Citation
Sunday Supplement

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Title:
Sunday Supplement
Creator:
U.S. Naval Base
Place of Publication:
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Publisher:
U.S. Naval Base
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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Copyright, Sunday Supplement. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Related Items

Preceded by:
Indian
Succeeded by:
Gitmo Review
Related Item:
Gitmo Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Gazette
Related Item:
Daily Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Daily Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Bay Gazette

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Full Text








-A VOIGE OF THE PEOPLE


When Yo
because you gave....Last year, here in Guantanamo-Bay the American Red Cross individiLally handled 890 cases. Not to be thought of js mere figures, these are true instance where the Red oss Field Director was lled on to help someone. M oe with no other place to turn but to the Red Cross.
However, figuratively speaking --- t833 wires were sent out last year and 886 wires were received in ha.dling these 890 cases. In checking, the absolute minimum cost for a wire is one dollar. So simple mathematics says an absolute minimum of $1719 was spent by the Red Cross in Guantanamo in wire communications. Loans and grants on the base for 1961 totals $3,I15.
*. This includes family asstan, transportation, Id loans for emergency leave.
American Red Cross Gray Ladies, during 1961, served a total of 2,830 hours in the .Base Hospital--coxletely voluntarily. Approximat. ely .60 Guantanamo elemen, tary school children were giyen eye tests with the asslistance of the Gray Ladies.,
Many people hear adverse
-and harsh criticisms directed toward the Red Cross.
eof these critical rerk .are from oPinions from
! befremany of .us were oorn...Having been passed on over the years.


Give.... We Can Help


One of the questions which a Navyman may ask is: "Does the Red Cross charge me in
the armed forces for arything?" The answer, from
General Alfred X Gruenther, President of the ARC is: "It does not. In WWII, below cost charges were made for meals ad lodging in offpost clubs and hotels. This was done at the specific request of the War Department, to avoid creating -a morale
problem among Allied service men who were required to pay for services in their ow club an d canteens." This question alwys aries--"The Red Cross never did anything-for me." To this the ARC sayst "Many ser vicemen need and use servic es from the Red Cross. Many (Continued on page two)


Golf Pro Gives to Charity Paul Hahn the magician golfer enriched-the- Navy.Relief during his .viit to the Naval Base, Sunday March 14
Hahn challenged the audience gathered at the golf course to watch his performance to duplicate one of his trick shots: Knocking a golf ball from a three-foot high tee.
If anyone could do this, Hahn ann ounced he would donate $10 to their favorite charity.'
Not one but three: Kennoy Frier; Capt. Bruce Weber; and Smoky Lawrance combined to make the fifficult shot, and the Navy Relief is ten dollars the better.
MX__ K


II7






If It's


NEWS I

Call 9247-9944


Base Residents.witness Paul Hahn's ,Magic Golf


Base residents who thought for a gay awakening at the Guar day. There a tall, handsome ext a broad grin, unloaded his 904 shots. He combined the tricks with a lucid golf clic in his one hour show at the course.
Hahn's most difficUlt feat of the ,afrnon was his double action series. In this, Habn griped a righty' irm in each'hand and stepped up to a dozen balls :teed in line. Swinging altemately, forehand and backhand, he whiped out twelve perfect one handers in perfect caden Ce.
When asked why he 'stays out of tournament golf, he saidI'm Just not a copetitor. Haven't got that old fire." Nevertheless, he enJoys the deep .respect of his fellow professidcals,-They consider- that:, he does more for g olf than any ,other practitioner.'*

Riyme o theTM- ,0%



WH*rOUP OU
COUNTRY/

ToA TEAT2
EXTENT'-h
PS PEN 2
.Age -.AP


they understood golf were in itanano Gold O use last Bunrovert named Paul Hahn, with )oumd bagfuill of "Magic" golf

RED CROSS CONTINUED Servicemen may never have personal or family problem that require Red Cros assistance; perhaps they have not -Wben sick or wounded-and in need of blood or Red Cross welfare and recreation services An military hospitals. Even so, those with no personal experience of Red Cross assistance should recognize that a tremendous amount of service iS rendered to otherS."
Nationally, during 1961, there -were 82,000 service families helped ... -each month by the Red+ Cross. Sevihng the armed forces is the largest ~ i sige-o the Red Cross program. It requires about :35 percent of each anrual- budget and some, 55 percent of all staff and volunteer time.,
In this decade _when the morale- of ur IMed forces i's severly ted by. the Incpreazin, ten 4cm. of,;the ol War, the symbol .of Red Cross is arivnder that the people ,back ,,home h&ve not forgottenn,


Base Marine Talks
With Bob Hope
Staff Sergeant Allen P. Smith Jr., Communications Chief, attached to Marine Barracks here was the first of many servicemm from around the world to thank Bob Hope on Sunday, March 40 for Hope' s almost continuous visits to the U.S Armed Forces and to congratula the comedian upon receivii the Screen Producers Guill "Mile Stone" award.
Smith, talking via shortwave radio,- told Hope, we will "never: forget ',your Christ ms 9 visit here at Guantanamo Bay. .
The Sergeant's hobby as .-an amateur radio.... operator gives pleasure to mamy base residents. He makes frequent cls to "HometOdI, US" for mmy of the pefsonnel station 6hre.
Smith xtend his intereats into marksmanship, as an -. officer in the Gi o Club. During the: past j icr League baseball eas' Smith managed the White So the League Champions. '


Wmen o train in Hospia
Eight baseladies cmpete ed~their 12 hourorientation classes with the GrayLady
group -lst We& esday and are now Prepared to take 12 .our. of 4wh, job training in a probationary + status in




inced Gray Ladies. V
(Continued Orb pae three)






Women's World


Perusing the ca Valentine' a Day, of a story,, and t Holi.days in Gu Just how differe entine rommay receive? Well
r~a~~m are m gn


greater thoughts However, I had our home was the tim. It did n was the creditab]


The Cbpl.c th k for


( to a s tnat n s, but are cap


our


Look WhO's He


anq
























Prelude to awin - .This jump final Hospital-Marine post so game, Friday, March 2. Th4 gam 5&33. Glenn Fitch was


Git mo Sports Corner
By Jim Prejean
The 1962 base basketball season is nov hi tory, but let'*review the past and give re, ogition ,to, an outstanding team.
Whether you speak of the pre-season tournament, the league or the post season tourney Hospital is the winner, and only defeated twice during these three stages. Both losses were to the Marines, during leue play Hospit won 11 games while losing only one.
Losing thier first game in post season play to the Marines, the Medics foud them-selves behind for the first time, but came out of the losers bracket to defeat the Marives twice, becoming tournament champions.
During league play Hospital scored a total of 757 points in 12 games for an average of 63 points per game, as compared to their op, ponents' 572 points. In tournament pla' s Hospital totaled 31points in five games.
Hospital' s Glenn Fitch -was instrumental in the Medics' great season with a total of 303 points and a 21.64 point average in league play. Fitch was second only to Bartos of
FTG who had 314i points and a 22.*43 average., Dale Roberts of AS, who was. voted Most Val" uable ki~ayer in the Coaten Tournament, had' 239 points.
The Medics' team was abundant in talent, with the able play ingof Thoson of NSD White, Maturi, Beal,Evana and langlosis of Hospital. Cogratulations and many more successful seasons to a fine group of athe-m




Full Text

PAGE 1

SUna -A VOlGE OF THE PEOPLE When Yo Because you gave.Last year, here in Guantanamo Bay the American Red Cross individually handled 890 cases. Not to be thought of ps mere figures, these are true instance where the Red *08s Field Director was 11sd on to help someone. onewith no other place to turn but to the Red Cross. However, figuratively speaking --833 wires were sent out last year and 886 wires were received in handling these 890 cases. In checking, the absolute minimum cost for a wire is one dollar. So simple mathematics says an absolute minimum of $1719 was spent by the Red Cross in Guantanamo in wire communications. Loans and grants on the base for 1961 totals $3,I13* *. This includes family asbstnce, transportation, d loans for emergency leave. American Red Cross Gray Ladies, during 1961, served a total of 2,830 hours in the Base Hospital--completely voluntarily. Approximately i450 Guantanamo elementary school children were given eye tests with the as'sistance of the Gray Ladies. Many people hear adverse and harsh criticisms directed toward the Red Cross. of, these critical rerks are from opinions from before many of us were Dorn.Having been passed on over the years. Give. We Can Help One of the questions which a Navyman may ask is: "Does the Red Cross charge men in the armed forces for anything?" The answer, from General Alfred X Gruenther, President of the ARC is: "It does not. In WWII, below cost charges were made for meals and lodging in offpost clubs and hotels. This was done at the specific request of the War Department, to avoid creating a morale problem among Allied service men who were required to pay for services in their own club and canteens." This question always arises*m*"The Red Cross never did anything for me." To this the ARC says: "Many ser vicemen need and use servic* es from the Red Cross. Many (Continued on page two) Golf Pro Gives to Charity Paul Hahn the magician golfer enriched the Navy Relief during his visit to the Naval Base, Sunday March 4. Hahn challenged the audience gathered at the golf course to watch his performance to duplicate one of his trick shots: Knocking a golf ball from a three-foot high tee. If anyone could do this, Hahn ann ounced he would donate $10 to their favorite charity. Not one but threes Kenney Frier; Capt. Bruce Weber; and Smoky Lawrance combined to make the fifficult shot, and the Navy Relief is tea dollars the better.

PAGE 2

If It's NEWS Call 9247-9944 Base Residents witness Paul Hahn's Magic Golf Base residents who thought for a gay awakening at the Guan day. There a tall, handsome ext a broad grin, unloaded his 90op shots. He combined the tricks with a lucid golf clinic in his one hour show at the course. Hahn's most difficult feat of the afternoon was his double action series. In this, Hahn griped a righty iron in each hand and step* ped up to a dozen balls teed in line. Swinging alternately, forehand and backhand, he wiped out twelve perfect one handers in perfect caden ce. When aked why he stays out of tournament golf he saids"I'm just not a competitor. Haven't got that old fire." Nevertheless, he enjoys the deep respect of his fellow professionals. They consider that, he does more for golf than any other practitioner., ]thymes of the Times WHAT Ou'Qa COUNTRY~ TOAGiREA rI EXTENT ON YOU.they understood golf were in itanamo Gold coursee last Sunrovert named Paul Habn, with omund bagfull of "magio golf RED CROSS CONTINUED Servicemen may never have personal or family problems that require Red Cross assistance; perhaps they have not been sick or wounded and in need of blood or Red Cross welfare and recreation services in military hospitals. Even so, those with no personal experience of Red Cross assistance should recognise that a tremendous a-o mount of service is rendered to others." Nationally, during 1961, there were 82,000 service families helped each month by the Red Cross. Serving the armed forces is the largest single job on the Red Cross program. It requires about 35.percent of each an-w nual budget and some 55 per-* cent of all staff and volun-m teer time. In this decade when the morale of our armed forces is severly tested by the in*creasing tensions of the Cold Warl the symbol of Red Cross is a reminder that the people back home have not forgotten. Base Marine Talks With Bob Hope Staff Sergeant Allen P. Smith Jr., Communications Chief, attached to Marine Barracks here was the first of many servicemen from around the world to thank Bob Hope on Sunday, March 4. for Hope's almost continuous visits to the U.S. Armed Forces and to congratula the comedian upon recei the Screen Producers Guil "Mile Stone" award. Smith, talking via shortwave radio, told Hope, we will "never forget your Christmas 1960 visit here at Guantanamo Bay. The Sergeant's hobby as an amateur radio operator gives pleasure to many base resi* dents. He makes frequent calls to 'Hometown, USA" for many of the pefsonnel stationed here. Smith extends his interests into marksmanship, as an officer in the Gitmo G Club. During the past J ior League baseball seas Smith managed the White Sop the League Champions. Women to train in Hospital Eight base ladies complete ed their 12 hour orientation classes with the Gray Lady group last Wednesday, and are now prepared to take 12 hours of on-the-job training in a probationary status in the wards of the Base Hospital. The training will be under the supervision of expe ienced Gray Ladies. (Contined on page three)

PAGE 3

Women's World ing Delivered Brownie ally Way and Girl Scout Susie Work are delivering Girl Scout Cookies just like their sister scouts all over the base. These scouts are filling Mrs. Pauline White'a cookie order. Mrs. White is Service Project'a Chairman for the Scouts. Look Who's He.e! The following births were recorded at the U.S. Naval Hospital, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. A daughter Kimberly Dee Gibsont lbs, 131 oss, to. s a Lee and Margeretta bson. Born Feb. 2. Gibson a attached to NAS. A son, Scott Brian Anderson, 6 1l, $j os, to Richard R. an d Alta A. Anderson. Born Feb. 20. Anderson is attach ed to the Hospital. A daughter, ellie Kristine Tate, 6.lb., 1S oss, to William B. and Nancy E. Tate. Born Feb. 22. Tate is atsched to Leeward Point* BUY-AND SAVE, U. S SAVINqS BONDS, By Jackie Lloyd Perusing the calendar the other day, I noted I had marked Valentine'a Day with a red border.this date reminded me of a story, and the story reminded me of an important point* Holidays in Guantanamo, let' s face it, are differentJ But just how different I never realized until" received a'Va* entine "rom may favorite little boy last monthly What did I receive? Well, let me tell you.a lacy heart, candy or perfume are guesses that don't even come close I was the surprised recipient of a beautiful, huge, fift *starred American flag (complete with pole) I And may I7add that no gift has ever been more enthusiastically given, nor more happily receivedL The choice indicated to me that not only can our children think for themselves, but are capable of greater thoughtsthan we sometimes realize. However, I had the feeling the patriotic fervor permeating our home was the result of some carefully implanted instruction. It did not take long to discover Mrs. Peggy Fielding was the creditable inspiration. Her second grade class had been studying our flag and our patriots, and memorizing patriotic poems and songs. This alert young teacher obviously recognizes a very important part of our children' developametal world. Her point hit home toq, for Brian' 5exclamation "Every American home should have an American flag&" could not have been more sincere. For too long, it seems to me, the United States has beer bashful and self-conscious about showing its pride and patriotism. Now, -more than ever before, we need to say the "Pledge of Allegiance," we need to sing the National Anthem, we need to show our pride when "Old Glory" goes by. Our children anst understand our history and respect our hertage.*but in addition, this history and heritage must be cherished and kept meaningful. Unfortunately, there are not enough Peggy Fieldings. But fortunately, a patriotic spirit is something we mothers can help cultivate and keep alive. And where is there a better place to "till the oil" than here at Guantanamo, where just a few miles away, freedom is being destroyed and young minds are being filled with hate and contempt for the very things at .hve made our flag the important freedom symbol that it is.fa te r HELP KEEP GUANTANAMO CLEAN GRAY LADIES CONTINUED Women graduating from the orientation classes areS Marjorie Allen;g Elisaberl Ball; hatrgaet Breslin; Carolyn Crone; Isabel Graves Mildred Roberacn Barbara Ruth; and Beverly Willis* up~ 'cONrT YoU MEAK T-E FIFTEENTH PECKGIRI i I I ,.,

PAGE 4

Prelude to a win -This jump ball opened the final Hospital-Marine post season basketball game, Friday, March 2. The Medics won the game 56-33. Glenn Fitch was high point man. Peppy Go-Carts Make Guantanamo Scene They may be small, but they pack a powerful punch. Go-carts that is. These pintsized racers have been the vogue in the States for a couple of years, and now have made their way to the Caribbean. Clifford Dykeman, an avid cartist, and his son Billy brought the first go-cart to Guantanamo last September. Dykeman, who wants competition for his cart, has been instrumental in forming a base go-cart club, the Kuba Kart Klub. Donald R. Walton was voted in as president of the group. The Kuba Kart Klub presently has 22 memnbersD and only two go-carts. However, 12 mAore carts are on order through Naval Station Special Services. The carts will cost in the neighborhood of $1504200. Go-cart racing is one of the safest forms of racing, in the States youngsters and women take their turns at the wheel of the minatures. But the base club has strict safety regulations each driver must meet. Racing has not started on the base. This is pending on base approval. Dykeman says he is sure the approval will come through. Dykean said he didn't think that as many married personnel would respond to a go-cart club, however, enthusiasm is great in the married circles. Even some wives have caught the bug. If you are interested in joining the Kuba Kart flub or want more information on the group, contact Clifford Dykeman at 8722. Gitmo Sports Corner By Jim Prejean The 1962 base basketball season is now hiL3 toty, but let's review the past and give re ignition to an outstanding team. Whether you speak of the pre-season tournament, the league or the post season tourney Hospital is the winner, and only defeated twice during these three stages. Both loss sea were to the Marines. During league play Hospital won 11 games while losing only one. Losing thier first game in post season play to the Marines, the Medics found themselves behind for the first time, but came out of the losers bracket to defeat the Marines twice, becoming tournament champions. During league play Hospital scored a total of 757 points in 12 games for an average of 63 points per game, as compared to their op ponents' 572 points. In tournament play Hospital totaled 311 points in five games. Hospital' s Glenn Fitch was instrumental in the Medics' great season with a total of 303 points and a 21.64 point average in league play. Fitch was second only to Bartoe of FTG 'who had 314 points and a 22.43 average. Dale Roberts of NAS, who was voted Most Valuable player in the Conten Tournament, had 239 points. The Medics' team was abundant in talent, with the able play making of Thompson of NSD White, Maturi, Beal,Evans and langlosis of Hospital. Congratulations and many more successful seasons to a fine group of athelets. Pint-aized racer -This is one of the t go-carts on the base, its owner is M.R.LM Intosh (in cart)* Others with McIntosh ar 1-rs J.W. Shreck; and D.A. Laramnie


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