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Sunday Supplement

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Sunday Supplement
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U.S. Naval Base
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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A VOIGE OF THE PEOPLE

VOL. IINO. 63 .U.S. NAVAL BASE, GUANTANAMO BAY, CUBA MAY 27, 1962


As parents and visitors stood to honor William T. Sampson's Class of 1962, Junior Class Marshals proudly led them to their introduction to adulthood. Eight Juniors marched ahead of the twenty-three graduating Seniors to Guantanamo Bay's first Baccalaureate Servces. The service was held Sunday, May 20 at 4 p.m. in the Base Chapel's auditorium. LCDR W. L.
Maloy gave the Seniors their Baccalaureate Address. Mikki Carter, President of the Senior Class, moved emotions as she humbly gave the Creed of the Class of 1962. Miss Carter said that the Class of 1962 was an "average class" with the highest
4 hopes and with energy to visualize dreams. They are


SENIORS OF '62 -The twenty three William T. Sampson Seniors above graduated in ceremonies at the Open Air Assembly Hall
Thursday, May 24. Sampson Principal Leslie A. West said the 1962 class was the "most successful" in the school's histor7. About forty per cent of the 1962 graduating class
have been accepted to college. Photo by Douthit, PH3.
S


GRAY LADY CLASS TEN CAPPED AT HOSPITAL

The Base Hospital is now-graced with the presence of a new
class of volunteer Gray Ladies.
Gray Lady Class number ten was capped at the Hospital Monday, May 14 by, Commander Dorothy Eaton, NC, Chief Nurse.
Eight ladies received their caps from Commander Eaton at this time. Mrs. Edward J. ODonnell, honorary Chairman of
the Gray Ladies presented the pin to the new Gray Ladies.
Miss Beryle Trombley, Red Cross Field Director, presented
the class to Captain Miles C. Krepela, Commanding Officer,
USNH.
Also on the agenda were service awards. Edith Holt re4 eived a pin representing four years of service with the
ay Ladies. Six other ladies received pins marking their
rst full year with the volunteer organization.
For a photo of the new Gray Ladies, turn to page four.


willing to "risk" a "fail-. ure" to gain a "dream." What they have done has been for the "thrill of fulfillmen t"
The graduating class "stands erect" realizing, "this we have done with the help of God."
Maloy began a friendly, per5onal greeting with a sincere thankfulness for the honor of addressing of the (CONTINUED ON PAGE 3)






i I II IIII IIII I! I'1 ISUNDAYI . . SUPPLEMEN SUNDAY .1 f MAY.. 27-- 1962


PAGE 2


DOG'm TO


unmire, s class forward drin ,in the CPO Cl 17. The luncheon practice the goo been teaching h


kBarton


AWARD


w the Naval Base aval Operation's e Prevention. Base's fire prepast year.


vices which 3e Cemetaty are schedi by Poot#l Fleet Re-


serve Asso ciati(
All Base res these services.


its are invited to attend


PLAY BAL -Two strikes,.th leaguer Jim Zeal's stance sh, ination to hit that bali S that I've-got-confidence in ng waits for-the ball. Photo by


1 LET'S. GIVE VY RELIEF


aboul ,Navy

it the


year


SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT


SUNDAY,, MAY 27, 1962






%U I J( IhI IIIAYI II I vI I A9SU DA SU P EM N IPAI.. .E _I


Women's World
By Jacke Uoy4
The 1962 Sampson School has graduated,

forty-four of the approximate two hundred and sixty fa'miies to leave Guantanamo have departed, and the cry "Play ball,"
has sounded across our baseball diamonds. Baseball mtts are now a regular part of a young man's attire, and mothers once more prepare to chauffeur the family. taxi and to adapt
the hour of dinner to that of the game'
Yes, summer has arrived, and though we may note few changes in the weather, we mothers Will note many changes in our routines. Guantanamos exceptional recreation program Will soon be underway., with baseball heading the list' Tb people working in this part of the program alone are many, and it seems to me, we should know who they are. These men gave volunteered their time and energies, and on behalf of
r delighted, eager little baseball players others can
ow our appreciation too.
First, we might remember that on the baseball field, the
coachcarge not us. The managers have sa they
would like constrictive criti ci sm from parents, but at an appropriate place and time--not from the bleachers. during the game. Second, we might keep in mind the pint of the
"game is to play for the sport of playing--not for the neces0 oa ad. playe r wants t wi .
sity of ..winning. Every goo d -coach andpaewntto i,
but these are amateur coaches and littleboy players. Our children are growing up in a world ful of pressures-let's not add to these pressures. We are fortunate to have men in charge who want to teach and to help, whose ideas on organized baseball for children are sound and healthy.
Lt. E.R. Oscarson is President of the Junior-Baseball
League. Mr. L. A. Henthorne is player agent for the Pony League (open to boys thirteen through eleventh grade), with Messrs. Kleinmeyr, West and Hombeck as managers. The call here is for more players "We have only thirty-six boys, and four of them are leaving," Mr. Henthorne told me. A new Stature for this league wl be Saturday night games.
Lt. W' A. Godfrey heads the Little League (open to boys e through twelve). His managers-are K. L. LeBlanc, Joseph Rice, and George Wacker. "There will be fewer games
this season (about fifteen for our league)-," says Lt. Godfrey, "and there Will be no Sunday games for anyone. We are alo loigfrsoemtest epermaent scorekeepers. If you are interested, please call 85 56." �Chief W. G. Franklin asplayer agent, and MesSrs. Augst, Barry, lesn and Charles asmanagers, are the molderso t he Pe WeLeague(pnt boys seven through nie.These mnms haeteptecofJband thefersnsso
Fosdick. Teeaeover one huxrdboys in t i eague, adtecry here isfor more hel frm ay interested


It is possible we have some budding Mickey Mantles and e Snyders. On the other hand, if each boy who goes out
or baseball feels apart of a team, learns the game and ccompanying sportsmanship, and has a good time, no paren nor coach could ask for morel v ON "14 WwX


BACCALAUREATE SERVICES OON..


graduating cl ass.
The responsibilities of graduating classes in our society for the future is so evident, thia worldwill continue to*have the "thrust for leadership... excitmet and unbelieveable changes!
They must be met with "direct movement" by this year's graduating ..class, "they will be responsible' for the next 50 years," Maloy told the Class , fl 1962.
"Man can reach higher... you must give"
They must.make a working
social-formula so that people can. live together, -until each man accepts the dignity of man;an economical formula that will insure happiness; a technological formula that will-conquer outer-space and have faith to overcome f ear .Each man and woman must realize the thrillingpossibilities and demands of each of them and then demand more of hi melf. More than any other generationhas
demanded of itself.
The kind of people that are to control this world must be those that have a clear idea of what's right and what's wrong.
Societies must be based on our present ideas.,democragovern imslf .cn. ovr life This generation has the chance tocange life,

Alyugmenanwoe




an obe a "part four


society."
Jeanette Thacker's vords ended in prayer.


.8 S DIAI SUPPLEMENT


.tAMMAY.. AV ' - I A


I


PAGE 3





SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT


SUNDAY. MAY 27 1962


FROM THE CHAPLAIN'S DESK


THE VALIANT

Valiancy is a word that you might hesitate to use regarding yourself. You think of it as a word to use sparingly. One that should be used only two or three times in a generaetion. One that is applicable to those situations demanding extraordinary courage. You marvel at the exhibited bravery, the indomitable courage, the undying devotion to a cause. You may even wistfully have wished to have lived the life of some hero or heroine.
And yet, rhkat of you who go thru life day after day with the two edge sword of boredome and monotony hanging over your head?
What of you whose frustrations and crisis are not demmed important enough for the world to notice and recognize, but which are none the less painful? And you who have felt the ache of loneliness impossible to describe? And you humbled beyond justice by misunderstanding? And you who carry thru iife a physical, an emotional or a spiritual illness which despite your best efforts remains with you?
The challenges of life, hether t hey be physical, emotional or spiritual--the determination to adjust, to adapt, the will to focus on reality despite the lure of selfdelusion, demands a valianxy beyond the world's imagination.
Edward J. Dunn, LCDR, CHC, USN


LAD IN GRAY - Gray Lady Class number ten was capped at the Naval Base Hospital Monday, May 14. Members of the new class are, from left: Betty Ball; Margaret Breslin; Mildred Roberson; Beverly Wills; Barbara Ruth; and Isabel Graves. Marjorie Allen and Carolyn Crone aren't pictured. Photo by Engle PH3.


By George Thomson

Hello everybody, here are the highlights from the world of sports, but first my sports question...Only three drivers have found themselves in the winners circle at the Indy 500 Mile Classic, three times, can you name these drivers?
The biggest event on this week's sports calendar will be the traditional Memorial Day 500 mile automobile race at Indianapolis Indiana. Thirty-three men will drive fo nearly 3j hours in Indiana heat for the tcI prize money expected to be about, $115,000
kiss from a prominent female of the entertainment world, about $50,000 for endorsing automobile ads and enough headlines and publicity to keep him busy until driving time rolls around again next year. Here are a few facts concerning the 500 mile classic
you might find interesting.
Indianapolis Motor Speedway is located in Speedway City, Indiana, 7 miles from downtown Indianapolis. The first race meet was
held on August 19, 1909. Because of accidents, the track was paved with brick and a reppening was held in December of that year. Ray Harroun, won the first 500 mile race at the speedway on May 30, 1911 and the classic has been nin on Memorial Day ever since, with the exception of the war years. The
event annually draws the largest crowd to witness a single sporting event in America Estimates place the figure between 150-20c@ 000.
The Post Season Softball Tournament will be played this week and will be a doubleelimination affair..When this article went to press these teams had already earned tournament playoff berths: BASE CPOS; FLEET TRAINING GROUP; and MARINE BARRACKS. The
remaining berths (3), were to be di cided on the outcome of games played in the latter part of the week.
SPORTS QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Young female fan, complaining about Milwaukee not coming home until 10 days after the opening of the baseball season: "It isn't fair. On .opening day all the teams should be allowed to ope at home." ~ V6
NI NOM {ONI I~1flVN O0,a '6 a 'L�6T NI NC4 MVHI; 1flB'IM :9� '� ' Z6T NI N& 1XX IlflO'I


DA_(1 I


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L LI' I I 2 iI . . .[. I Il l L . . . .I . . . . . , . - - - -- . . .




Full Text

PAGE 1

U Samet A VOIGE OF THE PEOPLE VOL. II NO. 63 U. S. NAVAL BASE, GUANTANAMO BAY, CUBA MAY 27, 1962 PARENTS, JUNIORS HONOR W. T. SAMPSON CLASS OF 1962 AT BACCALAUREATE As parents and visitors stood to honor William T. Sampson's Class of 1962, Junior Class Marshals proudly led them to their introduction to adulthood. Eight Juniors marched ahead of the twenty-three graduating Seniors to Guantanamo Bay's first Baccalaureate Services. The service was held Sunday, May 20 at 4 p.m. in the Base Chapel's auditorium. LCDR W. L. Maloy gave the Seniors their Baccalaureate Address. Mikki Carter, President of the Senior Class, moved emotions as she humbly gave the Creed of the Class of 1962. Miss Carter said that the Class of 1962 was an "average class" with the highest hopes and with energy to visualize dreams. They are, SENIORS OF 162 -The twenty three William T. Sampson Seniors above graduated in ceremonies at the Open Air Assembly Hall Thursday, May 24. Sampson Principal Leslie A. West said the 1962 class was the "most successful" in the school's history. About forty per cent of the 1962 graduating class have been accepted to college. Photo by Douthit, PH3. GRAY LADY CLASS TEN CAPPED AT HOSPITAL The Base Hospital is now graced with the presence of a new. class of volunteer Gray Ladies. Gray Lady Class number ten was capped at the Hospital Monday, May 14 by Commander Dorothy Eaton, NC, Chief Nurse. Eight ladies received their caps from Commander Eaton at this time. Mrs. Edward J. O'Donnell, honorary Chairman of the Gray Ladies presented the pin to the new Gray Ladies. Miss Beryle Trombley, Red Cross Field Director, presented the class to Captain Miles C. Krepela, Commanding Officer, USNH. Also on the agenda were service awards. Edith Holt reeived a pin representing four years of service with the ay Ladies. Six other ladies received pins marking their rst full year with the volunteer organization. For a photo of the new Gray Ladies, turn to page four. willing to "risk" a "failure" to gain a "dream." What they have done has been for the "thrill of fulfillmen t." The graduating class "stands erect" realizing, "this we have done with the help of God." Maloy began a friendly, personal greeting with a sincere thankfulness for the honor of addressing of the (CONTINUED ON PAGE 3)

PAGE 2

SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT SUNDAY MAY 27, 1962 PAGE 2 GOOD MANNERS ON DISPLAY AT YOUNGSTER'S LUNCHEON YOUR MANNERS ARE SHOWING -First Graders of Mrs. Amelia Dunmire's class put their best table manners forward daring their formal luncheon held in the CPO Club dining room Thursday, May 17. The luncheon was designed to put into practice the good manners Mrs. Dunmire has been teaching her class. The boys and girls were dressed in party clothes and polite thank yous and pleases were heard through the meal. Photo by Barton PH3. BASE RECEIVES CNO'S FIVE PREVENTION AWARD For the third year in a row the Naval Base has received the Chief of Naval Operation's Certificate of Merit for Fire Prevention. The certificate cites the Base's fire prevention practices during the past year. Captain Alfred Gerkin, Naval Base Chief of Staff and Captain George C. Ball Jr., Commanding Officer, Naval Station presented the Certificate of Merit to Base Fire Chief J.C. Pinckard. DON'T FORGET the Memorial Day services which will be held at the Naval Base Cemetary Wednesday, May 30. The services are scheduled to begin at 11 a.m. sharp. The services will be conducted by Post#1 American Legion and Branch 100, Fleet Reserve Association. All Base residents are invited to attend these services. DOG-GONE IT LET'S GIVE TO THE NAVY RELIEF EVERYBODY'S IN ON THE ACT -How about you? Have you given to Navy Relief? Navy Relief can help you when you need it the most. Let's get in on the givirg act today! IT'S "PLAY BALL" TIME AGAIN PLAY BALL -Two strikes, three balls Po leaguer Jim Zeal's stance shows the dete ination to hit that ball Steven Kith that I've-got-confidence in my pitcher as W waits for the ball. Photo by Douthit, PH3. SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT SUNDAY MAY 27, 1962

PAGE 3

Sf MAY 7, SNT Women's World By Jackie Lloyd The 1962 class of William T. Sampson School has graduated, forty-four of the approximate two hundred and sixty families to leave Guantanamo have departed, and the cry "Play ball," has sounded across our baseball diamonds. Baseball mitts are now a regular part of a young man's attire, and mothers once more prepare to chauffeur the family taxi and to adapt the hour of dinner to that of the game! Yes, summer has arrived, and though we may note few changes in the weather, we mothers will note many changes in our routines. Guantanamo's exceptional recreation program will soon be underway, with baseball heading the list! The people working in this part of the program alone are many, and it seems to me, we should know who they are. These men ve volunteered their time and energies, and on behalf of r delighted, eager little baseball players, we mothers can ow our appreciation too. First, we might remember that on the baseball field, the coach is in charge-not us. The managers have said they would like constructive criticism from parents, but at an appropriate place and time--not from the bleachers during the game. Second, we might keep in mind the point of the game is to play for the sport of playing-not for the necessity of winning. Every good coach and player wants to win, but these are amateur coaches and little-boy players. Our children are growing up in a world full of pressures-let's not add to these pressures. We are fortunate to have men in charge who want to teach and to help, whose ideas on organized baseball for children are sound and healthy. Lt. E. R. Oscarson is President of the Junior Baseball League. Mr. L. A. Henthorne is player agent for the Pony League (open to boys thirteen through eleventh grade), with Messrs. Kleinmeyer, West and Hornbeck as managers. The call here is for more players. "We have only thirty-six boys, and four of them are leaving," Mr. Henthorne told me. A new eature for this league will be Saturday night games. Lt. W. A. Godfrey heads the Little League (open to boys en through twelve). His managers are K. L. LeBlanc, Joseph Rice, and George Wacker. "There will be fewer games this season (about fifteen for our league)," says Lt. Godfrey, "and there will be no Sunday games for anyone. We are also looking for some mothers to be permanent scorekeepers. If you are interested, please call 8556." Chief W. G. Franklin as player agent, and Messrs. August, Barry, Alderson, and Charles as managers, are the molders of the Pee Wee League (open to boys seven through nine). These men must have the patience of Job and the fearlessness of Fosdick. There are over one hundred boys in this league, and the cry here is for more help from any interested parents. It is possible we have some budding Mickey Mantles and .e Snyders. On the other hand, if each boy who goes out or baseball feels a part of a team, learns the game and companying sportsmanship, and has a good time, no parent nor coach could ask for morel BACCALAUREATE SERVICES ON.m TINUED graduating class. The responsibilities of graduating classes in our society for the future is so evident, this world. will continue to have the "thrust for leadership., excitment and unbelieveable changes They must be met with "direct movement" by this year's graduating class, "they will be responsible for the next 50 years," Maloy told the Class oft 1962. "Man can reach higher. you must givel" They must make a working social formula so that people can live together, until each man accepts the dignity of man; an economically formula that will insure happiness; a technological formula that will conquer outer-space and have faith to overcome fear Each man and woman must realize the thrilling possibilities and demands of each of them and then demand more of himself. More than any other generation has demanded of itself. The kind of people that are to control this world must be those that have a clear idea of %hat's right and what's wrong. Societies must be based on our present ideas, democratic ideals, a man that can govern himself, can govern life. This generation has the chance to change life, not to just plan it. All young men and women must be confident, "not to be afraid to be intellectual," to be "commeted to learning youringenuity," and to be a "part of our society." Jeanette Thacker's words ended in prayer. SU NAY MAY 1962 -O i PAGE SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT

PAGE 4

SUNDAY SUl PRETh it FROM THE CHAPLAIN'S DESK THE VALIANT Valiancy is a word that you might hesitate to use regarding yourself. You think of it as a word to use sparingly. One that should be used only two or three times in a generation. One that is applicable to those situations demanding extraordinary courage. You marvel at the exhibited bravery, the indomitable courage, the undying devotion to a cause. You may even wistfully have wished to have lived the life of some hero or heroine. And yet, what of you who go thru life day after day with the two edge sword of boredome and monotony hanging over your head? What of you whose frustrations and crisis are not demmed important enough for the world to notice and recognize, but which are none the less painful? And you who have felt the ache of loneliness impossible to describe? And you humbled beyond justice by misunderstanding? And you who carry thru life a physical, an emotional or a spiritual illness which despite your best efforts remains with you? The challenges of life, whether they be physical, emotional or spiritual--the determination to adjust, to adapt, the will to focus on reality despite the lure of selfdelusion, demands a valianxy beyond the world's imagination. Edward J. Dunn, LCDR, CHC, USN LADIES IN GRAY -Gray Lady Class number ten was capped at the Naval Base Hospital Monday, May 14. Members of the new class are, from left: Betty Ball; Margaret Breslin; Mildred Roberson; Beverly Wills; Barbara Ruth; and Isabel Graves. Marjorie Allen and Carolyn Crone aren't pictured. Photo by Engle PH3. PPLEMENT SUNDAY, MAY 27. 1962 By George Thomson Hello everybody, here are the highlights from the world of sports, but first my sports question.Only three drivers have found themselves in the winners circle at the Indy 500 Mile Classic, three times, can you name these drivers? The biggest event on this week's sports calendar will be the traditional Memorial Day 500 mile automobile race at Indianapolis Indiana. Thirty-three men will drive nearly 32 hours in Indiana heat for the t prize money expected to be about, $115,000 kiss from a prominent female of the entertainment world, about $50,000 for endorsing automobile ads and enough headlines and publicity to keep him busy until driving time rolls around again next year. Here are a few facts concerning the 500 mile classic you might find interesting. Indianapolis Motor Speedway is located in Speedway City, Indiana, 7 miles from downtown Indianapolis. The first race meet was held on August 19, 1909. Because of accidents, the track was paved with brick and a reppening was held in December of that year. Ray Harroun, won the first 500 mile race at the speedway on May 30, 1911 and the classic has been run on Memorial Day ever since, with the exception of the war years. The event annually draws the largest crowd to witness a single sporting event in Americ Estimates place the figure between 150-20 000. The Post Season Softball Tournament will be played this week and will be a doubleelimination affair.When this article went to press these teams had already earned tournament playoff berths: BASE CPOS; FLEET TRAINING GROUP; and MARINE BARRACKS. The remaining berths (3), were to be dicided on the outcome of games played in the latter part of the week. SPORTS QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Young female fan, complaining about Milwaukee not coming home until 10 days after the opening of the baseball season: "It isn't fair. On opening day all the teams should be allowed to ope at home."6 mi Miom nouiurnvw oliv'6"KL"6T NIl iOiC MVHS


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