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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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Fla. State U. May Teach College


Extension Courses. Aboard Base

With the resumption of the navy's tuition aid program, Florida State University has indicated a willingness to conduct a college level programat Guantanamo Bay beginning in February, 1957, provided ther .e is sufficient interest shown in the program by Base personnel.


Commnander Naval Base will shortly conduct a poll of interested persons -in the Base commands. If the poii produces a sufficient~ number of would-be students, a representative of Florida State U. will come to the Base sometime in October to determine the advisability of beginning an extension program.
All Base commands will submit, by October 1, the number of individuals intcrcsted in each of the courses offered. The names will be submitted in the following categories: military personnel, dependents of military personnel, and clilian employees and dependents.
Those interested are urged by the Base Commander to turn their names along with the course or courses interested in to their respective Commanding Officers before October 1.
Under BuPers Instruction 1560. 10, the Navy will pay 75 per cent of the tuition, not to exceed $7.50 a semester hour or $5 a quarter


hour, with a limit of six hours during a semester or quarter, for all navy personnel taking the offduty courses.
Commanding Officers are authorized to approve applications for accredited courses, which will lead to improved performance of duty or toward earning a baccalaureate degree.
Officers accepting this assistance must agree to stay on-active duty two years after completing the courses. Enlisted personnel must have enough obligated time to complete their studies.
Dependents and civilians who enroll in the extension program must pay full tuition.
List of the courses in the Florida State University extension program are as follows: English (Freshman, English Literature) Speech (Fundamentals, Professional Speaing) I
Mathematics (Basic, College Algebra,
(Continued. on Page Three)


COVERS GTMO LIKE THE SUNSHINE U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Volume V1I, No. 39 Saturday, 15 September 1956


ADM Cooper Heads Gtmo'Group At Naval Activity Commissioning


RADM W. G. Cooper, Commander Naval Base, posed with Cuba's President Fulgencio Batista Saldivar for photographers at the inauguration of the Marina' de Guerra naval activity in Antilla, Cuba. Left to right: Mr. Bolin, administrator of the United Fruit Company's sugar compound, President Batista and RADM Cooper.


Six officers from the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base headed by RADM W. G. Cooper, ComNavBase, flew to Antilla, Cuba, Sunday, September 9, to witness the inauguration of the new naval activity of the Marina de Guerra.
General Fulgenclo Batista Saldivar, President of the Republic of Cuba, dedicated the new activity.
In the group accompanying
RADM Cooper to the inauguration were CAPT F. S. Habecker, Commander FTG; CAPT G. L. Kohr, CO Naval Air Station; CAPT R. A. Williams, CO Naval Supply Depot; LT B. Hahn, Aide for Cuban Affairs, and LT G.H. Leach, Aide.

94 At tend Initial

Nooner's Day Prog.
The initial Nooner's Day Luncheon was held at the CPO Club, Tuesday September 11, at 1130. Eighty-six chiefs and eight officers attended...
Guest speaker for the first luncheon was RADM W. G. Cooper, ComNavBase. Chief A. Henderson, introduced CAPT W. R. Caruthers, C. 0. Naval Station who in turn introduced Ad miral Cooper.


ARTS Bans More

Musicals For WGBY
The scores from an additional three Broadway musicals have been added to the "banned music" list
-for WGBY. Word was received early in the week by dispatch from the Armed Forces Radio and Telesion Service in Los Angeles, California. The shows are "My Fair Lady," "Most Happy Fella," and "Mister Wonderful."
This brings to a total of ten, those musicals whose tunes cannot be played over Armed Forces Radio Stations. There are, in addition, other tunes not in Broadway productions -that cannot be aired. Shows previously placed on the banned list are "Kismet," "Pajama Game,". "Damn Yankees," "Plain and -Fancy," "Can, Can,"; I"Fanny," %and "Silk Stockings." According '.to t~efense Department officials, banned tunes are the result of an inability-*to reach agreement with the copyright owners of the music in question. This does not affect television programs
(Continued on Page Five)


Air Force Major Th anks


Transport Volunteers

The following letter was received from an Air Force Major. I wish to express my personal appreciation to all the ladies of the Guantanamo Transportation volunteers for their unselfish eff orts.
RADM W. G. Cooper
Dear Admiral Cooper:
While enroute recently from Brooklyn Army Terminal to San Juan on the USNS THOMAS, it was necessary to land temporarily at Guantanamo Bay for military reasons on August 6, 1956.
While still a day out at sea, the ship's military office advised passengers that the officers' wives of Guantanamo Bay had a tour planned for those wishing to avail themselves of the adventure.
On debarking, my family and 1, among others, were cheerfully greeted by the ladies who gave us a brief introduction of what was planned, the first item being that of caring for our children, a well needed treat for both the parents and children.
The following tour was far more than any sea traveler could ever hope for, walking on land, riding in comfortable busses, shopping and most of all, fountain coke!
The thought I would most lik e to impart, Admiral, is not the manner in which this charitable work was executed and the cheerfulness in which it whs offered, but rather the high degree of morale exhibited among the wives we met, their ability to speak intelligently about the U. S . Navy and its activities at Guantanamo Bay and their general interest in your command for which you can be proud. Thi s was evidenced by a schedule for the day which was well planned and coordinated.
I -would, therefore, feel remiss if I didn't, ask you. to take official recognition of the tender interest Accorded -our, .grQup by the various elements of your command and to express -my -personal appreciation to6 the ladies. We are most grateful- and- shall never forget the courtesy.,
Thanking you in advance for your Interest in, these premises,

an Air Force Major.






ft14
Page Two THE INDIANSaudy15epmbr95


THE INDIAN

The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a possible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.
RADM WILLIAM G. COOPER, Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
Editorial Staff
LCDR K. S. Dick ------------------------ --------Officer-Adviser
G. L. Henderson, JOC------------------------------------- Editor
J. C. Curren, JOSN ------------------------------ Managing Editor
E. U. Orias, J03--------------------------------- Feature Editor
D. D. Hinton, JOSN-------------------------- --- Staff Reporter
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds.
Materials marked AFPS may be used by news media provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All materials originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part or without credit.
All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.


A Community Project Needs You!


Support "The Spirit Of The Navy"~

This past week casting was held for "The Spirit of the Navy." A great deal of work faces the production and direction staff of this historical pageant which when produced will culminate a fine evening of entertainment on the Base.
The production is the outcome of an idea by the Chief of Naval Operations that something might be done within the navy by navy people to focus attention upon the heritage and tradition of which the navy is so proud. "The Spirit of the Navy" is a "family affair" and is not intended to be used as publicity for the American armada.
It should become a Guantanamo Bay community project including wives and families of naval personnel. The talents of many on the Base are needed-your help is necessary if this birthday production is to be a success on October 27.
Gtmo is one of 16 outlying stations which will stage "The Spirit of the Navy" with the hope that whatever degree of theatrical success may come about, a feeling of pride and tradition for the navy will be infused in those who take part in. the production and in those who see it on the stage. If this pageant suceeds in doing that, it will be well worthwhile.


Sunday, 16 September 1956

CATHOLIC MASSES
Sunday: 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. through Fri.:
1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday: 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions-1700 - 1800. 1900 - 2000, and daily before Mass
PROTESTANT SERVICES Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 0030-Adult Bible Class Open
Air Assembly
1100-Protestant Divine Warship-Naval Base Chapel
1930-Fellowship Tour-Open
Air Assembly
Thursday :1900-Choir Rehearsal JEWISH SERVICES Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel CHURCH OF CHRIST
Sunday: 1000-Bible Study--Community Auditorium
1046-Worship Service-Community Auditorium LATTER DAY SAINTS Sunday: 1100-Naval Station Librry CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Sunday: 1000-Naval Station Library CHAPLAINS AT THIS ACTIVITY
CDR8 P. R. McPhee, CHC. USN


(Protestant)
CDR J-. J. Sullivan. CHC, USN
(Catholic)


The Chaplain's Corner

A Personal Prayer on the Jewish New, Year
In the belief that all men are brothers and that they share the same feelings, hopes, fears, joys, and sorrows which come to all through the experience of living in this world, the following prayer is offered.
"0 Lord, on this day I offer my prayer to thee. Thou knowest my life, my thoughts, my conduct. Thou knowest the longings and ideals, the pains and hopes that urge and impel me.
There are moments when the vision of my better self livens my soul. I dream of a life of character and high achievement, a life of worth and service. But I also have my hours of temptation and struggle, when the vision fades and the will weakens. When in the pressure of daily living, when in the pursuit after pleasure and success, I lose sight of my better self, strengthen me with a sense of purpose and value of life.
Often I am overwhelmed by the vastness of the world and my own littleness and insignificance in it. I seem so pitifully small; I seem unable to find my place in all this bewildering scheme of things. My life appears meaningless, my work seems useless.
Yet I know that Thou has placed me here and has allotted me a task that is useful and necessary. Deepen within me the awareness of my obligations to my fellowman and to Thee, to my loved ones and to myself.
Give me the strength and the courage to realize these high ideals of right living in my thoughts and actions. May my life always be counted for a blessing. Thou art with me, I have no fear. Amen."
Chaplain Herbert Morris



I Killed A Child

Editor's Note: School just recently opened and the Base has 1,500 children. We cannot spare a one of them. In the interest of traffic safety, the following is reprinted from the BUFFALO COURIER-EXPRESS. It was told to reporter Walter Froehligh by a driver who killed a child.
"They ask me, 'Did I see the child?' Yes, I saw him, and he's all I've been seeing since. I saw him, but it was too late to stop. I was the last to see, him alive, and, the first to see his lifeless body limply sprawled on the pavement-a few inches from 'the bumper of my car.
"Yes, I am the man they now call 'Death Car Driver.' I own the car whose pictures you saw in the daily press. And yet, a thousand times I wish I were the victim rather than the man who killed him. For he died only once, but I have died a thousand deaths since then.
"I walked ahead and bent over his crumpled form. 'Call an ambulance,' I shouted. 'Quick!' I saw the gathering crowd. They looked at the child and then at me.
"Then came police and then the doctor. lHe looked first at the bloody face and form, then looked away and slowly shook his head. And then I saw the anguished. features of a man-the father-and heard the desperate scream of a bereaved mother-how can I forget?
"And when the scene had cleared and I had filed reports at headquarters and the police had cleared me, I stood alone and suddenly knew what I had really done.
'Could happen to any of us," a voice behind me said. 'You were not speeding or violating any law. No charge were preferred against you. The child was roaming the streets alone and ran out in front of you!'
"It could happen to any of us, sure. But who can replace a life? Should I visit the pare 'nts? See the child laid out? Or coldly disregard the death, the bitter grief? Will the father, mother hate me? A sense of moral guilt hangs over mie. I wasn't careless. I was within the law, but my conscience lives with me and I with it. And think that perhaps the slightest bit more of attention on my part could have everted this will haunt my thoughts for every hour I shall live."


Calendar of Events
Saturday, September 15
Catholic Catechism Class-Naval Base
School-OOG_.'
Kid's Matinee-Villomar Lyceimi-1800
Monday, September 17 Payday-all military personnel Soujourner's Club-Officers' Club-OBO O.E.S. Social Club-Gi.1 Scout Hut-93O
Tuesday. September 18 American Legion-Fit. Rsv. Rm


(Marina Pt.)
American Legion Auziliary-Girl Scout
Hut-1930
Wednesday, September 19
Boy Scout Meeting--Chapel Hill Auditorium-183O
Kid's Matinee"-Villamar Lyeuxm-1800
Thursday. September 20
Fellowcraft Club 1075-Community Auditorium-1930
Friday, September 21
CPO Wives Club--Family Rm (CPO
Club)-2000


p


Christmas Toy

Drive Is On
This is the time of the year for Guantanamo Bay's annual Christmas toy drive. sponsored by the Trading Post. Boxes have been placed at the three exchanges and at a later date, to be publicized, the Boy Scouts will collect toys from door to door so start saving toys now. There is a particular need for tricycles, bicycles, toy trucks, etc.

The firemen and the Naval Station Hobby Shop will repair the toys. The toy sale will be open for everyone on the Base and the sale will be held in back of the Naval Station movie lyceum.


Saturday, 15 September 1956








Saturday, 15 September 1956


!T'E INDIAN


New Officers Report Aboard Base; Fleet To Test Navy's 'Tender Trap' Slated

CAPTInging ome To l~r~ru New White Jumper For Dec. Production
CAP Iglig ome T Flraru Washington (AFPS) - An im- "The Tender Trap" will be tli


INDIAN Photo
Numerous officer arrivals and departures occurred in Gtmo during the past week.
.CAPT Francis W. Ingling, USN, relieved CAPT Owen B. Murphy, USN, as Training officer, of the Fleet Training- Group


yesterday.
CAPT Ingling's military career began in August 1982 as a member of the National Guard of Pennsylvania. He was appointed to the U.S. Naval Academy in 1938 and graduated with the class of 1937.
Among the ships that CAPT Ingling has served on are USS TENNESSE, his first duty station, USS NASHVILLE, USS HULL, USS HEYWOOD L. EDWARDS and USS JARVIS.
His duty station prior to arrival in Gtmo was Division Commander of DesDiv,132. CAPT and Mrs. Ingling arrived. aboard the Base last Saturday with their three children.
CAPT and Mrs. Murphy left yesterday for Norfolk, Where CAPT Murphy will assume command of the USS CANISTEO.
Also the past week CDR B. R. Manser as sumed duties as Base Legal officer. He relieved CDR G. E. Krouse, who departed Gtmo the past week for new duties in the office of the Judge Advocate General, Washington.
CDR Manser's duty station prior to his arrival in Gtmo was the office of the JAG. CDR Manser, his Wife and s on arrived here Monday. At the present time, CDR Manser has another son attending the naval, academy.
LCDR G. E. Hoppe, Naval Station Personnel officer, departed Gtmo the past week to assume new duties as comminading officer USNRTC at South Portland, Maine.
LCDR K: S. Dick, Naval Stati Special Services oflcer, *till a'ssuine collateral 'duties .:as - Personnet oficer, *with ENS9 R.C.: Ltle, Assistant Personinel'officer."
Other new officer arrivals the past week were 1st LT J. K. Walters, Jr., USMC. LT Walters is. a new officer to the Marine Command and Will be assigned duties as a


gua rd officr in the Security Section.
The Naval Station gained four new officers. LCDR L. L. Buswell arrived: from Staff ComTransAmphib, Squadron 8. LCDR Buswell will become Assistant Port Operations officer. CWO B. 0.- Moses arrived from duty 'in USS CHILTON to assume duties a 's movie exchnge officer. He relieved ELEC J. F. Perdue who goes to Fleet Training Group for duty.
ENSs H.E. Seward and W. J. Landroche Jr. complete the new officer arrivals.
Other departures were LTJG P. Buckholz, who will report for duty in USS KRISHNA a nd L CDR R. L. Harris, former officer-in-charge Fleet Boat Pool, who will report to Little Creek Virginia.
LT J..V. Gorman arrived at the Naval Air Station ot assume temporary duties as 1st LT and Security officer.


Extension Courss...
(Continued from Page One)
Trigonometry, Plane Analytical, Calculus I and II)
History (Western Civilization, American. Fir Eastern)
Political Science (American Government. International Politics, Political Parties. Far Eastern, Internatoinal Relations)
Psychology (General. Applied. Child, Abnormal, Clinical, Educational) Busin ess L~aw (I and II) SpanisW f2 years)
Introductivpil to Manageent, Economics (Principles) Humarnities (3semesters"-B- hour", CZ644e).
Music (Appreciation) Physics (Gieneral)
Philosophy (History of Philosophy,
Though,'Logic)
American. Studies (Cultural)
Georgraphy (World) And possibly others


proved dress white jumper soon will be given a "shakedown cruise" by fleet sailors to test its wearing qualities and appearance.
The jumper, with blue collar and cuffs and white striping, will get a six-week trial run as a possible replacement for the plain undress white jumper now worn.
Prior to WWII, the Navy used a dress jumper with a blue wool collar, hut difficulties ia laundering which caused fading, shrinkage and lint forced it to be discontinued.
With collar and cuff s of c ott on twill, the new jumper is expected to be both colorfast and washable. It is estimated that the new jumper will cost about 2 cents more than the undress.


e


next production of the.Gtmo Little Theater. The play a Broadway comedy hit of a few years back is currently a popular movie starring Frank, Sinatra and Debbie Reynolds.

Tentative production dates for the new play will be the first or second week in December. Casting will be held in approximately two or three weeks, pending arrival of the scripts.
Jim Le Mar has been appointed director of the new play by Don Wilkinson, president.
The play concerns a New York playboy who is surrounded by women and a married friend who. comes to visit.


B. Ramer, LT True United In Military Wedding Sat


The former Beatrice Ramer of York, Pennsylvania and LT Alvia C. True Jr., Senior Medical Officer of the Naval Air Station Dispensary, were united in matrimony at a military wedding in the Base Chapel Saturday afternoon, September 8.
Miss Ann Cooper, daughter of RADM and Mrs. William G. Cooper, was maid of honor, while LTJG Frank X. Azzarita, Line Division Officer of VU-10, was best man.A *nculed-in the wedding entourage were six naval officers who provide& sword-archlhonors for, the newly-weds, and flower girl Minnie Lawlor.
Mrs. True is a graduate from York High School, Class of '49. After her graduation she went to New York and was employed as


a Powers model. The bride is CAPT and Mrs. G. L. Kohr's niece. She's been living with the Kohrs since February.
Dr. True is a native of Brooklyn, New York. After graduation from Asbury Park High School in 1946, he went to Princeton University where he obtained an A. B. degree in 1950. In 1954 Dr. True acquired his M. D. from New York Medical College.
Before joining the Navy in 1955, Dr. True was a resident physician at the Flowergs Hospital in New York.- He reported aboard the Naval Air Station on August 13, 1955 from the U.S.' Naval Hospital, :St. Albans, New York.
The Trues are now honeymooning in San Juan, Puerto Rico. They will be back in two weeks and will take up residence on the Base.


6i


M


M
Page Three






M


Page Four


ft
Saturday, 15 September 1956


THE INDIAN


Two Seabee Crews Re-Do Vacated VU-~1O Prop'Blast- F TO0 & F T *C Bulletin


Quarters, Shorten Waiting List


INDIAN Photo
One of the steps in rehabilitating a set of quarters is the repairing and oiling of the jalousies. For Seabees, two from crew no. one and two from crew no. two, work in the jalousies of quarters RH 274 D. Left to right: A. D. Morgan, CP; W. C. Browne, CN; J. L. Bekus, BUCP, and R. D. Nichols, CP.
IWith their "Can Do" spirit, two crews of Seabees stationed in Guantanamo Bay turned painters-carpenters this summer and the results of their work more than pleased many a navy family moving into Gtmo housing.
After school was out last May there was a tremendous turnover of Base personnel. Men with children were leaving the Base and others were pouring in. The turnover was so great that Public Works could not possibly keep up with the two week schedule normally required to r Rehabilitate vacated family quarters.
By the middle of June such a
big backlog of work had accumu- continued to handle the rest of the lated that is was taking as long vacated homes. as six weeks before a set of quar- Finished 60 by Sept. ters could be readed for the new As of September 7 the two crews occupants. It directly affected the had completely rehabilitated 60 waiting time for people on the sets of quarters. This had as an housing waiting list, end result the shortening of the
Situation Was Critical housing waiting period.
The situation became critical, As a set of quarters is vacated but with Seabees in the area any a Public Works inspector goes problems involving construction through them and files a job order work can be solved. The local navy sheet on the work needed to be builders stepped in and even done before the quarters will be though most of them had never ready for occupancy again. For had a saw, hammer or a paint replacement and DOD housing, brush in their hand (they were ac- these job orders were turned over customed to working with heavy to the Seabees who then moved in construction) they turned to and with paint, wax and swabs. were doing a bang-up job in re- Before rehabilitating a house the markable time, men give the place a general cleanLTJG H. E. Adams, CEC, divi- up, paint the rooms which need sion officer of the Seabees, organ- repainting-all quarters are given ized the first rehabilitation crew a standard color paint job, oil the which went to work on June 18. jalousies, clean the screens and It is composed of six men and a send them for repair if needed, first class petty officer in charge, clean the stoves and refrigerators, L. J. Weirich, CD1. -clean and wax the floors, varnish
Team number two joined the stairways in two story units and first one in the early 'part of July do any other minor repairs which and also has six men with a petty may pop up. officer in charge, E.S. Thompson, Walls Tell on Children CD1. The crew members claim that
The two teams confined their they can walk into a vacated set quarters-revamping to replacement of quarters and tell if the former and DOD housing. Public Works tenants had children. If there were


6*


In the past .two we 'eks eight Mallards have been detached. from the squadron.'
LT Bill Hill and family departed Gtmo on Sept. 1 aboard FLAW for return to the states a nd transfer to his new duty station, YAW12 at NAS, Quonset Point. For the past year LT Hill served as squadron Flight Officer,* and he was relieved recently by .LCDR. S. D. Blythe.
A trio of E. E. Van Horn, AN; R. D. Lackie, PN2, and R.: K. Harnsberger, A03, all departed fr NAS, Key West and separation from the naval service.

H. J. Kelley, AT2, was. released for transfer to VR-31 in NorVa, and E. H. Schultz, AT2, left Gtmo on FLAW for his new duty station, NATU, Sanford, Fla.
K. Talliman, AB3, is on his way to NAS, Patuxent River for, a, normal tour, and E. Mounts, BM3, returns to general service duty aboard the USS ROCK BRIDGE (APA-228).
On the, other side of the ledger, however, the Mallards have welcomed aboard A. E. Cole, QM1, reporting from the USS FLAMINGO (MSCO-11), and Louis Jacobell, ATAN, formerly attached to the NaTechTraCen, Memphis.
C. C. Norbrell, AN, has recently completed USAFI courses which will enable him to receive a high school graduation certificate. Norrell now plans to continue with his courses on a college level.

CDR S. R. Stanul, Commanding Officer of Utility Squadron. TEN, has received a letter of congratulations from the Commander Air Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet for the squadron reenlistment rate for fiscal year 1956.
This letter stated in part, .. Commander Air Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet notes with pleasure that the reenlistment rate in your command for the second consecutive six month period was significantly higher than the Force and Fleet average."


youngsters in the place, there are usually tell-tale marks on the walls.

Some of the units require more than 200 man -hours before the rehabilitation is completed, but ordinarily two to three days are spent on each set of quarters.

With school opened,, the turnover has slowed done so on September 21 the two crews of Seabees will retire from their rehabilitation program and let Publie Works take over again. This is another job well done by the Seabees.


Last week seven new arrivals reported to FTG and FTC for duty. LCDR Gerald H. Wilson, joined the CIC department from USS COLUMBUS (CA-74). LCDR Wilson has attended a number of naval schools: CIC School at Glenview, General Line School, -Monterey and Gunnery Officer's Ordnance School, Washington D.C.
In addition he served aboard various carriers in WWII as a naval aviator. LCDR Wilson's family will be coming from Manistique, Michig-an.
W.M. Rafolowski, FTC, reported from USS TARAWA (CVS-40). His hometown is Anosia, Conn. K. W. Fritsche, ENC, calls Secaucus, New' Jersey home. Mrs. Fritsche is presently residing there with sons Kenneth and Glen.
W. J. Thorpe, ETi, joined the ranks of FTC, hailing from Menlo Park, New Jersey, and coming from USS CHUKAWAN (AO100). R. Custodio, RM1, left his family at Oaglyn, New Jersey, and reported to, the Communication's department from USS ANTIETAM (CVS-36).
A.RH. King, RM3, recently attended T ele t yp e Maintenance School at Norfolk Virginia, and call's Wakefield, Mass. home. E. W. Daunaron, RM3, came from the Naval Communication S tat i on, Washington D.C. having previously'se ,rved with the Embassy Staff in Rome, Italy. His family is presently in Washington D.C. Welcome on board, everybody.
The FTG Officers were guests of their wives at the monthly FTG Officer's Wives Lucheon last Sunday morning. It was a gay affair. The. general consensus is that there ought to be more "brunches" to start Sundays off right.
FTC held a family picnic on Saturday September 8 at Windmill Beach to say goodbye to Robert M. Cousins, BTC, and William J. Gleason, RDI, and to welcome aboard the families of CWO Eugene L. Hill and Edward L. Cofer, ETI.
Ben W. Smith, BTC, and Mrs. Smith are proudly showing off their son born at 3:02 a.m., September 11 at the Naval Base Hospital. Young Mr. Smith tipped the scales at 8 pounds 13% ounces which, according to local unofficial FTG statistics, makes him this year's heavyweight champion.


Two farmers met on a country road and pulled up their teams. "i,"bp said. Josh, "I've. got a. mule With distemper. What did you give that one. of yours that had it?"
" Turpenitine. Giddapl"
A week later they met again. "'9Si, I gave my mule terpentine like you said and it killed him."
"Killed mine too. Giddap!"


a








Saturday, 15 September 1956


THE INDIAN


Presentation Of Fishing Tourney


Dr. Robie Promoted Public Works Center


Prizes Will Be Next Friday Night To Captain's Rank

Presentation of awards for the 1956 Guantanamo Bay Fishing Tournament will be held September 21, at the Naval Station Movie Lyceumbeginning at 1900.RADM W. G. Cooper, ComNavBase, will present the awards. Judges for this year's tournament were LCDR R. M. Moore, CWO R. J. Harper


and E. H. Cavanaugh.
Grand prize for the 1956 tournament was won by E. L. Hill, who caught a 100 pound tarpon.
Winner of the special division (shark) was James Parkins, with his 420 pound gray nurse. For the special division (Ladies) Merla Schwind was awarded first for bagging a 14 pound 2 ounce barracuda.
26 Children Win Prizes
Twenty-six children in the special division (children) will be awarded prizes for their catches. George Lacy won first prize by catching a 17 pound 3 ounce barracuda.
First division winners in the snapper, grouper and jewfish class were Thomas Waite, with a 59 pound snapper, Junious Williams with a 51 pound snapper and Sid Davenport with a 49 pound snapper.
In the first division ladyfishbonefish class Harry Fitch won first with a 4 pound 7 ounce ladyfish, Daniel Davidson took second with a 3 pound 5 ounce bonefish and Thomas Cotten placed third with a 3 pound 2 ounce ladyfish.

Croaker Class
Croaker class (first division) first place was won by Daniel Bowman with a 2 pound 14 ounce croaker. Mark Hopkins won second with a 2 pound 4 ounce croaker and Albert Gillis won third with a 2 pound 4 ounce croaker. The difference in the latter two fish was in width and girth.
First place in the first division snook class was won by J.W. Dilson with a 22 pound 4 ounce. William St. Johns placed second with a 20 pound 12 ounce and George Bailey took third with a 14 pound 2 ounce snook.
In the tarpon class of the first division T. R. Haymans won first with a 43 pound 8 ounce fish Carl Craft took second with a 34 pounder. John McAfee placed third with an 18 pound 4 ounce tarpon.

Barracuda Class
First division barracuda class honors were taken by Harry Waranack wtih a 20 pound 4 ouu~ee fish. F. L. Pauley and E. J. Guiflory took second and third with a 20 pound 3 ounce and 18 pound ounce fish respectively.
In the pompano-jack class John Latwiss took first with a 27 pound 13 ounce pompano, D. R. Ferrell


took second with an 18 pound 4 ounce pompano and Virgil Witt placed third with a 12 pound 12 ounce jack.
Second division winners were E. B. Sloan with a 25 pound king mackerel, first place, and Harry Fitch, a 10 pound 12 ounce albacore took second. Third prize winner was Harry Waranack with a 2 pound 11 ounce spanish makerel.
Third division (the spear-fishing division) honors were won by R. R. Vickers for a 20 pound 14 ounce grouper. Francisco Morreale won second with a 14 pound 2 ounce snapper and Guy Turner placed third with a 12 pound 8 ounce jack. In the Special Division (children), the winners are George A. Gardes Jr., Dan Kelley, Marvin Hamlin, Robert A Williams, Richard Moore and D.E. Kubicki. Richard Williams, Karl J. Skadowski, Billy Williams, Juanita McNamara, Dick Brown. Paul Lee Snow, John M. Sanborn, Issac Guillory. Robert Kuczynski, Jane Ferrante, Robert B. Skadoweki. Carroll Van Blakeman will also he winners in the children's division.
Completing the list of winners in the children's division are; Hugh Hill, David Seaton, Dennis Hill, Ann L. Gardes, John R. Pepin. Billy Broughton and Paul S. Gardea.




All-Stars Eliminated

In All-Navy Tourney


The Guantanamo Bay baseball
All-Star contingent was defeated in two separate games during the opening day of the All-Navy Eastern Baseball Tournament in Bainbridge, Maryland.
Playing two games Monday, September 10, the Gtmo All-Stars were routed by the fourth and eight naval district teams, with a score of 11-1 and 8-3, respectively.
A double elimination tournament, the Gtmo All-Star squad having lost two games already, is barred from further participation in the tourney.


Snow was falling gently; there was a definite winter time scene being set. Poetically, the young man spoke as he tucked his girl into the car: "Winter draws on."
Girl: "Is that any of your business ?"


Fleet Camera Party Photo
Mrs. Jessie Robie puts the extra stripe neatly in place for her husband, CAPT W. A. Robie, MC. The new captain is the Base hospital's Chief of Dependent Service.

CAPT W. A. Robie, MC, last week shed the silver oak leaf of commander for the silver eagle of his new rank, captain. CAPT Robie's advancement wag retroactive to July 1.
He has been stationed in Gtmo since September of 1955 and is at present Chief of Dependent Service at the Base Hospital. The duty station of the new captain, prior to his coming to Guantanamo Bay, was the U.S. Naval Academy where he served as Assistant Medical Officer.
CAPT Robie attended the University of Maryland, 1936-1938 and the George Washington School of Medicine from 1938 to 1942. He entered the Navy in 1943.
He has served in the Marshalls, Marianas, Phillipines, the South China air strikes and on Iwo Jima and Okinawa. He was advanced to commander in.1950.
Residing with CAPT Robie here at Gtmo are his wife and three children.



AFRTS Bans .

(Continued from Page One)
since these programs are intact with commercials and original rights to music are still held by the sponsor.
Radio programs -have been decommercialized and thus legally are entirely new programs requiring special permission from copyright owners to play music.
Several of the tunes in the latest shows placed on the banned list are, "Mister Wonderful," "With A Little Bit of Luck." "I Could Have Danced All Night," "I've Grown Accustomed To Her Face," and "Get Me To The Church On Time."


Just to get acquainted, the Public Works Center, as commissioned on 1 August 1956, was designated by SecNav to provide Public Works, Public Utility and Transportation support to all Commands in the Gtmo Bay area. In carrying out this assignment, we are dependent upon the whole-hearted support of everyone on the Base.
Of interest to all Base residents is the reason for continuation of the water-rationing program. The basic reason is that we have only the facilities to store one day's supply and on many days we, as a Base, are using more water than we can process. The statistics show that we use as much as 2,500,000 gallons per day which means we are draining more out of the tanks than we are putting in.
Another source of waste is the dripping faucet or toilet. A stream of water only 1/32 of an inch in diameter flowing contiouously will waste 750 gallons per month. Multiply this by 1500 to 2000 buildings and you can see the need for constant checking.
If you have a drippy faucet or have one in your quarters, please call 8424 or 8559 and we'll have the waste shut off in jig-time. Sir Water Ration says, "The drip you stop may make your lawn."


NAS Scuttlebutt
A little Rhumba, Samba, fox trot, lindy, waltz and not forgetting cha cha cha leads to a wonderful evening. At least that is the opinion of the men of the personnel division. Twenty-four attended a party at the Bamboo Club in Caimanera given by the division on September 7.
LCDR Idoux acted as MC of the affair and guests were LT Williams, CWO Haygood, PN1 "Skip" Oglivie and wife and Bill Garbutt of the Chaplain's office. LCDR Idoux says there was no limit to the fun had.
FLAW terminal has been the scene of many farewells, goodbyes and good lucks in the past and will continue to be just that. Robert H. Broyles, YN3, will receive his farewells tomorrow morning at 0730 when he flies to Key West for his ''walking papers."~
As the man in charge of the NAS Legal office, Broyles has presented many lectures on the Uniform Code of Military Justice to NAS Personnel as well as to members of the Dental Clinic. his release from the service he plans to attend. the Ohio State University where he hat; hopes of obtaining a Law degree..
He had no intentions of studying law when he enlisted in1952. Left behind to carry the legal work load is Raymond D. Hinrichs, YN3, and Charles M. Sullivan, YN3.


91


m


Page Five







An


Saturday, 15 September 1956


THE MMIAN


a


Nav y-'BP POL-ON D- Guantanamio


Cinema - Scoop

by Don Hinton

The schedule for this week is fair to middlin' with nothing outstanding, in fact, far from it.

Day of Fury (U.I., in color) is one of the new ones and a good example of what is to come this week. The title is grossly wrong and should be "Day of Nothing." The stars are Dale Robertson and Mara Corday. Oh yes, it's a western!

New Faces (Nat'l Pic., in color) is another new one and although a good 'production will be received with a, number of jeers, catcalls and the like that usually acconmpanies A musical here in Gtmo, especially one like this. There is no story to the filmi at all and it is more or less filmed as it was presented on Broadway, when Leonard Sillman introduced the review in 1952.
It goes from one musical number into another with very brief flashes backstage where supposedly the plot of the picture is unfolding, but never does. The two stars are Eartha Kitt and Robert Clary. If you guys in the barracks can sit still long enough, I promise you will be rewarded, especially when Miss Kitt sings "Santa Baby."

-Crashing Las Vegas (A.A.) . . . a new one . - . Leo Gorcey and the Bowery Boys . . . you already know my opinion of these characters.

French Line (RKO, in color), has
played the Base before and proves a great disappointment, especially if you have already seen the uncensored version of the picture. This was the movie in which Jane Russell did the very controversial dance. Myself, when I saw the uncut version a couple years back in the States, I enjoyed it immensely. Even with the dance cut out, La Russell and Gilbert Roland make a very enjoyable comedy team, crossing the Atlantic on the Liberte.

Screaming Eagles (A.A.) .... Tom Tryon and Jacqueline Beer
a new one, concerning WWII . . . no info on this one!
Sea Chase (W.B., in color), has
played the Base before and is a good movie. Lana Turner (one of the best she has done) and John Wayne are really a good team. Story concerns a German freighter that'is caught in the middle of the Pacific at the outbreak of WWII, and its attempts to make home -port.Star In the Dust~ (tY.I., -in color), is a new one and' stars John Agar and Mamie Van Doren. This might turn out to be enjoyed by the majority of people, no question for you western fans. Still in all, its the same old western goings on.


Midget Fire Brigade In- Acton


INDIAN Photo
The newly organized junior volunteer fire brigade of the Villamar area visited fire department headquarters during the week.
One of the midget brigaders said, "Bigt fires are terrible and only real fire fighters know how to handle them. But everybody should know how to put out a little fire safely so it will not become a big fire."
And a few words to the wise :The fire department should always be called even if it is only to make sure you really have put the fire out. Notice where the fire alarm boxes are located and :Familiarize yourself


with their operations so time will someday.




Saturday, September 15 NavSta-Day of Fory-101 minl. NAS-wild Dakotas-99 min. Mar. Site-Lady Godiva-119 minl. Vjlla.-Afrcana-97 mini. MOB-i Rage At Dawn-95 mini. Lwd. Pt.-Meet Me In Las Vegas-124 mini.
Sunday, September 16 Nav~ta-New Faces-11O mill. NAS-Day of Fury Mar. Site-Green Budha-90 muin. Villa.-Lady Godiva MCB-1-Africana Lwd. Pt.-Rage At Dawn
Monday, September 17
NavSta-Orashing Las Vegas-98 minl. NAS-New Faces Mar. Site-Wild Dakotas Villa.-Green Budha MOB-i Lady Godiva Lwd. Pt.-Africana
Tuesday, September 18 NavSta-French Line-0l mini. NAS-Crashing Las Vegas Mar. Site-Day of Fury Villa.-Wild Dakotas MOB-i Green Budha Lwd. Pt.-Lady Godiva
Wednesday. September 19 Nav~ta-Screaming Eagles-104 mill. NAS-French Line Mar. Site-New Faces Villa.-Day of Fury MOB-i-wild Dakotas Lwd. Pt.-Green Budha
Thursday, September 20 NavSta-Sea Chase-117 mill. NAS-Screaming Eagles Mar. Site-rahing Las Vegas Villa.-New Faces MOB-i-Day of Fury Lwd. Pt.-Wild Dakotas.
Friday. September 21
Nav~ta-Star In the Dust-102 mini. NAS-Sea Chase Mar. Site-French Line Villa.-Crashing Las Vegas MOB-i-New Faces Lwd. Pt.-Day of Fury


not be wasted if you have a fire



WGBY - TV'
Due to a delay in the, shipment of film from the -Armed Forces Television Service, WGBY-TV was unable to prepare a program log for this week's INDIAN. The TV station will, however, announce the day by day program schedule during its nightly station breaks.


H~OT AIR


Bo6ok - N ok

by R. C. D.
Glasgow, Ellen. An American woman who is rapidly becoming recognized as one of the mainstreams of American literature. Her economy of words is refreshing. Four of her novels are available.

Godden, Rumer. ,This English novelist recently wrote "An Episode of Sparrows" which firmly consolidated her reputation. "Black Narcissus" is also worth the time.

Goudge, Elizabeth. Another Englishman who improves with age, she is an inveterate story-teller, but 'Green Dolphin Street" was one of the best books to come from her pen.

Greene, Graham. In my humble opinion, Mr. Greene is the greatest novelist ,living today. He has written some mediocre books, but his outstanding ones tower over the world of contemporary fiction. Two, "The Heart of the Matter" and "The End of the Affair" may be found in the Library. I like the second so well that I have read it four times over the 'years. For those who are looking for something else by this gifted writer, there is "The Labyrinthine Ways" (also titled "The Power :and the Glory").

Guareschi, Giovanni. This Italian has made a name for himself since the end of the war with his books about Don *Camillo, 'a comical priest, and his struggles with the local -Communists. Light reading about serious matters.

Hardy, Thomas. Hardy is- another of the classic English novelists. To tell the truth, his books, on the surface, look'a bit forbidding, and I've never ventured inside. "The Return of the Native" is* anl acknowledged masterpiece, however. The setting is the English: moors.
Hawley, Cameron. Two. of his novels, may -be found here, and both are bestsellers. "Executive Suite" established him, and "Cash McCall" continues his reputation. Both are about businessmen and the pressures of big business in America today.


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PAGE 1

Fla. State U. May Teach College Extension Courses Aboard Base With the resumption of the navy's tuition aid program, Florida State University has indicated a willingness to conduct a college level program at Guantanamo Bay beginning in February, 1957, provided there is sufficient interest shown in the program by Base personnel. Commander Naval Base will shortly conduct a poll of interested persons in the Base commands. If the poll produces a sufficient number of would-be students, a representative of Florida State U. will come to the Base sometime in October to determine the advisability of beginning an extension program. All Base commands will submit, by October 1, the number of individuals interested in each of the courses offered. The names will be submitted in the following categories: milory personnel, dependents of military personnel, and civilian employees and dependents. Those interested are urged by the Base Commander to turn their names along with the course or courses interested in to their respective Commanding Officers before October 1. Under BuPers Instruction 1560. 10, the Navy will pay 75 per cent of the tuition, not to exceed $7.50 a semester hour or $5 a quarter hour, with a limit of six hours during a semester or quarter, for all navy personnel taking the offduty courses. Commanding Officers are authorized to approve applications for accredited courses which will lead to improved performance of duty or toward earning a baccalaureate degree. Officers accepting this assistance must agree to stay on-active duty two years after completing the courses. Enlisted personnel must have enough obligated time to complete their studies. Dependents and civilians who enroll in the extension program must pay full tuition. List of the courses in the Florida State University extension program are as follows: English (Freshman, English Literature) Speech (Fundamentals, Professional Speaking) Mathematics (Basic, College Algebra, (Continued on Page Three) COVERS GTMO LIKE THE SUNSHINE U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Volume VII, No. 39 Saturday, 15 September 1956 ADM Cooper Heads Gtmo Group At Naval Activity Commissioning RADM W. G. Cooper, Commander Naval Base, posed with Cuba's President Fulgencio Batista Saldivar for photographers at the inauguration of the Marina de Guerra naval activity in Antilla, Cuba. Left to right: Mr. Bolin, administrator of the United Fruit Company's sugar compound, President Batista and RADM Cooper. Six officers from the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base headed by RADM W. G. Cooper, ComNavBase, flew to Antilla, Cuba, Sunday, September 9, to witness the inauguration of the new naval activity of the Marina de Guerra. General Fulgencio Batista Saldivar, President of the Republic of Cuba, dedicated the new activity. In the group accompanying RADM Cooper to the inauguration were CAPT F. S. Habecker, Commander FTG; CAPT G. L. Kohr, CO Naval Air Station; CAPT R. A. Williams, CO Naval Supply Depot; LT B. Hahn, Aide for Cuban Affairs, and LT G.H. Leach, Aide. 94 Attend Initial Nooner's Day Prog. The initial Nooner's Day Luncheon was held at the CPO Club, Tuesday September 11, at 1130. Eighty-six chiefs and eight officers attended. Guest speaker for the first luncheon was RADM W. G. Cooper, ComNavBase. Chief A. Henderson, introduced CAPT W. R. Caruthers, C. 0. Naval Station who in turn introduced Admiral Cooper. ARTS Bans More Musicals For WGBY The scores from an additional three Broadway musicals have been added to the "banned music" list for WGBY. Word was received early in the week by dispatch from the Armed Forces Radio and Telesion Service in Los Angeles, California. The shows are "My Fair Lady," "Most Happy Fella," and "Mister Wonderful." This brings to a total of ten, those musicals whose tunes cannot be played over Armed Forces Radio Stations. There are, in addition, other tunes not in Broadway productions that cannot be aired. Shows previously placed on the banned list are "Kismet," "Pajama Game," "Damn Yankees," "Plain and Fancy," "Can Can," -"Fanny," .and "Silk Stockings." .According to Defense Department officials, banned tunes are the result of an inability to reach agreement with the copyright owners of the music in question. This does not affect television programs (Continued on Page Five) Air Force Major Thanks Transport Volunteers The following letter was received from an Air Force Major. I wish to express my personal appreciation to all the ladies of the Guantanamo Transportation volunteers for their unselfish efforts. RADM W. G. Cooper Dear Admiral Cooper: While enroute recently from Brooklyn Army Terminal to San Juan on the USNS THOMAS, it was necessary to land temporarily at Guantanamo Bay for military reasons on August 6, 1956. While still a day out at sea, the ship's military office advised passengers that the officers' wives of Guantanamo Bay had a tour planned for those wishing to avail themselves of the adventure. On debarking, my family and I, among others, were cheerfully greeted by the ladies who gave us a brief introduction of what was planned, the first item being that of caring for our children, a well needed treat for both the parents and children. The following tour was far more than any sea traveler could ever hope for, walking on land, riding in comfortable busses, shopping and most of all, fountain coke! The thought I would most like to impart, Admiral, is not the manner in which this charitable work was executed and the cheerfulness in which it was offered, but rather the high degree of morale exhibited among the wives we met, their ability to speak intelligently about the U. S. Navy and its activities at Guantanamo Bay and their general interest in your command for which you can be proud. This was evidenced by a schedule for the day which was well planned and coordinated. I would, therefore, feel remiss if I didn't ask you.to take official recognition of the tender interest accorded our. .group by the various elements of your command and to express my personal appreciation to the ladies. We are most grateful and shall ever forget the courtesy. Thanking you in advance for your interest in these premises, an Air Force Major.

PAGE 2

Saturday, 15 September 1956 THE INDIAN The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a possible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. RADM WILLIAM G. COOPER, Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Editorial Staff LCDR K.S. Dick _-------------------__ Officer-Adviser G. L. Henderson, JOC ---------------------------------Editor J. C. Curren, JOSN ---------------------------Managing Editor E. U. Orias, JO3 -------------------------------Feature Editor D. D. Hinton, JOSN -----------------------------Staff Reporter THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. Materials marked AFPS may be used by news media provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All materials originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part or without credit. All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. A Community Project Needs You! Support "The Spirit Of The Navy" This past week casting was held for "The Spirit of the Navy." A great deal of work faces the production and direction staff of this historical pageant which when produced will culminate a fine evening of entertainment on the Base. The production is the outcome of an idea by the Chief of Naval Operations that something might be done within the navy by navy people to focus attention upon the heritage and tradition of which the navy is so proud. "The Spirit of the Navy" is a "family affair" and is not intended to be used as publicity for the American armada. It should become a Guantanamo Bay community project including wives and families of naval personnel. The talents of many on the Base are needed-your help is necessary if this birthday production is to be a success on October 27. Gtmo is one of 16 outlying stations which will stage "The Spirit of the Navy" with the hope that whatever degree of theatrical success may come about, a feeling of pride and tradition for the navy will be infused in those who take part in the production and in those who see it on the stage. If this pageant suceeds in doing that, it will be well worthwhile. Sunday, 16 September 1956 CATHOLIC MASSES Sunday: 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. through Fri.: 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday: 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions-1700 -1800, 1900 -2000, and daily before Mass PROTESTANT SERVICES Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 0930-Adult Bible Class Open Air Assembly 1100-Protestant Divine Worship-Naval Base Chapel 1980-Fellowship Tour-Open Air Assembly Thursday :1900-Choir Rehearsal JEWISH SERVICES Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel CHURCH OF CHRIST Sunday: 1000-Bible Study-Community Auditorium 1045-Worship Service--Community Auditorium LATTER DAY SAINTS Sunday: 1100-Naval Station Library CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Sunday: 1000-Naval Station Library CHAPLAINS AT THIS ACTIVITY CDR P. R. McPhee, CHC, USN (Protestant) CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN (Catholic) 0 The Chaplain's Corner A Personal Prayer on the Jewish New Year In the belief that all men are brothers and that they share the same feelings, hopes, fears, joys, and sorrows which come to all through the experience of living in this world, the following prayer is offered. "0 Lord, on this day I offer my prayer to thee. Thou knowest my life, my thoughts, my conduct. Thou knowest the longings and ideals, the pains and hopes that urge and impel me. There are moments when the vision of my better self livens my soul. I dream of a life of character and high achievement, a life of worth and service. But I also have my hours of temptation and struggle, when the vision fades and the will weakens. When in the pressure of daily living, when in the pursuit after pleasure and success, I lose sight of my better self, strengthen me with a sense of purpose and value of life. Often I am overwhelmed by the vastness of the world and my own littleness and insignificance in it. I seem so pitifully small; I seem unable to find my place in all this bewildering scheme of things. My life appears meaningless, my work seems useless. Yet I know that Thou has placed me here and has allotted me a task that is useful and necessary. Deepen within me the awareness of my obligations to my fellowman and to Thee, to my loved ones and to myself. Give me the strength and the courage to realize these high ideals of right living in my thoughts and actions. May my life always be counted for a blessing. Thou art with me, I have no fear. Amen." Chaplain Herbert Morris I Killed A Child Editor's Note: School just recently opened and the Base has 1,500 children. We cannot spare a one of them. In the interest of traffic safety, the following is reprinted from the BUFFALO COURIER-EXPRESS. It was told to reporter Walter Froehligh by a driver who killed a child. "They ask me, 'Did I see the child?' Yes, I saw him, and he's all I've been seeing since. I saw him, but it was too late to stop. I was the last to see him alive, and the first to see his lifeless body limply sprawled on the pavement,-a few inches from the bumper of my car. "Yes, I am the man they now call 'Death Car Driver.' I own the car whose pictures you saw in the daily press. And yet, a thousand times I wish I were the victim rather than the man who killed him. For he died only once, but I have died a thousand deaths since then. "I walked ahead and bent over his crumpled form. 'Call an ambulance,' I shouted. 'Quick!' I saw the gathering crowd. They looked at the child and then at me. "Then came police and then the doctor. He looked first at the bloody face and form, then looked away and slowly shook his head. And then I saw the anguished features of a man-the father-and heard the desperate scream of a bereaved mother-how can I forget? "And when the scene had cleared and I had filed reports at headquarters and the police had cleared me, I stood alone and suddenly knew what I had really done. '"Could happen to any of us," a voice behind me said. 'You were not speeding or violating any law. No charge were preferred against you. The child was roaming the streets alone and ran out in front of you!' "It could happen to any of us, sure. But who can replace a life? Should I visit the parents? See the child laid out? Or coldly disregard the death, the bitter grief? Will the father, mother hate me? A sense of moral guilt hangs over me. I wasn't careless. I was within the law, but my conscience lives with me and I with it. And think that perhaps the slightest bit more of attention on my part could have everted this will haunt my thoughts for every hour I shall live." Calendar of Events Saturday. September 15 Catholic Catechism Class-Naval Base School-1000 Kid's Matinee-Villamer Lyceum-1800 Monday, September 17 Payday-all military personnel Soujourner's Club-Officers' Club-1930 O.E.S. Social Club-Gi.l Scout Hut-190 Tuesday, September 18 American Legion-Flt. Rsv. Rm (Marina Pt.) American Legion Auxiliary-Girl Scout Hut-1930 Wednesday, September 19 Boy Scout Meeting-Chapel Hill Auditorium-1830 Kid's Matinee-Villamar Lyceum-1800 Thursday, September 20 Felloweraft Club 1078-Community Auditorium-1930 Friday, September 21 CPO Wives Club-Family Rm (CPO Club)-2000 9 P Page Two THE INDIAN Christmas Toy Drive Is On This is the time of the year for Guantanamo Bay's annual Christmas toy drive. sponsored by the Trading Post. Boxes have been placed at the three exchanges and at a later date, to be publicized, the Boy Scouts will collect toys from door to door so start saving toys now. There is a particular need for tricycles, bicycles, toy trucks, etc. The firemen and the Naval Station Hobby Shop will repair the toys. The toy sale will be open for everyone on the Base and the sale will be held in back of the Naval Station movie lyceum.

PAGE 3

Saturday, 15 September 1956 0 m THE INDIAN m Page Three New Officers Report Aboard Base; Fleet To Test Navy's Tender Trap' Slated CAPT Ingling Comes To FlTraGru New White Jumper For Dec. Production Washington (AFPS) -An im"The Tender Trap" will be th INDIAN Photo Numerous officer arrivals and departures occurred in Gtmo during the past week. CAPT Francis W. Ingling, USN, relieved CAPT Owen B. Murphy, USN, as Training officer of the Fleet TrainingGroup yesterday. CAPT Ingling's military career began in August 1932 as a member of the National Guard of Pennsylvania. He was appointed to the U.S. Naval Academy in 1933 and graduated with the class of 1937. Among the ships that CAPT Ingling has served on are USS TENNESSE, his first duty station, USS NASHVILLE, USS HULL, USS HEYWOOD L. EDWARDS and USS JARVIS. His duty station prior to arrival in Gtmo was Division Commander of DesDiv 132. CAPT and Mrs. Ingling arrived aboard the Base last Saturday with their three children. CAPT and Mrs. Murphy left yesterday for Norfolk, where CAPT Murphy will assume command of the USS CANISTEO. Also the past week CDR B. R. Manser as sumed duties as Base Legal officer. He relieved CDR G. E. Krouse, who departed Gtmo the past week for new duties in the office of the Judge Advocate General, Washington. CDR Manser's duty station prior to his arrival in Gtmo was the office of the JAG. CDR Manser, his wife and son arrived here Monday. At the present time, CDR Manser has another son attending the naval academy. LCDR G. E. Hoppe, Naval Station Personnel officer, departed Gtmo the past week to assume new duties as commnading officer USNRTC at South Portland, Maine. LCDR K. S. Dick, Naval Station Special Services officer, will assume collateral, duties as Personnel officer, with ENS R.C. Lytle, Assistant personnel officer. Other new officer arrivals the past week were 1st LT J. K. Walters, Jr., USMC. LT Walters is a new officer to the Marine Command and will be assigned duties as a proved dress white jumper soon will be given a "shakedown cruise" by fleet sailors to test its wearing qualities and appearance. The jumper, with blue collar and cuffs and white striping, will get a six-week trial run as a possible replacement for the plain undress white jumper now worn. Prior to WWII, the Navy used a dress jumper with a blue wool collar, but difficulties in laundering which caused fading, shrinkage and lint forced it to be discontinued. With collar and cuffs of cotton twill, the new jumper is expected to be both colorfast and washable. It is estimated that the new jumper will cost about 2 cents more than the undress. next production of the Gtmo Little Theater. The play a Broadway comedy hit of a few years back is currently a popular movie starring FrankSinatra and Debbie Reynolds. Tentative production dates for the new play will be the first or second week in December. Casting will be held in approximately two or three weeks, pending arrival of the scripts. Jim Le Mar has been appointed director of the new play by Don Wilkinson, president. The play concerns a New York playboy who is surrounded by women and a married friend who comes to visit. B. Ramer, LT True United guard officer in the Security In M military Vedding Sat. Section. The Naval Station gained four new officers. LCDR L. L. Buswell arrived from Staff ComTransAmphib Squadron 8. LCDR Buswell will become Assistant Port Operations officer. CWO B. 0. Moses arrived from duty in USS CHILTON to assume duties as movie exchnge officer. He relieved ELEC J. F. Perdue who goes to Fleet Training Group for duty. ENSs H.E. Seward and W. J. Landroche Jr. complete the new officer arrivals. Other departures were LTJG P. Buckholz, who will report for duty in USS KRISHNA and LCDR R. L. Harris, former officer-in-charge Fleet Boat Pool, who will report to Little Creek Virginia. LT J. V. Gorman arrived at the Naval Air Station ot assume temporary duties as 1st LT and Security officer. Extension Courses. (Continued from Page One) Trigonometry, Plane Analytical, Calculus I and II) History (Western Civilization, American, Far Eastern) Political Science (American Government, International Politics, Political Parties, Far Eastern, Internatoinal Relations) Psychology (General, Applied, Child, Abnormal, Clinical, Educational) Business Law (I and II) Spanish (2 years) Introduction to Management Economics (Principles) Xumanities (3 semesters-3 hour courses): Music (Appreciation) Physics (General) Philosophy (History of Philosophy, Though, Logic) American Studies (Cultural) Georgraphy (World) And possibly others 6 The former Beatrice Ramer of York, Pennsylvania and LT Alvin C. True Jr., Senior Medical Officer of the Naval Air Station Dispensary, were united in matrimony at a military wedding in the Base Chapel Saturday afternoon, September 8. Miss Ann Cooper, daughter of RADM and Mrs. William G. Cooper, was maid of honor, while LTJG Frank X. Azzarita, Line Division Officer of VU-10, was best man. Inluled in the wedding entourage were six naval officers who provided sword-arch honors for the newly-weds, and flower girl Minnie Lawlor. Mrs. True is a graduate from York High School, Class of '49. After her graduation she went to New York and was employed as a Powers model. The bride is CAPT and Mrs. G. L. Kohr's niece. She's been living with the Kohrs since February. Dr. True is a native of Brooklyn, New York. After graduation from Asbury Park High School in 1946, he went to Princeton University where he obtained an A. B. degree in 1950. In 1954 Dr. True acquired his M. D. from New York Medical College. Before joining the Navy in 1955, Dr. True was a resident physician at the Flowers Hospital in New York: He reported aboard the Naval Air Station on August 13, 1955 from the U.S. Naval Hospital, St. Albans, New York. The Trues are now honeymooning in San Juan, Puerto Rico. They will be back in two weeks and will take up residence on the Base. 6 e

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M Page Four Saturday, 15 September 1956 Two Seabee Crews Re-Do Vacated VU-10 Prop Blast F T G & F T C Bulletin Quarters, Shorten Waiting List INDIAN Photo One of the steps in rehabilitating a set of quarters is the repairing and oiling of the jalousies. For Seabees, two from crew no. one and two from crew no. two, work in the jalousies of quarters RH 274 D. Left to right: A. D. Morgan, CP; W. C. Browne, CN; J. L. Bekus, BUCP, and R. D. Nichols, CP. With their "Can Do" spirit, two crews of Seabees stationed in Guantanamo Bay turned painters-carpenters this summer and the results of their work more than pleased many a navy family moving into Gtmo housing. After school was out last May there was a tremendous turnover of Base personnel. Men with children were leaving the Base and others were pouring in. The turnover was so great that Public Works could not possibly keep up with the two week schedule normally required to rehabilitate vacated family quarters. By the middle of June such a big backlog of work had accumulated that is was taking as long as six weeks before a set of quarters could be readed for the new occupants. It directly affected the waiting time for people on the housing waiting list. Situation Was Critical The situation became critical, but with Seabees in the area any problems involving construction work can be solved. The local navy builders stepped in and even though most of them had never had a saw, hammer or a paint brush in their hand (they were accustomed to working with heavy construction) they turned to and were doing a bang-up job in remarkable time. LTJG H. E. Adams, CEC, division officer of the Seabees, organized the first rehabilitation crew which went to work on June 18. It is composed of six men and a first class petty officer in charge, L. J. Weirich, CD1. Team number two joined the first one in the early part of July and also has six men with a petty officer in charge, E.S. Thompson, CD1. The two teams confined their quarters-revamping to replacement and DOD housing. Public Works continued to handle the rest of the vacated homes. Finished 60 by Sept. As of September 7 the two crews had completely rehabilitated 60 sets of quarters. This had as an end result the shortening of the housing waiting period. As a set of quarters is vacated a Public Works inspector goes through them and files a job order sheet on the work needed to be done before the quarters will be ready for occupancy again. For replacement and DOD housing, these job orders were turned over to the Seabees who then moved in with paint, wax and swabs. Before rehabilitating a house the men give the place a general cleanup, paint the rooms which need repainting-all quarters are given a standard color paint job, oil the jalousies, clean the screens and send them for repair if needed, clean the stoves and refrigerators, clean and wax the floors, varnish stairways in two story units and do any other minor repairs which may pop up. Walls Tell on Children The crew members claim that they can walk into a vacated set of quarters and tell if the former tenants had children. If there were 4 In the past two weeks eight Mallards have been detached from the squadron. LT Bill Hill and family departed Gtmo on Sept. 1 aboard FLAW for return to the states and transfer to his new duty station, VAW12 at NAS, Quonset Point. For the past year LT Hill served as squadron Flight Officer, and he was relieved recently by LCDR S. D. Blythe. A trio of E. E. Van Horn, AN; R. D. Lackie, PN2, and R. K. Harnsberger, AO3, all departed for NAS, Key West and separation from the naval service. H. J. Kelley, AT2, was released for transfer to VR-31 in NorVa, and E. H. Schultz, AT2, left Gtmo on FLAW for his new duty station, NATU, Sanford, Fla. K. Talliman, AB3, is on his way to NAS, Patuxent River for a normal tour, and E. Mounts, BM3, returns to general service duty aboard the USS ROCK BRIDGE (APA-228). On the other side of the ledger, however, the Mallards have welcomed aboard A. E. Cole, QM1, reporting from the USS FLAMINGO (MSCO-11), and Louis Jacobell, ATAN, formerly attached to the NaTechTraCen, Memphis. C. C. Norbrell, AN, has recently completed USAFI courses which will enable him to receive a high school graduation certificate. Norrell now plans to continue with his courses on a college level. CDR S. R. Stanul, Commanding Officer of Utility Squadron TEN, has received a letter of congratulations from the Commander Air Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet for the squadron reenlistment rate for fiscal year 1956. This letter stated in part, ". Commander Air Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet notes with pleasure that the reenlistment rate in your command for the second consecutive six month period was significantly higher than the Force and Fleet average." youngsters in the place, there are usually tell-tale marks on the walls. Some of the units require more than 200 man hours before the rehabilitation is completed, but ordinarily two to three days are spent on each set of quarters. With school opened, the turnover has slowed done so on September 21 the two crews of Seabees will retire from their rehabilitation program and let Publin Works take over again. This is another job well done by the Seabees. Last week seven new arrivals reported to FTG and FTC for duty. LCDR Gerald H. Wilson, joined the CIC department from USS COLUMBUS (CA-74). LCDR Wilson has attended a number of naval schools: CIC School at Glenview, General Line School, Monterey and Gunnery Officer's Ordnance School, Washington D.C. In addition he served aboard various carriers in WWII as a naval aviator. LCDR Wilson's family will be coming from Manistique, Michigan. W. M. Rafolowski, FTC, reported from USS TARAWA (CVS-40). His hometown is Anosia, Conn. K. W. Fritsche, ENC, calls Secaucus, New Jersey home. Mrs. Fritsche is presently residing there with sons Kenneth and Glen. W. J. Thorpe, ET1, joined the ranks of FTC, hailing from Menlo Park, New Jersey, and coming from USS CHUKAWAN (AO100). R. Custodio, RM1, left his family at Oaglyn, New Jersey, and reported to the Communication's department from USS ANTIETAM (CVS-36). A. R. King, RM3, recently attended Telety pe Maintenance School at Norfolk Virginia, and calls Wakefield, Mass. home. E. W. Daunaron, RM3, came from the Naval Communication Statio n, Washington D.C. having previously served with the Embassy Staff in Rome, Italy. His family is presently in Washington D.C. Welcome on board, everybody. The FTG Officers were guests of their wives at the monthly FTG Officer's Wives Lucheon last Sunday morning. It was a gay affair. The general consensus is that there ought to be more "brunches" to start Sundays off right. FTC held a family picnic on Saturday September 8 at Windmill Beach to say goodbye to Robert M. Cousins, BTC, and William J. Gleason, RD1, and to welcome aboard the families of CWO Eugene L. Hill and Edward L. Cofer, ET1. Ben W. Smith, BTC, and Mrs. Smith are proudly showing off their son born at 3:02 a.m., September 11 at the Naval Base Hospital. Young Mr. Smith tipped the scales at 8 pounds 13% ounces which, according to local unofficial FTG statistics, makes him this year's heavyweight champion. Two farmers met on a country road and pulled up their teams. "Si," said. Josh, "I've_ got a mule with distemper. What did you give that one of yours that had it?" "Turpentine. Giddap!" A week later they met again. "'Si, I gave my mule terpentine like you said and it killed him." "Killed mine too. Giddap!" a THE INDIAN

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Saturday, 15 September 1958 dm Page Five Presentation Of Fishing Tourney Dr. Robie Promoted Public Works Center Prizes Will Be Next Friday Night To Captain's Rank Presentation of awards for the 1956 Guantanamo Bay Fishing Tournament will be held September 21, at the Naval Station Movie Lyceum beginning at 1900. RADM W. G. Cooper, ComNavBase, will present the awards. Judges for this year's tournament were LCDR R. M. Moore, CWO R. J. Harper and E. H. Cavanaugh. Grand prize for the 1956 tournament was won by E. L. Hill, who caught a 100 pound tarpon. Winner of the special division (shark) was James Parkins, with his 420 pound gray nurse. For the special division (Ladies) Merla Schwind was awarded first for bagging a 14 pound 2 ounce barracuda. 26 Children Win Prizes Twenty-six children in the special division (children) will be awarded prizes for their catches. George Lacy won first prize by catching a 17 pound 3 ounce barracuda. First division winners in the snapper, grouper and jewfish class were Thomas Waite, with a 59 pound snapper, Junious Williams with a 51 pound snapper and Sid Davenport with a 49 pound snapper. In the first division ladyfishbonefish class Harry Fitch won first with a 4 pound 7 ounce ladyfish, Daniel Davidson took second with a 3 pound 5 ounce bonefish and Thomas Cotten placed third with a 3 pound 2 ounce ladyfish. Croaker Class Croaker class (first division) first place was won by Daniel Bowman with a 2 pound 14 ounce croaker. Mark Hopkins won second with a 2 pound 4 ounce croaker and Albert Gillis won third with a 2 pound 4 ounce croaker. The difference in the latter two fish was in width and girth. First place in the first division snook class was won by J.W. Dilson with a 22 pound 4 ounce. William St. Johns placed second with a 20 pound 12 ounce and George Bailey took third with a 14 pound 2 ounce snook. In the tarpon class of the first division T. R. Haymans won first with a 43 pound 8 ounce fish Carl Craft took second with a 34 pounder. John McAfee placed third with an 18 pound 4 ounce tarpon. Barracuda Class First division barracuda class honors were taken by Harry Waranack wtih a 20 pound 4 ounce fish. F. L. Pauley and E. J. Guillory took second and third with a 20 pound 3 ounce and 18 pound 3 ounce fish respectively. In the pompano-jack class John Latwiss took first with a 27 pound 13 ounce pompano, D. R. Ferrell took second with an 18 pound 4 ounce pompano and Virgil Witt placed third with a 12 pound 12 ounce jack. Second division winners were E. B. Sloan with a 25 pound king mackerel, first place, and Harry Fitch, a 10 pound 12 ounce albacore took second. Third prize winner was Harry Waranack with a 2 pound 11 ounce spanish makerel. Third division (the spear-fishing division) honors were won by R. R. Vickers for a 20 pound 14 ounce grouper. Francisco Morreale won second with a 14 pound 2 ounce snapper and Guy Turner placed third with a 12 pound 8 ounce jack. In the Special Division (children), the winners are George A. Garden Jr., Dan Kelley, Marvin Hamlin, Robert A Williams, Richard Moore and D.E. Kubicki. Richard Williams, Karl J. Skadowski, Billy Williams, Juanita McNamara, Dick Brown, Paul Lee Snow, John M. Sanborn, Issar Guillory, Robert Kuczynski, Jane Ferrante, Robert B. Skadowski, Carroll Van Blakeman will also be winners in the children's division. Completing the list of winners in the children's division are; Hugh Hill, David Seaton, Dennis Hill, Ann L. Gardes, John R. Pepin, Billy Broughton and Paul S. Gardens. All-Stars Eliminated In All-Navy Tourney The Guantanamo Bay baseball All-Star contingent was defeated in two separate games during the opening day of the All-Navy Eastern Baseball Tournament in Bainbridge, Maryland. Playing two games Monday, September 10, the Gtmo All-Stars were routed by the fourth and eight naval district teams, with a score of 11-1 and 8-3, respectively. A double elimination tournament, the Gtmo All-Star squad having lost two games already, is barred from further participation in the tourney. Snow was falling gently; there was a definite winter time scene being set. Poetically, the young man spoke as he tucked his girl into the car: "Winter draws on." Girl: "Is that any of your business?" 9 Just to get acquainted, the Public Works Center, as commissioned on 1 August 1956, was designated by SecNav to provide Public Works, Public Utility and Transportation support to all Commands in the Gtmo Bay area. In carrying out this assignment, we are dependent upon the whole-hearted support of everyone on the Base. Of interest to all Base residents is the reason for continuation of the water-rationing program. The basic reason is that we have only the facilities to store one day's supply and on many days we, as a Base, are using more water than we can process. The statistics show that we use as much as 2,500,000 gallons per day which means we are draining more out of the tanks than we are putting in. Another source of waste is the dripping faucet or toilet. A stream of water only 1/32 of an inch in diameter flowing contiouously will waste 750 gallons per month. Multiply this by 1500 to 2000 buildings and you can see the need for constant checking. If you have a drippy faucet or have one in your quarters, please call 8424 or 8559 and we'll have the waste shut off in jig-time. Sir Water Ration says, "The drip you stop may make your lawn." NAS Scuttlebutt A little Rhumba, Samba, fox trot, lindy, waltz and not forgetting cha cha cha leads to a wonderful evening. At least that is the opinion of the men of the personnel division. Twenty-four attended a party at the Bamboo Club in Caimanera given by the division on September 7. LCDR Idoux acted as MC of the affair and guests were LT Williams, CWO Haygood, PN1 "Skip" Oglivie and wife and Bill Garbutt of the Chaplain's office. LCDR Idoux says there was no limit to the fun had. FLAW terminal has been the scene of many farewells, goodbyes and good lucks in the past and will continue to be just that. Robert H. Broyles, YN3, will receive his farewells tomorrow morning at 0730 when he flies to Key West for his "walking papers." As the man in charge of the NAS Legal office, Broyles has presented many lectures on the Uniform Code of Military Justice to NAS Personnel as well as to members of the Dental Clinic. his release from the service he plans to attend the Ohio State University where he has hopes of obtaining a Law degree. He had no intentions of studying law when he enlisted in 1952. Left behind to carry the legal work load is Raymond D. Hinrichs, YN3, and Charles M. Sullivan, YN3. 9 THE INDIAN Fleet Camera Party Photo Mrs. Jessie Robie puts the extra stripe neatly in place for her husband, CAPT W. A. Robie, MC. The new captain is the Base hospital's Chief of Dependent Service. CAPT W. A. Robie, MC, last week shed the silver oak leaf of commander for the silver eagle of his new rank, captain. CAPT Robie's advancement was retroactive to July 1. He has been stationed in Gtmo since September of 1955 and is at present Chief of Dependent Service at the Base Hospital. The duty station of the new captain, prior to his coming to Guantanamo Bay, was the U.S. Naval Academy where he served as Assistant Medical Officer. CAPT Robie attended the University of Maryland, 1936-1938 and the George Washington School of Medicine from 1938 to 1942. He entered the Navy in 1943. He has served in the Marshalls, Marianas, Phillipines, the South China air strikes and on Iwo Jima and Okinawa. He was advanced to commander in 1950. Residing with CAPT Robie here at Gtmo are his wife and three children. AFRTS Bans .. (Continued from Page One) since these programs are intact with commercials and original rights to music are still held by the sponsor. Radio programs have been decommercialized and thus legally are entirely new programs requiring special permission from copyright owners to play music. Several of the tunes in the latest shows placed on the banned list are, "Mister Wonderful," "With A Little Bit of Luck." "I Could Have Danced All Night," "I've Grown Accustomed To Her Face," and "Get Me To The Church On Time."

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a Saturday, 15 September 1956 THE INDIAN Navy-BPPO---10ND-Guantanamo Cinema -Scoop by Don Hinton The schedule for this week is fair to middlin' with nothing outstanding, in fact, far from it. Day of Fury (U.I., in color) is one of the new ones and a good example of what is to come this week. The title is grossly wrong and should be "Day of Nothing." The stars are Dale Robertson and Mara Corday. Oh yes, it's a western! New Faces (Nat'1 Pic., in color) is another new one and although a good production will be received with a number of jeers, catcalls and the like that usually accompanies a musical here in Gtmo, especially one like this. There is no story to the film at all and it is more or less filmed as it was presented on Broadway, when Leonard Sillman introduced the review in 1952. It goes from one musical number into another with very brief flashes backstage where supposedly the plot of the picture is unfolding, but never does. The two stars are Eartha Kitt and Robert Clary. If you guys in the barracks can sit still long enough, I promise you will be rewarded, especially when Miss Kitt sings "Santa Baby." Crashing Las Vegas (A.A.) a new one ...Leo Gorcey and the Bowery Boys ...you already know my opinion of these characters. French Line (RKO, in color), has played the Base before and proves a great disappointment, especially if you have already seen the uncensored version of the picture. This was the movie in which Jane Russell did the very controversial dance. Myself, when I saw the uncut version a couple years back in the States, I enjoyed it immensely. Even with the dance cut out, La Russell and Gilbert Roland make a very enjoyable comedy team, crossing the Atlantic on the Liberte. Screaming Eagles (A.A.) .... Tom Tryon and Jacqueline Beer ..a new one, concerning WWII .no info on this one! Sea Chase (W.B., in color), has played the Base before and is a good movie. Lana Turner (one of the best she has done) and John Wayne are really a good team. Story concerns a German freighter that is caught in the middle of the Pacific at the outbreak of WWII, and its attempts to make home port; Star In the Dust (U.I., in color), is a new one and stars John Agar and Mamie Van Doren. This might turn out to be enjoyed by the majority of people, no question for you western fans. Still in all, its the same old western goings on. Midget Fire Brigade In Action INDIAN Photo The newly organized junior volunteer fire brigade of the Villamar area visited fire department headquarters during the week. One of the midget brigaders said, "Big fires are terrible and only real fire fighters know how to handle them. But everybody should know how to put out a little fire safely so it will not become a big fire." And a few words to the wise :The fire department should always be called even if it is only to make sure you really have put the fire out. Notice where the fire alarm boxes are located and familiarize yourself with their operations so time will not be wasted if you have a fire someday. Saturday, September 15 NavSta-Day of Fury-101 min. NAS-Wild Dakotas-99 min. Mar. Site-Lady Godiva-119 min. Villa.-Africana-97 min. MCB-1-Rage At Dawn-95 min. Lwd. Pt.-Meet Me In Las Vegas-124 min. Sunday, September 16 NavSta-New Faces-110 min. NAS-Day of Fury Mar. Site-Green Budha-90 min. Villa.-Lady Godiva MCB-1-Africana Lwd. Pt.-Rage At Dawn Monday, September 17 NavSta-Crashing Las Vegas-98 min. NAS-New Faces Mar. Site-Wild Dakotas Villa.-Green Budha MCB-1-Lady Godiva Lwd. Pt.-Africana Tuesday, September 18 NavSta-French Line-101 min. NAS-Crashing Las Vegas Mar. Site-Day of Fury Villa.-Wild Dakotas MCB-1-Green Budha Lwd. Pt.-Lady Godiva Wednesday, September 19 NavSta-Screaming Eagles-104 min. NAS-French Line Mar. Site-New Faces Villa.-Day of Fury MCB-1-Wild Dakotas Lwd. Pt.-Green Budha Thursday, September 20 NavSta-Sea Chase-117 min. NAS-Sereaming Eagles Mar. Site-Crashing Las Vegas Villa.-New Faces MCB-1-Day of Fury Lwd. Pt.-Wild Dakotas Friday, September 21 NavSta-Star In the Dust-102 min. NAS-Sea Chase Mar. Site-French Line Villa.-Crashing Las Vegas MOB-1-New Faces Lwd. Pt.-Day of Fury WGBY -TV Due to a delay in the. shipment of film from the Armed Forces Television Service, WGBY-TV was unable to prepare a program log for this week's INDIAN. The TV station will, however, announce the day by day program schedule during its nightly station breaks. HOT AIR "He Hopped It Up' Book-Nook by R. C. D. Glasgow, Ellen. An American woman who is rapidly becoming recognized as one of the mainstreams of American literature. Her economy of words is refreshing. Four of her novels are available. Godden, Rumer. This English novelist recently wrote "An Episode of Sparrows" which firmly consolidated her reputation. "Black Narcissus" is also worth the time. Goudge, Elizabeth. Another Englishman who improves with age, she is an inveterate story-teller, but 'Green Dolphin Street" was one of the best books to come from her pen. Greene, Graham. In my humble opinion, Mr. Greene is the greatest novelist living today. He has written some mediocre books, but his outstanding ones tower over the world of contemporary fiction. Two, "The Heart of the Matter" and "The End of the Affair" may be found in the Library. I like the second so well that I have read it four times over the years. For those who are looking for something else by this gifted writer, there is "The Labyrinthine Ways" (also titled "The Power and the Glory"). Guareschi, Giovanni. This Italian has made a name for himself since the end of the war with his books about Don Camillo, a comical priest, and his struggles with the local Communists. Light reading about serious matters. Hardy, Thomas. Hardy is another of the classic English novelists. To tell the truth, his books, on the surface, look a bit forbidding, and I've never ventured inside. "The Return of the Native" is an acknowledged masterpiece, however. The setting is the English moors. Hawley, Cameron. Two of his novels may be found here, and both are bestsellers. "Executive Suite" established him, and "Cash McCall" continues his reputation. Both are about businessmen and the pressures of big business in America today. FROM: 3 cent stamp TO: Send The INDIAN Home