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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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EssaY Winners Are Announced"'New School Name Set By BuPers; In "Home Fire Prevention" Contest William T. Sampson Judged Best


Last week the Base school, through the suggestion of RADM William G. Cooper, ComNavBase, sponsored an essay contest in conjunction with the national observance of Fire Prevention Week which ran from October
7 through 13.
With "Fire Prevention In The Home" as the bone of contention, approximately 30 students in the different grades (7-12) took part in the contest. The contest, however, was divided into two categories: One group was participated in by all 7-12 graders, while the second group was limited to seventh and eight graders.
Winners were announced Wednesday, October 3, by the board of judges which was composed of * ,Glenn Morton, English teacher, as ,chairman, and members LT C. L. Robertson, ComNavBase Administrative Aide and James C. Pinckard, Base fire department chief.
Frances Lee Linder, a ninth
grader, copped the first prize in the grades 7-12 group. Miss Linder was awarded a $50. savings bond, COVERS GTMO LI while Ursula Teagle was presented with a $25. savings bond for having U. S. Naval Base, G won second place in the same Volume VII, No. 41 group. Miss Teagle, a tenth grader, is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
In the second group, Betty Jo C

DeLong, seventh grader and daughter of NAS chief ship serv- W e iceman and Mrs. Hubert B. DeLong, romped away with the first prize-winning essay in that category. Miss DeLong was awarded a $25. savings bond.
The entries in the essay contest were judged through gramatical correctness, practical suggestions and general presentation of the subject.
Winning essay-by Frances L. Lider&-is published in its entirety on page five, this issue.
The 14 year old essay contest winner is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank L. Linder. Mr. Linder is attached to the Transportation Division, Public Works Center.
Miss Linder's favorite subjects are English and civics. Queried whether her literary triumph will eventually lead her to the path of journalism, Frances bluntly said, "No. I've always wanted to be a nurse and I want to realize that ambition." CDR Arthur P. Finan (left) arr
The Linders are from Thibo- duties as the Naval Base Catholic c deaux, Louisiana. ,-. T a11.. .I- ...


Fleet Camera Party Photo Frances L. Linder


u


The Base School will be known as William T. Sampson School, U.S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, as directed in a letter sent by the Bureau of Naval Personnel to the Commanding Officer, U.S. Naval Station, Gtmo.
The new name assigned the local school was one among the three names that were adjudged in a School Name Contest held and participated in by Base residents during July 1956.
Names of William T. Sampson, Commodore Winfield Scott Schley
* and Theodore Roosevelt were forwarded by the Base Commander to
-the Bureau of Naval Personnelfor final selection of the school's (r a a a a name, to be picked from the three different names submitted. BuPers decided on the name William T. ME Sampson as the official name for the Base school.
E THE SUNSHINE With further instructions, the BuPers letter has decreed that in correspondence, student transfer Saturday, 13 October 1956 records, report cards, etc., the school must be referred to as William T. Sampson School.
1 eaves ext BJulio J. Wright and Carlos P.
Bru, both of the Industrial Relations Office, combined their talents Janils P ost in support of their 100-word asian Lia sertion why the Base school has to be so named-William T. Sampson. The school's name is that of Admiral Sampson who was in charge of the North Atlantic Squadron that conducted the blockade of Cuba during the SpanishAmerican War. In 1898, Admiral Sampson with his squadron, blockaded the harbor of Santiago de Cuba, and destroyed the Spanish ships when they attempted to escape.


INDIAN Photo


ived Tuesday, October 9, to assume chaplain. Chaplain Finan is relieving


C R J eruuiie ,. OuIIanL wII Wo l w ave e~n nase, ,,uh tA e ilihl
week for release from active duty.
Chaplain Sullivan will teach at the University of San Francisco.
Chaplain Finan's duty stations before coming to Gtmo was the Boston Receiving Station, where he completed a full tour of duty and also for a short time at the Potomac River Command at Washington, D.C. He entered the Navy in 1942. Chaplain Finan attended Boston College, the Seminary of Mount Saint Alphonsus, Esopos, New York and received three years education at Catholic University, Washington.
Chaplain Finan has served in USS JOSEPH T. DICKENSON, USS BLUERIDGE, and USS MACON. Other duty stations were the MTC at Sampson, New York, the Naval Shipyards at Philadelphia, the Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland, the Naval Base, Norfolk, Virginia and MSTS Lant.
A farewell-welcome picnic was held for Chaplain Sullivan and Chaplain Finan yesterday evening at Phillips Park.


Born in 1840, Admiral Sampson died in 1902. He graduated at the head of his class from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1861,
The Base school is planning to hold appropriate dedication ceremonies as soon as arrangements are completed. An "All School Affair"-date and time for the William T. Sampson School dedication will be announced later.



Navy Pageant On

Stage Oct. 26-27;

Two Shows A Nite
"The Spirit of the Navy will be presented on October 26 and 27.
Tentative schedule of performances will be two each night. The first performance will be at 7:00 p.m., the second at 9:00 p.m.
"The Spirit of the Navy" is being presented in cohjunction-with the local observance of Navy Day. Numerous other naval installations in the States and in Hawaii. are also presenting this narrative pageant of the history of the U. S. Navy.







THE INDIAN


m


0


THE INDIAN

The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a possible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.
RADM WILLIAM G. COOPER, Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
Editorial Staff
LCDR K. S. Dick --------------------------------- Officer-Advisor
G.L. Henderson, JOC ------------------------------------Editor
J.C. Curren, JOSN -----------------------------Managing Editor
E.U. Orias, J03 --------------------------------Feature Editor
D.D. Hinton, JOSN ------------------------------ Staff Reporter
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropri. ated funds.
Materials marked AFPS may be used by news media provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All materials originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part or without credit.
All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.



How Important Is A Vote?

One fairly good yardstick is the often-stated phrase: "Each vote counts two-the one you cast and the one you cancel."
More realistically, though, let's look at Uncle Sam's point of view concerning the right of the individual voter.
A recent news item forcefully points up his thinking. It reads in part: "Washington-A special airlift will carry absentee ballots to 162 servicemen and four civilians stationed in the South Polar wastelands so they can vote in the Presidential election . . ."
To fly the 162 ballots to the South Pole requires a lot of time and trouble. Our government thought enough of each individual's voting rights to fly them south regardless of circumstances.
To have such a guarantee from our government is nothing new. It is simply a part of the American way of life.
That puts it squarely up to the individual serviceman to use these vitally important pieces of paper. No one can take the vote away from you-except yourself. (AFPS)


Calendar Of Events


Sunday, 7 October 1956

CATHOLIC MASSES Sunday: 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. through Fri.:
1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday: 0800-Naval Base Chapel Saturday Confessions at 1700- 1800 1900 -2000
Daily Confessions: immediately preceding Mass
PROTESTANT SERVICES Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 0930-Adult Bible Class--Open
Air Assembly
1000-Leeward Point
1100-Divine Worship-Naval
Base Chapel
1900-Fellowship Hour-Open
Air Assembly Thursday. 1000-Choir Rehearsal JEWISH SERVICES Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel CHURCH OF CHRIST Sunday: 1000-Bible Study7Community
Auditorium
1045--Worship Service-Community Auditorium LATTER DAY SAINTS Sunday: 1100-Naval Station Library CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Sunday: 1000-Naval Station Library


Saturday, October 13
Catholic Catechism Classes-Naval Base
School-1000
Kid's Matinee-Villamar Lyceum-1800
Sunday, October 14 Movie Night-Officers' Club-2000
Monday, October 15
Soujourner's Clu-NavSta Training Office
-1900
O.E.S. Social Club-Girl Scout Hut-1930
Tuesday, October 16
American Legion-Fit Reserve Rm (Comm.
Aud.)-1930
American Legion Auxiliary-Girl Scout
Hut-1930
Payday-All military personnel
Wednesday, October 17
Boy Scout Meeting-Chapel Hill Auditorium-1830
Toastmaster's Club-Officers' Club-1830 Kid's Matinee-Villamar Lyceum-1800 Movie Night-Officers' Club-2000
Thursday, October 18 Navy Wives Club-Villamar-1330 Felloweraft Club 1078-Community Auditorium-1930
CPO Movie-CPO Club-2000
Friday, October 19
CPO Wives Club-Family Rm (CPO Club)
-2000
CHAPLAINS AT THIS ACTIVITY
CDR P. R. McPhee, CHC, USN
(Protestant)
LCDR A. C. Budd, CHC, USN
(Protestant)
CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN
(Catholic)


Admiral W. G. Cooper Exhorts Fire


Prevention Over WGBY Thursday
EDITOR'S NOTE: Following is a transcript of the speech delivered by Rear Admiral W. G. Cooper, Commander Naval Base, over WGBY Radio on Thursday, October 11, to assist in pointing out the importance of Fire Prevention Week.
"National Fire Prevention Week is dedicated to the purpose of reminding us all of the importance of taking measures to insure that fires do not start. It is not my intention this evening to deliver a long speech on all the precautions we should take. Rather I want to speak


briefly about how important I think
"I doubt if we will ever live anywhere that fire prevention would mean more to us than it does right here on the Naval Base. And right now the need is more pressing for these fire prevention measures than ever before.
"About a year ago I brought my family to Guantanamo. I have never seen it so green. During 1955 we had nearly 40 inches of rain. We could hardly keep our grass cut. Now our average annual rainfall here is about 25 inches. But, this year during the calendar 1956 we have had less than 6 inches of rain. The Base is parched. It is a daily reminder to us all of the importance of preventing fires.
"Our record in fire prevention is good. Since I have been here as Base Commander there has been only one fire of any consequence. You will all remember that fire. It was on the hill above the Naval Station Exchange. Thanks to the efficiency of our fire fighting force, our Base Police Force, our Public Works Department and many military personnel, no great damage resulted. But it took the efforts of hundreds of men about three hours to get that fire under control. It came dangerously close to some of our magazines. It could have been disastrous. And we are almost sure that that fire was caused by someone flipping a cigarette ... a lighted cigarette . . . from an automobile.
"Any fire on this Base whether it starts in one of our shops or in an office, whether it starts in one


these precautionary measures are.

of our homes, whether it starts in the brush alongside our roads, is potentially dangerous. A fire here could mean a heavy loss of valuable government property. It could mean the loss of -,une- of our homes and I do not need to remind you how hard we have all struggled to provide adequate housing at Guantanamo. The end of our housing shortage is just around the corner but a bad fire could set us back for years.
"A fire could mean a heavy loss of treasured personal property. All of these things cause hardships and suffering but closest to our hearts are our loved ones and friends. They can never be replaced and bad fires mean loss of life. Most fires are caused by carelessness. A human life is a big price to pay for a moment's carelessness.
"We have a well-trained and highly experienced fire fighting force led by Chief Pinckard, Assistant Chiefs Clark, Beech, Rose and Bell and Inspectors Richards and Lopez. These men are highly skilled fire fighters but they are an even more valuable asset to our community because they are highly skilled in fire prevention.
"This week is their week. We will hear them on the radio. They will have demonstrations for us. They will inspect our homes to help us protect our lives and property. I ask you all to cooperate with them. Fire Prevention is an all hands job. It is an all year job.
"Let's lock our stable door before our horse is stolen."


Fly In The Ointment On Base H20
by Don Hinton
Gtmo uses 2,500,000 gallons of water per day!
The "fly in the ointment" is, however, that the stated figure equals the amount that the Base water plants can treat daily and make fit for consumption and use. At times, the daily consumption of water aboard the Base even excels the output of the water plants.
The consequences of a breakdown in equipment that could not immediately be repairable could mean water rationing. The need for water conservation is vital.
Besides all the individual facilities, such as the golf course, the water plant must in addition, service Leeward Point and its constantly expanding facilities.


Prior to 1938, when the Base was in its infancy, it gained all its water supply from Guantanamo City and was brought aboard the Base by barge from Caimanera. At that time, the only purifying process that the water underwent


was chlorine treatment.
Gtmo now gets its water from the nearby Yateras river.
Two pumping stations, designated number 5 and 6 take the water from the river by means of
(Continued on Page Five)


9


Saturday, 13 October 1956


Page Two





m


'Saturday, 13 October 1956


THE-INDIAN


Pagb Thrbb


Capture Of First INDIAN Ends Lengthy Paper-:Hunt

by Ely U. Orias

For the past several years, members of the INDIAN staff
were beset with some challenging questions: When was the . first INDIAN published? How does it look like? Is there a copy of it in existence on the Base?
Efforts to satisfy not only their curiosity but also to prove they are not turning their faces away from the challenge, were exerted-asking every logical source, whenever possible, about the background and history of the first INDIAN VOL I N0
Sourcs like the Base printing shop which allegedly ran the flurst copy, the library, people who are known to have resided on the Base the longest, and the INDIAN office itself ... IN S),-; IAN, I -NC
-failed to account for any clue which may have led to its . discovery, much less the production of its corpus delicti! 'NK.: WINIR ) I B ASEt WtdeprlcacteI-ARRWO F8. -. With deep reluctance, the IN- Marine who has completed a tour ]-,V,- U) M DIAN staff cowers in shame to re- i veal that its copy file has only the of duty at this Base. : .da,,i VAit\ editions of the year 1948. And from "We know that Chief Ilatuey T s , the tenor of the reportorial news will always have a place in your _h ....... in the first available copy for that memory and we also hope that by: ie . year, it pointed to the fact that The INDIAN will serve to record US. . . . there were still many editions that the highlights of your tour of duty n m
d i.. at this Base." U."'k Mi"'


Search Continues
But since a quitter never wins, the INDIAN staff pursued its paper-hunt until one day, recently, when one of its staffers stumbled on the right spot. The man at the end of the long INDIAN trail is Clarence T. Proctor, former chief yeoman of the U.S. Navy, erstwhile Base chaplain's yeoman, and now a civilian employee at the local Naval Supply Depot. He was in possession of the first copy. Jokingly, the INDIAN staffer asked for it and Mr. Proctor munificently parted with it . . . case solved! Volume 1 No. 1 of the INDIAN was published on July 29, 1945. A 10 x 8, four-page letter press paper, the maiden INDIAN carried four news stories and a funnycut on its front page. Its second page sported five news bits, a church column, a crusade-columnsort-of which began with "Install a scuttlebutt at the movie lyceum and concluded itself with "Hurry up and end the war."
Message Quoted
Printed on the second page was the editorial masthead which listed a staff of 18 writers and a lieutenant for an editor. Beneath the masthead was a boxed message to the officers and men of N.O.B., Navy 115 which is quoted entirely hereunder:
"You are now reading the first edition of the new Base newspaper. We hope that you like this issue and that you will enjoy the succeeding issues as they come out each Sunday.
"We of the editorial staff want this paper to be your paper. We want to put into its columns the news you want to read. The INDIAN takes its name as a lasting tribute to a very famous Indian of this part of the world. Famed in song and story and in the folklore of antiquity, this well-known Indian will have a lasting place in the hearts of every bluejacket and


The Editorial Staff
Brown Baggers Yet
It was also on page two where one of its five news bits carried an important news to married military personnel on the Base. It said in part: "Officers and enlisted men of the Base who are planning to bring dependents to the Base were notified this week (week of July 29, 1945) that government transportation for dependents who are to travel to this area from the states is now available . . . " Page three carried the Movie Log, Radio Schedule and Profiles column which printed a 2-column cut of Commodore J. J. Mahoney, commander of the Base at the time. A jump from page one was also continued on page three. Sports news occupied page four. Reporting on baseball, the first INDIAN said: "In the N.O.B. baseball league, the Marines defeated the Naval Air Station 12 to 10 last Sunday. The greatly improved Marine team was paced by Jack Shaner, who made four hits including a 4th inning home run. Shaner was also the winning pitcher . . . "
Also on page four was The Crow's Nest column which started with: "Hi yah fellows! Let's take a nice deep bow for the audience. ... It's our first appearance and we want to look good. Now let's come to attention and salute the INDIAN . . . "
Completing page four was a one inch deep Laff Week column. It started with a poem thus: 'Twas in a restaurant they met, Romeo and Juliet. He had no cash to pay the debt, So Romeo'd what Juli'et. Today marks the 110th day past the 11th anniversary of the INDIAN. The INDIAN's mission is to inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a possible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.


INDIAN Photo
The present staff of the INDIAN would like to say, "We've progressed quite a bit," but we'll let that be up to you. Have we?



2nd Cubana 0]. To Santiago


Last Night;: 2;

The second weekend flight of the Cubana Airlines from the Base to Santiago de Cuba, left last night at 6:10. A total of 27 passengers which included seven children made the trip.
Last weekend the first commercial air service from the Base to Santiago and return, was inaugurated. Twenty-six pass engers which included a nine-year-old child boarded the Cubana plane in its maiden Base-originated flight.
Cubana's first-flight passengers included CAPT and Mrs. William R. Caruthers; CAPT and Mrs. G. L. Kohr; CDR and Mrs. Bruce M. Barackman: LT and Mrs. J. V. Gorman; Chief and Mrs. Del Clay; Chief and Mrs. M. C. Williams; Chief and Mrs. C.E. Troutman and their nine year-old son, Eugene, and Mrs. P.W. Becker.
Other first Santiago weekenders via Cubana were Thomas J.


On Board
Ramsden, TE3; Jack T. Blevins, RM3; W. J. Gribben, AN; L. J. Cannon, FT1; Roy E. Cobble, BM3; Joseph and Requel Hughes; D. Danenburgh; Ray Tuers, JOSN and Ely U. Orias, J03. Among the passengers that left for Santiago last night were CAPT and Mrs. William A. Robie and their four children and a host of others, totalling 25 passengers altogether.
Flying time one way is 21 minutes. In simple arithmetic, a passenger is gone to Santiago de Cuba and back to the Base in a matter of 42 minutes. However, a good time in Santiago makes the roundtrip aerial passage much longer than 42 minutes. It's a little over 40 hours back and forth! Military personnel must check out with their weekend liberty chits with the Base Police before boarding Cubana.


0








Page Four THE INDIAN Saturday, 13 October 1956


Public Works Center
Sorry to have missed getting the column in last week's INDIAN, but things just went awry. We hope it won't happen again.
More Power
The Center received some good news this week when BuDocks made a portable 600 KW Generator available for use in the Base Power System. With the full cooperation of all you "Ten percenters" we hope that when this new generator is delivered and installed, we will be able to carry the electrical load until the new power plant currently in the planning stages is built. It all depends on your conservation efforts though-one 600 KW generator isn't enough unless we meet the 10% mark. We noted a small drop-off in usage last week, but nowhere near what we can do. Let's give it the big try this week
-turn out the lights when you head for the movies, turn off the TV when you're sitting in the yard.

Landscaping
With the cooperation of ComCBLant and the Commanding Officer, MCB-6, two important improvements to the landscape of the Naval Base will be underway very shortly under the sponsorship of the Public Works Center. The first of these, to start, will be the straightening and relocation of the dangerous "S" curve in the North East Gate Road just beyond Nob Hill. The other is the raising and seeding of the Fleet Recreation baseball fields to provide a greensward for the athletic members of our community. The dust problem so evident during the dry months will be a thing of the past upon completion of this project.
Congratulations are in order for Mr. George Reynolds of the Utilities Department on his promotion from Leadingman to Quarterman. All of us in the Center are happy to see George's talents and abilities recognized and rewarded.



Devil- Dog Doin's
by Pfc Herb Bailey
Last week the Staff NCO Club held an installation of its new Board of Governors. Congratulations for a job well done goes to the members of the old Board: MSgt Smith, MSgt Allen, TSgt Carter, TSgt Deldo, TSgt Stoneking, and SSgt Webb. They were ably relieved by SSgt Stadler, SSgt Szili, TSgt Carter, TSgt Rq~er, $Sgt Gibbons, 4nd SSgt Webb.
This exciting World Series has taken some of the enthusiasm out of the Barracks Softball League, but the "ancients" of the Command, the "Strikeouts", made a startling comeback last Saturday


Sheriff's


Scribe


EDITOR'S NOTE: In this edition, the Base Police starts a column dubbed: Sheriff's Scribe. This column is designed to inform the driving public what to do and what not to do while on the road. The column will also attempt to define and clarify Base regulations in connection with traffic situations under unusual circumstances.
By J. V. DiMaggio
Hey cop! Your red light is on. Yes I know it's on. There's a reason for it.
The Base Provost Marshal's Office provides police escorts for all vehicles traveling on the Base that do not have valid Base tags or insurance. A typical example of this class are Cuban trucks or jeeps selling produce or products to various Base activities.
Also needing escorts are Cuban Police vehicles, customs officials and Army and Navy representatives, and all vehicles going to the Base Police driving range for vehicle inspection.
In order for the policeman to protect his escort or convoy, he is authorized to use the EMERGENCY RED LIGHT while proceeding to his convoy's ultimate destination.

A valid Naval Base operator's permit or a Department of Defense operator's permit is required to be in possession of persons operating vehicles on the Naval
Base.

All traffic is warned that it is in violation of Base Regs for failure to yield to an emergency vehicle or to cut into or through an escorted convoy.


Distaff Divot Diggers

Release Golf Scores

Scores of the Ladies' Day golf matches, held on Wednesday, October 10 were:
For 18 holes:
First low net: Edie.Ware.
Second low net: Evelyn Leach
and Marian Caruthers
For 9 holes:
First low net: Fran Skadowski
Low putts: Nina Sheppardson
and June Drones
by defeating the Headquarters team, the "Hoboes", by a score of 3 to 2. Cpl Boranians "Bums" beat Cpl Rogers' "Angels" by a score of !2 to 9 last Monday. Nevertheless, with so little time remaining in the season, it appears to this columnist as though it will narrow down to a battle between the "Angels" and the "Strikeouts".


Gtmo Bay Mosquito "Pyro" Fleet Embarks On Fire Prevention Ride


INDIAN Photo
The Base Fire Department during the past week afforded the children of the Base Nursery School with a ride on one of the Base fire trucks.


F T G & F T C Bulletin Hair Stylist Hired


The FTG softball team, namely "The Trainers", powered their way to an 11 to 5 victory over the SeaBees in the season opener Monday night. Harvie Giese, SO1, was the winning pitcher. James from USS SHAKARI, the FTG relief pitcher, pounded out a wonderful homerun with a man on in the 5th inning to salt the game away. The "Trainers" next game is on Tuesday the 16th versus the High School.
FTG received two new men this past week. F. G. Harman, came from FTG Narragansett Bay. Mrs. Harman is awaiting transportation at St. Petersburg, Florida. Before joining the Navy, Harman, YN1, reported on board from USS MC CARD (DD-822). His family is now in Norfolk, Virginia.
CDR McIntosh took time out for a lesson in fishing recently. Mrs. McIntosh landed a 3 pound langusta, daughter Ann caught a 2:V2 pound bonefish, son David brought in a nice snapper and Poppa MAC also ran.
USNS GENERAL G.W. GOETHALS (TAP-182) was a welcome sight last Tuesday morning. She increased the FTG families on the Base by eight. It even rained that day. Who could ask for more? The Enlisted Bowling League starts next week. The Officer's League is well underway. The Admin Erasures have a 4 and 0 record. The Smoothbores a 7 and 1 record, the Pluggers a 4 and 4 record. The Caravella Flats team, which is an orphan child of FTG, has a 0 and 4 record.


By Beauty Shop

The position of hair stylist at the Naval Station Beauty Shop was recently filled when the Navy Exchange Office accepted Mrs. Margaret J. Wilson's application for the job. Mrs. Wilson will work hand-in-hand with Mrs. Suzanne L. Marsh who was hired two months ago.
Under the new beauty shop's operating schedule, no appointment is necessary for a patron to get a beauty treatment. Both Mrs. Marsh and Mrs. Wilson will attend to patrons as they come in.
With all haircut, hair-dos and facial beauty applications guaranteed, the NavSta Exchange Beauty Shop offers all kinds of hair treatment which includes cutting, trimming and thinning.
Mrs. Suzanne L. Marsh is a beautician with a considerable background. She has worked for a long time at a Cambridge, Maryland beauty salon. Married to second class hospital corpsman Walter J. Marsh, Mrs. Marsh is a graduate of the Montrose School for Girls at Riestertown, Maryland.
Mrs. Margaret J. Wilson is likewise a veteran in the field of beauty culture. She has worked in big stateside beauty salons all her life. The height of her career occurred when she became assistant store manager of Louis' Beauty Salon at Newport, Rhode Island. Mrs. Wilson is married to ship serviceman third class Wayne Wilson of the Naval Air Station.


0


Pago rout


THE INDIAN Saturday, 13 October 1956






a a
Saturday, 13 October 1956 THE. INDIAN


$400 Top Payment .....

Ohio Voters To Decide On Bonus


For 1950-53 Korean Veterans
Following the end of the Korean conflict many of the states enacted laws providing for payments of compensation for residents of those particular states who served in the armed forces during the conflict.
Although the state of Ohio has been considering a compensation plan similar to that which was enacted by the state of Michigan last year, no positive action was taken until early this year. As a result, a proposed state constitutional amendment has been included in the forthcoming national elections (November 6, 1956) which will place the issue


before the registered voters of the
Lase personnel and their dependents who are registered voters of the state of Ohio and who have or will submit absentee ballots, will find in their ballot the proposed amendment. It provides for the amendment of Article VIII of the Constitution of the state of Ohio to provide for payments of compensation to certain of its residents who shall have served in the armed forces of the United States during the Korean conflict, or to certain of their survivors, and to issue bonds of the state not to exceed $90,000,000 to provide for the funds.
The maximum amount that can be received by any one person is $400, based on payments of $10 for each month during which the person was on active domestic service, and $15 for each month the person was on active foreign service, including sea duty.
Every person who shall have served on active duty in the armed forces of the United States at any time between June 25, 1950, and July 19, 1953, both dates inclusive, and who, at the time of commencing such service, was and had been a resident of the state of Ohio for at least one year immediately preceding the commencement of such service, is eligible to the benefits of the proposed amendment.
This is a referendum: Qualified voters of Ohio, whether on the mainland or overseas, may vote for or against this proposed amendment in the coming elections.


Fly In The Ointment...

(Continued from Page Two)
intake pipes in the bed of the river.
Deep well pumps, using 250 pounds pressure, in turn, bring the water to the Base water plants.
Located along the pipe lines to the Base are several surge tanks which store as much as 200,000 gallons each, thus ensuring a steady flow of water to the Base processing plants.
The two pumping stations are administered by the Schueg-Shassin Corporation, a Cuban firm.
Two methods are employed in treating the water for Base use. Water plant number three, located


state of Ohio.


Okla. Sets Record

32nd Win Over

Kansas; 2 Upsets
Upsets were few and far between in the previous week of play. The most notable one was California over Pittsburgh 14-0. Probably the most unexpected one even to the team itself was Pennsylvania's 14-7 triumph over Dartmouth. This was the Quakers first win since mid-season of 1953. Friday night the watered-down UCLA team edged Oregon 6-0. Oklahoma played its fourth and fifth units in an endeavor to hold down the score against Kansas State but still wound up on top of a 66-0 score. This was their 32nd straight victory, a new major college record and their 58th consecutive Big Seven Conference triumph.
Other scores were: Arkansas 6; Mississippi 14, Houston 0; USC 13, Wisconsin 6; and Tennessee 33, Duke 20.
In the games this week it is Army at Syracuse, Colgate at Princeton, Harvard at Columbia, Cornell at Yale, Cincinnati at Navy, Pittsburgh at Duke, Illinois at Minnesota, Oklahoma at Kansas, Michigan State at Notre Dame, Northwestern at Michigan, Penn State at Ohio State, and Purdue at Wisconsin.
Alabama at Tennessee, Auburn at Georgia Tech, Florida at Vanderbilt, LSU at Kentucky, Maryland at North Carolina, Arkansas at Texas, Rice at SMU, Utah at Wyoming, UCLA at California, Standford at Oregon, Washington at USC, and Oregon State at Washington State.
near Villamar, uses a soda-lime process. Number one employs a permuted pressure process and is located just off Rogers Road. The latter process involves the use of four sand filters plus the necessary chemical treatment.
The two plants then feed into one main line which supplies the Base with its water. Making water available to you is big business. Don't waste it, the one to pay will be you.


Highest Job There Is! First Prize Essay On


INDIAN Photo
High on a windy pole might be a take-off for a song title but is actually A. G. Sturm, ET2, putting the finishing touches on a new directional b e a m antenna for WGBY Radio.
The new antenna was cut to receive New York's Armed Forces Radio Service short wave broadcasts for rebroadcast to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
While the new antenna has resulted in much better shortwave reception, there are conditions resulting from sunspots that at times make any type reception difficult or impossible.



NWC Elects

New Officers

At the annual election held by the Navy Wives Club on 5 Oct., Mrs. Mike French was elected president for the coming year. Joyce Hall was elected vice-president; Ellen Van Cleef, recording secretary; Anne Plourde, treasurer; Wylda Stevens, Chaplain; Edith Dunsmore, Parliamentarian; Flora Higgs, Master-at-arms; and Anne Tillman, Historian.
The installations of the new officers will be held 25 Oct., at a Luncheon at the CPO Caribbean Room. Reservations must be made by calling 9503 by 23 October.

TOY DRIVE
The Boy Scouts of Gtmo will pick up toys in the second phase of the 1956 Trading Post Toy Drive, beginning this morning at 9:00 a.m.
The Scouts will canvass all the various housing areas aboard the Base. Get your toys ready now!


Fire Prevention
by Frances Lee Linder
Each year 10,000 Americans die in fires at home, an appalling number of deaths. Yet these deaths could be drastically reduced if we all practiced fire prevention.
The secret of prevention is getting the fireman on the scene before the fire happens. This means that every fireman on duty is out looking for potential fires instead of idling in quarters waiting for the gong to ring.
A fireman visiting a home, pointing out fire hazards will make the home owners more fire conscious. A fireman can point out the condition of electrical cords, the number of electrical appliances on a circuit, the rating of fuses in the fuse box, the storage of oil mops, polishing cloths, and flammable liquids.
He can also point out the condition of heaters and how close they should be from the wall. An accumulation of rubbish that so many house-holders may think of as harmless is a common source of fire from spontaneous ignition. A pile of newspapers, left undisturbed for some time, may prove a threat to the household.
A fireman can point out risks in dumping hot ashes into inflammable containers, and he can caution the homeowner against substituting pennies for fuses. This practice simply makes some part of the wiring the weakest link in the chain instead of the fuse. When a circuit is overloaded, the wire hidden in a wall will blow, sending white hot metal to start a fire. Fringed or frayed extension cords and overloading the circuit with too many appliances are common causes of your home fires.
The fireman can give a short lecture on matches and smoking, the two worse offenders. He can caution the mother that matches should not be left within reach of children and advise the use of ash trays, especially large and deep ones.
Lastly your fireman can tell you what to do in case of fire. Your family should practice an escape plan. In case of fire, never open a door without first feeling to see if it is hot. Heat can kill; go to a window. If you can not drop safely to the ground, call for help.
If the house-holder cooperates with his fireman, fire losses and fatalities will be cut considerably. Let's all be fire-prevention conscious.

Then there's the over-ambitious bandleader-he hired more men than he could shake a stick at.


9


m

Page Five






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Sattirday, 13 October 1956


Navy-BPMi 10NM-4 ttAtafltd


Cinema - Scoop

by Don Hinton
Hollywood will be releasing a great line-up of pictures in the months to come, they include: "Teahouse of the August Moon," "Around the World In Eighty Days," F r i e n d 1 y Persuasion," "Spirit of St. Louis," "Barrets of Winpole Street," and the "Pride and the Passion." In fact, I think that a couple of these have already been released.
On the local scene a couple of top ones this week.
Man With the Golden Arm (released through United Artists), is completely Frank Sinatra's picture. His performance rated him an oscar nomination in last year's derby. Eleanor Parker and Kim Novak are co-starred. N o v a k proves that acting talent can be combined with beauty. Otto Preminger produced and directed the film. The story deals with drug addiction and one of the main outstanding features of the film is the terrific musical score. It's a great picture for an adult audience. Don't miss it!
The Mountain (Para, in color), marks number two on the excellent list this week. Spencer Tracy and Robert Wagner star, with Claire Trevor featured. Time has proved the ability of Trevor and Tracy and Wagner is new on the horizon, but shows great possibilities. Story concerns a plane crash on a mountain top. Another one to definitely not miss.
Leather Saint (Para.), mixes religion and prizefighting, in a story that smacks slightly of the oldie "Going My Way." This one is without music, however. John Derek and Paul Douglas star. It may entertain you, if you're not too particular about your film fare.
Earth vs the Flying Saucers (Col.), is a science fiction flick, and one that may hold your interest. It's nothing to brag about. Hugh Marlowe and Joan Taylor are starred. The title implies the plot.
These have played the Base before:
Desperate Hours (Para.), is the best of the re-runs this week. Humphrey Bogart, Fredric March, Dewey Martin and Mary Murphy star. It's the story of a gang of escaped convicts who invade the home of a family. It is great entertainment. If you haven't seen it, do!
Foxfire (U.I., in color) . . . Jane Russell and Jeff Chandler... trials and tribulations of a miner and a rich girl . . . Fair to middlin'.
Footsteps In the Fog (Col.) . . . Stewart Granger and Jean Simmons . . . off beat mystery-drama � . . good!

He has a contagious smiletrench mouth.


WGBY Television Program


Saturday, 13 October 1:00 Paul Winchell 1:30 Life with Elizabeth 2:00 Football 3:00 The Big Picture 3:30 Two for the Money 4:00 You Asked for It 4 :30 Masquerade Party 5:00 Western Movie 6:00 Beat the Clock 6:30 That's My Boy
7 :00 Stage Show 7:30 Justice 8:00 Jackie Gleason 9:00 Arthur Murray 9:30 Star Tonight Sunday, 14 October 1:00 Winky Dink 1:30 People's Choice 2:00 Stop the Music 2:30 Life is Worth Living 3:00 Victory at Sea 3:30 Calvacade of America 4:00 Liberace
4:30 Roy Rogers 5:00 Zoo Parade 5:30 Sunday News
5:45 Meet the Champs
6 :00 Chance of Lifetime


6 :30 Mr. Citizen 6:15 Industry on Parade 7:00 T-Men in Action 6:30 I've Got a Secret 7:30 LrtA Young 7:00 My Little Margie 8:00 Ed Sullivan
9:00 Star Stage 7:30 Playhouse of Stars 9:30 Medic 8:00 Godfrey & Friends Monday, 15 October 9:00 Kraft Theatre "Death 5:30 Man on the Hill is a Spanish Dancer" 6:00 News & Weather Thursday, 18 October 6:15 Perry Como
6:30 My Favorite Husband 5:30 TV Reader's Digest 7:00 Talent Scouts 6:00 News & Weather 7:30 Highway Patrol 6:15 Perry Como 8:00 Caesar's Hour 6:30 This is Your Life 9:00 Studio One 7:00 Bob Cummings
"Flight" 7:30 Dragnet
8:00 Martha Raye
Tuesday, 16 October 9:00 Climax 5:30 Meet Millie "The Circular Staircase" 6:00 News & Weather
6:15 Eddie Fisher Friday, 19 October 6:30 Disneyland 5:30 Dollar a Second
"Monsters of the Deep" 6:00 News & Weather 7:30 Russ Morgan 6:15 Eddie Fisher 8:00 Milton Berle 6:30 Dunninger Show 9:00 Goodyear Playhouse 7:00 Life of Riley
"Christmas 'till Closing" 7:30 Crusader
Wednesday, 17 October 8:00 Frankie Laine 5:30 Truth or Consequence 9:00 Boxing-Gene Poirer


6:00 News & Weather


vs Carmine Fiore


MCarnival Orders Due


Saturday, October 13
NavSta Leather Saint-101 min. NAS-Last of the Desperados-101 min. Mar. Site-Terror At Midnight-101 min. Villa.-Marty-100 min. MCB-6-Trial-108 min. Lwd. Pt.-Tender Trap-123 min.
Sunday, October 14 NavSta The Mountain 105 min. NAS-Leather Saint Mar. Site-It's A Dog's Life-107 min. Villa.-Terror At Midnight MCB-6-Marty Lwd. Pt.-Trial
Monday, October 15 NavSta-Foxfire-103 min. NAS-The Mountain Mar. Site-Last of the Desperados Villa. It's A Dog's Life MCB-6-Terror At Midnight Lwd. Pt.-Marty
Tuesday, October 16
NavSta-Earth vs the Flying Saucers103 min.
NAS-Foxfire Mar. Site-Leather Saint Villa. Last of the Desperados MCB-6-It's A Dog's Life Lwd. Pt.-Terror At Midnight
Wednesday, October 17
NavSta-Footsteps In the Fog-90 min. NAS-Earth vs the Flying Saucers Mar. Site-The Mountain Villa.-Leather Saint MCB-6-Last of the Desperados Lwd. Pt.-It's A Dog's Life
Thursday, October 18
NavSta-Man With the Golden Arm131 min.
NAS-Footsteps In the Fog Mar Site-Foxfire Villa.-The Mountain MCB-6-Leather Saint Lwd. Pt.-Last of the Desperados
Friday. Octobet 19
NavSta-Desperate Hours-112 min. NAS-Man With the Golden Arm Mar. Site-Footsteps In the Fog Villa.-Earth vs the Flying Saucers MCB-6-Foxfire Lwd. Pt-The Mountain

A lot of choice GI homes are the governments revenge for the person not re-enlisting.


LCDR E. L. Kurek, 1957 Base carnival procurement committee chairman, requests all command activities and associations requiring carnival booth equipments, prizes, etc., to submit procurement applications prior to 26 October in order to insure timely delivery.
The carnival procurement officer is available at the Naval Station Exchange Office during working hours.


Photo Exhibit Opens

1 March, Rochester

The 21st Rochester Photo Exhibition will open at the Memorial Art Gallery in Rochester, N.Y. on 1 March 1957, Closing date for entries in the Salon is 10 Feb. 1957. Data and entry forms are available from Thomas F. Murray, 301 Ridgeway Avenue, Rochester 13, N.Y.
Eighteen medals will be awarded for exhibits in five sections. The sections are (1) Pictorial prints, monochrome and color. (2) Nature prints) monochrome and color.
(3) Pictorial color slides, 2" x 2" only. (4) Nature color slides, 2" x 2" only. (5) Stereo color slides, 1%" x 4", mounted for projection.


Book - Nook

by Bob Densmore
Oldenbourg, Zoe. The quality of this French novelist's writing is not merely above-average-it's extraordinary. Her latest work, entitled "The Cornerstone," is a powerful tale of the Middle Ages. Although it is more or less a sequel to her other book "The World Is Not Enough," it can be appreciated and enjoyed on its own content.
Paton, Alan. This modern novelist is represented by two novels in our library, "Cry, the Beloved Country," and "Too Late the Phalarope." The former definitely established him as a gifted artist, and is perhaps the better. He writes about South Africa.
Poe, Edgar Allan. Here is a famous American who needs no introduction. His "Tales" were the first of their kind (mystery), and in many respects they remain the best. Chills and thrills aplenty!
Roberts, Kenneth. Roberts is a modern American novelist who makes early American history the subject of his stories. As a historical novelist he is one of the best, and can spin a fine yarn with the greatest of ease. "Lydia Bailey" is available here, and is Worth the time and effort.
Scott, Walter. Scott was probably the first real "historical novelist." He wrote 150 years ago, but his novels are still being read and enjoyed. Like everyone back thei, he is ineliied to be a bit long-winded, but this doesn't diminish his reputation as an excellent storyteller. "Ivanhoe" is perhaps his favorite novel, and one of his most readable.
Selinko, Anneinaric. "Desiree," which hit the bookstands only a couple of years ago, is an excellent historical novel. The heroine is a French girl who lived at the time of Napoleon, nearly married him, and eventually became the Queen of Sweden. Most of the story is true, and its background is one of the most colorful periods of history.

A Washington bureaucrat parked his car in a lot whose sign read: "All Day Parking-350 and don't argue with me, I'm not on the policy-making level,"


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PAGE 1

Essay Winners Are Announced New School Name Set By BuPers; In "Home Fire Prevention" Contest William T. Sampson Judged Best Last week the Base school, through the suggestion of RADM William G. Cooper, ComNavBase, sponsored an essay contest in conjunction with the national observance of Fire Prevention Week which ran from October 7 through 13. With "Fire Prevention In The Home" as the bone of contention, approximately 30 students in the different grades (7-12) took part in the contest. The contest, however, was divided into two categories: One group was participated in by all 7-12 graders, while the second group was limited to seventh and eight graders. Winners were announced Wednesday, October 3, by the board of judges which was composed of ,Glenn Morton, English teacher, as chairman, and members LT C. L. Robertson, ComNavBase Administrative Aide and James C. Pinckard, Base fire department chief. Frances Lee Linder, a ninth grader, copped the first prize in the grades 7-12 group. Miss Linder was awarded a $50. savings bond, while Ursula Teagle was presented with a $25. savings bond for having U. S. Naval Base, G won second place in the same Volume VII, No. 41 group. Miss Teagle, a tenth grader, is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ira C. Tal.Cahlc hp In the second group, Betty Jo DeLong, seventh grader and daughter of NAS chief ship serviceman and Mrs. Hubert B. DeLong, romped away with the first prize-winning essay in that category. Miss DeLong was awarded a $25. savings bond. The entries in the essay contest were judged through gramatical correctness, practical suggestions and general presentation of the subject. Winning essay-by Frances L. Linder-is published in its entirety on page five, this issue. The 14 year old essay contest winner is the daughter of Mr. and MVrs. Frank L. Linder. Mr. Linder is attached to the Transportation Division, Public Works Center. Miss Linder's favorite subjects are English and civics. Queried whether her literary triumph will eventually lead her to the path of journalism, Frances bluntly said, "No. I've always wanted to be a nurse and I want to realize that ambition." CDR Arthur P. Finan (left) arr The Linders are from Thiboduties as the Naval Base CatholicG deaux, Louisiana. VII, Fleet Camera Party Photo Frances L. Linder K u iv ch CDR Jerome J. u Ivan w o wi week for release from active duty. Chaplain Sullivan will teach at th Chaplain Finan's duty stations Boston Receiving Station, where he also for a short time at the Potomac R He entered the Navy in 1942. Chap the Seminary of Mount Saint Alphon three years education at Catholic U Chaplain Finan has served in US BLUERIDGE, and USS MACON. Ot Sampson, New York, the Naval Shi Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland, and MSTS Lant. A farewell-welcome picnic was hel lain Finan yesterday evening at Ph The Base School will be known as William T. Sampson School, U.S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, as directed in a letter sent by the Bureau of Naval Personnel to the Commanding Officer, U.S. Naval Station, Gtmo. The new name assigned the local school was one among the three names that were adjudged in a School Name Contest held and participated in by Base residents during July 1956. Names of William T. Sampson, Commodore Winfield Scott Schley and Theodore Roosevelt were forwarded by the Base Commander to the Bureau of Naval Personnelfor final selection of the school's name, to be picked from the three different names submitted. BuPers decided on the name William T. Sampson as the official name for the Base school. E THE SUNSHINE With further instructions, the BuPers letter has decreed that in antanamo Bay, Cubs correspondence, student transfer Saturday, 13 October 1956 records, report cards, etc., the school must be referred to as William T. Sampson School. Leaves NJext Julio J. Wright and Carlos P. Bru, both of the Industrial Relations Office, combined their talents an ills IP ~ost in support of their 100-word assertion why the Base school has to be so named-William T. Sampson. The school's name is that of Admiral Sampson who was in charge of the North Atlantic Squadron that conducted the blockade of Cuba during the SpanishAmerican War. In 1898, Admiral Sampson with his squadron, blockaded the harbor of Santiago de Cuba, and destroyed the Spanish ships when they attempted to escape. Born in 1840, Admiral Sampson died in 1902. He graduated at the head of his class from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1861. The Base school is planning to hold appropriate dedication ceremonies as soon as arrangements are completed. An "All School Affair"-date and time for the William T. Sampson School dedication INDIA Photo will be announced later. ed Tuesday, October 9, to assume aplain. Chaplain Finan is relieving leave the Base during the coming Navy Pageant On e University of San Francisco. Stage Oct. 26-27; before coming to Gtmo was the Two Shows A Nite completed a full tour of duty and liver Command at Washington, D.C. "The Spirit of the Navy will be presented on October 26 and 27. lain Finan attended Boston College, Tentative schedule of performsus, Esopos, New York and received dances will be two each night. The niversity, Washington. first performance will be at 7:00 p.m., the second at 9:00 p.m. S JOSEPH T. DICKENSON, USS "The Spirit of the Navy" is beher duty stations were the MTC at ing presented in conjunction -with pyards at Philadelphia, the Naval the local observance of Navy Day. the Naval Base, Norfolk, Virginia Numerous other naval installations in the States and in Hawaiiare also presenting this narrative pagd for Chaplain Sullivan and Chapmeant of the history of the U. S. illips Park. Navy. 9

PAGE 2

Page Two THE INDIAN The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a possible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. RADM WILLIAM G. COOPER, Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Editorial Staff LCDR K. S. Dick -----------------------------------Officer-Advisor G. L. Henderson, JOC ------------------------------------Editor J. C. Curren, JOSN -------------------------------Managing Editor E. U. Orias, J03 -----------------------------------Feature Editor D.D. Hinton, JOSN ---------------------------------Staff Reporter THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. Materials marked AFPS may be used by news media provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All materials originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part or without credit. All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. How Important Is A Vote? One fairly good yardstick is the often-stated phrase: "Each vote counts two-the one you cast and the one you cancel." More realistically, though, let's look at Uncle Sam's point of view concerning the right of the individual voter. A recent news item forcefully points up his thinking. It reads in part: "Washington-A special airlift will carry absentee ballots to 162 servicemen and four civilians stationed in the South Polar wastelands so they can vote in the Presidential election ." To fly the 162 ballots to the South Pole requires a lot of time and trouble. Our government thought enough of each individual's voting rights to fly them south regardless of circumstances. To have such a guarantee from our government is nothing new. It is simply a part of the American way of life. That puts it squarely up to the individual serviceman to use these vitally important pieces of paper. No one can take the vote away from you-except yourself. (AFPS) Calendar Of Events Sunday, 7 October 1956 CATHOLIC MASSES Sunday: 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. through Fri.: 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday: 0800-Naval Base Chapel Saturday Confessions at 1700-1800 19002000 Daily Confessions: immediately preceding Mass PROTESTANT SERVICES Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 0030-Adult Bible Class-Open Air Assembly 1000-Leeward Point 1100-Divine Worship-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Fellowship Hour-Open Air Assembly Thursday. 1000-Choir Rehearsal JEWISH SERVICES Friday: 1000-Naval Base Chapel CHURCH OF CHRIST Sunday: 1000-Bible Study-Community Auditorium 1041-Worship Service-Community Auditorium LATTER DAY SAINTS Sunday: 1100-Naval Station Library CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Sunday: 1000-Naval Station Library Saturday, October 13 Catholic Catechism Classes-Naval Base School-1000 Kid's Matine-Villamar Lyceum-1800 Sunday, October 14 Movie Night-Officers' Club-2000 Monday, October 15 Soujourner's Club-NavSta Training Office -1900 O.E.S. Social Club-Girl Scout Hut-1930 Tuesday, October 16 American Legion-Fit Reserve Rm (Comm. Aud.)-1930 American Legion Auxiliary-Girl Scout Hut-1930 Payday-All military personnel Wednesday, October 17 Boy Scout Meeting-Chapel Hill Auditorium-1830 Toastmaster's Club-Officers' Club-1830 Kid's Matinee-Villamar Lyceum-1800 Movie Night-Officers' Club-2000 Thursday, October 18 Navy Wives Club-Villamar-1330 Felloweraft Club 1078-Community Auditorium-1980 CPO Movie-CPO Club-2000 Friday. October 19 CPO Wives Club-Family Rm (CPO Club) -2000 CHAPLAINS AT THIS ACTIVITY CDR P. R. McPhee, CHC, USN (Protestant) LCDR A. C. Budd, CHC, USN (Protestant) CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN (Catholic) Admiral W. G. Cooper Exhorts Fire Prevention Over WGBY Thursday EDITOR'S NOTE: Following is a transcript of the speech delivered by Rear Admiral W. G. Cooper, Commander Naval Base, over WGBY Radio on Thursday, October 11, to assist in pointing out the importance of Fire Prevention Week. "National Fire Prevention Week is dedicated to the purpose of reminding us all of the importance of taking measures to insure that fires do not start. It is not my intention this evening to deliver a long speech on all the precautions we should take. Rather I want to speak briefly about how important I think "I doubt if we will ever live anywhere that fire prevention would mean more to us than it does right here on the Naval Base. And right now the need is more pressing for these fire prevention measures than ever before. "About a year ago I brought my family to Guantanamo. I have never seen it so green. During 1955 we had nearly 40 inches of rain. We could hardly keep our grass cut. Now our average annual rainfall here is about 25 inches. But, this year during the calendar 1956 we have had less than 61/2 inches of rain. The Base is parched. It is a daily reminder to us all of the importance of preventing fires. "Our record in fire prevention is good. Since I have been here as Base Commander there has been only one fire of any consequence. You will all remember that fire. It was on the hill above the Naval Station Exchange. Thanks to the efficiency of our fire fighting force, our Base Police Force, our Public Works Department and many military personnel, no great damage resulted. But it took the efforts of hundreds of men about three hours to get that fire under control. It came dangerously close to some of our magazines. It could have been disastrous. And we are almost sure that that fire was caused by someone flipping a cigarette .. a lighted cigarette ...from an automobile. "Any fire on this Base whether it starts in one of our shops or in an office, whether it starts in one these precautionary measures are. of our homes, whether it starts in the brush alongside our roads, is potentially dangerous. A fire here could mean a heavy loss of valuable government property. It could mean the loss of :;mon of our homes and I do not need to remind you how hard we have all struggled to provide adequate housing at Guantanamo. The end of our housing shortage is just around the corner but a bad fire could set us back for years. "A fire could mean a heavy loss of treasured personal property. All of these things cause hardships and suffering but closest to our hearts are our loved ones and friends. They can never be replaced and bad fires mean loss of life. Most fires are caused by carelessness. A human life is a big price to pay for a moment's carelessness. "We have a well-trained and highly experienced fire fighting force led by Chief Pinckard, Assistant Chiefs Clark, Beech, Rose and Bell and Inspectors Richards and Lopez. These men are highly skilled fire fighters but they are an even more valuable asset to our community because they are highly skilled in fire prevention. "This week is their week. We will hear them on the radio. They will have demonstrations for us. They will inspect our homes to help us protect our lives and property. I ask you all to cooperate with them. Fire Prevention is an all hands job. It is an all year job. "Let's lock our stable door before our horse is stolen." Fly In The Ointment On Base H20 by Don Hinton Gtmo uses 2,500,000 gallons of water per day! The "fly in the ointment" is, however, that the stated figure equals the amount that the Base water plants can treat daily and make fit for consumption and use. At times, the daily consumption of water aboard the Base even excels the output of the water plants. The consequences of a breakdown in equipment that could not immediately be repairable could mean water rationing. The need for water conservation is vital. Besides all the individual facilities, such as the golf course, the water plant must in addition, service Leeward Point and its constantly expanding facilities. Prior to 1938, when the Base was chlorine treatment. was in its infancy, it gained all Gtmo now gets its water from its water supply from Guantanamo the nearby Yateras river. City and was brought aboard the Two pumping stations, desigBase by barge from Caimanera. nated number 5 and 6 take the At that time, the only purifying water from the river by means of process that the water underwent (Continued on Page Five) e Saturday, 13 October 1956 THE INDIAN

PAGE 3

Saturday, 13 October 1956 Page Thrde THE INDIAN Capture Of First INDIAN Ends Lengthy Paper -Hunt by Ely U. Orias For the past several years, members of the INDIAN staff were beset with some challenging questions: When was the first INDIAN published? How does it look like? Is there a copy of it in existence on the Base? Efforts to satisfy not only their curiosity but also to prove they are not turning their faces away from the challenge, were exerted-asking every logical source, whenever possible, a bout the background and history of the first INDIAN .___,_ Sourcs like the Base printing shop which allegedly ran the fi-st copy, the library, people who are known to have O r'esided on the Base the longest, and the INDIAN office itself i 3-failed to account for any clue which may have led to its dliscovery, much less the production of its corpus delicti! NAVY DISchARGE' With deep reluctance, the INAI M 1 101W 1 Marine who hai completed a tour T n~ >.E< Mix II PLN BASE'I) ON DIAN staff cowers in shame to re1 eal that its copy file has only the F I editions of the year 1948. And from We know that Chief Iatuex ., .; o5 the tenor of the reportorial news in the first available copy for that memory and we also hope that 4 j s ,stoOsowtek year, it pointed to the fact that The INDIAN will serve to record USM v i there were still many editions that the highlights of your tour of duty a x y, xot !. od at this Base. M." Search Continues But since a quitter never wins, the INDIAN staff pursued its paper-hunt until one day, recently, when one of its staffers stumbled on the right spot. The man at the end of the long INDIAN trail is Clarence T. Proctor, former chief yeoman of the U.S. Navy, erstwhile Base chaplain's yeoman, and now a civilian employee at the local Naval Supply Depot. He was in possession of the first copy. Jokingly, the INDIAN staffer asked for it and Mr. Proctor munificently parted with it ...case solved! Volume 1 No. 1 of the INDIAN was published on July 29, 1945. A 10% x 8, four-page letter press paper, the maiden INDIAN carried four news stories and a funnycut on its front page. Its second page sported five news bits, a church column, a crusade-columnsort-of which began with "Install a scuttlebutt at the movie lyceum and concluded itself with "Hurry up and end the war." Message Quoted Printed on the second page was the editorial masthead which listed a staff of 18 writers and a lieutenant for an editor. Beneath the masthead was a boxed message to the officers and men of N.O.B., Navy 115 which is quoted entirely hereunder: "You are now reading the first edition of the new Base newspaper. We hope that you like this issue and that you will enjoy the succeeding issues as they come out each Sunday. "We of the editorial staff want this paper to be your paper. We want to put into its columns the news you want to read. The INDIAN takes its name as a lasting tribute to a very famous Indian of this part of the world. Famed in song and story and in the folklore of antiquity, this well-known Indian will have a lasting place in the hearts of every bluejacket and The Editorial Staff Brown Baggers Yet It was also on page two where one of its five news hits carried an important news to married military personnel on the Base. It said in part: "Officers and enlisted men of the Base who are planning to bring dependents to the Base were notified this week (week of July 29, 1945) that government transportation for dependents who are to travel to this area from the states is now available ." Page three carried the Movie Log, Radio Schedule and Profiles column which printed a 2-column cut of Commodore J. J. Mahoney, commander of the Base at the time. A jump from page one was also continued on page three. Sports news occupied page four. Reporting on baseball, the first INDIAN said: "In the N.O.B. baseball league, the Marines defeated the Naval Air Station 12 to 10 last Sunday. The greatly improved Marine team was paced by Jack Shaner, who made four hits including a 4th inning home run. Shaner was also the winning pitcher ." Also on page four was The Crow's Nest column which started with: "Hi yah fellows! Let's take a nice deep bow for the audience. .It's our first appearance and we want to look good. Now let's come to attention and salute the INDIAN ." Completing page four was a one inch deep Laff Week column. It started with a poem thus: 'Twas in a restaurant they met, Romeo and Juliet. He had no cash to pay the debt, So Romeo'd what Juli'et. Today marks the 110th day past the 11th anniversary of the INDIAN. The INDIAN's mission is to inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a possible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. INDIAN Photo The present staff of the INDIAN would like to say, "We've progressed quite a bit," but we'll let that be up to you. Have we? 2nd Cubana Off To Santiago Last Night; 27 On Board The second weekend flight of the Cubana Airlines from the Base to Santiago de Cuba, left last night at 6:10. A total of 27 passengers which included seven children made the trip. Last weekend the first commercial air service from the Base to Santiago and return, was inaugurated. Twenty-six passengers which included a nine-year-old child boarded the Cubana plane in its maiden Base-originated flight. Cubana's first-flight passengers included CAPT and Mrs. William R. Caruthers; CAPT and Mrs. G. L. Kohr; CDR and Mrs. Bruce M. Barackman: LT and Mrs. J. V. Gorman; Chief and Mrs. Del Clay; Chief and Mrs. M. C. Williams; Chief and Mrs. C. E. Troutman and their nine year-old son, Eugene, and Mrs. P. W. Becker. Other first Santiago weekenders via Cubana were Thomas J. Ramsden, TE3; Jack T. Blevins, RM3; W. J. Gribben, AN; L. J. Cannon, FT1; Roy E. Cobble, BM3; Joseph and Requel Hughes; D. Danenburgh; Ray Tuers, JOSN and Ely U. Orias, JO3. Among the passengers that left for Santiago last night were CAPT and Mrs. William A. Robie and their four children and a host of others, totalling 25 passengers altogether. Flying time one way is 21 minutes. In simple arithmetic, a passenger is gone to Santiago de Cuba and back to the Base in a matter of 42 minutes. However, a good time in Santiago makes the roundtrip aerial passage much longer than 42 minutes. It's a little over 40 hours back and forth! Military personnel must check out with their weekend liberty chits with the Base Police before boarding Cubana.

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e0 Page Four THE INDIAN Public Works Center Sorry to have missed getting the column in last week's INDIAN, but things just went awry. We hope it won't happen again. More Power The Center received some good news this week when BuDocks made a portable 600 KW Generator available for use in the Base Power System. With the full cooperation of all you "Ten percenters" we hope that when this new generator is delivered and installed, we will be able to carry the electrical load until the new power plant currently in the planning stages is built. It all depends on your conservation efforts though-one 600 KW generator isn't enough unless we meet the 10% mark. We noted a small drop-off in usage last week, but nowhere near what we can do. Let's give it the big try this week -turn out the lights when you head for the movies, turn off the TV when you're sitting in the yard. Landscaping With the cooperation of ComCBLant and the Commanding Officer, MCB-6, two important improvements to the landscape of the Naval Base will be underway very shortly under the sponsorship of the Public Works Center. The first of these, to start, will be the straightening and relocation of the dangerous "S" curve in the North East Gate Road just beyond Nob Hill. The other is the raising and seeding of the Fleet Recreation baseball fields to provide a greensward for the athletic members of our community. The dust problem so evident during the dry months will be a thing of the past upon completion of this project Congratulations are in order for Mr. George Reynolds of the Utilities Department on his promotion from Leadingman to Quarterman. All of us in the Center are happy to see George's talents and abilities recognized and rewarded. Devil -Dog Doin's by Pfe Herb Bailey Last week the Staff NCO Club held an installation of its new Board of Governors. Congratulations for a job well done goes to the members of the old Board: MSgt Smith, MSgt Allen, TSgt Carter, TSgt Deldo, TSgt Stoneking, and SSgt Webb. They were ably relieved by SSgt Stadler, SSgt Szili, TSgt Carter, TSgt Rozier, SSgt Gibbons, and SSgt Webb. This exciting World Series has taken some of the enthusiasm out of the Barracks Softball League, but the "ancients" of the Command, the "Strikeouts", made a startling comeback last Saturday Sheriffs Scribe Gtmo Bay Mosquito "Pyro" Fleet EDITOR'S NOTE: In this edition, the Base Police starts a colEmbarks On Fire Prevention Ride mn dubbed: Sheriff's Scribe. This column is designed to inform the driving public what to do and what rot to do while on the road. The column will also attempt to define and clarify Base regulations in connection with traffic situations under unusual circumstances. By J. V. DiMaggio Hey cop! Your red light is on. Yes I know it's on. There's a reason for it. The Base Provost Marshal's Office provides police escorts for all vehicles traveling on the Base that do not have valid Base tags or insurance. A typical example of this class are Cuban trucks or jeeps selling produce or products to various Base activities. Also needing escorts are Cuban Police vehicles, customs officials and Army and Navy representatives, and all vehicles going to the Base Police driving range for vehicle inspection. In order for the policeman to protect his escort or convoy, he is authorized to use the EMERGENCY RED LIGHT while proceeding to his convoy's ultimate destination. A valid Naval Base operator's permit or a Department of Defense operator's permit is required to be in possession of persons operating vehicles on the Naval Base. All traffic is warned that it is in violation of Base Regs for failure to yield to an emergency vehicle or to cut into or through an escorted convoy. Distaff Divot Diggers Release Golf Scores Scores of the Ladies' Day golf matches, held on Wednesday, October 10 were: For 18 holes: First low net: Edie.Ware. Second low net: Evelyn Leach and Marian Caruthers For 9 holes: First low net: Fran Skadowski Low putts: Nina Sheppardson and June Drones by defeating the Headquarters team, the "Hoboes", by a score of 3 to 2. Cpl Boranians "Bums" beat Cpl Rogers' "Angels" by a score of 12 to 9 last Monday. Nevertheless, with so little time remaining in the season, it appears to this columnist as though it will narrow down to a battle between the "Angels" and the "Strikeouts". INDIAN Photo The Base Fire Department during the past week afforded the children of the Base Nursery School with a ride on one of the Base fire trucks. FT G & F T C Bulletin Hair Stylist Hired The FTG softball team, namely "The Trainers", powered their way to an 11 to 5 victory over the SeaBees in the season opener Monday night. Harvie Giese, SO1, was the winning pitcher. James from USS SHAKARI, the FTG relief pitcher, pounded out a wonderful homerun with a man on in the 5th inning to salt the game away. The "Trainers" next game is on Tuesday the 16th versus the High School. FTG received two new men this past week. F. G. Harman, came from FTG Narragansett Bay. Mrs. Harman is awaiting transportation at St. Petersburg, Florida. Before joining the Navy, Harman, YN1, reported on board from USS MC CARD (DD-822). His family is now in Norfolk, Virginia. CDR McIntosh took time out for a lesson in fishing recently. Mrs. McIntosh landed a 3 pound langusta, daughter Ann caught a 2/z pound bonefish, son David brought in a nice snapper and Poppa MAC also ran. USNS GENERAL G. W. GOETHALS (TAP-182) was a welcome sight last Tuesday morning. She increased the FTG families on the Base by eight. It even rained that day. Who could ask for more? The Enlisted Bowling League starts next week. The Officer's League is well underway. The Admin Erasures have a 4 and 0 record. The Smoothbores a 7 and 1 record, the Pluggers a 4 and 4 record. The Caravella Flats team, which is an orphan child of FTG, has a 0 and 4 record. By Beauty Shop The position of hair stylist at the Naval Station Beauty Shop was recently filled when the Navy Exchange Office accepted Mrs. Margaret J. Wilson's application for the job. Mrs. Wilson will work hand-in-hand with Mrs. Suzanne L. Marsh who was hired two months ago. Under the new beauty shop's operating schedule, no appointment is necessary for a patron to get a beauty treatment. Both Mrs. Marsh and Mrs. Wilson will attend to patrons as they come in. With all haircut, hair-dos and facial beauty applications guaranteed, the NavSta Exchange Beauty Shop offers all kinds of hair treatment which includes cutting, trimming and thinning. Mrs. Suzanne L. Marsh is a beautician with a considerable background. She has worked for a long time at a Cambridge, Maryland beauty salon. Married to second class hospital corpsman Walter J. Marsh, Mrs. Marsh is a graduate of the Montrose School for Girls at Riestertown, Maryland. Mrs. Margaret J. Wilson is likewise a veteran in the field of beauty culture. She has worked in big stateside beauty salons all her life. The height of her career occurred when she became assistant store manager of Louis' Beauty Salon at Newport, Rhode Island. Mrs. Wilson is married to ship serviceman third class Wayne Wilson of the Naval Air Station. e 0 Saturday, 13 October 1956

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Saturday, 13 October 1956 Saturday, 13 October 1956 THE INDIAN $400 Top Payment. Ohio Voters To Decide On Bonus For 1950-53 Korean Veterans Following the end of the Korean conflict many of the states enacted laws providing for payments of compensation for residents of those particular states who served in the armed forces during the conflict. Although the state of Ohio has been considering a compensation plan similar to that which was enacted by the state of Michigan last year, no positive action was taken until early this year. As a result, a proposed state constitutional amendment has been included in the forthcoming national elections (November 6, 1956) which will place the issue before the registered voters of the state of Ohio. Lase personnel and their dependents who are registered voters of the state of Ohio and who have or will submit absentee ballots, will find in their ballot the proposed amendment. It provides for the amendment of Article VIII of the Constitution of the state of Ohio to provide for payments of compensation to certain of its residents who shall have served in the armed forces of the United States during the Korean conflict, or to certain of their survivors, and to issue bonds of the state not to exceed $90,000,000 to provide for the funds. The maximum amount that can be received by any one person is $400, based on payments of $10 for each month during which the person was on active domestic service, and $15 for each month the person was on active foreign service, including sea duty. Every person who shall have served on active duty in the armed forces of the United States at any time between June 25, 1950, and July 19, 1953, both dates inclusive, and who, at the time of commencing such service, was and had been a resident of the state of Ohio for at least one year immediately preceding the commencement of such service, is eligible to the benefits of the proposed amendment. This is a referendum: Qualified voters of Ohio, whether on the mainland or overseas, may vote for or against this proposed amendment in the coming elections. Fly In The Ointment. (Continued from Page Two) intake pipes in the bed of the river. Deep well pumps, using 250 pounds pressure, in turn, bring the water to the Base water plants. Located along the pipe lines to the Base are several surge tanks which store as much as 200,000 gallons each, thus ensuring a steady flow of water to the Base processing plants. The two pumping stations are administered by the Schueg-Shassin Corporation, a Cuban firm. Two methods are employed in treating the water for Base use. Water plant number three, located Okla. Sets Record 32nd Win Over Kansas; 2 Upsets Upsets were few and far between in the previous week of play. The most notable one was California over Pittsburgh 14-0. Probably the most unexpected one even to the team itself was Pennsylvania's 14-7 triumph over Dartmouth. This was the Quakers first win since mid-season of 1953. Friday night the watered-down UCLA team edged Oregon 6-0. Oklahoma played its fourth and fifth units in an endeavor to hold down the score against Kansas State but still wound up on top of a 66-0 score. This was their 32nd straight victory, a new major college record and their 58th consecutive Big Seven Conference triumph. Other scores were: Arkansas 6; Mississippi 14, Houston 0; USC 13, Wisconsin 6; and Tennessee 33, Duke 20. In the games this week it is Army at Syracuse, Colgate at Princeton, Harvard at Columbia, Cornell at Yale, Cincinnati at Navy, Pittsburgh at Duke, Illinois at Minnesota, Oklahoma at Kansas, Michigan State at Notre Dame, Northwestern at Michigan, Penn State at Ohio State, and Purdue at Wisconsin. Alabama at Tennessee, Auburn at Georgia Tech, Florida at Vanderbilt, LSU at Kentucky, Maryland at North Carolina, Arkansas at Texas, Rice at SMU, Utah at Wyoming, UCLA at California, Standford at Oregon, Washington at USC, and Oregon State at Washington State. near Villamar, uses a soda-lime process. Number one employs a permuted pressure process and is located just off Rogers Road. The latter process involves the use of four sand filters plus the necessary chemical treatment. The two plants then feed into one main line which supplies the Base with its water. Making water available to you is big business. Don't waste it, the one to pay will be you. Highest Job There Is! First Prize Essay On INDIAN Photo High on a windy pole might be a take-off for a song title but is actually A. G. Sturm, ET2, putting the finishing touches on a new directional b e a n antenna for WGBY Radio. The new antenna was cut to receive New York's Armed Forces Radio Service short wave broadcasts for rebroadcast to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. While the new antenna has resulted in much better shortwave reception, there are conditions resulting from sunspots that at times make any type reception difficult or impossible. NWC Elects New Officers At the annual election held by the Navy Wives Club on 5 Oct., Mrs. Mike French was elected president for the coming year. Joyce Hall was elected vice-president; Ellen Van Cleef, recording secretary; Anne Plourde, treasurer; Wylda Stevens, Chaplain; Edith Dunsmore, Parliamentarian; Flora Higgs, Master-at-arms; and Anne Tillman, Historian. The installations of the new officers will be held 25 Oct., at a Luncheon at the CPO Caribbean Room. Reservations must be made by calling 9503 by 23 October. TOY DRIVE The Boy Scouts of Gtmo will pick up toys in the second phase of the 1956 Trading Post Toy Drive, beginning this morning at 9:00 a.m. The Scouts will canvass all the various housing areas aboard the Base. Get your toys ready now! Fire Prevention by Frances Lee Linder Each year 10,000 Americans die in fires at home, an appalling number of deaths. Yet these deaths could be drastically reduced if we all practiced fire prevention. The secret of prevention is getting the fireman on the scene before the fire happens. This means that every fireman on duty is out looking for potential fires instead of idling in quarters waiting for the gong to ring. A fireman visiting a home, pointing out fire hazards will make the home owners more fire conscious. A fireman can point out the condition of electrical cords, the number of electrical appliances on a circuit, the rating of fuses in the fuse box, the storage of oil mops, polishing cloths, and flammable liquids. He can also point out the condition of heaters and how close they should be from the wall. An accumulation of rubbish that so many house-holders may think of as harmless is a common source of fire from spontaneous ignition. A pile of newspapers, left undisturbed for some time, may prove a threat to the household. A fireman can point out risks in dumping hot ashes into inflammable containers, and he can caution the homeowner against substituting pennies for fuses. This practice simply makes some part of the wiring the weakest link in the chain instead of the fuse. When a circuit is overloaded, the wire hidden in a wall will blow, sending white hot metal to start a fire. Fringed or frayed extension cords and overloading the circuit with too many appliances are common causes of your home fires. The fireman can give a short lecture on matches and smoking, the two worse offenders. He can caution the mother that matches should not be left within reach of children and advise the use of ash trays, especially large and deep ones. Lastly your fireman can tell you what to do in case of fire. Your family should practice an escape plan. In case of fire, never open a door without first feeling to see if it is hot. Heat can kill; go to a window. If you can not drop safely to the ground, call for help. If the house-holder cooperates with his fireman, fire losses and fatalities will be cut considerably. Let's all be fire-prevention conscious. Then there's the over-ambitious bandleader-he hired more men than he could shake a stick at. 9 m m Page Five THE INDIAN

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e Saturday, 13 October 1956 THE INDIAN Navy-BPPO-10NDtaltafalsit Cinema -Scoop by Don Hinton Hollywood will be releasing a great line-up of pictures in the months to come, they include: "Teahouse of the August Moon," "Around the World In Eighty Days," Friendly Persuasion," "Spirit of St. Louis," "Barrets of Winpole Street," and the "Pride and the Passion." In fact, I think that a couple of these have already been released. On the local scene a couple of top ones this week. Man With the Golden Arm (released through United Artists), is completely Frank Sinatra's picture. His performance rated him an oscar nomination in last year's derby. Eleanor Parker and Kin Novak are co-starred. No vak proves that acting talent can be combined with beauty. Otto Preminger produced and directed the film. The story deals with drug addiction and one of the main outstanding features of the film is the terrific musical score. It's a great picture for an adult audience. Don't miss it! The Mountain (Para, in color), marks number two on the excellent list this week. Spencer Tracy and Robert Wagner star, with Claire Trevor featured. Time has proved the ability of Trevor and Tracy and Wagner is new on the horizon, but shows great possibilities. Story concerns a plane crash on a mountain top. Another one to definitely not miss. Leather Saint (Para.), mixes religion and prizefighting, in a story that smacks slightly of the oldie "Going My Way." This one is without music, however. John Derek and Paul Douglas star. It may entertain you, if you're not too particular about your film fare. Earth vs the Flying Saucers (Col.), is a science fiction flick, and one that may hold your interest. It's nothing to brag about. Hugh Marlowe and Joan Taylor are starred. The title implies the plot. These have played the Base before: Desperate Hours (Para.), is the best of the re-runs this week. Humphrey Bogart, Fredric March, Dewey Martin and Mary Murphy star. It's the story of a gang of escaped convicts who invade the home of a family. It is great entertainment. If you haven't seen it, do! Foxfire (U.I., in color) ...Jane Russell and Jeff Chandler .trials and tribulations of a miner and a rich girl ...Fair to middlin'. 'ootsteps In the Fog (Col.) .. Stewart Granger and Jean Simmons ...off beat mystery-drama .good! * He has a contagious smiletrench mouth. WGBY Television Program Saturday, 13 October 1:00 Paul Winchell 1:30 Life with Elizabeth 2:00 Football 3:00 The Big Picture 3:30 Two for the Money 4:00 You Asked for It 4 :30 Masquerade Party 5:00 Western Movie 6 :00 Beat the Clock 6:30 That's My Boy 7:00 Stage Show 7:30 Justice 8:00 Jackie Gleason 9:00 Arthur Murray 9:30 Star Tonight Sunday, 14 October 1:00 Winky Dink 1:30 People's Choice 2:00 Stop the Music 2:30 Life is Worth Living 3:00 Victory at Sea 3:30 Calvacade of America 4:00 Liberace 4:30 Roy Rogers 5:00 Zoo Parade 5:30 Sunday News 5:45 Meet the Champs 6:00 Chance of Lifetime 6:30 Mr. Citizen 7:00 T-Men in Action 7:30 Loretta Young 8:00 Ed Sullivan 9:00 Star Stage 9:30 Medic Monday, 15 October 5:30 Man on the Hill 6:00 News & Weather 6:15 Perry Como 6:30 My Favorite Husband 7:00 Talent Scouts 7 :30 Highway Patrol 8:00 Caesar's Hour 9:00 Studio One "Flight" Tuesday, 16 October 5:30 Meet Millie 6:00 News & Weather 6:15 Eddie Fisher 6:30 Disneyland "Monsters of the Deep" 7:30 Russ Morgan 8:00 Milton Berle 9:00 Goodyear Playhouse "Christmas 'till Closing" Wednesday, 17 October 5:30 Truth or Consequence 6:00 News & Weather Carnival LCDR E Saturday, October 13 NavSta-Leather Saint-101 min. NAS-Last of the Desperados-101 min. Mar. Site-Terror At Midnight-101 min. Villa.-Marty-100 min. MCB-6-Trial-108 min. Lwd. Pt.-Tender Trap-123 min. Sunday, October 14 NavSta-The Mountain-105 min. NAS-Leather Saint Mar. Site-It's A Dog's Life-107 min. Villa.-Terror At Midnight MCB-6-Marty Lwd. Pt.-Trial Monday, October 15 NavSta-Foxfire-103 min. NAS-The Mountain Mar. Site-Last of the Desperados Villa.-It's A Dog's Life MCB-6-Terror At Midnight Lwd. Pt.-Marty Tuesday, October 16 NavSta-Earth vs the Flying Saucers103 min. NAS-Foxfire Mar. Site-Leather Saint Villa.-Last of the Desperados MCB-6-It's A Dog's Life Lwd. Pt.-Terror At Midnight Wednesday, October 17 NavSta-Footsteps In the Fog-90 min. NAS-Earth vs the Flying Saucers Mar. Site-The Mountain Villa.-Leather Saint MCB-6-Last of the Desperados Lwd. Pt.-It's A Dog's Life Thursday, October 18 NavSta-Man With the Golden Arm131 min. NAS-Footsteps In the Fog Mar Site-Foxfire Villa.-The Mountain MCB-6-Leather Saint Lwd. Pt.-Last of the Desperados Friday, October 19 NavSta-Desperate Hourn-112 min. NAS-Man With the Golden Arm Mar. Site-Footsteps In the Fog Villa.-Earth vs the Flying Saucers MCB-6-Foxfire Lwd. Pt.-The Mountain * A lot of choice GI homes are the governments revenge for the person not re-enlisting. e carnival p chairman, activities a ing carniv prizes, etc. ment applic tober in o 6:15 Industry on Parade Book -Nook 6 7 7 8 9 5 6 6 6 7 7 8 9 5 6 6 6 7 7 8 9 delivery. The carnival procurement officer is available at the Naval Station Exchange Office during working hours. Photo Exhibit Opens 1 March, Rochester The 21st Rochester Photo Exhibition will open at the Memorial Art Gallery in Rochester, N.Y. on 1 March 1957. Closing date for entries in the Salon is 10 Feb. 1957. Data and entry forms are available from Thomas F. Murray, 301 Ridgeway Avenue, Rochester 13, N.Y. Eighteen medals will be awarded for exhibits in five sections. The sections are (1) Pictorial prints, monochrome and color. (2) Nature prints, monochrome and color. (3) Pictorial color slides, 2" x 2" only. (4) Nature color slides, 2" x 2" only. (5) Stereo color slides, 1%" x 4", mounted for projection. FROM: the time and effort. Scott, Walter. Scott was probably the first real "historical novelist." He wrote 150 years ago, but his novels are still being read and enjoyed. Like everyone back then, he is inclined to be a bit long-winded, but this doesn't diminish his reputation as an excellent storyteller. "Ivanhoe" is perhaps his favorite novel, and one of his most readable. Selinko, Annemnarie. "Desitee," which hit the bookstands only a couple of years ago, is an excellent historical novel. The heroine is a French girl who lived at the time of Napoleon, nearly married him, and eventually became the Queen of Sweden. Most of the story is true, and its background is one of the most colorful periods of history. A Washington bureaucrat parked his car in a lot whose sign read: "All Day Parking-35 and don't argue with me, I'm not on the policy-snaking level." 3 cent stamp TO: Send The INDIAN Home :30 I've Got a Secret by Bob Densmore :00 My Little Margie :30 Playhouse of Stars Oldenborg, Zoe. The quality of :00 odfey &Frinds this French novelist's writing is :00 Godfrey & Friends :00 Kraft Theatre "Death not merely above-average-its exis a Spanish Dancer" traordinary. Her latest work, enThursday, 18 October titled "The Cornerstone," is a :30 TV Reader's Digest powerful tale of the Middle Ages. :00 News & Weather Although it is more or less a sequel :15 Perry Como to her other book "The World Is :30 This is Your Life Not Enough," it can be appreci:00 Bob Cummings acted and enjoyed on its own :30 Dragnet :00 Martha Raye content, :00 Climax Paton, Alan, This modern novel"The Circular Staircase" ist is represented by two novels Friday, 19 October in our library, "Cry, the Beloved :30 Dollar a Second Country," and "Too Late the Pha:00 News & Weather larope." The former definitely es:15 Eddie Fisher established him as a gifted artist, :30 Dunninger Show and is perhaps the better. He :00 Life of Riley :30 Crusader :00 Frankie Laine Poe, Edgar Allan Here is a :00 Boxing-Gene Poirer famous American who needs no vs Carmine Fiore introduction. His "Tales" were the first of their kind (mystery), and l Orders Due in many respects they remain the best. Chills and thrills aplenty! .L. Kurek, 1957 Base Roberts, Kenneth. Roberts is a procurement committee modern American novelist who requests all command makes early American history the nd associations requirsubject of his stories. As a hisal booth equipments, torical novelist he is one of the to submit procurebest, and can spin a fine yarn with ations prior to 26 Octhe greatest of ease, "Lydia Bairder to insure timely icy" is available here, and is worth