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Sunday Supplement

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Sunday Supplement
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U.S. Naval Base
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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English

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Indian
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Gitmo Review
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Gitmo Gazette
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Guantanamo Gazette
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N


"A VOIGE OF THE PEOPLE \VOL IINO"-. 54 .U. S. NAVAL BASE,- GUANTANAMO BAY, CUBA MARCH 25, -1962


CNO0 say s We Will MainainOurRig hts T This Basei

_6 h i 'o''NTh Nal as
Admiral George W. Anderson, Chief of "Naval Opertions,arrved on the Nav e, ' nesday, Narch: 21.... for ' a: short orientation visit. Admiral Anderson was en route to Vina De] Mar, Chile for a conference of American Naval Chiefs.
Immediately after his arrival Admiral Anderson was given a briefing by Rear Admir Edward J. O'Donnell, ComavBase, and Coloyel M. Adelman, CO Marine Barracks. This include rather brief run along the fence line perimeter where the Chief of Naval Operations a


fade away."
The Chief of Naval Opera(WNuINUED ,ON PAGE 3),





SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT


SUNDAY MARCH 25, 1962'


BASE ARTSOCIETY FORMED

Webster's dictionary says art is creative-s ness, skill, a making or doing of things that have form or beauty. Mrs. Sandra'MacArthur, .,an ..art ..major. at the ....University .of
Illinois, and wife of LTJG Don - MacArthur, was i nstrumental in. forming an .art society on the base in January of this year.
Th-rough the - society, theyong nd very talented . .M r. Macrhr oe o put Mr.


SANDRA MACARTHUR
Webster's definition into use by holding informal classes and discussions on art.
Being in its infancy, the group needed a starting point. The painting of still. life was selected. Mrs. MacArthur explained that still life is composed of straight and curved lines...lights and shadows.'.. the basis of all objects.
There are 16 serious members in this art group, ranging from the irexperienced, but willing to try, to the more experienced that have exhibited their fine works.
In art, says Mrs. MacArthur, you* have a tangable object when the labor is finished.


MOPPING UP - Hosemen in "hot suits" advance on the fuel fire after the initial foam blanket is laid on the flames.


YOU CRASH WE DASH, NAS CRASH CREW

If a '.man saves one life-as a crash cre member, all'.the ..expense of his training is returned many fold," said Robert Shipley, ...ACC, .Chief ...in .Charge .of ..the_..NAS_. McCalla
Crash Crew..
There are 32 men in the ,IvIcCalla -crash.crew and "each is trained.-to the.. n 'th degree in aircraft fi re f i gh tin.Theme rain, with actial . fires;s -, - un de r c on diti on' made t o- simulate aircraft accidents. The fires, drills lectures and movies round. out the ''crash crewman' s rigorus training. Robert Benchoff, -ABl;, attached to the crash -.crew, says the McCall crew can


ON THE SPOT - A blanket of foam is spread on a one hundred gallon fuel fire by crash crew members manning "foam Cannons". The fire is part of the training
the McCalla crash crewmen receive.
handle any emergency which might arise at the field." He added!that the crash creN can reach any spot on the field with truck men and equipment ready to fight a blaze 30 to 45 seconds.
SA m chemcalknown to most of us as "foam" is used extensively by the crash crew to fight fuel fires. In bringing a blaze- to a halt the foam is sprayed like a blanket, smothering the flames, then the crew members dressed in asbestos and aluminum "hot suits" close in with hoses charged with the foam. A five-man crew, one in the fire truck, two manning foam cannons and two hosemen can quell a wind whipped, one hundred gallon fuel fire in about two minutes.
During the working day, when planes are operating in the area, the crash crew stand a "hot spot" watch. A fire truck and crm members are positioned just off the runwi in an area designated as a hot spot. The motto---"You crash we dash...You light' em we fight' em...We go to blazes for you."


PAGE 2


Ar,






SUNDAY MARCH | ... Il III 196.SUNDA SUPPLEMENT. PAGE 3 ....


CNO CONT�INUED

SI77 Z ssedhi-s feelings
that ..the' individual,.person. or this base .is very importart to the security of our na tio by saying: -Every individual we've got in the red- S..ervices and every civilian -that works for' the Government of' the United StateS an d: ,.. every dependent' is a very important ind4vidual . and the work he or She does is extremely important to the security of our courtry.- And so I say that the rst and most important ing that each one of us
n do is to know the job that we have to do and to fulfill the duties of that position to the very best of our ability.
"We must remain physically alert, mentally alert and ready to fulfill these duties which disolve so seri-ously upon us." Soon after his talk Admiral Anderson and his party departed the Naval Base for
Vina Del Mar, Chile.


Women's World

By ,Jaekie Lloyd
I dropped in on a practice of "Dial M for Murder" last Monday evening, and seems to me this play has all the possibilities/ of being one of the Theater Guild's best productions. Under the able direction of Gary Schlosser, who by the way holds a degree in radio andTV, everyne and everything is being whipped into rapid readiness.
The *cast consists of five peOple, four of Whom have
-peared :previously before Guantanamo audiences. Don Rhamey and Luckey Heath, two "Gazebo" favorites, wil be much in
evidence: this production. What will the Guild do when Luckey and Don depart these parts? Roger Whitcomb, editOrial writer for the Gitmo Gazette, switches his Santa suit for a police inspector's uniform. Surely you remember Roger and his holiday performance for the kiddies over WGBY-TV. Sam Roehl (a multiple personality ranging from "Ma Claus" to "Top of the Morning") lends her very feminine charms to brighten up an otherwise all-male cast. Jack Modesette, "The All American Boy" and the only exception to the rule of ]previous Gitmo performances, is a new face to this theater group, but certainly not new to dramatics in general.
"Dial M for Murder" is an excellent drama, full of suspense and intrigue. If by chance you have seen the movie or stage play, you should have forgotten the plot by now. The cast is enthusiastic and hard-working in its maneuver to bring to you a good evening's entertainment. Make your reservations today for April 4., 5, 6, or 7.
Now. . have only one question.. ,is Roger really supposed to come crashing through the: window during the murder scene? For sure, IPm going to pay my money and find out'


RED CROSS SERVES


-rh e A4WRA NEWSG'
APOO.'eW yot,,


ISN'--rki MY. NOME" AWAY fV%2MA HOME"


BUILD A STRONG, SECURE FUTURE---BUY AND SAVE U.S. SAVINGS BONDS


Some of ...the foreign posts where our fellow servicemen
n ow serve are hard to locate even in a geography book. But as l!ong as a man or woman in American uniform is there, Red Cross can be called upon for help.
-There are.. some 2100 nate ional Red Cross career workers serving. members of the American military instalations- everywhere.
The . services they perform f or us range from helpi ng to arrange emergency leaves to granting financial aid. About 38 cents of every Red Cross dollar was spent last year in services to men in uniform and veterans.


ART SHOW DURING PLAY

Base residents wi be in for a double treat during :the run of "Dial X for Murder" to be presented at Morin Center, April h, 5, 6, and 7.
Pain t brushes are. fly-in g as base artists are gettn together their entries -for the next exhibition, -which will. coincide with the play dates, and will be shown in the NormnCenter .auditorium.,
Your play ticket will be the fare to view the exhibition., Sunday afternoon;. April 8, the exhibition wiUl
be open- to the public.


S U N D A 1 , I A R C H -i , 1 9 - 2 1


S TPAY:SUPPLEMENT


PAGE3






PAGE ....SUNDAY.SUPPLEMENT SUNDAY MARCH 2I 196


FROM ,THE

CHAPLAIN'S DESK


CO-OPERATION

here is a story to tell the next time you want to illustrate the value of cooperation.
A group of boys in the mountains of Eastern Kentucky would indulge in a little fox hunting for recreation on Sunday afternoons. One memorable day the jIack of hounds very soon picked up a fox trail and was hot on the chase, The boys scrambled to a knoll overlooking the valley, and saw the fox out ahead.
Right below them was a hollow log. The fox headed straight for it, scampered through, and ran on. The dogs sniffed at the entrance, then like good hounds ran to the other end, picked up the scent again, and dashed on in, full pursuit.
The fox led the hounds on a merry chase in a tremedous circle back to the hollow log, through which he ran again. He repeated this maneuver time after time. Finally the dogs grew visibly tired, but the fox seemed as fresh as ever.
All of a sudden the boys caught on to what was actually happening. They ran to the log poked in a long stick--and out sprang a fox. There were two foxes' Each time Fox No. 1 dashed. into the log, Fox No. 2 would come plunging out of the exit at the other end, to lead. the hounds on an exhausting chase while No. 1 caught his breath and awaited his turn. They had learned the big secret of :CO-OIPERATIONI
R.K. Wilson Station Chaplain


By Jim Prejean
Amidst the softball furor, some 12 volleyball teams- from the base, half of these
teams playing at Leeward Point, fought for the right to play in the Base Championship Tournament held at the Naval Station Recreation Area volleyball court on Feb. 20 and 21
VS-935, one of the teams which won this right, requested to play in the tournament even though it meant flying back.from the States. Unfortunately, transportation was not available and the team was unable to come back It is indeed gratifying to kno that these people felt strongly enough make such an effort to participate in thi tournamert.
Marine Security and Anglico were the Leeward*Point representatives, while TYA, a VU10 group and Marine Barracks were the other teams in the four team, double elimination tournament.
On the first day of tournament play, Marine Security defeated the Marine Barracks in the first match. TIA was victorious over Anglico. Marine Security overpowered .TMAto remain undefeated :and Marine Barracks was eliminated from the tournament by Anglico after three very close games which could have gone either way until the last spiked ball.
Last Wednesday night, with a win each and playing the third game, Anglico came back t, defeat TMA. But Marine Security proved t be too tough for Anglico and took two strain ght games to become the 1962 Base Volleyball Champions.
A base* team composed of seven members of th winning team and seven players selected by thewinning team' s manager is, scheduled, to, :" leave, today to take part inthe ComTen Tournament.' The- tou''rney is being held at the U*.S. Naval Station, San Juan.
Congratulations to Marine Security and lots of luck to the base team in San Juan. ALL THE: WAY HOME - Don"West, hurler for Leeward k-oint' s softball .te m, leaps onto horne plate. West's run was Leeward's first of the night.i Despite Don's. pitching and beautiful homer by "'Tex" Slaton, L. P.'U catcher, Marine Barracks took the MondaW night .over-time game, 21-1)4. William Clark was winning pitcher.


tJ
:SUNDAY:1MARCH 25, 1962


PAGE! 4


SUNDAY: SUPPLEMENT




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PAGE 1

A VOIGE OF THE PEOPLE VOL II 1N. 54 U. S. NAVAL BASE, GUANTANAMO BAY, CUBA MARCH 2, 1962 CNQ Says We Will Maintain Our Rights To This Base Admiral George W. Anderson, Chief of Naval Operations, arrived on the Naval Base Wednesday, March 21 for a short orientation visit. Admiral Anderson was enroute to Vina Del Mar, Chile for a conference of American Naval Chiefs. Immediately after his arrival Admiral Anderson was given a briefing by Rear Admiral Edward J. O'Donnell, ComavBase, and Colonel M. Adelman, CO Marine Barracks. This included rather brief run along the fence line perimeter where the VISITING CONGRESSMEN -Members of the Inter-American Sub-Committee of the House of Foreign Affairs are shown at Suicide Gap during their visit to the Naval Base March '1. The Congressmen are: Armistead Selden, S Dem. Ala.; DB. Fascell, Dem. Fla.; Omar Burleson, De~m Tex.; L. Beckworth, Dem. Tex.; C.E. Merrow,.Rep. N.H.; W. S. Mailliard, Rep. Calif.; and J.I. Whalley Rep. penn. CONGRESSMEN SEE NO CUBAN ARMY BUILDUP Seven Congressmen, all members of the Inter-American SubCommittee of the House of Foreign Affairs, arrived on the Naval Base Thursday night, March 15 and were greeted by Rear Admiral Edward J. O'Donnell, ComNavBase. Friday morning the Congressmen were given a briefing in Flag Plot, and later toured the outer perimeter of the base. The Congressmen ate the noon meal with constituants of their respective states in th.e NAS mess hall. The office of Representative Armistead Selden Jr., Dem. Alabama, chairman of the sub-committee, said, "there have been persistant reports of troop movements and increased Cuban military capability in the vicinity outside the base." owever, after extensive tours and briefings by the Naval Se Commander and unit Commanding Officers, the Congressmen d no visual evidence of a buildup of Cuban soldiers and equipment around the base. Chief of Naval Operations hvas briefed on the readiness of the Naval Base. Admiral Anderson addressed a representative cross section of the base population at the Naval Station Movie Lyceum that afternoon. In his short talk, Admiral Anderson said: We have here in this island a very unfortunate situation. We know that here in this island, people who love freedom, cannot enjoy freedom. We hope that this condition will not prevail for long. We wish the people of Cuba well, because we have over the years enjoyed a great affection and friendship with these people. But we believe that this base here for the American Navy and Marine Corps here in the orient of Cuba serves well, this freedom. "We intend to maintain our rights in this base.wc will live our lives normally.We will provide an example of freedom--of spiritual strength--of physical and mental stamina in the hope that before too long this peril which exists in this part of the world will fade away." The Chief of Naval Opera(WONTINUED ON PAGE 3)

PAGE 2

PAGE 2 SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT SUNDAY MARCH 2$, l9~ BASE ART SOCIETY FORMED Webster' s dictionary says art is creative. ness, skill, a making or doing of things that have form or beauty. Mrs. Sandra MacArthur; an art major at the University of Illinois, and wife of LTJG Don MacArthur, was instrumental :in forming an art society on the base in January of this year. Through the society, the young and very talented Mrs. MacArthur hopes to put Mr. SANDRA MACARTHUR Webster's definition into use by holding informal classes and discussions on art. Being in its infancy, the group needed a starting point. The painting of still life was selected. Mrs. MacArthur explained that still life is composed of straight and curved lines.lights and shadows.the basis of all objects. There are 16 serious members in this art group, ranging from the inexperienced, but willing to try, to the more experienced that have exhibited their fine works. In art, says Mrs. MacArthur, you'have a tangable object when the labor is finished. MOPING UP -Hosemen in "hot suits" :dvance on the fuel fire after the initial foam blanket is laid on the flames. YOU CRASH WE DASH .NAS CRASH CREW "If a man saves one life as a crash cre member, all the expense of his training is returned many fold," said Robert Shipley, ACC, Chief in Charge of the NAS iMcCalla Crash Crew. There are 32 men in the McCalla crash crew and each is trained to the n'th degree in aircraft fire ,fighting. The men train with actual fires, under conditions made to simulate aircraft accidents, The fires, drills lectures and movies round out the crash crewman's rigorus training. Robert Ben choff, AB1, attached to the crash crew, says the McCall crew can ON THE SPOT -A blanket of foam is spread on a one hundred gallon fuel fire by crash crew members manning "foam cannons". The fire is part of the training the McCalla crash crewmen receive. handle any emergency which might arise at the field." He added that the crash cre can reach any spot on the field with truck men and equipment ready to fight a blaze 30 to 45 seconds. A chemical known to most of us as "foam", is used extensively by the crash crew to fight fuel fires. In bringing ablaze to a halt the foam is sprayed like a blanket, smothering the flames, then the crew members dressed in asbestos and aluminum "hot suits" close in with hoses charged with the foam. A five-man crew, one in the fire truck, two manning foam cannons and two hosemen can quell a wind whipped, one hundred gallon fuel fire in about two minutes. During the working day, when planes are operating in the area, the crash crew stand a "hot spot" watch. A fire truck and cr members are positioned just off the runw in an area designated as a hot spot. The motto---"You crash we dash.You light'em we fight'em.We go to blazes for you." SUNDAY MARCH 25, 19 62 PAGE 2 SUNDAY, SUPPLEMENT

PAGE 3

SUNDAY MARCH 2~, 1962 SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT PAGE 3 CNO CONTINUED on77exrZsed his feelings8 that the individual person on this base is very important to the security of our nation by saying: Every individual we've got in the Earned Services and every civilian that works for the Government of the United States and every dependent is a very important individual and the work he or she does is extremely important to the security of our courtry. And so I say that the -rst and most important ing that each one of us n do is to know the job that we have to do and to fulfill the duties of that position to the very best of our ability. "We must remain physically alert, mentally alert and ready to fulfill these duties which disolve so seri-ously upon us." Soon after his talk Admiral Anderson and his party departed the Naval Base for Vina Del Mar, Chile. Women's World By Jackie Lloyd I dropped in on a practice of "Dial M for Murder" last Monday evening, and seems to me this play has all the possibilities of being one of the Theater Guild's best productions. Under the able direction of Gary Schlosser, who by the way holds a degree in radio and TV, everyone and everything is being whipped into rapid readiness. The cast consists of five people, four of whom have appeared previously before Guantanamo audiences. Don Rhamey and Luckey Heath, two "Gazebo" favorites, will be much in evidence this production, What will the Guild do when Luckey and Don depart these parts? Roger Whitcomb, editorial writer for the Gitmo Gazette, switches his Santa suit for a police inspector's uniform. Surely you remember Roger and his holiday performance for the kiddies over WGBY-TV. Sam Roehl (a multiple personality ranging from "Ma Claus" to "Top of the Morning") lends her very feminine charms to brighten up an otherwise all-male cast. Jack Modesette, "The All American boy" and the only exception to the rule of previous Gitmo performances, is a new face to this theater group, but certainly not new to dramatics in general. "Dial M for Murder" is an excellent drama, full of suspense and intrigue. If by chance you have seen the movie or stage play, you should have forgotten the plot by now. The cast is enthusiastic and hard-working in its maneuver to bring to you a good evening's entertainment. Make your reservations today for April 4, 5, 6, or 7. Now, ..1 have only one question. ..is Roger really supposed to come crashing through the window during the murder scene? For sure, I'm going to pay my money and find out' RED CROSS SERVES' 1zheAMFEA NEWS APo/oNew Yo-rk,>VY. "I KNOW E6 R, LIrAFTER ALL, 16N'-rT-Is MV NOME AWAY Fom H OM E BUILD A STRONG, SECURE FUTURE---BUY AND SAVE U.S. SAVINGS BONDS Some of the foreign posts where our fellow servicemen now serve are hard to locate even in a geography book. But as long as a man or woman in American uniform is there, Red Cross can be called upon for help. There are some 2100 national Red Cross career workers serving members of the American military installations everywhere. The services they perform for us range from helping to arrange emergency leaves to granting financial aid. About 38 cents of every Red Cross dollar was spent last year in services to men in uniform and veterans. ART SHOW DURING PLAY Base residents will be in for a double treat during the run of "Dial M for Murder" to be presented at Morin Center, April 4, 5, 6, and 7. Faint brushes are flying as base artists are getting together their entries for the next exhibition which will coincide with the play dates, and will be shown in the Morin Center auditorlums Your play ticket will be the fare to view the exhibition. Sunday afternoon, April 8, the exhibition will be open to the public. SUNDAY MARCH 25, 1962 SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT PAGE ,3

PAGE 4

PAGE )~ SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT SUNDAY MARCH 25, 1962 FROM THE CHAPLAIN'S DESK CO-OPERATION here is a story to tell the next time you want to illustrate the value of cooperation. A group of boys in the mountains of Eastern Kentucky would indulge in a little fox hunting for recreation on Sunday afternoons. One memorable day the lack of hounds very soon picked up a fox trail and was hot on the chase. The boys scrambled to a knoll overlooking the valley, and saw the fox out ahead. Right below them was a hollow log. The fox headed straight for it, scampered through, and ran on. The dogs sniffed at the entrance, then like good hounds ran to the other end, picked up the scent again, and dashed on in full pursuit. The fox led the hounds on a merry chase in a tremedous circle back to the hollow log, through which he ran again. He repeated this maneuver time -after time. Finally the dogs grew visibly tired, but the fox seemed as fresh as ever. All of a sudden the boys caught on to what was actually happening. They ran to the log poked in a long stick--and out sprang a fox. There were two foxes! Each time Fox No. 1 dashed into the log, Fox No. 2 would come plunging out of the exit at the other endto lead the hounds on an exhausting chase while No.1 caught his breath and awaited his turn. They had learned the big secret of CO-OPERATIONI R.K. Wilson Station Chaplain By Jim Prejean Amidst the softball furor, some 12 volleyball teams from the base, half of these teams playing at Leeward Point, fought for the right to play in the Base Championship Tournament held at the Naval Station Recreation Area volleyball court on Feb. 20 and 21 VS-935, one of the teams which won this right, requested to play in the tournament even though it meant flying back.from the States. Unfortunately, transportation was not available and the team was unable to come back, It is indeed gratifying to kno that these people felt strongly enough make such an effort to participate in thi tournament. Marine Security and Anglico were the Leeward Point representatives, while TMVA, a VU10 group and Marine Barracks were the other teams in the four team, double elimination tournament. On the first day of tournament play, Marine Security defeated the Marine Barracks in the first match. TMA was victorious over Anglico. Marine Security overpowered TMA to remain undefeated and Marine .Barracks was eliminated from the tournament by Anglico after three very close games which could have gone either way until the last spiked ball. Last Wednesday night, with a win each and playing the third game, Anglico came back t defeat TMA. But Marine Security proved t be too tough for Anglico and took two straiI ght games to become the 1962 Base Volleyball Champions. A base' team composed of seven members of the winning team and seven players selected by the winning team's manager is scheduled to leave today to take part in the ComTen Tournament. The tourney is being held at the U.S. Naval Station, San Juan. Congratulations to Marine Security and lots of luck to the base team. in San Juan. ALL THE WAY HOME -Don West, hurler for Leeward roint's softball tegm, leaps onto home plate. West's run was Leeward's first of the night. Despite Don's pitching and beautiful homer by "Tex" Slaton, L.P.' catcher, Marine Barracks took the Monda-W night over-time game, 21-14. William Clark was winning pitcher. PAGE & SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT SUN DAY IMARC,,H 259, 1962