown as the 'Yippee Boat', arrived with a few fresh supplies from Miami. She was an old San Diego tuna boat and needless to say, could not carry a large cargo. On the other hand, the base had fewer people then, so the small amounts of eggs, fresh fruits and vegetables were helpful to all.n The next time you visit the commissary, try to visualize it as it was before, And as you chat with the efficient, courteous commissary ladies, I hope now you will feel better acquainted with them. These ladies are wonderful assets to a constantly improving organization! In my opinion, we and the commissary are better oft for their presence. YOU GET 334% INTEREST TO MATURITY FROM U. S. SAVINGS BONDS. BUY NOW! GITMO KEGLER AWARDED TROPHIES FOR EFFORT -Milton K. Forbes, stationed at Gitmo, receives bowling trophies from Corpus Christi, Texas officer. Forbes finished third in the mens' competitions of the South A;lantic Regional Championship with an average of 186. SERVICES CONTINUED.0. shrine; as the Naval Base Band played the Navy Hymn; as rifle volleys echoed over the hills; and as the mystical sounds of "Taps" soared up into the skies, all of us felt at that moment a personal bond with those who have fallen in battle. One ofttimes overlooks the special significance of our VFW, Fleet Reserve Association, and all those other organizations whose very existence symbolizes our heritage. Memorial was "their" day as well. President Robert A. Carr, PN1, of the Fleet Reserve and Mr. Ralph Kemp, President of the American Legion, played important roles in the services. Some of us attended the service at the cemetary. Others of us, doubtlessly, (continued on page 4) -e. m PAG 3 SUNDAYn JUtNTO 196t2 b I

PAGE 4

FROM THE CHAPLAIN'S DESK RECIPE FOR WORKING WITH PEOPLE A few months ago, a commanding officer, speaking to his officers on Naval leadership gave them a recipe for working with people. Because everyone of us spends much of the time with people, perhaps it would be well for us to read the following recipe: Courteous Words instead of sharp retorts; Smiles instead of blank looks; Enthusiasm instead of indifference; Warmth instead of coldness; Understanding instead of the closed mind; Attention instead of neglect; Patience instead of irritation; Sincerity instead of sham; Forehandedness instead of surprise; Consideration instead of annoyance; Remembering People instead of forgetting them; Cooperation instead of resistance; Creative Ideas instead of humdrum; Helpfulness instead of hindrance; Giving instead of getting; Appreciation instead of apathy; Action instead of delay. NOT IN NAVY -Ted Titcomb, son of LCDR and MRS. E. B. Titcomb, is receiving the God and Country, Scout award from Chaplain Griffin. This presentation was made at the Protestant WorshipService, Leeward Point, May 27. SERVICES CONTINUED.paused to take stock of the occasion. A man, twho lived some years ago, put it into everlasting immortality: ".that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion --that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain--that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom--and that government of the people by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth." auk JS3AO -o!Zua~ojiq OKA euo~xe 9W-14XSUO eJA GTtq tFLZ p~q Oulim "laamaci Ruuwir U1A 0'4 99TOUV 901 U~ T3 Ro JjunoD zeGT iat 912 e e4qsUv~OH uaq 4'176T UK @:uoTje;nt sliodS o; Iamsuvy --JUST FOR LAFFS-Passenger to pilot: How are we doing? Pilot: We're lost, but we're making good time. A passenger on a train told a fellow traveler that she had been in San Jose. fy pronounce that wrong," he corrected he "In San Jose, we pronounce J as H. How long were you there?" "From Hune to Huly." vfr' by George Thomson Hello everybody. Here are the highlights from the world of local sports, but first my sports question. What is the record low score for a full U.S. open golf tournament? This week's stateside golf tournament will be the U.S. Golf Association Open at the Oakmont Country Club, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, June 14-16. This sportswriter "Tips the ole FedoraI to: Captain Weber, recently crowned 196 Base Golf Champion, and all who receiv awards at Friday evening's banquet. Tom Forbes, who bowled his way to the All Navy Finals at Pearl Harbor and finished eighth. Bill Hutto, the winningest softball pitcher on the base, and the CPO softball team for winning the second consecutive Base Softball Championship. Just proves there's life in the ole Gents yet. The Chiefs' team trophy will be presented to the CPO Club. Pre-season baseball play begins on Monday, June 18. Anyone desiring to play baseball in the Base League and not now affiliated with a team, contact your recreation officer for information covering your command's team. Naval Station, PWC, VU-10, NAS, Marines, Leeward Point NAS, Hospital and FTG Composite, have teams entered in the league. Sports Quote of the Week: Gus Maucuso, former catcher after watchi the swift Dodger, Willie Davis, run: long last baseball may have come up with guy who can steal first." bSUNDAY. JUNE 10.a 1962 IIDAY SUPPLEMENT


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