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Sunday Supplement

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Sunday Supplement
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U.S. Naval Base
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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U.S. Naval Base
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Language:
English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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University of Florida
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Copyright, Sunday Supplement. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Indian
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Gitmo Review
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Gitmo Gazette
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Guantanamo Gazette
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Daily Gazette
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Guantanamo Gazette
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A VOIGE OF THE PEOPLE


Vol. II, No. 31 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Sunday, August 6, 1961


"Floodli1ght Fever" To


Appear Next Wee.k


Matched set -This set of dark-eyed twins do a delightfully confusing number called "Double Exposure". Singing, dancing, comedy and many other talents are coming to the base August 11 through 14th, with "Floolight Fever", a University of Maryland student production. Trim Twirler -- Pretty- Jean - Weaver, (far right), captain of the University of Maryland's Majoretts, will be one of the sixteen performers in the University's "Floolight Fever", appearing on the base August 11 through 14th.


Jean Weaver


WGBY Technican Riding High Right Hand Raised For Navy


Up in the air-John Moran, ET2, rides in a lift similar to a "Cherry Picker" to make repairs to a WGBY-TV antenna. The work was made more difficult by winds blowing both antenna, and the "bucket".


Twelve more for retirement-Charles P. Yerbury, GM2, takes the oath of service from Captain George C. Ball Jr., Naval Station Commanding Officer. On hand for her husband's reenlistment is Mrs. Yvonne Yerbury. This is Yerbury's second reenlistment, putting eight years of Naval Service behind him.Yerbury is attached to the Naval Station Ordnance Department.











Build It Y-ourself At The Hobby Shop


Built for relaxation.- Boat building is a popular project Music in the making-- LTJG Robert A. Erickson, is workat the Naval Station Hobby Shop. LT Millard C. Ball ing on a hi-fi cabinet at the Naval Station Hobby Shop. (above), has spent a lot of time but has kept the expense Mr. Erickson has been a steady customer at the shop, down by constructing his craft at the Hobby Shop. Plans havihg made various pieces of furniture there in his spare for Mr. Ball's boat are from a magazine, and modified time. Mr. Erickson will find all the materials and harware to fill his order. needed to complete the cabinet on sale at the Hobby Shop.



Muzzle Loaders Take Aim �


Members of the base's Muzzle Loader's gun club are ready to fire. The rifles the men are holding were hand made by their owners, and use a mixture of black powder and grits for the charge. The grits help to clean the barrel while the gun is in use. When the shooting matches ,are over, spectators are allowed to shoot the weapons. Shooters are, from left to right: Frank Linder; Paul Adams, and James Smillie.


Golf champs - Tom Reeb and Linda Brewer, Summer Program golf students, are overall winners of a golf match held at the Naval Station Golf Course Thursday, July 27. First place winners in each of the four other classes are: Frank Thibeault; Brain Stanfield;- Donna Elder, and Francine Davey.


S


















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A Careless Toss AOn AFuel Farm Reaps A Poor Harvest


Sunday, August 6, 1961


Page 2


* THE SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT















VOIGE OF THE PEC


U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo 'Ba


The


In The7'


. 2 0th Century


01 Space


PROJECT ,MERCURY .ASTRONAUT virgil I. '"GUs" Grissom, CAPT, USAF
who was the candidat for 8NASA's second suborbital marnned- space :flight, is, being helped into his, space .suit in the: Mercury_ hangar -at ,Cape ..Canav-, era, Fla. L ending a helping hand is personal equipment specialist Joe W. Schmidt ofthe, Space, Task; Group, LngleyField, a

The- -combi"'tion ofteMecr
spacecraft,-and: :the :Redstone rocket is made by-a clamping.-band whichis explosively. -.,disconnected just before �.the spacecraft separatesto make the flight into space.
:he launchrocket is approximately 59 feet long and the overall combination length is about 85 feet. The spacecaifthfully oade paon.-the-Mercury- lt Redsoe lgtnmbrtree wa 4,004 pounds. 'Pal wight lifted a takeofw6,0 pud n h
take ~ ~ .. oftrs ftelaunch: vehicle was7,0 ons


This is Mercury-Red.stone numberfour. "cherry icker"- at rlght has -bee posi for an emergency removal of the astr
if necessary. In the background is the used for preparing the spacecraft an rocket. It is moved to the edge of th about one hour before liftoff.


,PRoJECT MERCURY
In July 21, Virgil I. "Gus" Grissom, Captain, U. S. Air Force-,rocketed 118 miles into the :skYy to- become the United States' second spaceman. As-, tronaut.Grissom ,was- safely.- recovered, from the' Atantic: Oean about 16
minutes later.
Project-Meieur9f
is America's first venture into .manned space flight. At the initiation o6f Project Mercuryin October 1958,; approximately a year of research and study by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (before NASA), private industry, and other Government agencies
had taken place.
The scientific and
peaceful objective of
Project Mercury is
to determine man's capabilities in a space envitonmenti
--The and in situationsto PAt:
Which he.. will be Five, f 'onaut, s ube tto*uponet was
going into and regantry turning from space. spacec( Ld the Starting in Sep- be use .e pad tember 1960, the the ga
(Cont'd Page Two)


SUIT C HECK-P roject'Mec r ssure ,t.suit specialists 6e-W .&hmidt, adjugst-.4respirometer...ttacAhed .,tp the, helmet of Astronaut rgi. "Gut Gissom duringfad dusrn ... theAlor-- therNetion Aefaiutin and Sace Admstrtin' secon







mnnaed gi.brbs a f{lae igalen priehsuren off, Friday,, fJuly21. Threspiromete ena es , ground medical pers ... t.
durin gi't-he-co unt'dow-Iftand 'flight. 'Thehoe -'attahdt the;Thft-sidge of the p iilot's- sui rnsbreathing oxygen into the suit. Used oxygen-jis. then vented out through a- port on-th side--of -Grissom.'s--hp e,,and,.t~e
prfebefor t sued again .inth

left armi indicates pressure within the suit.--The suit is not inflated during
th lgtunless there is a failure in the cabin pressu-re*. 'The suit, when inflated"'gives the 'equivalent pressure o f --27,000 feet.


FIVE -This. islan overall, view: of" Tad rom which the Mecur7-Redsoe-4 oclSlaunched. Located by the hat hoffthe raft is a "cherry picker," which would d for the removal of the astronaut after ntry has been moved away.


,.udayiie i gi t . 196 Sunday, August 6.: 1961







Sunday, August 6, 1961 T HE SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT Page 2


READIED FOR FLIGHT -Project Mercury's second manned suborbital space flight from Cape Canaveral, Florida left the earth Friday, July 21, utilized this 58 foot Mercury-Redstone vehicle. Significant advances have been made in the design of the Mercury spacecraft and the astronaut's personal, equipment.


SPACECRAFT MATING -Surrounded by gantry work platforms, a 58-foot liquid-fueled Mercury-Redstone launch vehicle is made ready to carry Astronaut Virgil I. "Gus" Grissom 118 miles into the sky. Known as MR-4, the mission provided additional training for Mercury pilots prior to attempting a manned flight around the earth.


(Continued from Page One)
the astronauts began simulated flights of the Mercury-Redstone missions. The first unmanned and :the chimpanzee Redstone flights, of course furnished a great deal of experience from the stand point of ground preparaions and in-flight, flight control.
Of major importance in the Mercury-Redstone-Three flight was to record and study how man's body would react to flight through space. As man enters certain areas of space, his body becomes weightless and would in effect be ,free to float in space, if he were not strapped into the spacecraft. Additional flight objectives were to demonstrate the ability of the astronaut to perform his duties while in space flight and familiarize him with a: space flight experience.
Since this was to be the first manned flight, no rules existed for the training

14 1/2 -TURNAROUND


SPACECRAFT SEPARATION-N r~


of the astronauts at the start of this program. Three basic philosophies were adopted:
(a) Make use of any training device or method which has even remote possibilities of being of value;
(b) Make the training as difficult as possible with these devices even though studies indicate the task is relatively easy;
(c) Conduct the training on an informal basis except in the interests of intelligent scheduling of instructor and trainer time, since the astronauts were well suited to the job at hand.
The astronauts brushed up on basic mechanics and the study of forces exerted by air in motion in their early training for flight into space. In addition, prior to this training, they had studied many fields of science such as astronomy, meteorology, rocket engines, astrophysics, geophysics, physiology, and the paths of hurtling

34 -RETROFI RE

RETRO JETTISONED

D ~ 7I~ 400
E f.0 5g


This is the flight plan of the Mercury-Redstone, flight number three, the United States' first manned space flight. Figure three shows the spacecraft turning around, this is where Astronaut Shepard took manual control of his spacecraft.


objects through space.
Instructors for these classes were taken from the scientists of the Langley Research Center and the Space Task Group.

Adding to their classroom work, the astronauts made many field trips as a group and individually. They visited the company which manufactured the Mercury spacecraft, and the basic spacecraft structure. As a group, the astronauts visited practically every facility directly concerned with the launching of the Mercury spacecraft.
Another major section of their training was survival training and learning to exit from the spacecraft. The training started in a water tank at Langley Research Center, and later moved to the Gulf of Mexico, near Pensacola, Florida. The tests were conducted in both calm and rough seas.
The tasks performed by Astronauts Shepard and Grissom during the flight can be divided into four groups: First, they must check the major flight events in order to insure that they have occurred correctly. Twenty-seven major flight events occurred during CDR Shepard's first manned flight May 5, 1961. A second area of activity for the astronaut is communications.1 In addition to reports of significant events, Astronaut Shepard made a report to the ground at least every thirty seconds during the launching and re-entry to the earth.
The third and possibly one of the most important, was that Astronaut Shepard, in his flight, took manual control of the spacecraft at the beginning of the weighlessness period. This was the first time man has had control in a space flight. Navy Commander Shepard made a number of maneuvers to demonstrate that the manual control system was adequate.
A final area of activity was observing the earth and sky through the spacecraft periscope during the mission.
The United States, in keeping with her fine traditions, has made another giant step into the future, hoping to bring the people of the world closer to a tranquil life, full of prosperity and good health.V


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Page 2


Sunday, August 6, 1961


W HE SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT







SUNDAY, 6 AUGUST 1961


BE FIRE PREVENTATIVE CONSCIOUS. :IT IS MUCH EASIER TO PREVENT A FIRE T'r EN TO PUT ONE OUT. I________________________________


UNIVERSITY OF'MARYLAND GUYS AND GALS TO CAPER ON BASE STAGES AUG. 11--4

"Flying Folies", a student vaudeville group from the jiversity of Maryland will perform on the base August 11 through 14th. Scheduled shows for the bas performances are: Naval Station Movie Lyceum, Aug. 11; Leeward Point, Aug. 13 ,Also on August 12 and 13, the troupe will visit various areas and cornrmands.,


ARNED FORCES STRENI.TH PAT PRESENT -LEASED,
Washington Total strength of the Armed Forces on

June 30, 1961, based on preliminary reports, ras 2,482, 975. This represents an increase of 9,625 from the Nay 61 combined ste'ongth. Strength figures for each serwVice for Juno..0Jth onth ago and year ago comparisions follow:
30 JLne.6l 31 3 61 30 Juno 60
Total DOD 2,2f.2:co5 2,473,350 2,47645
5 473'073
;drmy 8 (1- 2, 3. 6vy52 62135 617,984 noCorps50 - 72 170,621 Afo.: e8-oro-.21,151 8, 71,752


HOBBY SHOP EAD FOR CT...... O -P " S"" SI= ELVES
T) _Y-'ri G- Pi,,0 U5, 3 INIS,. Ii < ,o
. . .. . . S~~owaft 0..bb

Locted_ ca Boat Shed 7oad, oe h-L --tati .Hobby Shope3naaweo .. ba - reients to come
anuaeueeflh ytl and facil itiesdesigned Youto reaway- yo leisuro, hours and to e:press youroself i wood,-,nhtography, or Terhaps inker onthe family
Th aVad. Station Hob-b Wood working can and has Shop is amagei by Lenton often in th- past been a E. Bostic, INT], and.. the fily projOct.. fahours of operation for the ilies have constructed shop -are: weekda s 1p.n. ccrplete s-ats .of furniture to 10 p.; ....Satuay, .9 for th.eir homes, savigr aR.4 to 6 pm._Sumday-and money, and at the. srui holidays, I p.m. to 6 p.m. tir-ie havinga-grand time. The Hobby Shop. is -closed Our careers in the Navy on Mon.days, make it imoftant. for us
Boats are-, by- far. the to have our belongings as argest single projct portable as r.ssible, constructeidn iathe shop, t.erefore hav*i: r 1-v a, orsnBostic. built a shed for al wood worki.,sh-p c..athe. boa build s_ keopin- p-. . to the Ho)y then ..out of the bun i'Sg Sn�- " " ext o sun,.and providing a seUl- sillJI An , Ih..or iMIortan,t ter-in the rainy soasin, " - that the shop At the present time. there .k c:i a large supply . -cf ar. three. boats... at.- dif fer-."ate] i on h-and -at.'-all
ent ..levels' coYstruc" t- :htes, tion. -Af tr a. counie of hours
Th' wat'ex crft are much of brahing-saw dust, you s 4e)r to Va thma one -m- ae .. o sit back. and iagi thi ... After the .. c v e ththe -..... . .... " chn r
frame work th-c r s- is a'or Wi-ever yo arc... mak;atter of ti and pa-. -Step in the-.. airo -C OnN- (CD ONPAT c)


\\ \ \\\ti i ii~i~ ~ i i ii II ilIIIm il iffl ~iiii IIII I M IhII ||~ i |i ii i[i | ii~ i i i i ~ iii~iuiuiiiii M M il"I M l1161 1ilIi 10 I IIH ! 1 H M4 1'ri .............................. -"


on the base.-.
The troupe, ich includes 16 students, a facu-dty tour -director and an assistant tour director,
will present a two-act rcview entitled, "Flo6dlight Fevr." The review wll consist of 24 sequences w-7.-th talent rangi from song and dance acts to baton tVrling to situation 0Comedy
The show is unique since, unlike most p,,ductions of this t qe, it is entirely studAt -.-rect ed. Ken Wai sLnmn. a se-nior. a- the uv- rsi.ty, is directing the sow ad Nina Baker, also a sunior,,..is .-assistTour- director - for the trip is J'"1. Danegger of the University of Mryl4a d photographi- s e c t i o , Assistant tour director is Miss Joy- Freunschuh of the, ur-iversity'.s College of Physical Eduction.
Th-e ".ying .Follies' troune was- organized at tha Univcr sity of Maryland in Decenber 195 7. Its papose is to provido students--with, an opportunity to develop thaer talent s through- .p. Mc�n-i on and off the. ... univearn:ty
-campus- and .. to act as a. m.di.=m- through-- -which or.a -i.,.et o s may obtain varioUls farms.- of enter*tairffimont,
in the- past four year . the. group has perf ormei~d extensivly throuhYott th e Mary-larod-Wiashinfgt( r- V i rg-i a area, They nave also p-erformed in iceland, the Azores, Scotland and


PAGE


THieS SUNDAY .SUPPIONT





0


. UNDA.. U'GUST 1961
SUN DAY, 6 AU GUT


SPORTS CORER-.
By JA, s EJ'EA .........

Pre-season softballis completed and the.., league has comumenced, MCB-7 and: Leeward Point ended in a-tie for the pre-season tournament title, while. VU-lO, P.ItC, the Hospital an, NAS Admin showed some fine potential.


Prior to the end of the tournament the Softball Committee mt.. and decided. to set up three rounds of league ,plca:-, The t ears were clivided into two leagues the .imerican a ri. National Le..1guos. The first round team piaccmeri:' was arrived at by pulling names out of a hat. The second round wi find the top teams ofboth1 leagues forming .2 new lie- ue and the bottom te.s forTing anoth er leagae. The third round will be set up in similar fashion. The innets of each round in each leagrae will earn the ri~t to play in a post season tournament.
The American League is composed. of NAS .Admn, FTG, P0, the Hopital NAS Ch s, NSD and N.A BoatshedO, The National League consists of NavSta Aimin, lCalla Flyers, iCB-7, Marine Barracks, Leeward Poirt, VU-lO and Dry Dock.
Thus far in American League play tb JSACh ief s have two wins, NSD two wins and N-AS Boat shed a 1-M record, The Chiefs are looldng particularly strong, In the. National League, the oMarines have two wins, VU-IO n .i-n, Leeward Point one-nan aml the Dry Dock aI-I record.
In the world of gpolf the U.S.S. Saratoga is finding some tough competition with the Naval Base golf.ers. Last Sunday, th e base composite teae defeated a ,team of twelve of the top golfers frcm teSaratoga. UncVunt ed, the Saratoga i2 *come aboard for another mt today.


(SmmTs CONERP coNT!ND)
Softb'il., games etween the -Saratopa a-nd"the Base All S -tars arr beinr n .nrr,-,
-eQd for weekend Some Mine ball ia.ving shoul': result fromn these games, The Sarato has ,o-en to b one of tet h
ton-piouges
tuoas around.


(HOBBs. SHOP ,CONTINID) ditioned lounge at te a of the "bo Shop. There you will find7 ocd coffee, and a chance to tlk t shipJmates who arc also wor~ang on a, project in the Fobby Shop.
if yju are wishing for an end table or a hi-fi
caiet-t'cam n down. to the Naval Station Hobby Shop. Tools are , : r'ndy, aterials available, and the Omployces are glad , to lknd a ad


9O1W SYOUR KNOW HOW?

I. In what two months does the euinox occur?
2 During V WI T what was an "rchio"?
3. '.1at is meant by alpha and omega.?
4. a Tht is the derivation Uf the rame Vermont?
5 Wh at as.osphricchangedos a s edot indicate on a weather chart? .




Listen to the latest 'in
.music and news over WGBY


0I
THJ SUNDAY S UPPItE14KNT


.LOOK ITJQ'S IHRE

The fL1owdir births were recorded at the U.S.
Naval Hosital Guantanamo Day, Cuba,
son, St .;vcl Joseph Lauder, 8 lbs. 8 azs., ic .. Oliver ard 3evrly Ann Laurder. Born Julay . Laud er - s aos h ed to FTG.

A on, William John Her'man, 7 lbs 6 ozs., to Frederick T. and. Carolyn Joan Herman. Burn July 24. _H-rman is attached to Shiji , Di.osartment

A so., Oerald Lynn Prker 6 lbs. 8 ozs. to Ueor :7 A. and Gloria C parkar. Born July 25. Parker is attached to the Bay H, -l Gall:y

A soni, Jcfery, Charles Shryock, 7 ljbs. 9 ounces, to Harry Chiarl o s and B-ar bara Nancy Shryock. .Born July 27. ShryoLk is attached'to the': Naval Air Station.

Al son, S ph iElliott Sikonia, 7 lb1, 15 ozs., to Wiliam B nad and T'a. iyn Ja a n Siona. Born Juy 2,) Sia is attacle. t"d "t val Bas.

Aauhtor, .Je'" Lorraine Sa.llivan, l6b. Ib 12 ozs., to tobert ige. a ,nd .Ora Eta Sullivan,. Born July
31 Sullivan Isattach ed to the U.3. Naval Hospital;




I. March (o_) ad.Sp teaber (22,),
2. An antiaircrsft gun.


S The beginning and the end,
...Fro the �Frnch,
meanrig f1g-ranni mountain tt
5. Contiuius r a i ni,


tacao, T'elevrewmlg:, ~anits drizzle, showers. best with W GF3-TV.


! RszP. KFP GUANT-AmO CLEAN


~X~'~J~ZL


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PAGE 1

*Snda meM~n A VOICE OF 'THE PEOPLE Vol. II, No. 31 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Sunday, August 6, 1961 "Floodlight Fever" To Appear Next Week Matched set -This set of dark-eyed twins do a delightfully confusing number called "Double Exposure". Singing, dancing, comedy and many other talents are coming to the base August 11 through 14th, with "Floolight Fever", a University of Maryland student production. Trim Twirler -Pretty Jean Weaver, (far right), captain of the University of Maryland's Majoretts, will be one of the sixteen performers in the University's "Floolight Fever", appearing on the base August 11 through 14th. Jean Weaver WGBY Technican Riding High Right Hand Raised For Navy Up in the air -John Moran, ET2, rides in a lift similar to a "Cherry Picker" to make repairs to a WGBY-TV antenna. The work was made more difficult by winds blowing both antenna, and the "bucket". Twelve more for retirement -Charles P. Yerbury, GM2, takes the oath of service from Captain George C. Ball Jr., Naval Station Commanding Officer. On hand for her husband's reenlistment is Mrs. Yvonne Yerbury. This is Yerbury's second reenlistment, putting eight years of Naval Service behind him.Yerbury is attached to the Naval Station Ordnance Department.

PAGE 2

Build It Yourself At The Hobby Shop Built for relaxation. -Boat building is a popular project Music in the making -LTJG Robert A. Erickson, is workat the Naval Station Hobby Shop. LT Millard C. Ball ing on a hi-fi cabinet at the Naval Station Hobby Shop. (above), has spent a lot of time but has kept the expense Mr. Erickson has been a steady customer at the shop, down by constructing his craft at the Hobby Shop. Plans having made various pieces of furniture there in his spare for Mr. Ball's boat are from a magazine, and modified time. Mr. Erickson will find all the materials and harware to fill his order. needed to complete the cabinet on sale at the Hobby Shop. Muzzle Loaders Take Aim Members of the base's Muzzle Loader's gun club are ready to fire. The rifles the men are holding were hand made by their owners, and use a mixture of black powder and grits for the charge. The grits help* to clean the barrel while the gun is in use. When the shooting matches are over, spectators are allowed to shoot the weapons. Shooters are, from left to right: Frank Linder; Paul Adams, and James Smillie. Golf champs -Tom Reeb and Linda Brewer, Summer Program golf students, are overall winners of a golf match held at the Naval Station Golf Course Thursday, July 27. First place winners in each of the four other classes are: Frank Thibeault; Brain Stanfield; Donna Elder, and Francine Davey. A Careless Toss On A Fuel Farm Reaps A Poor Harvest S S // / FU\& N I I~ S JL Sunday, August 6, 1961 Page 2 4 '. :r H. 1 THE SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT

PAGE 3

.da men Vol. I .S .OF TH naPEOPLBy Vol. II, No. 31 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo -Bay, Cuba Sunday, August 6. 1961 The USA In The. 20th Century Of Space PROJECT MERCURY ASTRONAUT Virgil I. "Gus" Grissom, CAPT, USAF who was the candidate for NASA's second suborbital manned space flight, is being helped into his space suit in the Mercury hangar at Cape Canaveral, Fla. Lending a helping hand is personal equipment specialist Joe W. Schmidt of the Space Task Group, Langley Field, Va. The combination of the Mercury spacecraft and the Redstone rocket is made by a clamping band which is explosively disconnected just before the spacecraft separates to make the flight into space. The launch rocket is approximately 59 feet long and the overall combination length is about 85 feet. The spacecraft fully loaded on the MercuryRedstone flight number three was 4,004 pounds. Total weight lifted at take off was 66,000 pounds and the take off thrust of the launch vehicle was 78,000 pounds., This is Mercury-Redstone number fourO"cherry picker' at right has been posi for an emergency removal of the astr if necessary. In the background is theg used for preparing the spacecraft an rocket. It is moved to the edge of th about one hour before liftoff. PROJECT MERCURY_ In July 21, Virgil I. "Gus" Grissom, Captain, U. S. 'Air Force rocketed 118 miles into the sky to 'become the United States' second spaceman. Astronaut Grissom was safely recovered from the Atlantic Ocean about 16' minutes later. Project Mercurf is America's first venture into manned space flight. At the initiation of Project Mercury in October 1958, approximately a year of research and study by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (before NASA), private industry, and other Government agencies had taken place. The scientific and peaceful objective of Project Mercury is to determine man's capabilities in a space environment, -The and in situations to PAD'I toned which he will be Five, f onaut, sub ject to upon et was going into and regantry turning from space. space id the Starting in Sepbe use e pad tember 1960, the the ga (Cont'd Page Two) SUIT CHECK-Project Mercury ptessure suit specialist Joe W. Schmidt adjusts a respirometer attached to the helmet of Astronaut Virgil I. "Gus" Grissom during addressfrehearsal for the Nation Aeronautics and Space Administration's second manned suborbital flight which wpnt off Friday, July 21. The respirometr enables ground medical personnel to monitor the pilot's breathing rate during the countdown and flight. The hose attached to the left side of the pilot's. suit brings breathing oxygen into the suit. Used oxygen is then vented out through a port on the side of Grissom's helnetand theh purified: before it is used .again in the suit. Agauge on Astronaut Grissom's left arm indicates pressure within the suit. The suit is not inflated during the flight unless there is a failure in the cabin pressure. The suit, when inflated gives the equivalent pressure of 27,000 feet. FIVE -This is an overall view of Pad rom which the Mercury-Redstone-4 rocklaunched. Located by the hatch of the raft is a "cherry picker," which would d for the removal of the astronaut after ntry has been moved away.

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Sudy-Ags-, 91THESNA SPLMNTPg READIED FOR FLIGHT -Project Mereury's second manned suborbital space flight from Cape Canaveral, Florida left the earth Friday, July 21, utilized this 58 foot Mercury-Redstone vehicle. Significant advances have been made in the design of the Mercury spacecraft and the astronaut's personal equipment. SPACECRAFT MATING -Surrounded by gantry work platforms, a 58-foot liquid-fueled Mercury-Redstone launch vehicle is made ready to carry Astronaut Virgil I. "Gus" Grissom 118 miles into the sky. Known as MR-4, the mission provided additional training for Mercury pilots prior to attempting a manned flight around the earth. (Continued from Page One) the astronauts began simulated flights of the Mercury-Redstone missions. The first unmanned and the chimpanzee Redstone flights, of course furnished a great deal of experience from the stand point of ground preparaions and in-flight, flight control. Of major importance in the Mercury-Redstone-Three flight was to record and study how man's body would react to flight through space. As man enters certain areas of space, his body becomes weightless and would in effect be free to float in space, if he were not strapped into the spacecraft. Additional flight objectives were to demonstrate the ability of the astronaut to perform his duties while in space flight and familiarize him with a space flight experience. Since this was to be the first manned flight, no rules existed for the training of the astronauts at the start of this program. Three basic philosophies were adopted: (a) Make use of any training device or method which has even remote possibilities of being of value; (b) Make the training as difficult as possible with these devices even though studies indicate the task is relatively easy; (c) Conduct the training on an informal basis except in the interests of intelligent scheduling of instructor and trainer time, since the astronauts were well suited to the job at hand. The astronauts brushed up on basic mechanics and the study of forces exerted by air in motion in their early training for flight into space. In addition, prior to this training, they had studied many fields of science such as astronomy, meteorology, rocket engines, astrophysics, geophysics, physiology, and the paths of hurtling 14 1/20 34 RETROFIRE TURNAROUND RETRO JETTISONED SPACECRAFT SEPARATION C D 400 TOWEB E .05 g TOER SEPARATION A F This is the flight plan of the Mercury-Redstone, flight number three, the United States' first manned space flight. Figure three shows the spacecraft turning around, this is where Astronaut Shepard took manual control of his spacecraft. objects through space. Instructors for these classes were taken from the scientists of the Langley Research Center and the Space Task Group. Adding to their classroom work, the astronauts made many field trips as a group and individually. They visited the company which manufactured the Mercury spacecraft, and the basic spacecraft structure. As a group, the astronauts visited practically every facility, directly concerned with the launching of the Mercury spacecraft. Another major section of their training was survival training and learning to exit from the spacecraft. The training started in a water tank at Langley Research Center, and later moved to the Gulf of Mexico, near Pensacola, Florida. The tests were conducted in both calm and rough seas. The tasks performed by Astronauts Shepard and Grissom during the flight can be divided into four groups: First, they must check the major flight events in order to insure that they have occurred correctly. Twenty-seven major flight events occurred during CDR Shepard's first manned flight May 5, 1961. A second area of activity for the astronaut is communications. In addition to reports of significant events, Astronaut Shepard made a report to the ground at least every thirty seconds during the launching and re-entry to the earth. The third and possibly one of the most important, was that Astronaut Shepard, in his flight, took manual control of the spacecraft at the beginning of the weighlessness period. This was the first time man has had control in a space flight. Navy Commander Shepard made a number of maneuvers to demonstrate that the manual control system was adequate. A final area of activity was observing the earth and sky through the spacecraft periscope during the misson. The United States, in keeping with her fine traditions, has made another giant step into the future, hoping to bringathe people of the world closer to a tranquil life, full of prosperity and good health.V S S Sunday, August 6, 1961 Page 2 WHE SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT

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PAGE 3 oiniEUmm a NnNDAY U P nlu mEN TSUNDAY 6 AUGUST 161innlann u mtomnnusnnos nn nuu ens es nonmnnun nnino na BE FIRE PREVENTAr CONSCIOUS.6 IT ISI EASIER TO PREVENT AI THEN TO PUT ONE OUT. TIVE MUCH FIRE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND bUYS AND GALS TO CAPER ON LSE STAGESAUG.1ll-:4 "tFlying Follies", a student vaudeville group from the University of Maryland will perform on the base August 11 through 14th. Scheduled shows for the bass performances are: Naval Station Movie Lyceum, Aug. 11; Leeward Point, Aug. 13. Also on August 12 and 13. the troupe will visit various areas and commands ARIMD FORCES STRENGTH PAST PRESENT RELEASED S Washington Total strength of the Armed Forces on June 30, 1961, based on preliminary reports, vi-as 2,482,975. This represents an increase of 9,625 from the May '61 combined strength, Strength figures for each service for Juno ith month ago and yea: ago comparisions follow: 30 JCe 61 31 Mr61 30 Jun 60 Total DOD 2,473,350 2 8F 22 85,233 873,07 6n66 621,135 617,984 rno rp 17650 16,72 170,621 kir. erce-821,151 819),410 814,752 HOBBY S H O.EADY FOR USM TO 1 PRES>3" TH-TESELVES Located on.Boat Shed Road, he Nv Sation Hobby Shop extenda.a(wlco a to all .as residets to come and make use/of theV ny toc,7nd failitiAesdesigned to wile awayyou Ieisure. hours and to exrss yoursell inwood,-photography, or perhap stinker on the family bus. The. Naval Station Hobby-Wood rLrn n .dhas Shop is managed by Lenton often in t p st been a E. Bostic, M1'-y-, and. .thea"iy o ct, n'-f:' hours of oueration for the'. iles ihav,. cOl.iructed shop-are: weekdays, l. complete e s of furniture to 10 p ; .Saturday, .9 orthir homes, s a, to 6 p.m, Sunday and money, and at the, soel holidays, I pam, to e p.m. tine having a no. time, The Hobby Shop is .closed Our car s in the NaaTy on Mondars.mke itinmortant.fer us S Boats. areby far the t.;h-ae curbcon in s largest single .project portuine a P ssible, constructed_ in the shop. -f---ng+-'-rsonBstic. built a sed for d.-the.boat builders, keeir--ti enlie th .out of the ournin-g.--. ,tc 1 c. sun, .and providing a s' i rt ter in the rainy seasonh At the present tine 'thereklae are(tree.boats at difert aleson ent levels of conistrucye. tion.m1KLrraceu ie of hours The tec., craft are muche} b simls then re -a S-.b ak and ma lhik f r th e z. iJthi 7._Af.-{. E t ; ._ sticl b chair irame .vok, th. r'. saor f>.ry' :.-are kmtte of tim and paru, ti h -uoor(Oenin ON p bOU) ,,,. y on the base, The troupe, which includes 16 students, a faculty tour director and an assistant tour director, will present a two-act review entitled, "Floodlight Fever," The review will consist of 24 sequences with talent ranging from song and dance acts to baton tiCrling to situation comedyo, The show is unique since, unike most-productions of this type, it is entirely studnit directed. Ken Waissm aa senior at-the university is directing the show ad Mina Baker, also a seraor,-.isassistant director. Tour. director for the trip isl.Danegger of the University of Maryland photographic s e c t i o n. Assistant tour director is Miss JcyFreunschiuh of the university's College of Physical Education. The "Flying Follies"u troune was organized at the University of Maryland in December 1937. Its purpose is to provide students with an opportunity to develop their talents through pi5fomobg on and off the univoqoty campus and .to act as a medium through -which orgaiatLion.s may obtain various forms .of .etertainmont. In the past four iers3 the group has pero rmed extensively throughout the Maryland-Wshtnon-V i rgiia area 1.y nCave also performed in Icelaind, the Az4ores, 5cotland and B r mruia.,.,,. .r. .,,r, ,. ...,. ..,., SUNDAY, 6 AUGUST 1961 'TH'E SUNDAY SUPPLEET

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0 PAGE 4 SUNDAY, 6 AUGUST 1961 SPORTS CORNER Dy JAMSES PREJEl Pre-season softball is completed and the league has commenced. MOB-7 and Leeward Point ended in a tie for the pre-season tournament title, while.VU-10, PVC, the Hospital and NAS Adrin showed some firem potential, Prior to the end of the tournament he Softball (SPOTT3 0 ?U Committee meti and decided .iu to set up three rounds ofth : .uo: S rd the Base league pa The teams AJ11 Stars'"re.bein."??rrowere divided into two for rea ekends, Some leagues -the American and"nea National Legues. The resut Fomtree'"mes0 first round team placemern.i Th:.Sraog aspOte was arrived at by Pullin to one o: he ii ast names out ofIahateSTh ofeamstiL as t second round wtSl faird thte top teallmsStarotsrlebaaes ge forweed. Sm forming _a new len ( OBn ballY ClryiNso1ul, the bottomtc s ri r> D n Th lSaaolra ha prear another leau e, Thtir o bee of thee there round willn w nud the'nyou '^ l ido: ofoe similar fashiion. The wrn and a ace to t: lk to here of each rrnJi ach wh~ o :r0, al so leave will etrnethegriuhts oring; pn ecLt:in to play in a post season the Hoby Sho tournament,ersfomiarngwishingfor The American Le ae isarrr i composed of NAS Admincabinetsteam on downto 'IG, Pd the Hosp tal, t Nval Station H.obb3y Nes Chiefs, SD and ASh oo. Tools are handy, Boat shed., The Nlational materials available, and, League consistslofl theravSig hmhyeesht arela to ti py pcCalla Flyers, lend a ha,) 10, Narine Brra cks,+ 1 Leeward Pin_ VU-l0 and Dry Do ck, ie'SY RKl;IHW Ths farin Aearican W HG? League pWl y the H S Chietfsl have twofs wNDs, aD tAstwo months wins and eBoatiohed al 1-4 recoridt The NavfS are loomdntrp ri icul r:, is meatab stron, McalasInl itioT Leagu, Marin ar tracks, IA~ La two } wintU onerL,; aad.ioa fh tin rme Vermont? Leeward Point, oeVU-1 and the Dry Do I-1 ?i t aes heric Ina thewo nNDrld of two change Ces a lire= t U.S.S. Sarto aisfindiohcated onw father some toui pomptitionchart? with theI aval BaeonlI1XtCOL ) ers, Last Sunday, the base composite team de-. feated a tes of twelve of the top golfers from Listen to the latest in the Saratoga, Undauntedm the Saratoga wil. come a R o lt board for anothermtdi tOod for o.h a best with WGBY-TV, today, THE SUNDAY SUPPlBMENT LOOK WOI T O E The folloini births were recorded at the U.S. Naval Hospital Guantanamo Boy, C'ba A son, Steven r Joseph Lauder, 8 lbs 8 as., to RichardOliver and Beverly Ann Lauder. Brn July 8. Lauder is atc'hld to FTG. A son, William John Heran '? lbs. 6.0ss., to Frei T. and Carolyn Jean Hermn. orn July 2 .na is attached to Ship Deprtmgent s on, Gerald Lynn Parker, 6 1bs ss., to Georg A. and Gloria C. Park. B iorn July 25. P er is attached to the Ba~y i _'LlGal.10p,".y A son, Jeoffery rCharles Shr'oc :k, 7 ls". 9ounces, to Hariry Crare mand Barbara Nacy Shryock. Born July 2. Shryock is att chiedto the Naril Air Stat ion. A son, Stephen Elliott Sikonia, 7 lia. 15 oas., to Wilam Bernard and Ma' rIlyn Jea .-trSikonia. Born July., 28, Sikonia is attached to Naval Base. A daughter, Jean Lorralxie Sullivan, 6 lbs. 12 ozssa to Robert Egene and Ora Eta Sullivan. Born Jul, 31. Sullvan is attached to the U.S. aral Hospital. ANSWERS TO QUIZ 1. March (21) and Septriber (22 2. An antiaircraft gun. 3. The beginning and the end. .4. From the French. meaning "1reen mountain.i 5, contin u us r ai ni, drizzle, showers. ET.1P KEEP GUjTTANAID CLEAN S S S1 Sl i iti!tI1111slii!iil'+ttkltt!itli ilfltitllilt+Il+tif(ilillll{N +ittl{I iillft!{Iltlll t;l l+!il rtllh ;ti l :;!O H IO Iit{iilw ili!iiilh !!: :;i11t i :'ci ;i11 ,i}+;,;+ ": r, + ;r ; i ,. r.t + ~ i; r ~ J t + i 1 .i ,iilr .r :t':IIr ,".rl111:;i +(}S{ .11{I tli.l+ l ,Illilit,;illr ,.Il{ +.)!lrftir rli {I}Ilt i'il{}}1iIii+r(r; lrh lll lt;{}Jiff,