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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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Cubana Airlines To Begin Flights CPsBegin Nooner's Day Luncheon


From McCalla Field To Santiago

The Cubana Air Lines will establish commercial flight operations from McCalla airfield to Santiago de Cuba and return as soon as negotiations between the Naval Air Station, and the air line company are completed, according to an announcement made by CAPT G.L. Kohr, NAS Commanding Officer.


Naval Air Station received this past week a letter from the Chief of Naval Operations advising the command that its request to permit the Cubana Air Lines to land at McCalla and set up regular flight operations for -Base residents has been approved.
CNO Directed
Implementing its approval, the Chief of Naval Operations has directed the Bureau of Yards and Docks to issue a landing permit to the Cubana Air Lines. Pending the issuance of the landing permit, CNO has also authoriized the Naval Air Station to notify the Cubana Air Lines to commence flight operations.
The establishment of this private air line service on the Base is intended to accomodate military personnel and their dependents desiring off-base liberty and recreation.
It was reported that Cubana Air Lines has indicated a willingness to provide air service, to many points in the Caribbean area as well as to -the United States on a charter basis.
Soon to Santiago
However, Commander N a v a 1 Base has signified that it is imperative to establish at the earliest, regular scheduled flights from NAS to Santiago, leaving here Friday and returning Sunday. Naval Air Station authorities disclosed that negotiations will be undertaken immediately.
Present plans point to the Naval Station Special Services department as the most logical military unit to assume control in connection with passenger flight reservation, the sale of tickets and the administration' of advertising programs.


Tues., RADM Cooper First Speaker

The Base CPO Club will inaugurate a Nooner's Day luncheon organization on September 11, from 1130 to 1300., The luncheon will be held at the CPO Club.
Guest speaker at the first meeting will be RADM W. G. Cooper, ComNavBase.


COVERS GTMO LIKE THE SUNSHINE U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba

Volume VII, No. 36 Saturday, 8 September 1956



LTJG Wagner, Former N.S. Officer, Appears On Ed Sullivan's TV Show


A former Crypto Officer of the Naval Station was among the successful finalists in the All-Navy talent contest. LTJG Alan Wagner, with the other finalists, appeared on Ed Sullivan's television show August 26.
LTJG Wagner, currently stationed at 90 Church Street in New York in the Public Information office of the Third Naval District, did a comedy monologue routine on the show and reports from, New York say it was "pretty good."
15 onr TV
This was the third annual AllNay contest.'Finals were held inSt. Albans Naval Hospital, Brooklyn, N.Y. Immediately after the finals, producers of the "Ed Sullivan Show" named 15 of the top acts for their August 26 show.


Following the television appearance, the troupe of 15, known as "Tops in Blue," left on a 32 day coast to coast tour, working their way to San Francisco and back to the East Coast again.

According to an informed source at AFRTS in New York, the kinescope film of the TV show should reach Guantanamo Bay's WGBY in six or, seven weeks.,
Active, In Gtmo Dramatics
While stationed in Guantanamo Bay, LTJG Wagner was active in the Little Theater and also participated in a weekly program formerly aired by .WGBY-"-Radio Workshop."
Due to be released from active. duty in about four months, LTJG Wagner plans to make dramatics his career. Already he has had several tentative offers in the New York area.


The Nooner's Day luncheons originated in Norfolk and is fast becoming Navy wide. Some of the naval installations that have these organizations aboard at present are the bases at Jacksonville, Quonset Point and Hawaii.
Purpose of the Nooner's Day luncheons is to enable the chief petty officers of the Base to receive general information concerning the Navy and other subjects from a higher level.
Approximate cost of the luncheons will be .75. Individuals will not make advance payment, but will pay at the meeting.
All Chiefs are urged to contact their welfare and recreation representative or the manager of the Club immediately, so an estimate can be obtained as to how many will attend the first luncheon.
Future meetings will be held on the second Tuesday of each month, at the same time, 1130 to 1300.
At present future plans for other guest speakers are the commanding officers of the Base and possibly some Cuban dignitaries.



Cougar Jet Lands

At McCalla Airfield


Saturday morning, an F9F-8 (Cougar) emergency landing Field.


September 1, jet made an at McCalla


Cause of the landing was general engine trouble. No damage resulted except for burned tires.
Pilot of the plane was LTJG E. C. Johnson, who is presently in Gtmo with VF-13 Auxiliary Squadron. The Squadron will be aboard the Base for one month's training.


'Spirit Of The Navy' On Gtmo :Stage In Oct., LclTln

"'The Spirit of the Navy" the Gtmo Little Theater organ- perience in lighting, sound effects, Arleigh Burke, Chief of Naval is coming to Gtmo. ization. set designing and decoration, or Operations. Admiral Burke, in The production is in the begin- any other field in the "behind the turn, called upon CDR Alan Brown, October 27 is the tentative ning stages and the need for ac- scenes" phase of the theater will a Hollywood script writer to carry production date of this his- tors, working crews, set designers, be key figures of "The Spirit of his idea through. +nvinl skr~d E3i1 1 M olk nlm akeun artists. lia-hting and sound the Navy." . .


many of the outstanding occurrences of U.S. Naval history.
LTJG Joseph Lewis and ENS Fred Anibal have teamed to coproduce and direct this narrative history of the U.S. Navy. Both Lewis and Anibal have had previous experience in the theater and at present are active members of


effects men and musicians is vital. Tryouts and readings for the allmale cast of 37 will be held September 10, 11 and 12 at the Community Auditorium at, 1930. According to Anibal and Lewis, "A large number of -people will be needed- to tryout." The need for working crews, and technical assistance is even greater. Personnel who have 'had ex-


Two other problems that face the producer - director team is bringing together personnel to comprise a men's chorus, and drill team. Anyone desiring to become a member of the cast or crew contact ENS Anibal or LTJG Lewis at 8-116.
The idea for the "Spirit of the Navy" originated with Admiral


According to LTJGi Lewis and ENS Anibal, who saw the production in Washington, CDR Brown's finished product plus the original music composed by LTJG Stuart Gordon, was thoroughly entertaining, giving -an insight into the men, places and things that have made the U.S. Navy what it is today.







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Page Two


Saturday; 8 September 1956


THE INDIAN

Ti, e Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a possible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel

RADM WILLIAM G. COOPER, Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

Editorial Staff

LCDR K. S. Dick --------------------------------- Officer-Advise~r
0G. L. 'Henderson, JOGC----------------- ------------------- Editor'
J. C. Curren, JOSN-------------------------..Managing Editor
E. U'. Orias, J03 --. --------------------- Feature Editor
D.D. Hinton, JOSN------------------------------- Staff Reporter

THE INDIAN iS published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P.35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropripteil funds.

Materials marked'AFPS may be used by news media provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All materials originated by THE. INDIAN may be used in whole or in part or without. credit.
All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.



Le av :Shop Talk At The Office!!

Remember World War*II? When you couldn't enter a bar or a restauyrgut. -without meeting head-on a sign, that. read, "A Slip of the LipMight Sink.. a Ship "

Well,'those signs, more or less, have gone the way of the one-horse shay. But, the need for security has not.

Security is a personal affair as well as a collective operation, Each man, no matter what his job, Must 'realize .the- need- for continuing security consciousness-personally, professionally and socially.

Security consciousness means locking the safe at the end of the day. ,It .means not confusing shop talk with small talk. It is not impressing someone_ with the importance of your. job-by detailing all the "hush hush" stuff you handle.

In this age of complex war machines, it is difficult to distinguish between classified items and those that are not. The best "rule of thumb" is to leave your job at the office.

Security consciousness must be with us always. There is no middle ground. We in the service either live with' the responsibilities of our job uppermost in mind-all the time--or the nation which has charged us with our special trust will be short-changed.




iMai The INDIAN Home


Calendar. of Events
Saturday, September 8
Catholian Catechism. Classes-BaseSchool*'10
Sunday, -September 9
11oly, Name Society .Cominunion Breakfast
Marine F;,mily Reastaurant-nimediately' following 000 Mass.
Monday, September. 10
0O.E.S., Chapter Meeting--Community Auditorlum-198O
Tuesda!Y, Stptember 11
Hopit~al S$ervicq..Yolunteers-Medical, Li-11brary (Hosp)- _1000-I'* .I CI'O."looner'g Day Luncioheo-CPO Club,1180-1800


Little Theater- Community Auditorium2leet Reserve Association-Flt. Rsv. Rm.
('Con. 'Aud.)-200
Fleet Reserve Association Auxiliary-Girl
Scout' Hut-2000
Wednesday.. September 13
Boy Scout Meeting-Chapol. Hill Auditorium-SSO
Toastmasstie' Club--Offcero' Club-183O
Thursday. September 13
Fellowcitaft Club 107$--Comminity Audi-, torium- 1930' Jr. Rifle and Pistol Club-Bldg. *27-1930
Friday, September 14
Yom. Kippur-Base Chapel-1730


Thne Chaplain's Corner


The Pride of Humility
Nobody likes'an arrogant, man', or. a. man. who "throws his weight around." Even the most conceited of men and women hidle their secret vanities under a ecunk of humiility. If the story in St. Luke (Chap. 14) were no more than a lesson in social graces, it would have to be considered the most successful of Christ's teachings. The whole world has accepted the external trappings' at least, of Christian humility. If anything we aencied-to carry the trappings into an "Alfonse-Gaston" caricature of humility.
We do not belittle the trappins. They graceful things and helpful to social living.: the. slight .blush that' deprecates *praise; the humble "I may be wrong but . .'." tbiAt Preludes our most dogmatic assertions; our external deference to others. Still and all, Christian humility goes much deeper than externals.
If you read the Gospel carefully, you will note that Christ taught the dignity and value of the hi~iman before launching into a- discourse on humility. According to a rigid interpretation of the Law, it was held unlawful to cure a man on the Sabbath; .and -yet, as Christ pointed out, the very men who insisted on that interpretation, would not hesitate to pull an ass or an ox out of a pit on the sacred day.
In the face of their disapproval, Christ went on to cure the man brought to him. A human being, He wanted to teach them, even a helpless, sick human being, is greater than an ox or. an ass or man-made laws.
Christ combines with a lesson on humility a lesson on the pride of human dignity. It is less than a half-truth to, tell a man that he is a mere handful of dust and therefore heshould be humble. He is dust infused by an immortal soul, a soul so 'precious that God Himself considered it worth the life and death of the God-man.
Created by God's individual act, created different from every other being that ever lived or will live, destined to live forever in the intimate family of God in heaven: that is the human being. He would be a poor human being indeed who failed to the conscious of his great dignity, who. did not demand from all the respect due to the greatness that is his.
Chaplain J.J. Sullivan


Last In Series..


APPS has prepared a three-part voting series to explain your state's voting laws. T his is the 10th and last in a series on registering to vote by absentee process.
Arkansas and Texas
There is no registration in these states.
North Dakota
Servicemen are exempted from all regristration requirements. Certain municipalities may require registration for elections held within the municipality. If this is the case, the County Auditor. will notify. Affected persons after receipt of ballot apllcation.
Alsa
Registration is necessary only for those municipal elections in which the city coun-, dll. or other governing authority of the municipality has directed that registration is. a prerequisite to voting. Such registra-; tion . must be accomplished annually in perqon-usually at voting time-at the seat of the municipall government. There i no iequiment for preregistratioin i 'the accoted sense of the* term for territorial elections. Registration for these elections is accomplished on election day.
Guam
Registration is permanent unless a voter


Sunday, 9 September 1956

CATHOLIC MASSES
Sunday: 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon.- through Fri.:
1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday: 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions-1700 - 1800, 1900 - 2000, and dAaily *before- Mass
PROTESTANT SERVICES Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 0930-Adult Bible Class Open
Air Assembly
1100-Protestant Divine Worship-Naval Base Chapel
1010-Felowship Tour-Open
Air Assembly
Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal JEWISH SERVICES Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel CHURCH OF CHRIST Sunday: 1000-Bible Study--Community Auditorium
1048-Worship Service--CommunIty Auditorium LATTER DAY SAINTS Sunday: 1100-Naval Station Library CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Sunday: 1100-Naval Station Library :CHAPLAINS AT THIS ACTIVITY
*CDR P. R. McPhee, CHC, USN
(Protestant)
'CDR J;' . Sullivan, cHC, 11517
(Catholic
failed to vote in the last general election. All qualified absent persons are registerd -automiatically when the. affidavit on the ballot envelope has ' been properly, ex-; ecuted and- accepted by the election officials; Therefore, registration in advance is not required.Fbr further 'iformation,' see your voting Officer.- (AFPS) .


9


THE INDIAN


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Saturday, 8 September 1056


40


THE INDIAN


Parents Of Triplets Are Flooded


Exchange Garage Permits Needed


With Gifts From Local Clubs., Grous Add AuoPlihn Before Builders


I


INDIAN Photo
Thursday afternoon, August 30, at the Base Hospitals' nursery ward, the Cole family consisting of Fleet Camera Party photographer and Mrs. James H. Cole and their set of triplets born Monday, August 20, were presented by the Trading Post with a cartload of gifts.
Other gifts received by the Coles on different occasions were a $40 check endorsed by the Fleet Camera Party, $28 check from the CPO Wives Club and another $40 check from the Felloweraft Club. Various organizations and clubs have also gifted the Coles with various baby items.
The Coles were residents of Caimanera before the birth of their triplets. The Commander Naval Base has granted the family the privilege of occupying government quarters on the Base until their transfer to the states in mid-October.
To set up housekeeping in Villamar when the mother and the triplets move out of the hospital, the Coles will be assisted by a maid through the courtesy of the local Eastern Star Club. The club also gave three cribs to the family.



Middies Leave Sidelight

A total of 25,000 Naval personnel which included officers, midshipmen and ship's company enlisted men were involved in the three separate Middle Cruises that wound up in Guantanamo Bay recently.
Last of the three cruises was Midshipman Baker which departed Monday night, August 27.
The three cruises caused quite a stir on the Base. But one thing nobody knows about, except three Cubans, is the sidelight that transpired at the Naval Station swimming pool check-room.
Lincoln McCalla, in charge of the checkroom and Morris Durant and Roland Claxton, lifeguards, have this statistical tale to tell:
Two thousand five hundred men of the three Middie Cruises utilized the Naval Station swimming pool.
Total amount checked in by these men for safekeeping amounted to an appalling sum of $23,000.
Seven out of the 2,500 men deposited $200 or more each, 40 entrusted $100 or more each, while 11 had no 'money at all.
The largest amount of money deposited by one single i ndividual -was $308. Owner of this sum was Robert L. Mayo, SN, of the USS GEARING. He was at the pool on August 26, 1956.
Smallest amount. deposited belonged to R. A. Radeckl, Midshipman 3/c, of the 1155 IOWA. The money checked in by Radeki on July 25, 1956 was a measly sum of $A.40
Also deposited were 631 cameras of all makes, 1,236 cigarette lighters and 1,702 wrist watches.


A polishing job through the* application of a liquid wax has recently been added by the Navy Exchange Garage to its "car.-body cleansing" service.
Before the addition of this new car-polishing feature, the garage has had only car-wash and solid wax simonizing facilities. Base private vehicle owners will now get a speedy service that incurs even less damages to their pockets with this new feature according to W.E. Koenig, garage manager.
Queried as to what makes the new polish job different from simonizing, the garage manager said: "In simonizing, a great deal of time and effort are involved, in addition to its being expensive. But the polish job, he argued, is cheaper and quicker to accomplish."
Prices tabled by the garage on car-body cleaning service are $1, for car wash alone, $2.50 for polish job and $7.00 for simionizing.


Windmill Beach Road

Gets Asphalt Coat

The gravel road from Radio Range to Windmill Beach will be opened for traffic this weekend after a resurfacing job by the Public Works Center.
Called a stabilized asphalt road, the improved route to the beach is' a Public Works Center experiment since it is the first such asphalt. road on the Base.
Although this is a first for Gtmo, many midwestern county roads use the same process which costs only half as much as regular black top. In about a week Public Works will lay a top seal on the road.


Gtmo Bay Golfers

Defeat Santiago
RADM William G. Cooper, CoinNayBase, played host to the golf players of the Santiago Country Club during the past weekend.
At -the local links, the Base golfers, headed by RADM Cooper soundly defeated the visitors. The final score was 38 for Gtmo and 16 for Santiago.
Meanwhile, Chief Shea Iof the Fleet Training Group was declared' last week* thT wiir of 'the Base Men's Handicap Tournament,'with air controlman Spriggs gaining the runner-up pos~tion. Trophies and other prizes for this tournament will be awarded shortly.


Can Constr uct

Public Works Center has cau.tioned "do-it-yourself" builders to observe provisions of existing Base regulations. A building permit is required by Base regulations for any new construction or alteration to quarters, or any government owned facility.
Construction or alterations -include TV antennas, boat houses, patios, car ports, fences, etc. Personnel currently working on projects without a permit must obtain a permit as soon as possible.
The Base Regs state that the permit must be posted in a prominent location at the job site immediately before and during the job. Permits may be obtained at the Public. Works Center, Maintenance Control division, building 13.
The permit will describe the construction,.location, bear a serial number and the date of issue, etc. The permit must be displayed until the job is completed, at which time the Public Works inspector will note the satisfactory completion of the work in accordance with the specifications.
-After construction is completed, tu e permit must. be returned to the Public Works Center, for filing.



CPO's Lead NavSta

Softball League
With -approximately a month of play remaining in the Naval Sta-. tion intra-mural softball league,' the Chief Petty Officers squad looks like the team to beat. Not too far behind the CPOs though is Second Division.
As of September 3 the CPOs sported a record of four wins against no losses while Second Division had five wins and one loss. In third position as of that date was Commissary with three victories and one defeat.
Standings as of Septemnber


Chief Petty Officers Second Division 1-4-7-Commissary Security Detachment Fifth Division Fleet Camera Party Electronics Sixth Division


Win Loss
4 0 5 '1

3 2 2 3

1 4 0 5


A great many people, like cats,. lick themselves with their tongues.


06


M.


Pagb Three







M
Page Four


Saturday, 8 September 1956


Navy Wives Club Has 50 Local Members


by Ely U. Orias

Twenty - seven wives who answered a Long Beach, California newspaper ad in February, 1931, inviting all wives of enlisted men of the United States Navy "to bond together and promote sociability and service, among us and our husbands," signalled the birth of .the now - mushrooming Navy Wives' Clubs all over the world.

The ad was a direct result of the transfer from the eastern seaboard to Long Beach of a big group of sailors who were followed by their wives.
These 27 Navy Wives' Club forerunners first met under the name of the Service Men's Club of Long Beach. Having met under that name for four years, it was decided in 1935, to form an organization on a national scale.
On June 3, 1936, the Great Seal of the State of California was affixed to its Articles of Incorporation by the state secretary-and so was born the Navy Wives' Club of America.
Their organizational plank and objectives as provided in the articles of incorporation states in part: "Our particular aim is to promote and encourage a friendly and sympathetic social relationship between the wives of the men of the United States Navy, and to assist, help and encourage each other for the purpose of contentment and enlightenment."

In Guantanamo Buy there is an active Navy Wives' Club. As a m ember of the incorporated Navy Wives Club of America, it adopts the principles and aims of that massive organization. To implement, its objectives, the local club has consistently and regularly entertained Base hospital patients with refreshments and coffee.

At Christmas time the Gtmo club undertakes the wrapping of the Base's Christmas packages for children. Members of the club also take turns meeting USTS transports where they collaborate with Tradingr Post representatives in taking care of service babies while the mothers take a Base shopping tour.

A relatively new feature on the varied activities program of the 1o1a group is the creation of a Tmige Printing Class. Instructors at this chass have gained experienee in that line while members of stateside clubs and are more than willing, without benefit of remunerition, to teach their local col-


INDIAN Photo
One of the activities of the Guantanamo Bay chapter of the Navy Wives' Club is the entertaining of the men at the Naval Base Hospital. Caught in one of their periodic "give away"~ sessions in a hospital ward are left to right: Betty James, Flora Higgs, Chief C. H. Aumann, injured in a scooter accident and still in the hospital; Anne Garvey, secretary of the Navy Wives' Club, and Ellen Van Cleef, president of the organization for Gtmo.


leagues.
On the lighter side of things, the club holds a luncheon each month, or occasionally a social in the evening, in order that husbands of members may meet socially.
Members of the local club are, as In any other Navy Wives' Club throughout the world, composed chiefly of wives of active duty enlisted men of the United States Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard and their respective reserve components.
Wives of servicemen who have been honorably discharged after 16 years of service and women who are friendly to the Club's cause are also eligible to become members.
Membership fees are $1.50 and a monthly due of $.26. Before one becomes a bona-fide member, she must first attend three club meetings, one of which should be a business meeting.
Officers of the local Navy Wives' Club which has a member-strength of 50, are Ellen Van Cleef, president; Louise Smith, vice-president; Anne Garvey, Rec secretary; Mary Jeff ers, Corres secretary; Jean Zemaitis, treasurer; Mike French, Master-at-Arms; Louis Fairchild, historian, anod Pat Aldridge, parliamentarian.
The Club's headquarters are tatiogrsrilv housed in the Girl S'hmst quoaeet hut on Marina PoWn.

Maxacer pointingg to cigarette
butt on stockroom floor): "Smith, is this yours?"
Smith: "Not at all sir. You saw it first."


Devil - Dog Doin's

The Sergeant Major seems to be losing all his office staff. Thursday his right-hand man, Sgt. Lambert, left for leave and duty at Quantico, Virginia. Sgt. Lambert will be working for his old C.O., Col. Fojt, on the equipment board.

The Staff NCOs held an election Tuesday night to vote in a new manager and member for the board of governors. TSgt Burnis was handed the job of manager and and TSgt Carter won the position of secretary on the board of governors.

The intra-barracks s o f t b a 11 league isn't as sewed up as the Angels thought. They were twotime winners over the Bums and the Hoboes, but more than met their match against the old men of the Strikeouts, who tossed them their first defeat by a -score of 14 to 0.
At present, the league stands with the Strikeouts won 2, lost 1; Angels won 2, lost 1; Hoboes won 1, lost 1; Bumns lost 2. Wednesday the Bums have a good chance of climbing the ladder by defeating the Hoboe".
The league is proving to be just about squared away as far 'as playing talent goes. Each of the four teams are pretty eTr~ly matched. Should be an interesting season.


06


FTG & FTC Bulletin

The end of the Base Golf tournament last Saturday saw Shea, BTC, bringing home the bacon for FTC
-congratulations to the new Base Handicap champion! The grind was a long and ardurous one, but Shea came through when it counted most.
The FTG softball team is coming nicely-practice games are the order of the day.
Two newly arrived officers were welcomed aboard this past week. LTJG David McIntosh, USCG came from the WPG ANDROSCOGGIN, Coast Guard search and rescue ship at Miami. His family is presently at Miami and will be on board later. ENS, Homer L. Ford Jr., USN comes to the Group by way of USS SUNBIRD CASR-15) and OCS. His family will soon leave Norwich, Conn. for sunny Gtmo.
With the end of the fishing tournament and the hunting season not yet started, the Group families were surprised to see "Pop" around on the weekend, making the most of the lull LCDR's Hamlin, Williams nad CWO Harper and their families motored to Santiago. They all report roads in as good a shape as they ever have been.
There are a couple of familiar faces back in the area, LCDR Dan Douglas returns as skipper of VF22 on the F. D. ROOSEVELT (CV A-42), having left the Air Department, FTG in February 1956. LCDR Robert Minard formerly of the Gunnery Department, FTG returned in command of USS NAWMAN (DE-416) for a worm's eye view of training proceedings. Welcome back to Gtmo I
CAPT and Mrs. Owen B. Murphy leave. Gtmo on September 14 by transport. CAPT Murphy has been Training Officer at FTG and will take command of USS CANISTEO (AO-99).
A quick survey at press time indicated that a long weekend could be habit forming, particularly after payday-but we all enjoyed it. Made it rough on your reporter getting together news items though, with all FTG at sea making up for the lost day.


Holy Name Society

Meets Sun. Morning

Guantanamo Bay's Holy Name Society will meet tomorrow morning at the Marine Family restaurant following the 9:00 Mass.

Guests from Guantanamo City are expect ted at the 'Communion breakfast. They are Jose Luis Amadeo, Jeorge Suarez, Dr. Fausto A. Salven t, Serafin Bustabad, Ricardo Rico, Eiego Aguilera, Florentino Calvinio and Jose Mota.


9


THE INDIAN


Ms







Saturday,. 8 September 1956


THE INDIAN


Colts Cop Little League's World


1956 Polar Expedition Will Depart


Series Playoffs, Take 2 Fro m Hawks: On Antaci Ventur*e This Month


The Guantanamo Bay Little League- World Series playoffs came to a close Saturday afternoon, 'September 1, at the,.Villamar Ball Park. Sealing the prize-packaged play-off pennant with the finishing touches of a 972 shellacking, the Colts were declared World Series champions against the Hawks.
Qualifying for the two-out-of-three games in the World Series championship eliminations after routing the Bears, the Hawks lost out to the Colts in their first encounter Saturday, August 25 and again dropped the ball last Saturday.


First to slug in last Saturday's game, the Hawks opened the inning with Dave Williams moving into first on a walk. With two mnen out, Bruce Barackman hit a fly to right field which proved too elusive to the Colts' right fielder.
While Barackman's hit was in the air, Williams moved into third. Then Sterling Case blasted the ball toward center field, enabling Williams to cross home plate and Case to negotiate second.
The Colts initiated their first batting program with Skip Cook walloping a fly to right field on a three-bagger reward. With Jack Kenworthy pounding another twobagger, Cook maneuvered home. Taking advantage of a wild pitch, Kenworthy dashed for third.
While Mack Gendrau was at bat Kenworthy stole home. The first inning ended with a 2-1 investment, with the Colts leading. In the early part of the third stanza, the Colts collected four runs, two of which- were stolen while the other two were docketted through a swift grounder hit by Steve Cook.
Fourth inning was scoreless, while on top of the fifth, the Colts racked up three runs. The sixth inning found Case swinging a fast ball that sent Barackman to third from first while the batter moved into second. Then on a wild pitch, Barackman took advantage and scored.
Final score was 9-2 in favor of the Colts.
Score by Innings
Colts 2 0 4 0 3 x Hawks 1 0 0 0 0 1
After last Saturday's game, a victory party for the Colts was held at the CP6 Club where a chicken dinner, ice cream and cakes were served to the World Series winners.
With the Little League season and the World Series concluded, the Little League players, all 175 of' them, will again assemble. But this time its no longer the ball scram-. ble they were used to, no more of the sweat, dirt or the emotional insomnia that-often struck them. It's a social, 'a banquet where trophies are to be awarded.
Date for the banquet was not determined at press time.


What Din' Stateside
Jimmy Faulk, 11, a prosperous Oklahoma City snail-raiser, has some authentic information about the slow-moving mollusks.
By actual count, Jimmy says, a healthy adult snail travels about an inch in 15 seconds.
Even more interesting to the young businessman is the way snails keep fishbowls clean, something owners of. fishbowls will pay nickles and dimes for.
He's delighted with the ease of production. "'No mess or bother," Jimmy explains brightly. "Just put the male and female together and they raise eggs."
Those old standbys, the "I told that cop to . "stories, will have to be changed a little to keep. up the new look in policemen.
Used to be the parlor lawyers said :they- were'- cool and collectedd when pinched, but the officer got hot under the collar.
Now some police uniform designers have gone to open-collar shirts for summer wear, and backed up the anti-redneck drive with regulation cowboy-style hats of cool and comfortable straw. With all these changes, it seems that only the end to the Cop-driver stories will stay the same; " and he just picked up his summonsbook and started writing." 'A recent cooking contest turned ub' a' trend toward fancy recipes ind delicate flavoring in onceplain American food. Leading the way were several enthusiastic male entrants.


.Washington (AFPS) ---Operation Deepfreeze II," the 1956. expedition supporting American 'scientific study in the Antarctic, gets underway in September, the Navy has announced.
The second 'venture to the South Pole, directed by RADM Richard E.


Byrd (ret.), is part of, a four-year program of earth-science studies for the International Geophysical Year, 1957-58.
More than 3,000 sailors and seabees with leave from East and West Coast ports in 12 ships between September anid the'end of the year to build four *scientific stations, two support bases and new air facilities at the- "bottom of the world," in addition to the two %major bases getup during "Deepefreeze I" in 1955.
1Some 166 Americans remained at the two bases in Antarctica followi *ng last year's operation, 93 at McMurdo Sound and 73 at Little America on Kainan Bay. Most of those who wiatered at the Little America base will move overland by tractortrain to erect a station at Marie


Byrd Land.
Those from other bases will build a scienfic outpost on the 10,000foot polar plateau at the geographical South Pole during October.
Navy planes first will land the seabees on the plateau; the AF Globemasters will airdrop 500 tons of building material and equipment. The planes will fly in from New Zealand.
Men were left at the bases over the winter to accomplish as much as possible between the time daylight begins i September and when Ships carrying supplies can first break through the ice pack in December..
RADM George Dufek (ret.) heads the ships and units engaged in the Polar, operation.,.


Anybody ForCo .ffee?, Black, Sugar?



World.'. Rarely Imitates U.'S. Mixes

New York (AFPS) -Although Americans consume,60 per cent of the world's coffee export, with a large assist from heavy coffee drinkers in the Armed Forces, American coffee drinking habits are rarely


imitated in other countries.
According to the. National Geographic Society, the Frenchman will have cafe' au lait-coffee with hot milk-for a morning pickme-up at his favorite sidewalk cafe.
An Arab generally drinks his coffee without *sugar or milk, and while he mnay take a sip of water before his coffee, a water chaser is considered a breach of etiquette.
Uganda natives swill a banana and coffee concoction and eat raw coffee berries. Algerians gave a booa to sweltering Amerleans whent they originated a sweetened cold coffee mixture, likely the father of iced


H ouse Trailers Arrived Wed. Morn.,

All Will Be Ready Next Friday

Eighteen pastel and white colored Prairie Schooner' house trailers purchased by the Navy Exchange arrived in Guantanai dWednesday *morning aboard the SS TRANSUNION. Two of the original 20 were smashed in the process of loading. The trailers were delayed a mouth due to the unavailability-of transportation.
Public Works Center is currently installing the 28 foot, 6 inch homes in the sites already prepared for them across from the Navy E~xchange garage. PWC expects 'to have all the trailers ready for occupancy by the end of next week.


coffee.
-The Turks take their coffee drinking so much to heart that during the 18th century a mant, when he married, had to promise to keep his wife in coffee. Failure provided grounds (no pun intended.). for'- divorce.
King Gustavus 111, .an early Swedish monarch, was determined to discover if coffee had, h armful effects. When two identical twins were sentenced to death for murdler,, he commuted their sentences to..life imprisonment with large daily doses of tea for one brother and coffee for the other.

Chain coffee drinkers will *be interested 'to learn 'that the tea drinker died first-at the age of 83. A nd: now Swedes drink more coffee, ,man-for-man, than- do Americanis.
That's; all Time - for -a- coffee break."Aren't, you ashamed," the judge asked:- the man, "ltot have -your, wife suppo rt you by doing suoh. imenial Work V"
"lYes, I am,. you honor," he replied, "but what 'can I do? She's too, ignorant to do anything else."


9


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P'age Mie






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Page six


Saturday, 8 September 1956


Saturday, Sept. 8 1:00 Winky Dink & You'
1 :30 Zoo Parade
2 :00 CAPT Gallant 2 :30 Godfrey Time
3 :00 Robt. Q; Lewis
3 :30 Lighted Window
4 :00 Riders of the Rockies 5:00 Big Picture 5 :30 Dunninger
6 :00 Harry Owens 6:30 Beat the Clock
7 :00 George Gobel
7 :30 Hit Parade
8 :00 Jackie Gleason 9:00 Stage Show 9:10 Star tonight Sunday, Sept. 9 1:00 Winky Dink & You
1 :30 Eddie Fisher 1:43 House Party 2 :00 Roy Rogers 2 :30 Garry Moore
3 :00 Frontiers of Faith 3:30 Mr. Peepers 4:00 Ted Mack
5 :00 You Asked for It


5 :30 Sun. News Headlines
5 :45 Industry on Parade 6:00 Mama
6 :30 You Are There 7:00 What's My Line
7 :30 Loretta Young
8 :00 Ed Sullivan Show 9 :00 Robt Montgomery
Presents
Monday, Sept. 10 5 :30 News Parade 5 :45 Perry Como
6 :00 Pantomine Quiz 6:30 Talent Scouts
7 :00 My Favorite Husband
7 :10 Highway Patrol 3:00 Cid Caesar 9:00 Studio One
Tuesday, Sept. 11
5 :10 News Parade 5 :45 Julius LaRosa
6 :00 Disney Land 7 :00 Meet Millie 7 :30 Red Skelton 8 :00 Russ Morgan 8:30 Justice
0 :00 Steel Hour


WGBY Television


Ci ne ma - Scoo 60 i LOG 400ProsAen

by. Don Hinton M0ProsAtn


Back at the old typewriter again and at a loss for words at the prospect of the flicks 'that- I have to cuss and'di ,scuss this week. This statement does not apply to the first two, however.
Harder, They Fall (Col.), bears the* distinctive touch of 'director Mark Robson. Humphrey Bogart, Rod Steiger and .Jan Sterling head the cast., Steiger is, pure talent, as has been evidenced by previous films, "Big Knife" and "Jubal." Story concerns the evils of the boxing ring and the brutality of the pitcure will be a detracting factor in many people's enjoyment of it. An. excellent picture and one all should see.
Meet Me In, Las Vegas (MGM, in color), is great . .. excellent
...outstanding and all other expressions of praise! Cyd Charisse finally emerges the great star that she should have been long ago. The plot ...the old Standby, boy gets girl . .. but with Las Vegas as the background and Cyd as the girl . . . need I say more. Dan Dailey is co-starred and Lena Horne and Frankie Lamne are guest stars. "Hollywood Reporter" termed this Super, duper musical as top entertainment. See it!
Rage At Dawn (RKO, in color) ..Randolph Scott and Forrest Tucker . .. usual Randy Scott goings on ...as for a rating, the usual Randy Scott rating. Africansa (Broder, in color), is a documentary of Africa. I know nothing of this picture, but such a film is very poor fare for our Base lyceums. These documentaries usually play on a double bill. ILady Godiva (U.I., in color).. Maureen O'Hara and George Nader ... the age old story ... fair
..played the Base before.
Green Buddha (Rep.) ... Wayne Morris 'and Mary Germaine.. no information on this one, but


Saturday. September 8
NavSta Harder They Fall-OB min. NAS-Searchers-ilO min. Mar. Site-While the City Sleeps-OD min. Villa.-Second Greatest Sex-96 min. MCB-1-You'Ye Never Too Young-OS min. Lwd. Pt.-Catered Affair-112 min.
Sunday, September 9
NavSta-Meet Me In Las Vegas-124 min. NAS-Harder They Fall Mar. Site -Pete Kelly's Blues-114 min. Villa.-While the City Sleeps MCB-1-Second Greatest Sex Lwd. Pt.-You're Never Too Young
Monday. September 10 NavSta-Rage At Dawn-9S min. NA S-Meet Me In Las Vegas Mar. Site-Searchers Villa.-Pete Kelly's Blues MCB-1-While the City Sleeps Lwd. Pt.-Second Greatest Sex
Tuesday. September 11 NavSta-Africana-97 min. NAS-Rage At Dawn Mar. Site-Harder They Fall Villa.-Searchers MCB-1-Pete Kelly's Blues Lwd. Pt.-While the City Sleeps
Wednesday. September 12 NavSta-Lady Godiva-119 min. NAS-Africans Mar. Site-Meet Me In Las Vegas Villa.-Harder They Fall MCB-I-Searchers Lwd. Pt.-Pete Kelly's Blues
Thursday, September 13
NavSta-Green Buddha-D min. NA S-Lady Godiva. Mar. Site-Rage At Dawn Villa.-Meet Me In Las Vegas MCB-1-Harder They Fall Lwd. Pt.--Searchera
Friday, September 14
NavSta-Wild Dakotas-09 min. NAS-Green Budcdha Mar. Site-African& Villa.-Rage At Dawn MCB-1-Meet Me In Las Vegas Lwd. Pt.-Harder They r~all

will no doubt add up to 90 minutes of boredom.
Wild Dakotas (Lippert) . . . Bill Williams and Jim Davis . . . the time worn low budget western, that will keep coming from Hollywood as long as it exists.


First P T A Meeting

Approximately 400 attended the first meeting of the Parent Teacher's Association, Tuesday evening, September 4, at the Chapel Hill Auditorium. This was believed to be the largest number of people to attend a PTA meeting in the history of Guantanamo Bay.
August 16, school registration day, 299 had joined the organization and Tuesday evening 134 more joined.

The, first meeting was called to order by LCDR J. Bayer, PTA president, followed by a selection by the Junior Glee club. Chaplain P. R. McPhee then delivered the invocation.
OWO R. B. Abbott gave a talk on UNICEF. T. G. Scarborough, Base school superintendent, followed CWO Abbott with a short talk 'on the prospects of the 1956-57 school year.
Scarborough pointed out ;that the 1951 school registration was 378 as compared ,to this year's 1,029. He then introduced the teachers for the, 1956-57 school term.
Attendence awards for this first meeting of the year went to Mrs. Benedini, Mrs. Doohen, Mrs. Becker, Mrs. Liveakos, Mrs. Ward, Mrs. Yarbro and Mrs. Walker.


Pro gram
,Wednesday, Sept. 12 5, :30 News Parade 5:45 Jane Froman 6:00 Two for the Money 6 :30 Professional Father 7:00 You Bet Your Life7 :30 I've Got a Secret
8 :00 Godfrey & Friends
9 :00 TV Theater
Thursday, Sept. 13
5 :30 News Parade 5:45 Bob Crosby
6 :00 Calvacade of America 6:30 This Is Your Life 7:00 Dollar a Second 7:30 Big Town 8:00 Playhouse of Stars 8:30 Johnny Carson 9:00 Climax
Friay Sept. 14 5 :30 News Parade
5 :45 Jo Stafford
6 :00 Truth or Consequences
6 :30 Life With Father
7 :00 Life of Riley 7:30 Crusader
8 :00 Chevy Hour
9 :00 Boxing


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Send The INDIAN

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THE INDIAN


Book - Nook

by R.C.D.
Du Maurier, Daphne. This excellent English novelist of our day and age has written several books. Two of the better ones are "Rebecca" and "My Cousin Rachel." Her setting is usually a huge house on the'cliffs of wild Cornwall, and her ability to incorporate the element of 'suspense into her novels is well-used. The two books listed above are guaranteed A-1 reading.
Dumas, Alexandre. This nineteenth-century French writer will undoubtedly appeal to ambitious readers who plunge into "The Count of Monte Cristo." Dumas didn't spare any words when he wrote, and the result is an. overlong and sometimes tedious novel, but the fact remains that the author is a highly successful storyteller.
Ferber, Edna. The library has five of the six books she has written, each dealing with a different local-color region of the United States. She's by no means a great novelist,.but she tells a good story, a .nd the settings are appealing. "Show Boat" is a representative example.
Faulkner, William. "A Fable" is
-his only novel here. I don't like him and couldn't get beyond the first chapter. Without a doubt many people do, because he has won the Nobel Prize for his wr .iting.z
Field, Rachel. This almost unknown writer has some good novels to her credit. "All This and Heaven Too" is perhaps her best, and "Time out of Mind" is deserving of consideration.
Forester, E. M. A modern English, novelist who has had a tremendous following in years gone by. His classic remains "A Passage to, -India," which is the literary handb ook of Birtish colonialism in India.
,Galsworthy, John. One of the finest, books, without exception, in the Library is "The Forsyte Saga." Galsworthy has immortalized the Forsytes in this trilogy, in which he follows their fortunes for three generations., This is a book which no one can afford to ignore.
Gallico, Paul. He is a contemplorary American whose style is his most appealing aspect. "The Snow Goose" is perhaps the best of the seven books here.




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PAGE 1

w m m Cubana Airlines To Begin Flights CPOs Begin Nooner's Day Luncheon From McCalla Field To Santiago Tues., RADM Cooper First Speaker The Cubana Air Lines will establish commercial flight operations from McCalla airfield to Santiago de Cuba and return as soon as negotiations between the Naval Air Station and the air line company are completed, according to an announcement made by CAPT G.L. Kohr, NAS Commanding Officer. The Base CPO Club will inaugurate a Nooner's Day luncheon organization on September 11, from 1130 to 1300. The luncheon will be held at the CPO Club. Guest speaker at the first meeting will be RADM W. G. Cooper, ComNavBase. Naval Air Station received this past week a letter from the Chief of Naval Operations advising the command that its request to permit the Cubana Air Lines to land at McCalla and set up regular flight operations for Base residents has been approved. CNO Directed Implementing its approval, the Chief of Naval Operations has directed the Bureau of Yards and Docks to issue a landing permit to the Cubana Air Lines. Pending the issuance of the landing permit, CNO has also authoriized the Naval Air Station to notify the Cubana Air Lines to commence flight operations. The establishment of this private air line service on the Base is intended to accomodate military personnel and their dependents desiring off-base liberty and recreation. It was reported that Cubana Air Lines has indicated a willingness to provide air service to many points in the Caribbean area as well as to the United States on a charter basis. Soon to Santiago However, Commander N a v a 1 Base has signified that it is imperative to establish at the earliest, regular scheduled flights from NAS to Santiago, leaving here Friday and returning Sunday. Naval Air Station authorities disclosed that negotiations will be undertaken immediately. Present plans point to the Naval Station Special Services department as the most logical military unit to assume control in connection with passenger flight reservation, the sale of tickets and the administration of advertising programs. COVERS GTMO LIKE THE SUNSHINE U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Volume VII, No. 36 Saturday, 8 September 1956 LTJG Wagner, Former N.S. Officer, Appears On Ed Sullivan's TV Show A former Crypto Officer of the Naval Station was among the successful finalists in the All-Navy talent contest. LTJG Alan Wagner, with the other finalists, appeared on Ed Sullivan's television show August 26. LTJG Wagner, currently stationed at 90 Church Street in New York in the Public. Information office of the Third Naval District, did a comedy monologue routine on the show and reports from New York say it was "pretty good." 15 on TV This was the third annual AllNay contest. Finals were held in St. Albans Naval Hospital, Brooklyn, N.Y. Immediately after the finals, producers of the "Ed Sullivan Show" named 15 of the top acts for their August 26 show. Following the television appearance, the troupe of 15, known as "Tops in Blue," left on a 32 day coast to coast tour, working their way to San Francisco and back to the East Coast again. According to an informed source at AFRTS in New York, the kinescope film of the TV show should reach Guantanamo Bay's WGBY in six or seven weeks. Active In Gtmo Dramatics While stationed in Guantanamo Bay, LTJG Wagner was active in the Little Theater and also participated in a weekly program formerly aired by WGBY-"Radio Workshop." Due to be released from active duty in about four months, LTJG Wagner plans to make dramatics his career. Already he has had several tentative offers in the New York area. The Nooner's Day luncheons originated in Norfolk and is fast becoming Navy wide. Some of the naval installations that have these organizations aboard at present are the bases at Jacksonville, Quonset Point and Hawaii. Purpose of the Nooner's Day luncheons is to enable the chief petty officers of the Base to receive general information concerning the Navy and other subjects from a higher level. Approximate cost of the luncheons will be .75. Individuals will not make advance payment, but will pay at the meeting. All Chiefs are urged to contact their welfare and recreation representative or the manager of the Club immediately, so an estimate can be obtained as to how many will attend the first luncheon. Future meetings will be held on the second Tuesday of each month, at the same time, 1130 to 1300. At present future plans for other guest speakers are the commanding officers of the Base and possibly some Cuban dignitaries. Cougar Jet Lands At McCalla Airfield Saturday morning, September 1, an F9F-8 (Cougar) jet made an emergency landing at McCalla Field. Cause of the landing was general engine trouble. No damage resulted except for burned tires. Pilot of the plane was LTJG E. C. Johnson, who is presently in Gtmo with VF-13 Auxiliary Squadron. The Squadron will be aboard the Base for one month's training. 'Spirit Of The Navy' On Gtmo Stage In Oct., Local Talent "The Spirit of the Navy" is coming to Gtmo. October 27 is the tentative production date of this historical pageant which tells many of the outstanding occurrences of U.S. Naval history. LTJG Joseph Lewis and ENS Fred Anibal have teamed to coproduce and direct this narrative history of the U.S. Navy. Both Lewis and Anibal have had previous experience in the theater and at present are active members of the Gtmo Little Theater organization. The production is in the beginning stages and the need for actors, working crews, set designers, makeup artists, lighting and sound effects men and musicians is vital. Tryouts and readings for the allmale cast of 37 will be held September 10, 11 and 12 at the Community Auditorium at 1930. Ac-. cording to Anibal and Lewis, "A large number of people will be needed to tryout." The need for working crews and technical assistance is even greater. Personnel who have had experience in lighting, sound effects, set designing and decoration, or any other field in the "behind the scenes" phase of the theater will be key figures of "The Spirit of the Navy." Two other problems that face the producer -director team is bringing together personnel to comprise a men's chorus and drill team. Anyone desiring to become a member of the cast or crew contact ENS Anibal or LTJG Lewis at 8-116. The idea for the "Spirit of the Navy" originated with Admiral Arleigh Burke, Chief of Naval Operations. Admiral Burke, in turn, called upon CDR Alan Brown, a Hollywood script writer to carry his idea through. According to LTJG Lewis and ENS Anibal, who saw the production in Washington, CDR Brown's finished product plus the original music composed by LTJG Stuart Gordon, was thoroughly entertaining, giving an insight into the men, places and things that have made the U.S. Navy what it is today.

PAGE 2

Page Two THE INDIAN THE INDIAN Tl Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a possible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personneL RADM WILLIAM G. COOPER, Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Editorial Staff LCDR K. S. Dick -------------------------------Officer-Adviser G.L. Henderson, JOC --.-------------------------------Editor J. C. Curren, JOSN ----------------------------Managing Editor E. U. Orias, JO3 03 ---------------------------------Feature Editor D. D. Hinton, JOSN -----------------------------Staff Reporter THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P.35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriAted funds. Materials marked AFPS may be used by news media provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All materials originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part or without credit. All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. Leave Shop Talk At The Office!!! Remember World War II? When you couldn't enter a bar or a restaurant. without meeting head-on a sign that read, "A Slip of the LipMight Sink a Ship?" The Chaplain's Corner The Pride of Humility Nobody likes an arrogant man, or a man who "throws his weight around." Even the most conceited of men and women hide their secret vanities under a cloak of humility. If the story in St. Luke (Chap. 14) were no more than a lesson in social graces, it would have to be considered the most successful of Christ's teachings. The whole world has accepted the external trappings. at least, of Christian humility. If anything, we are inclined to carry the trappings into an "Alfonse-Gaston" caricature of humility. We do not belittle the trappings. They are graceful things and helpful to social living: the. slight blush that deprecates praise; the humble "I may be wrong but ...'-that preludes our most dogmatic assertions; our external deference to others. Still and all, Christian humility goes much deeper than externals. If you read the Gospel carefully, you will note that Christ taught the dignity and value of the human before launching into a discourse on humility. According to a rigid interpretation of the Law, it was held unlawful to cure a man on the Sabbath; and yet, as Christ pointed out, the very men who insisted on that interpretation would not hesitate to pull an ass or an ox out of a pit on the sacred day. In the face of their disapproval, Christ went on to cure the man brought to him. A human being, He wanted to teach them, even a helpless, sick human being, is greater than an ox or. an ass or man-made laws. Christ combines with a lesson on humility a lesson on the pride of human dignity. It is less than a half-truth to. tell a man that he is a mere handful of dust and therefore he should be humble. He is dust infused by an immortal soul, a soul so precious that God Himself considered it worth the life and death of the God-man. Created by God's individual act, created different from every other being that ever lived or will live, destined to live forever in the intimate family of God in heaven: that is the human being. He would be a poor human being indeed who failed to the conscious of his great dignity, who. did not demand from all the respect due to the greatness that is his. Chaplain J.J. Sullivan Well, those signs, more or less, have gone the way of the one-horse shay. But, the need for security has not. Security is a personal affair as well as a collective operation, Each man, no matter what his job, must realize .the need. for continuing security consciousness-personally, professionally and socially. Security consciousness means locking the safe at the end of the day. It means not confusing shop talk with small talk. It is not impressing someone with the importance of your job by detailing all the "hush hush" stuff you handle. In this age of complex war machines, it is difficult to distinguish between classified items and those that are not. The best "rule of thumb" is to leave your job at the office. Security consciousness must be with us always. There is no middle ground. We in the service either live with the responsibilities of our job uppermost in mind-all the time-or the nation which has charged us with our special trust will be short-changed. Mail The INDIAN Home Calendar of Events Saturday, September 8 Catholic Catechism Classes-Base School1060 Sunday, September 9 Holy Name Society Communion Breakfast Marine Family Restaurant-Immediately following 0900 Mass. Monday, September 10 O.E.S. Chapter Meeting--Community Auditorium-1980 Tuesday, September 11 Hospital Servie -Volunteers-Medical Library (Hosp)-1000 CPO'Nooner's Day Lunoheon-CPO Club1130-1800 Little Theater-Community Auditorium1930 ?Fleet Reserve Association-Flt. Rsv. Rm. (Com. Auid.)-2000 Fleet Reserve Association Auxiliary-Girl Scout' Rut-2000 Wednesday, September 13 Boy Scout Meeting--Chapel Hill Auditorium-1380 Toastmaster's Club-Offieers' Club-1880 Thursday. September 18 Fellowetaft Club 1078-Community Auditorium-1980 Jr. Rifle and Pistol Club-Bldg. 27-1930 Friday, September 14 Yom Kippur-Base Chapel-170 AFPS has prepared a three-part voting series to explain your state's voting laws. This is the 10th and last in a series on registering to vote by absentee process. Arkansas and Texas There is no registration in these states. North Dakota Servicemen are exempted from all registration requirements. Certain municipalities may require registration for elections held within the municipality. If this is the case, the County Auditor will notify affected persons after receipt of ballot application. Alaske Registration is necessary only for those municipal elections in which the city coon-, cU. or other governing authority of the municipality has directed that registration is a prerequisite to voting. Such registra tion must be accomplished annually in person-usually at voting time-at the seat of the municipal government. There is no requirement for preregistration in the accepted sense of the term for territorial elections. Registration for these elections is accomplished on election day. Guam Registration is permanent unless a voter Sunday, 9 September 1956 CATHOLIC MASSES Sunday: 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. through Fri.: 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday: 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions-1700 -1800, 1900 -2000, and S'daily before Mass PROTESTANT SERVICES Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 0930-Adult Bible Class Open Air Assembly 1100-Protestant Divine Worship-Naval Base Chapel 1930-Fellowship Tour-Open Air Assembly Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal JEWISH SERVICES Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel CHURCH OF CHRIST Sunday: 1000-Bible Study--Community Auditorium 1045-Worship Service-Community Auditorium LATTER DAY SAINTS Sunday: 1100-Naval Station Library CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Sunday: 1100-Naval Station Library "CHAPLAINS AT THIS ACTIVITY CDR P. R. MePhee, CHC, USN (Protestant) ,CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN (Catholic ) failed to vote in the last general election. All qualified absent persons are registered automatically when the affidavit on the ballot envelope has been properly ex: ecuted and-accepted by the election officials. Therefore, registration in advance is not required. For further information, see your voting officer. (AFPS) 9 Saturday, 8 September 1956

PAGE 3

S Saturday, 8 September 1956 Parents Of Triplets Are Flooded Exchange Garage Permits Needed With Gifts From Local Clubs, Groups Adds Auto Polishing Before Builders I INDIAN Photo Thursday afternoon, August 30, at the Base Hospitals' nursery ward, the Cole family consisting of Fleet Camera Party photographer and Mrs. James H. Cole and their set of triplets born Monday, August 20, were presented by the Trading Post with a cartload of gifts. Other gifts received by the Coles on different occasions were a $40 check endorsed by the Fleet Camera Party, $28 check from the CPO Wives Club and another $40 check from the Felloweraft Club. Various organizations and clubs have also gifted the Coles with various baby items. The Coles were residents of Caimanera before the birth of their triplets. The Commander Naval Base has granted the family the privilege of occupying government quarters on the Base until their transfer to the states in mid-October. To set up housekeeping in Villamar when the mother and the triplets move out of the hospital, the Coles will be assisted by a maid through the courtesy of the local Eastern Star Club. The club also gave three cribs to the family. Middies Leave Sidelight A total of 25,000 Naval personnel which included officers, midshipmen and ship's company enlisted men were involved in the three separate Middle Cruises that wound up in Guantanamo Bay recently. Last of the three cruises was Midshipman Baker which departed Monday night, August 27. The three cruises caused quite a stir on the Base. But one thing nobody knows about, except three Cubans, is the sidelight that transpired at the Naval Station swimming pool check-room. Lincoln McCalla, in charge of the checkroom and Morris Durant and Roland Claxton, lifeguards, have this statistical tale to tell: Two thousand five hundred men of the three Middie Cruises utilized the Naval Station swimming pool. Total amount checked in by these men for safekeeping amounted to an appalling sum of $23,000. Seven out of the 2,500 men deposited $200 or more each, 40 entrusted $100 or more each, while 11 had no money at all. The largest amount of money deposited by one single individual was $308. Owner of this sum was Robert L. Mayo, SN, of the USS GEARING. He was at the pool on August 26, 1956. Smallest amount deposited belonged to R. A. Radeckl, Midshipman 3/c, of the USS IOWA. The money checked in by Radekl on July 25, 1956 was a measly sum of $.40. Also deposited were 631 cameras of all makes, 1,236 cigarette lighters and 1,702 wrist watches. *9 A polishing job through the application of a liquid wax has recently been added by the Navy Exchange Garage to its "car-body cleansing" service. Before the addition of this new car-polishing feature, the garage has had only car-wash and solid wax simonizing facilities. Base private vehicle owners will now get a speedy service that incurs even less damages to their pockets with this new feature according to W.E. Koenig, garage manager. Queried as to what makes the new polish job different from simonizing, the garage manager said: "In simonizing, a great deal of time and effort are involved, in addition to its being expensive. But the polish job, he argued, is cheaper and quicker to accomplish." Prices tabled by the garage on car-body cleaning service are $1, for car wash alone, $2.50 for polish job and $7.00 for simonizing. Windmill Beach Road Gets Asphalt Coat The gravel road from Radio Range to Windmill Beach will be opened for traffic this weekend after a resurfacing job by the Public Works Center. Called a stabilized asphalt road, the improved route to the beach is a Public Works Center experiment since it is the first such asphalt road on the Base. Although this is a first for Gtmo, many midwestern county roads use the same process which costs only half as much as regular black top. In about a week Public Works will lay a top seal on the road. Gtmo Bay Golfers Defeat Santiago RADM William G. Cooper, ComNavBase, played host to the golf players of the Santiago Country Club during the past weekend. At the local links, the Base golfers headed by RADM Cooper soundly defeated the visitors. The final score was 38 for Gtmo and 16 for Santiago. Meanwhile, Chief Shea of the Fleet Training Group was declared last week the winner of the Base Men's Handicap Tournament, with air controlman Spriggs gaining the runner-up position. Trophies and other prizes for this tournament will be awarded shortly. Can Construct Public Works Center has cautioned "do-it-yourself" builders to observe provisions of existing Base regulations. A building permit is required by Base regulations for any new construction or alteration to quarters or any government owned facility. Construction or alterations include TV antennas, boat houses, patios, car ports, fences, etc. Personnel currently working on projects without a permit must obtain a permit as soon as possible. The Base Regs state that the permit must be posted in a prominent location at the job site immediately before and during the job. Permits may be obtained at the Public Works Center, Maintenance Control division, building 13. The permit will describe the construction, location, bear a serial number and the date of issue, etc. The permit must be displayed until the job is completed, at which time the Public Works inspector will note the satisfactory completion of the work in accordance with the specifications. After construction is completed, tne permit must be returned to the Public Works Center for filing. CPO's Lead NavSta Softball League With approximately a month of play remaining in the Naval Station intra-mural softball league, the Chief Petty Officers squad looks like the team to beat. Not too far behind the CPOs though is Second Division. As of September 3 the CPOs sported a record of four wins against no losses while Second Division had five wins and one loss. In third position as of that date was Commissary with three victories and one defeat. Standings as of September Chief Petty Officers Second Division 1-4-7-Commissary Security Detachment Fifth Division Fleet Camera Party Electronics Sixth Division Win Loss 4 0 5 1 3 1. 3 2 2 3 1 3 1 4 0 5 A great many people, like cats, lick themselves with their tongues. 4 0 THE INDIAN M Page Three

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Page Four Navy Wives Club Has 50 Local Members by Ely U. Orias Twenty -seven wives who answered a Long Beach, California newspaper ad in February, 1931, inviting all wives of enlisted men of the United States Navy "to bond together and promote sociability and service among us and our husbands," signalled the birth of the now -mushrooming Navy Wives' Clubs all over the world. The ad was a direct result of the transfer from the eastern seaboard to Long Beach of a big group of sailors who were followed by their wives. These 27 Navy Wives' Club forerunners first met under the name of the Service Men's Club of Long Beach. Having met under that name for four years, it was decided in 1935, to form an organization on a national scale. On June 3, 1936, the Great Seal of the State of California was affixed to its Articles of Incorporation by the state secretary-and so was born the Navy Wives' Club of America. Their organizational plank and objectives as provided in the articles of incorporation states in part: "Our particular aim is to promote and encourage a friendly and sympathetic social relationship between the wives of the men of the United States Navy, and to assist, help and encourage each other for the purpose of contentment and enlightenment." In Guantanamo Bay there is an active Navy Wives' Club. As a member of the incorporated Navy Wives' Club of America, it adopts the principles and aims of that massive organization. To implement its objectives, the local club has consistently and regularly entertained Base hospital patients with refreshments and coffee. At Christmas time the Gtmo club undertakes the wrapping of the Base's Christmas packages for children. Members of the club also take turns meeting MSTS transports where they collaborate with Trading Post representatives in taking care of service babies while the mothers take a Base shopping tour. A relatively new feature on the varied activities program of the loal group is the creation of a Tege Printing Class. Instructors at this class have gained experienee in that line while members *f stateside clubs and are more than willing, without benefit of remuneration, to teach their local colINDIAN Photo One of the activities of the Guantanamo Bay chapter of the Navy Wives' Club is the entertaining of the men at the Naval Base Hospital. Caught in one of their periodic "give away" sessions in a hospital ward are left to right: Betty James, Flora Higgs, Chief C. H. Aumann, injured in a scooter accident and still in the hospital; Anne Garvey, secretary of the Navy Wives' Club, and Ellen Van Cleef, president of the organization for Gtmo. leagues. On the lighter side of things, the club holds a luncheon each month, or occasionally a social in the evening, in order that husbands of members may meet socially. Members of the local club are, as in any other Navy Wives' Club throughout the world, composed chiefly of wives of active duty enlisted men of the United States Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard and their respective reserve components. Wives of servicemen who have been honorably discharged after 16 years of service and women who are friendly to the Club's cause are also eligible to become members. Membership fees are $1.50 and a monthly due of $.25. Before one becomes a bona-fide member, she must first attend three club meetings, one of which should be a business meeting. Officers of the local Navy Wives' Club which has a member-strength of 50, are Ellen Van Cleef, president; Louise Smith, vice-president; Anne Garvey, Rec secretary; Mary Jefferis, Corres secretary; Jean Zemaitis, treasurer; Mike French, Master-at-Arms; Louis Fairchild, historian, and Pat Aldridge, parliamentarian. The Club's headquarters are teasoprarily housed in the Girl Seaut quouset hut on Marina Point. Manager (poiskia to cigarette butt on stockroom floor): "Smith, is this yours?" Smith: "Not at all sir. You saw it first." Devil -Dog Doin's The Sergeant Major seems to be losing all his office staff. Thursday his right-hand man, Sgt. Lambert, left for leave and duty at Quantico, Virginia. Sgt. Lambert will be working for his old C.O., Col. Fojt, on the equipment board. The Staff NCOs held an election Tuesday night to vote in a new manager and member for the board of governors. TSgt Burris was handed the job of manager and and TSgt Carter won the position of secretary on the board of governors. The intra-barracks s o f t b a 11 league isn't as sewed up as the Angels thought. They were twotime winners over the Bums and the Hoboes, but more than met their match against the old men of the Strikeouts, who tossed them their first defeat by a score of 14 to 0. At present, the league stands with the Strikeouts won 2, lost 1; Angels won 2, lost 1; Hoboes won 1, lost 1; Bums lost 2. Wednesday the Bums have a good chance of climbing the ladder by defeating the Hoboes. The league is proving to be just about squared away as far as playing talent goes. Each of the four teams are pretty evenly matched. Should be an interesting season. FTG & FTC Bulletin The end of the Base Golf tournament last Saturday saw Shea, BTC, bringing home the bacon for FTG -congratulations to the new Base Handicap champion! The grind was a long and ardurous one, but Shea came through when it counted most. The FTG softball team is coming nicely-practice games are the order of the day. Two newly arrived officers were welcomed aboard this past week. LTJG David McIntosh, USCG came from the WPG ANDROSCOGGIN, Coast Guard search and rescue ship at Miami. His family is presently at Miami and will be on board later. ENS, Homer L. Ford Jr., USN comes to the Group by way of USS SUNBIRD (ASR-15) and OCS. His family will soon leave Norwich, Conn. for sunny Gtmo. With the end of the fishing tournament and the hunting season not yet started, the Group families were surprised to see "Pop" around on the weekend, making the most of the lull LCDR's Hamlin, Williams nad CWO Harper and their families motored to Santiago. They all report roads in as good a shape as they ever have been. There are a couple of familiar faces back in the area, LCDR Dan Douglas returns as skipper of VF22 on the F. D. ROOSEVELT (CV A-42), having left the Air Department, FTG in February 1956. LCDR Robert Minard formerly of the Gunnery Department, FTG returned in command of USS NAWMAN (DE-416) for a worm's eye view of training proceedings. Welcome back to Gtmo! CAPT and Mrs. Owen B. Murphy leave Gtmo on September 14 by transport. CAPT Murphy has been Training Officer at FTG and will take command of USS CANISTEO (AO-99). A quick survey at press time indicated that a long weekend could be habit forming, particularly after payday-but we all enjoyed it. Made it rough on your reporter getting together news items though, with all FTG at sea making up for the lost day. Holy Name Society Meets Sun. Morning Guantanamo Bay's Holy Name Society will meet tomorrow morning at the Marine Family restaurant following the 9:00 Mass. Guests from Guantanamo City are expected at the Communion breakfast. They are Jose Luis Amadeo, Jeorge Suarez, Dr. Fausto A. Salvent, Serafin Bustabad, Ricardo Rico, Eiego Aguilera, Florentino Calvinio and Jose Mota. 9 Saturday, 8 September 1956 EM THE INDIAN

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Saturday, 8 September 1956 Colts Cop Little League's World 1956 Polar Expedition Will Depart Series Playoffs, Take 2 From Hawks On Antarctic Venture This Month The Guantanamo Bay Little League World Series playoffs came to a close Saturday afternoon, September 1, at the Villamar Ball Park. Sealing the prize-packaged play-off pennant with the finishing touches of a 9-2 shellacking, the Colts were declared World Series champions against the Hawks. Qualifying for the two-out-of-three games in the World Series championship eliminations after routing the Bears, the Hawks lost out to the Colts in their first encounter Saturday, August 25 and again dropped the ball last Saturday. First to slug in last Saturday's game, the Hawks opened the inning with Dave Williams moving into first on a walk. With two men out, Bruce Barackman hit a fly to right field which proved too elusive to the Colts' right fielder. While Barackman's hit was in the air, Williams moved into third. Then Sterling Case blasted the ball toward center field, enabling Williams to cross home plate and Case to negotiate second. The Colts initiated their first batting program with Skip Cook walloping a fly to right field on a three-bagger reward. With Jack Kenworthy pounding another twobagger, Cook maneuvered home. Taking advantage of a wild pitch, Kenworthy dashed for third. While Mack Gendrau was at bat Kenworthy stole home. The first inning ended with a 2-1 investment, with the Colts leading. In the early part of the third stanza, the Colts collected four runs, two of which were stolen while the other two were docketted through a swift grounder hit by Steve Cook. Fourth inning was scoreless, while on top of the fifth, the Colts racked up three runs. The sixth inning found Case swinging a fast ball that sent Barackman to third from first while the batter moved into second. Then on a wild pitch, Barackman took advantage and scored. Final score was 9-2 in favor of the Colts. Score by Innings Colts 2 0 4 0 3 x Hawks 1 0 0 0 0 1 After last Saturday's game, a victory party for the Colts was held at the CPO Club where a chicken dinner, ice cream and cakes were served to the World Series winners. With the Little League season and the World Series concluded, the Little League players, all 175 of them, will again assemble. But this time its no longer the ball scramble they were used to, no more of the sweat, dirt or the emotional insomnia that often struck them. It's a social, a banquet where trophies are to be awarded. Date for the banquet was not determined at press time. What's Doln' Stateside Jimmy Paulk, 11, a prosperous Oklahoma City snail-raiser, has some authentic information about the slow-moving mollusks. By actual count, Jimmy says, a healthy adult snail travels about an inch in 15 seconds. Even more interesting to the young businessman is the way snails keep fishbowls clean, something owners of fishbowls will pay nickles and dimes for. He's delighted with the ease of production. "'No mess or bother," Jimmy explains brightly. "Just put the male and female together and they raise eggs." Those old standbys, the "I told that cop to .." stories, will have to be changed a little to keep up the new look in policemen. Used to be the parlor lawyers said they were cool and collected when pinched, but the officer got hot under the collar. Now some police uniform designers have gone to open-collar shirts for summer wear, and backed up the anti-redneck drive with regulation cowboy-style hats of cool and comfortable straw. With all these changes, it seems that only the end to the cop-driver stories will stay the same; ". and he just picked up his summonsbook and started writing." A recent cooking contest turned up a trend toward fancy recipes and delicate flavoring in onceplain American food. Leading the way were several enthusiastic male entrants. Washington (AFPS)-"Operation Deepfreeze II," the 1956 expedition supporting American scientific study in the Antarctic, gets underway in September, the Navy has announced. The second venture to the South Pole, directed by RADM Richard E. Byrd (ret.), is part of a four-year program of earth-science studies for the International Geophysical Year, 1957-58. More than 3,000 sailors and seabees with leave from East and West Coast ports in 12 ships between September and the end of the year to build four scientific stations, two support bases and new air facilities at the "bottom of the world," in addition to the two major bases setup during "Deepefreeze I" in 1955. Some 166 Americans remained at the two bases in Antarctica following last year's operation, 93 at McMurdo Sound and 73 at Little America on Kainan Bay. Most of those who wintered at the Little America base will move overland by tractortrain to erect a station at Marie Byrd Land. Those from other bases will build a scienfic outpost on the 10,000foot polar plateau at the geographical South Pole during October. Navy planes first will land the seabees on the plateau; the AF Globemasters will airdrop 500 tons of building material and equipment. The planes will fly in from New Zealand. Men were left at the bases over the winter to accomplish as much as possible between the time daylight begins in September and when Ships carrying supplies can first break through the ice pack in December. RADM George Dufek (ret.) heads the ships and units engaged in the Polar operation. Anybody ForCoffee?, Black, Sugar? World Rarely Imitates U. S. Mixes New York (AFPS)-Although Americans consume 60 per cent of the world's coffee export, with a large assist from heavy coffee drinkers in the Armed Forces, American coffee drinking habits are rarely imitated in other countries. According to the National Geographic Society, the Frenchman will have cafe au lait-coffee with hot milk-for a morning pickme-up at his favorite sidewalk cafe. An Arab generally drinks his coffee without sugar or milk, and while he may take a sip of water before his coffee, a water chaser is considered a breach of etiquette. Uganda natives swill a banana and coffee concoction and eat raw coffee berries. Algerians gave a boon to sweltering Americans when they originated a sweetened cold coffee mixture, likely the father of iced House Trailers Arrived Wed. Morn., All Will Be Ready Next Friday Eighteen pastel and white colored Prairie Schooner house trailers purchased by the Navy Exchange arrived in Guantanaino Wediesday morning aboard the SS TRANSUNION. Two of the original 20 were smashed in the process of loading. The trailers were delayed a month due to the unavailability. of transportation. Public Works Center is currently installing the 28 foot, 6 inch homes in the sites already prepared for them across from the Navy Exchange garage. PWC expects to have all the trailers ready for occupancy by the end of next week. coffee. The Turks take their coffee drinking so much to heart that during the 18th century a man, when he married, had to promise to keep his wife in coffee. Failure provided grounds (no pun intended) for divorce. King Gustavus III, an early Swedish .monarch, was determined to discover if coffee had harmful effects. When two identical twins were sentenced to death for murder, he commuted their sentences to life imprisonment with large daily doses of tea for one brother and coffee for the other. Chain coffee drinkers will be interested to learn that the tea drinker died first-at the age of 83. And now Swedes drink more coffee, man-for-man, than do Americans. That's all. Time for a coffee break. "Aren't you ashamed," the judge asked the man, "to have your wife support you by doing such menial work?" "Yes, I am, you honor," he replied, "but what can I do ? She's too ignorant to do anything else." 9 THE INDIAN m Page Five

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W Saturday, S September 1956 Page Six .SCUTrLEBUTp< "Do n't Hand Me That I'm Broke, Well Have To Stay Here' Routine-) Know You Get Paid Twice A Month!" Back at the old typewriter again and at a loss for words at the prospect of the flicks that I have to cuss and discuss this week. This statement does not apply to the first two, however. Harder They Fall (Col.), bears the distinctive touch of director Mark Robson. Humphrey Bogart, Rod Steiger and Jan Sterling head the cast. Steiger is pure talent, as has been evidenced by previous films, "Big Knife" and "Jubal." Story concerns the evils of the boxing ring and the brutality of the pitcure will be a detracting factor in many people's enjoyment of it. An excellent picture and one all should see. Meet Me In Las Vegas (MGM, in color), is great ...excellent .outstanding and all other expressions of praise! Cyd Charisse finally emerges the great star that she should have been long ago. The plot ...the old standby, boy gets girl ...but with Las Vegas as the background and Cyd as the girl ...need I say more. Dan Dailey is co-starred and Lena Horne and Frankie Laine are guest stars. "Hollywood Reporter" termed this super duper musical as top entertainment. See it! Rage At Dawn (RKO, in color) .Randolph Scott and Forrest Tucker ...usual Randy Scott goings on ..as for a rating, the usual Randy Scott rating. Africana (Broder, in color), is a documentary of Africa. I know nothing of this picture, but such a film is very poor fare for our Base lyceums. These documentaries usually play on a double bill. Lady Godiva (U.I., in color) .. Maureen O'Hara and George Nader .the age old story ...fair .played the Base before. Green Buddha (Rep.) .Wayne Morris and Mary Germaine .. no information on this one, but Saturday, Sept. 8 1:00 Winky Dink & You 1:30 Zoo Parade 2:00 CAPT Gallant 2:30 Godfrey Time 3:00 Robt. Q. Lewis 3:30 Lighted Window 4:00 Riders of the Rockies 5:00 Big Picture 5:30 Dunninger 6:00 Harry Owens 6:30 Beat the Clock 7:00 George Gobel 7:30 Hit Parade 8:00 Jackie Gleason 9:00 Stage Show 9:30 Star Tonight Sunday, Sept. 9 1:00 Winky Dink & You 1:30 Eddie Fisher 1:45 House Party 2:00 Roy Rogers 2:30 Garry Moore 3:00 Frontiers of Faith 3:30 Mr. Peepers 4 :00 Ted Mack 5:00 You Asked for It 5:30 Sun. News Headlines 5:45 Industry on Parade 6:00 Mama 6:30 You Are There 7:00 What's My Line 7:30 Loretta Young 8:00 Ed Sullivan Show 9:00 Robt Montgomery Presents Monday, Sept. 10 5:30 News Parade 5:45 Perry Como 6:00 Pantomine Quiz 6:30 Talent Scouts 7:00 My Favorite Husband 7:30 Highway Patrol 8:00 Cid Caesar 9:00 Studio One Tuesday, Sept. 11 5:30 News Parade 6:45 Julius LaRosa 6:00 Disney Land 7:00 Meet Millie 7:30 Red Skelton 8:00 Russ Morgan 8:30 Justice 0:00 Steel Hour Saturday. September 8 NavSta-Harder They Fall-108 min. NAS-Searchers-119 min. Mar. Site-While the City Sleeps-100 min. Villa.-Second Greatest Sex-96 min. MCB-1-You'e Never Too Young-103 min. Lwd. Pt.-Catered Affair-112 min. Sunday, September 9 NavSta-Meet Me In Las Vegas-124 min. NAS-Harder They Fall Mar. Site-Pete Kelly's Blues-114 min. Villa.-While the City Sleeps MCB-1-Second Greatest Sex Lwd. Pt.-You're Never Too Young Monday. September 10 NavSta-Rage At Dawn-95 min. NAS-Meet Me In Las Vegas Mar. Site-Searchers Villa.-Pete Kelly's Blues MCB-1-While the City Sleeps Lwd. Pt.-Second Greatest Sex Tuesday, September 11 NavSta-Africana-97 min. NAS-Rage At Dawn Mar. Site-Harder They Fall Villa.-Searchers MCB-1-Pete Kelly's Blues Lwd. Pt.-While the City Sleeps Wednesday, September 12 NavSta-Lady Godiva-119 min. NAS-Africana Mar. Site-Meet Me In Las Vegas Villa.-Harder They Fall MCB-1-Searchers Lwd. Pt.-Pete Kelly's Blues Thursday, September 13 NavSta-Green Buddha-90 min. NAS-Lady Godiva Mar. Site-Rage At Dawn Villa.-Meet Me In Las Vegas MCB-1-Harder They Fall Lwd. Pt.-Searchers Friday, September 14 NavSta-Wild Dakotas-99 min. NAS-Green Buddha Mar. Site-Africans Villa.-Rage At Dawa MCB-1-Meet Me In Las Vegas Lwd. Pt.-Harder They Fall will no doubt add up to 90 minutes of boredom. Wild Dakotas (Lippert) ..Bill Williams and Jim Davis ...the time worn low budget western, that will keep coming from Hollywood as long as it exists. Wednesday, Sept. 12 1:30 News Parade 5:45 Jane Froman 6:00 Two for the Money 6:30 Professional Father 7:00 You Bet Your Life 7:30 I've Got a Secret 8:00 Godfrey & Friends 9:00 TV Theater Thursday, Sept. 13 5:30 News Parade 5:45 Bob Crosby 6 :00 Calvacade of America 6:30 This Is Your Life 7:00 Dollar a Second 7:30 Big Town 8:00 Playhouse of Stars 8:30 Johnny Carson 9:00 Climax Friday, Sept. 14 5:30 News Parade 5:45 Jo Stafford 6:00 Truth or Consequences 6:30 Life With Father 7:00 Life of Riley 7:30 Crusader 8:00 Chevy Hour 9:00 Boxing First P T A Meeting Approximately 400 attended the first meeting of the Parent Teacher's Association, Tuesday evening, September 4, at the Chapel Hill Auditorium. This was believed to be the largest number of people to attend a PTA meeting in the history of Guantanamo Bay. August 16, school registration day, 299 had joined the organization and Tuesday evening 134 more joined. The first meeting was called to order by LCDR J. Bayer, PTA president, followed by a selection by the Junior Glee club. Chaplain P. R. McPhee then delivered the invocation. CWO R. B. Abbott gave a talk on UNICEF. T. G. Scarborough, Base school superintendent, followed CWO Abbott with a short talk on the prospects of the 1956-57 school year. Scarborough pointed out that the 1951 school registration was 378 as compared to this year's 1,029. He then introduced the teachers for the 1956-57 school term. Attendence awards for this first meeting of the year went to Mrs. Benedini, Mrs. Doohen, Mrs. Becker, Mrs. Liveakos, Mrs. Ward, Mrs. Yarbro and Mrs. Walker. WGBY Television Program FROM: 3 cent stamp TO: Send The INDIAN Home 0 m THE INDIAN Book -Nook by R.C.D. Du Maurier, Daphne. This excellent English novelist of our day and age has written several books. Two of the better ones are "Rebecca" and "My Cousin Rachel." Her setting is usually a huge house on the cliffs of wild Cornwall, and her ability to incorporate the element of suspense into her novels is well-used. The two books listed above are guaranteed A-1 reading. Dumas, Alexandre. This nineteenth-century French writer will undoubtedly appeal to ambitious readers who plunge into "The Count of Monte Cristo." Dumas didn't spare any words when he wrote, and the result is an overlong and sometimes tedious novel, but the fact remains that the author is a highly successful storyteller. Ferber, Edna. The library has five of the six books she has written, each dealing with a different local-color region of the United States. She's by no means a great novelist, but she tells a good story, and the settings are appealing. "Show Boat" is a representative example. Faulkner, William. "A Fable" is his only novel here. I don't like him and couldn't get beyond the first chapter. Without a doubt many people do, because he has won the Nobel Prize for his writing. Field, Rachel. This almost unknown writer has some good novels to her credit. "All This and Heaven Too" is perhaps her best, and "Time out of Mind" is deserving of consideration. Forester, E. M. A modern English novelist who has had a tremendous following in years gone by. His classic remains "A Passage to India," which is the literary handbook of Birtish colonialism in India. Galsworthy, John. One of the finest books, without exception, in the Library is "The Forsyte Saga." Galsworthy has immortalized the Forsytes in this trilogy, in which he follows their fortunes for three generations. This is a book which no one can afford to ignore. Gallico, Paul. He is a contemporary American whose style is his most appealing aspect. "The Snow Goose" is perhaps the best of the seven books here. Cinema -Scoop 400 Persons Attend by Don Hinton