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Sunday Supplement

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Asun EOPLt

A VOIGoE OF THE PEOPLE


Vol. II, No. 3


U. S. Naval Base, Gaatsaname Bay, Calm


Sunday, January 15, 1961 '


Kiddie 'Jack n' Jill' Club Navy Adopts Ration Dense


Turns out Equestriennes

When the James W. Dempsey family moved into Gtmo over two years ago,
wife, Connie, who grew up in the fox-hunting country of Maryland, never even dreamed that she'll be enjoy ng her favorite port here, of riding and jumping horses, let alone teach th art to nearly hundred children on the ase. For that matter, neither did her protegeesn \when they arrived here,
ever expected to leave Guantanamo as proficient little 'equestriennes.
Be that as it may, the wife of our
Base Golf Manager has been conduct- d
ing regular classes here for young- ut of I Cars
sters in horsemanship, and runs a
private club for the little horseback-IIn pe to
era clled The Jatk and Jill ClbTh Fall Inspection
Club puts out an annual show on
Labor Ddy for the entertainment of The annual safety inspection for
Gtmoites. privately owned motor vehicles is
It all began in summer of 1959. currently being conducted at the Base
Horses were not hard to acquire here, Police Driving Range, Corinaso Cove.
and many families owned one or two.
Mrs. Dempsey, who herself had re- At present there are close to 2,000
ceived five years of private tutoring privately owned cars here, plus 350 in horsemanship, at first taught it to motor scooters. The biggest portion the children here without any thought of the cars, 800, belong to enlisted of compensation, "just to be doing it, men, 250 belong to officers, 200 to because I love the sport," she ex- American civilians, and about 450 to
plained. Cuban civilian employees. Models
But when more and more boys and vary from as far back in the early
girls went to her for instruction (she forties to current year models.
once had 40 pupils in a class), parents
gladly paid her for her efforts so that Carl H. A. Hoffman of the Base their children could have regular Police said that about 2 out of every lessons. 10 cars brought down for inspection
Mrs. Dempsey starts her pupils and were turned down because they failed
their horses learning how to jump to meet minimum safety standards.
on a 4x4 inches lumber, And graduate He said that the most common defects 6 inches at a time to drums and found are unsafe tires, and bad or
hurdles. At the same time she in- inoperative lights, especially stop
structs the pupils in proper riding lights and license plate lights. Owners
(Continued on page 2) of cars that are turned down have
until the end of January to fix defects
before they are issued new stickers.
Inspections are conducted at no cost
'Child uidance' Prblems to the owners.
Inspection of privately owned cars
O HBPd ilSUSSO809 Gro is conducted once a year to ensure
Discussed that call cars on the base meet the
minimum safety standards. Items
A panel discussion on "Child Gui- checked for proper functioning in
dance" was held Tuesday night at automobiles include the steering methe Open Air Auditorium by the chanism, wheels, shock absorbers,
Base's PTA. Attendance in the discus- horns, mufflers, lights, brakes and sion, which was preceded by the windshield wipers. Cars must also regular PTA meeting, was counted at have at least one rearview mirror, a 300 adults. lockable key-type ignition switch,
The panel, composed of five mem- good fore and aft bumpers, and that
bers representing different points of front and rear glasses should have
view on the subject, gave a "grass no cracks.
roots" sort of deliberation in mostly . .
the psychological problems of child Plso, before issuing sticksratiase care. d . , . re .rto
MCB-4's Chaplain C. A. Vernon, a driver's permit, and a PL-PD inwhc was one of the panelists, began surance policy of at least $5,000the diseission with a definition of $10,000-$5,000.
"Child Care", which he said in essence
involves specific moral and ethical community promote wholesome boyvalues, emotional climate, and the girl relationships?"
giving of self by the home, the school Members of the anel were CAPT and the church. R. E. Thomas, PWC, (Moderator),
The panel then proceeded to discuss Messrs. M. A. Murphy, L. A. West,
the different questions, previously and W. L. Dalgren, Base school offisubmitted by parents, concerning cials, and Chaplain C. A. Vernon.
child care. A variety of 16 questions At present there are approximately O were discussed ,with the panel spend- 820 school children on the base. Of
ing an average of five minutes on these, 119 are in high school, about
each. 400 in the elementary grades, and the
Some of the questions asked were: remainder about evenly distributed in
"Is it necessary for a teenager to the 5th to 8th grades.
conform to the group with respect The PTA at present has a current
to dress and conduct'' "How do you membership total of 809, and its Wreshandle a youngster wio acts up to ident is CAPT N. W. James, III, NSD
attract attention?", "How can the Commanding Officer.


Foods that have bee proceseyd a new method are bing itoue by the Navy in its mess halls, the Bay Hill Galley disclosed Wednesday. LTJG R. A. Erickson, Commissary Officer, said that the men at Bay Hill
have been fed with some of these "Ration Dense" foods, without noticing any difference.
Ration dense is an entirely new method of preparing provisions in view of alleviating storage problems in ships and submarines, particularly in space and refrigeration. The name rationed dense" comes from the fact that the food occupies less space after being processed.
This new development is especially significant with the nuclear submarines, whose endurance underwater is limited to a large extent by the amount of food supply it can store aboard.
"Ration Dense" foods are not the same as the old "WWII type" dehyrated foods, in that the new process retains more fully the food's original flavour. They are often packed in tins and hardly ever require refrigeration.
On Tuesday, January 17, supper at the Bay Hill Galley will consist mostly of "ration dense" items. The menu for that meal will include turkey ala king on cheese biscuit, O'Brien potatoes, sweet and sour cabbage, baked peach pie, and cold chocolate milk.
The Navy does not intend "dense rations" for general use in shore installations. However it will be using it occassionally to familiarize all Navy cooks with its preparation.
Bay Hill bluejackets are asked by the Commissary Officer to submit comments on the forthcoming "ration dense" meal.


1960 Base Accidents

At an All-Time Low
The number of traffic accidents aboard the Base in 1960 is at an all-time low, Base Police records revealed Wednesday.
A total of 83 accidents occurred, which is 110 less than the high record of 1958, and 51 less than the average record. The drop was attributed partly to the closing of the gates, prohibiting travels outside.
Government vehicles were involved in 63 of last year's accidents, with a total damage of $4,861, while the remainder involved private automobiles. Private car damage amounted to $435. Most of the accidents occurred in July.


GITMO CHUCKLE
Like the driver who had an accident on his way to receive a Safety-Driving award, a certain club member here failed to attend the meeting in which he was to receive an award for faithful attendance to club meetings.








Sunday, January 15, 1961 THE SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT Page 2


Ctwo Cab

Sorry, dear readers, but our Sunday Supplement pictorial page has been discontinued for an indefinite time. However, phot( .raphs will still appear on the paper on occasions, whenever feasible.
* * *
It looks like GTMO might be making the "newslites" again, if all those reporters that poured in here this week were after stories. Fifteen of them were here, representing the following agencies: New York Times, Associated Press, NBC, Life Magazine, CBS, Wall Street Journal, ABC, TELENEWS, Look Magazine, Newsweek, and Knight Newspapers.

Closure of the Quarters Maintenance Shop at Villamar by PWC was due to the consolidation of the shop with that of Marine Site. The now centralized shop will result in more economical use of equipment and manpower. Hence, also improved and standardized service for all concerned, it was disclosed Tuesday by Public Works Center.
* * *
For the benefit of Gtmo newcomers who might be curious, the construction work goirg- on atop the hill near Special Services is for the future Enlisted Recreation Building.
The building, which is to be of modern design and expected to be completed by August, will have a total floor space of about 3,000 sq. feet. It will house a six-lane bowling alley, a restaurant and snack bar, and a gymnasium. The building is to be a replacement of the old EM. Club, which was partly destroyed by fire in 1958.
* * *
We extend a welcome aboard to LT E. R. OSCARSON, CEC, USN, who recently arrived here. He is attached to PWC ' as Project Management Officer.
* * *
Contribution articles are always welcome. This paper exists for your own pleasure and convenience. If you know of any news or have a message which you think Baseites might be interested to know, please write or call it in. The phone number is 92417.
For written contributions, we would appreciate typewritten copy, or at least very legible handwriting. All names mentioned must be full names, including rank, and/or position, and unit to which attached. The editorial staff reserves the right to edit, rewrite, or boil down articles, depending on available space.


Editorial


Gitmo's Hobby Shop Program


Satisfies 'Do - It- Yourselfers'

It's just two centuries ago that the beginnings of the Industrial Revolution in England laid the groundwork for what we call today American way of life. That life is rooted in our inventive and productive genius. We tell ourselves that Americans never had it so good; we wonder how people 100 years ago got along without the comforts from the gadgets we take for granted.
But the American of 1860 still enjoyed one deep and basic satisfaction that many of us are strangers to-the creative pleasure of making things with our own hands. That satisfaction is as old as the human race: you will find it reflected in the handicrafts on the ancients, in the carvin&. of primitive jungle tribes, in the home-produced furniture and utensils of early America. It is the satisfaction denied the shopper of today who needs only enough money to indulge his every whim. What he can never buy, alas, is the sense of achievement that yesteryear's crafts man felt.
Yet there are encouraging signs in the current "do-it-yourself" trend that Americans are realizing that something went out of their way of life when mass production took over to provide all their material needs.
In this trend, our base here at Gtmo is decidedly in the swim, for the Hobby Shop program here is quite elaborate and one of the most popular of Special Services recreational activities: There is the Carpentry Shop near the Driving Range, the Model and Handicraft Shop at NAS, and the Boat Building and Automotive Shops near the Boat Docks. Others even have their own private shops, such as Mr. Paul Adams's muzzle-loading gun shop.
The man who works with his hands-building furniture, speed boats, riflin his own guns, or designing and building model airplanes, ___ is a relaxed man, intent on creating something that will be peculiarly his own. He needn't be an artist at his hobby-a soundly-built barbecue pit in the back yard can give him the same satisfaction that a master craftsman experiences when he completes a unique carving. He-no one else-did it. It can't be bought anywhere; it wasn't tooled up to slide off an assembly line. In this age of outpour, knowing this gives a man fellowship with the resourceful generations who lived full, happy lives without mail order catalogues or department stores.


Jack n' Jill...
(Continued from page 1)
posture, so as to maintain good balance and not handicap their mounts. She holds one-hour sessions of instruction each Saturday, for which she gets paid a dollar per child. At present she has four children under instruction. She accepts the fee only until her pupils became qualified as "Jack and Jill" riders. From then on they workout twice a week, Tuesdays and Fridays, without charge.
The Club, while working out in their corral, which is beside Sherman Avenue opposite BOQ 3, oftentimes attracted many spectators who seem to enjoy watching the little, would-be equestriennes "perform".
To enhance their showmanship, the Club wears uniforms of black boots and hats, white riding breeches and stripped shirts. Although there has never been any accident since the club began, Mrs. Dempsey insists that the children wear riding helmets while training .
After sufficient instruction and training in the corral, Jack and Jill riders are allowed to gallop on out to the .trails, which extend all the way


I1


to Kittery Beach.
"Pupils like to be able to gallop on after each jump, rather than run around in circles," Mrs. Dempsey explained. She added that the children become really proficient at the sport after four months of practice.
The Dempseys own two horses, and they have trained all three of their children-Patrick, 13, Debora 7, and Teresa, 5, in the finer techniques of horsemanship. Patrick won last year's "Grand Champion" award during the Club's annual inter-club jumping competition. Prizes and ribbon awards were donated by the Caballo Club, an adult riding club, of which Mrs. Dempsey is also president.



'Mach' Explained

When the sound barrier was broken in 1947 a new word entered everyday language. The word was "Mach." It is used to denote the speed of an object at a certain altitude in relation to the speed of sound at the same altitude. The term serves as a memorial of Dr. Ernest Mach, an Austrian who pioneered research into the phenomena of ballistics and sound. 9


Pwni Buttons ...
HOW MANY TIMES MUST I 5COLD YOU A(OL)T PLAYING
IN TH-EMP


CAN'T YOU UNDER6TANI) MOM; WE'RE

MANEUVERS...


.JUST L-E .. PDD~Y!


S


THE SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT 4


Pace 2


Sunday, January 15, 1961 i




Full Text

PAGE 1

Un A VOIGE OF THE PEOPLE / VoL II, No. 3 U. S. Naval Bas. Gwatname Bay, Cabs Sunday, January 15, 1961 Kiddie 'Jack n' Jill' Club Navy Adopts Ration Dense Turns out Equestriennes When the James W. Dempsey family moved into Gtmo over two years ago, wife, Connie, who grew up in the fox-hunting country of Maryland, never even dreamed that she'll be enjoying her favorite sport here, of riding and jumping horses, let alone teach the art to nearly i hundred children on the Base. For that matter, neither did her protegees 'when they arrived here, ever expected to leave Guantanamo as proficient little -equestriennes. Be that as it may, the wife of our Base Golf Manager has been conducting regular classes here for youngsters in horsemanship, and runs a private club for the little horsebackers, called The Jack and Jill Club. The Club puts out an annual show on Labor Ddy for the entertainment of Gtmoites. It all began in summer of 1959. Horses were not hard to acquire here, and many families owned one or two. Mrs. Dempsey, who herself had received five years of private tutoring in horsemanship, at first taught it to the children here without any thought of compensation, "just to be doing it, because I love the sport," she explained. But when more and more boys and girls went to her for instruction (she once had 40 pupils in a class), parents gladly paid her for her efforts so that their children could have regular lessons. Mrs. Dempsey starts her pupils and their horses learning how to jump on a 4x4 inches lumber, and graduate 6 inches at a time to drums and hurdles. At the same time she instructs the pupils in proper riding (Continued on page 2) 'Child Guidance' Problems Discussed By Panel Here A panel discussion on "Child Guidance" was held Tuesday night at the Open Air Auditorium by ,the Base's PTA. Attendance in the discussion, which was preceded by the regular PTA meeting, was counted at 300 adults. The panel, composed of five members representing different points of view on the subject, gave a "grass roots" sort of deliberation in mostly the psychological problems of child care. MCB-4's Chaplain C. A. Vernon, who was one of the panelists, began the discussion with a definition of "Child Care", which he said in essence involves specific moral and ethical values, emotional climate, and the giving of self by the home, the school and the church. The panel then proceeded to discuss the different questions, previously submitted by parents, concerning child care. A variety of 16 questions were discussed ,with the panel spending an average of five minutes on each. Some of the questions asked were: "Is it necessary for a teenager to conform to the group with respect to dress and conduct'' "How do you handle a youngster who acts up to attract attention?", "How can the 2 Out of 10 Cars Fail Inspection The annual safety inspection for privately owned motor vehicles is currently being conducted at the Base Police Driving Range, Corinaso Cove. At present there are close to 2,000 privately owned cars here, plus 350 motor scooters. The biggest portion of the cars, 800, belong to enlisted men, 250 belong to officers, 200 to American civilians, and about 450 to Cuban civilian employees. Models vary from as far back in the early forties to current year models. Carl H. A. Hoffman of the Base Police said that about 2 out of every 10 cars brought down for inspection were turned down because they failed to meet minimum safety standards. He said that the most common defects found are unsafe tires, and bad or inoperative lights, especially stop lights and license plate lights. Owners of cars that are turned down have until the end of January to fix defects before they are issued new stickers. Inspections are conducted at no cost to the owners. Inspection of privately owned cars is conducted once a year to ensure that call cars on the base meet the minimum safety standards. Items checked for proper functioning in automobiles include the steering mechanism, wheels, shock absorbers, horns, mufflers, lights, brakes and windshield wipers. Cars must also have at least one rearview mirror, a lockable key-type ignition switch, good fore and aft bumpers, and that front and rear glasses should have no cracks. Also, before issuing stickers Base Police requires a vehicle registration, a driver's permit, and a PL-PD insurance policy of at least $5,000$10,000-$5,000. community promote wholesome boygirl relationships?" Members of the panel were CAPT R. E. Thomas, PWC, (Moderator), Messrs. M. A. Murphy, L. A. West, and W. L. Dalgren, Base school officials, and Chaplain C. A. Vernon. At present there are approximately 820 school children on the base. Of these, 119 are in high school, about 400 in the elementary grades, and the remainder about evenly distributed in the 5th to 8th grades. The PTA at present has a current membership total of 809, and its president is CAPT N. W. James, III, NSD Commanding Officer. Foods that have been processed by a new method are being introduced by the Navy in its mess halls, the Bay Hill Galley disclosed Wednesday. LTJG R. A. Erickson, Commissary Officer, said that the men at Bay Hill have been fed with some of these "Ration Dense" foods, without noticing any difference. Ration dense is an entirely new method of preparing provisions in view of alleviating storage problems in ships and submarines, particularly in space and refrigeration. The name "ration dense" comes from the fact that the food occupies less space after being processed. This new development is especially significant with the nuclear submarines, whose endurance underwater is limited to a large extent by the amount of food supply it can store aboard. "Ration Dense" foods are not the same as the old "WWII type" dehyrated foods, in that the new process retains more fully the food's original flavour. They are often packed in tins and hardly ever require refrigeration. On Tuesday, January 17, supper at the Bay Hill Galley will consist mostly of "ration dense" items. The menu for that meal will include turkey ala king on cheese biscuit, O'Brien potatoes, sweet and sour cabbage, baked peach pie, and cold chocolate milk. The Navy does not intend "dense rations" for general use in shore installations. However it will be using it occassionally to familiarize all Navy cooks with its preparation. Bay Hill bluejackets are asked by the Commissary Officer to submit comments on the forthcoming "ration dense" meal. 1960 Base Accidents At an All-Time Low The number of traffic accidents aboard the Base in 1960 is at an all-time low, Bate Police records revealed Wednesday. A total of 83 accidents occurred, which is 110 less than the high record of 1958, and 51 less than the average record. The drop was attributed partly to the closing of the gates, prohibiting travels outside. Government vehicles were involved in 63 of last year's accidents, with a total damage of $4,861, while the remainder involved private automobiles. Private car damage amounted to $435. Most of the accidents occurred in July. GITMO CHUCKLE Like the driver who had an accident on his way to receive a Safety-Driving award, a certain club member here failed to attend the meeting in which he was to receive an award for faithful attendance to club meetings.

PAGE 2

Sunday, January 15, 1961 0 THE SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT Page? Gimo Cab Sorry, dear readers, but our Sunday Supplement pictorial page has been discontinued for an indefinite time. However, photo ;raphs will still appear on the paper on occasions, whenever feasible. ** It looks like GTMO might be making the "newslites" again, if all those reporters that poured in here this week were after stories. Fifteen of them were here, representing the following agencies: New York Times, Associated Press, NBC, Life Magazine, CBS, Wall Street Journal, ABC, TELENEWS, Look Magazine, Newsweek, and Knight Newspapers. ** Closure of the Quarters Maintenance Shop at Villamar by PWC was due to the consolidation of the shop with that of Marine Site. The now centralized shop will result in more economical use of equipment and manpower. Hence, also improved and standardized service for all concerned, it was disclosed Tuesday by Public Works Center. ** For the benefit of Gtmo newcomers who might be curious, the construction work goir-' on atop the hill near Special Services is for the future Enlisted Recreation Building. The building, which is to be of modern design and expected to be completed by August, will have a total floor space of about 3,000 sq. feet. It will house a six-lane bowling alley, a restaurant and snack bar, and a gymnasium. The building is to be a replacement of the old EM. Club, which was partly destroyed by fire in 1958. We extend a welcome aboard to LT E. R. OSCARSON, CEC, USN, who recently arrived here. He is attached to PWC as Project Management Officer. * Contribution articles are always welcome. This paper exists for your own pleasure and convenience. If you know of any news or have a message which you think Baseites might be interested to know, please write or call it in. The phone number is 9247. For written contributions, we would appreciate typewritten copy, or at least very legible handwriting. All names mentioned must be full names, including rank, and/or position, and unit to which attached. The editorial staff reserves the right to edit, rewrite, or boil down articles, depending on available space. Editorial Gitmo's Hobby Shop Program Satisfies 'Do-ItYourselfers' It's just two centuries ago that the beginnings of the Industrial Revolution in England laid the groundwork for what we call today American way of life. That life is rooted in our inventive and productive genius. We tell ourselves that Americans never had it so good; we wonder how people 100 years ago got along without the comforts from the gadgets we take for granted. But the American of 1860 still enjoyed one deep and basic satisfaction that many of us are strangers to-the creative pleasure of making things with our own hands. That satisfaction is as old -as the human race: you will find it reflected in the handicrafts on the ancients, in the carving, of primitive jungle tribes, in the home-produced furniture and utensils of early America. It is the satisfaction denied the shopper of today who needs only enough money to indulge his every whim. What he can never buy, alas, is the sense of achievement that yesteryear's crafts man felt. Yet there are encouraging signs in the current "do-it-yourself" trend that Americans are realizing that something went out of their way of life when, mass production took over to provide all their material needs. In this trend, our base here at Gtmo is decidedly in the swim, for the Hobby Shop program here is quite elaborate and one of the most popular of Special Services recreational activities: There is the Carpentry Shop near the Driving Range, the Model and Handicraft Shop at NAS, and the Boat Building and Automotive Shops near the Boat Docks. Others even have their own private shops, such as Mr. Paul Adams's muzzle-loading gun shop. The man who works with his hands-building furniture, speed boats, rifling his own guns, or designing and building model airplanes, is a relaxed man, intent on creating something that will be peculiarly his own. He needn't be an artist at his hobby-a soundly-built barbecue pit in the back yard can give him the same satisfaction that a master craftsman experiences when he completes a unique carving. He-no one else-did it. It can't be bought anywhere; it wasn't tooled up to slide off an assembly line. In this age of outpour, knowing this gives a man fellowship with the resourceful generations who lived full, happy lives without mail order catalogues or department stores. Jack n' Jill. (Continued from page 1) posture, so as to maintain good balance and not handicap their mounts. She holds one-hour sessions of instruction each Saturday, for which she gets paid a dollar per child. At present she has four children under instruction. She accepts the fee only until her pupils became qualified as "Jack and Jill" riders. From then on they workout twice a week, Tuesdays and Fridays, without charge. The Club, while working out in their corral, which is b-side Sherman Avenue opposite BOQ 3, oftentimes attracted many spectators who seemto enjoy watching the little, would-be equestriennes "perform". To enhance their showmanship, the Club wears uniforms of black boots and hats, white riding breeches and stripped shirts. Although there has never been any accident since the club began, Mrs. Dempsey insists that the childre wear riding helmets while trainin,. After sufficient instruction and training in the corral, Jack and Jill riders are allowed to gallop on out to the .trails, which extend all the way 1 to Kittery Beach. "Pupils like to be able to gallop on after each jump, rather than run around in circles." Mrs. Dempsey explained. She added that the children become really proficient at the sport after four months of practice. The Dempseys own two horses, and they have trained all three of their children-Patrick, 13, Debora 7, and Teresa, 5, in the finer techniques of horsemanship. Patrick won last year's "Grand Champion" award during the Club's annual inter-club jumping competition. Prizes and ribbon awards were donated by the Caballo Club, an adult riding club, of which Mrs. Dempsey is also president. 'Mach' Explained When the sound barrier was broken in 1947 a new word entered everyday language. The word was "Mach." It is used to denote the speed of an object at a certain altitude in relation to the speed of sound at the same altitude. The term serves as a memorial of Dr. Ernest Mach, an Austrian who pioneered research into the phenomena of ballistics and sound. Panle Buttons. CANT. YOU HOW MANY TIMES MUST I UNDERSTAND JUST LIKE A SCOD YOU ABOUT PLAYING MOM? WE'RE IN THE MUP? ON MANEUVERS.n :" S THE SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT 4 Page 2 Sunday, January 15, 1961 i


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