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Indian

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Indian
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Dedcation 0f Base- Hoptal Se o on-


COVERS GTMO LIKE THE SUNSHINE U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Volume VII, No. 38 Saturday, 22 September 1956


Ceremonies To Begin At 1000; V I Ps


From Washington, Cuba Expected

The new 100 bed, $2,500,000 (exclusive of equipment) Base hospital will be dedicated in ceremonies Monday morning, September 24. The ceremonies will take place in front of the gleaming white structure on Caravella Point.
Officials of the various Bureaus and Offices of the Navy, the Department of Defense, Cuba and representatives of the Army and Air Force will be on hand to witness the commissioning scheduled to begin at 1000.


SARATOGA Has Open House Tomorrow


The world's largest and most powerful warship-the USS SARATOGA, CVA-60-will hold an open house tomorrow, September 23. All military personnel and American citizens residing on the Base are invited.
Hours of the open house will be 1300 to 1600. Boats will be available at the Fleet Landing to transport visitors to and from the carrier. While aboard the ship, visitors will be permitted on the flight and hangar decks and designated areas below deck.
Also no children under six will The SARATOGA is the second be allowed on the ship and minors of the FORRESTAL class carriers under 16 must be accompanied by to be built. ,Five have been authoran adult. ized by Congress and the fourth


Exchange Toyland Opens Wed.


INDIAN Photo
The aura of this year's Christmas spirit in Guantanamo Bay was sniffed Wednesday morning, September 19, at the opening of the Naval Station Exchange toyland situated in the old NavSta Exchange soda fountain building.
First customer attended to by Mrs. Anna M. Boswell, toyland clerk, on the left, was Penny Jo, two year old daughter of VU-Ten's enlisted pilot (AOC) Robert R. Fife, holding Penny Jo. The toyland is heavily supplied with the most modern of playthings,
hand operated as well as mechanized, that will make even the most discriminating moffet excited.
Prominent toys on display include musical instruments, car and airplane models, dolls, miniature golf clubs, baby carriages, bungalows, guns a la western, bicycles, erector amusement park sets, etc.


of this class, the INDEPENDENCE, is now under constitution at the New York Naval Shipyard, while the third, RANGER, is being built at Newport News, Va. In length, the SARATOGA is 1,039 feet, slightly longer than the FORRESTAL, and would reach to the 80th floor of the Empire State building if stood on end. Her flight deck-252 feet at extreme breadth
-is more than four acres, big enough for three football fields.
The engines that drive the SARATOGA deliver more than 200,000 horsepower and could generate enough electricity to supply a city the size of Pittsburgh. She cruises at a speed of more than 30 knots-about 36 miles an hour.
And speaking of big things, this mobile air base has two anchors which weigh 30 tons each and has over 2,000 feet of anchor chain with each link weighing 360 pounds. The list of giant accessories for this supergiant carrier could go on indefinitely.
Open house visitors aboard the Sara tomorrow may be surprised to see a fighting cock on this fighting lady. The fighting cock has been the symbol of four navy ships to bear the name SARATOGA. And now it has been adopted by the newest Sara.
The symbol was born in battle during the War of 1812 when the British were trying to regain their former colonies. Four British meno'-war, under full sail, were engaged on Lake Champlain* by an American fleet-outnumbered and outgunned.
The American flagship was the SARATOGA of that day, under the command of a 28-year-old commodore. The first British shot fell short of its mark, but a second ball landed on deck, crashing into a hen coop containing a young gamecock brought on board by a sailor.

(Continued on Page Three)


According to the Technical Informartion Office, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, this is the first naval hospital to be thoroughly air conditioned. The new unit will


See pre-dedication picture coverage on page 5.

replace the old wooden and temporary building used for many years as the Base hospital.
RADM B.W. Hogan, Navy Surgeon General, will receive and accept the new hospital during the ceremonies from RADM R. J. Meade, Chief of the Bureau of Yards and Docks. RADM Hogan will then turn the new edifice with its latest medical facilities over toCAPT L. A. Newton, Commnuading Officer, Naval Base Hospital.
Dr. F. B. Berry, Assistant Seeretary of Defense (Health and Medical) and numerous other officials will accompany RADM Hogan and other Washington, D. C. officials coming for the dedication. Also included in RADM Hogan's party will be representatives of


RADM B. W. Hogan
the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery and his Aide and, Executive Assistant, LCDR T. L. Hollis, MCS. The group is expected to leave Washington for Gtmno tomorrow.

Local hospital authorities expect
(Continued on Page Four)


10







THE INDIAN Saturday, 22 September 1956


THE INDIAN

The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a possible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.
RADM WILLIAM G. COOPER, Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
Editorial Staff
LCDR K. S. Dick --------------------------------Officer-Adviser
G. L. Henderson, JOC ------------------------------------Editor
J. C. Curren, JOSN -----------------------------Managing Editor
E.U. Orias, J03 --------------------------------Feature Editor
D.D. Hinton, JOSN ------------------------------ Staff Reporter
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds.
Materials marked AFPS may be used by news media provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All materials originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part or without credit.
All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.

You Too Can Go To College

Now that personnel stationed on the Base are being given a chance for some higher education, it will be a shame if a lack of interest is shown in the Base Commander's announcement last week of a college extension program for Gtmo-provided enough interest is shown.
The usual Gtmo complaint is "What to do in the spare time." Here is an opportunity for time-wasters to turn pseudo-intellectuals and at little monetary cost to themselves. The navy will pay 75 percent of the colloge's tuition costs.
But, if insufficient interest is shown in the proposed Florida State University Extension Program for Gtmo, the entire plan will be scuttled and rightly so. Turn your name into your Commanding Officer before October 1 and induce your buddy to do the same. The Base Commander will take a poll on that date to determine the feasibility of such a program for the Naval Base.
Much the same plan was proposed last year, but had to be dropped because of lack of interest. This year, with the Tuition Aid Program in effect, there is no reason for a recurrence.
The program is receiving tremendous acceptance throughout the navy since its resumption after a five years' absence. The same ought to happen here and can if you let it.
Think the matter over and then turn your name into your CO. Don't be sorry afterwards if the local college education plan is dropped because you and many others failed to let it be known that you wanted to take advantage of the program-it will be your own fault!


Sunday, 23 September 1956

CATHOLIC MASSES Sunday: 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. through Fri.:
1646-Naval Base Chapel Saturday: 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions-1700 - 1800, 1900 - 2000, and daily before Mass
PROTESTANT SERVICES Sunday: 0980-Sunday School 0930-Adult Bible Class Open
Air Assembly
1100-Protestant Divine Worship-Naval Base Chapel
1980-Fellowship Tour-Open
Air Assembly Thursday :1900--Choir Rehearsl JEWISH SERVICES Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel CHURCH OF CHRIST Sunday: 1000-Bible Study-Community Auditorium
1045-Worship Service-Community Auditorium


Calendar of Events
Saturday, September 22
Kid's Matinee-Villamar Lyceum-1800 Catholic Catechism Classes-Naval Base
School-1000
Sunday, Septenber 23 Movie Night-Officers' Club-2000
Monday, September 24
O.E.S. Chapter Meeting-Community Auditorium-1930
Age Club-193o
Teen-Age Advisory Group Meeting-TeenWednesday, September 26
13oy Scout Meeting-Chapel Hill Audito.
rium-1830
Toastmaster's Club-Officers' Club-1830 Kid's Matinee-Villamar Lyceum-1800 Movie Night-Officers' Club-2000
Thursday, September 27
Navy Wives Club-Luncheon (Marine
Family Restaurant) -1300
Felloweraft Club 1078-Community Auditorium-1930
LATTER DAY SAINTS Sunday: 1100-Naval Station Library CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Sunday: 1000--Naval Station Library CHAPLAINS AT THIS ACTIVITY
CDR P. R. MePhee, CHC, USN
(Protestant)
CDR J. J. Sullivan, CEC, USN
(Catholic)


The Chaplain's Corner,

Are You An Egotist?
No one likes to be around an uncontrolled egotist, the person who has done something bigger, better and more spectacular than anyone else, or the person who by manner or attitude exalts himself above all his neighbors.
Perhaps the most important thing for everyone of us is the realization that these feelings of superiority need controlling. We need a good healthy egotism as evidenced through self-confidence and a realistic approach to our own capacities. Most of us have something in which we excel. But I suppose that as we search we find others who have the same superiorities or are our betters.
Let's hear what Jesus said: "Whosoever exalteth himself shall be abased; and he that humbleth himself shall be exalted." It is my opinion that Christ was not here speaking of mental capacities, but rather of character. The person who is virtuous (that is, honest, truthful, just, kind, thoughful, industrious, thrifty, respectful, etc.) will establish a place for himself without having to "brag" himself into a higher position.
I am naive enough to believe the old fashioned virtues pay off in the end, nor do they depend on "brain-power."

Chaplain P. R. McPhee


When we vote this year, we will be choosing the men and women who will guide America through a perilous phase in its history.
The hydrogen bomb and the threat of communist expansion hang heavy over our daily lives. The need for enlightened leadership is there. Our responsibility in selecting -the proper leaders becomes apparent.
An election should be everything but a popularity contest. Joe Doakes may be a nice guy, have a real sweet wife and look just like your nephew Ned, but that doesn't mean he is more qualified to hold office.
Some self-styled experts insist people vote for a man because of his personal mannerisms. Others maintain race, religion and the size of his family are seriously weighed by the voting public.
Maybe some voters consider these things. If so, our country is in a bad way. What the man says, how he stands on the issues and his past record in politics are the important factors.
All candidates believe in the sanctity of the American home, are loyal Americans and just love apple pie.
Which are most qualified to guide America through this perilous age ? It is our duty as citizens to find out. When we do, it is our duty to vote. America's future depends on an educated ballot. (AFPS)


Toy Collection This Weekend

The annual Christmas Toy Drive, sponsored by the Trading Post, is in full swing and deserves the wholehearted support of everybody on the Base. This weekend, today and tomorrow, the local Boy Scouts will conduct a no longer needed or broken toy collection in the housing areas.
If there are unused toys occupying space around the house, give them to the Scouts this weekend or drop them off at one of the collection boxes in front of each of the Exchanges on the Base. In addition to this week's collection drive, the Scouts have future collections slated for the weekends of October 13.14 and November 17-18.
Damaged toys will be repaired and painted by the Naval Base firemen and the Naval Station Hobby Shop. The repaired toys will then be placed on sale to everyone on the Base. Dates and location of the sales will be announced at a later date.


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Saturday, 22 September 1956


THE INDDIAN


All Hands Enjoy Gtmo Naval Base Band Public Works Center


by Ely U. Orias
Recognized as one of the indispensable factors for the entertainment of all hands, the Navy provides every major naval command with a unit which deals in nothing but rhythms. This unit is known as the navy band.
Commander Naval Base's Flag personnel allowance of 35 enlisted men includes 19 musicians which constitute the Naval Base Band. But when the band plays as a dance orchestra, only 16 of the 19 enlisted rhythm makers participate, while the remaining three alternate to stand military watches.
The band starts out the military day by playing colors at 0800 at the Base administration building. From there they go to rehearsals conducted in the bandroom situated across from the Naval Station Boat Shed.
The Naval Base Band is always on hand when a goverment building is being dedicated, at the guard mount ceremonies at the Marine Barracks every Friday afternoon, the welcome and send-off for miltary personnel and their dependents embarked on MSTS or the rendering of honors to visiting Flag Officers.
Dedicating their musical talents strictly for the bIuejackets, the band's itinerary includes a White Hat Club engagement every Wednesday night from 1900 to
-2130. Another musical rendition for the enlisted man is heard one Monday each month when the band plays at the Naval Air Station Enlisted Men's Club. Patients in the Base hospital are also entertained by the magic of their music every Wednesday noon.
Other routine activities lined up for the Naval Base Band include musical engagements at the Commander Naval Base's quarters for official receptions, dance parties at the Officers' Club, CPO Club, TeenAge Club and sometimes at the Villamar lyceum during a marriedset social dance.
When attending a purely social function, the Base dance orchestra members are allowed, in keeping with the atmosphere of the occasion, to wear civilian clothes while in the performance of their duties.
Chief musician Russell Van Vlack has been the band's maestro for the past two years. A native New Yorker, Van Vlack is also noted as a polyglot with five different languages at his command. He is


also an accomplished carpenter. A prospective warrant officer, Van Vlack is leaving Gtmo shortly.
Chief Musician John Benton, who got his present rate only last Sunday, will assume the leadership of the Naval Base Band and Orchestra when Van Vlack leaves.
Benton first enlisted in the Navy in 1941. A former electrician's mate, he changed his rate to musician during the war. While stationed at Seattle, Benton held a job as a music writer for a TV show. Married and a father of two boys, Benton has attended Los Angeles Conservatory of Music.
Members of the band are first class musicians Jake Jacquay, trumpet and french-horn; Chuck Misner, sax and clarinet; Ray


Toastmasters Club

Elects Year's Officers
Toastmasters Club No. 92 of Guantanamo Bay elected its new officers at a meeting held Wednesday night, September 12, at the Officers' Club. Jack E. Brown, principal of the Base School's elementary department, was named president of the club.
Other officers elected were CWO Ray J. Harper, educational vicepresident; LCDR S. C. Ferguson, administrative secretary; L. C. Serig, secretary-treasurer; and G. Ward, sgt.-at-arms.
Installation of the newly-elected club officers will be held in the dining room of the Officers' Club on Wednesday night, October 3. Incidentally, this event has also been designated as "Ladies Night" by the T-Club and wives of club members are required to attend.


INDIAN Photo
Credit, trumpet; Dick Klotz, drums; "Red" Ostern, MU2, sax; third class musicians Ken Cielo, trumpet; Dale Dieckman, bass viol and sousaphone; Bill Fletcher, trumpet; Jerry Owensby, trumpet; Charles Ambrester, sax and clarinet and Bill Currier, drums.
Other members of the band include musician seaman Abe Silverman, sax-clarinet-flute; Ralph Horner, trumpet and french-horn; Angelo Tromba, baritone; Mike. Fiorillo, accordion and piano; Erwin Orchekowski, trombone and musician apprentices Fred Ring, sax and clarinet and Ed White, sax and clarinet.



'Old' Men Command

N. S. Softball League

First place standing in the Naval Station Intra- Mural Softball league goes to the CPOs.
The league standings as of September 17, proved the CPOs as yet undefeatable with eigth wins and no losses.
Second and third place goes to 1-4-7-Commissary Store and Security activity respectively. The quadruple combine has six wins and two losses, while Security has six wins and three losses.
Fourth place honors go to the Second Division team with six wins and four losses to their credit. The AFDL-47 team places fifth with five wins and three losses.
Remainder of the nine team intra-mural league place in this order; sixth-Sth Div., five wins and five losses; seventh-Electronics, three wins and six losses; eighthSeabees, one win and two losses and last place Fleet Camera Party,


M


Page Three


Save Your Toys For The Christmas Toy Drive


The Trouble & Service Call Shop of the Center is highly important facility in terms of service to Base residents. For the benefit of those who may not be familiar with the shop's functions, it is organized to provide quick, on the spot service when needed-fixing the stove which blew out in the middle of dinner, unstopping the kitchen sink after Junior has soaked the back off stamps for his collection, repairing leaks in hot water lines, fixing the office water cooler, patching the roof leak or getting the lights back on. Under the direction of J. M. Smillie, Quarterman Plumber, and E.J. Guillory Jr., Leadingman Maintenance, the services of the shop are available for the dialing-8424 or 8459. So don't let the faucet drip or the fan rattle give the shop a call.
The Center welcomes the family of E. E. Henderson, Quarterman (Building & Grounds), recently arrived from Washington, D. C. Among the visitors to that big island up North, are Mr. and Mrs. Chapman, who are on a well-earned vacation trip. They intend to make a perimeter tour of the U.S.
The Sailing regatta at Santiago last weekend saw the Center represented in force by Mr. and Mrs. Henry and Ensign and Mrs. Anibal. They sailed well, but the cry of ''wait 'till next year" was heard ringing through the Rancho.


SARATOGA...
(Continued from Page One)
With a flurry of feathers, the startled bird flew to the rail and, as if expressing his personal indignation, crowed lustily and defiantly! To the Americans, this was an omen of good luck, and they entered the battle with new courage.
Afterwards-with some 50 men of the SARATOGA dead, and not a mast standing on any ship-the commodore was able to send the dispatch: "The Almighty has been pleased to grant us a signal victory on Lake Champlain in the capture of one frigate, one brig and two sloops of war of the enemy."
Though the day of the sailing ship is gone, the fighting cock lives on-on the navy's newest SARATOGA.

one win and seven losses.
With approximately 50 games yet to be played, the league is scheduled to end October 17. All games are played in the Naval Station recreation area.







THE INDIAN Saturday, 22 September 1956


Stop Fires Before They Start!


INDIAN Photo
Guantanamo Bay's Little Theater organization, in cooperation with the Base Fire Department, gave their assistance in helping to further the local fire prevention program.
"Most deaths by fire tragically involve women and children in the home. Many are suffocated by smoke and fire gases without being actually burned. Many deaths-too many-are caused by people falling asleep while smoking or re-entering burning homes to rescue pets and personal possessions.
"It is our responsibility to continue the determined effort of fire prevention for 365 days of the year."


VU-1O Prop Blast

CAPT W.B. Short, USN, Commander Utility Wing, U.S. Atlantic Fleet, visited Guantanamo Bay earlier this week during an inspection trip through the Caribbean area. CAPT Short relieved CAPT J. A. Miller, USN, as Commander Utility Wing earlier this month at Wing headquarters in Norfolk.
A Mallard Welcome Aboard to ENS Henry S. Donaldson who reported last week from Chase Field. Donaldson is a native of Indiana, his home is in Fowler. Prior to his entry into the Naval service he was attending Purdue University, where he was majoring in Mathematics Statistics (try to say that after a few Hatueys!).
V. A. Fries, AT1, has reported aboard from his last duty station at China Lake, and Donald N. Kennelly, ATAN, arrived following a tour with NATTC, Memphis.
G. A. Landrum, A03, has arrived from NAS, Jacksonville, and J. M. Irby, SN, reports from NAS, Patuxent River.
G. E. Wilson, ATI, joins the Mallards following training with NavTechTraCen, Memphis.
R. Vickers, AD2, has been detached and has departed Gtmo for transfer to the VX-1 detachment in Key West, just up the line from here. W.A. Mardoni, TM3, left on Monday for return to the states and new duties with ComSubRon TEN at the base at New London.
D. N. Lawson, AKC, and family departed Gtmo on Tuesday and are currently enjoying stateside leave prior to reporting to Memphis and


Columnist Discovers

'Something -- BIG! !'
by Cinema-Scoop
This past week was scouting around trying to find something to put in the column and run into something so big that I asked "ye olde editor" if he would allow me some added space.
That big thing is... "The Spirit of the Navy."
This Navy effort of putting the history of our outfit in pageant and dramatic form for the entertainment of all hands will really be something for everyone to see.
The main thing that struck me, when looking over a copy of the script is the vast amount of information that can be learned about the Navy, things that normally never rate coverage in the history books and it's downright interesting too, besides being entertaining.

duty with NAS.
Nothing against the Miami transit system, but eight of the Mallard bachelor officers have joined together to buy a used car which will be available to them whenever they are in Miami.
And speaking of Miami, we came across a rather interesting item at the MCAS there. It seems that one of the MSGTs there with 24 years in the Corps behind him has decided to 'ship' for another six years. His only comment was, "... I guess I'll just make a career out of it now."


Rifle, Pistol Club Awards 30 Local


Youngsters At Shooting Meet

Shooting proficiency diplomas and awards were presented to 30 members of the Guantanamo Bay Rifle and Pistol Club, Junior Division, at the last-meeting held September 13.
The awards were made in recognition of shooting performed under National Rifle Association rules, and were awards for the ProMarksman, Marksman, Marksman 1st Class and Sharpshooter classifications.


Devil - Dog Doin's

by T/Sgt. A. Burris
This last week the Barracks was joined by one officer and three Marines, all from Camp Lejeune, lstLt. Waters reported aboard with his family and was assigned to the Security Section. Sgt. Gibson and Cpl. Blair reported to T/Sgt. Deldo in Security, and Cpl. Coates reported to the Sgt. major as his Legal Clerk, relieving Sgt. Spencer. Welcome aboard Marines, new blood is needed.
The Marines from Gtmo All Star Baseball Team have returned from Bainbridge, Md. Sgt. Magas reported back Tuesday night and the other players followed.
Pfcs Ozuk and Lawson reported back to Gtmo. from their 30 day shipping-over leave. From their reports, stateside duty isn't all it's claimed to be for a hard charging Marine. Rather tame after a tour at Marine Barracks, Gtmo.
The Barracks Softball League is running fairly tight. The Angels and Strikeouts are running neck and neck for the first place, followed by the Hoboes. Cpl. Boranian's Bums are at the bottom of the heap, but he promises to pull them out if it takes the rest of the season.




Gtmoites Are Invited

To Model Plane Meet

The Miami Marine Corps Air Station will play host at the Third King Orange International Model Plane Contest to be held in Miami, Florida, from December 28 through 31, 1956.
Sponsors of the contest have extended an invitation to Gtmo Bay personnel. The contest involves three phases, namely; high point altitude, control class "C" line and control line jet. Prizes worth $5,000 will be awarded to the winners.
Personnel interested in participating in this contest are advised to submit their entry to: Exchange Clubs Model Aviation Corporation, 368 Palm Avenue, Hialeah, Florida.


Members winning the ProMarksman award were Larry Abbot, Kit Becker, Jane Ferrante, Judy Harrison, Butch Holder, Eric Hoppe, Bill Koraska, David Maxwell and Virginia McConnon. Other members also winning the award included Mike Powell, Jon Ward, Robert Wilkinson, David Williams, Richard Williams, and Robert Williams.
Members awarded the Marksman award were Judy Harrison, Eric Hoppe, David Maxwell, Virginia McConnon, Mike Powell, Jon Ward, David Williams, Richard Williams and Robert Williams.
Four members won the Marksman 1st Class award. They were Eric Hoppe, David Maxwell, Richard Williams and Robert Williams. Two members won the sharpshooter awards, they were David Maxwell and Robert Williams.
Ages of the Junior Club members run from 7 to 15. Miss Jane Ferrante, age 8, was the youngest member winning an award. At present there are 30 active members in the Junior Division.
Supervised instruction is conducted every Saturday afternoon at the Naval Station Pistol Range. In order to qualify for firing, all members must attend two classroom safety lectures and two range instruction periods.
Included in the new Senior Rifle and Pistol Club range will be a Junior Division range. In the new range, there will be 10 firing positions available for members, who at present are limited to four at the Naval Station Pistol range. Also there will be a clubhouse for meetings and instruction.



Dedication...

(Continued from Page One)
numerous dignitaries from Cuba along with officials of the Frederick-Snare Corporation, builders of the hopsital.
All military and civilian personnel are invited by hospital officials to attend the commissioning and open house which will be held immediately following the commissioning ceremonies. Uniform for military personnel will be, for officers: Full dress whites (large medals and swords); Chief Petty Officers: Service dress white, other enlisted personnel: Undress white "A" with neckerchief.


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Page Four











New Naval Base Hospital:.,


Pre-commissioning scenes of the New Base hospital, top row reading from left to right: CDR E. G. Dobbins, Resident Officer of Construction, and LCDR F. E. Stewart, Administrative Assistant, Naval Hospital, walk out of one of the elevators in the new hospital. This


INDIAN Photo
is the first building on the Base sery of the to be commissioned Below, left to right: LCDR to sport such a covenience and hospital. And on the far right, Stewart and CAPT L.A. Newton, probably one of a few in this part CDR Dobbins, J.R. Connor, project Commanding Officer, Naval Hosof Cuba. m a n a g e r for Frederick-Snare pital, look over the bronze plaque

CAPT W. A. Robie, Chief- of De- Corp, and CDR W. C. Turville, outside the main entrance of the massive hospital. And in the last
pendents clinic, Naval. Hospital, Chief Surgeon, Naval Hospital, picturefi Connors and CDR Turville and LT J.B. Smith, Dependents look at an overhead lamp in one seem to be enjoying their tour of
Clinic, Naval Hospital, in the nur- of the operating rooms, the hospital.


INDIAN Photo


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Saturday, 22 September 1956


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Saturday, 22 September 1956


TEM INDIAN Navy-BPPO-OND-"uantanamo


Cinema - Scoop

by Don Hinton
Hollywood and the movie going public are talking about . . . the continuing fanatacism over the late James Dean and efforts by the "money-mongers" to cash in on the dead star . . . Presley's first movie "The Reno Brothers," currently in the making and the coming of the much ballyhooed $13,000,000, four hour long "Ten Commandments," C. B. De Mille's latest and greatest!
On the local scene, the "0" Club and the Chief's Club will be in for some great entertainment in the near future when "Guys and Dolls," comes to their Cinemascope screens!
The movies playing the circuit this week are not worth the walking effort from Bay Hill to the Lyceum!

Serenade (W.B., in color), is the only exception! Mario Lanza and Joan Fontaine star. The story is nothing but Lanza is great! Even at that, he isn't what he used to be. The story is taken from the James M. Cain novel and is a considerably watered down version. Summing up, go see Lanza, but don't expect anything else!

Three For Jamie Dawn (A.A.) ... Lairane Day and Richard Carlson crime-drama... No comment.
Gamma People (Col.). The comedy accompanying this "movie" is "Gerald McBoing Boing on Planet Moo" and promises to be one of the best comedies that has been here in a long time. These short laugh getters of the little boy who doesn't talk, but squeaks are the greatest! By the way, Paul Douglas and Eva Bartok star in the featured movie, "Gamma People."
Pearl of the South Pacific (RKO, in color) . .. Dennis Morgan and Virginia Mayo ... this is the biggest nothing that Hollywood has here to for attempted to put before the movie going public.

Over-Exposed (Col.), stars Cleo Moore and with a title such as it is, you couldn't ask for anything more. The story is rather corny, but who's paying attention to the story when Miss Moore's charms are gracing the screen.

Far Horizons (Para., in color)
*.. Fred McMurray, Charlton Heston, Donna Reed and Barbara Hale ... a very good frontier days picture concerning Lewis and Clark . . . played the Base before.

After loading the family car for a trip, the man told the neighbors, "We aren't getting away from it all-we're taking it with us."

Nothing makes a man go places like a woman who likes to go.


WGBY Television


Saturday, Sept. 22 1:00 Winky Dink & You 1:80 Zoo Parade 2:00 This Is Your Life 2:30 Godfrey Time 3:00 Robert Q. Lewis 3:30 Lighted Window 4:00 Garry Moore 4:30 Lamp Unto My Fleet 5:00 Big Picture 5:30 Ethel & Albert 6:00 Harry Owens 6:30 Beat The Clock 7:00 Appt. With Adventure 7:80 Hit Parade 8:00 Martha Raye 9:00 Stage Show 9:30 Star Tonight Sunday, Sept. 23 1:00 Paul Winchell 1:30 Godfrey Time 2:00 Roy Rogers 2:30 Garry Moore 3:00 Faith For Today 3:30 Robert Q. Lewis 4:00 Ted Mack 5:00 You Ask For It 5:30 Sun. News Headlines


5:45 Tony Martin 6:00 Mama 6:30 You Are There 7:00 Masquerade Party 7:30 I've Got a Secret 8:00 Ed Sullivan 9:00 Robert Montgomery Monday, Sept. 24 5:30 News Parade 5:45 Eddie Fisher 6:00 Ozzie & Harriet 6:30 Talent Scouts 7:00 My Favorite Husband 7:30 Highway Patrol 8:00 Sid Caesar 9:00 Studio One Tuesday, Sept. 25 5:30 News Parade 5:45 Jane Froman 6:00 Disneyland 7:00 Meet Millie 7:30 Red Skelton 8:00 Lineup 8:30 Justice 9:00 Philco Playhouse Wednesday, Sept. 26 5:30 News Parade 5:45 Patti Page


Program
6:00 Two For The Money 6:30 I & E Time 7:00 Arthur Murray 7:30 T-Men In Action 8:00 Godfrey & Friends 9:00 TV Theater Thursday, Sept. 27 5:30 News Parade 5:45 Perry Como 6:00 Calv. of America 6:30 This Is Your Life 7:00 Dollar a Second 7:30 Bob Cummings 8:00 Playhouse of Stars 8:30 Johnny Carson 9:00 Climax Friday, Sept. 28 5:30 News Parade 5:45 Eddie Fisher 6:00 Truth or Consequences 6:30 Fury 7:00 Life of Riley 7:30 Crusader 8:00 People Are Funny 8:30 Dragnet 9:00 Boxing


4Ladies Golf Assoc.


Saturday, September 22 NavSta-One Desire-106 min. NAS-Star In the Dust-102 min. Mar. Site-Screaming Eagles-104 min. Villa.-French Line-101 min. MCB-1-Crashing Las Vegas-98 min. Lwd. Pt.-New Faces-l0 min.
Sunday, September 23 NavSta-Serenade-133 min. NAS-One Desire Mar. Site-Sea Chase-117 min. Villa.-Screaming Eagles MCB-1-French Line Lwd. Pt.-Crashing Las Vegas
Monday, September 24
NavSta-Three For Jamie Dawn-102 min. NAS-Serenade Mar. Site-Star In the Dust Villa.-Sea Chase MCB-1-Screaming Eagles Lwd. Pt.-French Line
Tuesday, September 25 NavSta-Gamma People-97 min. NAS-Three For Jamie Dawn Mar. Site-One Desire Villa.-Star In the Dust MCB-1 Sea Chase Lwd. Pt.-Screaming Eagles
Wednesday, September 26
NavSta-Pearl of the South Pacific106 min.
NAS-Gamma People Mar. Site-Serenade Villa.-One Desire MCB-1-Star In the Dust Lwd. Pt.-Sea Chase
Thursday, September 27 NavSta-Over-Exposed-96 min. NAS-Pearl of the South Pacific Mar. Site-Three For Jamie Dawn Villa.-Serenade MCB-1-One Desire Lwd. Pt.-Star In the Dust
Friday, September 28 NavSta-Far Horizons-107 min. NAS-Over-Exposed Mar. Site-Gamma People Villa.-Three For Jamie Dawn MCB-1--Serenade Lwd. Pt.-One Desire


A customer was trying out the nib of a fountain pen at a stationer's shop. Several times he wrote "Tempus Fugit" on a sheet of paper.
The clerk, intrigued but intending to be helpful, handed him another pen saying: "Would you care to try this one, Mr. Fugit?"


To Hold Luncheon
The Gtmo Ladies Golf Association will hold a luncheon on Friday, September 29, at 1215 at the Marine Family restaurant. Anyone interested in playing golf is cordially invited. For reservations call Mrs. R. F. Wall, phone 8152 or Mrs. G. H. Leach, phone 9603.


Support "The Spirit of the Navy."


Book-Nook

by R. C. D.
Hawthorne, Nathaniel. Hawthorne is one of those classic novelists whom everybody reads in school (supposedly). Those who haven't might enjoy "The Scarlet Letter," a tale of Puritan folk in colonial New England. Some have gone so far to term it the greatest novel ever written in America. "The House of the Seven Gables" is also a famous novel.
Hemingway, Ernest. It seems that readers are divided into two schools, those that like Hemingway and those that don't. "The Old Man and the Sea," however, appealed to everyone. It's set in Cuba, and some of his description should be familiar. Four other novels by this controversial American are also here.
Hersey, John. Hersey is a reporter turned writer, and his books are written with the journalist's typewriter rather than the novelist's pen. Nevertheless, he is one of the best novelists in America today. "A Bell for Adano" and "A Single Pebble" may be found here, but you'll have to look a bit further for what I consider his best effort, "The Wall."
Hilton, James. An exceptionally fine writer whose versatility is seemingly unlimited. "Goodbye Mr. Chips" swept him from obscurity to fame, and Mr. Chips, and English schoolmaster is probably his greatest character, and the hero of one of his best books. "Lost Horizon" is a fantastic and engrossing tale of an Oriental fountain of youth. "Random Harvest" is a longer novel about an amnesia victim. All are excellent, as are six others not mentioned here.
Irving, Washington. Irving was our first real writer in America. "The Sketch Book" is a series of essays and stories on many topics. Although rather outdated, they have a certain charm which is appealing to all.
Longstreet, Stephen. This virtually unknown author has written an excellent novel about a Jewish family in America entitled "The Pedlocks." It's another one of those dynastic stories, and it's a good


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Dedication Of Base Hospital Set For Mon. COVERS GTMO LIKE THE SUNSHINE U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Volume VII, No. 38 Saturday, 22 September 1956 Ceremonies To Begin At 1000; V I Ps From Washington, Cuba Expected The new 100 bed, $2,500,000 (exclusive of equipment) Base hospital will be dedicated in ceremonies Monday morning, September 24. The ceremonies will take place in front of the gleaming white structure on Caravella Point. Officials of the various Bureaus and Offices of the Navy, the Department of Defense, Cuba and representatives of the Army and Air Force will be on hand to witness the commissioning scheduled to begin at 1000. SARATOGA Has Open House Tomorrow The world's largest and most powerful warship-the USS SARATOGA, CVA-60-will hold an open house tomorrow, September 23. All military personnel and American citizens residing on the Base are invited. Hours of the open house will be 1300 to 1600. Boats will be available at the Fleet Landing to transport visitors to and from the carrier. While aboard the ship, visitors will be permitted on the flight and hangar decks and designated areas below deck. Also no children under six will The SARATOGA is the second be allowed on the ship and minors of the FORRESTAL class carriers under 16 must be accompanied by to be built. Five have been authoran adult. ized by Congress and the fourth Exchange Toyland Opens Wed. INDIAN Photo The aura of this year's Christmas spirit in Guantanamo Bay was sniffed Wednesday morning, September 19, at the opening of the Naval Station Exchange toyland situated in the old NavSta Exchange soda fountain building. First customer attended to by Mrs. Anna M. Boswell, toyland clerk, on the left, was Penny Jo, two year old daughter of VU-Ten's enlisted pilot (AOC) Robert R. Fife, holding Penny Jo. The toyland is heavily supplied with the most modern of playthings, hand operated as well as mechanized, that will make even the most discriminating moffet excited. Prominent toys on display include musical instruments, car and airplane models, dolls, miniature golf clubs, baby carriages, bungalows, guns a la western, bicycles, erector amusement park sets, etc. of this class, the INDEPENDENCE, is now under constitution at the New York Naval Shipyard, while the third, RANGER, is being built at Newport News, Va. In length, the SARATOGA is 1,039 feet, slightly longer than the FORRESTAL, and would reach to the 80th floor of the Empire State building if stood on end. Her flight deck-252 feet at extreme breadth -is more than four acres, big enough for three football fields. The engines that drive the SARATOGA deliver more than 200,000 horsepower and could generate enough electricity to supply a city the size of Pittsburgh. She cruises at a speed of more than 30 knots-about 36 miles an hour. And speaking of big things, this mobile air base has two anchors which weigh 30 tons each and has over 2,000 feet of anchor chain with each link weighing 360 pounds. The list of giant accessories for this supergiant carrier could go on indefinitely. Open house visitors aboard the Sara tomorrow may be surprised to see a fighting cock on this fighting lady. The fighting cock has been the symbol of four navy ships to bear the name SARATOGA. And now it has been adopted by the newest Sara. The symbol was born in battle during the War of 1812 when the British were trying to regain their former colonies. Four British meno'-war, under full sail, were engaged on Lake Champlain by an American fleet-outnumbered and outgunned. The American flagship was the SARATOGA of that day, under the command of a 28-year-old commodore. The first British shot fell short of its mark, but a second ball landed on deck, crashing into a hen coop containing a young gamecock brought on board by a sailor. (Continued on Page Three) According to the Technical Informartion Office, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, this is the first naval hospital to be thoroughly air conditioned. The new unit will See pre-dedication picture coverage on page 5. replace the old wooden and temporary building used for many years as the Base hospital. RADM B. W. Hogan, Navy Surgeon General, will receive and accept the new hospital during the ceremonies from RADM R. J. Meade, Chief of the Bureau of Yards and Docks. RADM Hogan will then turn the new edifice with its latest medical facilities over to CAPT L. A. Newton, Commnading Officer, Naval Base Hospital. Dr. F. B. Berry, Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health and Medical) and numerous other officials will accompany RADM Hogan and other Washington, D. C. officials coming for the dedication. Also included in RADM Hogan's party will be representatives of RADM B. W. Hogan the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery and his Aide and Executive Assistant, LCDR T. L. Hollis, MCS. The group is expected to leave Washington for Gtmo tomorrow. Local hospital authorities expect (Continued on Page Four) e

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'p Page Two Saturday, 22 September 1956 THE INDIAN The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a possible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. RADM WILLIAM G. COOPER, Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Editorial Staff LCDR K. S. Dick -----------------------Officer-Adviser G.L. Henderson, JOC -----------------------------__ Editor J. C. Curren, JOSN ---------------------------Managing Editor E. U. Orias, J03 -------------------------------Feature Editor D. D. Hinton, JOSN ----------------------------Staff Reporter THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. Materials marked AFPS may be used by news media provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All materials originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part or without credit All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. You Too Can Go To College Now that personnel stationed on the Base are being given a chance for some higher education, it will be a shame if a lack of interest is shown in the Base Commander's announcement last week of a college extension program for Gtmo-provided enough interest is shown. The usual Gtmo complaint is "What to do in the spare time." Here is an opportunity for time-wasters to turn pseudo-intellectuals and at little monetary cost to themselves. The navy will pay 75 percent of the colloge's tuition costs. But, if insufficient interest is shown in the proposed Florida State University Extension Program for Gtmo, the entire plan will be scuttled and rightly so. Turn your name into your Commanding Officer before October 1 and induce your buddy to do the same. The Base Commander will take a poll on that date to determine the feasibility of such a program for the Naval Base. Much the same plan was proposed last year, but had to be dropped because of lack of interest. This year, with the Tuition Aid Program in effect, there is no reason for a recurrence. The program is receiving tremendous acceptance throughout the navy since its resumption after a five years' absence. The same ought to happen here and can if you let it. Think the matter over and then turn your name into your CO. Don't be sorry afterwards if the local college education plan is dropped because you and many others failed to let it be known that you wanted to take advantage of the program-it will be your own fault! Sunday, 23 September 1956 CATHOLIC MASSES Sunday: 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. through Fri.: 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday: 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions-1700 -1800, 1000 -2000, and daily before Mass PROTESTANT SERVICES Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 0930-Adult Bible Class Open Air Assembly 1100-Protestant Divine Worship-Naval Base Chapel 1980-Fellowship Tour-Open Air Assembly Thurpday:1900-Choir Rehearsal JEWISH SERVICES Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel CHURCH OF CHRIST Sunday: 1000-Bible Study-Community Auditorium 1045-Worship Service-Community Auditorium Calendar of Events Saturday, September 22 Kid's Matinee-Villamar Lyceum-1800 Catholic Catechism Classes-Naval Base School-1000 Sunday, September 23 Movie Night-Officers' Club-2000 Monday, September 24 O.E.S. Chapter Meeting-Community Auditorium-1930 Age Club-1930 Teen-Age Advisory Group Meeting-TeenWednesday, September 26 Boy Scout Meeting-Chapel Hill Audito. rium-1830 Toastmaster's Club-Officers' Club-1830 Kid's Matinee-Villamar Lyceum-1800 Movie Night-Officers' Club-2000 Thursday, September 27 Navy Wives Club-Luncheon (Marine Family Restaurant)-1300 Felloweraft Club 1078-Community Auditorium-1930 LATTER DAY SAINTS Sunday: 1100-Naval Station Library CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Sunday: 1000--Naval Station Library CHAPLAINS AT THIS ACTIVITY CDR P. R. McPhee, CHC, USN (Protestant) CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, TJSN (Catholic) The Chaplain's Corner Are You An Egotist? No one likes to be around an uncontrolled egotist, the person who has done something bigger, better and more spectacular than anyone else, or the person who by manner or attitude exalts himself above all his neighbors. Perhaps the most important thing for everyone of us is the realization that these feelings of superiority need controlling. We need a good healthy egotism as evidenced through self-confidence and a realistic approach to our own capacities. Most of us have something in which we excel. But I suppose that as we search we find others who have the same superiorities or are our betters. Let's hear what Jesus said: "Whosoever exalteth himself shall be abased; and he that humbleth himself shall be exalted." It is my opinion that Christ was not here speaking of mental capacities, but rather of character. The person who is virtuous (that is, honest, truthful, just, kind, thoughful, industrious, thrifty, respectful, etc.) will establish a place for himself without having to "brag" himself into a higher position. I am naive enough to believe the old fashioned virtues pay off in the end, nor do they depend on "brain-power." Chaplain P. R. McPhee When we vote this year, we will be choosing the men and women who will guide America through a perilous phase in its history. The hydrogen bomb and the threat of communist expansion hang heavy over our daily lives. The need for enlightened leadership is there. Our responsibility in selecting the proper leaders becomes apparent. An election should be everything but a popularity contest. Joe Doakes may be a nice guy, have a real sweet wife and look just like your nephew Ned, but that doesn't mean he is more qualified to hold office. Some self-styled experts insist people vote for a man because of his personal mannerisms. Others maintain race, religion and the size of his family are seriously weighed by the voting public. Maybe some voters consider these things. If so, our country is in a bad way. What the man says, how he stands on the issues and his past record in politics are the important factors. All candidates believe in the sanctity of the American home, are loyal Americans and just love apple pie. Which are most qualified to guide America through this perilous age? It is our duty as citizens to find out. When we do, it is our duty to vote. America's future depends on an educated ballot. (AFPS) Toy Collection This Weekend The annual Christmas Toy Drive, sponsored by the Trading Post, is in full swing and deserves the wholehearted support of everybody on the Base. This weekend, today and tomorrow, the local Boy Scouts will conduct a no longer needed or broken toy collection in the housing areas. If there are unused toys occupying space around the house, give them to the Scouts this weekend or drop them off at one of the collection boxes in front of each of the Exchanges on the Base. In addition to this week's collection drive, the Scouts have future collections slated for the weekends of October 13.14 and November 17-18. Damaged toys will be repaired and painted by the Naval Base firemen and the Naval Station Hobby Shop. The repaired toys will then be placed on sale to everyone on the Base. Dates and location of the sales will be announced at a later date. h N THE INDIAN S-

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0 40 Saturday, 22 September 1956 THE INDIAN e e Page Three All Hands Enjoy Gtmo Naval Base Band Public Works Center by Ely U. Orias Recognized as one of the indispensable factors for the entertainment of all hands, the Navy provides every major naval command with a unit which deals in nothing but rhythms. This unit is known as the navy band. Commander Naval Base's Flag personnel allowance of 35 enlisted men includes 19 musicians which constitute the Naval Base Band. But when the band plays as a dance orchestra, only 16 of the 19 enlisted rhythm makers participate, while the remaining three alternate to stand military watches. The band starts out the military day by playing colors at 0800 at the Base administration building. From there they go to rehearsals conducted in the bandroom situated across from the Naval Station Boat Shed. The Naval Base Band is always on hand when a goverment building is being dedicated, at the guard mount ceremonies at the Marine Barracks every Friday afternoon, the welcome and send-off for miltary personnel and their dependents embarked on MSTS or the rendering of honors to visiting Flag Officers. Dedicating their musical talents strictly for the bluejackets, the band's itinerary includes a White Hat Club engagement every Wednesday night from 1900 to 2130. Another musical rendition for the enlisted man is heard one Monday each month when the band plays at the Naval Air Station Enlisted Men's Club. Patients in the Base hospital are also entertained by the magic of their music every Wednesday noon. Other routine activities lined up for the Naval Base Band include musical engagements at the Commander Naval Base's quarters for official receptions, dance parties at the Officers' Club, CPO Club, TeenAge Club and sometimes at the Villamar lyceum during a marriedset social dance. When attending a purely social function, the Base dance orchestra members are allowed, in keeping with the atmosphere of the occasion, to wear civilian clothes while in the performance of their duties. Chief musician Russell Van Vlack has been the band's maestro for the past two years. A native New Yorker, Van Vlack is also noted as a polyglot with five different languages at his command. He is also an accomplished carpenter. A prospective warrant officer, Van Vlack is leaving Gtmo shortly. Chief Musician John Benton, who got his present rate only last Sunday, will assume the leadership of the Naval Base Band and Orchestra when Van Vlack leaves. Benton first enlisted in the Navy in 1941. A former electrician's mate, he changed his rate to musician during the war. While stationed at Seattle, Benton held a job as a music writer for a TV show. Married and a father of two boys, Benton has attended Los Angeles Conservatory of Music. Members of the band are first class musicians Jake Jacquay, trumpet and french-horn; Chuck Misner, sax and clarinet; Ray Toastmasters Club Elects Year's Officers Toastmasters Club No. 92 of Guantanamo Bay elected its new officers at a meeting held Wednesday night, September 12, at the Officers' Club. Jack E. Brown, principal of the Base School's elementary department, was named president of the club. Other officers elected were CWO Ray J. Harper, educational vicepresident; LCDR S. C. Ferguson, administrative secretary; L. C. Serig, secretary-treasurer; and G. Ward, sgt.-at-arms. Installation of the newly-elected club officers will be held in the dining room of the Officers' Club on Wednesday night, October 3. Incidentally, this event has also been designated as "Ladies Night" by the T-Club and wives of club members are required to attend. Credit, trumpet; drums; "Red" Ostern third class musician trumpet; Dale Dieckm and sousaphone; B trumpet; Jerry Owen Charles Ambrester, inet and Bill Currier, Other members of clude musician seama man, sax-clarinet-flute ner, trumpet and fren gelo Tromba, bariton illo, accordion and Orchekowski, trombo cian apprentices Fre and clarinet and Ed and clarinet. 'Old' Men Command N. S. Softball League First place standing in the Naval Station Intra -Mural Softball league goes to the CPOs. The league standings as of September 17, proved the CPOs as yet undefeatable with eigth wins and no losses. Second and third place goes to 1-4-7-Commissary Store and Security activity respectively. The quadruple combine has six wins and two losses, while Security has six wins and three losses. Fourth place honors go to the Second Division team with six wins and four losses to their credit. The A.FDL-47 team places fifth with five wins and three losses. Remainder of the nine team intra-mural league place in this order; sixth-5th Div., five wins and five losses; seventh-Electronics, three wins and six losses; eighthSeabees, one win and two losses and last place Fleet Camera Party, SARATOGA (Continued from Page One) With a flurry of feathers, the startled bird flew to the rail and, as if expressing his personal indignation, crowed lustily and defiantly! To the Americans, this was an omen of good luck, and they entered the battle with new courage. Afterwards-with some 50 men of the SARATOGA dead, and not a mast standing on any ship-the commodore was able to send the dispatch: "The Almighty has been pleased to grant us a signal victory on Lake Champlain in the capture of one frigate, one brig and two sloops of war of the enemy." Though the day of the sailing ship is gone, the fighting cock lives on-on the navy's newest SARATOGA. one win and seven losses. With approximately 50 games yet to be played, the league is scheduled to end October 17. All games are played in the Naval Station recreation area. Save Your Toys For The Christmas Toy Drive The Trouble & Service Call Shop of the Center is highly important facility in terms of service to Base residents. For the benefit of those who may not be familiar with the ,shops functions, it is organized -'"~ to provide quick, on the spot service when needed-fixing the stove which blew out in the middle of dinner, unstopping the kitchen sink after Junior has soaked the back off stamps for his collection, -repairing leaks in hot water lines, fixing the office water cooler, patchlug the roof leak or getting the lights back on. Under the direction of J. M. Smillie, Quarterman Plumber, and E. J. Guillory Jr., Leadingman Maintenance, the services of the shop are available for the dialing-8424 or 8459. So don't INDIAN Phote let the faucet drip or the fan ratDick Klotz, tle give the shop a call. oMU2, sax; The Center welcomes the family faKen Cielo, of E. E. Henderson, Quarterman tan, bass viol (Building & Grounds), recently arill Fletcher, rived from Washington, D. C. shy, trumpet; Among the visitors to that hig ax and clarisland up North, are Mr. and Mrs. drums. Chapman, who are on a well-earned the band invacation trip. They intend to make a Abe Silvera perimeter tour of the U.S. SRalph HorThe Sailing regatta at Santiago .ch-horn; Anlast weekend saw the Center repe Mike Fiorresented in force by Mr. and Mrs. piano; Erwin Henry and Ensign and Mrs. Anibal. fe and musiThey sailed well, but the cry of ed Ring, sax "wait 'till next year" was heard lWhite, sax ringing through the Rancho.

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THE INDIAN Saturday, 22 September 1956 Stop Fires Before They Start! INDIAN Photo Guantanamo Bay's Little Theater organization, in cooperation with the Base Fire Department, gave their assistance in helping to further the local fire prevention program. "Most deaths by fire tragically involve women and children in the home. Many are suffocated by smoke and fire gases without being actually burned. Many deaths-too many-are caused by people falling asleep while smoking or re-entering burning homes to rescue pets and personal possessions. "It is our responsibility to continue the determined effort of fire prevention for 365 days of the year." VU-10 Prop Blast Columnist Discovers CAPT W. B. Short, USN, Commander Utility Wing, U.S. Atlantic Fleet, visited Guantanamo Bay earlier this week during an inspection trip through the Caribbean area. CAPT Short relieved CAPT J. A. Miller, USN, as Commander Utility Wing earlier this month at Wing headquarters in Norfolk. A Mallard Welcome Aboard to ENS Henry S. Donaldson who reported last week from Chase Field. Donaldson is a native of Indiana, his home is in Fowler. Prior to his entry into the Naval service he was attending Purdue University, where he was majoring in Mathematics Statistics (try to say that after a few Hatueys!). V. A. Fries, AT1, has reported aboard from his last duty station at China Lake, and Donald N. Kennelly, ATAN, arrived following a tour with NATTC, Memphis. G. A. Landrum, A03, has arrived from NAS, Jacksonville, and J. M. Irby, SN, reports from NAS, Patuxent River. G. E. Wilson, AT1, joins the Mallards following training with NayTechTraCen, Memphis. R. Vickers, AD2, has been detached and has departed Gtmo for transfer to the VX-1 detachment in Key West, just up the line from here. W. A. Mardoni, TM3, left on Monday for return to the states and new duties with ComSubRon TEN at the base at New London. D. N. Lawson, AKC, and family departed Gtmo on Tuesday and are currently enjoying stateside leave prior to reporting to Memphis and 'Something -BIG!!' by Cinema-Scoop This past week was scouting around trying to find something to put in the column and run into something so big that I asked "ye olde editor" if he would allow me some added space. That big thing is ..."The Spirit of the Navy." This Navy effort of putting the history of our outfit in pageant and dramatic form for the entertainment of all hands will really be something for everyone to see. The main thing that struck me, when looking over a copy of the script is the vast amount of information that can be learned about the Navy, things that normally never rate coverage in the history books and it's downright interesting too, besides being entertaining. duty with NAS. Nothing against the Miami transit system, but eight of the Mallard bachelor officers have joined together to buy a used car which will be available to them whenever they are in Miami. And speaking of Miami, we came across a rather interesting item at the MCAS there. It seems that one of the MSGTs there with 24 years in the Corps behind him has decided to 'ship' for another six years. His only comment was, ". I guess I'll just make a career out of it now." Rifle, Pistol Club Awards 30 Local Youngsters At Shooting Meet Shooting proficiency diplomas and awards were presented to 30 members of the Guantanamo Bay Rifle and Pistol Club, Junior Division, at the last meeting held September 13. The awards were made in recognition of shooting performed under National Rifle Association rules, and were awards for the ProMarksman, Marksman, Marksman 1st Class and Sharpshooter classifications. Devil -Dog Doin's by T/Sgt. A. Burris This last week the Barracks was joined by one officer and three Marines, all from Camp Lejeune, 1stLt. Waters reported aboard with his family and was assigned to the Security Section. Sgt. Gibson and Cpl. Blair reported to T/Sgt. Deldo in Security, and Cpl. Coates reported to the Sgt. major as his Legal Clerk, relieving Sgt. Spencer. Welcome aboard Marines, new blood is needed. The Marines from Gtmo All Star Baseball Team have returned from Bainbridge, Md. Sgt. Magas reported back Tuesday night and the other players followed. Pfes Ozuk and Lawson reported back to Gtmo. from their 30 day shipping-over leave. From their reports, stateside duty isn't all it's claimed to be for a hard charging Marine. Rather tame after a tour at Marine Barracks, Gtmo. The Barracks Softball League is running fairly tight. The Angels and Strikeouts are running neck and neck for the first place, followed by the Hoboes. Cpl. Boranian's Bums are at the bottom of the heap, but he promises to pull them out if it takes the rest of the season. Gtmoites Are Invited To Model Plane Meet The Miami Marine Corps Air Station will play host at the Third King Orange International Model Plane Contest to be held in Miami, Florida, from December 28 through 31, 1956. Sponsors of the contest have extended an invitation to Gtmo Bay personnel. The contest involves three phases, namely; high point altitude, control class "C" line and control line jet. Prizes worth $5,000 will be awarded to the winners. Personnel interested in participating in this contest are advised to submit their entry to: Exchange Clubs Model Aviation Corporation, 368 Palm Avenue, Hialeah, Florida. Members winning the ProMarksman award were Larry Abbot, Kit Becker, Jane Ferrante, Judy Harrison, Butch Holder, Eric Hoppe, Bill Koraska, David Maxwell and Virginia McConnon. Other members also winning the award included Mike Powell, Jon Ward, Robert Wilkinson, David Williams, Richard Williams, and Robert Williams. Members awarded the Marksman award were Judy Harrison, Eric Hoppe, David Maxwell, Virginia McConnon, Mike Powell, Jon Ward, David Williams, Richard Williams and Robert Williams. Four members won the Marksman 1st Class award. They were Eric Hoppe, David Maxwell, Richard Williams and Robert Williams. Two members won the sharpshooter awards, they were David Maxwell and Robert Williams. Ages of the Junior Club members run from 7 to 15. Miss Jane Ferrante, age 8, was the youngest member winning an award. At present there are 30 active members in the Junior Division. Supervised instruction is conducted every Saturday afternoon at the Naval Station Pistol Range. In order to qualify for firing, all members must attend two classroom safety lectures and two range instruction periods. Included in the new Senior Rifle and Pistol Club range will be a Junior Division range. In the new range, there will be 10 firing positions available for members, who at present are limited to four at the Naval Station Pistol range. Also there will be a clubhouse for meetings and instruction. Dedication (Continued from Page One) numerous dignitaries from Cuba along with officials of the Frederick-Snare Corporation, builders of the hopsital. All military and civilian personnel are invited by hospital officials to attend the commissioning and open house which will be held immediately following the commissioning ceremonies. Uniform for military personnel will be, for officers: Full dress whites (large medals and swords); Chief Petty Officers: Service dress white, other enlisted personnel: Undress white "A" with neckerchief. M Page Four

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New Naval Base Hospital: Pre-commissioning scenes of the New Base hospital, top row reading from left to right: CDR E. G. Dobbins, Resident Officer of Construction, and LCDR F. E. Stewart, Administrative Assistant, Naval Hospital, walk out of one of the elevators in the new hospital. This is the first building on the Base to sport such a covenience and probably one of a few in this part of Cuba. CAPT W. A. Robie, Chief of Dependents clinic, Naval Hospital, and LT J. B. Smith, Dependents Clinic, Naval Hospital, in the nursery of the to be commissioned hospital. And on the far right, CDR Dobbins, J.R. Connor, project m a n a g e r for Frederick-Snare Corp, and CDR W. C. Turville, Chief Surgeon, Naval Hospital, look at an overhead lamp in one of the operating rooms. INDIAN Photo Below, left to right: LCDR Stewart and CAPT L. A. Newton, Commanding Officer, Naval Hospital, look over the bronze plaque outside the main entrance of the massive hospital. And in the last picturefi Connors and CDR Turville seem to be enjoying their tour of the hospital. INDIAN Photo Saturday, 22 September 1956 Page Five 'H'HNDIAN

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Saturday, 22 September 1956 e THE INDIAN Navy-BPPO-1OND-Guantanmo Cinema -Scoop by Don Hinton Hollywood and the movie going public are talking about ...the continuing fanaticism over the late James Dean and efforts by the "money-mongers" to cash in on the dead star ...Presley's first movie "The Reno Brothers," currently in the making and the coming of the much ballyhooed $13,000,000, four hour long "Ten Commandments," C. B. De Mille's latest and greatest! On the local scene, the "0" Club and the Chief's Club will be in for some great entertainment in the near future when "Guys and Dolls," comes to their Cinemascope screens! The movies playing the circuit this week are not worth the walking effort from Bay Hill to the Lyceum! Serenade (W.B., in color), is the only exception! Mario Lanza and Joan Fontaine star. The story is nothing but Lanza is great! Even at that, he isn't what he used to be. The story is taken from the James M. Cain novel and is a considerably watered down version. Summing up, go see Lanza, but don't expect anything else! Three For Jamie Dawn (A.A.) .Lairane Day and Richard Carlson crime-drama .No comment. Gamma People (Col.). The comedy accompanying this "movie" is "Gerald McBoing Boing on Planet Moo" and promises to be one of the best comedies that has been here in a long time. These short laugh getters of the little boy who doesn't talk, but squeaks are the greatest! By the way, Paul Douglas and Eva Bartok star in the featured movie, "Gamma People." Pearl of the South Pacific (RKO, in color) ...Dennis Morgan and Virginia Mayo ...this is the biggest nothing that Hollywood has here to for attempted to put before the movie going public. Over-Exposed (Col.), stars Cleo Moore and with a title such as it is, you couldn't ask for anything more. The story is rather corny, but who's paying attention to the story when Miss Moore's charms are gracing the screen. Far Horizons (Para., in color) .Fred McMurray, Charlton Heston, Donna Reed and Barbara Hale ...a very good frontier days picture concerning Lewis and Clark ...played the Base before. After loading the family car for a trip, the man told the neighbors, "We aren't getting away from it all-we're taking it with us." Nothing makes a man go places like a woman who likes to go. Saturday, Sept. 22 1:00 Winky Dink & You 1:30 Zoo Parade 2:00 This Is Your Life 2:30 Godfrey Time 3:00 Robert Q. Lewis 3:30 Lighted Window 4:00 Garry Moore 4:30 Lamp Unto My Fleet 5:00 Big Picture 5:30 Ethel & Albert 6:00 Harry Owens 6:30 Beat The Clock 7:00 Appt. With Adventure 7:30 Hit Parade 8:00 Martha Raye 9:00 Stage Show 9:30 Star Tonight Sunday, Sept. 23 1:00 Paul Winchell 1:30 Godfrey Time 2:00 Roy Rogers 2:30 Garry Moore 3:00 Faith For Today 3:30 Robert Q. Lewis 4:00 Ted Mack 5:00 You Ask For It 5:30 Sun. News Headlines 5:45 Tony Martin 6:00 Mama 6:30 You Are There 7:00 Masquerade Party 7:30 I've Got a Secret 8:00 Ed Sullivan 9:00 Robert Montgomery Monday, Sept. 24 5:30 News Parade 5:45 Eddie Fisher 6:00 Ozzie & Harriet 6:30 Talent Scouts 7:00 My Favorite Husband 7:30 Highway Patrol 8:00 Sid Caesar 9:00 Studio One Tuesday, Sept. 25 5:30 News Parade 5:45 Jane Froman 6:00 Disneyland 7:00 Meet Millie 7:30 Red Skelton 8:00 Lineup 8:30 Justice 9:00 Philco Playhouse Wednesday, Sept. 26 5:30 News Parade 5:45 Patti Page 6:00 Two For The Money 6:30 I & E Time 7:00 Arthur Murray 7:30 T-Men In Action 8:00 Godfrey & Friends 9:00 TV Theater Thursday, Sept 27 5:30 News Parade 5:45 Perry Como 6:00 Calv. of America 6:30 This Is Your Life 7:00 Dollar a Second 7:30 Bob Cummings 8:00 Playhouse of Stars 8:30 Johnny Carson 9:00 Climax Friday, Sept. 28 5:30 News Parade 5:45 Eddie Fisher 6:00 Truth or Consequences 6:30 Fury 7:00 Life of Riley 7:30 Crusader 8:00 People Are Funny 8:30 Dragnet 9:00 Boxing MOV' LOG Ladies Golf Assoc. Saturday, September 22 NavSta-One Desire-106 min. NAS-Star In the Dust-102 min. Mar. Site-Screaming Eagles-104 min. Villa.-French Line-101 min. MCB-1-Crashing Las Vegas-98 min. Lwd. Pt.-New Faces-110 min. Sunday, September 23 NavSta-Serenade-133 min. NAS-One Desire Mar. Site-Sea Chase-117 min. Villa.-Screaming Eagles MCB-1-French Line Lwd. Pt.-Crashing Las Vegas Monday, September 24 NavSta-Three For Jamie Dawn-102 min. NAS-Serenade Mar. Site-Star In the Dust Villa.-Sea Chase MCB-1-Screaming Eagles Lwd. Pt.-French Line Tuesday, September 25 NavSta-Gamma People-97 min. NAS-Three For Jamie Dawn Mar. Site-One Desire Villa.-Star In the Dust MCB-1-Sea Chase Lwd. Pt.-Screaming Eagles Wednesday, September 26 NavSta-Pearl of the South Pacific106 min. NAS-Gamma People Mar. Site-Serenade Villa.-One Desire MCB-1-Star In the Dust Lwd. Pt.-Sea Chase Thursday, September 27 NavSta-Over-Exposed-96 min. NAS-Pearl of the South Pacific Mar. Site-Three For Jamie Dawn Villa.-Serenade MCB-1-One Desire Lwd. Pt.-Star In the Dust Friday, September 28 Navta-Far Horizons-107 min. NAS-Over-Exposed Mar. Site-Gamma People Villa.-Three For Jamie Dawn MCB-1--Serenade Lwd. Pt.-One Desire A customer was trying out the nib of a fountain pen at a stationer's shop. Several times he wrote "Tempus Fugit" on a sheet of paper. The clerk, intrigued but intending to be helpful, handed him another pen saying: "Would you care to try this one, Mr. Fugit?" To Hold Luncheon The Gtmo Ladies Golf Association will hold a luncheon on Friday, September 29, at 1215 at the Marine Family restaurant. Anyone interested in playing golf is cordially invited. For reservations call Mrs. R. F. Wall, phone 8152 or Mrs. G. H. Leach, phone 9603. Support "The Spirit of the Navy." WGBY Television Program FROM: TO: Send The INDIAN 3 cent stamp Home Book -Nook by R. C. D. Hawthorne, Nathaniel. Hawthorne is one of those classic novelists whom everybody reads in school (supposedly). Those who haven't might enjoy "The Scarlet Letter," a tale of Puritan folk in colonial New England. Some have gone so far to term it the greatest novel ever written in America. "The House of the Seven Gables" is also a famous novel. Hemingway, Ernest. It seems that readers are divided into two schools, those that like Hemingway and those that don't. "The Old Man and the Sea," however, appealed to everyone. It's set in Cuba, and some of his description should be familiar. Four other novels by this controversial American are also here. Hersey, John. Hersey is a reporter turned writer, and his books are written with the journalist's typewriter rather than the novelist's pen. Nevertheless, he is one of the best novelists in America today. "A Bell for Adano" and "A Single Pebble" may be found here, but you'll have to look a bit further for what I consider his best effort, "The Wall." Hilton, James. An exceptionally fine writer whose versatility is seemingly unlimited. "Goodbye Mr. Chips" swept him from obscurity to fame, and Mr. Chips, and English schoolmaster is probably his greatest character, and the hero of one of his best books. "Lost Horizon" is a fantastic and engrossing tale of an Oriental fountain of youth. "Random Harvest" is a longer novel about an amnesia victim. All are excellent, as are six others not mentioned here. Irving, Washington. Irving was our first real writer in America. "The Sketch Book" is a series of essays and stories on many topics. Although rather outdated, they have a certain charm which is appealing to all. Longstreet, Stephen. This virtually unknown author has written an excellent novel about a Jewish family in America entitled "The Pedlocks." It's another one of those dynastic stories, and it's a good one.