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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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U.S. Naval Base ( Publisher )
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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English

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Exercise Your Right To Vote


EDITOR'S NOTE: On November 6, 1956, a national balloting to elect a President, Vice-President and other federal officials of the United States, will be held. The welfare of a nation is better served through a sound administrative body. Active participation of its citizens in the daily life of a nation counts as the most invaluable aspect of good government. To attain these goals, it is imperative that you must, as citizens of the Unites States, make use of your inalienable right to vote. Upon your vote depends the destiny of our nation. Our national heritage of freedom and democracy will not liken to a dusty book on the shelf if we make use of this franchise-"The Right To Vote!"


SecNav


SecNav Message
"I consider it the patriotic duty of every citizen to exercise his right
to a free vote. This right is one we in the Navy should especially cherish since the maintenance of our free government by free elections is one of the principal reasons we are in the service.
"All hands are encouraged to determine their eligibility, and if qualified, to take advantage of the privilege of the absentee ballots which are available to those who are away from home."
Charles S. Thomas
Secretary of the Navy


Chaplain Budd Reports To NAS; Fills New Billet


Fleet Camera Party Photo
In-answer to the request made by the Naval Air Station for an allowance of a chaplain's billet, the Bureau of Naval Personnel has recently ordered LCDR Allen C. Budd, Protestant, to fill the newlycreated position. Since its commissioning in 1941, this is the first time the Naval Air Station has ever had a chaplain.
Chaplain Budd reported aboard the NAS Thursday, September 27, from' the U.S. Naval Retraining Command at Norfolk, Virginia. While at this activity LCDR Budd had the additional duty of attending to the religious needs of the residents at the Benmoreell Housing Reservation in Norfolk. He was relieved of these jobs by a commander and two lieutenant commanders.
A member of a clan of ministers and preachers, Chaplain Budd's deceased father -was a Methodist minister in Missouri and Alabama for almost 40' years. LCDR Budd has two pastor brothers. Candler, an older brother, is pastor of Glenn MemoriAL Methodist Church. at. .Atlanta, Georgia, while James, a younger brother, is pastor of St. Mark at Augusta, Georgia.
Like his son Allen, Chaplain Budd's deceased father who built
(Continued on Page Three)


* U









COVERS GTMO LIKE THE SUNSHINE U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Volume VII, No. 40 Saturday, 6 October 1956


2nd MCB 6. Echelon Arrived Wed.,


Completes Gtmo CB Battalion

There will be more power and increased activtities for the Seabees on the Base.
The second echelon of MCB-6 constituting 130 enlisted personnel arrived in Gtmo from Davisville, Rhode Island, Wednesday morning, October 3, while the first group of MCB-6. with a strength of 110 men arrived here early last week.


.The Gtmo detachment of MCB-1 composed of 70 men, already at hard work here, will be consolidated with the elements of MCB-6.
An entire complement of 310 men and ten officers will form the Gtmo MCB-6 which is scheduled to stay on the Base for at least six months. Skipper of the CB Battalion is CDR R. C. Jacquess, CEC, USNR.Construction of housing units at Leeward Point will be the main job to be undertaken by the SeaBees. -One hundred thirteen units consisting of 25 married, officers' quarters and 88 enlisted men's quarters are to be added to Leeward Point.
As a collateral duty here on the main side, the SeaBees are to relocate the northeast gate road and raise the athletic field at the Fleet Recreation Center by adding top soil.


RADM Cooper On

WGBY-TV Monday.

RADRW. G. Cooper. will address-'the .television audience over WGBY-TV -Monday evening, October 8, at 7:00.
The Base Commander's speech will be in conjunction with the National Fire Prevention Drive.


Aero Predicts Slight

Rains Despite Season
The Naval Air Station. Aerology Office announced the past week that "although the rainy season is upon us, the outlook for a great deal of rain in this area is not too good."
The same source, however, predicted that for the next month, Gtmo can expect intermittent showers early in the afternoon and also a few hours after sundown.
In another- light, the Aerology Office said -that to date the frequehcy- of -hurricanes has -proved significantly below normal and that the immediate outlook will indicate a little likelihood of any noteworthy increase in hurricane activity for the latter part of the hurricane season which officially ends in .November.
The .NAS Aerological Officer feels that the extremely moderate hurricane season is,. in a large measure, .. due to the preceding severe winter--which -helped to equalize the .difference in temperature structure between the pole and
-the equator. .... ..

Si:i TOd ay!!!


Join Your WPGA
(See Page Five)


Sharp Voted As CPO Club Head


Fleet Camera Party Photo
Damage control chief Perry C. Sharp, ship: rider of the Fleet Training Group, assumed office as president of the local Chief Petty Officers Club Monday, October 1. President Sharp succeeded chief boatswain's mate Rocky Gugliemo, also of the Fleet' Training Group.
Engineman chief E. D. "Builrl Durham, new vice-president of the club, was sworn in with Chief Sharp, Chief ship serviceman Kenneth T. Sorge remains as the CPO Club manager.
The intra-CPO political saga of Chief Sharp was indeed unusual and meteoric!
At the club's general -election of officers held on Saturdayi September: 8, Chief Sharp was forcibly pulled out :of his political shell when a Naval Air Station chief nomniated him for president, was endorsed by a VU-Ten chief and was finally elected unanimously by 100 of the 230 chiefs that compose the club.
"If that pre-election enthusiasm manifested by my cqlleagues during the time when my name was in the presidential stake will be carried through my incumbency," says .Chief Sharp.. 'J don't see. why we - uldfi't *accomplish- -things for the: welfare; of the -club and. the service." ........... ..=
The -new: CPO Club' -iresident said that he plans no drastic policy changes in the execution of his duties. He further stated that plans
(Continued on Page Three)


/






M
Page Two


Saturday, 6 October 1956


THE INDIAN
The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a possible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.
RADM WILLIAM G. COOPER, Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
Editorial Staff
LCDR K. S. Dick -------------------------------- Officer-Advisor
G. L. Henderson, JOC ------------------------------------Editor
J. C. Curren, JOSN ----------------- ------------Managing Editor
E.U. Orias, J3 -------------------------------- Feature Editor
D.D. Hinton, JOSN --------------------- --------- Staff Reporter
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds.
Materials marked AFPS may be used by news media provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All materials originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part or without credit.
All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.

Electoral Franchise A Two-Way Job
Our obligation as citizens is to vote intelligently. Obligation is a two-way proposition. The men we vote for also have obligations.
The elected official is obliged to serve all the people in his district, not just the people who voted for him nor a particular group of voters.
In trying to represent all the people, the honest official has a tough job. He may assume that, by electing lim, the people endorsed his campaign platform. But, what else do the people expect of him? Here the obligation again becomes a two-way street.
As citizens, it is our right and our duty to inform our representatives how we feel on public issues. As servicemen, we are free to do this in all matters except legislation affecting the military.
Federal law and Armed Forces regulations forbid us from engaging in politics. But they certainly do not prohibit us from expressing ourselves on all non-military matters. In fact, as free citizens we should do so.


Sunday, 7 October 1956

CATHOLIC MASSES Sunday: 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. through Fri.:
1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday: 0800-Naval Base Chapel Saturday Confessions at 1700- 1800 1900 - 2000
Daily Confessions: immediately preceding Mass
PROTESTANT SERVICES Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 0930-Adult Bible Class-Open
Air Assembly
1000-Leeward Point
1100-Divine Worship-Naval
Base Chapel
1900-Fellowship Hour--Open
Air Assembly Thursday. 1000-Choir Rehearsal JEWISH SERVICES Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel CHURCH OF CHRIST Sunday: 1000-Bible Study-Community Auditorium
1045-Worship Service-Copimunity Auditorium LATTER DAY SAINTS Sunday: 1100-Naval Station Library CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Sunday: 1000-Naval Station Library CHAPLAINS AT THIS ACTIVITY
CDR P.R. McPhee, CHC, USN
(Protestant)
LCDR A. C. Budd, CHC, USN
(Protestant)
CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN
(Catholic)


Calendar Of Events
Saturday, October 6
Catholic Catechism Classes-Naval Base
School-1000
Kid's Matinee-Villamar Lyceum-iB00
Sunday, October 7
Movie Night--Officers' Club-2000
Monday, October 8
O.E.S. Chapter Meeting-Community Auditorium-1930
Tuesday, October 9
Hospital Service Volunteers-Medical Library (Hosp)-1000
Little Theater-Community Auditorium1930
Fleet Reserve AssociationCommunity Hall. Marina Point-2000 Fleet Reserve Association Auxiliary-Girl
Scout Hut-2000
CPO Nooner's Day Luncheon-CPO
Club-ll80
Wednesday, October 10
Boy Scout Meeting-Chapel Hill Auditorium-1880
Toastmaster's Club-Officers' Club--180 Kid's Matinee-Villamar Lyceum-1800
Thursday, October 11
Navy Wives' Club-Textile PaintingVillamar Lyceum-1330
Felloweraft Club 1078-Community Auditorium-1930
Jr. Rifle and Pistol Club--Bldg 27-1930


CATHOLIC PICNIC
The Official PicnicSupper and Farewell-Welcome _for - the Naval Base Catholic Chaplain Jerome J. Sullivan, and his relief, Chaplain Arthur P. Finan, will be held on Friday, October 12, from 5-8:30 p.m., at Phillips Park. All members of the parish are invited.


T-Agers' Fire Prevention Formula


INDIAN Photo
Teen-agers are also aware of Base Fire Prevention week, beginning tomorrow, October 7 and ending October 13.
In discussing fires, the teen-agers pointed out that when a fire is small it can be put out easily. Also, you can stamp it out with you foot, smother it with a rug or douse it with a pail of water.
One of the commonest kinds of fires in the home is the food or grease fire. It can best be put out by placing a metal cover on the pan or vessel containing the burning food. Such action at the start is more effective than the work of the entire fire department.
Do not use water on a grease fire.



New Hours Now In Effect For Comm.


Store; NavSta - NAS Exchanges

Effective yesterday, October 5, both the Naval Station and the Naval Air Station Exchange stores started under a revised sales operation


schedule which is published hereunder:
Naval Station Store


Monday

Wednesday Thursday Saturday

Friday Sunday
Tuesday


) 0915-1645
)
)
)

) 0915-1845 ) 1245-1645 ) Closed


Naval Air Station Store


Tuesday )
)
Wednesday )
)
Thursday )
)
Saturday )


Friday Sunday
Monday


0915-1645




0915-1845
Closed Closed


Also, both the Naval Station Commissary store and its Bargo branch began operating under a new sales schedule on Wednesday, October 3.


NavSta Commissary Store Tuesday )


Wednesday Thursday. Friday. Saturday Sunday


Monday


4


) 0880-1500 ).

) 1300-2000 .) 0830-1600 ) 0900-1400


C!3sed


Monday Tuesday


Bargo Branch
)
) 1000-1700
)


Wednesday ) Thursday ) 0830--1200
: )


Friday Saturday Sunday


) 1000-1700
)
) Closed
)


9


THE INDIAN


m






m
Page Thre


THEk IbfIAN4


Saturday, 6 October '1956


Same Service-New Location . . .

New Hospital Opens; Facilities. For 100 Bed Patients
by Ely U. Orias The outer qualities of the U.S. Naval Hospital in Gtmo have been drastically changed with the transfer of its operational activity from the old hospital building to the new. But its inner mission still remains
-dedicated to the physical, mental, and spiritual welfare of all military personnel and their dependents and to all mankind in times of possible disaster.
Navy medical history has made an entry into its log that on Thursday, September 27, 1956, the old Base hospital edifice ceased to function as a sanctuary for the sick. On the day following, however, the impressive and most modern structure situated on Caravella Point sallied forth to continue the old hospital's mission.


Hospital Staff
Staffed with 28 officers which include 12 doctors, nine nurses, four Medical Service Corps officers and three warrant officers, the new hospital is allowed a bed-patient capacity of 100 persons.
On the enlisted force, the hospital has an allowance of 102 corpsman, 25 of which are assigned as ambulance and utility drivers, 14 are doing clerical duties, while the rest are either guardians of the different wards or Lab Technicians.
Aiding the military personnel of the hospital are 59 civilians, 11 of which are American civil service eligibles, while the remaining 48.are aliens.
In charge of personnel and hospital records is LT Joseph J. Vitlip, Medical Service Corps.
Patient Care
At the present time, the hospital is taking care of 71 patients, 17 of which are bed patients, while the rest are ambulatory. Of the bed patients, seven are enlisted personnel, nine are dependents and one officer. Among the ambulatory patients, 53 are enlisted men and one officer.
Committed due to fractured bones are 16 enlisted patients, one of which is engineman chief Carl H. Aumann, of the Fleet Training Group, who was injured in a traffic accident while riding on his scooter. He was admitted to the hospital on July 12, 1956, the date when the accident happened. Incidentaly, Chief Aumanu is senior among- the patients in point of hospitalization.
First and Last
On the maternity side, six pound, 11 ounce George Elmer O'Bryan who was born on October 27, makes the grade of being the last baby delivered at the old hospital building. Baby George is the son of first class commissary steward and Mrs. Elmer: O'Bryan who hail from Bristol, Florida. Father O'Bryan is attached to the Leeward Point galley. .
First to occupy the maternity ward -'at' the 'new hospital building :is Mrs: Marie Clark of New London, connecticut She gave birth to a seven pound, six ounce baby boy named David Bryan, on September 28, 1956, the day when the new hospital started operating.


Mrs. Clark is the wife of engineman first class Raleigh Clark of the Fleet Boat Pool. Engineman Clark is a native of Southern Pines, North Carolina.
Without distinction as to what category the patient belongs, Roy T. Davis, U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of Haiti was the last patient to have been admitted to the old hospital. The Ambassador was also the first patient to have been registered in the admitting book of the new hospital.
Commands Bay View
The hospital is a "superlative" masterpiece of the ingenuity of the architects and builders that erected it. The main artery of the plush hospital are the ward wing which is composed of the first and second deck wards, the Senior Officers Quarters bedroom wing, dependents' bedroom wing and the surgical room.
Overlooking the harbor, the new hospital commands a good view over the array of ships steaming in or just simply lulling idle in the bay-constantly reminding the patients that the elements of the United States Navy, whether on land or at sea, are always ready to welcome them back or guard them in the midst of their physical misfortunes.
Genesis
History reveals that it was in nearby North Toro Cay in 1903 that the first Dispensary in Gtmo was established. At that time the staff consisted of one medical officer and a few corpsmen. As time went on, the number of personnel increased, and additional buildings were erected in 1939. On June 1, 1946, the medical facilities comprising the Naval Station Dispensary were commissioned as the U.S. Naval Hospital, Guantanamo Bay, with CAPT P.M. Crossland, MC, in command.
Incumbent skipper of the Base hospital is CAPT Lyle A. Newton. Serving in his staff -include CAPT James H. Boyers; Executive Officer and Chief of Medicine; CAPT WilJiam, A. Roije, Chid Dependents' "Cinic and Pediaticiai'CDR William C. Turville, Chief of Surgery; CDR Arthur R. Oesterle, Oral Surgeon; LCDR Fred E. Stewart, Administrative Officer; LCDR Jed Paul, Chief Radiologist; LCDR


Fleet Camera Party Photo
Mrs. Marie Clark, top left, beams secretly but proudly while she holds her somnolent baby-the first to have been ushered at the new Base hospital. Top right-Mrs. Zories 0' Bryan dotingly watches her babyothe last recorded birth at the old hospital.
Bottom left, l-r: William G. Huffman, HM1, CDR Herbert G. Stoeck'lein, hospital Sick Call Officer, and U.S. Ambassador to Haiti Roy T. Davis. Ambassador Davis is the first and last patient. at the new and old hospital, respectively. Bottom right-Frank R., Coyne, FT2, being lifted into the truck that formed the transfer-caravan of patients from the old to the new.


Tekla S. Gavelek, Chief of Nursing Service; LT Leonard A. Peppler, Finance Chief; WO Albern M. Porter Jr., Chief of Food Service; LT Orson M. White, Chief EENT and WO Ralph T. Georner Jr., Chief of Environmental Sanitation, etc.
The new hospital building was dedicated in impressive ceremonies on Monday, September 24, 1956. The old hospital main building will soon be occupied by the Base Public Works Center.


Sharp ......
(Continued from Page One)
-or programs began by his predecessor will be carried out to full realization by his administration. "For -instance," he said, "the construction of the club's swimming p6ol Which: is. now in- its planning stage, will-be imdertaken as soon as'ne essary funds' become available.Chief Sharp is a native of Richmond, Virginia. He is a career man-having already served 'the Navy for 18 years.


Chaplain.....
(Continued from Page One)
one of the strongest Methodist Churches in Alabama, had also two brothers who are Methodist ministers.
LCDR Budd is a member of the Virginia Conference, Staunton District, where he served in two different parishes before coming in the Navy in July, 1943. The chaplain has had more than six years of duty with aviation commands, five of which were aboard aviation ships which include, among others, the USS LAKE CHAMPLAIN where he served thereon as senior chaplain for 26 months.
A native of Georgia, Chaplain Budd took undergraduate and graduate studies in the Divinity School of Duke University from 1935 to 1938.
Married to the former' Mary Angie Pearce of Durham, North Carolina, the Budds have two daughters, Angieline Sue, 17 and Mary Molloy, 9. Chaplain Budd's family will soon rejoin him in Gtmo.


V.





m
Page Four


F T G & F T C Bulletin
CDR and Mrs. Fitch are awaiting the homecoming this weekend of their son Peter born 20 September at the local hospital. CDR Fitch has already bought him a fine spinning reel and rod.
Ensign H. L. Ford intends to set up housekeeping on Marine Site #1 with the arrival of Mrs. Ford on Saturday's FLAW flight. Mrs. Ford comes to sunny Gtmo by way of Oakdale, Conn.
CWO and Mrs. Peter Schwindt are scheduled to leave the area on 12 October, bound for U.S. Naval Station, Tongue Point, Astoria, Oregon. Mr. Schwindt has completed 28 years of service in the Navy and plans to retire and reside in that area, upon completion of 30 years.
CWO J. F. Perdue is to report to FTG on 6 October as relief for CWO Schwindt. CWO Perdue has to make only a short trek from NavSta to FTG on this change of duty.
New arrivals in the past week as follows:
R. C. Cook, EMC reported aboard from USS Iowa (BB-61). Mrs. Cook is presently residing in Kealy, N.C. from whence she will come when transportation and housing become available.
W. I. Atkeison, TMC who was formerly attached to FTG returns for duty after a absence of about
2 months.
A.L. Schluetter, RD1 reported to FTC for duty as an instructor from USS Otterstetter (DER-244). He is no stranger to Gtmo, having previously had duty with FTG in 1953. The Schluetter family eagerly awaits word to return to Gtmo at Newport, Rhode Island.
R. L. Kohl, YN2 comes to FTG, Gtmo from FTG, Narragansett Bay. Kohl's family is presently located at Middletown, Rhode Island.
The officers' Bowling League officially opened last Monday night when the Gunnery Department "Smoothbores" took 3 points and lost 1 to VU-10 #1 and the Damage Control "Pluggers" lost 4 Points to the "Keystones" from Public Works.


NAS Bowling Team

Routs CANBERRA
The NAS Bowling team defeated the highly rated USS CANBERRA (CAG 2) bowling team last Sunday, September, 30. The game was held at the NAS bowling alleys.
The CANBERRA team had had previously routed the U.S. Naval Air Station (Jacksonville) bowling champions.


Devil - Dog Doin's
Pfc Herb Bailey
Well, the "old men" of the command finally experienced the bitter taste of defeat at the hands of Cpl Boranians "Bums." The "Strikeouts" lost Saturday by a score of 8 to 14. The league seems to be tightening up somewhat as the season draws slowly to a close.
Last Saturday we bid a fond envous farewell to two of our NCO's. Sgt Churchman left for leave and duty at Treasure Island, Calif. Sgt C.P. Nichols left for leave and duty at Parris Island where they take boys and mold and shape them into men and Marines.
We now have four new Corporals in the command. Pfc's Straub, Hoppe, Duncan and Belville have finally been noticed for their merits and have been elevated to the position of Non-Commissioned Officer.
The rifle range is once again bustling with activity as the Barracks Marines find it is time to sharpen up their eyes and trigger fingers. The past week has seen them contorting themselves in the various positions that torture long unused muscles but mean steady pieces when the time comes for them to prove they are Marines on the rifle range.
Master Sergeant Allen, the Barracks Sergeant Major, found out what it is like to do battle with the denizens of the Caribbean deep last Sunday. He fought and landed, after a rigorous struggle lasting over an hour, a large Ray weighing between one hundred and one hundred and fifty pounds.


VU-1O Prop Blast
Congratulations to LT Michael Z. Zibilich who has recently joined the ranks of the newly promoted. He is the eighth Mallard officer to be promoted within the past four months.
Welcome aboard to the recent Mallard arrivals. L. E. Merchanct, ADI, reported aboard last week from his last duty station, the CIC School at NAS, Glynco, Brunswick, Ga. J. W. Kelly, AA, and T. R. Carrico, AN, both reported aboard from a tour aboard the USS Intrepid.
S. J. Burns, AD2, arrived aboard earlier this week. This last duty station was at NAS Atlantic City where he was attached to VA
(AW) 33. D. N. Hart, AD2, was formerly attached to VF-61 at NAS Oceana prior to his transfer to UTRON TEN. J. W. Jenkins, .AN, has reported aboard from a tour with NAS Jacksonville.
.R. H. Anderson, Jr., AMI, was detached last week for a stateside tour with VF-73. G. R. Flynn, AN, was released for transfer to NAS Jacksonville and separation from the Naval Service.


Eleven Cuban Judges Due Here


Today; Will Tour Base Facilities

Eleven Cuban judicial figures from the local area will arrive aboard the Base this morning as guests of RADM W. G. Cooper, ComNavBase.
This will mark the first trip to the Base by the judges and they will be conducted on an official orientation tour of the Base by officers of


the Admiral's staff.
The judges will have cocktails at the quarters of ADM Cooper at 1230, followed by a luncheon at the Officers' -Club.
Members of' the party will include the following judges from Santiago: Dr. Julio Cesar Guerra Perez, President, Provincial Supreme Court; Dr. Francisco Mendieta Hechavarria, Chief Prosecuting Attorney, Provincial Supreme Court; Dr. Fernando L. Aguilar Almeida, President, Second Section (Guantanamo District Court); Dr. Antonio M. Vallin Elias, Assistant to President, Second S e c t i o n (Guantanamo District Court); Dr. Evelio Morales del Castillo, Assistant to president, second section, (Guantanamo District Court); Dr. Francisco Perez Cisnero, Assistant Prosecuting Attorney Provincial Supreme Court; Dr. Angel Fernandez Rodriguez, Assistant Attorney to the Provincial Supreme Court and Dr. Luis F. Pera Rodriguez, Assistant Attorney to the Provincial Supreme Court.
Members of the party from Guantanamo City will be Dr. Juan Mentres, Judge of Instruction; Dr. Jose Garcia Alvarez, Judge of Civil Matters; Dr. Custina Blanes, Judge of Municipal Court-and Dr. Ramulso Martinez, Judge of Caimanera.
The party will leave the Base Saturday afternoon.


New Bus Schedule

Eliminates Routes 2-3

During the past week, in a release from the Commander Naval Base, a change in routing and scheduling of regular bus service aboard the Base was announced.
The purpose of the change is to provide more efficient bus service to all points aboard the Base.
The new system will eliminate routes 2 and 3 to the housing area, since the one route will cover all stops. Regular bus stops will be erected and numbered in the immediate future.
The re.vised bus schedule will go
-into effect on .October 8.
Nav'Al'Bige 1..bua will cornmnente per4 ing' # 0600 ona twenty- toiute- 'ba-'s.' 'Allbue
a~icu1ed romtly at 2330:.
Watch the "Papoose' for the new revised bus schedule printed in full.


Don't Mention Ham ...

Visit From Founder

Gives L. T. History
The past weekend of September 22, CDR Andrew (Andy) V. Reid, visited the Base. CDR Reid founded the Gtmo -Little Theater organization.
The need for an amateur theatrical group for the entertainment of Base personnel came to CDR Reid and his wife, Madeline, in 1948, while CDR Reid was officer in charge of Leeward Point Field.
According to CDR Reid, the organization was plagued with difficulties at the beginning, but after a time the idea was accepted and the Little Theater was founded.
The present site of the Little Theater, the Community Auditorium, was originally a galley Through CDR Reid's efforts the building was converted to the present auditorium and club rooms. CDR Reid also pointed out, upon touring the auditorium that WGB .Y-TV now occupies the space which was originally the refrigeration unit of the galley.
Mrs. Peggy Way and Ross Fegley, HM1, Little Theater members who conducted the tour, briefed CDR Reid on past and recent productions and brought out the fact that the theatrical group is now self supporting in a Community wide effort. In turn, CDR Reid stated that the original productions of the Little Theater were free and were financed through Special Services.
CDR Reid was quite favorably impressed with the organization as it now exists and voiced a desire to return to the Base for the next production.
The first production of the Little Theater was "Arsenic and Old Lace," which was presented in 1948. Twenty-five plays have been produced since then, with the cu rrent play "The Tender Trap," .bringing the total to 26.


CPO Nooners Day
Th Ttsecon~d rneet ig of the Non
er's Day _.uppheon organization .will be held Tuesday, .Octjober 9 at 1130 at the CPO Club.
Guest speaker for the luncheon will be CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer Naval Station.


M


go a O :THz INM!ANq Saturday, 60e ctber 19156








Saturday, 6 October 1956 THE INDIAN Page Five


Softball Season Opens Monday


Ladies Golf Tourney Medical Dept.


With 8-Team, 112 Game Schedule In Near Future


by Joe Duffy
Back in the Forty-Eight the arrival of Fall has ushered in a new sport scene with King Football reigning in center stage. However, locally we have a substitute more suitable to our temperature range, this being the modified, speeded-up version of baseball known as softball.
Here in Guantanamo Bay, softball fills the sport calendar between baseball and basketball, and has been the intramural program of Base Commands since early September. Inter-Command activity begins Monday night at Fleet Recreation under the arc lights, to kick off a 112-game schedule extending into the last week of November.
The ground work for the coming season was laid on Tuesday morning, when eight team represent- Favorites On Top
tives met with LCDR R.A. Allan, of the Naval Air Station, Chairman of the Softball Committee, to draw up a list of rules and regulations governing league opera- Of Grid Play tion. O rdPq


Rocky Gugliemo was appointed as chief umpire with Trapp, Tanzi, Kubek, Olson and Henderson forming his staff. Chief Scorekeeper duties went to Bob Dixon, who is a veteran of the tally sheet.
The eight -teams lined up to compete for the softball title are Naval Station, Leeward Point, MCB-6, Fleet Training Group, Naval Air Station, Hospital-Dental, Utility Squadron Ten and the High School. This marks the first venture into softball rivalry for the High School club, however, they have been represented in the basketball race for the past several seasons. The other seven clubs took part in last year's competition that was won by the VU-10 Mallards, who sported an undefeated record all season.
The eight teams will engage each opponent twice in the 112game schedule, with two games being played each night Monday thru- Thursday. The first game is scheduled for 1830 with the second contest listed for 2000. Friday nights will be used for makeup games if any postponements are encountered.
SCHEDULE
Monday 1830 NavSta vs Leeward
Pt, 2000 MCB-6 vs FTG
Tuesday 1830 NAS vs HospitalDental, 2000 VU-10 vs High
School
Wednesday 1830 Leeward Pt vs
MCB-6, 2000 FTG vs NAS
Thursday 1830 Hospital-Dental
vs VU-10, 2000 High School
vs NavSta.



W. P. C. A..The four letters W.P.C.A. stand for the Water and Power Cons atii As ac ion. True, there is so such organization on the Base, but everyone should be the WPCA himself. Remember save power and water!


The third week of war on the grid irons saw teams more or less adhering to expected form. However, the always-present possibility of upsets makes football one of our most popular sports. Both Navy and Army came through, the Middies rolling over Williams and Mary by 39-14 while the Cadets flattened Virginia Military 32-12.
Other scores were: Duke 40, Virginia 7; Maryland 6, Wake Forest 0; Pittsburgh 14, Syracuse 7; Brown 20, Columbia 0; Main 40, Rhode Island 7; Penn State 34, Pennsylvania 0; Colgate 34, Cornell 6; Purdue 16, Missouri .7; Northwestern 14, Iowa State 13; Illinois 32, California 20; Iowa 27, Indfana 0; Ohio State 34, Nebraska 7; Toledo 20, Ohio U. 13 and Michigan:42, U.C.L.A. 13. In games this week it is Brown at Yale; Colgate at Holy Cross; Columbia at Princeton; Navy at Cornell; Darmouth at Penn; Penn State at Army; Illinois at Washington; Indiana at Notre Dame; Kansas State at Oklahoma; Michigan St. at Michigan; Stanford at Ohio State; So. California at Wis. consin; and Alabama at Vanderbilt. Tennessee at Duke; Baylor at Maryland; West Virginia at Texas; Colorado at Kansas; Oregon at U.C.L.A.; and Washington State at Idaho.
As soon as the World Series have been completed, the Armed Forces Radio Service will commence broadcasting two games each day on Saturday and Sunday. These will. include both college and professional games and will be picked
-up -by -WGBY -and rebroadcast.

In spite of what many countries think, an American still chooses his own form of- governmentblonde, brunette or redhead.
* * it
Some people believe anything you tell them-=if you whisper it.


9


matches, held on Wed tober 3, were:
For 18 holes
First low net: Edie
Bea Kohr
Second low net: Ma
thers
Low putts: Mary Go Winners for the nine
play were:
First low net: Marge
Ginny Idoux
Low putts: Jean Sayr
McConnon
The Ladies' Fall Han nament will be played It is open to all Bas with an established ha: Qualifying rounds are ed on Wednesday, Oct Those interested sign Club House or call I at 9627.



NavSta Sofi

The Naval Station sol mural league standing October 1956.
Team
Chief Petty Officers
1-4-7-Commissary
AFDL-47
Second Division
Security Activity.
Fifth Division
Seabees
Electronics
Fleet Camera Party The NavSta softball games will be conclude day, October 16 when tangle with the Securit the first game of a dou The second game will se Division battle- against tronics' diamond.. techni


Scouts Xmas C

Sale Underway

Christmas cards will the Boy Scouts of G Bay this year. Scout T has gained permission Commander Naval Base
Also, the scout, -trool .Christmas 'wrappings a tions, and a wide -select mised in all three categ
The -prices of the cards :. and gift .wrapt ,range from .75 to $1,2
Sale .of the cards and :started October 4, 1956
The boys scouts hav


nesday, Oc-


Advises Care In Buying Of Food


'Ware and The Base Medical Officer, in cooperation with the Base Sanitation rion Caru- Officer, urges Base residents to exercise the utmost care and caution olsby when buying locally produced food. holes of The food supply for the Base is from two sources; the continental Hadley and U.S. and from Cuba. The Naval
Supply Depot, the Commissary re and Cass Store and the Navy Exchange food
service facilities are the three oridicap tour- ganizations by which this food this month. comes to the Base.

e residents It is the responsibility of the ndicap. Base Medical Officer with the asto beplay- sistance of the Base Sanitation tobe p Officer as well as the three food be 17 the outlets to insure that the food pron in at the ducts received on the Base are Edie Ware, safe for human consumption. This
requires supervision and close inspection even when in the United States. Here in Cuba an even closer [ball and tighter inspection is required.
The food .supply from the States ftball intra- is inspected by federal and naval s as of 2 inspectors and the supply from
Cuba by the Base Sanitation office.
Produce and fish are the only items of food procured locally. The fish 12 0 is purchased through the Commis7 3 sary Store only. The list of produce
includes: avocada, bonato (yam),
8 4 bananas, cantaloupe, coconut (in 8 6 shell), cucumbers, citrus fruit, 7 6 custard apple (Mamo'n), chickpeas, green string beans, guava,
6 8 garlic bulbs, eggplant mangoes,
4 5 okra and potatoes.
4 9 The reminder of the produce is:
papaya (fruit bomba), plantain,,
3 9 pineapples, peppers, tomatoes, sour ntra-mural sop or sweet sop, sapote, waterd on Tues- melon and yam. ;he Officers Notify the Base Sanitation Offiy squad in cer (8266) if the food is not top Lble-header. quality and remember "keep hot e the Sixth foods hot and cold foods cold." Be the Elec- sure that all food when eaten off clans, the Base is thoroughly cooked
and/or refrigerated.

ard participating in the Trading Post
Toy Drive and the next drive is scheduled .for October 13 and 14.
Scouts will. pick-up the toys in a be sold by house to house canvas. uantanamo Construction of the scout- huts roop #435
'from the in the Villamar area are near completion. CAPT H. N. Wallin, "Cgmp will sell manding Officer, Public Works Oennd decora- ter, is. supervising the com-pletion ion is .pro- -of. the. huts. - .......
cres,
. n-iajor-event -of the future'for Christmas
.Chriswill the Scouts will be the Boy'S.out pings will ::.
5 per box. Carnival to be held at Phillips Park decorations on November 10. LCDR J.W. Carleson is chairman of the carnival e also been committee.


9p


Saturday, 6 October 19 6-


Pate Five


TllE INDIAN





m


Saturday, 6 October 1956


THB INDIAN


Navy-BPPO-OND-Guantanamo


Cinema - Scoop

by Don Hinton
Two recently released movies that might eventually come Gtmo way are "Tea and Sympathy" and "The Bad Seed."
"Tea and Sympathy" is based on the hit play and retains its original cast of Deborah Kerr, John Kerr and Leif Erickson . . . besides an absorbing story, the acting is terrific, especially on the part of the two Kerrs (no relation, by the way).
"The Bad Seed" is another picture based on the hit play of the same name and also taken from the novel . .. it is proving quite controversial with its theme of a child murderess . . . Patty McCormick and Nancy Kelly star.
Fastest Gun Alive (MGM), is a grade "A" western from the first flash of the credits till "the end" appears on the screen. Glenn Ford, Jeanne Crain and Broderick Crawford star. The story concerns a gunfighter, naturally, and his endeavors to prove that he is the "fastest gun alive." It's really the type that people go for in a big way here in Gtmo. See it!
Tender Trap (MGM, in color), is highlighted by four very good comedy performances on the part of Frank Sinatra, Debbie Reynolds, Dravid Wayne and Celeste Holm. It is based on the hit play, but the characterizations have been changed somewhat. It is bright, witty and sparkling, a truly excellent adult comedy. The sprightly title song is also featured throughout the movie. Incidentally, the "Tender Trap" is the next play of the Little Theater, but I promise you they will be two completely different evenings of enjoyment.
Terror at Midnight (REP) ... Scott Brady and Joan Vohs ... a mystery flick ... Republic occassionally comes up with a sleeper, but this one I can't say... take your chances!
Last of the Desperados (Lippert) .James Craig and Margia Dean ... here we go again with another one of those horse operys, that I can't stand ... there oughta be a law, I'd much rather see the "Searchers" or some other top western a hundred times than sit through this stereotyped flick we've seen many times before... thumbs down on this one, feed it to the Lions!
These have played the Base before:
Marty (Hecht-Lancaster, released through U.A.) , .--Best picture of 1955 starring Ernest. Borgnine... GREAT... See it if you haven't and see it again if you have!
Trial (MGM) ... Glenn Ford, Dorothy McGuire, Arthur Kennedy, Katy Jurado and the late John Hodiak ... tense drama of a


WGBY Television Program


Saturday 6 Oct. 1:00 Winky Dink 1:30 Professional Father 2:00 You Asked for It 2:30 Life with Elizabeth 3:00 The Big Picture 3:30 Two For The Money 4:00 Robt. Montgomery
Presents "Homecoming' 5:00 Western Movie 6:00 Beat the Clock 6:30 That's My Boy 7:00 Stage Show 7:30 Hit Parade 8:00 Bob Hope 9:00 America's Greatest Ban Sunday, 7 Oct. 1:00 Paul Winchell 1:30 Topper 2:00 People's Choice 2:30 Masquerade Party 3:00 Life is Worth Living 3:30 Calvacade of America 4:00 Victory at Ses 4:30 Roy Rogers 5:00 Zoo Parade


6:00 Chance of a Lifetime 6:30 Loretta Young Show 7:00 Patti Page Show 8:00 Ed Sullivan 9:00 Aluminum Hour "Army Game"
Monday, 8 Oct.
5:30 News & Weather 5:45 Jo Stafford 6:00 Dollar A Second 6:30 My Favorite Husband 7:00 Talent Scouts 7:30 Highway Patrol 8:00 Sid Caesar 9:00 Studio One ds "The Power"
Tuesday, 9 Oct.
5:30 News & Weather 5:45 Industry on Parade 6:00 Disneyland


5:45 Tony Martin 6:00 I've Got a Secret 6:30 Big Town 7:00 Truth orConsequence 7:30 Foreign Intrigue 8:00 Godfrey & Friends 9:00 Kraft TV Theatre
"Trucks Welcome" Thursday, 11 Oct. 5:30 News & Weather 5:45 Jo Stafford 6:00 December Bride 6:30 This is Your Life 7:00 Bob Cummings 7:30 Playhouse of Stars 8:00 Martha Rays 9:00 Climax
"Faceless Enemy" Friday, 12 October 5:30 News & Weather


"The Great Train Chase'5:45 Bob Crosby
7 :00 Meet Millie 6 :00 Ozzie & Harriet 7:30 Russ Morgan 6:30 Dunninger Show :00 Milton Berle 7 :00 Life of Riley 9:00 Playwrite's '56 7 :30 Crusader
"Lost" 8:00 Frankie Laine Show


5:30 Sunday News Headlines Wednesday, 10 Oct. 5:45 Meet the Champions 5:30 News & Weather


9:00 BoxingCotton vs Suzina


MO New Villamar - Bargo


Saturday, October 6
NavSta-Fastest Gun Alive-1Ol min. NAS-Fury At Gunsight Pass-95 min. Mar. Site-Killing-100 min. Villa.-Night of the Hunter-98 min. MCB-i-Crooked Web-96 min. Lwd. Pt.--Green Fire-100 min.
Sunday, October 7 NavSta-Tender Trap-123 min. NAS-Fastest Gun Alive Mar. Site-Nightmare-100 min Villa.-Killing MCB-1-Night of the Hunter Lwd. Pt.-Crooked Web
Monday, October 8 Navsta-Trial-108 min. NAS-Tender Trap Mar. Site--Fury At Gunsight Pass Villa.-Nightmare MCB-1-Killing Lwd. Pt.-Night of the Hunter
Tuesday, October 9 NavSta-Marty-100 min. NAS-Trial
Mar. Site-Fastest Gun Alive Villa.-Fury At Gunsight Pass MCB-1-Nightmare Lwd. Pt.-Killing
Wednesday, October 10
NavSta-Terror At Midnight-101 min. NAS-Marty Mar. Site-Tender Trap Villa.-Fastest Gun Alive MCB-1-Fury At Gunsight Pass Lwd. Pt.-Nightmare.
Thursday, October 11
NavSta-It's A Dog's Life-107 min. NAS-Terror At Midnight Mar. Site-Trial Villa.-Tender Trap MCB-i-Fastest Gun Alive Lwd. Pt.-Fury At Gunsight Pass
Friday, October 12
NavSat-Last of the Desperados-92 rnin. NAS-It's A Dog's Life Mar. Site-Marty Villa.-Trial
MCB-1-Tender Trap Lwd. Pt.-iFatest Gun Alive
-young boy accused -of murder-. Excellent ,.- Go! . It's-A Dog's Life (MGM, in color) ... Edmund wenn-. and Jeff Richards . . the heart warming story of a you guess what... really good entertainment for the whole family.


Mr. P. D. Lairmore of NavSta Public Works was recently elected mayor of the Villamar-Bargo Council. Replacing former mayor A. V. Ward, Mr. Lairmore assumed office Tuesday, October 2.
Vice mayor B. D. Adams will remain in that capacity for another period of three months.
Other officers elected are councilmen J. C. Wheeler, precinct #5, C. P. Anderson, precinct #7 and M. C. Williams, councilman - at large.
Meeting night for the VillamarBargo Council has been changed from the first Tuesday to the second Tuesday each month. Meetings will be held at the I&E Office at 7:30 p.m.
The Council is planning to hold a dance at the Villamar lyceum in the near future.



Trading Post


Toy Drive



October 13 ,14


Book.-Nook

by R. C. D.
After a review of the new books at the NAS Library, back to the rundown of the best books available at your main Naval Station Library.
Mann, Thomas. It is impossible to praise too highly this talented German novelist who, when he died last year, was hailed as the world's greatest contemporary novelist. Some of his works are a bit on the heavy side, both in length and content, but he is a thoroughgoing modern. The Library boasts a good selection of his works. Each has its own particular excellence, but I liked his four books about the biblical Joseph the best.
Mansfiield, Katherine. This New Zealander has been called the greatest short-story writer in modern times. Her collected works are published under the title of "The Garden Party." Her forte seems to be a remarkable power of trueto-life description.
Marquand, John. Marquand is an American novelist who writes best about the emotional and social problems of upper-class Bostonians and New Yorkers. "The Late George Apley" was his first novel, and I still think it's his best. You may also like "Point of No Return" and "H. M. Paulham, Esquire."v
Maugham, Somerset. One of the best tale-tellers in the business, Maugham is equally at ease with the novel or the short story. Nearly everyone will be attracted to his "Complete Short Stories." His plots-and dramatic situations are among the finest.
Mauriac, Francois. This French Nobel prize winner is a prodigious workman, having more than thirty novels to his credit. His appeal lies in his ability to write about the forces of good and evil, love and hate, as they appear in his characters. The Library has four of his representative novels.
Melville, Herman. Melville is an American who wrote in the nineteenth century, but remained undiscovered until the twentieth. "Moby Dick" is his masterpiece, a deeply symbolistic story of the sea and seamen.


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PAGE 1

Exercise Your RightTo Vote .SecNav EDITOR'S NOTE: On November 6, 1956, a national balloting to elect a SecNav Message President, Vice-President and other federal officials of the United States, "I consider it the patriotic duty of every citizen to exercise his right will be held. The welfare of a nation is better served through a sound to a free vote. This right is one we in the Navy should especially cherish administrative body. Active participation of its citizens in the daily life since the maintenance of our free government by free elections is one of a nation counts as the most invaluable aspect of good government. of the principal reasons we are in the service. To attain these goals, it is imperative that you must, as citizens of the "All hands are encouraged to determine their eligibility, and if qualified, Unites States, make use of your inalienable right to vote. Upon your to take advantage of the privilege of the absentee ballots which are vote depends the destiny of our nation. Our national heritage of freedom available to those who are away from home." and democracy will not liken to a dusty book on the shelf if we make Charles S. Thomas use of this franchise "The Right To Vote!" Secretary of the Navy Chaplain Budd Reports To NAS; Fills New Billet Fleet Camera Party Photo In answer to the request made by the Naval Air Station for an allowance of a chaplain's billet, the Bureau of Naval Personnel has recently ordered LCDR Allen C. Budd, Protestant, to fill the newlycreated position. Since its commissioning in 1941, this is the first time the Naval Air Station has ever had a chaplain. Chaplain Budd reported aboard the NAS Thursday, September 27, fromthe U.S. Naval Retraining Command at Norfolk, Virginia. While at this activity LCDR Budd had the additional duty of attending to the religious needs of the residents at the Benmoreell Housing Reservation in Norfolk. He was relieved of these jobs by a commander and two lieutenant commanders. A member of a clan of ministers and preachers, Chaplain Budd's deceased father was a Methodist minister in Missouri and Alabama for -almost 40 years. LCDR Budd has two pastor brothers. Candler, an older brother, is pastor of Glenn MemoriaLMethodist Church at Atlanta, Georgia, while James, a younger brother, is pastor of St. Mark at Augusta, Georgia. Like his son Allen, Chaplain Budd's deceased father who built (Continued on Page Three) COVERS GTMO LIKE THE SUNSHINE U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Volume VII, No. 40 Saturday, 6 October 1956 2nd MCB 6 Echelon Arrived Wed., Completes Gtmo CB Battalion There will be more power and increased activtities for the Seabees on the Base. The second echelon of MCB-6 constituting 130 enlisted personnel arrived in Gtmo from Davisville, Rhode Island, Wednesday morning, October 3, while the first group of MCB-6 with a strength of 110 men arrived here early last week. The Gtmo detachment of MCB-1 composed of 70 men, already at hard work here, will be consolidated with the elements of MCB-6. An entire complement of 310 men and ten officers will form the Gtmo MCB-6 which is scheduled to stay on the Base for at least six months. Skipper of the CB Battalion is CDR R. C. Jacquess, CEC, USNR. Construction of housing units at Leeward Point will be the main job to be undertaken by the SeaBees. One hundred thirteen units consisting of 25 married officers' quarters and 88 enlisted men's quarters are to be added to Leeward Point. As a collateral duty here on the main side, the SeaBees are to relocate the northeast gate road and raise the athletic field at the Fleet Recreation Center by adding top soil. RADM Cooper On WGBY-TV Monday RADi W. G. Cooper will address the television audience over WGBY-TV Monday evening, October 8, at 7:00. The Base Commander's speech will be in conjunction with the National Fire Prevention Drive. Aero Predicts Slight Rains Despite Season The Naval Air Station Aerology Office announced the past week that "although the rainy season is upon us, the outlook for a great deal of rain in this area is not too good." The same source, however, predicted that for the next month, Gtmo can expect intermittent showers early in the afternoon and also a few hours after sundown. In another light, the Aerology Office said that to date the frequehey of -hurricanes has proved significantly below normal and that the immediate outlook will indicate a little likelihood of any noteworthy increase in hurricane activity for the latter part of the hurricane season which officially ends in .November. The NAS Aerological Officer feels that the extremely moderate hurricane season is, in a large measure,'. due to the preceding severe winter-which helped to equalize the difference in temperature structure between the pole and the equator. -.:Today!!III Join Your WPCA (See Page Five) Sharp Voted As CPO Club Head Fleet Camera Party Photo Damage control chief Perry C. Sharp, ship rider of the Fleet Training Group, assumed office as president of the local Chief Petty Officers Club Monday, October 1. President Sharp succeeded chief boatswain's mate Rocky Gugliemo, also of the Fleet Training Group. Engineman chief E. D. "Bull" Durham, new vice-president of the club, was sworn in with Chief Sharp, Chief ship serviceman Kenneth T. Sorge remains as the CPO Club manager. The intra-CPO political saga of Chief Sharp was indeed unusual and meteoric! At the club's general election of officers held on Saturday; September.8, Chief Sharp was forcibly pulled out -of his political shell when a Naval Air Station chief nomniated him for president, was endorsed by a VU-Ten chief and was finally elected unanimously by 100 of the 230 chiefs that compose the club. "If that pre-election enthusiasm manifested by my colleagues during the time when my name was in the presidential stake will be carried through my incumbency," says.Chief Sharp._"Idon't see why we .couldn't acconiplish things for the: welfare of .the club and. the service.------The -new CPO Club: president said that he plans no drastic policy changes in the execution of his duties. He further stated that plans (Continued on Page Three)

PAGE 2

M Page Two THE INDIAN Saturday, 6 October 1966 THE INDIAN The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a possible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. RADM WILLIAM G. COOPER, Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Editorial Staff LCDR K. S. Dick -------------------------------Officer-Advisor G. L. Henderson, JOC ---------------------------_ Editor J. C. Curren, JOSN ---------------------------Managing Editor E. U. Orias, J03 ------------------------------Feature Editor D. D. Hinton, JOSN ----------------------------Staff Reporter THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. Materials marked AFPS may be used by news media provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All materials originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part or without credit. All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. Electoral Franchise A Two-Way Job Our obligation as citizens is to vote intelligently. Obligation is a two-way proposition. The men we vote for also have obligations. The elected official is obliged to serve all the people in his district, not just the people who voted for him nor a particular group of voters. In trying to represent all the people, the honest official has a tough job. He may assume that, by electing him, the people endorsed his campaign platform. But, what else do the people expect of him? Here the obligation again becomes a two-way street. As citizens, it is our right and our duty to inform our representatives how we feel on public issues. As servicemen, we are free to do this in all matters except legislation affecting the military. Federal law and Armed Forces regulations forbid us from engaging in politics. But they certainly do not prohibit us from expressing ourselves on all non-military matters. In fact, as free citizens we should do so. T-Agers' Fire Prevention Formula INDIAN Photo Teen-agers are also aware of Base Fire Prevention week, beginning tomorrow, October 7 and ending October 13. In discussing fires, the teen-agers pointed out that when a fire is small it can be put out easily. Also, you can stamp it out with you foot, smother it with a rug or douse it with a pail of water. One of the commonest kinds of fires in the home is the food or grease fire. It can best be put out by placing a metal cover on the pan or vessel containing the burning food. Such action at the start is more effective than the work of the entire fire department. Do not use water on a grease fire. Calendar Of Event New Hours Now In Effect For Comm. Saturday, October 6 _____________________ Catholic Catechism Classes-Naval Base N v t A x h n e School-les S or ; Sunday, 7 October 1956 Kid's Matinee-Villamar Lyceum-18500 Sunday. October 7 CATHOLIC MASSES Movie Night-Officero' Club-2Ooo Effective yesterday, October 5, both the Naval Station and the Naval Sunday: 0700-Naval Base Chapel Monday. October 8 0900-Naval Base Chapel O.E.S. Chapter Meeting-Community AudiAir Station Exchange stores started under a revised sales operation 1230-Naval Base Chapel torium-1930 schedule which is published hereunder: Mon. through Fri.: Tuesday October 9 1645-Naval Base Chapel Hospital Service Volunteers-Medical LiNaval Station Store Naval Air Station Store Saturday: 0800-Naval Base Chapel brary (Hosp)-oMT Saturday Confessions at 1700-190Little Theater-Community Auditorium1900200 Daily Confessions: immediately preceding Mass PROTESTANT SERVICES Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 0930-Adult Bible Class-Open Air Assembly 1000-Leeward Point 1100-Divine Worship-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Fellowship Hour-Open Air Assembly Thursday. 1000-Choir Rehearsal JEWISH SERVICES Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel CHURCH OF CHRIST Sunday: 1000-Bible Study-Community Auditorium 1045-Worship Service--Com* munity Auditorium LATTER DAY SAINTS Sunday: 1100-Naval Station Library CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Sunday: 1000-Naval Station Library CHAPLAINS AT THIS ACTIVITY CDR P. R. McPhee, CHC, USN (Protestant) LCDR A. C. Budd, CHC, USN (Protestant) CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN (Catholic) Fleet Reserve AssociationCommunity Hall, Marina Point-2000 Fleet Reserve Association Auxiliary-Girl Scout Hut-2000 CPO Nooner's Day Luncheon-CPO Club-1180 Wednesday, October 10 Boy Scout Meeting-Chapel Hill Auditorium-1880 Toastmaster's Club-Officers' Club-1880 Kid's Matinee-Villamar Lyceum-1800 Thursday, October 11 Navy Wives' Club-Textile PaintingVillamar Lyceum-1330 Felloweraft Club 1078-Community Auditorium-1980 Jr. Rifle and Pistol Club-Bldg 27-1980 CATHOLIC PICNIC The Official PicnicSupper and Farewell-Welcome--for the Naval Base Catholic Chaplain Jerome J. Sullivan, and his relief, Chaplain Arthur P. Finan, will be held on Friday, October 12, from 5-8:30 p.m., at Phillips Park. All members of the parish are invited. Wednesday Thursday Saturday Friday Sunday Tuesday 0915-1645 ) 0915-1845 1245-1645 Closed Wednesday ) Thursday ) Saturday ) Friday Sunday Monday 0915-1645 0915-1845 Closed Closed Also, both the Naval Station Commissary store and its Bargo branch began operating under a new sales schedule on Wednesday, October 3. NavSta Commissary Store Tuesday Wednesday Thursday. Friday. Saturday Sunday Monday 0830-1500 Monday Tuesday Bargo Branch 1000-1700 0830-1200 1000-1700 Closed ) 1300-2000 We dsa Thursday ) 0830-1500 .) 0900-1400 Friday ) Saturday Sunday Closed 0 9 40 Saturday, 6 October 1956 ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) THE INDIAN

PAGE 3

Saturday, 6 October 1956 THE INDIAN M Page Three Same Service-New Location .. New Hospital Opens; Facilities For 100 Bed Patients by Ely U. Orias The outer qualities of the U.S. Naval Hospital in Gtmo have been drastically changed with the transfer of its operational activity from the old hospital building to the new. But its inner mission still remains -dedicated to the physical, mental, and spiritual welfare of all military personnel and their dependents and to all mankind in times of poss disaster. Navy medical history has made an entry into its log that on Thursday, September 27, 1956, the old Base hospital edifice ceased to function as a sanctuary for the sick. On the day following, however, the impressive and most modern structure situated on Caravella Point sallied forth to continue the old hospital's mission. Hospital Staff Staffed with 28 officers which include 12 doctors, nine nurses, four Medical Service Corps officers and three warrant officers, the new hospital is allowed a bed-patient capacity of 100 persons. On the enlisted force, the hospital has an allowance of 102 corpsman, 25 of which are assigned as ambulance and utility drivers, 14 are doing clerical duties, while the rest are either guardians of the different wards or Lab Technicians. Aiding the military personnel of the hospital are 59 civilians, 11 of which are American civil service eligibles, while the remaining 48 are aliens. In charge of personnel and hospital records is LT Joseph J. Vitlip, Medical Service Corps. Patient Care At the present time, the hospital is taking care of 71 patients, 17 of which are bed patients, while the rest are ambulatory. Of the bed patients, seven are enlisted personnel, nine are dependents and one officer. Among the ambulatory patients, 53 are enlisted men and one officer. Committed due to fractured bones are 16 enlisted patients, one of which is engineman chief Carl H. Aumann, of the Fleet Training Group, who was injured in a traffic accident while riding on his scooter. He was admitted to the hospital on July 12, 1956, the date when the accident happened. Incidentally, Chief Aumann is senior among the patients in point of hospitalization. First and Last On the maternity side, six pound, 11 ounce George Elmer O'Bryan who was born on October 27, makes the grade of being the last baby delivered at the old hospital building. Baby George is the son of first class commissary steward and Mrs. Elmer O'Bryan who hail from Bristol, Florida. Father O'Bryan is attached to the Leeward Point galley. First to occupy the maternity ward at' the new hospital building is Mrs. Marie Clark of New London, Connecticut. She gave birth to a seven pound, six ounce baby boy named David Bryan, on September 28, 1956, the day when the new hospital started operating. Mrs. Clark is the wife of engineman first class Raleigh Clark of the Fleet Boat Pool. Engineman Clark is a native of Southern Pines, North Carolina. Without distinction as to what category the patient belongs, Roy T. Davis, U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of Haiti was the last patient to have been admitted to the old hospital. The Ambassador was also the first patient to have been registered in the admitting book of the new hospital. Commands Bay View The hospital is a "superlative" masterpiece of the ingenuity of the architects and builders that erected it. The main artery of the plush hospital are the ward wing which is composed of the first and second deck wards, the Senior Officers Quarters bedroom wing, dependents' bedroom wing and the surgical room. Overlooking the harbor, the new hospital commands a good view over the array of ships steaming in or just simply lulling idle in the bay-constantly reminding the patients that the elements of the United States Navy, whether on land or at sea, are always ready to welcome them back or guard them in the midst of their physical misfortunes. Genesis History reveals that it was in nearby North Toro Cay in 1903 that the first Dispensary in Gtmo was established. At that time the staff consisted of one medical officer and a few corpsmen. As time went on, the number of personnel increased, and additional buildings were erected in 1939. On June 1, 1946, the medical facilities comprising the Naval Station Dispensary were commissioned as the U.S. Naval Hospital, Guantanamo Bay, with CAPT P.M. Crossland, MC, in command. Incumbent skipper of the Base hospital is CAPT Lyle A. Newton. Serving in his staff include CAPT James H. Boyers, Executive Officer and Chief of Medicine; CAPT William A. Roble, Chief .Dependents' Clinic and Pedisricial; CDR William C. Turville, Chief of Surgery; CDR Arthur R. Oesterle, Oral Surgeon; LCDR Fred E. Stewart, Administrative Officer; LCDR Jed Paul, Chief Radiologist; LCDR Fleet Camera Party Photo Mrs. Marie Clark, top left, beams secretly but proudly while she holds her somnolent baby-the first to have been ushered at the new Base hospital. Top right-Mrs. Zories O' Bryan dotingly watches her babythe last recorded birth at the old hospital. Bottom left, 1-r: William G. Huffman, HMI, CDR Herbert G. Stoecklein, hospital Sick Call Officer, and U.S. Ambassador to Haiti Roy T. Davis. Ambassador Davis is the first and last patient. at the new and old hospital, respectively. Bottom right-Frank R. Coyne, FT2, being lifted into the truck that formed the transfer-caravan of patients from the old to the new. Tekla S. Gavelek, Chief of Nursing Service; LT Leonard A. Peppler, Finance Chief; WO Albern M. Porter Jr., Chief of Food Service; LT Orson M. White, Chief EENT and WO Ralph T. Georner Jr., Chief of Environmental Sanitation, etc. The new hospital building was dedicated in impressive ceremonies on Monday, September 24, 1956. The old hospital main building will soon be occupied by the Base Public Works Center. Sharp. (Continued from Page One) or programs began by his predecessor will be carried out to full realization by his administration. "For instance," he said, ."the construction of the club's swimming pool Which is now in its planning stage, will be undertaken as soon as necessary funds become available. Chief Sharp is a native of Richmond, Virginia. He is a career man-having already served the Navy for 18 years. Chaplain (Continued from Page One) one of the strongest Methodist Churches in Alabama, had also two brothers who are Methodist ministers. LCDR Budd is a member of the Virginia Conference, Staunton District, where he served in two different parishes before coming in the Navy in July, 1943. The chaplain has had more than six years of duty with aviation commands, five of which were aboard aviation ships which include, among others, the USS LAKE CHAMPLAIN where he served thereon as senior chaplain for 26 months. A native of Georgia, Chaplain Budd took undergraduate and graduate studies in the .Divinity School of Duke University from 1935 to 1938. Married to the former Mary Angie Pearce of Durham, North Carolina, the Budds have two daughters, Angieline Sue, 17 and Mary Molloy, 9. Chaplain Budd's family will soon rejoin him in Gtmo. I

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Page Four Page Four THE INDIAN Saturday, 6 October 1956 FT6 & FTC Bulletin CDR and Mrs. Fitch are awaiting the homecoming this weekend of their son Peter born 20 September at the local hospital. CDR Fitch has already bought him a fine spinning reel and rod. Ensign H. L. Ford intends to set up housekeeping on Marine Site #1 with the arrival of Mrs. Ford on Saturday's FLAW flight. Mrs. Ford comes to sunny Gtmo by way of Oakdale, Conn. CWO and Mrs. Peter Schwindt are scheduled to leave the area on 12 October, bound for U.S. Naval Station, Tongue Point, Astoria, Oregon. Mr. Schwindt has completed 28 years of service in the Navy and plans to retire and reside in that area, upon completion of 30 years. CWO J. F. Perdue is to report to FTG on 6 October as relief for CWO Schwindt. CWO Perdue has to make only a short trek from NavSta to FTG on this change of duty. New arrivals in the past week as follows: R. C. Cook, EMC reported aboard from USS Iowa (BB-61). Mrs. Cook is presently residing in Kealy, N.C. from whence she will come when transportation and housing become available. W. I. Atkeison, TMC who was formerly attached to FTG returns for duty after a absence of about 2 months. A. L. Schluetter, RD1 reported to FTC for duty as an instructor from USS Otterstetter (DER-244). He is no stranger to Gtmo, having previously had duty with FTG in 1953. The Schluetter family eagerly awaits word to return to Gtmo at Newport, Rhode Island. R. L. Kohl, YN2 comes to FTG, Gtmo from FTG, Narragansett Bay. Kohl's family is presently located at Middletown, Rhode Island. The officers' Bowling League officially opened last Monday night when the Gunnery Department "Smoothbores" took 3 points and lost 1 to VU-10 #1 and the Damage Control "Pluggers" lost 4 Points to the "Keystones" from Public Works. NAS Bowling Team Routs CANBERRA The NAS Bowling team defeated the highly rated USS CANBERRA (CAG 2) bowling team last Sunday, September, 30. The game was held at the NAS bowling alleys. The CANBERRA team had had previously routed the U.S. Naval Air Station (Jacksonville) bowling champions. Devil -Dog Doin's Pfe Herb Bailey Well, the "old men" of the command finally experienced the bitter taste of defeat at the hands of Cpl Boranians "Bums." The "Strikeouts" lost Saturday by a score of 8 to 14. The league seems to be tightening up somewhat as the season draws slowly to a close. Last Saturday we bid a fond envous farewell to two of our NCO's. Sgt Churchman left for leave and duty at Treasure Island, Calif. Sgt C.P. Nichols left for leave and duty at Parris Island where they take boys and mold and shape them into men and Marines. We now have four new Corporals in the command. Pfe's Straub, Hoppe, Duncan and Belville have finally been noticed for their merits and have been elevated to the position of Non-Commissioned Officer. The rifle range is once again bustling with activity as the Barracks Marines find it is time to sharpen up their eyes and trigger fingers. The past week has seen them contorting themselves in the various positions that torture long unused muscles but mean steady pieces when the time comes for them to prove they are Marines on the rifle range. Master Sergeant Allen, the Barracks Sergeant Major, found out what it is like to do battle with the denizens of the Caribbean deep last Sunday. He fought and landed, after a rigorous struggle lasting over an hour, a large Ray weighing between one hundred and one hundred and fifty pounds. VU-10 Prop Blast Congratulations to LT Michael Z. Zibilich who has recently joined the ranks of the newly promoted. He is the eighth Mallard officer to be promoted within the past four months. Welcome aboard to the recent Mallard arrivals. L. E. Merchant, AD1, reported aboard last week from his last duty station, the CIC School at NAS, Glynco, Brunswick, Ga. J. W. Kelly, AA, and T. R. Carrico, AN, both reported aboard from a tour aboard the USS Intrepid. S. J. Burns, AD2, arrived aboard earlier this week. This last duty station was at NAS Atlantic City where he was attached to VA (AW) 33. D. N. Hart, AD2, was formerly attached to VF-61 at NAS Oceana prior to his transfer to UTRON TEN. J. W. Jenkins, AN, .has reported aboard from a tour with NAS Jacksonville. R. H. Anderson, Jr., AM1, was detached last week for a stateside tour with VF-73. G. R. Flynn, AN, was released for transfer to NAS Jacksonville and separation from the Naval Service. Eleven Cuban Judges Due Here Today; Will Tour Base Facilities Eleven Cuban judicial figures from the local area will arrive aboard the Base this morning as guests of RADM W. G. Cooper, ComNavBase. This will mark the first trip to the Base by the judges and they will be conducted on an official orientation tour of the Base by officers of the Admiral's staff. The judges will have cocktails at the quarters of ADM Cooper at 1230, followed by a luncheon at the Officers' Club. Members of the party will include the following judges from Santiago: Dr. Julio Cesar Guerra Perez, President, Provincial Supreme Court; Dr. Francisco Mendieta Hechavarria, Chief Prosecuting Attorney, Provincial Supreme Court; Dr. Fernando L. Aguilar Almeida, President, Second Section (Guantanamo District Court); Dr. Antonio M. Vallin Elias, Assistant to President, Second S e c t i on (Guantanamo District Court); Dr. Evelio Morales del Castillo, Assistant to president, second section, (Guantanamo District Court); Dr. Francisco Perez Cisnero, Assistant Prosecuting Attorney Provincial Supreme Court; Dr. Angel Fernandez Rodriguez, Assistant Attorney to the Provincial Supreme Court and Dr. Luis F. Pera Rodriguez, Assistant Attorney to the Provincial Supreme Court. Members of the party from Guantanamo City will be Dr. Juan Mentres, Judge of Instruction; Dr. Jose Garcia Alvarez, Judge of Civil Matters; Dr. Custina Blanes, Judge of Municipal Court and Dr. Ramulso Martinez, Judge of Caimanera. The party will leave the Base Saturday afternoon. New Bus Schedule Eliminates Routes 2-3 During the past week, in a release from the Commander Naval Base, a change in routing and scheduling of regular bus service aboard the Base was announced. The purpose of the change is to provide more efficient bus service to all points aboard the Base. The new system will eliminate routes 2 and 3 to the housing area, since the one route will cover all stops. Regular bus stops will be erected and numbered in the immediate future. The revised bus schedule will go into effect on.October 8. Naval Base -buses will commence operating at 0600 on a twentyminute basis. All buses are secured promptly at 2330. Watch the "Papoose" for the new revised bus schedule printed in full. Don't Mention Ham Visit From Founder Gives L. T. History The past weekend of September 22, CDR Andrew (Andy) V. Reid, visited the Base. CDR Reid founded the Gtmo Little Theater organization. The need for an amateur theatrical group for the entertainment of Base personnel came to CDR Reid and his wife, Madeline, in 1948, while CDR Reid was officer in charge of Leeward Point Field. According to CDR Reid, the organization was plagued with difficulties at the beginning, but after a time the idea was accepted and the Little Theater was founded. The present site of the Little Theater, the Community Auditorium, was originally a galley Through CDR Reid's efforts the building was converted to the present auditorium and club rooms. CDR Reid also pointed out, upon touring the auditorium that WGB Y-TV now occupies the space which was originally the refrigeration unit of the galley. Mrs. Peggy Way and Ross Fegley, HM1, Little Theater members who conducted the tour, briefed CDR Reid on past and recent productions and brought out the fact that the theatrical group is now self supporting in a Community wide effort. In turn, CDR Reid stated that the original productions of the Little Theater were free and were financed through Special Services. CDR Reid was quite favorably impressed with the organization as it now exists and voiced a desire to return to the Base for the next production. The first production of the Little Theater was "Arsenic and Old Lace," which was presented in 1948. Twenty-five plays have been produced since then, with the current play "The Tender Trap," bringing the total to 26. CPO Nooners Day. The second meeting of the Nooner's Day Luncheon organization will be held Tuesday, October 9 at 1130 at the CPO Club. Guest speaker for the luncheon will be CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer Naval Station. 0 ft THE INDIAN Saturday, 6 October 1986

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Saturday, 6 October 1956 Softball Season Opens Monday Ladies Golf Tourney Medical Dept. With 8-Team, 112 Game Schedule In Near Future Score of the L. di s' by Joe Duffy Bach in the Forty-Eight the arrival of Fall has ushered in a new sport scene with King Football reigning in center stage. However, locally we have a substitute more suitable to our temperature range, this being the modified, speeded-up version of baseball known as softball. Here in Guantanamo Bay, softball fills the sport calendar between baseball and basketball, and has been the intramural program of Base Commands since early September. Inter-Command activity begins Monday night at Fleet Recreation under the arc lights, to kick off a 112-game schedule extending into the last week of November. The ground work for the coming season was laid on Tuesday morning, when eight team representatives met with LCDR R. A. Allan, of the Naval Air Station, Chairman of the Softball Committee, to draw up a list of rules and regulations governing league operation. Rocky Gugliemo was appointed as chief umpire with Trapp, Tanzi, Kubek, Olson and Henderson forming his staff. Chief Scorekeeper duties went to Bob Dixon, who is a veteran of the tally sheet. The eight teams lined up to compete for the softball title are Naval Station, Leeward Point, MCB-6, Fleet Training Group, Naval Air Station, Hospital-Dental, Utility Squadron Ten and the High School. This marks the first venture into softball rivalry for the High School club, however, they have been represented in the basketball race for the past several seasons. The other seven clubs took part in last year's competition that was won by the VU-10 Mallards, who sported an undefeated record all season. The eight teams will engage each opponent twice in the 112game schedule, with two games being played each night Monday thru -Thursday. The first game is scheduled for 1830 with the second contest listed for 2000. Friday nights will be used for makeup games if any postponements are encountered. SCHEDULE Monday 1830 NavSta vs Leeward Pt, 2000 MCB-6 vs FTG Tuesday 1830 NAS vs HospitalDental, 2000 VU-10 vs High School Wednesday 1830 Leeward Pt vs MCB-6, 2000 FTG vs NAS Thursday 1830 Hospital-Dental vs VU-10, 2000 High School vs NavSta. W. P. C. A. The four letters W.P.C.A. stand for the Water and Power Conservationi association. True, there is so such organization on the Base, but everyone should be the WPCA himself. Remember save power and water! Favorites On Top In Third Week Of Grid Play The third week of war on the grid irons saw teams more or less adhering to expected form. However, the always-present possibility of upsets makes football one of our most popular sports. Both Navy and Army came through, the Middies rolling over Williams and Mary by 39-14 while the Cadets flattened Virginia Military 32-12. Other scores were: Duke 40, Virginia 7; Maryland 6, Wake Forest 0; Pittsburgh 14, Syracuse 7; Brown 20, Columbia 0; Main 40, Rhode Island 7; Penn State 34, Pennsylvania 0; Colgate 34, Cornell 6; Purdue 16, Missouri 7; Northwestern 14, Iowa State 13; Illinois 32, California 20; Iowa 27, Indfana 0; Ohio State 34, Nebraska 7; Toledo 20, Ohio U. 13 and Michigan 42, U.C.L.A. 13. In games this week it is Brown at Yale; Colgate at Holy Cross; Columbia at Princeton; Navy at Cornell; Darmouth at Penn; Penn State at Army; Illinois at Washington; Indiana at Notre Dame; Kansas State at Oklahoma; Michigan St. at Michigan; Stanford at Ohio State; So. California at Wis. cousin; and Alabama at Vanderbilt. Tennessee at Duke; Baylor at Maryland; West Virginia at Texas; Colorado at Kansas; Oregon at U.C.L.A.; and Washington State at Idaho. As soon as the World Series have been completed, the Armed Forces Radio Service will commence broadcasting two gameseach day on Saturday and Sunday. These will include both college and professional games and will be picked -up by WGBY -and -rebroadcast. In spite of what many countries think, an American still chooses his own form of governmentblonde, brunette or redhead. Some people believe anything you tell them-if you whisper it. s a e matches, held on Wed tober 3, were: For 18 holes First low net: Edie Bea Kohr Second low net: Ms thers Low putts: Mary Go Winners for the nine play were: First low net: Marge Ginny Idoux Low putts: Jean Say McConnon The Ladies' Fall Han nament will be played It is open to all Bas with an established ha Qualifying rounds are ed on Wednesday, Oct Those interested sign Club House or call at 9627. NavSta Soft The Naval Station sof mural league standing October 1956. Team Chief Petty Officers 1-4-7-Commissary AFDL-47 Second Division Security Activity. Fifth Division Seabees Electronics Fleet Camera Party The NavSta softball i games will be conclude day, October 16 when tangle with the Securit the first game of a dou The second game will se Division battleagainst tronics' diamond techni Scouts Xmas C Sale Underway Christmas cards will the Boy 'Scouts of G Bay this year. Scout T has gained permission Commander Naval Base Also, the scout troo .Christmas wrappings a tions, and a wide select mised in all three categ .The -prices -of the cards and gift wrap range from .75 to $1.2 Sale of the cards and started October 4, 1956 Advises Care In a y go nesday, OcWare and Byn fFo 'aead The Base Medical Officer, in cooperation with the Base Sanitation arion CaruOfficer, urges Base residents to exercise the utmost care and caution olsby when buying locally produced food. holes of The food supply for the Base is from two sources; the continental Hadley and U.S. and from Cuba. The Naval Supply Depot, the Commissary re and Cass Store and the Navy Exchange food service facilities are the three ordicap tourorganizations by which this food this month. comes to the Base. e residents It is the responsibility of the ndicap. Base Medical Officer with the astbepa-sistance of the Base Sanitation to be playOfficer as well as the three food ber outlets to insure that the food pro in at the ducts received on the Base are Edie Ware, safe for human consumption. This requires supervision and close in-spection even whea in the United all States. Here in Cuba an even closer ba1 and tighter inspection is required. The food supply from the States tall intrais inspected by federal and naval s as of 2 inspectors and the supply from Cuba by the Base Sanitation office. Wi os Produce and. fish are the only items Win of food procured locally. The fish 12 0 is purchased through the Commis7 3 scary Store only. The list of produce includes: avocada, bonato (yam), 8 4 bananas, cantaloupe, coconut (in 8 6 shell), cucumbers, citrus fruit, 7 6 custard apple (Mamo'n), chickpeas, green string beans, guava, 6 8 garlic bulbs, eggplant mangoes, 4 5 okra and potatoes. 4 The reminder of the produce is: 3 papaya (fruit bomba), plantain, S 9 pineapples, peppers, tomatoes, sour .ntra-mural sop or sweet sop, sapote, waterd on Tuesmelon and yam. he Officers Notify the Base Sanitation Offiy squad in cer (8266) if the food is not top ble-header. quality and remember "keep hot e the Sixth foods hot and cold foods cold." Be the Elecsure that all food when eaten off cians. the Base is thoroughly cooked -and/or' refrigerated. ard participating in the Trading Post Toy Drive and the next drive is scheduled. for October 13 and 14. Scouts will, pick-up the toys in a be sold by house to house canvas. uantanam uantanam Construction of the scout huts roop #435 in the Villamar area are near cofrom the pletion. CAPT H. N. Wallin, 'Comp will sell mending Officer, Public Works Cennd decorater, is, supervising the completion ion is pro-of. the huts ories. A major event of the future for Christmas the Scouts will be the Boy Scout pings will 5 per box. Carnival to be held at Phillips Park decorations on November 10. LCDR J. W. Carleson is chairman of the carnival The boys scouts have also been committee. 9 p THE INDIAN M Page Five D lf

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em Saturday, 6 October 1956 THE INDIAN Navy-BPPO-10ND-Guantanamo Cinema -Scoop by Don Hinton Two recently released movies that might eventually come Gtmo way are "Tea and Sympathy" and "The Bad Seed." "Tea and Sympathy" is based on the hit play and retains its original cast of Deborah Kerr, John Kerr and Leif Erickson besides an absorbing story, the acting is terrific, especially on the part of the two Kerrs (no relation, by the way). "The Bad Seed" is another picture based on the hit play of the same name and also taken from the novel ...it is proving quite controversial with its theme of a child murderess ...Patty McCormick and Nancy Kelly star. Fastest Gun Alive (MGM), is a grade "A" western from the first flash of the credits till "the end" appears on the screen. Glenn Ford, Jeanne Crain and Broderick Crawford star. The story concerns a gunfighter, naturally, and his endeavors to prove that he is the "fastest gun alive." It's really the type that people go for in a big way here in Gtmo. See it! Tender Trap (MGM, in color), is highlighted by four very good comedy performances on the part of Frank Sinatra, Debbie Reynolds, David Wayne and Celeste Holm. It is based on the hit play, but the characterizations have been changed somewhat. It is bright, witty and sparkling, a truly excellent adult comedy. The sprightly title song is also featured throughout the movie. Incidentally, the "Tender Trap" is the next play of the Little Theater, but I promise you they will be two completely different evenings of enjoyment. Terror at Midnight (REP) .. Scott Brady and Joan Vohs ...a mystery flick ...Republic occassionally comes up with a sleeper, but this one I can't say .. take your chances! Last of the Desperados (Lippert) ...James Craig and Margia Dean .here we go again with another one of those horse operys, that I can't stand ...there ought be a law, I'd much rather see the "Searchers" or some other top western a hundred times than sit through this stereotyped flick we've seen many times before .thumbs down on this one, feed it to the Lions! These have played the Base before: Marty (Hecht-Lancaster, released through U.A.) ..Best picture of 1955 starring Ernest. Borgnine .GREAT ..See it if you haven't and see it again if you have! Trial (MGM) ...Glenn Ford, Dorothy McGuire, Arthur Kennedy, Katy Jurado and the late John Hodiak ...tense drama of a WGBY Television Program Saturday 6 Oct. 00 Chance of a Lifetime 1:00 Winky Dink 6:30 Loretta Young Show 1:30 Professional Father 7:00 Fatti Page Show 2:00 You Asked for It Sullivan 2:30 Life with Elizabeth 'Arm Game 3:00 The Big Picture 3:30 Two For The Money Monday, 8 Oct. 4:00 Robt. Montgomery 5:30 News & Weather Preents "Momecoming" 1 :40 Jo Stafford 5:00 Weatern Movie 0:00 Dollar A Second 6:00 Beat the Clock 0:30 My Favorite Musband 6:30 That'a My B y 7:00 Talent Scouts 7:00 Stage Show 7:30 Highway Patrol 7:30 Mit Parade 8:00 Bid Caesar 8:00 Bob Mope 9:00 Studio One 4:00 America's Greatest Bands "The Power" Sunday, 7 Oct. 1:00 Paul Winchell 1:30 Topper 2:00 People's Choice 2:30 Masquerade Party 3:00 Life is Worth Living 3:30 Calvacade of America 4:00 Victory at Sea 4:30 Roy Rogers 5:00 Zoo Parade Tuesday, 9 Oct. 5:30 News & Weather 5:45 Industry en Parade 6:00 Disneyland 5:45 Tony Martin 6:00 I've Got a Secret 6:30 Big Town 7:00 Truth orConsequence 7:30 Foreign Intrigue 8:00 Godfrey & Friends 9:00 Kraft TV Theatre "Trucks Welcome" Thursday, 11 Oct. 5:30 News & Weather 5:45 Jo Stafford 6:00 December Bride 6:30 This is Your Life 7:00 Bob Cummings 7:30 Playhouse of Stars 8:00 Martha Raye 0:00 Climax "Faceless Enemy" Friday, 12 October 5:30 News & Weather "The Great Train Chase'5:45 Bob Crosby 7:00 Meet Millie 6:00 Ozzie & Harriet 7:30 Russ Morgan 6:30 Dunninger Show :00 Milton Berle 7:00 Life of Riley 9:00 Playwrite's '56 7 :30 Crusader "Lost" 8:00 Frankie Laine Show 5:30 Sunday News Headlines Wednesday, 10 Oct. 5:45 Meet the Champions 5:30 News & Weather 9:00 BoxingCotton vs Suzina Saturday, October 6 NavSta-Fastest Gun Alive-101 min. NAS-Fury At Gunsight Pass-95 min. Mar. Site-Killing-100 min. Villa.-Night of the Hunter-98 min. MCB-1-Crooked Web-96 min. Lwd. Pt.-Green Fire-100 min. Sunday, October 7 NavSta-Tender Trap-123 min. NAS-Fastest Gun Alive Mar. Site-Nightmare-100 min Villa.-Killing MCB-1-Night of the Hunter Lwd. Pt.-Crooked Web Monday. October 8 NavSta-Trial-108 min. NAS-Tender Trap Mar. Site-Fury At Gunsight Pasa Villa.-Nightmare MOB-1-Killing Lwd. Pt.-Night of the Hunter Tuesday, October 9 NavSta-Marty-100 min. NAS-Trial Mar. Site-Fastest Gun Alive Villa.-Fury At Gunsight Pass MCB-1-Nightmare Lwd. Pt.-Killing Wednesday. October 10 NavSta-Terror At Midnight-101 min. NAB-Marty Mar. Site-Tender Trap Villa.-Fastest Gun Alive MOB-1-Fury At Gunsight Pass Lwd. Pt.-Nightmare Thursday, October 11 NavSta-It's A Dog's Life-107 min. NAS-Terror At Midnight Mar. Site-Trial Villa.-Tender Trap MOB-1-Fastest Gun Alive Lwd. Pt.-Fury At Gunight Pass Friday, October 12 NavSat-Last of the Desperados-92 min. NAS-It's A Dog's Life Mar. Site-Marty Villa.-Trial MOB-1-Tender Trap Lwd. Pt.-Fastest Gun Alive young boy accused of murder .. Excellent ..Go! -. It's A Dog's Life (MGM, in color) .Edmund G*enn and Jeff Richards ...the heart warming story of a you guess what .really good entertainment for the whole family. aor Eected Mr. P. D. Lairmore of NavSta Public Works was recently elected mayor of the Villamar-Bargo Council. Replacing former mayor A. V. Ward, Mr. Lairmore assumed office Tuesday, October 2. Vice mayor B. D. Adams will remain in that capacity for another period of three months. Other officers elected are councilmen J. C. Wheeler, precinct #5, C. P. Anderson, precinct #7 and M. C. Williams, councilman -at large. Meeting night for the VillamarBargo Council has been changed from the first Tuesday to the second Tuesday each month. Meetings will be held at the I&E Office at 7:30 p.m. The Council is planning to hold a dance at the Villamar lyceum in the near future. Trading Post Toy Drive October 13 -14 Book-Nook by R. C. D. After a review of the new books at the NAS Library, back to the rundown of the best books available at your main Naval Station Library. Mann, Thomas. It is impossible to praise too highly this talented German novelist who, when he died last year, was hailed as the world's greatest contemporary novelist. Some of his works are a bit on the heavy side, both in length and content, but he is a thoroughgoing modern. The Library boasts a good selection of his works. Each has its own particular excellence, but I liked his four books about the biblical Joseph the best. Mansfield, Katherine. This New Zealander has been called the greatest short-story writer in modern times. Her collected works are published under the title of "The Garden Party." Her forte seems to be a remarkable power of trueto-life description. Marquand, John. Marquand is an American novelist who writes best about the emotional and social problems of upper-class Bostonians and New Yorkers. "The Late George Apley" was his first novel, and I still think it's his best. You may also like "Point of No Return" and "H. M. Paulham, Esquire." Maugham, Somerset. One of the best tale-tellers in the business, Maugham is equally at ease with the novel or the short story. Nearly everyone will be attracted to his "Complete Short Stories." His plots and dramatic situations are among the finest. Mauriac, Francois. This French Nobel prize winner is a prodigious workman, having more than thirty novels to his credit. His appeal lies in his ability to write about the forces of good and evil, love and hate, as they appear in his characters. The Library has four of his representative novels. Melville, Herman. Melville is an American who wrote in the nineteenth century, but remained undiscovered until the twentieth. "Moby Dick" is his masterpiece, a deeply symbolistic story of the sea and seamen. FROM: 3 cent stamp TO: Send The INDIAN Home MO New Villamar -Bargo