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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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U.S. Naval Base ( Publisher )
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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U.S. Naval Base
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English

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COVERS GTMO LIKE THE SUNSHINE U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Volume VII, No. 29 Saturday, 21 July 1956



LCDR Bager Retires, Leaves Tues., CHBOSN Arwood Provost Marshal


Yesterday LCDR T. E. Bager was relieved as Base Provost Marshal by CHBOSN W. L.. Arwood. LCDR Bager is retiring from the navy after 22/ years of- service.
He has been stationed in Guantanamo Bay for the past year in the capacity of Provost Marshal. He, his wife and daughter leave by FLAW Tuesday for the states.
LCDR Bager began his career in the navy as a seaman apprentice and worked his way up the rank ladder, never missing a pay grade. After his release from active duty, LCDR Bager and family will make Los Angeles, Calif. their home.
The new Provost Marshal CHBOSN Arwood, was formerly the Base Shore Patrol Officer and 1st LT of the Naval Station. Seventeen months ago he served as the assistant Provost Marshal.


Mayor, Councilmen

Elected For Villamar

At the Villamar-Bargo Council meeting held recently for the election of a new council mayor and councilmen, the following persons were, elected: A. V. Ward, civilian from NSD, council mayor; Floyd B. Winland, MMLC, FTG, councilman for Precint No. 4; Easton J. Guillory jr., civilian, PWD, councilman for Precinct No. 5; Edie D. Surroz, MMC, councilman for Precinct No. 6 and Mrs. Marilyn Q. Anderson, council secretary.
Incumbent councilmen- for Precincts one, two, three, seven and eight still hold their respective offices until such time when their tenure of office will have been expired.
The new council mayor announced that the council meets every first Tuesday of the month at the Naval Station I & E office, at which meeting suggestions "for the -betterment of the community are accepted and discussed."
The Council cordially invites residents of the Base housing communities to the council's regular monthly meeting.


Weekend Warriors

On Base Two Days

One hundred forty men of our reserve force who -play around on weekdays' and become veterans on weekends arrived in Gtmo early this week.
The first group of 70 Weekend Warriors of the Naval Air Reserve Training Unit in Miami landed at the Naval Air Station Tuesday morning, July 17. The second group which Was also composed, of 70 reserves arrived at NAS Wednesday morning, July 18.
While in Gtmo both groups toured the Base. After their Base sojourn the warriors boarded the USS LEYTE.
CDR F.L. Lawlor, NAS Executive Officer disclosed that the purpose of the NARTU visit was to "acquaint themselves with aircraft shipboard maneuvers and to initiate the recruits on how a Naval Air outfit operates."
Officer in Charge of both-groups was CDR R.K. Knight.
The first wave of warriors left for Miami Wednesday, July 18, while the second batch left Thursday,* July 19.


Base Ready For Midshipmen Influx


When First Cruise Anchors Wed.

The man power complement of Midshipman Cruise Alpha scheduled to drop anchor in Guantanamo Bay Wednesday, July 25, will be met by various elements on the Base with a jam-packed recreational agenda. With the view to making their visit in Gtmo a "pleasant and memorable one," special arrangements have been made. The NavSta Retail Store, Uniform, Sports, Tailor and Barber- planes at the shop will be sold on shop, Dry Cleaning and the NAS a 25 per cent discount. Retail Store will keep their doors Dance Friday open from 0915-2100 on July 25 LCDR R. M. Moore, "0" Club and 27. On July 26 the hours will Mess Treasurer, reports that a rebe 1300-2100. ception and dance in honor of the
LTJG J. L. Johnston, Asst. Navy Middies will be held at the club Exchange Officer, said that no on Friday evening, July 27. special orders will be taken by Mrs. Betty Dean, Long Distance the Navy Exchange while the Mid- Telephone Exchange Supervisor, shipmen are still around. He also passed the word that shifts of announced that Base residents are telephone operators "are all set" expected not to shop on the dates to meet the expected wave of the above specified "in order to make cruise's long distance callers." room for the Midshipmen while Special Services Gets Ready they make their purchases."
The NAS Hobby Shop will re- The Naval Station Special Servmain open during the cruise. Model ices department has every recreational and athletic facility on a
stand-by status. When the Middie
Public Works C. 0. wave strikes, the department's bicycle shop, bowling alleys, pool
Arrives Tuesday, 17th tables, softball and baseball diamonds, basketball and t e n n i s


INDIAN Photo
CAPT H. N. Wallin, future Publick Works Center Commanding Officer, on the left with CDR E. L. Rowan, Public Works department head, was conducted on a 'driving tour" of the Base Tuesday morning. CAPT Wallin arrived by plane that same morning. The new Public Works officer came from the Bureau of Yards and Docks where be was executive assistant to the chief of the Bureau for maintenance and nAterial. CAPT Wallin has been one of the leaders in the implementation of the navy-wide controlled maintenance program.
He also served as the naval representative on a joint committee of the Defense department which discussed saving of maintenance funds in the military establishments.
During the war CAPT Wallin served with the Seabees and he has been the Public Works Officer at White Oak, Maryland.


Ma..ids Quarters

Effective immediately there will be maintained in the Base Housing Office, room 211, Naval Base Administration Building a maids' quarters waiting list. Eligibility for a position on this list will be the occupancy of a residence on the Base. The date of application will determine the position on the waiting list.


courts, swimming pools, stable, White Hat club, Phillips Park, etc. will let-go their doors wide open! The PO club at the Fleet Recreation Center will be used exclusively by Midshipmen. On the lawn in front of the PO Club are 15 party tables deployed for the big event. Tennis matches and sailing races between NavBase and the Midshipmen will be held. CDR George Gardes, Commodore of the Gtmo Sailing Club accepted the challenge the Middies had sent to the club for a sailing race. The Base, in turn, challeged them to the tennis matches.
A special "joy ride" treat to the Midshipmen will be given by ten submarines due to arrive in Gtmo Tuesday, July 24.


NEGDF Instructors'

School Is Underway

An instructors' school in conjunction with the National Emergency Ground Defense Force started at Marine Barracks July 9 and will run through July 29.
Key personnel from all commands except from NSD aboard the Base were transferred TAD to the Marine Barracks to undergo training in the school.
The school is devoted primarily to the instruction- of these key personnel in a concentrated course of small unit Marine tactics. Purpose of the school is to enable these men to return to their respective commands and train personnel.
The actual NEGDF exercises which are held annually on the Base will be held later in the year.









Saturday, 21 July 1956


Page Two


THE INDIAN

The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a possible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.
RADM WILLIAM G. COOPER, Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo
Bay, Cuba.
CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo
Bay, Cuba.
Editorial Staff
LTJG -D. G. LaCasse------------------------------ Officer-Advisor
G. L. Henderson, JOC------------------------------------ Editor
J. C. Curren, JOSN ------------------------------ Managing Editor
E. U. Orias, J03 --------------------------------- Feature Editor
D. D. Hinton, JOSN ------------------------------- Staff Reporter
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P.35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds.
Materials marked AFPS may be used by news media provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All materials originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part or without credit.
All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.


A*''-madn Injured.In Scooter Mishap


E mily Post was never in any chain of command. What she had to say, however, does have a place in the military life.
Our Armed Forces are built on mutual respect-respect for the individual and his mission. Respect, too, for the fact that his opinions may differ from yours.
Every time, you extend a salute or use the word "sir," you are expressing good manners. But courtesy does not end there.
It extends, for instance, to the mess hall. You may be hungry as the proverbial bear, but there is no, excuse to ram a fork into someone's gullet as you reach for the bread or catsup.
It isn't sissy-like, either, to avoid spicing your sentences with those colorful little phrases. A man who must curse to express himself proves the low status of his I.Q. every time he opens his mouth.
No, Emily Post would have seemed ridiculous toting an M-1 or swabbing the deck. But what she had to say carries weight for us in the service. So-Pass the salt, PLEASE!-(AFPS)


Sunday, 22 July 1956


CATHOLIC MASSES
Sunday, 7000-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1280-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri.-1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessio ns: Saturday,' 1700-1800, 1900
-200, and daily before Mass

PROTESTANT SERVICES
0980-Sunday School 0980-Sunday School
0980-Adult Worship (Naval
.Vase Chapel)
1980--Fellowship Hour
Wednesday: 1980-Mid-Week Bible Study, Thursday: 19000-Choir Rehearsal JEWISH SERVICES
Friday-lOOD-Naval Base Chapel CHURCH OF CHRIST 1000-Biblei Study


Calendar of Events

Monday, July 29
O.E.S. Chapter Meeting-Community Autorium-? :80 p.m.
Monday, July 23
Toastmaster's Club-Officers Club6 :80 P.M.
.,Thursday, July 25
Fellowcraft Club 1078-Community Audi.
torium-? :80 p.m.

1045-worship Service
Community Auditorium LATER DAY SAINTS Sundey-l100-Naval Station Library CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Sunday-1000-NavSt* Library Chaplains at this Activity
CDR P. R. McPhee, CHC, USN
(Protestant),
CIDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN
(Catholic)


Serious injuries resulted for C. .H. Aumann, EMC, Engineering Dept., FTG, last Thursday, July 12, when the scooter he was riding collided with a Navy Exchange truck driven by a Cuban employee.
The accident occurred during the noon hour at the intersection of Bay Hill Road and Sherman Avenue.
Chief Aumann was hospitalized with injuries of a serious nature, including a broken leg. Emergency surgery was required. His condiition, at press time was described


Third In Series...


Maryland
Unregistered servicemen and civilians who are attached to or serving with the Armed Forces outside the geographical limits of the U.S. are registered by the Board of Elections in country of residence. An applicationu for a ballot also serves as an application for registration. Therefore, registration in advance is not required.
For all others registration is Permanent unless thet voter has failed to vote at least once within the past five years.' Baltimore city residents may register in person -with the Board of Election Supervisors any time up to Sept. 21. Others must appear before the Registration Officers, country of residence, Oct. 2nd or 9th.
Moutana
Registration is permanent unls a voter failed to vote in the last general election or has moved from one Precinct to another. Servicemen, civilian employees attached to the, Armed Forces overseas and their dependents may register by r-qnesting a "Registration Card" from the County. city


INDIAN Photo
by hospital authorities as good.
Mrs. C. H. Aumann requested that the INDIAN extend her sincere thanks to all who donated blood for her husband during the time when emergency treatment was required.
Last Thursday's accident brought the total of private vehicle accidents up to 34, for this year while 82 government vehicles have been involved in accidents on the Base.
Out of the total of 115 accidents, 16 injuries have resulted but no deaths.

or Town Clerk, place of residence. This should be done early enough so that the completed card is returned not later than Sept. 21.
Other qualified absent persons within the continental limits of the U.S. or its territories may register in the same way.
Ohio
Registration is permanent unless a person has failed to vote in at least one election every two years.
Members of the Arnied Forces may vote without being registered. All other persons are required to be registered before voting if their residence is bn a city with a pop. ulation greater than 10,000 or in a county that requires registration. Where required, registration must be in person and prior to Sept. 25.
New Jersey
Registration is permanent unless a voter has failed to vote at least once in the past four Years. Registration is not required for members of the, Armed Foces. All other persons must register in person at the office of the Commissioner of Registration at the place of residence before Sept. 25.
Oregon
Registration is permanent unless a voter has failed to vote at least once in the past two years.
Servicemen, civilian employees of the government outside the limits of the U.S., members of religious groups or welfare agencies officially attached to and serving with the Armed Forces and their dependents accompanying them need niot register in advance
Registration is accomplished when the above named persons havg propperly executed the oath which will be forwarded with the absentee ballot.
All other persons must register in person with appropriate registration officials anytime up to 80 days before election day. ,For further information, see your voting officer.-(AFPS)


TBZ INDIO






M


Saturday, 21 July 1956 THE INDIAN


ft


LitleThete PiksCAPT Habecker Is He1rpetologist,


WGBY Changes


Radio Frequency

Effective August 1 radio station WGBY will broadcast on a frequency of 1340 kilocycles instead of the present 1450 kilocycles. Purpose of the change of frequency was to eliminate interference with the Cuban radio station in Baracoa. So come Wednesday, August 1, set your radio dial at 1340 if you want to listen to WGBY.


Has Two Boas Cage'd. In'Office


VU-10 [l-Ias Oper. 'AirLilt'
Some weeks ago a feature article appeared in the INDIAN regarding the number of dependents on the Base. If that article was to appear again next week, you would find that the figures had been changed. Thanks to the recent "VU-1O Airlift."
Here is an airlift that will never appear in a military history, but it will be one that will be long remembered in VU-10.
On Thursday, July 12, the FLAW flight from Patuxent River arrived. On board were LCDR Hogan, Mrs. Hogan and their five children; LCDR Blythe, Mrs. Blythe and their five children, and Mrs. Marie Glanville, wife of LTJG Glanville.
The Glanville family will report aboard early this Fall. the following Saturday Mrs. Errington Brown, wife of LT Brown, arrived with their two children.
Not to rest on their past laurels, BuPers is in the final stages of preparing to "airlift" the remainder: LCDR Beyer, Mrs. Beyer and their five children; LCDR Orcutt, Mrs. Orcutt and their three children, and Mrs. Lawrence Sharpe, wife of LTJG Sharpe, and their child.
Who said logistic was the art of moving men and materials, only?


Yard Of Month


INDIAN Photo
Winner of the Yard of the Month award for July was F. J. Reilly, PN1. Reilly was presented $10 by new Villamar-Bargo mayor, A. V. Ward. Reilly and his family moved into 14B, Granadillo Point March' 10, but did not begin work on the yard until April 1.
Each month the members of the Villamar-Bargo community council pick a Yard of the Month. Their choice is based on the yard which has shown the most improvement over a month's time.


Blimp Arrives, Has

Special Features

One of the Navy's blimps attached to Airship Squadron Two based at Glynco, Georgia, arrived at'McCalla Field last week.
Dubbed as the ZL it has a complement of 16 officers and 62 enlisted men. Five officers and six enlisted men form the airship's flight complement. The rest make up the blimp's ground mooring force.
LCDR R. 0. Bodell, Officer in
Charge of the detachment, said that the airship will participate in the Atlantic Fleet Anti-Submarin e Force's -training tactics.
The blimp has an envelope volume of 670,000 cubic feet, 285 feet in length, 96 feet in height'and a maximum gross weight of 44,0100 lbs.
The special features of the airship are: Three tail control surfaces instead of the usual four; speed is slightly faster; not very many windows; more effective in tracking down submarines and exclaimed one officer---much prettier than 'the older ones!"
The detachment is scheduled to depart Gtmo at the end of the month.


INDtIAN Photo
CAPT F. S. Habecker holds "Eddie" and . "Bertha," the two majas (Cuban boas) which he captured and now, keeps in a cage in his office. One of the captain'.s main purposes in keeping the snakes is to prove to people that, most snakes are harmless and do serve a purpose to humanity.


by Don Hinton
What, do you know about herpetology?
Most people have never heard of the word or the science, but Gtmo has an a mn a t e u r herpetologist CAPT F. S. Habecker, Commanhder Fleet Training Group. He admits his outside interest is a bit unusual, but his study of snake s proves that reptiles are creatures not necessarily to be feared.
Evidence to this fact and very much 'alive, and active are two snakes, housed in a black and gray cage in the captain's office. ,The wiggly, vivacious "pets" have been tagged "unofficially," "Eddie" and "Bertha."
Why "Eddie" and "Bertha?" Well, it is believed that the two are male and female, due to their different markings and characteristics. This caged-twosome, according t o the captain, are of the Cuban boa variety or maji, as they are called in Spanish. He stressed that the boas are harm less, and 'should not be killed.
"Eddie" was the first of the two to., "b apprehended. CAPT Habecker, -himself, using a broom to avoGid injury to the snake, captured "Eddie"' 'under his quarters on Evans Point on June 1, 1956. The captain's. quarters is built on stilts, thus enabling the capture of "Eddie," who,,is :approximately 37 inches long.
"Bertha",was caught; July 6, 'on Crane Hill near the Fleet Training


.Center. 'She is approximately 36 inches long and was captured by CAPT Habecker with the aid of several sailors armed with brooms.
There is no definite way to determine 'the ages of the pair, but they are estimated* to be several years old 'due to their size. The average length of the maifi snakes at full growth are between six and 'ten feet* long.
Chief foo4.of, the two constrictors are lizards and mice. The food supply, is kept more. than adequate by members, of the Fleet- Training Group.
What are the impressions of office visitors when they see the two caged snakes? CAPT Habecker said, "'Everyone seems to display a detached interest coupled with a reluctant fascination."
The FTG commander has previously had garter snakes and other small and harmless varieties in captivity, but these are the first boas.
Among his wide and. varied ,travels with the Navy, CAPT Habecker has had several opportunities 'to see many other. kinds of reptiles. One of the most interesting; experiences he relates is his visit in 1939 to a laboratory in Bangkok, Thailand, where 'the venom is extracted from various kinds of, poisonous snakes , to be used for the serum to counter-act snake bites. One of the most inter estig snakes he saw at this laboratory was a giant, 16. foot King Cobra.,
A point of inte rest for all Base residents is that there are .no poisonous snakes in Cuba.


CJast F~or 'Laura'
Production of "Laura" is underway. Peggy Way, director, and her assistant Flo Schnake made final casting decisions the past weekend.
Fred Anabal will play the part of Mark McPherson, the detective assigned to the case in this mystery drama. Evelyn Leach is "The Girl." Don MacQuarrie will portray Waldo Lydecker,,a suave and, sophisticated newspaper, columnist. Jim Le Mar, and Joe West portray Danny Dorgan and Shelby Carpenter, two men in Laura's


Page Three


THE INDIAN






m


THE INDIAN


m


Saturday, 21 July 1956


The Medic
by W. A. Dal and R. A. Albright
July 11 a change of command ceremony was held at the Hosptial. CAPT L. A. Newton became the new commanding officer relieving CAPT T. I. Moe. CAPT Moe will report to Charleston. S.C. to become the district medical officer of the Sixth Naval District.
CAPT J. H. Boyers became our executive officer by relieving CAPT L. E. Tebow. CAPT Tebow is going to U.S.N.H. Memphis as Chief of Surgery
Our new CO, CAPT Newton, has a varied career. Dr. Newton has an AB from York College and an MD from the University of Nebraska College of Medicine. He was commissioned in June, 1930 as a LTJG. He is a member. of the Notional Board of Medical Examaners and the American Board of Urology.
Dr. Newton is married to the former Miss Patricia Stock of Omaha, Nebraska. They have three children.
CAPT Boyers, or new XO, received his pre-med at Marshall College and his MD at Ohio State University College of Medicine graduated in 1940. He was commissioned in 1943 at LTJG.
Departures
Other staff members are going on to "greener pastures." T. L. Trimble, HMC, will report to the Heavy Attack Squadron #11 in Sanford, Florida. Three HMI's will leave shortly; J. G. Platt to M.A.T. School at Portsmouth, Va., S. E. Ellen for duty at USNH Charleston, S.C., and C.R. Foster for duty at USNH, Portsmouth, Va. T. W. Price, HM2, will bo to Jacksonville for separation. B. R. "Red" McCormick, HM3, will go to the Navy Dept. Dispensary in Washington, D.C., for duty, and J. P. Filibert, HM3, will report aboard the USS EVERGLADES.
Arrivals
We recently acquired 23 additions to the staff. From USNH, Philadelphia, we received two doctors, CDR W. C. Turville and LTJG J. B. Scith. LTJG L. A. Peppler, MSC, reported from Bethesda, Md., and R. T. Goerner, Jr., CWO, reported from USNH, Oakland. J. R. Doyle, HMC, arrived here from the USS Threadfin and HM3's R. J. Davis, Parris Island, J. L. Gee, Naval Reserve Training Center, Pittsburgh, and W. A. Cohen, NAS, Brunswick, were among the new arrivals.
Reporting aboard from HCS, Bainbridge, were the following HN's: P. R. Diefenbach, J. T. Duffy, E. A. Bryan, N. T. Furlong, M. R. Fields, M. Goldstein, A. J. Lenovitz, J. A. Vena, J. P. Kelly, W. A. Stetson, R. K. Turton, J. F. Krell, and R. J. Klug. Also from HCS, Bainbridge, is K. R. Shaw, HA.


DAY Thursday Thursday Friday Saturday Saturday
Sunday Monday Monday
Tuesday Wednesday Wednesday


DAY
Thursday Thursday Friday Saturday Saturday Sunday Monday Monday
Tuesday Wednesday Wednesday


19 July 19 July 20 July 21 July 21 July 22 July 23 July 28 July 24 July 25 July 25 July



19 July 19 July 20 Jjdy 21 July 21 July 22 July 23 July 23 July 24 July 25 July 26 July


Flight 966 967 970 * 972 973 974 * 976 * 977 * 978 970 * 981 *


906 967 971 * 972
973 975 * 976 * 977 * 979 980 981 *


INBOUND
Arrive Gtmo
0230
1400 0330 0230
1200 0530
0230
1400 0330 0230
1200


From
PaxRiv, NorVa, Jax Coco Solo
PaxRiv, Norva, Jax PaxRiv, NorVa, Jax San Juan
PaxRiv, NorVa, Jax, KWest PaxRiv, NorVa, Jax Coco Solo
PaxRiv, NorVa, Jax PaxRliv NorVa. Jax San Juan


Coco Solo
Jax, NorVa, PaxRliv Jax, NorVa, PaxRiv San Juan
Jax, NorVa, PaxRiv KWest, Jax, NorVa, PaxRiv Coco Solo'
Jax, NorVa, PaxRiv Jax, NorVa, PaxRiv San Juan
Jax, NorVa, PaxRiv


Flights marked with an * are not authorized to carry dependents.


Trail Of The Eagle
The Boy Scouts' quarterly Court of Honor was held Wednesday, July 18 at the School Auditorium on Chapel Hill. Awards were presented and the boys receiving them are to be congratulated.

Opening prayer was given by the new protestant chaplain, Peter McPhee. CAPT F. S. Habecker, Commander FTG, presented the awards.
Advancement ratings were presented George Lacy for Second Class, James Ross and Larry Abbot for First Class and Mike Maddox and Bob Whiting for Star. Merit badges were awarded Pat Dickson for reading and horsemanship, Carl Heimer for pioneering and swimming, Joseph Duffy for horsemanship and swimming and Larry Abbott, Tom Fortenberry, Nelson Hicks, Dick Williams and Jim Ross for swimming.
Chuck Averitt and Art Babine also earned and received their swimming merit badges, but were given them prior to this Court of Honor as they have already left the Base.
An additional feature of the evening was the installation of LCDR L. E. Ogilvy as new Boy Scout Committee Chairman who will take over for LCDR E. T. Fortenberry. However, the two chairman will work together until LCDR Fortenberry leaves the Base.
The Committee wishes to thank all who came out to the Court of Honor as it is most beneficial and encouraging to the boys to see their parents and friends interest in this wholesome activity.


CPO Wives
The collection drive has now started for all members to donate any usable household articles such as irons, cakepans, mixing bowls, etc. so that they may be loaned out to the families of chiefs recently arriving on the Base. Bring all the household gear you can spare to the next business meeting, August 3 at 2000 in the Family Room of the CPO Club.


Correction

In a front page article
in last week's INDIAN the name of the new Commanding Officer of the Dental Clinic was misspelled. Dental's new CO is CAPT R.S.
Snyder Jr.
CAPT Snyder officially took
over his command Friday morning, July 13, in a formal change of command ceremonies held at the clinic. He relieved CAPT J. B. Stoll, who became Executive Officer ' of the command.


FLAW Flights For July 21 - 25


So! That, That Is, Is!

Tacoma, Wash. (AFPS)-O.K., you service grammarians, does this stump you as much as it did the delegates to the National Conference of Teacher Education and Professional Standards here?
All you-have to do is punctuate the following to make sense:
That that"is- is that that is :not is not but'that that is not is not that that is nor is that that is that that is'not.
The answer? Some of the sharper teachers came up with:
That, that is, is; that, that is not, is not; but that, that is not, is not that that is; nor is that, that is, that that is .not.


Page Four


VU -10 Prop Blast

by 0. A. Porter Jr.
Some of the Mallard "old guard" have been transferred. Chief G. A. Fordyce departed Gtmo on the twelfth for a tour of shore duty with NADU at NAS, South Weymouth. Two days before his departure Chief Fordyce completed 20 years of service in the Navy.
E. A. Chipparoni, ADC, who spent the past three years here in VU-10, has been transferred to VX-2 at NAS, Chincoteague. J. D. Mullins, AD1, departed for a tour of duty with HUTRON 2 at NAS, Lakehurst. W. M. Blanchard, who recently reenlisted with J. D. Mullins, is on his way to VP-23, and W. C. McDaugh, A02, checked out to join AIRDEVRON 1. J. F. Cooley, A02, is due to report to NAOTS, NAS, Chincoteague.
L. Leitenberger, III, ADC, is now serving temporary duty with FltTraCen, Norfolk.
On the other side of the ledger, however, we can extend a Welcome Aboard to: G. F. McAuliffe, A02, and J. R. Campbell, A03, both of whom report from VP-8 in Quonset Point. R.R. Bacak, AD2, arrived from FITRON 102 at Cecil Field, and J. A. Boza, Jr., A02, has reported from VS-27 at Norfolk.
J. Terry, BMC, recently arrived on board from HDQTRS, MSTS, Brooklyn, and R. M. Herdgins, AD3, reports to us from NAS, Patuxent River.
R.H. Eggleston, AMAN, is an ex-NATTC, Memphis member, J. C. Walter, Jr., AN, last served with NPC, NAS, Antacostia, J. C. Zinc, AN, and J. Houlihan, AN, arrived from NAS, Cecil Field and NAAS, Kingsville, Texas, respectively.
M. W. Smith, AN, has reported from the USS CORAL SEA, and J.W. Holloway, SK1, reports in relief of L.S. Culver, SK2, from the USS WYANDOT. Culver recently successfully passed an examination for transfer in rate to Aviation Storekeeper.
Congratulations to R. Riker, AE3, and A. Spadofora, AD3, both of whom recently completed USAFI courses for credits toward high school graduation.


OUTBOUND
Flight Depart Gtmo To






F


Saturday, 21 July 1956


m


THE INDIAN Page Five


Devil- Dog Doin's
Last week brought a number of new Marines to Gtmo for duty. Col. August Penzold arrived with his family. Col. Penzold was ordered to Gtmo as C.O. of the Marine Barracks.
A colorful change of command ceremonies was held on the Barracks parade field when Lt. Col. Esterline presented the Barracks colors to Col. Penzold. Upon completion of the presentation Col. Penzold reviewed his command of spit and polish Marines.
Capt. Reese flew in this week to replace CWO Roberts as Supply Officer of the Barracks. CWO Roberts will report for duty at the Marine Supply Depot in Albany, Ga. to finish out his two more years before retiring on 30.
TSgt Carter, SSgt Gibbons and Sgt Wells reported aboard for duty with the Security Section. TSgt Carter came from MCS, Quantico. SSgt Gibbons and Sgt Wells left 2MarDiv at Camp Lejeune.
Sgt Lewis and Sgt Johnson were assigned duty with the Hqs. Sect. Sgt Lewis left Lejeune and Sgt Johnson came down from MCSC, Albany, Ga. Pfc Smith reported aboard from 3MarDiv in Japan after a leave period stateside.
Sgt Asbury left this week for duty with 2MarDiv, Camp Lejeune. Several more Marines have their orders, but their sailing date remains hanging.
Mrs. Stoneking presented TSgt Stoneking with a four and one half pound bundle of feminity last Saturday morning. Mother and daughter are doing fine, but the new pop
isn't holding up too well.
We had five more Marines take the big step. Sgt Lambert, Cpl Chambers, Cpl Lowe, Cpl Polly and Pfc Ozuk have all shipped for six. Their place of duty has not been determined. The SgtMaj has been doing a fine job of selling a good thing to the, Marines.
Lt Dowd is fielding another range detail this week. Next week will be record firing with some pretty high scores anticipated. The NEGDF personnel have one more week of infantry training to undergo under Marine instructors before they return to their outfits. Their three weeks of training has run on a tight schedule with but few wasted minutes.
This Naval Emergency Ground Defense Force, with proper instruction and training, can be a powerful emergency holding force if it is ever called out. The past field problems have been a success as will be the next field problem.


Tomb Near Phillips Park Lighthouse Has Jamaican Buried In Standing Position Facing His Homeland

by Ely U. Orias


There are only two types of persons whose wishes are complied with without question. One is the doomed man facing death for a capital offense and the other is .a dying man.
John Simons, a Jamaican and former Base civilian employee died on February 20, 1938. A few minutes before his death, Simons made a dying wish that he be buried in a standing position facing Jamaica and in a place where his vision could stand unimpeded.


At the ,present time Simons' body still stands in infiinite repose beyond the Phillips Park Lighthouse where a chained tomb supports him. If the vision of a dead man could ,penetrate a catacomb, Simons' sight over his native land must be clearly unimpeded because his' tomb is situated 'on a slope between the lighthouse and Cable Beach where no obstructions to the view toward Jamaica exist.
Beside Simons' tomb lies the body of the late John Oxley, another Jamaican and former Base civilian worker. He died without such alwish, so he was buried the usual way. Oxley was buried in 1941.
Born in 1885 in St. Mary, Jamaica,. Simons put: 28 years of "continuous and outstanding" serv,ice on the Base. At the age of 15, he left Jamaica to exploit the greener pastures of Panama. While in Panama he first worked as a waterfront cleaner and rose to the position of stevedore.
In th6. early part! ofr 1910, however, Simons got the word about the lucrative opportunity on the Base for civilian hands. Convinced by the rumor, he left Panama and set his course for Guantanamo JBay.
Without waste of timethe applied for-a job and was hired.,-His 'first job found him as' head storekeeper. After seven years of storekeepership he was promoted- to the job of a stockman.
Simmons held this position until


INDIAN Photo
1930 when he was advanced as head of the Stevedoring Gang and Stockmen in the Base's Supply Division.
At this time Simons was considered by Base labor circles as "the working man with a supervisor's portfolio under his arms." His popularity among waterfront insiders led to his official recognition as "the champion of the Base's labor force."
With this attribute Simons was given the privilege to reside on the Base with his family. After two years of residence on thee Base, he sent his family back to Jamaica. When the family left, Simons then took up residence at the civilian barracks which were then located in the vicinity of. the present transportation office.
Stomach trouble claimed Simons' life. He was survived by his wife, three daughters and a son who were in Jamaica at the time of his death.
Simons was a 32 Degree Mason. He' was an active member of the Mason Lodge in Guantanamo City. Through the representations, made by the Lodge with CAPT Mark L. Hersey, jr., then . Commandant, Naval Operating Base, Simons' body was accorded the privilege to stand in death forever within the reservatio'i "as a token of appreciation for his undaunting services and as a gesture of compliance with his dying wish."


Fleet Reserve News
You are again reminded of the picnic Saturday 28 July for all Fleet Reserve members and their families. Don't forget to get your tickets by the 23rd so the committies -will know how many are going. If you are interested in .joining the Fleet Reserve Association the m e m be r s h i p requirements are printed below for your information. "1. 'Enlisted men now serving in the regular Navy or Marine Corps with six or more years active service in the Armed Forces.
2. Enlisted men who have been transferred to the Fleet Reserve or Fleet Reserve or Fleet Marine Corps Reserve.
q. Enlisted men who have been transferred to the retired list of the regular Navy or Marine Corps for any cause.
4. Enlisted men now serving in the regular Navy or Marine Corps as temporary officers.
5. Temporary officers who have
been transferred to the Fleet Reserve or the Fleet Marine Corps Reserve.
6. Temporary officers of the regular Navy or Marine Corps who have been retired as officers by a Naval Retiring Board.
7. Temporary officers of the regular Navy or Marine Corps who have been transferred to the retired lists as officers.
8. MEMBERS who have been discharged from the regular Navy or Marine Corps by medical survey may RETAIN membership in FRA. 9. MEMBERS who have been appointed to permanent officer status in the regular Navy or Marine Corps may RETAIN membership. 10. Members whose dues are in arrears for a period of more than three months are suspended from membership. Reinstatement may be effected if the man is eligible for membership as stated above. Reinstated members are not subject to the payment of dues in arrears unless desiring to do so.

The private was whistling happily as he cleaned out the carrier pigeon cages.
"Well," said a passing officer, "that's the first time we've ever had anyone happy on that job."
"Yes, sir," said the private, "you see, before I was transferred here, I was in the cavalry."


Page Five








Page Six


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m
Saturday, 21 July 1956


GTMO SPORTING CHIPS
by C. C. Drumright
Straight Pitches .... The men's handicap tournament is to start at sunrise Monday, July 23. You must registar by 1700 on the 22nd. It will be a match play contest with all pairings to be determined by the blind draw method. The entire tournament will be played on the old course.
Our Liberal Arts Department .... My ball lies in such a position on the green that my opponent's ball is apt to glance off my ball and roll into the hole if he is wide on his putt-May I mark my ball? NOI may never lift and mark my ball of my own volition. However, my opponent has the right to require me to lift it.
My opponent's ball knocks my ball into the cup. What then? In match play I would be credited with having holed out. In stroke play I would be required to replace the ball in its original position. Silence around the Tee, the green, the fairway and the rough, save your shouts for the baseball games. When your group is slow and there is a green open in front, allow the on-coming players to hit through, and once you permit them to hit, give them ample time to get clear before you resume play. Repair your divots and scuff marks on the greens.
Rimming The Cup Around The 19th.... CDR Stove has his youngster giving him putting lessons, furthermore after one lesson the CDR issued a challenge to CAPT Caruthers. The LEYTE has two "I'll see you in the fall" men frequenting the course, namely the tall man (LCDR Willey) and the short man (LT Norm Head), let this serve as a welcome to them and all the others from the LEYTE as well as a warning to the local players.
A not too ancient player of the Gtmo links last week played some fine golf on the west coast to reach the finals in the U.S. Public Links tournament, Chief Bill Scarborough, he was defeated at the 34th hole in the finals.


Only 47 Entries In Fishing Tourney

The 1957 Guantanamo Bay Fishing Tournament is well underway and as of Wednesday, July 18, 47 entries had been entered in all the divisions. Largest fish caught in the first division was a red snapper landed by J. R. Williams, CSC, of the NAS Galley. The snapper weighed 47 pounds and eight ounces and was 41 inches long. It was caught in the Gtmo River. Williams used a hand line with a croaker as bait.
In the second division the largest fish entered as of July 18, was a 2 pound 11 ounce Spanish mackerel, caught by H. E. Warnock, civilian, employed by the Supply depot. The fish was caught off Marine Site with a rod and reel using a number five spoon.
So far there are no entries in the third division, spearfishing.
The largest overall fish entered into the annual tourney is a 420 pound gray nurse shark, caught by J. W. Parks of VU-6, DET #1. The shark was 9 foot 4 inches long, and was caught off Fisherman's Point. A handline was used.


Strikes & Spares

by Dolly Aumann
High-Games High-Averages N. Williams 171 J. Darby 149 V. Hall 170 J. Dary 10 F. Grounds 147 J. Darby 168 K. Hazelton 161 M. Zeigler 145 P. Duffy 167 G. Rowan 146 E. Coxon 156 B. Schoonderwoerd
155 G. Kraft 142 G. Rowan 155 M. Marsh 141 R. Garaudy 162 M. Marsh 152 M. Swords 141
Team Standings


Alley-Katz
Bofleretts Push-Overs Gutter-Gals Lillies of the Alleys Down-Unders The Spoilers The Crickets


W-35 W-31 W-26
W-22 W-22
W-16Y2 W-12 W-11%


b-P


L-22 L-22 r-27% L-32
L-82%A


Dental Explorer

by Wally Jenkins
CAPT Robert S. Snyder, Jr., Mrs. Snyder, daughter Jane and son Robert arrived on the Johnson July 9. CAPT Snyder is our new Commander Officer.
CDR Albert R. Oesterle, Mrs. Oesterle and daughters Lane, Jill and Lynn arrived July 10. "Bienvenida a Cuba"
John Law, DT2, departed July 13 aboard the JOHNSON. Law is leaving the service and will find a warm reception in North Dakota.
At the Change of Command Ceremonies on July 13, our acting Commanding Officer, Captain John B. Stoll was relieved by Captain Snyder. Captain Stoll will assume his former duties as Executive Officer.


Skeet Shoot Slated

For Next Weekend
The Guantanamo Bay Rifle and Pistol Club will sponsor its second Skeet Shoot on Saturday, July 28 commencing at 0800 at the Marine Skeet Range. The Skeet Range is located in the Marine Movie Lyceum area.
National Skeet Shooting Association rules will apply. Cash prizes determined by the -number of shooters participating will be awarded. There will be a prize for the high man in each squad of five shooters and a grand prize, the winner of which will be determined by a shoot of the squad winners. Squad winners will be determined in case of ties, by the shooter breaking the greatest number of doubles.
The registration fee will be $1.00 per round and shooters will be allowed to enter as many-rounds as they desire.
Ammunition and shotguns will be available at the range for those unable to furnish their own. There is no charge for use of the weapons or for birds. Refreshments will be sold at the range.
There will also be a special round or rounds for those who would like to shoot and not compete for the cash prizes. Registration will be .50 per round for the practice rounds to be fired on completion of the prize shooting.
All Base personnel are welcome to come out and enter the competition and win a prize, fleet personnel are particularly welcomed. Spectators will fnd this type of shooting interesting to watch.

Tryon Top Scorer

In Pistol Match
The Guanatnamo Bay Rifle and Pistol club held its second monthly pistol match at the Naval Air Station pistol range Saturday, July 14.
In the .22 and .45 cal aggregate matches, C. E. Tryon, BMC, NAS, was high with a 557.
Winners during the competitions in the different shooting classifications indicated opposite their names were: J. B. Jocks, AO1, NAS, 1st expert with 547; L. C. James, A02, NAS, 1st sharpshooter with 504; H. Hines, BM2, NavSta with 456 and R. J. Aldridge, BMC, FTG, 1st Tyro with 493.
In the .22 cal matches, C. E. Tryon was again high with 295. In these matches, LT J.M. Ferrante, FTG, emerged as 1st expert with 285; L. C. James as 1st sharpshooter with 271; LTJG S. P. Gallup of the USS *LEYTE as 1st marksman with 244 and R. J. Aldridge as 1st Tyro with 272.
The next club pistol matches are scheduled for August 11.. This is a good chance for competitive practice preparatory to the Base Annual Military Pistol Matches under schedule this fall.


Ladies Golf Shots

The weekly event of the Ladies Golf association was a low netlow put tournament. The following winners were awarded golf balls: First FlightLow Net-Juanita Babcock
Second-Mary Goolsby
Low Putts-Lois Cooper Third FlightLow Net-Edna Bush
Second-Mrs. Buckholz
Low Putts-Mrs. Fortenberry
Congratulations this week go to Audrey Page for breaking 100, to Mary Goolsby for shooting two 79s and to Lois Cooper for shooting two 91s.


Sailor's Seabag

Loses Bedding

Washington (A F P S)
Blankets and pillows, long a weighty problem in the bottom of a sailor's seabag, now will be furnished at all ships :and shore stations under a new Navy policy.
Since July 1952, such bedding accessories have been issued EM as government property and had to be returned on discharge.
Now, when a sailor is
transferred, he will turn in his blankets and pillows and receive new ones on reporting to his next duty station.


An irate lawyer trying to establish a point in cross-examination demanded of the defendant: "Madam, while you were taking your dog for a walk, did you stop anywhere?"
"Sir," the witness said quietly, "have you ever taken a dog for a walk?'


0


THE INDIAN








Saturday, 21 July 1956 TEE INDIAN Pare Se~ii


VU-1O Clinches Runner-Up Spot In League, Playoffs Begin Mon.


The Fish Tales


by Carlos Caballo
Suspense is that vital element that has made fortunes for many a successful author or playwright. It is also the ingredient that was injected into the battle for second place in the League by VU-10's Mallards and the NAS Flyers.
Right up until the last game Thursday night the issue was in doubt although in VU-10's favor. They were in shaky possession of the runner-up position. A win would cinch it while a loss would have meant a possible tie with the Flyers.
As everyone now knows, when the turf and cries of "Kill the umpire" had died away into the hills, winner was the Marines and NAS was relegated to third place in standings.


Naval Base 9, VU TEN 4
The Naval Base Composite Team rose from the depths and prevented the Mallards from making a sure thing of the suddenly coveted seecond place. Winning pitcher was Scholl, the loser being Montgomery.
Big inning was the third when every man on the Naval Base team had a chance. Capitalizing on three hits and Mallard errors, five runs were chalked up. Two more were added in the fourth to make it 7-0 and seemingly a push-over for Naval Base. However in the sixth, the Mallards came to life and punched across four runs but this was the extent of their rally. Naval Base 005 201 01x-9 5 2 VU-10 000 004 000-4 5 7
Marines 7, Naval Base 4
The League-leading Leathernecks showed no let-up or relaxing as they clouted the ball for eight official hits and seven runs. This game offered one rather interesting item on the statistical side in that Naval Base only came up with 2 errors while the Marines were guilty of one. Credit for the win goes to Furtney while the loser was McCafferty.
Both teams lost no time in getting down to business, the first inning ended in 2-2 tie. The Marines forged ahead by adding a run in the second to lead 3-2. Not to be outdone, Naval Base fought back with a run in the fourth to tie it up again.
The Marines poured it on then with a run in the fifth and three more in the sixth. Another interesting statistic revealed itself at the end of the game when the official scorebook showed that nothing more than one-baggers had been hit during the entire evening. Marines 210 013 00x-7 8 1 Naval Base 200 100 000--4 6 2
Marines 4, NAS 3
This Thursday night game was


no gift on a platter for the Marines. In more than one instance they were in serious trouble but managed to contain the Flyers and give fans another very good game. Youngs went all the way to chalk up another win for himself. Waldrop is saddled with the loss.
Neither team crossed the plate until the third inning when NAS jumped into the lead with one run by Bogan, only to see it fade away when the Leathernecks came to bat. They never touched the ball for a hit but still came up with three runs to take over 3-1.
This was their margin although not a secure one. In the fifth, the package inning, the Flyers tied it up with two more runs but once again the Marines added one of their own and were retired with a 4-3 lead,
It looked like a Flyer win in the seventh when three successive singles loaded the bases. Youngs proved equal to the occasion when the next three men went down 1-2-3.
Their final chance came in the bottom of the ninth. Rhodes connected for his fourth hit of the game to land on first base. Sandblom blasted one to shortstop who fired to second where it was dropped, putting men on first and second. McCalmont bunted but Rhodes was cut off at third, runners now on first and second.
A passed ball by Marine Duncan
placed them on second and third and the Flyer outlook was good with only one away. However, Youngs fanned out both Ransom and Schaffer to down NAS and boot them out of a chance at second place in standings. Marines 003 010 00x-4 6 2 NAS 001 020 000-3 9 3


The Standings
Won
Marines 17 VU10 10 NA$ 9 Naval Base 5


Lost
3
10
12 16


The Schedule
Sunday VU-10 vs Marines Monday Playoffs Tuesday Playoffs Thursday Playoffs Friday Playoffs


What's DOin' Stateside
Commuters tired of choo-chooing, steering, foot-pounding and busing to work may someday have another choice-floating.
Monorail, a new transit idea, promises speed and comfort outmoding trains, cars, buses and plain old walking by hanging a passenger coach on a 30-foot-high steel tube supported by J-shaped towers.
Scooting along its tubular "sky hook" the Monorail car ignores rough roads, traffic jams and choleric horn-blowers. Speed can be almost anything the passengers want, with 200 miles per hour a possibility on long runs.
A test installation at Houston, Tex. has wafted 30,000 curious citizens in cool (air-conditioned) quiet along a 970-foot line. Promoters of the project, with typical Texas enthusiasm, are already building a factory to make coaches, rails and towers for their airborne traffic-dodger.
Americans who are behind in their taxes may have trouble sleeping, but they have nothing on taxdelinquent Danes.
The Danish Revenue Dept. and the police have conspired to make sleep hard to come by for Danes who have neglected to keep up with their taxes.
It all goes under the heading of harassment. The heavy fist of a policeman pounding on a burgher's door at 4 a.m. means no more sleep that night. The delinquent Dane must get dressed, join a busload of other dodgers and head for the police station. There they remain until it is time to go to work.
There's an old adage that you're as young as you feel, and Americans are feeling younger all the time.
A statistical study has turned up evidence that middle - aged Americans can look forward to five to 20 more productive years than their grandparents.
Dr. Hardin Jones of the University of California, author of these encouraging figures, believes that illnesses sap our strength. The United States provides an ideal climate for continued vitality, he claims, because good health conditions hold diseases to a minimum from childhood on.


by Pat Aldridge
A worlds' record breaker Blue Marlin was caught recently off the coast of Oahu, second largest of the Hawaiian Island chain. This 796 pound monster was boated in 32 minutes. The phenomenon lies in the strange fact that this Blue Marlin record smasher was the first of the species ever to be seen, much less landed, in the vast Pacific Ocean.
The fish still holding the world's record for size was caught off the coast of Florida in 1912 and succumbed after a five day battle. One can imagine the tremendous weight when told that the fifteen ton winch snapped trying to hoist the creature ashore. The liver alone weighed more than a ton.
Speaking of Shark, the Gray Nurse variety is being found in absolute hordes here in Guantanamo Bay and near the mouth of the harbor. Jim Parkin landed a 420 pounder at Fishermans' Point, where several, including a 380 pounder, have recently been landed. Nightly, those fishing with extremely heavy deep sea gear at the harbors' entrance, have been losing entire rigs to the sea beasts.
Snapper, too, the large type erroneously called "Red", have been biting regularly on both live bait and fish hunks at the mouth of the Gtmo river, J.R. Williams, Chief Cook, Leeward, who recently landed the 47% pounder, took a 51 pounder at seven p.m. on July 16.
Following evening, same time, same locale, T 'W. Waite, BM3, landed a 59 pounder.
The size of these fish entered in the present tournament should not discourage anyone for it should be remembered that Shark fall into an entirely separate catagory. The Grand Prize will go to any species other than Shark weighing in at the most poundage. At this writing, the fifty nine pound Snapper leads.
Final word for private boat owners. Next time you dress up the deck boards, add a little pumice to the paint. This doesn't hurt the paint at all and is plenty of help in preventing slipping and sliding when the deck is fish sloppy or water wet. See ya fishin'.

Football season is the time of the year you can walk down the street with a blonde on one arm and a blanket on the other and no cop gives you a dirty look.


-0


Saturday, 21 July 1959


Page Seveh


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Saturday, 21 July 1956


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THE INDIAN


a


Navy-BPPO-IOND-Guantanamo


Cinema - Scoop

by D. D. H.
"The King and I," is currently receiving rave notices from all quarters. Hollywood's lavish version sustains the warmth of the original play's story and adds spectacular sets in some real terrific color. Yul Brynner and Deborah Kerr are starred, he in his original Broadway role and Miss Kerr playing Anna.
. Very seldom does a Hollywood daptation of a Broadway play re:ceive such notices, especially in the musical category. It is put out in the new Cinemascope "55" process.
Officers and their families aboard the Base are enjoying Cinemascope now at the "0". Club . . . glad to hear it . . . Casting results for "Laura" were gratifying . . . four new ones to the circuit this week, with "Come Next Spring" walking away with the best honors!
-Let's Make Ui (released tbru U.A.), . . . Errol Flynn, Anna Neagle and David Farrar . . . a comedy . . . limited information on this one forces a no comment!
Come Next Spring (Rep., in color), is a thoroughly entertaining and interesting story of farm people. Ann Sheridan and Steve Cochran star as a couple who are attempting to patch up a broken marriage. Sonny Tufts and Walter Brennan are in supporting roles, with Brennan outstanding. If Republic could come up with more such entertaining movies, the company would be one to reckon with. Put this one down as one not to miss, the whole family will enjoy it. Adventures of Sadie (Fox), ...
Joan. Collins, Kenneth More and George Cole-. . . a somewhat enjoyable English comedy . .-. has played the Base circuit before.
Outside the Law (U.I.), was made initially to bring newcomers Ray Danton and Leigh Snowden before tie public eye, at least in this writer's opinion. Little heed is given to story material which this 'picture lacks considerably. It is a gang-busting yarn with the unusual twist of having Danton playing an ex-con while his father (Onslow Stevens) is a Treasury agent. Might be entertaining.
Blackboard Jungle (MGM),... Glenn Ford, Anne Francis, Louis Calhern and Margaret Hayes . . . deals with the juvenile delinquency problem in big city schools... excellent picture . . . played the the Base circuit before.
Night Holds Terror (COL) . . . Jack Kelly, Hildy Parks and Vince Edwards . . . a kidnap story based partially on fact... below average.
Magnificent Matador (Nat'l, in color) . . . Maureen O'Hara and Anthony Quinn. ... A bullfighting epic . . . good, but with some definite bad points . . . new to the circuit.


WGBY Television


Saturday, July 21
1:00 Winky Dink & You 1:30 Garry Moore 2:00 Victory at Sea 2:30 Studio Presentation 3:00 House Party 8:30 Two For The Money 4:00 Beat the Clock 4:30 Masquerade Party 5:00 Western Movie 6:00 Milton Berle 7:00 George Gobel 7:30 Your Hit Parade 8:00 Colgate Comedy Hour 9:00 Stage Show 9:30 Star Tonight
Sunday, July 22
1:00 Winky Dink & You 1:30 Contest Carnival 2:00 Lamp Unto My Feet 2:30 The Christophers 3:00 Big Picture 3:30 Arthur Godfrey 4:00 Ted Mack's Amateurs 5:00 Roy Rogers 5:30 That's My Boy 6:00 Royal Hawaiians 6:30 What's My Line 7:00 Mama


7:30 Jack Benny 8:00 Ed Sullivan 9:00 Damon Runyon 9:30 Appointment with
Adventure "
Monday', July 23
5:30 News Parade 5:45 Perry Como 6:00 AF Screen Magazine f "30 My Favorite Husband 7:00 Talent Scouts
7 :30 Highway Patrol 8:00 Ethel & Albert S :70 Guy Lombardo 9:00 Studio One
Tuesday, July 24:
5:30 News Parade 5:45 Perry Como 6:00 Meet Millie 6:30 Julius LaRosa 5:45 Dollar A Second 7:00 Phil Silvers 7:30 Screen Director'S
Playhouse
8:00 Red Skelton 8:30 Lineup 9:00 Robert Montgomery
Presents


Radio Round-ip Mov LoG


Press time found the influx of new tunes rather slow this week. More are expected and prevues can probably be heard either over Morning Caravan or your late evening Sandman Show, Monday through Saturday. Among those received were two tunes by Billy May, "The Beat" and "Nightmare."
PROGRAM CHANGES: No actual changes this week but approximately three shows are playing for the last time. You'll be hearing the last of "Philadelphia Orchestra," "Mostly Dixie," and "Treasury of Music." More on these next week. "At Ease" is also being dropped by the Armed Forces Radio & TV Service with their Number 2802 cutting but will be carried by WGBY with those issues saved so long as quality and variety can be preserved.
PROGRAMS THIS WEEK: Sunday is always a good day for those who prefer musical variety. Listed for tomorrow is "Mitch Miller" at 12:15 p.m. He introduces guests movie star Yvonne de Carlo ..: conductor Paul Weston . . . jazz pianist Marian McPartland ... and playright Joshua Logan.
The Billy Williams Quartet will sing on "Ed Sullivan's Show" at the 9:00 p.m. spot. Ed also presents an outstanding scene from the Broadway success, "The Matchmaker." Finally for tomorrow is "Sunday With Garroway" heard at 8:00 p.m. On this 55 minute program will be George M. Cohan, the original "Yankee Doodle Dandy," heard via a recorded speech which reviews his whole career in show ,business. British orchestra leader Ted Heath is interviewed across the ocean.


4


Saturday, July 21
NavSta-Let's Make Up-l03 min. NAS-Jubal--l3 min. Mar.'Site-Broken Star-89 min. Villa.-Unchained-90 min. Lwd. Pt.-Three Hours to Kill-105 min.
Sunday, July 22
NavSta-Come Next Sprin'g-92 min. NAS-Let's Make Up Mar. Site-Target Earth-96 min. Villa.-Broken Star Lwd. Pt.-Unchained
Monday, July 23,
NavSta-Adventures of Sadie-92 mm. NAS -Conie Next Spring Mar. Site-Jubal Villa.-Target Earth Lwd. Pt. 'Broken Star
Tuesday, July 24
NavSta Outside the Law-96 min. N_' \SAdventures of Sadie Mar. Site-Let's Make Up Villa.-Jubal Lwd. Pt.-Target Earth
Wednesday, July 25
NavSta-Blackboard Jungle-101 min. NkS-Outside the Law Mar. Site-Come Next Spring Vlilla-Let's. Make Up Lwd. Pt.-Jubal
Thursday, July 26
NavSta-Night Holds Terror-105 min. NAS-Blackboard Jungle Mar. Site-Adventure. of Sadie Villa.-Come Next Spring Lwd. Pt.-Let's Make Up
Friday, July 27
NavSta-Magnficent Matador-94 min. NAS-Night Holds"Terror. Mar. Site-Outside the Law Villa.-Adventures of Sadie Lwd. Pt.-Come Next Spring


Program
We dnesday, Jjliy 25 5:30 News Parade 5:45 Patti Page
6 :00 -Industry on Parade 5:15 Travel'Pg .:30 I've Got a Secret 7:00 This is Your Life 7:30 Danger 8:00 Godfrey and Friends 9:00 Kraft TV Theatre
Thursday, July 26 5:30 News -Parade 5:45 Perry Comn 6:00 Thruth or Consequence 6:30 Professional Father' 7:00 Bob Cummings 7:30 You Bet YourLife 8:00 Dragnet 8:30 Stop the Music 9:00 Climax
Friday, July 27 5:30 News Parade 5 :45 Perry Como 6:00 Officers Conference 6:30 Dollar a Second 7:00 Ozzie & Harriet 7:30 Playhouse of Stars 8,:0( Johnny Carson 8:30 Crusader 9:00 Boxing


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.Book - Nook

Trygve Lie, eminent Norwegian statesman, has written the story of his stewardship with the United Nations in:IN THE CAUSE OF PEACE. Lie, who served as secretary-general of the UN for seven years, tells the stories behind the stories of such crises as the Korean War, the Berlin Blockade, the Arab-Israeli dispute, etc.
SING, MORNING STAR is an
excellent historical novel by an expdrienced craftsman, Jane Oliver. The setting is feudal Scotland and the leading characters are. King Malcolm (son of Duncan of "Macbeth" fame) and his queen, Margaret who eventually became a saint. This is a fine historical romance in the best traditions of Scott.
For those who like their history straight, there is A HISTORY OF LATIN AMERICA, by Hubert Herring, This is a long book of over 7000 pages, but it covers a great deal of space and time, namely, all the territory from the Rio Grande to the Antarctic over a period of more than 400 years.
You won't want to read all of it, but certain parts like the succinct history of Cuba should.prove extremely interesting.
New specialty books this week
ihclude TAPE RECORDERS by Charles G. Wescott, HIGH FIDELITY HOME MUSIC SYSTEMS edited by the . Citadel Press, FELL'S U. S. COIN BOOK by Jacques DelMonte, and TENNIS
TECHNIQUES by Wynn Mace.
In THOREAU OF WALDEN
Henry .B. Hough has written a most readable exposition of the life and philosophy of one of America's most unusual public figures, Henry D. Thoreau. The famous author and naturalist, whose personal opinions were as erratic as his writing was brilliant, receives the full treatment in this volume of penetrating literary criticism.
Two anthologies just off the
presses are BEST SPORTS STORIES OF 1956, compiled by Irving T. Marsh, and THE BEST PLAYS OF 1954-1955, Collected by Louis Kronenbqrger. Just the books for people who like good reading in
small doses.




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COVERS GTMO LIKE THE SUNSHINE U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Volume VII, No. 29 Saturday, 21 July 1956 LCDR Bager Retires, Leaves Tues., CHBOSN Arwood Provost Marshal Yesterday LCDR T. E. Bager was relieved as Base Provost Marshal by CHBOSN W. L. Arwood. LCDR Bager is retiring from the navy after 22/2 years of service. He has been stationed in Guantanamo Bay for the past year in the capacity of Provost Marshal. He, his wife and daughter leave by FLAW Tuesday for the states. LCDR Bager began his career in the navy as a seaman apprentice and worked his way up the rank ladder, never missing a pay grade. After his release from active duty, LCDR Bager and family will make Los Angeles, Calif. their home. The new Provost Marshal CHBOSN Arwood, was formerly the Base Shore Patrol Officer and 1st LT of the Naval Station. Seventeen months ago he served as the assistant Provost Marshal. Mayor, Councilmen Elected For Villamar At the Villamar-Bargo Council meeting held recently for the election of a new council mayor and councilmen, the following persons were elected: A. V. Ward, civilian from NSD, council mayor; Floyd B. Winland, MMLC, FTG, councilman for Precint No. 4; Easton J. Guillory jr., civilian, PWD, councilman for Precinct No. 5; Eddie D. Surroz, MMC, councilman for Precinct No. 6 and Mrs. Marilyn Q. Anderson, council secretary. Incumbent councilmen for Precincts one, two, three, seven and eight still hold their respective offices until such time when their tenure of office will have been expired. The new council mayor announced that the council meets every first Tuesday of the month at the Naval Station I & E office, at which meeting suggestions "for the betterment of the community are accepted and discussed." The Council cordially invites residents of the Base housing communities to the council's regular monthly meeting. Maids Quarters Effective immediately there will be maintained in the Base Housing Office, room 211, Naval Base Administration Building a maids' quarters waiting list. Eligibility for a position on this list will be the occupancy of a residence on the Base. The date of application will determine the position on the waiting list. Weekend Warriors On Base Two Days One hundred forty men of our reserve force who play around on weekdays and become veterans on weekends arrived in Gtmo early this week. The first group of 70 Weekend Warriors of the Naval Air Reserve Training Unit in Miami landed at the Naval Air Station Tuesday morning, July 17. The second group which was also composed of 70 reserves arrived at NAS Wednesday morning, July 18. While in Gtmo both groups toured the Base. After their Base sojourn the warriors boarded the USS LEYTE. CDR F. L. Lawlor, NAS Executive Officer disclosed that the purpose of the NARTU visit was to "acquaint themselves with aircraft shipboard maneuvers and to initiate the recruits on how a Naval Air outfit operates." Officer in Charge of both groups was CDR R. K. Knight. The first wave of warriors left for Miami Wednesday, July 18, while the second batch left Thursday, July 19. Base Ready For Midshipmen Influx When First Cruise Anchors Wed. The man power complement of Midshipman Cruise Alpha scheduled to drop anchor in Guantanamo Bay Wednesday, July 25, will be met by various elements on the Base with a jam-packed recreational agenda. With the view to making their visit in Gtmo a "pleasant and memorable one," special arrangements have been made. The NavSta Retail form, Sports, Tailor shop, Dry Cleaning a Retail Store will keel open from 0915-2100 and 27. On July 26 t be 1300-2100. LTJG J. L. Johnston Exchange Officer, s special orders will the Navy Exchange w shipmen are still aro announced that Base expected not to shop above specified "in or room for the Midsh they make their purc The NAS Hobby S main open during the Public Works Arrives Tuesd CAPT H. N. Wallin lick Works Center Store, Uniand Barbernd the NAS planes at the shop will be sold on a 25 per cent discount. their doors Dance Friday on July 25 LCDR R. M. Moore, "0" Club he hours will Mess Treasurer, reports that a reception and dance in honor of the Asst. Navy Middies will he held at the cluh aid that no on Friday evening, July 27. be taken by Mrs. Betty Dean, Long Distance hile the MidTelephone Exchange Supervisor, und. He also passed the word that shifts of residents are telephone operators "are all set" on the dates to meet the expected wave of the der to make cruise's long distance callers." ipmen while Special Services Gets Ready hases." hop willre cruise. M eThe Naval Station Special Services department has every recreational and athletic facility on a stand-by status. When the Middle C. o wave strikes, the department's bicycle shop, bowling alleys, pool ay, 17th tables, softball and baseball diamonds, basketball and t en a i courts, swimming pools, stable, White Hat club, Phillips Park, etc. will let-go their doors wide open! The P0 club at the Fleet RecreaT tion Center l he used exclusively aby Midshipmen. On the lawn in front of the P0 Club are 15 party tables deployed for the big event. Tennis matches and sailing races between NayBase and the Midshiplen will be hield. CDR George Gardens, Commodore of the Gtmo Sailing Club accepted the challenge the Middies had sent to the club for a sailing race. The Base, r< i in turn, challeged them to the tennis matches. A special "joy ride" treat to the INDIAN Photo Midshipmen will be given by ten submarines due to arrive in Gtmo ,future PubTuesday, July 24. Commanding cufoasalnraeThBae Officer, on the left with CDR E. L. Rowan, Public Works department head, was conducted on a "driving tour" of the Base Tuesday morning. CAPT Wallin arrived by plane that same morning. The new Public Works officer came from the Bureau of Yards and Docks where be was executive assistant to the chief of the Bureau for maintenance and nfaterial. CAPT Wallin has been one of the leaders in the implementation of the navy-wide controlled maintenance program. He also served as the naval representative on a joint committee of the Defense department which discussed saving of maintenance funds in the military establishments. During the war CAPT Wallin served with the Seabees and he has been the Public Works Officer at White Oak, Maryland. NEGDF Instructors' School Is Underway An instructors' school in conjunction with the National Emergency Ground Defense Force started at Marine Barracks July 9 and will run through July 29. Key personnel from all commands except from NSD aboard the Base were transferred TAD to the Marine Barracks to undergo training in the school. The school is devoted primarily to the instruction of these key personnel in a concentrated course of small unit Marine tactics. Purpose of the school is to enable these men to return to their respective commands and train personnel. The actual NEGDF exercises which are held annually on the Base will be held later in the year. ES

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Saturday, 21 July 1956 THE INDIAN The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a possible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. RADM WILLIAM G. COOPER, Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Editorial Staff LTJG D. G. LaCasse ----------------------------Officer-Advisor G. L. Henderson, JOC -------------------------------------Editor J. C. Curren, JOSN ----------------------------Managing Editor E. U. Orias, J03 ------------------------------Feature Editor D. D. Hinton, JOSN ----------------------------Staff Reporter THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P.35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. Materials marked AFPS may be used by news media provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All materials originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part or without credit. All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. Auan Injured In Scooter Mishap Emily Post was never in any chain of command. What she had to say, however, does have a place in the military life. Our Armed Forces are built on mutual respect-respect for the individual and his mission. Respect, too, for the fact that his opinions may differ from yours. Every time you extend a salute or use the word "sir," you are expressing good manners. But courtesy does not end there. It extends, for instance, to the mess hall. You may be hungry as the proverbial bear, but there is no excuse to ram a fork into someone's gullet as you reach for the bread or catsup. It isn't sissy-like, either, to avoid spicing your sentences with those colorful little phrases. A man who must curse to express himself proves the low status of his I.Q. every time he opens his mouth. No, Emily Post would have seemed ridiculous toting an M-1 or swabbing the deck. But what she had to say carries weight for us in the service. So-Pass the salt, PLEASE!-(AFPS) Sunday, 22 July 1956 CATHOLIC MASSES Sunday, 7000-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri.-1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800, 1900 -2000, and daily before Mass PROTESTANT SERVICES 0930-Sunday School 0930-Sunday School 0930-Adult Worship (Naval Base Chapel) 1930-Fellowship Hour Wednesday: 1930-l4id-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal JEWISH SERVICES Friday-1900-Naval Base Chapel CHURCH OF CHRIST 1000-Bible Study Calendar of Events Monday, July 23 O.E.S. Chapter Meeting-Community Autorium-7:30 p.m. Monday, July 23 Toastmaster's Club-Officers Club6:30 p.m. Thursday, July 25 Felloweraft Club 1078-Community Auditorium-7:30 p.m. 1045-Worship Service Community Auditorium LATER DAY SAINTS Sunday-1100-Naval Station Library CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Sunday-1000-NavSts Library Chaplains at this Activity CDR P. R. McPhee, CHC, USN (Protestant) CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN (Catholic) 4 Serious injuries resulted for C. H. Aumann, EMC, Engineering Dept., FTG, last Thursday, July 12, when the scooter he was riding collided with a Navy Exchange truck driven by a Cuban employee. The accident occurred during the noon hour at the intersection of Bay Hill Road and Sherman Avenue. Chief Aumann was hospitalized with injuries of a serious nature, including a broken leg. Emergency surgery was required. His condition, at press time was described Third In Series. Maryland Unregistered servicemen and civilians who are attached to or serving with the Armed Forces outside the geographical limits of the U.S. are registered by the Board of Elections in country of residence. An applications for a ballot also serves as an application for registration. Therefore, registration in advance is not required. For all others registration is permanent unless thet voter has failed to vote at least once within the past five years. Baltimore city residents may register in person with the Board of Election Supervisors any time up to Sept. 21. Others must appear before the Registration Officers, country of residence, Oct. 2nd or 9th. Montana Registration is permanent unless a voter failed to vote in the last general election or has moved from one precinct to another. Servicemen, civilian employees attached to the Armed Forces overseas and their dependents may register by requesting a "Registration Card" from the County, City INDIAN Photo by hospital authorities as good. Mrs. C. H. Aumann requested that the INDIAN extend her sincere thanks to all who donated blood for her husband during the time when emergency treatment was required. Last Thursday's accident brought the total of private vehicle accidents up to 34, for this year while 82 government vehicles have been involved in accidents on the Base. Out of the total of 115 accidents, 16 injuries have resulted but no deaths. or Town Clerk, place of residence. This should be done early enough so that the completed card is returned not later than Sept. 21. Other qualified absent persons within the continental limits of the U.S. or its territories may register in the same way. Ohio Registration is permanent unless a person has failed to vote in at least one election every two years. Members of the Armed Forces may vote without being registered. All other persons are required to be registered before voting if their residence is in a city with a population greater than 16,000 or in a county that requires registration. Where required, registration must be in person and prior to Sept. 25. New Jersey Registration is permanent unless a voter has failed to vote at least once in the past four years. Registration is not required for members of the Armed Foces. All other persons must register in person at the office of the Commissioner of Registration at the place of residence before Sept. 25. Oregon Registration is permanent unless a voter has failed to vote at least once in the past two years. Servicemen, civilian employees of the government outside the limits of the U.S., members of religious groups or welfare agencies officially attached to and serving with the Armed Forces and their dependents accompanying them need not register in advance. Registration is accomplished when the above named persons have propperly executed the oath which will be forwarded with the absentee ballot. All other persons must register in person with appropriate registration officials anytime up to 30 days before election day. For further information, see your voting officer.-(AFPS) 4 Page Two e

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e Saturday, 21 July 1956 e THE INDIAN e Page Three Little Theater Picks CAPT Habecker Is Herpetologist, WGBY Changes Radio Frequency Effective August 1 radio station WGBY will broadcast on a frequency of 1340 kilocycles instead of the present 1450 kilocycles. Purpose of the change of frequency was to eliminate interference with the Cuban radio station in Baracoa. So come Wednesday, August 1, set your radio dial at 1340 if you want to listen to WGBY. Has Two Boas Caged In Office VU-10 Has Oper. 'AirLitt' Some weeks ago a feature article appeared in the INDIAN regarding the number of dependents on the Base. If that article was to appear again next week, you would find that the figures had been changed. Thanks to the recent "VU-10 Airlift." Here is an airlift that will never appear in a military history, but it will be one that will be long remembered in VU-10. On Thursday, July 12, the FLAW flight from Patuxent River arrived. On board were LCDR Hogan, Mrs. Hogan and their five children; LCDR Blythe, Mrs. Blythe and their five children, and Mrs. Marie Glanville, wife of LTJG Glanville. The Glanville family will report aboard early this Fall. The following Saturday Mrs. Errington Brown, wife of LT Brown, arrived with their two children. Not to rest on their past laurels, BuPers is in the final stages of preparing to "airlift" the remainder: LCDR Beyer, Mrs. Beyer and their five children; LCDR Orcutt, Mrs. Orcutt and their three children, and Mrs. Lawrence Sharpe, wife of LTJG Sharpe, and their child. Who said logistic was the art of moving men and materials only? Yard Of Month INDIAN Photo Winner of the Yard of the Month award for July was F. J. Reilly, PN1. Reilly was presented $10 by new Villamar-Bargo mayor, A. V. Ward. Reilly and his family moved into 14B, Granadillo Point March 10, but did not begin work on the yard until April 1. Each month the members of the Villamar-Bargo community council pick a Yard of the Month. Their choice is based on the yard which has shown the most improvement over a month's time. Blimp Arrives, Has Special Features One of the Navy's blimps attached to Airship Squadron Two based at Glynco, Georgia, arrived at McCalla Field last week. Dubbed as the ZL it has a complement of 16 officers and 62 enlisted men. Five officers and six enlisted men form the airship's flight complement. The rest make up the blimp's ground mooring force. LCDR R. O. Bodell, Officer in Charge of the detachment, said that the airship will participate in the Atlantic Fleet Anti-Submarine Force's training tactics. The blimp has an envelope volume of 670,000 cubic feet, 285 feet in length, 96 feet in height and a maximum gross weight of 44,000 lbs. The special features of the airship are: Three tail control surfaces instead of the usual four; speed is slightly faster; not very many windows; more effective in tracking down submarines and exclaimed one officer-"much prettier than the older ones!" The detachment is scheduled to depart Gtmo at the end of the month. S INDIAN Photo CAPT F. S. Habecker holds "Eddie" and "Bertha," the two majas (Cuban boas) which he captured and now keeps in a cage in his office. One of the captain's main purposes in keeping the snakes is to prove to people that most snakes are harmless and do serve a purpose to humanity. by Don Hinton What do you know about herpetology? Most people have never heard of the word or the science, but Gtmo has an a m a t e u r herpetologist CAPT F. S. Habecker, Commander Fleet Training Group. He admits his outside interest is a bit unusual, but his study of snakes proves that reptiles are creatures not necessarily to be feared. Evidence to this fact and very much alive and active are two snakes, housed in a black and gray cage in the captain's office. The wiggly, vivacious "pets" have been tagged "unofficially," "Eddie" and "Bertha." Why "Eddie" and "Bertha?" Well, it is believed that the two are male and female, due to their different markings and characteristics. This caged-twosome, according to the captain, are of the Cuban boa variety or maja, as they are called in Spanish. He stressed that the boas are harmless, and should not be killed. "Eddie" was the first of the two to be apprehended. CAPT Habecker, -himself, using a broom to avoid injury to the snake, captured "Eddie" under his quarters on Evans Point on June 1, 1956. The captain's quarters is built on stilts, thus enabling the capture of "Eddie," who is approximately 37 inches long. "Bertha" was caught July 6, on Crane Hill near the Fleet Training Center. She is approximately 36 inches long and was captured by CAPT Habecker with the aid of several sailors armed with brooms. There is no definite way to determine the ages of the pair, but they are estimated to be several years old due to their size. The average length of the maja snakes at full growth are between six and ten feet long. .Chief food of the two constrictors are lizards and mice. The food supply is kept more than adequate by members of the Fleet Training Group. What are the impressions of office visitors when they see the two caged snakes? CAPT Habecker said, "Everyone seems to display a detached interest coupled with a reluctant fascination." The FTG commander has previously had garter snakes and other small and harmless varieties in captivity, but these are the first boas. Among his wide and varied travels with the Navy, CAPT Habecker has had several opportunities to see many other kinds of reptiles. One of the most interesting experiences he relates is his visit in 1939 to a laboratory in Bangkok, Thailand, where the venom is extracted from various kinds of .poisonous snakes, to be used for the serum to counter-act snake bites. One of the most interesting snakes he saw at this laboratory was a giant, 16 foot King Cobra. A point of interest for all Base residents is that there are no poisonous snakes in Cuba. 1 Cast For 'Laura' Production of "Laura" is underway. Peggy Way, director, and her assistant Flo Schnake made final casting decisions the past weekend. Fred Anabal will play the part of Mark McPherson, the detective assigned to the case in this mystery drama. Evelyn Leach is "The Girl." Don MacQuarrie will portray Waldo Lydecker, a suave and, sophisticated newspaper columnist. Jim Le Mar and Joe West portray Danny Dorgan and Shelby Carpenter, two men in Laura's life.

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gm The Medic by W. A. Dal and R. A. Albright July 11 a change of command ceremony was held at the Hosptial. CAPT L. A. Newton became the new commanding officer relieving CAPT T. I. Moe. CAPT Moe will report to Charleston. S. C. to become the district medical officer of the Sixth Naval District. CAPT J. H. Boyers became our executive officer by relieving CAPT L. E. Tebow. CAPT Tebow is going to U.S.N.H. Memphis as Chief of Surgery. Our new CO, CAPT Newton, has a varied career. Dr. Newton has an AB from York College and an MD from the University of Nebraska College of Medicine. He was commissioned in June, 1930 as a LTJG. He is a member. of the Notional Board of Medical Examaners and the American Board of Urology. Dr. Newton is married to the former Miss Patricia Stock of Omaha, Nebraska. They have three children. CAPT Boyers, or new XO, received his pre-med at Marshall College and his MD at Ohio State University College of Medicine graduated in 1940. He was commissioned in 1943 at LTJG. Departures Other staff members are going on to "greener pastures." T. L. Trimble, HMC, will report to the Heavy Attack Squadron #11 in Sanford, Florida. Three HM1's will leave shortly; J. G. Platt to M.A.T. School at Portsmouth, Va., S. E. Ellen for duty at USNH Charleston, S. C., and C. R. Foster for duty at USNH, Portsmouth, Va. T. W. Price, HM2, will bo to Jacksonville for separation. B. R. "Red" McCormick, HM3, will go to the Navy Dept. Dispensary in Washington, D. C., for duty, and J. P. Filibert, HM3, will report aboard the USS EVERGLADES. Arrivals We recently acquired 23 additions to the staff. From USNH, Philadelphia, we received two doctors, CDR W. C. Turville and LTJG J. B. Scith. LTJG L. A. Peppler, MSC, reported from Bethesda, Md., and R. T. Goerner, Jr., CWO, reported from USNH, Oakland. J. R. Doyle, HMC, arrived here from the USS Threadfin and HM3's R. J. Davis, Parris Island, J. L. Gee, Naval Reserve Training Center, Pittsburgh, and W. A. Cohen, NAS, Brunswick, were among the new arrivals. Reporting aboard from HCS, Bainbridge, were the following HN's: P. R. Diefenbach, J. T. Duffy, E. A. Bryan, N. T. Furlong, M. R. Fields, M. Goldstein, A. J. Lenovitz, J. A. Vena, J. P. Kelly, W. A. Stetson, R. K. Turton, J. F. Krell, and R. J. Klug. Also from HCS, Bainbridge, is K. R. Shaw, HA. FLAW Flights For July 21 -25 INBOUND DAT Thursday Thursday Friday Saturday Saturday Sunday Monday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Wednesday DAY Thursday Thursday Friday Saturday Saturday Sunday Monday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Wednesday Flight Arrive Gtmo 19 July 19 July 20 July 21 July 21 July 22 July 23 July 28 July 24 July 25 July 25 July 19 July 19 July 20 Jply 21 July 21 July 22 July 23 July 23 July 24 July 26 July 25 July 966 967 970 972 973 974 976 977 978 970 981 0230 1400 0330 0230 1200 0530 0230 1400 0330 0230 1200 OUTBOUND Flight Depart Gtmo From PaxRiv, NorVa, Jax Coeo Solo PaxRiv, Norva, Jax PaxRiv, NorVa, Jax San Juan PaxRiv, NorVa, Jax, KWest PaxRiv, NorVa, Jax Coco Solo PaxRiv, NorVa, Jax PaxRiv, NorVa, Jax San Juan To 966 0400 Coco Solo 967 1530 Jax, NorVa, PaxRiv 971 0530 Jax, NorVa, PaxRiv 972 0400 San Juan 973 1330 Jax, NorVa, PaxRiv 975 0730 KWest, Jax, NorVa, PaxRiv 976 0400 Coco Solo 977 1530 Jax, NorVa, PaxRiv 979 0530 Jax, NorVa, PaxRiv 980 0400 San Juan 981 1330 Jax, NorVa, PaxRiv Flights marked with an are not authorized to carry dependents. Trail Of The Eagle The Boy Scouts' quarterly Court of Honor was held Wednesday, July 18 at the School Auditorium on Chapel Hill. Awards were presented and the boys receiving them are to be congratulated. Opening prayer was given by the new protestant chaplain, Peter McPhee. CAPT F. S. Habecker, Commander FTG, presented the awards. Advancement ratings were presented George Lacy for Second Class, James Ross and Larry Abbot for First Class and Mike Maddox and Bob Whiting for Star. Merit badges were awarded Pat Dickson for reading and horsemanship, Carl Heimer for pioneering and swimming, Joseph Duffy for horsemanship and swimming and Larry Abbott, Tom Fortenberry, Nelson Hicks, Dick Williams and Jim Ross for swimming. Chuck Averitt and Art Babine also earned and received their swimming merit badges, but were given them prior to this Court of Honor as they have already left the Base. An additional feature of the evening was the installation of LCDR L. E. Ogilvy as new Boy Scout Committee Chairman who will take over for LCDR E. T. Fortenberry. However, the two chairman will work together until LCDR Fortenberry leaves the Base. The Committee wishes to thank all who came out to the Court of Honor as it is most beneficial and encouraging to the boys to see their parents and friends interest in this wholesome activity. CPO Wives The collection drive has now started for all members to donate any usable household articles such as irons, cakepans, mixing bowls, etc. so that they may be loaned out to the families of chiefs recently arriving on the Base. Bring all the household gear you can spare to the next business meeting, August 3 at 2000 in the Family Room of the CPO Club. Correction In a front page article in last week's INDIAN the name of the new CommandVU -10 Prop Blast by O. A. Porter Jr. Some of the Mallard "old guard" have been transferred. Chief G. A. Fordyce departed Gtmo on the twelfth for a tour of shore duty with NADU at NAS, South Weymouth. Two days before his departure Chief Fordyce completed 20 years of service in the Navy. E. A. Chipparoni, ADC, who spent the past three years here in VU-10, has been transferred to VX-2 at NAS, Chincoteague. J. D. Mullins, AD1, departed for a tour of duty with HUTRON 2 at NAS, Lakehurst. W. M. Blanchard, who recently reenlisted with J. D. Mullins, is on his way to VP-23, and W. C. McDaugh, A02, checked out to join AIRDEVRON 1. J. F. Cooley, A02, is due to report to NAOTS, NAS, Chincoteague. L. Leitenberger, III, ADC, is now serving temporary duty with FitTraCen, Norfolk. On the other side of the ledger, however, we can extend a Welcome Aboard to: G. F. McAuliffe, A02, and J. R. Campbell, A03, both of whom report from VP-8 in Quonset Point. R. R. Bacak, AD2, arrived from FITRON 102 at Cecil Field, and J. A. Boza, Jr., A02, has reported from VS-27 at Norfolk. J. Terry, BMC, recently arrived on board from HDQTRS, MSTS, Brooklyn, and R. M. Herdgins, AD3, reports to us from NAS, Patuxent River. R. H. Eggleston, AMAN, is an ex-NATTC, Memphis member, J. C. Walter, Jr., AN, last served with NPC, NAS, Antacostia, J. C. Zinc, AN, and J. Houlihan, AN, arrived from NAS, Cecil Field and NAAS, Kingsville, Texas, respectively. ing Officer of the Dental M. W. Smith, AN, has reported Clinic was misspelled. Denfrom the USS CORAL SEA, and tal's new CO is CAPT R. S. J. W. Holloway, SKi, reports in Snyder Jr. relief of L. S. Culver, SK2, from CAPT Snyder officially took USS WYANDOT. Culver reCAPT hsny coadFficiayo cently successfully passed an axover his command Friday amnto frtaserirteo morning, July 13, in a formal aviation toretreeper change of command ceremonies held at the clinic. le Congratulations to R. Riker, relieved CAPT J. B. Stoll, AE3, and A. Spadofora, AD3, both who became Executive Offiof whom recently completed USAcer of the command. F W courses for credits toward high __________________________ school graduation. So! That, That Is, Is! Tacoma, Wash. (AFPS)-O.K., you service grammarians, does this stump you as much as it did the delegates to the National Conference of Teacher Education and Professional Standards here? All you have to do is punctuate the following to make sense: That that is is that that is not is not but that that is not is not that that is nor is that that is that that is not. The answer? Some of the sharper teachers came up with: That, that is, is; that, that is not, is not; but that, that is not, is not that that is; nor is that, that is, that that is not. S Page Four M Saturday, 21 July 1956 THE INDIAN

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e Saturday, 21 July 1956 THE INDIAN. THE INDIAN. Page Five DevilDog Doin's Last week brought a number of new Marines to Gtmo for duty. Col. August Penzold arrived with his family. Col. Penzold was ordered to Gtmo as C.O. of the Marine Barracks. A colorful change of command ceremonies was held on the Barracks parade field when Lt. Col. Esterline presented the Barracks colors to Col. Penzold. Upon completion of the presentation Col. Penzold reviewed his command of spit and polish Marines. Capt. Reese flew in this week to replace CWO Roberts as Supply Officer of the Barracks. CWO Roberts will report for duty at the Marine Supply Depot in Albany, Ga. to finish out his two more years before retiring on 30. TSgt Carter, SSgt Gibbons and Sgt Wells reported aboard for duty with the Security Section. TSgt Carter came from MCS, Quantico. SSgt Gibbons and Sgt Wells left 2MarDiv at Camp Lejeune. Sgt Lewis and Sgt Johnson were assigned duty with the Hqs. Sect. Sgt Lewis left Lejeune and Sgt Johnson came down from MCSC, Albany, Ga. Pfc Smith reported aboard from 3MarDiv in Japan after a leave period stateside. Sgt Asbury left this week for duty with 2MarDiv, Camp Lejeune. Several more Marines have their orders, but their sailing date remains hanging. Mrs. Stoneking presented TSgt Stoneking with a four and one half pound bundle of feminity last Saturday morning. Mother and daughter are doing fine, but the new pop isn't holding up too well. We had five more Marines take the big step. Sgt Lambert, Cpl Chambers, Cpl Lowe, Cpl Polly and Pfc Ozuk have all shipped for six. Their place of duty has not been determined. The SgtMaj has been doing a fine job of selling a good thing to the Marines. Lt Dowd is fielding another range detail this week. Next week will be record firing with some pretty high scores anticipated. The NEGDF personnel have one more week of infantry training to undergo under Marine instructors before they return to their outfits. Their three weeks of training has run on a tight schedule with but few wasted minutes. This Naval Emergency Ground Defense Force, with proper instruction and training, can be a powerful emergency holding force if it is ever called out. The past field problems have been a success as will be the next field problem. Tomb Near Phillips Park Lighthouse Has Jamaican Buried In Standing Position Facing His Homeland by Ely U. Orias There are only two types of persons whose wishes are complied with without question. One is the doomed man facing death for a capital offense and the other is a dying man. John Simons, a Jamaican and former Base civilian employee died on February 20, 1938. A few minutes before his death, Simons made a dying wish that he be buried in a standing position facing Jamaica and in a place where his vision could stand unimpeded. At the present time Simons' body still stands in infinite repose beyond the Phillips Park Lighthouse where a chained tomb supports him. If the vision of a dead man could penetrate a catacomb, Simons' sight over his native land must be clearly unimpeded because his tomb is situated on a slope between the lighthouse and Cable Beach where no obstructions to the view toward Jamaica exist. Beside Simons' tomb lies the body of the late John Oxley, another Jamaican and former Base civilian worker. He died without such a wish, so he was buried the usual way. Oxley was buried in 1941. Born in 1885 in St. Mary, Jamaica, Simons put 28 years of "continuous and outstanding" service on the Base. At the age of 15, he left Jamaica to exploit the greener pastures of Panama. While in Panama he first worked as a waterfront cleaner and rose to the position of stevedore. In the early part of 1910, however, Simons got the word about the lucrative opportunity on the Base for civilian hands. Convinced by the rumor, he left Panama and set his course for Guantanamo 1ay. Without waste of time he applied for a job and was hired. His first job found him as' head storekeeper. After seven years of storekeepership he was promoted to the job of a stockman. Simmons held this position until I INDIAN Photo 1930 when he was advanced as head of the Stevedoring Gang and Stockmen in the Base's Supply Division. At this time Simons was considered by Base labor circles as "the working man with a supervisor's portfolio under his arms." His popularity among waterfront insiders led to his official recognition as "the champion of the Base's labor force." With this attribute Simons was given the privilege to reside on the Base with his family. After two years of residence on the Base, he sent his family back to Jamaica. When the family left, Simons then took up residence at the civilian barracks which were then located in the vicinity of the present transportation office. Stomach trouble claimed Simons' life. He was survived by his wife, three daughters and a son who were in Jamaica at the time of his death. Simons was a 32 Degree Mason. He was an active member of the Mason Lodge in Guantanamo City. Through the representations. made by the Lodge with CAPT Mark L. Hersey, jr., then .Commandant, Naval Operating Base, Simons' body was accorded the privilege to stand in death forever within the reservations 'as a token of appreciation for his undaunting services and as a gesture of compliance with his dying wish." Fleet Reserve News You are again reminded of the picnic Saturday, 28 July for all Fleet Reserve members and their families. Don't forget to get your tickets by the 23rd so the committies will know how many are going. If you are interested in joining the Fleet Reserve Association the m m be r s h i p requirements are printed below for your information. "1. Enlisted men now serving in the regular Navy or Marine Corps with six or more yeats active service in the Armed Forces. 2. Enlisted men who have been transferred to the Fleet Reserve or Fleet Reserve or Fleet Marine Corps Reserve. 2. Enlisted men who have been transferred to the retired list of the regular Navy or Marine Corps for any cause. 4. Enlisted men now serving in the regular Navy or Marine Corps as temporary officers. 5. Temporary officers who have been transferred to the Fleet Reserve or the Fleet Marine Corps Reserve. 6. Temporary officers of the regular Navy or Marine Corps who have been retired as officers by a Naval Retiring Board. 7. Temporary officers of the regular Navy or Marine Corps who have been transferred to the retired lists as officers. 8. MEMBERS who have been discharged from the regular Navy or Marine Corps by medical survey may RETAIN membership in FRA. 9. MEMBERS who have been appointed to permanent officer status in the regular Navy or Marine Corps may RETAIN membership. 10. Members whose dues are in arrears for a period of more than three months are suspended from membership. Reinstatement may be effected if the man is eligible for membership as stated above. Reinstated members are not subject to the payment of dues in arrears unless desiring to do so. The private was whistling happily as he cleaned out the carrier pigeon cages. "Well," said a passing officer, "that's the first time we've ever had anyone happy on that job." "Yes, sir," said the private, "you see, before I was transferred here, I was in the cavalry." i Page Five

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Page Six GTMO SPORTING CHIPS by C. C. Drumright Straight Pitches. ...The men's handicap tournament is to start at sunrise Monday, July 23. You must register by 1700 on the 22nd. It will be a match play contest with all pairings to be determined by the blind draw method. The entire tournament will be played on the old course. Our Liberal Arts Department. My ball lies in such a position on the green that my opponent's ball is apt to glance off my ball and roll into the hole if he is wide on his putt--May I mark my ball? NOI may never lift and mark my ball of my own volition. However, my opponent has the right to require me to lift it. My opponent's ball knocks my ball into the cup. What then? In match play I would be credited with having holed out. In stroke play I would be required to replace the ball in its original position. Silence around the Tee, the green, the fairway and the rough, save your shouts for the baseball games. When your group is slow and there is a green open in front, allow the on-coming players to hit through, and once you permit them to hit, give them ample time to get clear before you resume play. Repair your divots and scuff marks on the greens. Rimming The Cup Around The 19th. CDR Stove has his youngster giving him putting lessons, furthermore after one lesson the CDR issued a challenge to CAPT Caruthers. The LEYTE has two "I'll see you in the fall" men frequenting the course, namely the tall man (LCDR Willey) and the short man (LT Norm Head), let this serve as a welcome to them and all the others from the LEYTE as well as a warning to the local players. A not too ancient player of the Gtmo links last week played some fine golf on the west coast to reach the finals in the U.S. Public Links tournament, Chief Bill Scarborough, he was defeated at the 34th hole in the finals. Only 47 Entries In Fishing Tourney The 1957 Guantanamo Bay Fishing Tournament is well underway and as of Wednesday, July 18, 47 entries had been entered in all the divisions. Largest fish caught in the first division was a red snapper landed by J. R. Williams, CSC, of the NAS Galley. The snapper weighed 47 pounds and eight ounces and was 41 inches long. It was caught in the Gtmo River. Williams used a hand line with a croaker as bait. In the second division the largest fish entered as of July 18, was a 2 pound 11 ounce Spanish mackerel, caught by H. E. Warnock, civilian, employed by the Supply depot. The fish was caught off Marine Site with a rod and reel using a number five spoon. So far there are no entries in the third division, spearfishing. The largest overall fish entered into the annual tourney is a 420 pound gray nurse shark, caught by J. W. Parks of VU-6, DET #1. The shark was 9 foot 4 inches long, and was caught off Fisherman's Point. A handline was used. Strikes & Spares by Dolly Aumann High-Games N. Williams 171 J. V. Hall 170 F J. Darby 166 K. Hazelton 161 M P. Duffy 157 G. E. Coxon 16 B. Sehosnderwoerd 155 G. G. Rowan 166 M R. Garaudy 152M M. Marsh 152 M Team Stand Alley-Katz Bofleretts Push-Overs Gutter-Gals Lillies of the Alleys Down-Unders The Spoilers The Crickets Dental Explorer by Wally Jenkins High-Averages Mrs. Snyder, daughter Jane and Darby 149 son Robert arrived on the JohnGrounds 147 son July 9. CAPT Snyder is our Zeigler 145 new Commander Officer. Rowan 145 CDR Albert R. Oesterle, Mrs. Aumann 143 Oesterle and daughters Lane, Jill Kraft 142 and Lynn arrived July 10. "BienMarsh 141 venida a Cuba" Swords 141 John Law, DT2, departed July 13 aboard the JOHNSON. Law is wings leaving the service and will find W.a warm reception in North Dakota. W-31 L-15 At the Change of Command CerW.26 L-18 monies on July 13, our acting W-22 L-22 Commanding Officer, Captain John W-22 L-22 B. Stoll was relieved by Captain W-16% L-27% Snyder. Captain Stoll will assume w-12 L-32 his former duties as Executive W-ne% Commnde Officer. 0 Skeet Shoot Slated For Next Weekend The Guantanamo Bay Rifle and Pistol Club will sponsor its second Skeet Shoot on Saturday, July 28 commencing at 0800 at the Marine Skeet Range. The Skeet Range is located in the Marine Movie Lyceum area. National Skeet Shooting Association rules will apply. Cash prizes determined by the number of shooters participating will be awarded. There will be a prize for the high man in each squad of five shooters and a grand prize, the winner of which will be determined by a shoot of the squad winners. Squad winners will be determined in case of ties, by the shooter breaking the greatest number of doubles. The registration fee will be $1.00 per round and shooters will be allowed to enter as many rounds as they desire. Ammunition and shotguns will be available at the range for those unable to furnish their own. There is no charge for use of the weapons or for birds. Refreshments will be sold at the range. There will also be a special round or rounds for those who would like to shoot and not compete for the cash prizes. Registration will be .50 per round for the practice rounds to be fired on completion of the prize shooting. All Base personnel are welcome to come out and enter the competition and win a prize, fleet personnel are particularly welcomed. Spectators will find this type of shooting interesting to watch. Tryon Top Scorer In Pistol Match The Guanatnamo Bay Rifle and Pistol club held its second monthly pistol match at the Naval Air Station pistol range Saturday, July 14. In the .22 and .45 cal aggregate matches, C. E. Tryon, BMC, NAS, was high with a 557. Winners during the competitions in the different shooting classifications indicated opposite their names were: J. B. Jocks, AO1, NAS, 1st expert with 547; L. C. James, A02, NAS, 1st sharpshooter with 504; H. Hines, BM2, NavSta with 456 and R. J. Aldridge, BMC, FTG, 1st Tyro with 493. In the .22 cal matches, C. E. Tryon was again high with 295. In these matches, LT J. M. Ferrante, FTG, emerged as 1st expert with 285; L. C. James as 1st sharpshooter with 271; LTJG S. P. Gallup of the USS 'LEYTE as 1st marksman with 244 and R. J. Aldridge as 1st Tyro with 272. The next club pistol matches are scheduled for August 1.1. This is a good chance for competitive practice preparatory to the Base Annual Military Pistol Matches under schedule this fall. Ladies Golf Shots The weekly event of the Ladies Golf association was a low netlow put tournament. The following winners were awarded golf balls: First FlightLow Net-Juanita Babcock Second-Mary Goolsby Low Putts-Lois Cooper Third FlightLow Net-Edna Bush Second-Mrs. Buckholz Low Putts-Mrs. Fortenberry Congratulations this week go to Audrey Page for breaking 100, to Mary Goolsby for shooting two 79s and to Lois Cooper for shooting two 91s. SCUTTLEBUTT ~k1 She's Kind Of A Tall Thin Marilyn Monroe, Fred?' Sailor's Seabag Loses Bedding Washington (A F P S) Blankets and pillows, long a weighty problem in the bottom of a sailor's seabag, now will be furnished at all ships and shore stations under a new Navy policy. Since July 1952, such bedding accessories have been issued EM as government property and had to be returned on discharge. Now, when a sailor is transferred, he will turn in his blankets and pillows and receive new ones on reporting to his next duty station. An irate lawyer trying to establish a point in cross-examination demanded of the defendant: "Madam, while you were taking your dog for a walk, did you stop anywhere?" "Sir," the witness said quietly, "have you ever taken a dog for a walk?" 9 m Saturday, 21 July 1956 THE INDIAN m

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Saturday, 21 July 1956 THE INDIAN W Page Seven VU-10 Clinches Runner-Up Spot In League, Playoffs Begin Mon. by Carlos Caballo Suspense is that vital element that has made fortunes for many a successful author or playwright. It is also the ingredient that was injected into the battle for second place in the League by VU-10's Mallards and the NAS Flyers. Right up until the last game Thursday night the issue was in doubt although in VU-10's favor. They were in shaky possession of the runner-up position. A win would cinch it while a loss would have meant a possible tie with the Flyers. As everyone now knows, when the turf and cries of "Kill the umpire" had died away into the hills, winner was the Marines and NAS was relegated to third place in standings. Naval Base 9, VU TEN 4 The Naval Base Composite Team rose from the depths and prevented the Mallards from making a sure thing of the suddenly coveted seccond place. Winning pitcher was Scholl, the loser being Montgomery. Big inning was the third when every man on the Naval Base team had a chance. Capitalizing on three hits and Mallard errors, five runs were chalked up. Two more were added in the fourth to make it 7-0 and seemingly a push-over for Naval Base. However in the sixth, the Mallards came to life and punched across four runs but this was the extent of their rally. Naval Base 005 201 01x-9 5 2 VU-10 000 004 000-4 5 7 Marines 7, Naval Base 4 The League-leading Leathernecks showed no let-up or relaxing as they clouted the ball for eight official hits and seven runs. This game offered one rather interesting item on the statistical side in that Naval Base only came up with 2 errors while the Marines were guilty of one. Credit for the win goes to Furtney while the loser was McCafferty. Both teams lost no time in getting down to business, the first inning ended in 2-2 tie. The Marines forged ahead by adding a run in the second to lead 3-2. Not to be outdone, Naval Base fought back with a run in the fourth to tie it up again. The Marines poured it on then with a run in the fifth and three more in the sixth. Another interesting statistic revealed itself at the end of the game when the official scorebook showed that nothing more than one-baggers had been hit during the entire evening. Marines 210 013 00x-7 8 1 Naval Base 200 100 000-4 6 2 Marines 4, NAS 3 This Thursday night game was no gift on a platter for the Marines. In more than one instance they were in serious trouble but managed to contain the Flyers and give fans another very good game. Youngs went all the way to chalk up another win for himself. Waldrop is saddled with the loss. Neither team crossed the plate until the third inning when NAS jumped into the lead with one run by Bogan, only to see it fade away when the Leathernecks came to bat. They never touched the ball for a hit but still came up with three runs to take over 3-1. This was their margin although not a secure one. In the fifth, the package inning, the Flyers tied it up with two more runs but once again the Marines added one of their own and were retired with a 4-3 lead. It looked like a Flyer win in the seventh when three successive singles loaded the bases. Youngs proved equal to the occasion when the next three men went down 1-2-3. Their final chance came in the bottom of the ninth. Rhodes connected for his fourth hit of the game to land on first base. Sandblom blasted one to shortstop who fired to second where it was dropped, putting men on first and second. McCalmont bunted but Rhodes was cut off at third, runners now on first and second. A passed ball by Marine Duncan placed them on second and third and the Flyer outlook was good with only one away. However, Youngs fanned out both Ransom and Schaffer to down NAS and boot them out of a chance at second place in standings. Marines 003 010 00x--4 6 2 NAS 001 030 000-3 9 3 The Standings Marines VU10 NAS Naval Base Won Lost 17 3 10 10 9 12 5 16 The Schedule Sunday VU-10 vs Marines Monday Playoffs Tuesday Playoffs Thursday Playoffs Friday Playoffs What's Dl' Stateside Commuters tired of choo-chooing, steering, foot-pounding and busing to work may someday have another choice-floating. Monorail, a new transit idea, promises speed and comfort outmoding trains, cars, buses and plain old walking by hanging a passenger coach on a 30-foot-high steel tube supported by J-shaped towers. Scooting along its tubular "sky hook" the Monorail car ignores rough roads, traffic jams and choleric horn-blowers. Speed can be almost anything the passengers want, with 200 miles per hour a possibility on long runs. A test installation at Houston, Tex. has wafted 30,000 curious citizens in cool (air-conditioned) quiet along a 970-foot line. Promoters of the project, with typical Texas enthusiasm, are already building a factory to make coaches, rails and towers for their airborne traffic-dodger. Americans who are behind in their taxes may have trouble sleeping, but they have nothing on taxdelinquent Danes. The Danish Revenue Dept. and the police have conspired to make sleep hard to come by for Danes who have neglected to keep up with their taxes. It all goes under the heading of harassment. The heavy fist of a policeman pounding on a burgher's door at 4 a.m. means no more sleep that night. The delinquent Dane must get dressed, join a busload of other dodgers and head for the police station. There they remain until it is time to go to work. There's an old adage that you're as young as you feel, and Americans are feeling younger all the time. A statistical study has turned up evidence that middle -aged Americans can look forward to five to 20 more productive years than their grandparents. Dr. Hardin Jones of the University of California, author of these encouraging figures, believes that illnesses sap our strength. The United States provides an ideal climate for continued vitality, he claims, because good health conditions hold diseases to a minimum from childhood on. The Fish Tales by Pat Aldridge A worlds' record breaker Blue Marlin was caught recently off the coast of Oahu, second largest of the Hawaiian Island chain. This 796 pound monster was boated in 32 minutes. The phenomenon lies in the strange fact that this Blue Marlin record smasher was the first of the species ever to be seen, much less landed, in the vast Pacific Ocean. The fish still holding the world's record for size was caught off the coast of Florida in 1912 and succumbed after a five day battle. One can imagine the tremendous weight when told that the fifteen ton winch snapped trying to hoist the creature ashore. The liver alone weighed more than a ton. Speaking of Shark, the Gray Nurse variety is being found in absolute hordes here in Guantanamo Bay and near the mouth of the harbor. Jim Parkin landed a 420 pounder at Fishermans' Point, where several, including a 380 pounder, have recently been landed. Nightly, those fishing with extremely heavy deep sea gear at the harbors' entrance, have been losing entire rigs to the sea beasts. Snapper, too, the large type erroneously called "Red", have been biting regularly on both live bait and fish hunks at the mouth of the Gtmo river, J. R. Williams, Chief Cook, Leeward, who recently landed the 47%2 pounder, took a 51 pounder at seven p.m. on July 16. Following evening, same time, same locale, T. W. Waite, BM3, landed a 59 pounder. The size of these fish entered in the present tournament should not discourage anyone for it should be remembered that Shark fall into an entirely separate catagory. The Grand Prize will go to any species other than Shark weighing in at the most poundage. At this writing, the fifty nine pound Snapper leads. Final word for private boat owners. Next time you dress up the deck boards, add a little pumice to the paint. This doesn't hurt the paint at all and is plenty of help in preventing slipping and sliding when the deck is fish sloppy or water wet. See ya fishin'. Football season is the time of the year you can walk down the street with a blonde on one arm and a blanket on the other and no cop gives you a dirty look. 11

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e e Saturday, 21 July 1956 St THE INDIAN S Navy-BPPO-1OND-Guantanamo Cinema -Scoop by D. D. H. "The King and I," is currently receiving rave notices from all quarters. Hollywood's lavish version sustains the warmth of the original play's story and adds spectacular sets in some real terrific color. Yul Brynner and Deborah Kerr are starred, he in his original Broadway role and Miss Kerr playing Anna. Very seldom does a Hollywood adaptation of a Broadway play receive such notices, especially in the musical category. It is put out in the new Cinemascope "55" process. Officers and their families aboard the Base are enjoying Cinemascope now at the "0" Club ...glad to hear it ...Casting results for "Laura" were gratifying ...four new ones to the circuit this week, with "Come Next Spring" walking away with the best honors! Let's Make Up (released thru U.A.), ...Errol Flynn, Anna Neagle and David Farrar ...a comedy ...limited information on this one forces a no comment! Come Next Spring (Rep., in color), is a thoroughly entertaining and interesting story of farm people. Ann Sheridan and Steve Cochran star as a couple who are attempting to patch up a broken marriage. Sonny Tufts and Walter Brennan are in supporting roles, with Brennan outstanding. If Republic could come up with more such entertaining movies, the company would be one to reckon with. Put this one down as one not to miss, the whole family will enjoy it. Adventures of Sadie (Fox), .. Joan Collins, Kenneth More and George Cole ...a somewhat enjoyable English comedy ...has played the Base circuit before. Outside the Law (U.I.), was made initially to bring newcomers Ray Danton and Leigh Snowden before the public eye, at least in this writer's opinion. Little heed is given to story material which this picture lacks considerably. It is a gang-busting yarn with the unusual twist of having Danton playing an ex-con while his father (Onslow Stevens) is a Treasury agent. Might be entertaining. Blackboard Jungle (MGM), .. Glenn Ford, Anne Francis, Louis Calhern and Margaret Hayes .. deals with the juvenile delinquency problem in big city schools .. excellent picture ...played the the Base circuit before. Night Holds Terror (COL) .. Jack Kelly, Hildy Parks and Vince Edwards ...a kidnap story based partially on fact .below average. Magnificent Matador (Nat'l, in color) ...Maureen O'Hara and Anthony Quinn. ...A bullfighting epic ...good, but with some definite bad points ...new to the circuit. WGBY Television Program Saturday, July 21 7:3 0:0 9:0 9:3 5:3 5:4 1:00 Winky Dink & You 1:30 Garry Moore 2:00 Victory at Sea 2:30 Studio Presentation 8 :00 House Party 3:30 Two For The Money 4:00 Beat the Clock 4:30 Masquerade Party 5:00 Western Movie 6:00 Milton Berle 7:00 George Gobel 7:30 Your Hit Parade 0:00 Colgate Comedy Hour 9:00 Stage Show 9:30 Star Tonight Sunday, July 22 1:00 Winky Dink & You 1:30 Contest Carnival2:00 Lamp Unto My Feet 2:30 The Christophers 3:00 Big Picture 3:30 Arthur Godfrey 4:00 Ted Mack's Amateurs 5:00 Roy Rogers 5:30 That's My Boy 6:00 Royal Hawaiians 6:30 What's My Line 7:00 Mama 0 Jack Benny Wednesday, July 25 0 Ed Sullivan 5:30 News Parade 0 Damon Runyon 5:45 Patti Page 0 Appointment with 6:00 Industry on Parade Adventure 6:15 Travelog :30 I've Got a Secret Monday, July 23 7:00 This is Your Life 0 News Parade 7:30 Danger 5 P-rry Como 8:00 Godfrey and Friends 01A Screen Magazne. 0:00 Eraft TV Theatre r 30 My Favorite Husband Thursday, July 26 7:00 Talent Scouts. 5:30 News -Parade 7:30 Highway Patrol 5:45 Perry Como 8:00 Ethel & Albert 6:00 Thruth or Consequence O:30 Guy Lombardo 6:30 Professional Father' 9:00 Studio One 7:00 Bob Cummings 7:30 You Bet Your Life Tuesday, July 24 8:00 Dragnet 5:30 News Parade 8:30 Stop the Music 5:45 Perry Como 9:00 Olimax 0:00 Meet Millie Friday, July 27 6:30 Julius LaRosa 5:30 News Parade 5:45 Dollar A Second 545 Perry Como 7:00 Phil Silvers 6:00 Officers Conference 7:30 Screen Director's 6:30 Dollar a Second Playhouse 7:00 Ozzie & Harriet 8:00 Red Skelton 7:30 Playhouse of Stars 8:30 Lineup 8:00 Johnny Carson -, 9:00 Robert Montgomery 8:38 Crusader Presents 9:00 Boxing Radio Round-Up Mv L 'I Press time found the influx of new tunes rather slow this week. More are expected and prevues can probably be heard either over Morning Caravan or your late evening Sandman Show, Monday through Saturday. Among those received were two tunes by Billy May, "The Beat" and "Nightmare." PROGRAM CHANGES: No actual changes this week but approximately three shows are playing for the last time. You'll be hearing the last of "Philadelphia Orchestra," "Mostly Dixie," and "Treasury of Music." More on these next week. "At Ease" is also being dropped by the Armed Forces Radio & TV Service with their Number 2802 cutting but will be carried by WGBY with those issues saved so long as quality and variety can be preserved. PROGRAMS THIS WEEK: Sunday is always a good day for those who prefer musical variety. Listed for tomorrow is "Mitch Miller" at 12:15 p.m. He introduces guests movie star Yvonne de Carlo ... conductor Paul Weston ...jazz pianist Marian McPartland. and playright Joshua Logan. The Billy Williams Quartet will sing on "Ed Sullivan's Show" at the 9:00 p.m. spot. Ed also presents an 'outstanding scene from the Broadway success, "The Matchmaker." Finally for tomorrow is "Sunday With Garroway" heard at 8:00 p.m. On this 55 minute program will be George M. Cohan, the original "Yankee Doodle Dandy," heard via a recorded speech which reviews his whole career in show business. British orchestra leader Ted Heath is interviewed across the ocean. 4a Saturday, July 21 NavSta-Let's Make Up-103 min. NAS-Jubal-113 min. Mar. Site-Broken Star-89 min. Villa.-Unchained-90 min. Lwd. Pt.-Three Hours to Kill-105 min. Sunday, July 22 NavSta-Come Next Spring-92 min. NAS-Let's Make Up Mar. Site-Target Earth-96 min. Villa.-Broken Star Lwd. Pt.-Unchained Monday, July 23. NavSta-Adventures of Sadie-92 min. NAS-Conie Next Spring Mar. Site-Jubal Villa.-Target Earth Lwd. Pt.-Broken Star Tuesday, July 24 NavSta-Outside the Law-96 min. '\f-Adventures of Sadie Mar. Site-Let's Make Up Villa;-Jubal Lwd. Pt.-Target Earth Wednesday, July 25 NavSta-Blackboard Jungle--101 min. N S-Outside the Law Mar. Site-Come Next Spring Villa.-Let's Make Up Ld. Pt.-Jubal Thursday, July 26 NavSta-Night Holds Terror-105 min. NAS-Blackboard Jungle 02ar. Site-Adventures of Sadie Villa.-Come Next Spring Lwd. Pt.-Let's Make Up Friday, July 27. NavSta-Magnificent Matador-94 min. NAS-Night Holds Terror. Mar. Site-Outside the Law Villa.-Adventures of Sadie Lwd. Pt.-Come Next Spring Book -Nook Trygve Lie, eminent Norwegian statesman, has written the story of his stewardship with the United Nations in. IN THE CAUSE OF PEACE. Lie, who served as secretary-general of the UN for seven years, tells the stories behind the stories of such crises as the Korean War, the Berlin Blockade, the Arab-Israeli dispute, etc. SING, MORNING STAR is an excellent historical novel by an experienced craftsman, Jane Oliver. The setting is feudal Scotland and the leading characters are King Malcolm (son of Duncan of "Macbeth" fame) and his queen, Margaret, who eventually became a saint. This is a fine historical romance in the best traditions of Scott. For those who like their history straight, there is A HISTORY OF LATIN AMERICA, by Hubert Herring. This is a long book of over 7000 pages, but it covers a great deal of space and time, namely, all the territory from the Rio Grande to the Antarctic over a period of more than 400 years. You won't want to read all of it, but certain parts like the succinct history of Cuba should -prove extremely interesting. New specialty books this week include TAPE RECORDERS by Charles G. Wescott, HIGH FIDELITY HOME MUSIC SYSTEMS edited by the .Citadel Press, FELL'S U. S. COIN BOOK by Jacques DelMonte, and TENNIS TECHNIQUES by Wynn Mace. In THOREAU OF WALDEN Henry t B. Hough has written a most readable exposition of the life and philosophy of one of America's most unusual public figures, Henry D. Thoreau. The famous author and naturalist, whose personal opinions were as erratic as his writing was brilliant, receives the full treatment in this volume of penetrating literary criticism. Two anthologies just off the presses are BEST SPORTS STORIES OF 1956, compiled by Irving T. Marsh, and THE BEST PLAYS OF 1954-1955, collected by Louis Kronenbrger. Just the books for people who like good reading in small. rlnses. FROM: 3 cent stamp TO: Send The INDIAN Home 4