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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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U.S. Naval Base ( Publisher )
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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U.S. Naval Base
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English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )
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More". Rains fiTernps Midshipmen Cruise ILeaves Today, Open House Sunday Under 96 Next Week 11 D ir+ k+m Aboard USS LEYTE


The stale vegetation on the Base got some water-sprinkling Sunday night, July 22, to the ;disgust Of 'the Base's' outdoor movie-goers when .49 huindrethis of aninch of rain fell.
Sunday right's downpour was the first in Gtmo since the start of the, Summer season. Easterly waves was repbrtba by the Naval 'Air Station Aerolog yOffice *asthe cause of the "sudden rainfall.
"Easterly waves," explains'LTJG A.M.:'MeCalinont, NAS. Aerology Officer, ",is a line of cyclonic Aa lifting' conversions 'and thuinderstorms moving from east to west in the tad winds."V FVorecasting next Week's weather conditions in the Guantan~mo By area, the Aerology pificer said that there will be an increa ,sed'gustiness during the; day' and - an' increased afternoon and lr evening 'thundershower activity.
Thc temperature in general Will remain below 9 degrees which is the norhmAl temperature in this area this time of 'the year.


L1,J IXuI..pa 1F I t~EI~,# ~~j~JJ


Guantanamo, Bay harbor will once again feel the void of numerous sailors and ships after Task Oroup 40'.1 (Midshipman'Cruiise Alpa), weighs anchor today.,
S. h i 'p that: anchored in Gtmo from July 25 until their departure were the U S S IOWA (BB 61), Task Group flagship.:On board the IOWA \Vas eRADM K. M. McManes, Commander .,Battle - Cruiser Atlantic. Other big ships were the battleship NEW JERSEY and the cruisers MACON and DES MOINES.
Sixteen destr oyers including the USS ROWE, ROSS, WREN, BEARSS, ROBINSON, SIGOURNEY, HiOOD, KENN4EDY, JOHNSTON, PERRY, WARjE,:BAILEY, GOODRICHl, TURNER .and N K PERRY


COVERS GTMO LIKE THE SUNSHINE U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
volume viI, No0. SO.. Saturday, 2MJuly 1956


Co mmissioning Of Public Works C.4


On Next Wednesday's Agenda

Commissioning ceremonies for the Public Works Center will be held Wednesday, August .1, beginning at,9 :0I0. a.m..
The new command and its commanding officer,' CAPT HI. N. WAllin, CEC; will be under the military command of the Commander Naval Base and under the management of the


Bure au of Yards Iand-Docks.
-CAPT Wallin will also assume the duties of Base Civil engineer relieving CDR E. G. Dobbins, present Base CivEng who will continue as 'Resident Officer in Charge of Construction.
LT Mlarron- Executive Officer
-Present Public, Works officers LT J. P. Matrron, LTJ(G D. S. Griffin and ENS F. It. Aniba Il will ass Iume duties on the staff of the new command. LT Marron will become acting Executive offic~r. 'and' Operations.ficr
LTJG Griffin will be Maintenance off~ift hidj ENS Anibal will serve a s the Transportation and Utilities officer.
Lt F. E. .Lehnox will be transferred frtom the ROIN'C office and will become, assistant Base Civil engineer and Planning officer.


At: the, commissioning .ceremo-, nies Chaplain, J. -J. Sullivan will deliver the 'invocation. Following the,4i11yocation, CAPT W. R. Caruthers, C.O. Naval. Station, and CDR E. L. Rowan, Public Works officer,'will speak. CAPT Wallin will'then read his orderss and report to the Comimander, Naval Base as having assumed, command upon which the flag will be raised.
IRADM Cooper to Speak
Aftr th~flg s, raised, RADM W. G. Cooper, ,ComNavlase, will give a short talk.followed by the benedicti6n; -whidi will'be delivered by Chiailain P. H'. McPhee.'
In a SecNav notice the Secretary of the Navy stated the missi Ion of the new-s Public Works Center: "To
t.,ontinued on Page Four)


made up- the ,cruise's mosquito force.
The nine submarines, instead of the originally scheduled ten, that gave the Middies the feel of an underwarter cruise also left Gtmo' today.,
Approximately 13,000 Naval perso-nnel which included ship's, co., officers, enlisted personnel and midshipmen units constituted the Aipa Middie cruise.
3,027 Midshipmen
A total number of 3,027 midshipmen, 1,398 of which are first classes and 1,616 are third classes were on board the 20 ships attached to the cruise. Out of the 1,398 first -classes, 15 NROTCs are candidates for Supply Corps commission. Except for the 15 Supply hopefuls, all the Alpa Middies are gunning for the line commission.
Base Shore Patrol Headquarters disclosed that the first wave of the Middies' liberty party arrived at the Fleet landing at about 1330, July 25. On Wharf Baker the first liberty party was clocked at exactly 1300.
At about 1400 the midshipmen, and Fleet personnel on liberty literally littered every place on the Base where they could amuse themselves.
Exchanges Packed
In the mid-afternoon of July 25, the NavSta Exchange store was jampacked. The Drive Inn had a long line too. Marine Site and NAS stores were' also invaded.
NavSta Special Services' forrent bicycles were all checked out. Some Middies ons the bikes went as far as Kittery Beach. Horses strutted away from Marine Corral Lane stable. But these transporta(Continued on Page Three)


Bathers Get Rash

At Yateras Beach

Five, cases of skin eruptions caused by Guoa (pronounced as gwaw) was reported last week, according* to CDR Samuel' Moscbhella, Base Hospital Sick Call Officer.
Guon is a terebinthine tree with star-like leaves that yield -milky fluid in the form of exudates as a result of incisions. This milky substance is known as "viciously infectious turpentine" and when the skin is exposed to even a drop of it, rash follows immediately.
According to the men who fell victim to the Guoa milk, trees of the kind prominently thrive in the Yateras Beach area.
In this 'connection Dr. Moschella issues a 'preventive warning to bathers at Yateras Beacn to "lookout and; avoid contact with this skin-wounding plant."


Guantanamo Bay naval personnel and their dependents have been invited by CAPT H. T. Johnson, C.O. USS LEYTE to visit the ship during the open house Sunday afternoon, July 29, between 1300 and 1700.
A guided tour of all topside spaces, including the bridge, flight deck and hangar deck will be offered to all who attend. Refreshments prepared by the ship's galley will be served throughout the afternoon.
Children under 14 year of age should be accompanied by at least one parent. It is, recommended that ladies do not wear high heels.
There will be demonstration of helicopter rescue at sea and firefighting at 1500. The hangar deck exhibits of shipboard activities -include the S2F Sentinel plane which will be open for inspection.
LEYTE motorboats will leave fleet landing for the ship every 15 minutes between 1245 and 1530 and will return every 15 minutes from the LEYTE.



Navy's 'Follow-Up'

Congrats Local SN

The Navy's administrative "follow-up" tradition never fails. When a man having unsettled matters gets transferred from one station to another, matters in that regard follow him wherever he goes.
Millard Starr, former leading deck seaman on the USS CALCATERRA (DER 390) homeported
in Newport, R.I., was transferred to the Naval Air Station, Gtmo on July 2. But before his transfer he had done a job-"with extreme valor" that was never officially recognized until he received a letter from his former commanding officer.
Tradition working well in hand, a letter from CALCATERRA's skipper was received by Starr commending him "for actions on the night of March 16, 1956, under stress of freezing weather, snow and wind up to 60 knots, at which time Starr cut loose the last mooring line of the USS CASCADE to which the CALCATERRA was nestling thus permitting both ships to get underway from dockside punishment"



WGBY ChangLtes Radio

Frequency On Wed.

Next Wednesday, August.1 radio station WGBY will change its radio frequency to 1340 kilocycles. The new frequency will go into effect at 0700 Wednesday morning, with the Morning Caravan program.









THE INDIAN


ft


Saturday, 28 July 1956


THE INDIAN

The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a possible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.
RADM WILLIAM G. COOPER, Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo
Bay, Cuba.
CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHE RS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo
Bay, Cuba.
Editorial Staff
LTJ G D. G. LaCasse ------------------------------ Officer-Adviser
G. L. Henderson, JOC------------------------------------ Editor
J. C. Curren, JOSN ------------------------------ Managing Editor
E. U. Orias, J03 --------------------------------- Feature Editor
D. D. Hinton, JOSN ------------------------------- Staff Reporter
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P.35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds.
Materials marked AFPS may be used by news media provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All materials originated by THE INDIAN may be* used in whole or in part or without credit.
All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.


The Chaplain's, Corner

When Jesus taught his Apostles and, disciples the Lord's Prayer, he immediately added to the petitions an exhortation to perseverance, in the form of an imaginary incident taken from the everyday semi-nomadic life of Palestine. He said to them: "Which of. you shall have a friend and shall go to him in the middle of the night'and say to him, "Friend, lend me three loaves, for a friend of mine has just come to me from a journey, and I have nothing to set before him'; and he from within should answer and say "Do not disturb me; the door is now shut, and my children and I are in bed; I cannot get up and give *to thee."
Despite the obstacles to his getting up and finding the loaves, the very importunity of his neighbor would force him to the rescue, as Christ tells his disciples: "I say to you, although he will not get up and give to him because he' is friend, yet because of, his persistence he will get up and give him all he, needs."
Our Lord, in whose very name we petition God, stresses and repeats and restresses this importance, nay, this, necessity, of making a nuisance of ourselves, so to speak, when we pray. First, he. makes the advice solemn with "I say to you, ask, and it shall be given to, you; seek and you shall find; knock, and it shall be opened to you."
He next underlines the. success. of, such importunity: "For everyone who asks, receives; and he who seeks, finds; and to him who knocks it shall be opened."
He then reduces to the absurd the idea of God's refusing to grant prayers that properly ask those things necessary for our spiritual and temporal welfare; it would, however, be against the very idea of God's wisdom, his Fatherly care over us and the greater good of our eternal salvation, to expect him to grant even our most urgent requests-if these were actually detrimental to our well-being.
"if one of. you asks his father for a loaf." qeisCrs,"ilh
hand him a stone? or for a fish, will he for a fish hand him a serpent ? or if he asks for -an egg, Will he-hand him a scorpo" Our Lord encourages us to petition God with perseverance'for all we need., by coniparing parental kindness, in, fallen man with. the paternal- generosity' of


our, heavenly Father.


Funny thing about Sturdley. When he joined up and that nasty old barber trimmed his curly locks he was fit to be tied. His new coiffure would'not see the light of day if he could help it.
Funny thing about the service. It cooperated with our boy Sturd and gave him a hat to wear. Sturdley, not to be outdone, flip-flopped. Now everyone can scan the top of his head out of doors. For Sturd has joined the Hat Fumblers Society.
,The hat fumblers are legion. It may take one a full 15 minutes to travel from barracks to mess hall but somehow his chapeau never quite finds a home atop his head..
An expert hat fumbler is always JUST.ON THE VERGE of donning his headgear. Surely anyone interested in proper military dress-a passing officer, a non-coin, etc.-can see that.
On a real good day, an expert hat fumbler can meet the test of four officers, a couple of senior NCOs and an MP or two thrown in and still play his, favorite game to perfection. The expert's eyes are always peeled despite the whistle on his lips.
Once under cover, he puts the hat back into his pocket. Now THAT takes talent. (AFPS)


Sunday, 29 July 1956

CATHOLIC MASSES
Sunday, 7000-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri.-1645--Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800. 1900
-2000, and daily before Mass PROTESTANT SERVICES
0930-Sunday School 0930-unday School
0930-Adult Worship (Naval
Base Chapel)
1990-Felowship Hour
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900--Choir Rehearsal JEWISH SERVICES Friday-blOO-Naval Base Chapel CHURCH OF CHRIST 1000-Bible Study 1045-Worship :Service
Community Auditorium


Calendar of Events
Sunday, July 29
nase Sunday School will resume today.
Monday, July 30
Teen-Age Advisory Group-Teen-Age Club
-7 :30 p.m.
Tuesday, July 31
CPO Wives Club-Coffee (Dining Rm.,
CPO Club)-1 :30 p.m.
Thursday, August 2
Navy Wives Club-Business Meeting
(School Aud.)-5 :00 p.m.
Felloweraft Club 1078--Community Aud.7:30 p.m.
Friday, August a
OPO Wives Club-Business Meeting (Family Rm., CPO Club)-5 :00 p.m.
LATER DAY SAINTS Sunday-1100--Naval Station Library
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Sunday-1000-NavSta; Library Chaplains at this Activity
CDR P. R. McPhee, CHC. USN
(Protestant)
CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHO, USK
(Catholic),


0I


J. J. Sullivan Chaplain~, USN


Fourth In Series ...,


Connecticut
Registration is permanent and registration is not required.
Active service personnel, members of the Coast and Geodetic Survey and Public Health Service may apply for registration by mail to the Town Clerk, place of residence, at any time.
All other persons must appear in person in order to be admitted as a voter.
Iowa
You must re-register this year in those cities and towsbips where registration is required except Des Moines. Registration is permanent in Des Moines unless the voter did not vote at least once in the past four years.
All Qualified absent persons are considered registered when. a marked absentee ballot and the executed affidavit on the back of the ballot envelope have been accepted by the election officials.
Louisiana
Registration must be accomplished once exery four years by every person except in parishes of more that 100,000 which have permanent registration. Registration may be accomplished only by appearing in person at the office of the Registrar of Voters. parish of residence, at any time up to Oct. 7.


Florida


Registration is permanent in most Plorida counties. Permanency is determined by the County Commissioners of each county. A voter who changes his residence from one 'county to another is subject to re. registration which may be accomplished after he has lived in the new county six months.
First registration, where required, and re-registration must be in person at the office at the Supervisor of Registration' county of residence, before Oct. 6.
Members of the Armed Forces, civilian employees of the U.S. and their dependents whose registration has lapsed will receive a blank form for re-registration in the same envelope as the absentee ballot.
Any resident under 21 in the Armed Forces may pre-register for voting. He must appear in person at the Office of the Supervisor of Registration, county of residence, anud 111 out an affidavit that he Is in service. When he reaches 21, he will obtain a certificate of registration.
Kansas
All persons. except members of the Armed Forces, civilian employees working with -the Armed Forces overseas and their dependents whose residence is in counties with a population of 260,000 or more must register once ee6ry four years. Also, reregistration is required if person changes address or name.- If these persons reside in cities with a population. of 2.000 or more, they must register but such registra. tion is Permanent unless the voter failed to vote in a general election, moved or changed his name.
If registration is required, it must be accomplished in person at the *Mfce of the Registrar, or city of residence. This must be done before Oct.. 17 in the cases of Kansas City, Topeka and Wichita and before Oct. 27 in the other Instances.
Members of the Armed Forces, civilians working for theArmed Forces outside the U.S. and their dependents need not register to vote by absentee ballot.
For further information, see Your voting officer. (APPS)


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Pago Two






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Saturday, 28 July 1956


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THEINDIAN


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Page Three


Regulations Cover School Name Contest Commissary Installs Music Maker


Officers' S. Pool
New regulations concerning the officers' swimming pools were released recently by the Commander Naval Base in a NayBase instruction. The directive reads that the swimming pools will be open from 0900 to 2100 daily.
Only officers and civilian members of the Commissioned Officers' Mess and their dependents and guests are permitted to use the officiers' pools.
Children under 12 year of age will not be allowed in the pools unless accompanied by an adult. Maids may not accompany children. Also children are not permitted in the large pool after 1600 on Mondays through Fridays and after 1200 on Saturdays, Sundays and holidays.
No person under the influence of' intoxicating liquor shall be allowed nor will running around and about the pool be permitted. No food and/or drinks are permitted in the pool area, shower and locker room.
Inner tubes and similar devices are permitted in the large pool only during the hours children under 12 are permitted and then between the five foot depth and the shallow end of the pool.
The lifeguard on duty is directed to enforce these regulations. All persons are warned against disputing any decision he may make except through proper channels.


Middies, . ..

(Continued from Page One)
tions did not in any way alleviate the acute shortage of public conveyance system on the Base.
A great many had to use their feet to transport themselves to the place they'd like to see. Base private car owners driving along Sherman Avenue however were generous enough to give the, walking sailor a ride!
The Fleet Recreation Center was turned into a veritable carnival ground-minus the buntings. Everything at the center was geared up. In fact the whole works was in cyclonic turmoil.
Shore patrol estimate of the Midshipman Cruise 's liberty party totalled to an appalling number of 7,000 personnel on the first day.

Herb Shriner tells how one of the local spintsters finally got married: "She saw this fellow on a 'Wanted' poster and offered a bigger reward for him than the government did."
One mother kangaroo said to another mother kangaroo: "I hope it doesn't rain today; it's awful when the kids have to play inside."


Ends Next Tuesday


Submit Entries Now

The contest for the naming of the Base dependent's school ends July 31.
It is open to all military and civilian personnel and their dependents. Submit your entries to Commander Naval Base, Attn., School Name Competition Judges. Prizes of $25 and $10 will be awarded for the best suggestions.


Some dairy and poultry farms in the states play music to hasten the process of milking cows and to cheer up chickens while they lay their eggs. But in Gtmo the Naval Station Commissary store 'plays music to make the grocery hours of service wives a syncopated occupation.
Inside the office of LCDR R. E. Newton Jr., NavSta Commissary Officer, there has recently been installed a radio amplifier with eight speakers strategically posted.
While the installation of the commissary music-maker was basically designed to "'.add more home-like atmosphere in the store, its secondary purpose is to render service to the husband who might want to speak to his wife even at a time when she is busy hunting for groceries."
According to LGDR Newton, all the husband has to do is to call 8438 and give the name of the person he would like to speak to. "At this point," he explained, "the name asked for will be paged in the store's public address~ system while a telephone receiver hangs ready."


CAPT Kohr Commends 3 EMs;


Skaters Waltz ..


Ware Relieves Douglass-Club Mgr. Crowd Top Reor


The greatest turn out of family group skaters was recorded Tuesday night, July 24, when 200 children, ages 3 to 17 and some 30 adults stormed the Fleet Recreation Skating Rink.
Hoight Smith, in charge of the skating rink, reports that Tuesday night's record of family skaters topped all previous records in that category since 1954.
The cause for the big attendance was not known until James B. Robinson, SK3, skating rink insider, came up with an answer. He said that "the children have nothing else to do since the Base's school summer recreation program ended last week."



Merit Badge Winner


IDUDIN Photo
A meritorious mast was held Tuesday morning, July 24, by CAPT G. L. Kohr, extreme right, NAS commanding officer, in which three men of that command were officially commended for "outstanding performance of duty" and a "Job Well Done."
Thomas N.. Douglass, ADC, outgoing manager of the Naval Air Station EM Club, accepts from CAPT Kohr a commendatory testimonial letter which reads in part: "During the period of your managership the EM Club has gained an enviable reputation due chiefly through your personal interest in the welfare of all men patronizing the club, permanent or transient alike.
"You have been responsible for the wholesome foods served; various entertainment features inaugurated. Due to your outstanding performance of duty, you will be sorely missed by the personnel of this command when you leave." Douglas will be relieved by W. M. Ware, SHC.
Louis E. Miller, SN, extreme left, and Donald F. Wagner, SN,.center, both swimming instructors for the swimming classes sponsored recently by the Naval Base School were also commended by CAPT Kohr as a result of the official recognition expressed by the school's Summer Recreation Program Director in a letter addressed to CAPT Kohr.
In commending both Wagner and Miller, CAPT Kohr said: "...I take pleasure in commending you for the manner in which you so ably and expertly performed the duties devolving upon you in connection with the summer recreation program.
"The manner in which the youngsters responded and the excellent results attained is evidence of your personal interest, patience and individual attention to them. Since your performance of duties has brought much favorable attention not only to yourselves but to the Naval Air Station which is proud to have you as members of its crew, I commend you with great pleasure for a 'Job Well Done'."


INDIA Photo
During the Boy Scout Court of Honor last Wednesday, CAPT F. S.* Habecker, Commander Fleet Training Group, presented advancement ratings to the scouts meriting them. CAPT Habecker awards Tom Fortenberry with a Merit Badge for swimming.


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Page Four


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THE INDIAN


W


Saturday, -28 July 1956


The Medic

by W. A. Dall & R. A. Albrecht
The Stork Club
The girls outnumber the boys this week in the newborn parade. A boy was born to EN2 and Mrs. Gates and girls to Staff Sgt. and Mrs. Stoneking, AG3 and Mrs. August, and Mr. and Mrs. Back. Congratulations to all.
Arrivals
Welcome aboard to H. D. Person, HM3, from the USS ALBANY and A.Df. Batoff, HN, and R. J. fleas, HA, from HCS, Bainbridge.
Local Athlete
The outstanding baseball player from the hospital this season is HM3 David W. McCafferty. Mac is the regular third beaseman on the Naval Base combine and was a unanimous selection for the Base All-Star team.
McCafferty's leading attribute has been his clutch hitting, 17 hits which produced 16 RBI's and 12 runs scored despite a .233 batting average. His team spirit and flawless fielding was one of the few bright spots of the last place combine.
McCafferty has been playing baseball 11 of his 26 years which includes semi-pro and Class C professional teams. Originally a pitcher, he switched to third-base due to an arm injury early in his career. The staff congratulates "Big Mae" on his selection to the All-Star team and for outstanding representation of the hospital.
Kickin' It Around
Mat invested in a carton of smokes . . . Wirt returned unmarried from Haiti . . . Shook is showing off his $10.93 camera ... Cohen and Turton are the luckiest.
Kingaroo awakens every morning at 0650 sharp . . . caught by the local fisherman this week:,19 fish, 3. cases anid 4 fifths . .. "Goldy"O is re-enlisting ... . Harding is still "King Sackrat" despite strong challengers by Muff er, Watuzee, and McMillan... Ski. requested 30 more nights ... and :remember, only 150 days till Christmas. ...


Charles Atlas Has Nothing On 7' Base Men -- Gtmo's Workout Artists


INDIAN Pho'to.
The "Atlas Society" go through their muscle-building routine. Lifting the weights in the foreground is J. J. Bonk, PN3. In the back row,' left' to right: J. N. Caughey, AV3; D. E. Kujawski, SN; D. F. Lowe, SN;* and A. Anzaldua, SA.
by Ely U. Orias

There is no denying the fact that women don't go for sickly-looking, out-of-shape or to put it bluntly, shipwrecked men!
Sunken chest, skinny runt, puny weakling, pipe-stem arms and bulging bread-baskets are the physical characteristics shunned by seven enlisted personnel on the Base and possibly


all women everywhere. Men like Donald E. Kujawski, SN, NavSta; John Bonk, PN3, NavSta; Dale Lowe, SN, NSD; Alfredo Anzaldua, SA, NavSta; Bruce Colegrove, SN, NaySta; J. N. Caughey, AV3, NAS and Don Wagner, SN, NAS, have already made personal sacrifices in order to obtain for themselves the much coveted physical vigor and vitality which they term as man's keys to success., IAt the Naval Air Station's old hangar by the seaplane ramp, there stands a shed. which these men call "our body-building workshop."
From their own pockets came the amount that paid for their muscle-producing equipment such as the four chinning bars, four hand adjustable dumbells, a kettlebell, squat racks, iron boots, bead strap, parallel bars and punching bags.
They have also inclined stomach boards at different angles, forearm apparatus, lat machine and various benches of different sizes and grades. Their gym also sports 530 lbs of weights ranging from 1'4 lbs up to 50 pounders.
After service working hours, on a four-day-a-week timetable, they assemble themselves at their own gym without the benefit of a muster roll. Gathering themselves on their own free time, they spontane-


ously think that "to do otherwise, our body-building program will be highly prejudiced."
Sacrificing money and time for other amusements, these men w 'orkout with profound devotion. Discipline has become their bosom word, without which, "our efforts will merely be swallowed by the wind."
They have set norms of workout-conduct and have imposed same upon themselves without pretense but with the view to making themselves bigger and better muscled men. For instance they have elected to get "plenty of sleep and food after each workout" to supply the body system for the re-growth of muscle tissue.
John Bonk, a relatively newcomer to this Atlassy hobby, found out that discipline to one's self always pays great dividends. Before he started working-out six months ago, he was a plump, unmuscled skaboots. Now he sports a well depressed stomach, bulging muscles and a chesty chest.
Father of these beginners is Donald E. Kujawski, a Naval Station MAA VIP driver. A prizewinning weightlifter in his own right, Donald has won first prize trophies in the 1C53 Pittsburgh and in the 1954 Fort Lauderdale


Navy Wives, Club
Members of the local Navy Wives Club attended -a Luncheon at the" GPO Club Thursday, July 26. Plans" are also progressing for the textile painting group. Members and friends interested should sign up now and be in on the fun from the start.
.The next business meeting of. the club will be held at the School Auditorium on August 2, at 8:00 p.m. We extend a Iwelcome to all wives of enlisted personnel to attend this meting.
To become a member of the club, one has to attend three functions. Our events take place on Thursday afternoons.


Commissioning...
.(Continued from Page One)
perform public works, public utilities and transportation functions including engineering services, incident thereto, for all activities in the Guantanamo Bay area, except nuinor maintenance and housekeepi ng functions which are retained by individual activities; perform such other public works functions
-as may be directed by the Comm ander U.S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba."
Reception at "0" Club
CAPT and Mrs. Wallin will hold a reception at the Officer's Club .when the commissioning ceremonies have been completed. The reception will be held for official guests members of the commissioning party.
Uniform for the commissioning ceremonies will be full dress whites for official guests and members of the commissioning party. Other guests will wear the uniform of the day.
CAPT Wallin came to Gtmo from the Bureau of Yards and Docks where he was Director of the Maintenance division and later served as executive -assistant to the Assistant chief of the' Bureau for Maintenance and Material.
In these billets CAPT Wallin was instrumental in developing and implementing the. �avy-wide controlled -maintenance *program for public works uand public utilities.
CDR Howan will leave the Base, August 28, for his new duties at the Naval Station, San Diego, California.

and Florida State weightlifting contests. He was also for sometime an instructor in the weightlifting classes of the Key West, Florida YMCA.
'The history of weightlifting is well associated to the-now mythical name Atlas, son of Iapetus and Clyme. After the downfall, of the Titans, he was condemned to stand at the Western end of the earth, bearing the sky on his head and hands. Then weightlifting began in Europe and in 1896 it became an event in the modern olympics.


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Saturday, 28 July 1956


THE INDIAN


CAPT Caruthers - Reenlistees


Fleet Camera Party Photo
Seven men re-enlisted at the Naval Station in the period July 7 to 21. During June and July there have been 22 re-enlistments in the command.
CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer Naval Station, stands with the seven most recent "ship-overs" after last Saturday's inspection.. They are left to, right: F. J. Arndt, EN3, 9th division; J. L. Hahn, YN2, 3rd division; 0. D. Adams Jr., TE3, 2nd division; G. R. Walter, P113, FCP; S. E. Cobbs, PH3, FCP; W. Beard, TN, BOQ3, and D. A. Reinold, EMI,, FBP.


F T G Bulletin

FTG almost replaced the usual summer losses of personnel this past week when a total of 15 men reported aboard. There are 13 wives and 25 children soon to follow. Donald A. Kingsley RM2 Comm Frank M. Kotnik ETC CXC James A. Schulters ETi CXC George E. Kneiple ETC CXC Robert A. Holbrook RD1 CIC William A. Brett EMC ENG Ray J. Motter EMC ENG Harold K. Anderson Sol A/S Harvey Giese Sol A/S Raymond F. Esparza FP1 DC William S. Smith DCI. DC John T. Carleton FTC GUN William A. Richards FTC GUN William A. Nichols RD2 FTC Dean Rt. Nichols RD3 FTC CDR Gendreau was seen at 0530 last Tuesday knocking the old golf ball around the local pasture. It is reported he is going to try the game in daylight when his flashlight batteries run down.
Junior Pop Glaser, FTC, and George Bailey, FTC, assisted by the Gunnery Officer were victors in the Windmill Beach softball game last Sunday. Their worthy opponents were determined but unable to come through in -the clutch. The game ended when the opposing team members mother's called them.
The following men have their orders and are to be transferred within the next two weeks. J. W. Higdon, EMC, is to report to the EM Class A School San Diego, California as an instructor. W. I. Jones, EMC, is going to the EM class B School Great Lakes Ill as a student. W. J. Boyer, FTC, is also going to San Diego and will be an instructor in the FT class A school, and R. A. Kraft, DCC, is going aboard U.S.S. NORTHAMPTON (CLC-1) for duty.


Fleet Reserve News
Don't forget the Branch picnic today at Windmill Beach. If you are a member of the Fleet Reserve Association and don't have a ticket as yet you can purchase one at the beach. Remember .... your ticket is your admission.
Our special committees have been working hard to make this picnic a good one .. .. so we'll see you all at the beach at 1100 .... come on out and join in the fun.
The Fleet Reserve Association is always out in front in helping to better the welfare of the men of the Navy and Marine Corps. Join the Fleet Reserve Association and become a member of an organization that is working for you, your family and your shipmates.


VU -10 Prop Blast
Three more Mallards continue to make the Navy their career. Q. M. Christie, ADi, recently signed for an additional four years. He has elected an option which will transfer him early this fall to VFP-62.
J. E. Morphis, ADi, and R. J. DeMent, AB3, both reenlisted for six additional years each. Congratulations to all of you.
D. P. McAndrews, ATC, was transferred this week to INASj Cecil Field, where he will join VF-102.
William Roder, AN, recently arrived on board from his last duty station at NAS, Anacostia, D.C. R. C. Aton, AD2, R. D. Crain, AD2, and C. Caplice, AE2, have all departed Gtmo for Key West, where they will be separated from the service.


What's Doin' Stateside
Girls are in better shape than boys in Louisville.
The authority for this not-verystartling statement doesn't come from a beauty contest judge or committee of bachelors in the Kentucky city. It's the City Division of Recreation-and they've got test results to prove it.
Only 43 per cent of the boys who took a physicalfitness exam featuring pull-ups, sprints and other assorted muscle-stretchers made a passing score, while 61 per cent of the girls came out all right.
Some poltron ("A mean spirited wretch"-ed.) might mention that the passing score for boys was higher, but any southern gentleman would simply say that LousvIlle girls are the finest-suh!
Beware the long-suffering hushand-at last he has his own organization.
Encouraged by the success of groups dedicated to the preservation of dumb animals, open-air trolley cars and other assorted bric-a-brac, some brave souls have started the Husbands Protective Association.
The club publishes Husband's Home Journal, a collection containing advice on handling wives, ready-made alibis and comforting mottos. "Husbands are kind, considerate and affectionate," runs one sample. "No home is complete without one,"
Members claim the club is a big success, but they still haven't managed to hold any meetings. Probably their wives won't let them out.
Monogrammed shirts, mo0no0grammed ties-and now, monogrammed false teeth. That is, if Dr. Harold Beddoe, a Virginia medical examiner, has his way.
Dr. Beddoe told the Southwestern Homicide Investigators at a meeting recently that monogrammed false t eeth would help identify victims. He said dentists should'be persuaded to inscribe the wearer's name inside the upper plate of the dentures. Monogrammed "choppers"'. wuold be a wonderful thing, he opined.
Party Life, a Russian magazine, is a candidate for the title of official Party Pooper. SThe communist journal. recently blasted Soviet citizens for, spending too much time at blasts (birthday and anniversary variety).
"Celebrating has become almost a permanent occupation for some people," the magazine observed. Its stern editors obviously have never heard that all work and no play makes Ivan a dull comrade.
To most people, mealtime is a relaxing break. When chow call comes in a jet fighter, things get a bit more complicated.
Modern pilots, encased in heavy pressure suits and shoe-horned in-


Devil - Dog Doin's

by TSgt Burris
Several more sets -of orders came in this past week. Sgt. Sanspree will be leaving shortly for some duty with the Air Wing at Edenton, N.C.. Sgt. Hoover will be in his glory at Parris Island, S.C. making Marines from civilians.
Pfc. Sturgis hit the jackpot with more security duty at Brooklyn, N.Y.. Pvt. Shontz goes right back to. Lejeune, this time to Force Troops. Pfc. Horton is also going to Lejeune hut to the 2nd Marine Div.
This week found two more of the Barracks Marines going for six more. This is TSgt. Carters last re-enlistment before retiring to the unregimented of a civilian. Pfc. Lawson is making a fine start in his Marine Corps Career by shipping over for the first time.
Saturday is another big day for the Barracks Marines. Record day on the Rifle Range secures all routine work and all hands turn out to run the butts, keep scores, and all the other duties connected with firing. This year the Marine Range Detail is also playing host to Chief Klingensmith and two of his Coast Guardsmen.
The Fleet is returning and the spit and polish troops of the Barracks are squaring away their white gear for the steady flow of High Rank who will require Honor Guards. The Marines are here so the situation is well in hand.
The Barracks is again the Temporary home of the various ships' Marine Detachments. At the present the Marine Detachment from the USS LEYETF, is living ashore, preparing for their yearly Range Firing.
During the course of the year, detachments from all types of ships report to the Barracks either TAD or for short one night stays for range firing or to get some boondock training. The Marines from the Fleet welcome a chance to live ashore and get their sea legs stretched up and down the rough Gtmo' hills and swap yarns with the land locked Marines.

to crowded cockpits, can't eat a la Emily Post. Foods must be high in acceptability, though, or morale and energy will sag.
Doctors at, the AF's aero-medical laboratory, Wright Patterson AFB, Ohio, are working on three answers; liquid food, tablets and' semisolids. The liquids are taken through a tu *be in the pilot's helmet, cheese or milk tablets fall into his hand at a button's touch, and the semisolids, are squeezed out like a tube of toothpaste.
It is expected that in the future all three types will be used to make a square meal.


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Skeet Shoot Today Tennis Team Opens Future Dodger Home

Beginning At 0800 Season With 5-0 Win___ __________


This morning at 0800 the Guantanamo Bay Rifle and Pistol club is sponsoring its second Skeet Shoot of the year. The shoot is being held at the Marine Skeet Range located in the Marine Lyceum. area.
Rules of the National Skeet Shooting association will apply with the cash prizes determined by the number of participating shooters. High man in each squad of five shooters will be awarded a prize With a grand prize going to the winner in a shoot composed of squad winners.
Registration fee is $1 per round with shooters being allowed to enter as many rounds as they desire. Ammunition and shotguns are available at the range for those unable to furnish their own.
There will be a special round for those who would like to shoot and yet not compete for the cash prizes. All Base personnel are welcome to enter the competition. Spectators, too, will find this type of shooting interesting to watch.


Cast Change Made

In L. T. Play-'Laura'

Winnie Mathews, Jane Whited and Carl Bailey complete the cast of the Little Theater's new play "'Laura."~
Winnie Mathews plays Bessie the housekeeper; Jane Whited, Danny's mother Mrs. Dorgan and Carl Bailey, Olsen another detective assigned to the case.
Also during the past week, circumstances prevented Don MacQuarrie from continuing in the role. of Waldo. The part has been filled by Ross Fegley. "Laura," a Broadway play of the early forties is better known from the movie which was based on the play. Gene Tierney, Dana Andrews and, Clifton Webb were the stars of the movie .which won an. oscar in 1944. The haunting theme of the movie is one of -the factors which made it so popular.
August 14, at 7:30 p.m., is the next regularly scheduled meeting of the Little Theater.

Fed up with the fancy descriptions he had to .set in type day after day,..a printer added his own to the end of one wedding story: "The linotype operator, while he set this, wore a pale blue shirt w ith pants to match and a silver wxrist watch on his lef t wrist."

Meek Voice: "Doctor, this is Mr. Henpeck. My wife just dislocated her jaw. If you're out this way within-the. next week or two, you might drop in."-


The Naval Base tennis team opened its 1956 season July with a convincing 5-0 win over an eager, scrappy team from the USS JOHN PAUL JONES, DD-932. Although the score would indicate a one-sided match, the actual play proved otherwise.
Most games went to deuce several times before the more practised Naval Base team was able to win the crucial points. This was particularly true in the matches in which the Commanding Officer, CDR Robert Hayler proved to be a worthy competitor.
With the JOHN PAUL JONES operating in the area through August, frequent visits to the tennis courts are planned by the team members and it is anticipated that a return match will result in several of the scores being reversed. The results of the match were as follows:

E. Nichols (Nay~ase) defeated
CDR R. Hayler 6-0, 6-1
ENS J. Pruitt (NayBase) def eated LTJG Bob Clarke, 6-1, 6-0
LCDR L. E. Ogilvy (NayBase)
defeated ENS Pete Maytham
6-4, 6-0
V. Penoso, ADC (Nay~ase) defeated LT Dave Foxwell 6-0,
6-1
E. Nichols-J. Nici, SKC def eated Hayler-Maytham 6-0, 6-0
A match with the Midshipmen from the USS IOWA (BB-61) was played yesterday, but scores were not available at press time.
Personnel interested in participating on the team in future matches, are encouraged to enter their names on the forms provided at the Officers' Club Snack Shack and the Fleet Recreation Center courts.



Strikes & Spares

Hight-Games High-Averages


M. Zeiler J. Da~rby F. Grounds E. Krupski V. Hall M. Houston J. Enders J. Babcock K. Hazelton Ii. Garaudy


If current plans to replace the beloved Ebbets Field are followed through, the future home games of the Brooklyn Dodgers may he played under a huge plastic dome as shown in this artist's conception. Architect Buckminster F u 11I e r claims the huge cup-shaped roof over the baseball field would be 300 f eet high and 750 f eet in diameter.


The air-conditioned, all-weather sports center would have a seating capacity of more than 55,000 as compared to 32,000 for Ebbets Field.
This coutaway view shows airconditioning and shadowless lighting equipment at the top, the field, stands passageways and shops in center and the edge of an underground parking lot at the bottom.


Wrens Lead Peewee; Tie For 2nd
The completion of the ninth week of Peewee ball play found the Wrens leading the league with the Chips and the Owls tied for second and 1%/ games behind. The team standings as of 24 July for both the Peewee and Little League are shown below.


Team Wrens Chips Owls Eels Cubs Lions Pups

Team Colts Bears Ramns Eagles Hawks


'Whale' Of A Shark Caught


J. Darby F. Grounds M. Zeigler D. Aumian G. Rowan V. Hall G. Kraft M. Marsh


Team Standings


Alley-Katz Bowleretts Push-Overs Lillies of the Alleys Gutter-Gals Down-Unders The Crickets


W-39 L-9 W-81 L-17 W-29 r-19 W-26 L-22 W-25 L-23 W-17%A L-30%A W-1132 L-81%A


NAS Photo Lab Photo


Here's the 420 pound shark which was caught by J. W. Parkin, AN, of VU-6, Det. #1, on the left. The shark was caught off Fishermanl's Point by Parkin who was aided by C. W. Haun, AM3, on the right.

This 9 foot, 4 inch monster had a girth of '70 inches. It is the largest fish so far entered in the, fishing tourney.

Last Friday, July 20 Dan Kelly, entered a 17 pound barracuda; Nelson Hicks entered an 8 pound skipjack, and Ray Vickers, AD2, entered a 21 pound grouper in the spearfishing division.


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Peewee Standings
w 10


7 6 7 7
5 9

Little League Standings
W L
11 5 11 5

8 8 2 is








THE INDIAN


Page Seven


Marin es'. And VU - 1 Meet: Head -OQn Supply Tops In NAS

LI -~AI LASummer Bowling


Next Week, H ayotts Begin *Monday


by Carlos Caballo

A head-on .collision is scheduled this coming week between the Marines and, VU-1O. and undoubtedly a lot of things will happen that won't be criket . . . but it 'will be baseball. As avid fans will recall of games during the latter part of the regular League season, pitchers tightened up and the number of errors per game dropped way off.

So, stand by for fast and hard baseball. The playoffs will commence Monday, run through Tuesday and if a third game is. necessary, end Wednesday. No one Seems willing to give.. odds and it would take an optimist to d6 so.
However, one axiom is that the odds favor you if you stick with the champs and the Marines are that without any argument from anyone.' Take your pick.
On the statistics side, of the
Marines 6, NAS 3
picture, elsewhere in this. INDIAN
is a story on heavy hitters and top Termed a "'Sudden Death" playtwirlers.. In our "Little Known And off , the Marines made it a literal Deprtmnt" expression insofar as the ,Flyers Who Cres tatiticswere concerned. They took an early
..first place Marines and. third lend and were never headed from spot NAS were even on hits with there on. by a team that had given 175 each for 21 games' but NAS them' more trouble during ,the regcollected 182 runs to the Leather- ular season than any other one. necks' 150. Second place VU-1o Furtner takes credit for 'the win with relief from Marine teamclouted the ball 152 times for 108 mate Dowd. Loser was Waldrop runs while' the Naval~ Base con- vh o went the full distance.
nectd 12 tmes or 1 tmes The Leathernecks took a one run across hime. leads~ in the seond' innin- thern


The 'CARLOS CABALLO AWARD- of the. year for ".The Least Discouraged Player" goes to Petinak of the Naval Base Team. Petinak was guilty of the most errors, but had close competition from other team players as well as, his own. In spite of all. this he continues to be one' of the top league hitters and one of-the most avid players and fans. Perhaps-one could also add, "He who, never tries to catch ball never drops ball."

Marines 4, VU TEN 0
The last: game of the League and so far as everyone was concerned, just plain baseball since all* issues had ,been settled, previously. The Marine win* meant nothing insofar as' Standings were concerned since they were still in top position and the Mallards in firin possession of second. This was a duel between Crosby for the Marines and King for VU-10. Both hurlers went the full distance.

There were only 11 hits during the entire game and, strangely enough, the Mallards were on the heavy end but couldn't combine
them as well as did the Marines. Once again there was nothing heavier than a single hit by either team.
Marines 021 000 00x-4 4 5 VU-10 000 000 000-0 7 4


double it in the fourth. The clincher for the game came with the only home run -made in the- fifth.
Mariie fiiSt baseman Bland clouted the' ball with two on for a bigthree-run inning to push the Leathlernecks out in- front by 5-0. The Flyers surged In the seventh with three runs of their own to knock Furtney off of the mound but the eff ort -proved futile. Marine s 010 130 001-6 10 4 NAS' 000 000 300-3 6 4
VU TEN 11. Naval !3ase'2
This 'Tuesday night game provided Ithe other halff of the two-team playoff and' provided good limbering up. exercises for the Mallards. The Naval Base nine failed to rise, to'the heights they area capable6 of. or. perhaps the Mallards were flying too, high.


Ladies Golf Shots

by Mae Hadley
The weekly event of the ladies golf association was a hickey tournament. The following ladies were winners of golf balls: First flightFirst place-Margaret Wall
Second place--Cynthia Holley Third flightFirst place-Florence Fortenberry
There was a monthly meeting of the association on July 16 at the home of the club president, Mrs. Lois Cooper. Ladies' handicaps and the ringer tournament were discussed. The ringer tourney began July 20 and will end August 17.
Each lady has eight numbered cards at the desk in the club house. these cards may be called for at anytime you wish to play. The cards must be turned back into the desk following the round.


The NAS bowling league ended its summer league competition July 10 with the Supply department emerging victor over the Administration team by a narrow two point margin. CPO's, Medical, Ordnance, Commissary, Aerology and photo finished the season in that order.
A banquet and trophy presentation was held Monday night, July 23, at the NAS Enlisted Men's club. Team members who received individual trophies were R. E. Klunder, ATO, for high individual average of 178, and R. G. Hanson, SK3, for high individual game (scratch), 247.
Others getting individual awards; V. Penoso, SDC, for high individual series (scratch), 597, A. T. Casantini, CS3, high individual game game (With handicap), 258, and J. A. Westfall, high individual series
(with handicap), 641.

A championship team trophy was
also presented to the Supply department squad.


League Leaders' Baseball Statistics

League Standings
Team Won Lost Pet Marines 18 3 .857 VU-10 10 11 .476 NAS 9 12 .429 NayBase 5 16 .238 The following' are the statistics on the leading batters and pitchers in the Naval Base league.
The vital statistics may be obtained for each player in the league at the Naval Station Special Services office.

Leading Batters


Name
Scholl Bland Dowd Duncan Petnick


Name
Furtney Montgomery Waldrop


Team 2B 3B AB R H NayBase 5 - ,77 25 29 Mar. 9 1 89 17 33 Mar. 6 1 87 23 30 Mar. 2 - 89 26 29 NayBase 2 2 77 19 26

Leading Pitcher's Record


Team
Mar. vU-10 NS


Lost
2
3
3


I.P.
82.1 86 77.1'


S.0.
61 73 94


Stolen IBase HR
6

12
3 2 13 -


Hits
46 54 69


ERA 2.08 1.88 1.39


Saturday, 28.July 1950


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Saturday, 28 July 1956


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THE INDIAN


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Navr-3PP0-40ND-GvUfAntanmo


Cinema - 'Scoop

by D. D.H.
TV finds its way into the column this week, with the mention of two shows. The Monday .night show "'Studio One" features a play written by Jackie Gleason concerning a co uple of saints who are instructed to cleanse a very wicked town. The show stars Red Buttons and James Barton as 'the saints.
Wednesday night the Navy gets into the act with men from the USS LEYTE appearing on "I've Got A Secret". Garry Moore emicees the popular quiz show. The LEYTE is in the. Bay at present and many of her men appear on the show.
"'Moby Dick" seems to be a "movie to look forward to seeing." Produced and directed byJohn Houston, the Herman Melville classic adds up to some great motion picture entertainment. Gregory Peck stars as Captain Ahab. This is one that probably will be in line for some oscars.
Diane (MGM, in color), will probably be received by Gtmoites ,with assorted exclamations of dislike and the movie verges on deserving it. The story which deals with the life of Diane do Poitiers, one of the most famous French Royal mistresses, goes, into -politics and the many* conspiracies .of the time when it could be sticking tothe. story of Diane. Lana 'Turner plays !the title role and' ii' teamed with' Roger Moore' and Pedro Armendariz. 'If you don't enjoy it, doift say I didn't warn you.
Slightly Scarlet (RKO, in color) can'best be termed as slightly confusing. The two luscious redheads Rhonda Fleming, and Arlene Dahl play sisters, with John Payne and Kent Taylor furnishing the* male components of this movie: The story easwith.th big cityrackets and, lacks realism. Still, the movie might be enjoyed even.'' with its very many drawbacks..
West ,of Zanzibar (U.I., in color),
Anthony. Steel and Sheila. Sim ..,. story of a native uprising in Africa ,... definitely below average -. . . Played the Base before,
:Shadow of the Eagle (U.A.), Richard Greene:-and Valentine Cortesa . .. story set in the time of Catherine, Queen of Russia . .. no comment. It's a new one to the circuit.
Patterns (Harris-Mvyerberg'production, released through U.A,), is an all round excellent movie and one that has not been ballyhooed a great deal, but is great entertainment. Originally a TV show, the screen adaptation proves Ias did "Marty" that an unpretentious budget does not mean a low-grade movie. Story concerns a big corporation and has much the same background as "Executive Suite."


WGBY Television


Saturday. July 28 1:00 Winky Dink & You
1 :30 Contest Carnival
2 :00 Garry Moore 2:50 House Party 6:00 Robt Q. Lewis 3 :30 Ethel & Albert 4:00 Victory at Sea 4:36, Two for the Money 5:00 Wsetern Movie 6:00 Beat the Clock
6 :30 Masquerade Party 7:00 George Gobel
7 :30 Screen Director's
Playhouse
8 :00 Colgate Comedy Hour 9:00 Stage Show
9 :30 Appointment with
Adventure
Sunday, July' 29
1:-00 Winky Dink & You
1 :30 ,Paul Winchell 2:00 Garry Moore 2:30 Big Picture
3 :00,Lamp unto my Feet
3..30 Christophers
4 :00 Ted Mack's Amateurs 5:00 Roy Rogers
5 :30 That's My Boy 6:00 Mama 6:30 You Are There


7 :00 Guy Lombardo 7:30 What's My Line S :00 Ed Sullivan 9:00 U.S. Steel Hour


Program
6:30 I've Got a Secret 7:00 This Is Your Life
7 :30 Danger


Monday, July 39 9:00 Kraft TV Theater 5 :30 News Parade "It's Only Money" ,
5:45 Perry Como
6:00 Private Secretary Thursday, Asuut 2
6 :30 My Favorite Husband 5 :30 News Parade
7 :00 Talent Scouts 5:45 Perry Coma
7 :30 Highway Patrol 6 :00 Captain Gallant of 8 :00 Sid Caesar the*Foreign Legion 9:00 Studio One 6:30 Professional Father
"The Tale of St. MO5 Thruth or Consequences
Emergency" 7:30 Dragnet
Tuesday. July 81 5 :00 Milton Berle
5 : 30 News Parade 0 :00 Climax
5 :45 Perry Comao "Sailor on Horseback".
6 :00 Fantomine Quiz Friday. August a 6:30 Meet Millie :3NesPrd 7:00 Phil Silvers 5:45 e P arCom 7:o0 Star Tonight 6:00 Pe&ry Filmo
8 :00 Red Skelton 6 :00 Dola & Seconm 8:30 Lineup 63 olraScn
9 :00 Philco Playhouse 7:00 Stop the Music
"A Man is Ten Feet Tall" 7:80 Playhouse of Stars 8:00 Arthur Murray
Wednesday, August 1 8:30 Crusader
3 :30 News Parade 9:00 Boxing: Milo Savage vs
5 :45 Patti Page Artie Towne, Midle.
6 :00 Industry on Parade weights


Saturday, July 28
Nav~ta-Diane-122 min. NAB-Magnificent Matador-94 min. Mar. Site-Blackboard Jungle-101 min. Villa.-Outside the Law-OS min. Lwd. Pt.-Adventures of Sadie-9.4 min.
Sunday, July 29
Nav~ta-Slightly Scarlet-99 min. NAB-Diane
Mar. Site-Night Holds Terror-1OS min. Villa.-alackboard Jungle Lwd. Ft.-Outside the Law
Monday, July 80
NavSta-West of Zanzibar-94 min. NAB-Slightly Scarlet Mar. Bite-Magnificent Matador Villa.-Night Holds Terror Lwd. Pt.-Blackboard Jpingle
Tuesday, July 31
NavSta-Shadow of the Eagle-OS min. NAB-West of Zanzibar Mar. Site-Diane Villa,-Magnificent Matador Lwd. Pt.-Night Holds Terror
.I Wednesday, August 1 NavSta-Patterns--03 min. NAB-Shadow of the Eagle Mar. Bite-Slightly Scarlet Villa.-Diane
Lwd. Ft.-Magnificent Matador
Thursday, August 2
Nav~ta-Valley of the Kings-90 min. NAB-Patterns Mar. Bite-West of Zanzibar Villa.-Slightly Scarlet Lwd. Pt.-Diane
Friday, August 3
NavSta-Blackjack Ketchum, Desperado-92 min.
NAB-Valley of the Kings Mar. Bite-hadow of the Eagle Villa.-West of Zanzibar Lwd. Pt.-Slightly Scarlet

Van Heflin stars with Everett Sloane, Ed Begley and Beatrice Straight featured .See it!
Valley of the Kings (MGM, in color) . .. Robert Taylor, Eleanor Parker and Carlos Thompson. . Diggings in the ancient tombs of Egypt ... Good.
Blackjack Ketchum, Desperado (Col) . .. Howard Duff and Victor Jory . -. , just another western
..you might go for it. A new one.


Radio Round-Up

NEW WAX DEPARTMENT: First shipment during the week came from RCA . Westerners will like to bend an ear to ."Reminiscing" and "New Spanish TwoStep" by Chet Atkins and Hank Snow, both guitar duets. Leo Diamnond is up to par with his "Go See Tony"' and "Le Rilfi&?" Both arc lively numbers and chances are you've already heard-them over WGBY. Ralph Flanagan does "Out Last Night" and "What's New."
Others are "It's Better In The Dark" and "Your Place In The Sun" by Tony Martin; "How Many Teardrops" and "Your Heart's In Danger" by the Laurie Sisters, and last but never least where, Helen Grayco is concerned is her "A Fool For You" and "C'Est La Guerre."
PROGRAM CHANGES: On e change for this, week, late, tomorrow night "Philadelphia Orchestra" has expired and its place is taken by "Symphonies For Youth," a 60-minute program beginning at 11I p.h. Music is by the Los, Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra directed by Alfred Wallenstein, The Orchestra is rated as among the nation's top five.


Book -] Nook

For baseball fans (and who isn't at this time' of' the year?) THE
BASEBALL AL MA NA C should* fill the bill perfectly. It's a large book full of all the possi-ble baseball facts, figures and statistics, and it' put together so that desired information can be located quickly and easily."
Several books on, Eisenhower specifically, and the presidency in general, have hit the market lately. The Library has two of the latest.THE PRESIDENCY TODAY, and
*THE EISENHOWER YEARS. The second looks like the better of the -two for election-year reading.
H. 3.,Rose's A HANDBOOK OF GREEK MYTHOLOGY is a modern, watered-down Bullflinch which is a, great deal more readable than its classic predecessor. It's surprising to find out how many modern literary themes are based on this ancient' Greek thought. The title alone of this book will probably scare most people away, but the wonderful tales between the covers mean that that's their loss.
Marion Hargrove, who wrote the World War II bestseller "See Here, Private Hargrove," is up to his old tricks again with THE GIRL HE LEFT BlEHIND. It's good to learn that Hargrove hasn't lost his knack of translating riotous hilarity onto the pr~iied page. This is another laugh-a-minute story, and one of the better ones at that.
Another biography (which actually reads more like alid adventure. story) is CAPTAIN OF THE QUEENS, by IRichard, Collier. Mr.. Collier has-been in the service of. the "Cunard Lines for most of his seafaring life, and his tales of .the great liners like the "Queen Mary", and of the 'famous people who traveled in them, mike first-class reading.
HOW TO* PLAN FOR. COLLEGE, byJohn W. McReynolds, should find a followvig among the many i .esidents of Gtmo who are looking forward to higher educatio.n after their tour of duty, eitheri With or without the aid of thie V.A. This is a deta ile handbook with, the exact information 'for anyonie's particular inclinations.


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More Rain, Temps Midshipmen Cruise Leaves Today, Open House Sunday Under 96 Next Week Aboard USS LEYTE The stale vegetation on the Base got some water-sprinkling Sunday night, July 22, to the disgust of the Base's outdoor movie-goers when .49 hundreths of an inch of rain fell. Sunday night's downpour was the first in Gtmo since the start of the Summer season. Easterly waves was reported by the Naval Air Station Acrology Office as the cause of the "sudden rainfall." "Easterly waves," explains LTJG A. M. McCalmont, NAS Aerology Officer, "is a line of cyclonic and lifting conversions and thunderstorms moving from east to west in the trade winds." Forecasting next week's weather conditions in the Guantanamo Bay area, the Aerology officer said that there will be an increased gustiness during the day and an increased afternoon and evening thundershower activity. The temperature in general will remain below 96 degrees which is the normal temperature in this area this time of the year. Guantanamo Bay harbor will once again feel the void of numerous sailors and ships after Task Group 40.1 (Midshipman Cruise Alpa) weighs anchor today. Ships that anchored in Gtmo from July 25 until their departure were the U S S IOWA (BB 61), Task Group flagship. On board the IOWA was RADM K. M. McManes, Commander Battle -Cruiser Atlantic. Other big ships were the battleship NEW JERSEY and the cruisers MACON and DES MOINES. Sixteen destroyers including the USS ROWE, ROSS, WREN, BEARSS, ROBINSON, SIGOURNEY, HOOD, KENNEDY, JOHNSTON, PERRY, WARE, BAILEY, GOODRICH, TURNER and N K PERRY COVERS GTMO LIKE THE SUNSHINE U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Volume VII, No. 30 Saturday,25 July 1956 Commissioning Of Public Works C. On Next Wednesday's Agenda Commissioning ceremonies for the Public Works Center will be held Wednesday, August 1, beginning at 9:00 a.m. The new command and its commanding officer, CAPT H. N. Wallin, CEC, will be under the military command of the Commander Naval Base and under the management of the Bureau of Yards and Docks. CAPT Wallin will also assume the duties of Base Civil engineer relieving CDR E. G. Dobbins, present Base CivEng who will continue as 'Resident Officer in Charge of Construction. L' Marron-Executive Officer -Present Public Works officers LT J. P. Marron, LTJG D. S. Griffin and ENS F. R. Anibal will assume duties on the staff of the new command. LT Marron will become acting Executive officer and Operatiois. officer. LTJG Griffin will be Maintenance officer anid.' ENS Anibal will serve as the Transportation and Utilities officer. LT F. E. Lennox will be transferred from the 'ROINC office and will become assistant Base Civil engineer and Planning officer. At the commissioning .ceremonies Chaplain J. J. Sullivan will deliver the invocation. Following the invocation, CAPT W. R. Caruthers, C.O. Naval Station, and CDR E. L. Rowan; Public Works officer, will speak. CAPT Wallin will then read his orders and report to the Commander Naval Base as having assumed command upon which the flag will be raised. RADM Cooper to Speak After the flag is raised, RADM W. G. Cooper, .ComNavBase, will give a short talk. followed by the benediction; which will be delivered by Chaplain P. R. McPhee. In a SecNav notice the Secretary of the Navy stated the mission of the new Public Works Center: "To continuedd on Page Four) made up the cruise's mosquito force. The nine submarines, instead of the originally scheduled ten, that gave the Middies the feel of an underwarter cruise also left Gtmo today. Approximately 13,000 Naval personnel which included ship's co., officers, enlisted personnel and midshipmen units constituted the Alpa Middie cruise. 3,027 Midshipmen A total number of 3,027 midshipmen, 1,398 of which are first classes and 1,616 are third classes were on board the 20 ships attached to the cruise. Out of the 1,398 first classes, 15 NROTCs are candidates for Supply Corps commission. Except for the 15 Supply hopefuls, all the Alpa Middies are gunning for the line commission. Base Shore Patrol Headquarters disclosed that the first wave of the Middies' liberty party arrived at the Fleet landing at about 1330, July 25. On Wharf Baker the first liberty party was clocked at exactly 1300. At about 1400 the midshipmen and Fleet personnel on liberty literally littered every place on the Base where they could amuse themselves. Exchanges Packed In the mid-afternoon of July 25, the NavSta Exchange store was jampacked. The Drive Inn had a long line too. Marine Site and NAS stores were also invaded. NavSta Special Services' forrent bicycles were all checked out. Some Middies ons the bikes went as far as Kittery Beach. Horses strutted away from Marine Corral Lane stable. But these transporta(Continued on Page Three) Bathers Get Rash At Yateras Beach Five cases of skin eruptions caused by Guoa (pronounced as gwaw) was reported last week, according to CDR Samuel' Moschella, Base Hospital Sick Call Officer. Guoa is a terebinthine tree with star-like leaves that yield milky fluid in the form of exudates as a result of incisions. This milky substance is known as "viciously infectious turpentine" and when the BaeReuoaezFnmnspuh skin is exposed to even a drop WGBY Changes Radio of it, rash follows immediately. According to the men who fell victim to the Guoa milk, trees of the kind prominently thrive in the Yateras Beach area. In this connection Dr. Moschella issues a preventive warning to bathers at Yateras Beach to "lookout ad avoid contact with this skin-wounding plant." Frequency On Wed. Next Wednesday, August.1 radio station WGBY will change its radio frequency to 1340 kilocycles. The new frequency will go into effect at 0700 Wednesday morning with the Morning Caravan program. 9 Guantanamo Bay naval personnel and their dependents have been invited by CAPT H. T. Johnson, C.O. USS LEYTE to visit the ship during the open house Sunday afternoon, July 29, between 1300 and 1700. A guided tour of all topside spaces, including the bridge, flight deck and hangar deck will be offered to all who attend. Refreshments prepared by the ship's galley will be served throughout the afternoon. Children under 14 year of age should be accompanied by at least one parent. It is recommended that ladies do not wear high heels. There will be demonstration of helicopter rescue at sea and firefighting at 1500. The hangar deck exhibits of shipboard activities include the S2F Sentinel plane which will be open for inspection. LEYTE motorboats will leave fleet landing for the ship every 15 minutes between 1245 and 1530 and will return every 15 minutes from the LEYTE. Navy's Follow-Up' Congrats Local SN The Navy's administrative "follow-up" tradition never fails. When a man having unsettled matters gets transferred from one station to another, matters in that regard follow him wherever he goes. Millard Starr, former leading deck seaman on the USS CALCATERRA (DER 390) homeported in Newport, R.I., was transferred to the Naval Air Station, Gtmo on July 2. But before his transfer he had done a job "with extreme valor" that was never officially recognized until he received a letter from his former commanding officer. Tradition working well in hand, a letter from CALCATERRA's skipper was received by Starr commending him "for actions on the night of March 16, 1956, under stress of freezing weather, snow and wind up to 60 knots, at which time Starr cut loose the last mooring line of the USS CASCADE to which the CALCATERRA was nestling thus permitting both ships to get underway from dockside punishment."

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We Page Two a Saturday, 28 July 1956 THE INDIAN The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a possible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. RADM WILLIAM G. COOPER, Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Editorial Staff LTJG D. G. LaCasse ---------------------------Officer-Adviser G. L. Henderson, JOC --------------------------------Editor J. C. Curren, JOSN ----------------------------Managing Editor E. U. Orias, J03 -------------------------------Feature Editor D. D. Hinton, JOSN ----------------------------Staff Reporter THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P.35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. Materials marked AFPS may be used by news media provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All materials originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part or without credit. All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. 74.(4HA.PEA.U AG.TATOR Funny thing about Sturdley. When he joined up and that nasty old barber trimmed his curly locks he was fit to be tied. His new coiffure would not see the light of day if he could help it. Funny thing about the service. It cooperated with our boy Sturd and gave him a hat to wear. Sturdley, not to be outdone, flip-flopped. Now everyone can scan the top of his head out of doors. For Sturd has joined the Hat Fumblers Society. The hat fumblers are legion. It may take one a full 15 minutes to travel from barracks to mess hall but somehow his chapeau never quite finds a home atop his head. An expert hat fumbler is always JUST ON THE VERGE of donning his headgear. Surely anyone interested in proper military dress-a passing officer, a non-coin, etc.-can see that. On a real good day, an expert hat fumbler can meet the test of four officers, a couple of senior NCOs and an MP or two thrown in and still play his favorite game to perfection. The expert's eyes are always peeled despite the whistle on his lips. Once under cover, he puts the hat back into his pocket. Now THAT takes talent. (AFPS) Sunday, 29 July 1956 CATHOLIC MASSES Sunday, 7000-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri.-1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800, 1900 -2000, and daily before Mass PROTESTANT SERVICES 0930-Sunday School 0930-Sunday School 0930-Adult Worship (Naval Base Chapel) 1930-Fellowship Hour Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal JEWISH SERVICES Friday-1900-Naval Base Chapel CHURCH OF CHRIST 1000-Bible Study 1045-Worship Service Community Auditorium Calendar of Events Sunday, July 29 Base Sunday School will resume today. Monday, July 30 Teen-Age Advisory Group-Teen-Age Club -7:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 31 CPO Wives Club-Coffee (Dining Rm., CPO Club)-1:30 p.m. Thursday, August 2 Navy Wives Club-Business Meeting (School Aud.)-8:00 p.m. Felloweraft Club 1078--Community And.7:30 p.m. Friday, August 3 CPO Wives Club-Business Meeting (Family Rm., CPO Club)-8:00 p.m. LATER DAY SAINTS Sunday-1100-Naval Station Library CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Sunday-1000-NavSta Library Chaplains at this Activity CDR P. R. McPhee, CH, USN (Protestant) CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN (Catholic) 9 The Chaplain's Corner When Jesus taught his Apostles and disciples the Lord's Prayer, he immediately added to the petitions an exhortation to perseverance, in the form of an imaginary incident taken from the everyday semi-nomadic life of Palestine. He said to them: "Which of you shall have a friend and shall go to him in the middle of the night and say to him, "Friend, lend me three loaves, for a friend of mine has just come to me from a journey, and I have nothing to set before him'; and he from within should answer and say "Do not disturb me; the door is now shut, and my children and I are in bed; I cannot get up and give to thee." Despite the obstacles to his getting up and finding the loaves, the very importunity of his neighbor would force him to the rescue, as Christ tells his disciples: "I say to you, although he will not get up and give to him because he is friend, yet because of his persistence he will get up and give him all he needs." Our Lord, in whose very name we petition God, stresses and repeats and restresses this importance, nay, this necessity, of making a nuisance of ourselves, so to speak, when we pray. First, he makes the advice solemn with "I say to you, ask, and it shall be given to you; seek and you shall find; knock, and it shall be opened to you." He next underlines the success of such importunity: "For everyone who asks, receives; and he who seeks, finds; and to him who knocks it shall be opened." He then reduces to the absurd the idea of God's refusing to grant prayers that properly ask those things necessary for our spiritual and temporal welfare; it would, however, be against the very idea of God's wisdom, his Fatherly care over us and the greater good of our eternal salvation, to expect him to grant even our most urgent requests-if these were actually detrimental to our well-being. "If one of you asks his father for a loaf." queries Christ, "will he hand him a stone? or for a fish, will he for a fish hand him a serpent? or if he asks for an egg, will he hand him a scorpion?" Our Lord encourages us to petition God with perseverance for all we need, by comparing parental kindness in fallen man with the paternal generosity of our heavenly Father. J. J. Sullivan Chaplain, USN Fourth In Series Connecticut Registration is permanent and registration is not required. Active service personnel, members of the Coast and Geodetic Survey and Public Health Service may apply for registration by mail to the Town Clerk, place of residence, at any time. All other persons must appear in person in order to be admitted as a voter. Iowa You must re-register this year in those cities and townships where registration is required except Des Moines. Registration is permanent in Des Moines unless the voter did not vote at least once in the past four years. All qualified absent persons are considered registered when a marked absentee ballot and the executed affidavit on the back of the ballot envelope have been accepted by the election officials. Louisiana Registration must be accomplished once exery four years by every person except in parishes of more that 100,000 which have permanent registration. Registration may be accomplished only by appearing in person at the office of the Registrar of Voters. parish of residence, at any time up to Oct. 7. Florida Registration is permanent in most Florida counties. Permanency is determined by the County Commissioners of each county. A voter who changes his residence from one county to another is subject to reregistration which may be accomplished after he has lived in the new county six months. First registration, where required, and re-registration must be in person at the office at the Supervisor of Registration, county of residence, before Oct. 5. Members of the Armed Forces, civilian employees of the U.S. and their dependents whose registration has lapsed will receive a blank form for re-registration in the same envelope as the absentee ballot. Any resident under 21 in the Armed Forces may pre-register for voting. He must appear in person at the Office of the Supervisor of Registration, county of residence, and fill out an affidavit that he is in service. When he reaches 21, he will obtain a certificate of registration. Kansas All persons except members of the Armed Forces, civilian employees working with the Armed Forces overseas and their dependents whose residence is in counties with a population of 250,000 or more must register once every four years. Also, reregistration is required if person changes address or name. If these persons reside in cities with a population of 2,000 or more, they must register but such registration is permanent unless the voter failed to vote in a general election, moved or changed his name. If registration is required, it must be accomplished in person at the office of the Registrar, or city of residence. This must be done before Oct. 17 in the cases of Kansas City, Topeka and Wichita and before Oct. 27 in the other instances. Members of the Armed Forces, civilians working for the Armed Forces outside the U.S. and their dependents need not register to vote by absentee ballot. For further information, see your voting officer. (AFPS) I THE INDIAN

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et Saturday, 28 July 1956 e e Regulations Cover Officers' S. Pool New regulations concerning the officers' swimming pools were released recently by the Commander Naval Base in a NavBase instruction. The directive reads that the swimming pools will be open from 0900 to 2100 daily. Only officers and civilian members of the Commissioned Officers' Mess and their dependents and guests are permitted to use the officiers' pools. Children under 12 year of age will not be allowed in the pools unless accompanied by an adult. Maids may not accompany children. Also children are not permitted in the large pool after 1600 on Mondays through Fridays and after 1200 on Saturdays, Sundays and holidays. No person under the influence of intoxicating liquor shall be allowed nor will running around and about the pool be permitted. No food and/or drinks are permitted in the pool area, shower and locker room. Inner tubes and similar devices are permitted in the large pool only during the hours children under 12 are permitted and then between the five foot depth and the shallow end of the pool. The lifeguard on duty is directed to enforce these regulations. All persons are warned against disputing any decision he may make except through proper channels. Middies .. (Continued from Page One) tions did not in any way alleviate the acute shortage of public conveyance system on the Base. A great many had to use their feet to transport themselves to the place they'd like to see. Base private car owners driving along Sherman Avenue however were generous enough to give the walking sailor a ride! The Fleet Recreation Center was turned into a veritable carnival ground-minus the buntings. Everything at the center was geared up. In fact the whole works was in cyclonic turmoil. Shore patrol estimate of the Midshipman Cruise's liberty party totalled to an appalling number of 7,000 personnel on the first day. Herb Shriner tells how one of the local spintsters finally got married: "She saw this fellow on a 'Wanted' poster and offered a bigger reward for him than the government did." One mother kangaroo said to another mother kangaroo: "I hope it doesn't rain today; it's awful when the kids have to play inside." School Name Contest Ends Next Tuesday Submit Entries Now The contest for the naming of the Base dependent's school ends July 31. It is open to all military and civilian personnel and their dependents. Submit your entries to Commander Naval Base, Attn., School Name Competition Judges. Prizes of $25 and $10 will be awarded for the best suggestions. Commissary Installs Music Maker Some dairy and poultry farms in the states play music to hasten the process of milking cows and to cheer up chickens while they lay their eggs. But in Gtmo the Naval Station Commissary store plays music to make the grocery hours of service wives a syncopated occupation. Inside the office of LCDR R. E. Newton Jr., NavSta Commissary Officer, there has recently been installed a radio amplifier with eight speakers strategically posted. While the installation of the commissary music-maker was basically designed to "'add more home-like atmosphere in the store, its secondary purpose is to render service to the husband who might want to speak to his wife even at a time when she is busy hunting for groceries." According to LCDR Newton, all the husband has to do is to call 8438 and give the name of the person he would like to speak to. "At this point," he explained, "the name asked for will be paged in the store's public address system while a telephone receiver hangs ready." CAPT Kohr Commends 3 EMs; Skaters Waltz 230 t FiRi k Ware Relieves Douglass-Club Mgr. %1 Crw o Rcr Crowd Tops Record The greatest turn out of family group skaters was recorded Tuesday night, July 24, when 200 children, ages 3 to 17 and some 30 adults stormed the Fleet Recreation Skating Rink. Hoight Smith, in charge of the skating rink, reports that Tuesday night's record of family skaters topped all previous records in that category since 1954. The cause for the big attendance was not known until James B. Robinson, SK3, skating rink insider, came up with an answer. He said that "the children have nothing else to do since the Base's school summer recreation program ended last week." Merit Badge Winner INDIAN Photo A meritorious mast was held Tuesday morning, July 24, by CAPT G. L. Kohr, extreme right, NAS commanding officer, in which three men of that command were officially commended for "outstanding performance of duty" and a "Job Well Done." Thomas N. Douglass, ADC, outgoing manager of the Naval Air Station EM Club, accepts from CAPT Kohr a commendatory testimonial letter which reads in part: "During the period of your managership the EM Club has gained an enviable reputation due chiefly through your personal interest in the welfare of all men patronizing the club, permanent or transient alike. "You have been responsible for the wholesome foods served; various entertainment features inaugurated. Due to your outstanding performance of duty, you will be sorely missed by the personnel of this command when you leave." Douglas will be relieved by W. M. Ware, SHC. Louis E. Miller, SN, extreme left, and Donald F. Wagner, SN, center, both swimming instructors for the swimming classes sponsored recently by the Naval Base School were also commended by CAPT Kohr as a result of the official recognition expressed by the school's Summer Recreation Program Director in a letter addressed to CAPT Kohr. In commending both Wagner and Miller, CAPT Kohr said: ...I take pleasure in commending you for the manner iix which you so ably and expertly performed the duties devolving upon you in connection with the summer recreation program. "The manner in which the youngsters responded and the excellent results attained is evidence of your personal interest, patience and individual attention to them. Since your performance of duties has brought much favorable attention not only to yourselves but to the Naval Air Station which is proud to have you as members of its crew, I commend you with great pleasure for a 'Job Well Done'." INDIAN Photo During the Boy Scout Court of Honor last Wednesday, CAPT F. S. Habecker, Commander Fleet Training Group, presented advancement ratings to the scouts meriting them. CAPT Habecker awards Tom Fortenberry with a Merit Badge for swimming. S0 e Page Three THE INDIAN

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e Page Four The Medic by W. A. Dall & R. A. Albrecht The Stork Club The girls outnumber the boys this week in the newborn parade. A boy was born to EN2 and Mrs. Cates and girls to Staff Sgt. and Mrs. Stoneking, AG3 and Mrs. August, and Mr. and Mrs. Back. Congratulations to all. Arrivals Welcome aboard to H. D. Person, HM3, from the USS ALBANY and A. D. Batoff, HN, and R. J. Deas, HA, from HCS, Bainbridge. Local Athlete The outstanding baseball player from the hospital this season is HM3 David W. McCafferty. Mac is the regular third beaseman on the Naval Base combine and was a unanimous selection for the Base All-Star team. McCafferty's leading attribute has been his clutch hitting, 17 hits which produced 16 RBI's and 12 runs scored despite a .233 batting average. His team spirit and flawless fielding was one of the few bright spots of the last place combine. McCafferty has been playing baseball 11 of his 26 years which includes semi-pro and Class C professional teams. Originally a pitcher, he switched to third-base due to an arm injury early in his career. The staff congratulates "Big Mac" on his selection to the All-Star team and for outstanding representation of the hospital. Kickin' It Around Mat invested in a carton of smokes ...Wirt returned unmarried from Haiti ...Shook is showing off his $10.98 camera. Cohen and Turton are the luckiest. .Kingaroo awakens every morning at 0650 sharp ...caught by the local fisherman this week: 19 fish, 3 cases and 4 fifths ."Goldy" is re-enlisting ..Harding is still "King Sackrat" despite strong challenges by Muff er, Watuzee, and McMillan ...Ski requested 30 more nights ..and remember, only 150 days till Christmas. S SCUTTLEBUTT ( f E 1 !z s 3 I } f i Charles Atlas Has Nothing On 7 Base Men -Gtmo's Workout Artist INDIAN Pho The "Atlas Society" go through their muscle-building routine. Liftir the weights in the foreground is J. J. Bonk, PN3. In the back row, le to right: J. N. Caughey, AV3; D. E. Kujawski, SN; D. F. Lowe, S and A. Anzaldua, SA. by Ely U. Orias There is no denying the fact that women don't go fo sickly-looking, out-of-shape or to put it bluntly, shipwrecked men! Sunken chest, skinny runt, puny weakling, pipe-stem ar and bulging bread-baskets are the physical characteristi shunned by seven enlisted personnel on the Base and possible all women everywhere. Men like Donald E. Kujawski, SN, NavSta; John Bonk, PN3, NavSta; Dale Lowe, SN, NSD; Alfredo Anzaldua, SA, NavSta; Bruce Colegrove, SN, NavSta; J. N. Caughey, AV3, NAS and Don Wagner, SN, NAS, have already made personal sacrifices in order to obtain for themselves the much coveted physical vigor and vitality which they term as man's keys to success. At the Naval Air Station's old hangar by the seaplane ramp, there stands a shed which these men call "our body-building workshop." From their own pockets came the amount that paid for their muscle-producing equipment such as the four chinning bars, four hand adjustable dumbells, a kettlebell, squat racks, iron boots, head strap, parallel bars and punching bags. They have also inclined stomach boards at different angles, forearm apparatus, lat machine and various benches of different sizes and grades. Their gym also sports 530 lbs of weights ranging from 14 lbs up to 50 pounders. After service working hours, on a four-day-a-week timetable, they assemble themselves at their own gym without the benefit of a muster roll. Gathering themselves on their own free time, they spontaneously think that "to do otherwise our body-building program will highly prejudiced." Sacrificing money and time f other amusements, these men wor out with profound devotion. Di cipline has become their boso word without which, "our effort will merely be swallowed by t wind." They have set norms of wor out-conduct and have imposed sam upon themselves without preten but with the view to making the selves bigger and better muscle men. For instance they have elect ed to get "plenty of sleep and fo after each workout" to supply t body system for the re-growth muscle tissue. John Bonk, a relatively ne corner to this Atlassy hobby, fou out that discipline to one's se always pays great dividends. B fore he started working-out s months ago, he was a plump, u muscled skaboots. Now he sport a well depressed stomach, bulgi muscles and a chesty chest. Father of these beginners Donald E. Kujawski, a Naval St tion MAA VIP driver. A priz winning weightlifter in his ow right, Donald has won first pri trophies in the 1053 Pittsbur and in the 1954 Fort Lauderda Navy Wives Club Members of the local Navy Wives Club attended a Luncheon at the 5 CPO Club Thursday, July 26. Plans are also progressing for the textile painting group. Members and friends interested should sign up now and be in on the fun from the start. The next business meeting of the club will be held at the School Auditorium on August 2, at 8:00 p.m. We extend a welcome to all wives of enlisted personnel to attend this meeting. To become a member of the club, one has to attend three functions. Our events take place on Thursday afternoons. 'iCommissioning .. (Continued from Page One) perform public works, public utilities and transportation functions including engineering services, incident thereto, for all activities in the Guantanamo Bay area, except to minor maintenance and housekeeping functions which are retained ig. by individual activities; perform ft such other public works functions g N'as may be directed by the Commander U.S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba." Reception st "0" Club ed a reception at the Officer's Club tehen the commissioning ceremoms nies have been completed. The recs ception will be held for official 1 guests members of the commissionY ing party. Uniform for the commissioning -ceremonies will be full dress whites sefor official guests and members be of the commissioning party. Other guests will wear the uniform of or the day. kCAPT Wallin came to Gtmo from sthe Bureau of Yards and Docks mn where he was Director of the Maints tenance division and later served he as executive assistant to the Asss sistant chief of the Bureau for k-Maintenance and Material. me In these billets CAPT Wallin was se instrumental in developing and m-implementing thenavy-wide conad trolled maintenance program for t-public works and public utilities. od CDR Rowan will leave the Base, hie August 28, for his new duties at of the Naval Station, San Diego, California. wnd lf eix nts ng is aen ze gh le and Florida State weightlifting contests. He was also for sometime an instructor in the weightlifting classes of the Key West, Florida YMCA. The history of weightlifting is well associated to the now mythical name Atlas, son of Iapetus and Clyme. After the downfall of the Titans, he was condemned to stand at the Western end of the earth, bearing the sky on his head and hands. Then weightlifting began in Europe and in 1896 it became an event in the modern olympics. 0 e e0 Saturday, 28 July 1956 THE INDIAN

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e0 Saturday, 28 July 1956 CAPT Caruthers -Reenlistees Fleet Camera Party Photo Seven men re-enlisted at the Naval Station in the period July 7 to 21. During June and July there have been 22 re-enlistments in the command. CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer Naval Station, stands with the seven most recent "ship-overs" after last Saturday's inspection. They are left to right: F. J. Arndt, EN3, 9th division; J. L. Hahn, YN2, 3rd division; 0. D. Adams Jr., TE3, 2nd division; G. R. Walter, PH3, FCP; S. E. Cobbs, PH3, FCP; W. Beard, TN, BOQ3, and D. A. Reinold, EM1,, FBP. F T 6 Bulletin FTG almost replaced the usual summer losses of personnel this past week when a total of 15 men reported aboard. There are 13 wives and 25 children soon to follow. Donald A. Kingsley RM2 COMM Frank M. Kotnik ETC CIC James A. Schulters ET1 CIC George E. Kneiple ETC CIC Robert A. Holbrook RD1 CIC William A. Brett EMC ENG Ray J. Matter EMC ENG Harold K. Anderson So1 A/S Harvey Giese So1 A/S Raymond F. Esparza FP1 DC William S. Smith DC1 DC John T. Carleton FTC GUN William A. Richards FTC GUN William A. Nichols RD2 FTC Dean R. Nichols RD3 FTC CDR Gendreau was seen at 0530 last Tuesday knocking the old golf ball around the local pasture. It is reported he is going to try the game in daylight when his flashlight batteries run down. Junior Pop Glaser, FTC, and George Bailey, FTC, assisted by the Gunnery Officer were victors in the Windmill Beach softball game last Sunday. Their worthy opponents were determined but unable to come through in the clutch. The game ended when the opposing team members mother's called them. The following men have their orders and are to be transferred within the next two weeks. J. W. Higdon, EMC, is to report to the EM Class A School San Diego, California as an instructor. W. I. Jones, EMC, is going to the EM class B School Great Lakes Ill as a student. W. J. Boyer, FTC, is also going to San Diego and will be an instructor in the FT class A school, and R. A. Kraft, DCC, is going aboard U.S.S. NORTHAMPTON (CLC-1) for duty. Fleet Reserve News Don't forget the Branch picnic today at Windmill Beach. If you are a member of the Fleet Reserve Association and don't have a ticket as yet you can purchase one at the beach. Remember .your ticket is your admission. Our special committees have been working hard to make this picnic a good one .so we'll see you all at the beach at 1100 .come on out and join in the fun. The Fleet Reserve Association is always out in front in helping to better the welfare of the men of the Navy and Marine Corps. Join the Fleet Reserve Association and become a member of an organization that is working for you, your family and your shipmates. VU -10 Prop Blast Three more Mallards continue to make the Navy their career. Q. M. Christie, AD1, recently signed for an additional four years. He has elected an option which will transfer him early this fall to VFP-62. J. E. Morphis, AD1, and R. J. DeMent, AB3, both reenlisted for six additional years each. Congratulations to all of you. D. P. McAndrews, ATC, was transferred this week to 1NAS, Cecil Field, where he will join VF-102. William Roder, AN, recently arrived on board from his last duty station at NAS, Anacostia, D.C. R. C. Aton, AD2, R. D. Crain, AD2, and C. Caplice, AE2, have all departed Gtmo for Key West, where they will be separated from the service. What's Doin' Stateside Girls are in better shape than boys in Louisville. The authority for this not-verystartling statement doesn't come from a beauty contest judge or committee of bachelors in the Kentucky city. It's the City Division of Recreation-and they've got test results to prove it. Only 43 per cent of the boys who took a physicalfitness exam featuring pull-ups, sprints and other assorted muscle-stretchers made a passing score, while 61 per cent of the girls came out all right. Some poltron ("A mean spirited wretch"-ed.) might mention that the passing score for boys was higher, but any southern gentleman would simply say that Lousville girls are the finest-suh! Beware the long-suffering husband-at last he has his own organization. Encouraged by the success of groups dedicated to the preservation of dumb animals, open-air trolley cars and other assorted bric-a-brac, some brave souls have started the Husbands Protective Association. The club publishes Husband's Home Journal, a collection containing advice on handling wives, ready-made alibis and comforting mottos. "Husbands are kind, considerate and affectionate," runs one sample. "No home is complete without one." Members claim the club is a big success, but they still haven't managed to hold any meetings. Probably their wives won't let them out. Monogrammed shirts, mon ogrammed ties-and now, monogrammed false teeth. That is, if Dr. Harold Beddoe, a Virginia medical examiner, has his way. Dr. Beddoe told the Southwestern Homicide Investigators at a meeting recently that monogrammed false teeth would help identify victims. He said dentists should be persuaded to inscribe the wearer's name inside the upper plate of the dentures. Monogrammed "choppers"' wuold be a wonderful thing, he opined. Party Life, a Russian magazine, is a candidate for the title of official Party Pooper. The communist journal recently blasted Soviet citizens for spending too much time at blasts (birthday and anniversary variety). "Celebrating has become almost a permanent occupation for some people," the magazine observed. Its stern editors obviously have never heard that all work and no play makes Ivan a dull comrade. To most people, mealtime is a relaxing break. When chow call comes in a jet fighter, things get a bit more complicated. Modern pilots, encased in heavy pressure suits and shoe-horned inDevilDog Doin's by TSgt Burris Several more sets of orders came in this past week. Sgt. Sanspree will be leaving shortly for some duty with the Air Wing at Edenton, N.C. Sgt. Hoover will be in his glory at Parris Island, S.C. making Marines from civilians. Pfc. Sturgis hit the jackpot with more security duty at Brooklyn, N.Y. Pvt. Shontz goes right back to Lejeune, this time to Force Troops. Pfc. Horton is also going to Lejeune but to the 2nd Marine Div. This week found two more of the Barracks Marines going for six more. This is TSgt. Carters last re-enlistment before retiring to the unregimented of a civilian. Pfc. Lawson is making a fine start in his Marine Corps Career by shipping over for the first time. Saturday is another big day for the Barracks Marines. Record day on the Rifle Range secures all routine work and all hands turn out to run the butts, keep scores, and all the other duties connected with firing. This year the Marine Range Detail is also playing host to Chief Klingensmith and two of his Coast Guardsmen. The Fleet is returning and the spit and polish troops of the Barracks are squaring away their white gear for the steady flow of High Rank who will require Honor Guards. The Marines are here so the situation is well in hand. The Barracks is again the Temporary home of the various ships' Marine Detachments. At the present the Marine Detachment from the USS LEYETE is living ashore, preparing for their yearly Range Firing. During the course of the year, detachments from all types of ships report to the Barracks either TAD or for short one night stays for range firing or to get some boondock training. The Marines from the Fleet welcome a chance to live ashore and get their sea legs stretched up and down the rough Gtmo hills and swap yarns with the land locked Marines. to crowded cockpits, can't eat a la Emily Post. Foods must be high in acceptability, though, or morale and energy will sag. Doctors at the AF's aero-medical laboratory, Wright Patterson AFB, Ohio, are working on three answers; liquid food, tablets and semisolids. The liquids are taken through a tube in the pilot's helmet, cheese or milk tablets fall into his hand at a button's touch, and the semisolids, are squeezed out like a tube of toothpaste. It is expected that in the future all three types will be used to make a square meal. e e THE INDIAN e Page Five }

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ft Skeet Shoot Today Tennis Team Opens Future Dodger Home Beginning At 0800 Season With 5-0 Win This morning at 0800 the Guantanamo Bay Rifle and Pistol club is sponsoring its second Skeet Shoot of the year. The shoot is being held at the Marine Skeet Range located in the Marine Lyceum area. Rules of the National Skeet Shooting association will apply with the cash prizes determined by the number of participating shooters. High man in each squad of five shooters will be awarded a prize with a grand prize going to the winner in a shoot composed of squad winners. Registration fee is $1 per round with shooters being allowed to enter as many rounds as they desire. Ammunition and shotguns are available at the range for those unable to furnish their own. There will be a special round for those who would like to shoot and yet not compete for the cash prizes. All Base personnel are welcome to enter the competition. Spectators, too, will find this type of shooting interesting to watch. Cast Change Made In L. T. Play-'Laura' Winnie Mathews, Jane Whited and Carl Bailey complete the cast of the Little Theater's new play "Laura." Winnie Mathews plays Bessie the housekeeper; Jane Whited, Danny's mother Mrs. Dorgan and Carl Bailey, Olsen another detective assigned to the case. Also during the past week, circumstances prevented Don MacQuarrie from continuing in the role of Waldo. The part has been filled by Ross Fegley. "Laura," a Broadway play of the early forties is better known from the movie which was based on the play. Gene Tierney, Dana Andrews and Clifton Webb were the stars of the movie which won an oscar in 1944. The haunting theme of the movie is one of the factors which made it so popular. August 14, at 7:30 p.m., is the next regularly scheduled meeting of the Little Theater. Fed up with the fancy descriptions he had to set in type day after day, a printer added his own to the end of one wedding story: "The linotype operator, while he set this, wore a pale blue shirt with pants to match and a silver wrist watch on his left wrist." s* Meek Voice: "Doctor, this is Mr. Henpeck. My wife just dislocated her jaw. If you're out this way within the next week or two, you might drop in." The Naval Base tennis team opened its 1956 season July with a convincing 5-0 win over an eager, scrappy team from the USS JOHN PAUL JONES, DD-932. Although the score would indicate a one-sided match, the actual play proved otherwise. Most games went to deuce several times before the more practised Naval Base team was able to win the crucial points. This was particularly true in the matches in which the Commanding Officer, CDR Robert Hayler proved to be a worthy competitor. With the JOHN PAUL JONES operating in the area through August, frequent visits to the tennis courts are planned by the team members and it is anticipated that a return match will result in several of the scores being reversed. The results of the match were as follows: E. Nichols (NavBase) defeated CDR R. Hayler 6-0, 6-1 ENS J. Pruitt (NavBase) defeated LTJG Bob Clarke, 6-1, 6-0 LCDR L. E. Ogilvy (NavBase) defeated ENS Pete Maytham 6-4, 6-0 V. Penoso, ADC (NavBase) defeated LT Dave Foxwell 6-0, 6-1 E. Nichols-J. Nici, SKC defeated Hayler-Maytham 6-0, 6-0 A match with the Midshipmen from the USS IOWA (BB-61) was played yesterday, but scores were not available at press time. Personnel interested in participating on the team in future matches, are encouraged to enter their names on the forms provided at the Officers' Club Snack Shack and the Fleet Recreation Center courts. Strikes & Spares Hight-Games High-Averages M. Zeiler J. Darby K. Grounds E. itrupski V. Hall M. Houston J. Enders J. Babcock K. Hazelton R. Garaudy 187 181 176 169 167 162 159 150 159 157 J. Darby F. Grounds M. Zeigler D. Aumann G. Rowan V. Hall G. Kraft M. Marsh If current plans to replace the beloved Ebbets Field are followed through, the future home games of the Brooklyn Dodgers may be played under a huge plastic dome as shown in this artist's conception. Architect Buckminster F u 11 e r claims the huge cup-shaped roof over the baseball field would be 300 feet high and 750 feet in diameter. The air-conditioned, all-weather sports center would have a seating capacity of more than 55,000 as compared to 32,000 for Ebbets Field. This coutaway view shows airconditioning and shadowless lighting equipment at the top, the field, stands passageways and shops in center and the edge of an underground parking lot at the bottom. Wrens Lead Peewee; Tie For 2nd The completion of the ninth week of Peewee ball play found the Wrens leading the league with the Chips and the Owls tied for second and 1% games behind. The team standings as of 24 July for both the Peewee Little League are shown below. PeeweeS Team W Wrens 10 Chips 9 Owls 9 Eels 7 Cubs 7 Lions 5 Pups 1 Little Leagu Team W Colts 11 Bears 11 Rams 8 Eagles 8 Hawks 2 Whale' Of A 148 148 144 148 143 141 141 140 Team Standings Alley-Kats Bowleretts Push-Overs Lillies of the Alleys Gutter-Gals Down-Unders The Crickets W-39 L-9 W-31 L-17 W-29 L-19 W-26 L-22 W-25 L-23 W-17%A L-301% W-113/ L-311% NAS Photo Lab Photo landings L 3 15 6 7 9 183 ue Standings Pet. .770 .643 .648 .538 .500 .857 .071 L Pet. 5 .680 5 .680 8 .500 8 .500 13 .138 Shark Caught Here's the 420 pound shark which was caught by J. W. Parkin, AN, of VU-6, Det. #1, on the left. The shark was caught off Fisherman's Point by Parkin who was aided by C. W. Haun, AM3, on the right. This 9 foot, 4 inch monster had a girth of 70 inches. It is the largest fish so far entered in the fishing tourney. Last Friday, July 20 Dan Kelly, entered a 17 pound barracuda; Nelson Hicks entered an 8 pound skipjack, and Ray Vickers, AD2, entered a 21 pound grouper in the spearfishing division. M Page Bix W THE INDIAN M Saturday, 28 July 1956

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Saturday, 28July 1956 Marines And VU -10 Meet Head -On Supply Tops In NAS Next Week, Playoffs Begin Monday by Carlos Caballo A head-on collision is scheduled this coming week between the Marines and, VU-10 and undoubtedly a lot of things will happen that won't be criket ...but it will be baseball. As avid fans will recall of games during the latter part of the regular League season, pitchers tightened up and the number of errors per game dropped way off. So, stand by for fast and hard baseball. The playoffs will commence Monday, run through Tuesday and if a third game is. necessary, end Wednesday. No one seems willing to give. odds and it would take an optimist to do so. However, one axiom is that the odds favor you if you stick with the champs and the Marines are that without any argument from anyone. Take your pick. On the statistics side of the picture, elsewhere in this INDIAN is a story on heavy hitters and top Termed a "Sudden Death" playtwirlers. In our "Little Known And off, the Marines made it a literal Deparment" expression insofar as the Flyers Who Cares Statistics Department" were concerned. They took an early ...first place Marines and third lead and were never headed from spot NAS were even on hits with there on by a team that had given 175 each for 21 games but NAS then more trouble during the regcollected 182 runs to the Leatherular season than any other one. Furtney takes credit for the necks' 150. Second place VU-10 win with relief from Marine teamclouted the ball 152 times for 108 mate Dowd. Loser was Waldrop runs while the Naval Base conwho went the full distance. netted 132 times for 91 times The Leathernecks took a one run across hime. lead in tr seon inning the The CARLOS CABALLO AWARD of the year for "The Least Discouraged Player" goes to Petinak of the Naval Base Team. Petinak was guilty of the most errors, but had close competition from other team players as well as his own. In spite of all this he continues to be one of the top league hitters and one of the most avid players and fans. Perhaps one could also add, "He who never tries to catch ball never drops ball." Marines 4, VU TEN 0 The last game of the League and so far as everyone was concerned, just plain baseball since all issues had been settled previously. The Marine win meant nothing insofar as standings were concerned since they were still in top position and the Mallards in firm possession of second. This was a duel between Crosby for the Marines and King for VU-10. Both hurlers went the full distance. There were only 11 hits during the entire game and, strangely enough, the Mallards were on the heavy end but couldn't combine them as well as did the Marines. Once again there was nothing heavier than a single hit by either team. Marines 021 000 00x-4 4 5 VU-10 000 000 000--0 7 4 double it in the fourth. The clincher for the game came with the only home run made in the fifth. Marine first baseman Bland clouted the ball with two on for a big three-run inning to push the Leathernecks out in front by 5-0. The Flyers surged in the seventh with three runs of their own to knock Furtney off of the mound but the effort proved futile. Marines 010 130 001-6 10 4 NAS 000 000 300-3 6 4 VU TEN 11. Naval Base 2 This Tuesday night game provided the other half of the two-team playoff and provided good limbering up exercises for the Mallards. The Naval Base nine failed to rise to the heights they are capable of or perhaps the Mallards were flying too high. Ladies Golf Shots by Mae Hadley The weekly event of the ladies golf association was a hickey tournament. The following ladies were winners of golf balls: First flightFirst place-Margaret Wall Second place-Cynthia Holley Third flightFirst place-Florence Fortenberry There was a monthly meeting of the association on July 16 at the home of the club president, Mrs. Lois Cooper. Ladies' handicaps and the ringer tournament were discussed. The ringer tourney began July 20 and will end August 17. Each lady has eight numbered cards at the desk in the club house. These cards may be called for at anytime you wish to play. The cards must be turned back into the desk following the round. Summer Bowling The NAS bowling league ended its summer league competition July 10 with the Supply department emerging victor over the Administration team by a narrow two point margin. CPO's, Medical, Ordnance, Commissary, Aerology and photo finished the season in that order. A banquet and trophy presentation was held Monday night, July 23, at the NAS Enlisted Men's club. Team members who received individual trophies were R. E. Klunder, ATC, for high individual average of 178, and R. G. Hanson, SK3, for high individual game (scratch), 247. Others getting individual awards; V. Penoso, SDC, for high individual series (scratch), 597, A. T. Casantini, CS3, high individual game game (with handicap), 258, and J. A. Westfall, high individual series (with handicap), 641. A championship team trophy was also presented to the Supply department squad. League Leaders' Baseball Statistics League Standings Team Won Marines 18 VU-10 10 NAS 9 NavBase 5 The following are the statistics on the le in the Naval Base league. The vital statistics may be obtained for e the Naval Station Special Services office. Leading Batters Name Scholl Bland Dowd Duncan Petnick Team NavBase Mar. Mar. Mar. NavBase 2B 5 9 6 2 2 3B 1 1 2 AB 77 89 87 89 77 R 25 17 23 26 19 Lost 3 11. 12 16 ading batters and Pct .857 .476 .429 .238 pitchers ach player in the league at H 29 33 30 29 26 Stolen RBI Base HR 11 6 19 -9 12 21 3 2 6 13 Leading Pitcher's Record Name Furtney Montgomery Waldrop Team Won Mar. 7 VU-10 5 NS 5 Lost 2 3 3 I.P. 82.1 86 77.1 S.O. 61 73 94 R.B. 43 49 37 Hits 46 54 69 ER 19 18 12 AV .377 .371 .345 .326 .325 ERA 2.08 1.88 1.39 sr u y r> 1 -ti U. UM THE INDIAN Page Seven

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M Saturday, 28 July 1956 M THE INDIAN M Navy-BPPO-10ND-Guaatanano Cinema -Scoop by D. D. H. TV finds its way into the column this week, with the mention of two shows. The Monday night show "Studio One" features a play written by Jackie Gleason concerning a couple of saints who are instructed to cleanse a very wicked town. The show stars Red Buttons and James Barton as the saints. Wednesday night the Navy gets into the act with men from the USS LEYTE appearing on "I've Got A Secret" Garry Moore emcees the popular quiz show. The LEYTE is in the Bay at present and many of her men appear on the show. "Moby Dick" seems to be a "movie to look forward to seeing." Produced and directed by John Houston, the Herman Melville classic adds up to some great motion picture entertainment. Gregory Peck stars as Captain Ahab. This is one that probably will be in line for some oscars. Diane (MGM, in color), will probably be received by Gtmoites with assorted exclamations of dislike and the movie verges on deserving it. The story which deals with the life of Diane de Poitiers, one of the most famous French Royal mistresses, goes into politics and the many conspiracies of the time when it could be sticking to. the story of Diane. Lana Turner plays the title role and is teamed with Roger Moore and Pedro Armendariz. If you don't enjoy it, don't say I didn't warn you. Slightly Scarlet (RKO, in color) can best be termed as slightly confusing. The two luscious redheads Rhonda Fleming and Arlene Dahl play sisters, with John Payne and Kent Taylor furnishing the male components of this movie. The story deals with .the big city rackets and lacks realism. Still, the movie might be enjoyed even with its very many drawbacks. West of Zanzibar (U.I., in color) Anthony Steel and Sheila. Sim ...story of a native uprising in Africa ...definitely below average ...Played the Base be-. fore. : Shadow of the Eagle (U.A.) .. Richard Greene and Valentine Cortesa ...story set in the time of Catherine, Queen of Russia ..no comment. It's a new one to the circuit. Patterns (Harris-Myerberg production, released through U.A.), is an all round excellent movie and one that has not been ballyhooed a great deal, but is great entertainment. Originally a TV show, the screen adaptation proves as did "Marty" that an unpretentious budget does not mean a low-grade movie. Story concerns a big corporation and has much the same background as "Executive Suite." Saturday, July 28 1:00 Winky Dink & You 1:30 Contest Carnival 2:00 Garry Moore 2:30 House Party 3:00 Robt Q. Lewis 3:30 Ethel & Albert 4:00 Victory at Sea 4:30 Two for the Money 5:00 Wsetern Movie 6:00 Beat the Clock 6:30 Masquerade Party 7:00 George Gobel 7:30 Screen Director's Playhouse 8:00 Colgate Comedy Hour 9:00 Stage Show 9:30 Appointment with Adventure Sunday, July 29 1:00 Winky Dink & You 1:30 Paul Winchell 2:00 Garry Moore 2:30 Big Pieture 3:00 Lamp unto my Feet 3:30 Christophers 4:00 Ted Mack's Amateurs 5:00 Roy Rogers 5:30 That's My Boy 6:00 Mama 6:30 You Are There 7:00 Guy Lombardo 6:30 I've Got a Secret 7:30 What's My Line 7:00 This In Your Life 8:00 Ed Sullivan 9:00 U.S. Steel Hour 0:00 Godfrey and Friends Monday, July 9 0:00 Kraft TV Theater 5:30 News Parade "It's Only Money" 5:45 Perry Como 6:00 Private Secretary 6:30 My Favorite Husband 0:30 News Parade 7:00 Talent Scouts 0:45 Perry Cams 7:30 Hisghway Patrol 6:00 Captain Gallant of 8:00 Sid Caesar the Foreign Legion 9:00 Studio One 8:30 Profes.ional Father "'rho Tale of St. 7-00 Thruth or Consequences Emergency" 7:30 Dragnet Tuesday, July 81 0:00 Hilton Berl 5:30 News Parade 0:00 Climax 5:45 Perry Como "Sailor en iorschack" 6:00 Pantomine Quiz Friday, August 9 6:30 Meet Millie 6:30 News Parade 7 :00 Phil Silvers :40 Perry Corn 7:;0 Star Tonight 6:00 l&r Film 0 :00 Bed Skelton 900 Leup 6:30 Dollar a Second 9:00 Philco Playhouse 7:00 Stop t Music "A Man is Ten Feet Tall" :00 Ayhus ofrar Wednaday, Augunt 1 0:30 Crusader 5:30 News Parade 0:00 Boxing: Milo Savage vs 5:45 Patti Page Artie Towne, Hidle6:00 Industry on Parade weights Saturday, July 28 NavSta-Diane-122 min. NAS-Magnificent Matador-94 min. Mar. Site-Blackboard Jungle-101 min. Villa.-Outside the Law-96 min. Lwd. Pt.-Adventures of Sadie-94 min. Sunday, July 29 NavSta-Slightly Scarlet-99 min. NAS-Diane Mar. Site-Night Holds Terror-105 min. Villa.-Blackboard Jungle Lwd. Pt.-Outside the Law Monday, July 30 NavSta-West of Zanzibar-94 min. NAS-Slightly Scarlet Mar. Site-Magnificent Matador Villa.-Night Holds Terror Lwd. Pt.-Blackboard Jungle Tuesday, July 31 NavSta-Shadow of the Eagle-100 min. NAS-West of Zanzibar Mar. Site-Diane Villa,-Magnificent Matador L'wd. Pt.-Night Holds Terror Wednesday, August 1 NavSta-Patterns-103 min. NAS-Shadow of the Eagle Mar. Site-Slightly Scarlet Villa.-Diane Lwd. Pt.-Magnificent Matador Thursday, August 2 NavSta-Valley of the Kings-90 min. NAS-Patterns Mar. Site-West of Zanzibar Villa.-Slightly Scarlet Lwd. Pt.-Diane Friday, August 3 NavSta-Blackjack Ketchum, Desperado92 min. NAS-Valley of the Kings Mar. Site-Shadow of the Eagle Villa.-West of Zanzibar Lwd. Pt.-Slightly Scarlet Van Heflin stars with Everett Sloane, Ed Begley and Beatrice Straight featured .See it! Valley of the Kings (MGM, in color) ..Robert Taylor, Eleanor Parker and Carlos Thompson .. Diggings in the ancient tombs of Egypt ..Good. Blackjack Ketchum, Desperado (Col) ...Howard Duff and Victor Jory ..just another western you might go for it. A new one. 0 Radio Round-Up NEW WAX DEPARTMENT: First shipment during the week came from RCA. Westerners will like to bend an ear to "Reminiscing" and "New Spanish TwoStep" by Chet Atkins and Hank Snow, both guitar duets. Leo Dianond is up to par with his "Go See Tony" and "Le Rifif." Both are lively numbers and chances are you've already heard them over WGBY. Ralph Flanagan does "Out Last Night" and "What's New." Others are "It's Better In The Dark" and "Your Place In The Sun" by Tony Martin; "How Many Teardrops" and "Your Heart's In Danger" by the Laurie Sisters, and last but never least where Helen Grayco is concerned is her "A Fool For You" and "C'Est La Guerre." PROGRAM CHANGES: On e change for this week, late tomorrow night "Philadelphia Orchestra" has expired and its place is taken by "Symphonies For Youth," a 60-minute program beginning at 11 p.h. Music is by the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra directed by Alfred Wallenstein. The Orchestra is rated as among the nation's top five. WGBY Television Program FROM: 3 cent stamp TO: Send The INDIAN Home 9 Book -Nook For baseball fans (and who isn't at this time of the year?) THE 1956 BASEBALL ALMANAC should fill the bill perfectly. It's a large book full of all the possible baseball facts, figures and statistics and it's put together so that desired information can be located quickly and easily. Several books on Eisenhower specifically, and the presidency in general, have hit the market lately. The Library has two of the latestTHE PRESIDENCY TODAY, and THE EISENHOWER YEARS. The second looks like the better of the two for election-year reading. H. J. Rose's A HANDBOOK OF GREEK MYTHOLOGY is a modern, watered-down Bullfinch which is a great deal more readable than its classic predecessor. It's surprising to find out how many modern literary themes are based on this ancient Greek thought. The title alone of this book will probably scare most people away, but the wonderful tales between the covers mean that that's their loss. Marion Hargrove, who wrote the World War II bestseller "See Here, Private Hargrove," is up to his old tricks again with THE GIRL HE LEFT BEHIND. It's good to learn that Hargrove hasn't lost his knack of translating riotous hilarity onto the printed page. This is another laugh-a-minute story, and one of the better ones at that. Another biography (which actually reads more like and adventure story) is CAPTAIN OF THE QUEENS, by Richard Collier. Mr. Collier has been in the service of the Cunard Lines for most of his seafaring life, and his tales of the great liners like the 'Queen Mary", and of the famous people who traveled in them, make first-class reading. HOW TO PLAN FOR COLLEGE, by John W. McReynolds, should find a following among the many residents of Gtmo who are looking forward to higher education after their tour of duty, either with or without the aid of the V.A. This is a detailed handbook with the exact information for anyone's particular inclinations.


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