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Indian
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3 Base Commands Have New Commanding Officers


INDIAN Photo
Three Base commands received new commanding officers on the JOHNSON Monday morning. Working from left to right: LT COL W. C. Esterline watches as COL A. F. Penzold Jr., new Marine CO, picks his luggage from the mass of baggage lined along the pier. In the center picture CAPT R. S. Schneider Jr., new Dental Clinic CO, poses with CAPT J. B. lStoll shortly after walking off the JOHNSON. The picture on the far right has CAPT L. A. Newton, new Hospital CO, giking hands with CAPT T. I. Moe who was on hand to greet the new Hospital head.


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COVERS GTMO LIKE THE SUNSHINE U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Volume VII, No. 28 Saturday, 14 July 1956


Arrive Aboard Johnson Monday:

For Hospital, Marines And Dental

Three new commanding officers arrived. aboard the Base Monday morning, July 9, on the MSTS JOHNSON.
CAPT Lyle A. Newton, MC, CAPT Robert S. Schneider Jr., DC, and COL August F. Penzold Jr., arrived to assume command of the Hospital, Dental Clinic and Marine Barracks respectively.


Men Of Coast Guard


Public Works To Become Separate To Train With FTG


Command, CDR Rowan Leaving


The Naval Base will have another command added to its list on August 1 when the Public Works department, now under Naval Station, will become an entirely separate command. The Secretary of the Navy established the new center in a notice issued in June.
To be known as the Public Works Center, the new command will be under the military command of the Commander Naval Base, unless otherwise directed by the Chief of Naval Operations. It will be under the management control of the Bureau of Yards and Docks. Commanding Officer for the Center will be CAPT H. H. Wallin who will report aboard the Base from the Bureau of Yards and Docks. CAPT Wallin is expected to arrive this month and will officially take over his command August 1.
CDR E. L. Rowan, present Public Works department head, leaves


the Base in August for duty at the Naval Station, San Diego, Calif. According to CDR Rowan the department will be changed to a command in order to provide for more efficient operation of construction and maintenance on the Naval Base.


NAS Insignia Contest

To End Tomorrow

The contest for the selection of an insignia for the Naval Air Station ends Sunday, July 15.
A $75 first prize will be awarded the member of the NAS command who itUbmits the winning drawing. Second and third prize winners will receive $45 and $25 respectively.
All entries of the insignia contest may be submitted in full color or black and white with the colors 'necified.


The advance contingent of five Coast Guard enlisted men reported aboard the Fleet Training Group last week. Three more enlisted personnel and two officers are expected to report in shortly. They will form the FTG permanent Coast Guard Training Unit and will assist Fleet Training Group in the training of Coast Guard vessels. Members of the advance party are Robert H. Collins, BMC; Isaac W. Lance, ENC; James N. Neville, DCC; Vergil M. Fleming, RDC, and Philip M. Snow, EM1.
The gunboat MENDOTA (WPG) will be the first Coast Guard vessel to undergo training under the operational control of the Fleet Training Group. It is expected that approximately ten such ships will undergo training in Gtmo each year.
"When no Coast Guard ship is under training," says CDR J. D. Patterson, FTG Gunnery Officer, "the FTG Coast Guard Unit will assist the Fleet Training Group in 4he training of Navy ships."


CAPT Newton relieved CAPT Moe, Wednesday July 11, as commanding officer of the U.S. Naval Hospital. Prior to assuming his new duties, CAPT Newton was Executive officer of the U.S.N.H., Jacksonville, Florida.
CAPT Moe Leaves Today
CAPT Moe leaves Gtmo today for the states. He will report to the Sixth Naval District Headquarters, Charleston, S.C., where he-will assume duties as the district's medical officer. CAPT Newton is a graduate of the school of medicine at the University of Nebraska. He is a member of the National Board of Medical Examiners and the American Board of Urology. Arriving on the JOHNSON with the captain were his wife and family. Also at the hospital the past week, CAPT L. E. Tebow, MC, was relieved by CAPT J. H. Boyers, MC, as Executive officer. CAPT Tebow will report to US.N.H., Memphis, Tennessee. CAPT Boyers before assuming his new duties was Chiefd of Medicine for -he Base hospital .
-Dental',Changes -omnmand
. Ysterday.-' , ."
CAPT Schneider Trtived- acting (Cofitinued, on Page Three)







Saturday, 14 July 1956


THE INDIA1N


THE INDIAN
The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a possible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.
RADM WILLIAM G. COOPER, Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo
Bay, Cuba.
CAPT G.M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo
Bay. Cuba.
Editorial Staff
LTJG D. G. LaCasse ------------------------------- Officer-Advisor
G. L. Henderson, JOC --------------------------------------- Editor
J. C. Curren, JOSN ------------------------------ Managing Editor
E. U. Orias, JOS---------------------------------- Feature Editor
D..D. Hinton, JOSN -------------------------------- Staff Reporter
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P.35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds.
Materials marked AFPS may be used by news media provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All materials originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part or without credit
All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.


Spend , 31Minutes And Make $25

It seems too bad that only two people have entered the contest for naming the Naval Base School. With $50 in prizes awaiting the winners
-there will be three-everyone on the Base should at least submit one entry.
But people always say, "Why, I could never think of a name and even if I did, I wouldn't be able to write down the reasons for my choice." Anybody can think of a name; there are plenty of outstanding, deceased Naval personalities to pick from.
For instance, a good name to submit would be "The Marshall-Peddicord High School", named after CDR Marshall and LT Peddicord who lost their lives five years ago in the waterfront fire here in Guantanamo Bay.
It took only three minutes to think of that name, so you see it is no brain-wrecking chore. The big problem is sitting down and taking the time to spend three minutes. Yet if you win first prize of $25 after your three minutes of thought, you will have made a little over 13 cents a second.
The contest closes July 31 and $25 is $25.


CDR McPhee, Protestant Chaplain,


Reports Aboard NavBase For Duty


. The first part of the democratic election process, nomination of candidates, is now underway in the United States.
Within the two major parties-and in smaller ones as well-men are competing for the right to represent their party and receive its backing in the next election.
Now is an excellent time for servicemen to get a picture of the people who will be running for office in November. Newspapers, magazines, radio and television are reporting their actions and statements on public issues. Read, watch, and remember.
Above all, keep! in mind that the best-informed serviceman in the world won't be able to cast his vote this fall if he's not eligible. So find


out what the candidates stand for, voting requirements, and you'll be most precious rights. (AFPS)


Sunday, 15 July 1956
CATHOLIC MASSES
Sunday, 1000-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Bame Chapel Sunday. 1280-Naval Base Chapel
Mon. thru Frl-B645-Naval ae Chapel
Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel
Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800, 1900
-2000, and daily before Mass PROTESTANT SERVICES
0930-Sunday School 0980-Sunday School
0980-Adult Bible Clan
1100.-Divine Worship (Naval
Base Chapel)
1980-Fellowship Hour
Wednesday: 1980-Mid-Week Bible Study
Thursday: 1900--Choir Rehearsal JEWISK SERVICES .FrIday-1900-Naval Bame Chapel CEUXR iF ORRIST '100*-.Bble Study 104s-Woship Service
Community Auditorium LATER DAY SAINTS
Sunday-I100-Naval Station Library CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Sundaw-I000-NavSta Library


CDR Peter R. McPhee arrived Monday to assume duties as the Naval Base protestant chaplain. Chaplain McPhee is now senior chaplain on the Base and is relieving LCDR Karl G. Peterson who will leave for the New London, Conn. submarine base this month.
Chaplain McPhee's duty station before coming to Gtmo was the Naval Air Station in Corpus Christi, Texas where he was stationed for three years. At Corpus Christi CDR McPhee was senior chaplain and also served on the staff of Commander Naval Air Advanced Training.
Entered Navy in 1941
He entered the Navy in 1941 after having a parish in Kittittas, Washington. Chaplain McPhee is


make sure you meet your state's prepared to exercise one of your


Calendar of Events
Saturday, July 14
Rifle and Pistol Club-Monthly Pistol
Match-NavSta Pistol Range-1:00 p.m. Jr. Rifle and Pistol Club-Classroom Instruction-Bldg. 27-1:00 p.m.
Monday, July 16
Beginning today vehicle inspection for all civilians, Marine Exchange, Special Services, CPO Club and all other activities having Base-registered vehicles. This inspection lasts through July 18. Sojourner's Club-Officer's Club-7:30 p.m. O.E.S. Social Club-Girl Scout Hut7:30 p.m.
Payday-all military personnel.
Tuesday, July 17
American Legion-Fit. Reserve Rm.
(Marina Pt.)-7:30 p.m.
American Legion Auxiliary-Girl Scout
Hut-7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, July 18
Toastmaster's Club--Officers' Club6:30 p.m.
Thursday, July 19
Navy Wives Club--Bingo-i-:30 p.m. Fellowcraft Club 1078--Community Auditorium-7:30 p.m.
Friday, July 20
CPO Wives-Bingo--Family Rm. (CPO
Club)-8:00 p.m.


INDIAN Photo
a Baptist minister and received his higher education at William Jewell in Liberty, Missouri, at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Fort Worth, Texas and at Berkeley Baptist Divinity School in


Calif.
During the second World War CDR McPhee served in the USS ZEILIN, a Marine transport, which made all the initial landings in 1942 and 1943 in the north and south Pacific. Ten years ago he spent a short stay in Gtmo while in the USS VALLEY FORGE.
The new chaplain whose home is in Salt Lake City. Utah, came to Guantanamo on the JOHNSON with his wife and three boys, ages 8, 10 and 12.
Reception Tuesday
There will be a reception for Chaplain McPhee Tuesday, July 17, at 1900 at the Naval Base School patio. All who wish to greet the new protestant chaplain are invited.
A third chaplain for Guantanamo is expected to arrive this Fall with duties at the Naval Air Station. He is CDR Allen Budd. And sometime in September CDR A. P. Finan will report to the Base from RecSta, Boston, Mass. as relief for CDR. J. J. Sullivan, Catholic chaplain.



NO SUNDAY SCHOOL

Due to painting and renovation of school rooms on Chapel Hill and Victory Hill, there will be no Protestant Sunday School tomorrow or the next Sunday. Classes will resume on Sunday July 29.



What's ODin' Stateside
Helen Dow Peck of Bethel, Conn., believed in Ouija boards, so much so that she left $178,000 to one John Gale Forbes because his name appeared on her Ouija board in 19i9.
When Mrs. Peck died recently, investigators were unable to turn up John Gale Forbes.


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Safittday, U4 Muy 1956


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Pate ~['1iree


T~HE IDIAN


Summer Recreation Cuban Catholic Teachers Tour Base,


Program Closed

The summer recreation of the Naval Base School ended yesterday, July 13. During the preceding six weeks, approximately 500 Base children took advantage of the summer program which was patterned from similar programs set up in Stateside schools.
Swimming classes for beginners, intermediates and swimmers were held at the Naval Station, NAS and Marine Site pools. Horseback riding lessons were also offered. During the afternoons, and activities program consisting of library study, etc, was held.
According to Jack Brown, director of the summer activities, the summer program was a success and similar program will be set up in the coming summers' months.
Registration for the school-year '56-'57 will be held on August 16, and classes will begin, August 20.


Commanding Officers ....
(Continued from Page One)
commanding officer CAPT J. B. Stoll, DC, in formal change of command ceremonies, at the Dental Clinic, Friday Morning, July 13, at 9:00 a.m. CAPT Stoll will assume his former duties of Executive officer.
For the past three years, CAPT Schneider has been on the staff of the U. S. Naval Dental School, NNMC, Bethesda, Md.
He entered the naval service in 1936, after having graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Dentistry with the class of 1932. He has served as dental officer on several ships, with the Marine Corps and is also a graduate of the Industrial College of the Armed Forces, Washington, D.C.
CAPT Schneider was accompanied to Gtmo by his wife, daughter, Jane and son, Robert.
COL Penzold relieved LT COL W. C. Esterline, at the Marine formal change of command ceremonies, Wednesday, July 11, at 9:00 a.m. COL Esterline will assume the duties of executive officer. Prior to his arrival in Gtmo, COL Penzold served as Chief of Staff for Lant Raex, 2-56.
COL Penzold is a graduate of the Virginia Military Institute with the class of 1936. He has served with numerous Marine commands and spent the war years, 1941 through 1945 in the central and western Pacific.
He is also a graduate of the Amphibious Warfare school, Quantie, Va., where he served as an instructor for three years. COL Penzold arrived in Gtmo accompanied by his wife and -five daughters.


Helicopter Demonstration At NAS


INDIAN; Photo
At the Main Gate by the Base Police Headquarters, interpreters W. M. Mas, SN, NAS; L. Ramirez, PN3, NAS and Luis Rivera, AN, VU-10, left to right, pose with two of the six Cuban Catholic priests that headed the 138 Cuban Catholic teachers that toured the Base Sunday, July 8.
Commander Naval Base and the local Holy Name Society played hosts to the Cubans from 1:00 p.m. until 5:80 p.m.
LCDR Edward Kubicki, Holy Name Society president, was in charge of tour interpreters and guideswho led the visitors throughout the afternoon jaunt which included the Base Chapel, school, Fleet landing, Marine site, Villamar and other housing areas, Fleet Recreation Center, I & E office and Phillips Park. Six buses transported the teachers to these points.
At the Naval Air Station, the teachers were treated to a helicopter demonstration which was highlighted by the execution of a simulated rescue operation.
After the tour the group was conveyed back to the Base school where coffee, refreshments and hors d'oeuvres Were served.
The visitors were all impressed by the hospitality of ComNavBase and felt that their convention which started out in Havana had wound up in the United States. The group left at 5:80.


Few Seek Prize Money Offered

In Contest To Name Base School


So far only two entries have been received in the contest to name the Base dependents' school. Prizes of $25 and $10 are being offered for the best suggestion.
The contest is open to all military personnel and civilian employees of naval activities at Guantanamo Bay. Their dependents are also eligible.
Names suggested for the school should be those of prominent deceased Naval figures. They should be submitted in writing to Commander Naval Base, Attn: School Name Competition Judges, prior to July 31.
Each name suggested must be accompanied by a written state-ment of not more than 100 words telling ;why the school should be so named. There is no limit to the number. of- entries a person- may submit.
Three prize-winning names, togethe; with the reason for each, will be forwarded to the Chief of Naval Personnel who will choose from the three, the official school name.


Little Theater Elects

Semi-Annual Officers

At the regular monthly meeting, Tuesday evening, July 10, the semi-annual election of officers was held. Elected to head the group are Don Wilkinson, president; Jim LeMar, vice-president; Joyce Stevenson, secretary, and Winnie Mathews, treasurer. Peggy Way was appointed director of the new Little Theater play "Laura" with Flo Schnake serving as assistant. Fred Hannibal was named technical director and Jane Whited, producer.
Tentative dates for the play were set for August' 28 through Septembei 1.
All Base personnel are eligibleto become members of zthe Little Theater and are urged to attend the regular monthly meeting held on the second Tuesday of each month at 7:30 p.m.


To guide you as to your particular state's absentee voting 'laws, AFPS is running a three part voting series. This article is the second in a series on registering to vote by absentee ballot.
RHODE ISLAND
Registration is permanent for those qualified voters who registered under the Permanent Registration Act of 1952 and have voted at least once since then.
Servicemen, employees of religious and welfare agencies serving in the armed forces and their dependents, may vote without registering.
All other persons desiring to vote must register in person at the office of the Board of Canvassers, place of residence, not latet than 60 days before election day.Kentucky
Registration is permanent unless a person has failed to vote in any primary or general election for two consecutive years.
Members of the armed forces and-their dependents become registered when a Fed. eral Post Card application for absence ballot is mailed to the county court clerk of residence.
All other persons must registelin pason at the ahove office by Sept 7.
California
Registration is permanent unless a voter failed to vote at either the last primary or general election.
Members of the armed forces., 'civilian employees serving outside the U.S., members of welfare or religious agencies assist. ing the armed forces and their dependents need not apply for registration. They are automatically registered upon mailing a Federal Post Card application to the coun. ty clerk of residence.
All other unregistered persons should request an "Affidavit of Registration" from the above office at least 90 days before election day.
PENNSYLVANA
Registration is permanent unless a person has failed to vote at least once in past two yea rs
Members of the armed forces are exempt from all registration requirements.
All other persons must register in person with the County Board of Elections, county of residence, or wiht the Registration Commission, city of residence. This may be done any time before Sept. 18.
For further information, consult your voting officer.-(AFPS)


Notice

Complete information and details as to how the proposed Navy Exchange Trailer Park will be set up and to whom. the trailers will be available is not yet know.
According to Navy Exchange
officials, as soon as" complete information is available and has been made official, notices will appear in the INDIAN.
Please, do not call the Navy Exchange for details concerning the new trailer park..







Saturday, 14 July 1956


VU -10 Prop Blast' FTG Chief Transfers To Fleet


by O. A. Porter Jr.
The Intra-squadron Golf Tourney ended after a fast and surprising final week of competition. LT Tom N. Drace, who lead the tournament from the very first, walked off with top honors and first place. LT Drace was awarded as First Prize a new golf putter, which we know he will find useful when he burns up those Georgia links around Glynco.
Although he entered competition late, LCDR C. Scott Ferguson came from behind to cop second place. He received a colorful set of club covers as his prize.
D.E. Campbell, AE3, who was among the top contenders throughout the tournament, came through in Third position. He was awarded a rather sporty golf cap.
D. E. Campbell will find that golf cap useful this week. He and C. C. Roberts, ADC, are currently in Norfolk, Virginia, where they are representing VU-10 in the annual AirLant golf tournament. The Mallards wish them both the best of luck.
There are more cigars being passed around the hangar these days than we'll be able to smoke all year. Congratulations to LT Orland A. Porter Jr. on his recent promotion to that rank and to CWO Frank K. Hamel on his selection to the permanent rank of W-4. LT Porter and CWO Hamel are the third and fourth officers respectively that have been promoted in VU-10 within the past three weeks.
This is in addition to the baby business, which right now is doing equally as well. Chief and Mrs. Standley Wenderlich are the proud parents of a new son, Thomas John. Young Tom weighed in at seven pounds eight ounces at 0027 on July 7.
Chief and Mrs. J. P. Carroll have a new daughter, Eileen. Both mother and daughter Eileen, who are currently residing in Philadelphia, are doing fine.
Two more reenlistments for the Mallards too. J. D. Mullins, ADI, recently reenlisted in the Navy for an additional four years. He received change of duty orders and this week he and Mrs. Mullins departed Gtmo for NAS, Lakehurst, where he will be attached to HU-2. W.M. Blanchard, A03, reenlisted for an additional six years. Congratulations to both of you.
Welcome Back to B.G. Vail, BM3, who has been assigned to NAS for the past year, and to Chief L. H. Podgett, who returns from Norfolk TAD. Welcome a-board to D.F. Nicholson, AD2, who reports on board from VR-6 at McGuire AFB, Trenton. A.L. Gibeavlt, ADS, has been transferred to NAAS, Kingsville.


Reserve, Over 19 Years In Navy


INDIAN Photo
CAPT F. S. Habecker, Commander Fleet Training Group, gives Michial Benedini, BTC, a farewell handshake one half hour before Benedini transferred to the Fleet Reserve and civilian life. Benedini had been in the Navy 19 years and nine months. He enlisted in Sprinfield, Mass.
His duty stations while in the navy were the USS LEARY, the USS BENSON, the USS CLEVELAND, the USS TWINING, at the US Naval Recruiting Station in Philadelphia, in the USS FORREST ROYAL, the USS DES MOINES, and he came to the Fleet Training Group in Gtmo in August, 1953.
With his transfer to the Fleet Reserve, Benedini has taken a position with the local Public Works department in the inspection branch. The Benedinis have two children.


F T G Bulletin
The results of the 4th of July FTG golf matches were no surprise as far as low gross is concerned. Mrs. Edie Ware was first low gross for women with a nice 82. J. L. Bland, GMC, was first low gross for men with a very nice 73. Mrs. Rita Bland made it a clean sweep for the Bland family by taking women's low net with a 75 followed close behind by Mrs. Audrey Page with a 76.
J. F. Shea, BTC, walked off with the men's low net with a 65 and CAPT Murphy displayed a clear eye and cool determination to take second low net with a 68. The junior tournament, which was nine holes, was won by young "KJ" Skadowski with a 51, Jimmy Christie had a 52 and Jim Page a 62.
Most of the talk around FTG on Monday morning concerned the weekend trip to Port-au-Prince on CAMBRIA. The ship's officers and men were perfect hosts and did everything they could to make the trip more pleasant. It seems that the sight-seers didn't miss a thing while ashore. The Casino, voodoo dancing, French cooking, the Iron Market, La Perchoir, The Riviera and, of course, the taxi drivers were much discussed.
FTG extends best wishes for a good cruise to the five Coast Guard-


men who reported aboard for duty last week. There are more to follow soon.
Young Bill Sewell jr. arrived on board the Naval Hospital Sunday morning 8 July at 0357. He weighed in at 7 pounds 12 ounces. W. W. Sewell, YN3, of the Administrative department and his wife Judy are the proud parents. They are currently living in Caimanera.
Three new men reported aboard this past week. Robert C. Sheldon, SO1, came from USS BROWNSON (DD-808). He had previously served in USS PURVIS (DD-709) and USS SARSFIELD (DD-837). He is married and has two children. His family is now in Portsmouth R. I.
Thomas J. Anderson, BTC, reported from the Narraganset Bay, Fleet Training Group. He is married and has six children, five girls and finally a boy. He has previously served in USS SELFRIDGE (DD-357), USS TAYLOR (DD468), USS OKLAHOMA CITY (CL-91) and USS RICH (DD-820).
John A. Perry, QMC, also reported from the Narragaliset Bay, Fleet Training Group. He is married and has a six week old girl. He has previously served in USS WAUKESHA (AKA-84),l USS PC 1262, USS YMS 114, USS HECTOR (AR-7), and USS QUACHITA COUNTY (LST-1071).


L(" ro


Fleet Reserve News
Branch 100 held its regular monthly meeting Tuesday night 10 July. Out of 45 new members there were 31 shipmates present for their initiation into the Branch. They were shipmates, Abla, Atkeison, Campbell, Childers, Cochran, Coley, Dittrich, Duvall, French, Gibson, Gillis, Hague, Hayes, Horning, Jbsey, Klemis, Lanier, Mayfield, Nicholson, Nolan, Pedneault, Racek, Rahl, Ramsey, Remon, Rittenhouse, Striegel, Tricarico, Walczuk, Walmsley, and Wells. WELCOME SHIPMATES!
Branch 100 is proud to say that we are getting a lot of new members. This is one of the responsibilities of eoch member. It only takes a few minutes to explain some of the things the Fleet Reserve Association does for the Navy career enlisted man. Let's all do our part to help make Branch 100 a bigger and better branch by getting more and more new members.
There will be a picnic at Windmill Beach on 28 July for members of Branch 100 and their families and holders of FRA membership cards. The cost will be 500 per person and children free. It is requested that you contact your representative and let him know how many tickets you will want not later than Monday, 23 July. For further information on the picnic please contact one of the representatives listed below. Naval Station: Abla, Adams, French, Bonner, Horning, Kirwan, Powell, Schoonover. Naval Air Station: Boyd. Fleet Training Group: Huff. VU-10: Harrison. Leeward Point: Paulsen. Naval Supply Depot: Hohman. Marine Barracks: Campbell. Naval Hospital: Ryan.
The above named shipmates are your contact for any Branch business.



Trail Of The Eagle
The Boy Scouts will hold their Court of Honor this coming Wednesday, July 18, at 8 p.m. at the School Auditorium on Chapel Hill. At this time the boys who have worked so hard to pass their tests before their counsellors and the Boards of Review which are held monthly, will be presented their Merit Badges and Advancement ratings.
This is an occasion of great accomplishment for these boys and all parents are urged to attend this impressive ceremony. All Scout officials, friends and the public in general are also very cordially invited to attend.


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Page Four


THE INDIAN






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Saturday, 14 July 1956 THE INDIAN


The Medic
by W. A. Dal & R. A. Albrecht
The Stork Club
New additions to the stork club for the last few weeks are as follows: a girl to AC2 and Mrs. Jenkins, and boys to ADC and Mrs. S. Wenderlich, YN3 and Mrs. W. Sewell, AE3 and Mrs. T. Long, and BM3 and Mrs. D. Sabol. Congratulations to all and the best of luck.
New Arrivals
Arriving for duty recently were HM3s H. L. Johnson from NAS, Pensacola, Florida and C. J. Thomas from the Naval Proving Grounds, Dahlgreen, Va. K. 0. Wadswork, HN, reported here from HCS, Bainbridge, Maryland. Welcome aboard, men.
Bon Voyage
M. A. Bilbo, HM3, departing for duty aboard the USS WISCONSIN; D. J. Sullivan, HM3 Rec Sta. Brooklyn for separation and H. E. Davis, HM2, NAS, Jacksonville for separation. Good Luck to all.
Meet The MAA
The "local sheriffs" who see that good old USNH runs "4.0 gung-ho" and keep the troops in clean uniforms, shined shoes, squared hats and belts, are three pretty good guys despite their tough job.
They are Chief Master at Arms, L. B. Whited, HMC, assistant MAA D. H. Willingham, HM1, and MAA W. E. Basham, HM2. Chief Whited became a "blue-jacket" in August of 1939 and has been in Gtmo since May of 1955 at his present position. He reported aboard from the USS KIEINSMITH APD 134.
"Little Willie" Willingham put on the garb of the U.S. Navy in 1940 and has been "on the rock" since November of 1955. He reported abroad from the USS AGGRESSIVE MSD 422. "Little Willie's" M.A.A. experience includes a two year hitch at USNH Charleston, S. C. "Boats" Basham became a "white hat" in 1942 and has been with us since May of this year.
He reported here from "home" after a short tour of civilian life. These three men have the most thankless job in the hospital but still manage to keep cleanliness and order around the clock.
Hair doesn't grow too well in Jr. Quarters, leading proof of this statement: McCafferty, Dal, Coleman, Johnson, Wadsworth, Hayes and "Red on the Head" McCormick, plus Sullivan, Johnston, and Ouzonian- -Filibirdy gets seasick in mild "Yippee" weather - - - Babe S. writes a letter a day to Philly - Bilbo has been seep wearing a "white glove"--- The O.R. and the Food Service tied this week for the Title "Fewest Working Hours Per Day" - - - 164 days till Christmas - - - P. S. Kardon caught his first fish on Ron's head.


Ships At Sea Are Land Extensions Pet Vaccination


Of Home Nation Says Int. Law
by Ely U. Orian
Navy ships of the United States and other countries recognized by the United Nations, are not only floating hunks of steel but are floating lumps of soil as well!
According to International Law, all public vessels other than commercial, are exempt from local jurisdiction when within foreign territorial waters. These ships are, by fiction of International Law, considered part of the territory of the country which they represent.


Since it is a detached portion of a nation's soil, the vessel is supreme in itself even when found floating beyond the three mile sea limit of the mother country. On the high seas the ship is likewise free from external control.
An international law principle known as extraterritoriality supports this practice. By extraterritoriality is meant the freedom from arrest of certain persons residing in a foreign country by virtue of government employment. These persons are: Ambassadors, ministers or other accredited diplomatic agents. Public vessels in foreign ports and armed forces crossing foreign territory with permission also enjoy extraterritorial privilege.
As a floating extension of the territory of the state, the ship can be considered as exercising the powers of sovereignty. It meets the four requirements of a sovereign state as conceived by Aristotle. The manpower complement of the vessel is its people, the physical structure of the ship takes the definite territory and the inter-ship commands which are directly responsible to the ship's captain denote shipboard organized government. The fourth requirement is the extraterritorial status of the ship which connotes independence from outside control.
Occurrences aboard the vessel demanding the exercise of sovereign powers are accorded full faith and credit by other states and are considered by them as "quasi" acts of the state to which the public vessel belongs. Bona fide acts of its commanding officer toward a foreign power are deemed legitimate.
Through its commanding officer in his two-fold capacity as a shipboard chief executive and a representative of the head of his government, governmental policies and/or functions, domestic as well as foreign, are put into operation.
In the execution of domestic policies the commanding officer is guided by the rules prescribed by the home government. As an example he may issue a memorandum to all hands implementing the duly home-made absentee voting law.


He may also investigate whether the contracting parties to a wedding he is going to solemnize are competent. Also, he exercises discretionary preventive measures to insure that contraband articles as defined by Customs regulations" are not in transit, etc.
In compliance with the home government's foreign policy and commitments within the bounds of international practices, the commanding officer of a vessel "may grant the right of asylum to political or other refugees if he thinks the grant would enhance the interest of humanity."
But in 1910, at Corinto, Nicaragua a native, in fleeing from the local police, swam out and climbed aboard the USS PRINCETON and appealed for protection. Shortly afterward, the chief of police went on board and requested that the refugee be surrendered to him. CAPT Hayes, the PRINCETON's skipper, considered the local authorities fully capable of handling the case." -Consequently, he turned the refugee over without question.
The fact of birth is another typical example attesting to the sovereignty extension of the home government to the vessel wherever found. For instance, if a child is born aboard a public ship, without regard to the mother's citizenship, the child is deemed a citizen of that country whose flag the vessel flies. This legal fiction is called the principle of Jus Soli, the right of birthplace, to which the United States' private international law adheres.
In another instance, a foreign national may commit an infraction aboard a vessel. This case becomes triable under the laws of the country represented by the ship. But this right may be rendered nugatory by the exercise of extradition if there is any. In time of war, the principle of extraterritoriality may be violated by belligerent states. But hospital ships, vessels engaged in philanthropic or religious missions, carterl ships designated for and engaged in the exchange of war prisoners and other ships operating on account of a treaty or special proclamation enjoy freedom from intrusions and capture according to the Hague Convention of 1907.


is Still Available
One of the mandatory provisionsembodied in the Naval Base Regulations states that "it is obligatory to have animals on the Base vaccinated."
Owners wishing their animals innoculated for rabies may call R. L. Hill, HM1, at 8685 or M. Gordon, HM1, at 8765 for arrangements. Each innoculation will cost $1.50.
Rabies vaccination identification tags may be picked up by persons with pets that have already been innoculated, at the Base Hospital medical storage office anytime during working hours.


CPO Wives
The regular business meeting was held in the Family Room of the CPO Club, Friday, July 6. This was the first meeting presided over by the new President, Doris Hay%.
Calendar of events for the coming month sound exciting with a beach ,party, and cake sale; :but more talk about these when the plans have been completed by the entertainment committee.
The hospital committee for the month are Doris Hays and Betty Jenkins. Now that Marie Chandler and Emily Trapp are out of hospital let us not have any more members checking in there.
Hostesses for the month are, Marie Chandler, Loretta Craver and Ida Ewards.
A cordial welcome is extended to all new arrivals on the Base. So that we may be acquainted come join the club and have a good time during your stay here.


Navy. Wives Club

The regular business meeting of the Navy Wives Club was held in the School auditorium on Thursday, July 5. Five new members were added to the roll. They were Ruth Leach, Eleanor Childers, Jean Brown, Flora Higgs and Loretta Craver.
Members volunteered for their turn meeting the transport; on July 9, and also for Bingo for the patients on July 18. Discussion was held for a class in textile painting.
The afternoon Bingo this month at Villamar is on July 19 at 1:30 p.m.
This was the last business meeting of our sponsors, Chaplain and Mrs. Peterson. We bid them farewell and many thanks for all that they have done -for us.
Our next business meeting is on August 2, at 8:00 p.m. in the School auditorium.


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THE INDIAN







Palo. six TIlE INDIA4


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Saturday, U July 1956


GTMO SPORTING CHIPS
S. by C..C. Drumright
Straight Pitches. . .. The new section of the regular 18 hole course has been secured and will not be opened for several weeks, reason for this action was due to heavy maintenance required in the face lifting process. We are fortunate in still having 18 holes however, your front nine is what has commonly been called the ladies' nine. Your 10th T was formerly the first and your course after leaving the 10th green is to proceed to the regular No. 3 T, this hole is now your 11th, after this instead of hitting up old No. 4, you reverse and play the regular No. 11, this hole now being your No. 12, you then by-pass the regular No. 12 (short par three) and go to the regular No. 13th T and from here in all is as was.
You need to use the blue score cards for this 18, handicap strokes are correct as listed.
Our Liberal Arts Department. ... I use a club to pull my ball from under a bush or long grass, counting the operation as one storke. Did I score correctly? No. I loose the hole for not hitting at the ball "fairly"
-with the clubhead. In match play my ball strikes myself or my caddieI loose the hole.
Rimmin The Cup Around The 19th... . Rogers out of commission due to injuries sustained playing ball, someone should tell him, Rotherberg is gone. Red Adams looking like a pro for nine holes, making the turn with a nice 31. Wish to caution all strangers.... Bushes' turkey farm is barren. Big duel set for to-day, 1280, Place-Putting Green-Participants CDR Dobbins, Radioman Flanagan, Chief Englund and Mr. Griffin Weapons-Putters-Honor at stake-lst, 2nd and 3rd prizes from our last weeks blind bogey.


Wrens Still On Top In P. League,

Colts, Bears Tied For First In Little
The Peewee league has the Wrens still on top berth with eight winnings and two loses. After the seventh week of league play, teams now stand as follows:
Peewee Standings
Teams W L Pet.
Wrens 8 2 .800 Chive 7 , .588 Cubs 6 5 .54S
Es.65. -.545
Owls 5 5 .500 Lions 4 6 AO0 Pups 1 9 .100
In the Little league the Colts and the Bears are tied for first honor. Both teams have won nine games and suffered only two defeats thus far.
Little Leasse Standi g&
Teams W L C1 Pet.
Colts 9 2 .648 Bears 9 2 .648 S Eagles 7 4 .0 .68s Rams S 6 .2 .00 Hawks 1 10 .6 .099
There are still a few vacancies for boys seven and eight years old in the Little 'League. Boys under seven are not desired at this time since the managers do not have sufficient time to spend training the boys to bring ,them up to par with the rest of the team members. Parents interested in having their sons assigned to a team may call LT Colbert at 8131 (office) or 8386 (home).


I0ND Pistol Team

Fails To Qualify

For All-Navy Shoot

At the Atlantic Fleet pistol competitions held at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina last week, 56 individual shooters and eight teams were recorded to have participated.
-.Six of.the 56 individual shoot:era at the Lejeune pistol matches were. representatives from the Tenth 'Naval District. Of these six shooters which formed the ComTen team, five came from ComNavBase Gtmo and the sixth member of the team came from the


ComTen Staff in San Juan, Puerto Rico.
The team failed to qualify for the All-Navy pistol matches to be held at NAS Norfolk, Virginia, from July 17 through 19.
One of the two teams entered by the Potomac River Command won the top flight honor at the Camp Lejeune shooting matches. The Potomac River Command pistol team will represent the Atlantic Fleet in the All-Navy pistol competitions.
The local Rifle and Pistol club will sponsor a skeet shoot at the .Marine skeet range open to all shooters on July 28. Details of the shooi will be in next week's INDIAN.


1st Games In 776 B. C.

Modern Day Olympics Outstrips

Old Grecian Counterpart In Size
New York (AFPS)-The United States expects to send some 325 athletes to the 16th Olympiad in Melbourne, Australia, later this yearand when the contestants of more than 70 countries are counted the total may well reach into the thousands.


While exact figures are unknown, it is probable that at their height the old games never had more than a few hundred competitors. Yet dynasties fell and rulers were deposed as a result of the scoring.
The first Olympics in recorded history were held in 776 B.C., when one Coroebus was victorious in the equivalent of a 200-yard dash. Earlier contests are shrouded in myth and legend.
There are many stories of the origin of the games. One of the most provocative says that King Oenamaus, who ruled the Greek city of Elis near Olympia, devised a grisly pastime.
He ordered that his beautiful daughter Hippodamia could be won as a bride by anyone who could escape with her in a chariot. Her father -would pursue the abductor in another chariot. If the suitor was caught he would be killed by the monarch's spear.
Thirteen young men attempted and all 13 failed. A 14th aspirant was a youthful warrior named Pelops hired someone to sabotage the king's vehicle. During the race, the wheel fell off of Oenomaus' chariot and he was killed in the


Strikes & Spares

by Dolly Aumann
The last two weeks have brought two of our beginners into some good games, Bette Johnson with 158 and Tex. Zarkou 153, which goes to show it can be done, and may be of encouragement to some who say they can not bowl good enough to get into our leagues.
A meeting of captains and committee members was held on Friday and the date for the Bowling Banquet was set for August 7. It was decided we would have an evening affair this time, watch this column for time and place later.
High-Games Hight-Averages V. Hall 180 J. Darby 149 D. Aumann 'll1
3. En er 1 0 F. Grounds 147 J. Enders 170
J. Darby 165 M. Zeigler 147 D. Dickson 164 D. Aumann 145 M. Swords 168 G. Rowan 145
-M. Marsh 160
M.mrh 10G. Kraft 142 1X Garaudy 1571
G. Kraft 156 M. Swords 141 R. McGowan 156 M. Marsh 141 Team .Steandigs
Bowleretts W-81 .-9 Alley-Katz W,81 U-9 Push-Over- W-22 L-18 Lillies of the Alleys W-22 L-18 Gutter-Gals W-18 L-22 Down-Unders W-18 L-27 Spoilers W-12 L-28 Crickets W-11 L-29


crash.
In celebration. Pelops is supposed to have founded the games as a thanksgiving ceremony to Zeus for his triumph. Whatever their origin, the games lasted for more than 10 centuries. After 410 B. C. the games reached their peak. It was the ambition of every city in Greece to have an Olympic champion. But after the Roman invasion the games gradually deteriorated. The athletes, instead of being satisfied with a simple olive wreath and municipal honors, began receiving money and other valuable prizes. The games were abolished as a public nuisance in 394 A.D. by Emperor Theodosius I of Rome. The games were revived in Athens in 1896,with athletes from nine nations competing.


Ladies Golf Shots
by Mae Hadley
A week ago Friday the lady golfers played a match versus par tourney. Golf balls were awarded to the following winners: 18 Hole TournamentFirst place-tieCynthia Holley, Juanita Babcock
Second place-Marion Caruthers
9 Hole TournamentFirst place-Edna Bush
Second place-tieMillie Kuba, Mae Hadley
Congratulations to Cynthia Holley for breaking 100 by two strokes and to Margaret Wall for making a birdie on No. 7.
A welcome is extended to all ladies interested in playing golf. Anyone wishing to join the Ladies Golf club should be at the golf club house any Friday morning at 0800.


Villamar Schedules

Dance Next Friday

The Villamar-Bargo Community Council will sponsor a community dance to be held at the Villamar lyceum Friday, July 20, from 8:00 p.m. to 12:00 p.m.
Holders of Department of Defense ID card, Liquor Card, Commissary Permit, or Family passes may invite guests of their choice. The council pointed out however that guests will be admitted only if accompanied by their hosts.
Julio Delgado and his Cha-ChaCha Orchestra will furnish the music.






6S
Saturday, U4 July 1956


6S


TEX INDIAN


The Fish Tales VU-10, NAS Battle For Second Position /While NavBase Cops Cellar, Marines 1st

by Carlos Caballo


by Pat Aldridge
That Gray Nurse Shark, caught last week by Darian and Waite, just prior to the tournaments' beginning, is the same variety responsible for the deaths of an average of seventy persons annually off the coast of Australia. The danger is such, in fact, that the Australian government not only lays strong nets off shore but maintains a constant plane patrol hunting the ugly sea beasts.
The biggest Shark entered, as of this writing, in the contest is a 125 pounder, a baby compared to those many others seen playing around in waters beneath the ATC dump. The two Tarpon entered, by yours truly and Ernie Guirey, are babes of the species, also, running a mere five and two pounds but, where those were hooked, there are some grand daddys to be had and they're biting. That particular spot is a seeming playground for Tarpon, Snook and Snapper for they can be seen in great numbers in all sizes although the Snook run larger than any we've noted elsewhere. One doesn't mess around with light test line and leader, either, for we lost two Snook when 40-test leader, unkinked and new, snapped like thread.
Technique, unusual for Snook but applicable in this area, is still fishing with shrimp. The Tarpon hit this bait equally well and the bites come fast. Any tide, any time will assure a fine mess of pan sizers.
Leeward Pointers should remember that there is an official weighin station for the tournament at the new "Fisherman's Wharf." There, too, for those who do not care to take a boat from main side, boats and motors may be rented and bait bought.
Rental periods run differently than they do at the Naval Station Locker. There are just two periods, rental wise, designated morning and afternoon, but actually covering the 24 hour time lapse.
The fee is $2 per period for boat and motor and, should it be rough out there, one having rented a vessel from Naval Air Station Locker, may leave it at the Leeward Locker and return by safer launch. And that's it for this time.

"In the old days," Grandpa remembers, "when a young man began sowing wild oats, his father started the thrashing machine."


Now that all the dust stirred up by a season of hard play is all but settled on Diamond No. 1, only the top and cellar positions are firmly in grasp. Everyone is the happier that the League-leading Marines cooperated by losing three games which makes them seem more human . . . no one seems to like the idea of having an unbeatable superman in their midst.
Second place honors are a different matter. With only four games still left to play, VU-10 and NAS are battling it out right down the line. The Flyers are the ones that downed the Marines twice and are always in the running no matter whom they play. The same can be said for VU-10's Mallards.


Monday, July 23, will mark the first game of the play-offs. No one will actually be a favorite here and rabid partisan fans are the only ones that will go out on a limb to pick the winner. There will be two games, one each on Monday and Tuesday.
Two teams will taste defeat and be out of the running. The two winning teams will then play each other for two out of three games. And, in view of the past, these two teams could easily be the two low teams in the League at the end of play. Fans who like their baseball had better not miss any of these play-off games.
Marines 7, VU-TEN 2
Played Sunday, the game was an anti-climax because it could mean nothing in League Standings. The League-leading Leathernecks jumped to an early lead and were never headed. The Mallards didn't play their usual brand of ball and missed a good chance to help nail down second place.
NAS 7, Naval Base 6
If anyone was in doubt about standings, this Monday night game should have dispelled it. It kept NAS in the running for second place honors and dug the cellar for Naval Base just a little deeper.
A closely played game, the outcome was in doubt right up to the bottom half of the ninth inning. Winning pitcher was McCalmont, loser Schiller.
NAS jumped into the lead in the second with one run and added two more in the third. Naval Base came back in the fifth and sixth with a total of three of their own to tie up the game 3-3.
Ransom of the Flyers put his team back into the lead with a grand-slam with no one on and they led 4-3 until the ninth. In this free-swinging inning, Naval "Base 'collected three runs off of three hits and ha4 high hopes... until NAS took a last crack at changing the score.
Three men collected singles and the fourth a double resulting in


three runs and the game ended 7-6, with no Flyers out. No telling what score would have resulted with a full inning of play. NAS 001 200 103-7 9 3 Naval Base 000 012 003--6 6 9
VU-TEN 3, NAS 2
This aerial dogfight between two usually high-flying teams was scoreless until late in the game. Most of the flight time performed by the ball was purely between the pitchers and catchers . . . until the ninth inning. The game was one of the best played thus far in the season and had fans going wild right up to the winning run.
Montgomery went all of the way for the Mallards and came up as winning pitcher. Loss is credited to Waldrop who was relieved by McCalmont in the bottom of the ninth with the score tied but the winning run on first.
VU-10 was leading 2-1 as the ninth inning began in what appeared to be an insurmountable count. Not knowing this, the Flyers took Montgomery's offering and had men on 1st and 3rd with 2 out. Whittaker had 2 strikes and 1 ball with two away and lined one out just a little too far for King for a big double that scored the tying run.
After retiring the Flyers, VU10 led off with Bouffard rapping out a single. It was at this point that McCalmont took over hurling duties from Waldrop.
Bouffard promptly and safely stole second and advanced to third when Azzarita knocked a grounder to first for the second out. This brought up Postal who connected for a single, ending the game as Bouffard crossed home for the winning run.
The Standings
Teams Won Lost Marines 15 3 VT,.-0 10 9
NAS 9 11 �Naval 'Basie. 4 15:
The Schedule
Sunday VU-10 vs Naval Base Tuesday Naval Basd vs Marines Thursday NAS vs Marines


4


Ham Radio News

by Dot Sumara
The business meeting of the Guantanamo Amateur Radio club was held Thursday, July 5, at the home of Dick Cousins. Present were Dick Cousins, KG4AD, Stan Sumara W4BTH, Dorothy Sumara KG4AC, Walt Holloway :KG4AN, Bob Hewitt KG4AR, John Garvey KG4AZ, and Ralph Hurd.
A new meeting place for August was discussed and the next meeting will be held at the Amateur Radio Station KG4AO which is located top side in the NAS Administration Bldg. We wish to welcome any one interested in "HAM" radio, to come up and join us. The next meeting will be at- 1900, Aug. 1.
The Club will be participating in the new coastal emergency net as a link between Puerto Rico and Florida during the hurricane season.


Navy Unit Scouts

Carribbean Storms
Washington (AFPS) - An advance unit of navy "Hurricane Hunters" has been sent to San Juan, Puerto Rico, to scout the development of tropical storms in the breeding area east of the Antilles and in the Eastern Caribbean.
The unit, a component of Air. borne Early Warning Sq. 4, will operate in. coordination' wit the Miami, Fla., Fleet''Weather Ceii tral. . .. " ' P2V Neptunes and WV4 Suier Constellations will once again be used for reconnaissance flight in the storms, the Navy said.


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Saturday, 14 July 1956


m


THE INDIAN


m0
Nay-BPPO-1ND-Guantanamo


Cinema-- Scolp
Steve Allen and Ed Sullivan are running neck to neck in a race to see which one comes out on top with their Sunday night TV show. Allen is threatening to take over ,the No. 1 spot which Sullivan has "held for so long.
One of the reasons for Allen's threat to Sullivan was the appearance 'of Elvis Presley on his July I,' show. Gad!, what does this Presley have? From what I've heard of his records down here he is long on noise and short on actual singing talent. He has accomplished one thing however, and that is turning the one syllable word you :into at least seven syllables.
"Laura" the Little Theater's new play is on the way ... casting was held'the iast week and Peggy Way a well-known Little Theaterite was chosen director'... the recent surge of re-runs (some of which are' not too hot) on the Base is due to the Exchange receiving only four new films a week ... cross the fingers and hope they dig up some oldies that are worth seeing agail.
Pitn (Col, in color) 'is one of
the most awaited films to arrive on the Base in a long while. Here we have the Broadway hit made into a movie that somewhat expands "on the original scope of the play. Bill Holden plays the stranger who comes to the little Kansas town and disrupts, everything including Ahe feminine hearts.
Rosalind Russell is outstanding in her portrayal of the spinster school-teacher looking for a man. Kim Novak, Susan Strasberg, Bet"ty Field and Arthur O'Connell complete the line-up. Two outstanding features are its direction by Josha Logan and the background music from which the .recent top-tenner came.
Prodigal (MGM, in color). Here we have one of those spectacular melodramas set in ancient times. Edmund Purdom, playing the prodigal is betwitched, bothered and bewildered by-pagan priestess Lana Turner. Lots of money went into this picture which turns out no better than can be expected.
Three Hours to Kill (Col., in color) . .. Dana Andrews and Donna Reed.,.. a horse-opera combined with suspense ... okay if you don't want to go to Villamar to try for the jackpot.
Unchained (W.B.), is a surprisingly interesting movie of California's Chino prison, an honorsystem institution. It deals with one nn's fight to go straight after being wsiit to prison. Bt.rbii* Halo andZ rWoy Uliach star. Again we bay.'the theme melydd from the picture that became very popular some time ago.
Broken Star (U.A.), a new western starring Howard Duff, Bill


Saturday. July 14
1:00 Winky Dink & You 1:30 Paul Winchell 2:00 Garry Moore 2:30 Melody Mal 8:00 Victory at Sea 3:30 Robt Q. Lewis 4:00 House Party 4:30 Two for the Money 5:00 Warner Bros.
Presents "Cheyenne" 6:00 Beat the Clock 6:80 Masquerade Party 7:00 George Gobel 7:30 Your Hit Parade 8:00 Colgate Variety Hour 9:00 Stage Show 9:30 Star Tonight
Sunday, July 15 1:00 Winky Dink & You 1:30 Contest Carnival 2:00 LampUnto My Feet
2.:30 Adventure 3:00 Big Picture 3:30 You Are There 4:00 Ted Marck's Amateurs 5:00 Roy Rogers - -


5:80 That's My Boy 6:00 Royal Hawaiians 6:30 What's My Line 7:00 Milton Berle 8:00 Ed Sullivan 9:00 U.S. Steel Hour
Monday, July 16 5:30 News Parade 5:45 Perry Como 6:00 I&E Film 6:30 My Favorite Husband 7:00 Talent Scouts 7:30 Highway Patrol 8:00 Ethel & Albert 8:30 Medic
9 00 Studio One
Tuesday, July 17 5:30 News Parade 5:45 Perry Como 6:00 Disneyland 7:00 Phil Silvers 7 :30 Meet Millie 8:00 Guy Lombardo 8:80 Lineup 9:00 Robt Montgomery
Wednesday, July 18 5:30 News Parade


5:45 Patti Page 6:00 Industry on Parade. 6:15 Travelog 6:30 I've Got a Secret 7:00 This is Your Life 7:30 Star Stage 8:00 Godfrey & Friends 9:00 Kraft TV Theatre
Thursday, July 19 5:30 News Parade 5:45 Perry Como 6:00 Stop the Music 6:80 Professional Father 7:00 Bob Cummings 7:80 You Bet Your Life 8:00 Dragnet 8:30 Dunninger Show 9:00 Climax
Friday. July 20 5:80 News Parade 5:45 Perry Como 6:00 I&E Film 6:80 Dollar a Second 7:00 Ozzie & Harriet 7:30 Playhouse of Stars 8:00 Johnny Carson 8:80 Crusader 9:00 Boxing


Radio Round-Up M


Neon signs do not emblazon a "Welcome" or "Enter" above the inconspicuous main entrance to WGBY but visitors are always welcome. The extent of their tour of studios and control rooms will depend on the number of men available- and their duties at that moment. Tours may be made anytime between 8 a.m. and 10:00 p.m. any day of the week. To avoid confusion, children should be accompanied by their parents unless previous arrangements have been made.
NEW RECORDS: More music is pouring in at the present than can be listed .Some good, some bad and probably some that will. emerge as hit tunes in a month or so. Betty Johnson has a couple, "Why Do You Cry" and "Clay Idol."
Then there's "Bombolero" and "High Society" as done by Lew Douglas. "The, Girl I Love" by The Cues, flip side being "Crackerjack." Lonnie Sattin teams with Earl Sheldon's orchestra to do "My Broken Dream" and "What Time Does The Sun Go Down."

Williams and Lita Baron.
Target Earth (A.A.) ... Virginia Grey and Richard Denning ... science-fiction .. . a poor man's "War of the Worlds."
Jubal (Col., in color), is a good western, in an off-beat vein. Set in the cattle country it turns out to be an absorbing character study of its stars, Glenn Ford, Ernest Borgnine, Rod Steiger and Valerie French. Steiger as usual, is memorable in his pao! You* western fans who go expecting to see Indiane, calvary aind the works are goin to be disappointed, but I'll still insist, (till they make a horseopera where the Indians win) that this is a dern good movie.


Saturday, July 14 NavSta-Picnic--125 min. NAS--Ghost Town-92 mi. Mar Site-Hell on Frisco Bay-98 rain. Villa.-Crime Against Joe-94 min. Lwd. Pt.-High Society-88 min.
Sunday, July 15 NavSta-Prodigal--112 min. NAS--Pinic Mar. Site-Athena--95 min. Villa.-Hell on Frisco Bay Lwd. Pt.-Crime Against Joe
Monday, July 10
NavSta-h Hours to Kill--10 mn. NAS--Prodigal Mar. Site-Ghost Town Villa.-Athena Lwd. Pt.-Hell on Frisco Day
Tuesday. July 1t
NavSta-Unchained-90 min. NAS-Three Hours to Kill Mar. Site--Picnic Villa.-Ghost Town Lwd. Pt-Athena
Wednesday, July 18 NavSta-Broken Star-89 min. NAS-Unchained Mar. Site-Prodigal Vila.-rPicnie Lw. Pt.--Gohst Town
Thursday. July 19 NavSta-Target Earth-96 mn. NAS-Broken Star Mar. Sit-Three Hours to Kill Villa.-Prodigal Lwd. Pt.-Picnic
Friday, July 20 NavSta-.Jubal-l13 min. NAS-Target Earth Mar. Site-Unchained Villa,-Three Hours to Kill Lwd. Pt.-Prodigal


WGBY Television Program


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Book - Nook

Winston S. Churchill, whose writing career almost matches in brilliance his political life, is on the book lists again. His new book A HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH SPEAKING PEOPLES is perhaps his most monumental work, and may be the best remembered of the hundred or more volumes which he has written. The Library has just received volume one, which traces the English race from its earlist beginnings to the rise of the Tudor dynasty in 1485. Three more volumes are projected, and all four will be avidly devoured by every discerning reader.
New specialty books at the Library include the OUTBOARD BOATING HANDBOOK and the LAWS AND LANDSCAPING HANDBOOK. Both should prove to be popular in a climate like ours.
Richard Nixon, a controversial figure in American politics today, now has his own biography in print. THIS IS NIXON, by James Keogh, is a short book which devotes a few chapters to the story of his life and meteoric rise in politics, and most of the remaining chapters to an explanation of his political philosophy. Another suitable book for election-year reading.
COMFORT ME WITH APPLES ,is a rather funny story about American life. today by Peyer DeVries, who has already made his name in the field of the humorous novel. The setting is a small Connecticut town, and the action column in the newspaper. This book has already been voted one of the year's most entertaining stories.
Smiley Blanton is an old-fashioned doctor who has written a convincing book about what's wrong with the world today. In LOVE OR PERISH he analyzes the problems of the twentieth century, both ,physical and moral, and candidly presents his solutionlove. The absence of intricate terminology and psychiatric formulas is a welcome change in a book of this sort After a lifetime of experience with people and their problems, Dr. Blanton comes up with some down-to-earth, common sense answers.




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3 Base Commands Have New Commanding Officers INDIAN Photo Three Base commands received new commanding officers on the JOHNSON Monday morning. Working from left to right: LT COL W. C. Esterline watches as COL A. F. Penzold Jr., new Marine CO, picks his luggage from the mass of baggage lined along the pier. In the center picture CAPT R. S. Schneider Jr., new Dental Clinic CO, poses with CAPT J. B. Stoll shortly after walking off the JOHNSON. The picture on the far right has CAPT L. A. Newton, new Hospital CO,' haking hands with CAPT T. I. Moe who was on hand to greet the new Hospital head. COVERS GTMO LIKE THE SUNSHINE U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Volume VII, No. 28 Saturday, 14 July 1956 Arrive Aboard Johnson Monday For Hospital, Marines And Dental Three new commanding officers arrived, aboard the Base Monday morning, July 9, on the MSTS JOHNSON. CAPT Lyle A. Newton, MC, CAPT Robert S. Schneider Jr., DC, and COL August F. Penzold Jr., arrived to assume command of the Hospital, Dental Clinic and Marine Barracks respectively. Men Of Coast Guard Public Works To Become Separate To Train With FT G Command, CDR Rowan Leaving The Naval Base will have another command added to its list on August 1 when the Public Works department, now under Naval Station, will become an entirely separate command. The Secretary of the Navy established the new center in a notice issued in June. To be known as the Public Works Center, the new command will be under the military command of the Commander Naval Base, unless otherwise directed by the Chief of Naval Operations. It will be under the management control of the Bureau of Yards and Docks. Commanding Officer for the Center will be CAPT H. H. Wallin who will report aboard the Base from the Bureau of Yards and Docks. CAPT Wallin is expected to arrive this month and will officially take over his command August 1. CDR E. L. Rowan, present Public Works department head, leaves the Base in August for duty at the Naval Station, San Diego, Calif. According to CDR Rowan the department will be changed to a command in order to provide for more efficient operation of construction and maintenance on the Naval Base. NAS Insignia Contest To End Tomorrow The contest for the selection of an insignia for the Naval Air Station ends Sunday, July 15. A $75 first prize will be awarded the member of the NAS command who submis the winning drawing. Second and third prize winners will receive '$45 and $25 respectively. All entries of the insignia contest may be submitted in full color or black and white with the colors n-cified. The advance contingent of five Coast Guard enlisted men reported aboard the Fleet Training Group last week. Three more enlisted personnel and two officers are expected to report in shortly. They will form the FTG permanent Coast Guard Training Unit and will assist Fleet Training Group in the training of Coast Guard vessels. Members of the advance party are Robert H. Collins, BMC; Isaac W. Lance, ENC; James N. Neville, DCC; Vergil M. Fleming, RDC, and Philip M. Snow, EM1. The gunboat MENDOTA (WPG) will be the first Coast Guard vessel to undergo training under the operational control of the Fleet Training Group. It is expected that approximately ten such ships will undergo training in Gtmo each year. "When no Coast Guard ship is under training," says CDR J. D. Patterson, FTG Gunnery Officer, "the FTG Coast Guard Unit will assist the Fleet Training Group in 'he training of Navy ships." CAPT Newton relieved CAPT Moe, Wednesday July 11, as commanding officer of the U.S. Naval Hospital. Prior to assuming his new duties, CAPT Newton was Executive officer of the U.S.N.H., Jacksonville, Florida. CAPT Moe Leaves Today CAPT Moe leaves Gtmo today for the states. He will report to the Sixth Naval District Headquarters, Charleston, S. C., where he. will assume duties as, the district's medical officer. CAPT Newton is a graduate of the school of medicine at the University of Nebraska. He is a member of the National Board of Medical Examiners and the American Board of Urology. Arriving on the JOHNSON with the captain were his wife and family. Also at the hospital the past week, CAPT L. E. Tebow, MC, was relieved by. CAPT J. H. Boyers, MC, as Executive officer. CAPT Tebow will report to U.S.N.H., Memphis, Tennessee. CAPT Boyers before assuming his new duties was Chief of Medicine for the Base hospital. Dental Changes:Comiiand Yesterday" CAPT Schneider relieved acting (Continued on Page Three)

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Saturday, 14 July 1956 THE INDIAN THE INDIAN The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a possible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. RADM WILLIAM G. COOPER, Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Editorial Staff LTJG D. G. LaCasse -----------------------------Officer-Advisor G. L. Henderson, JOC -------------------------------------Editor J. C. Curren, JOSN ----------------------------Managing Editor E. U. Orias, JO3 --------------------------------Feature Editor D. D. Hinton, JOSN ------------------------------Staff Reporter THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P.35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. Materials marked AFPS may be used by news media provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All materials originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part or without credit. All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. Spend 3 Minutes And Make $25 It seems too bad that only two people have entered the contest for naming the Naval Base School. With $50 in prizes awaiting the winners -there will be three-everyone on the Base should at least submit one entry. But people always say, "Why, I could never think of a name and even if I did, I wouldn't be able to write down the reasons for my choice." Anybody can think of a name; there are plenty of outstanding, deceased Naval personalities to pick from. For instance, a good name to submit would be "The Marshall-Peddicord High School", named after CDR Marshall and LT Peddicord who lost their lives five years ago in the waterfront fire here in Guantanamo Bay. It took only three minutes to think of that name, so you see it is no brain-wrecking chore. The big problem is sitting down and taking the time to spend three minutes. Yet if you win first prize of $25 after your three minutes of thought, you will have made a little over 13 cents a second. The contest closes July 31 and $25 is $25. CDR McPhee, Protestant Chaplain, Reports Aboard NavBase For Duty .The first part of the democratic election process, nomination of candidates, is now underway in the United States. Within the two major parties-and in smaller ones as well-men are competing for the right to represent their party and receive its backing in the next election. Now is an excellent time for servicemen to get a picture of the people who will be running for office in November. Newspapers, magazines, radio and television are reporting their actions and statements on public issues. Read, watch, and remember. Above all, keep in mind that the best-informed serviceman in the world won't be able to cast his vote this fall if he's not eligible. So find out what the candidates stand for, voting requirements, and you'll be most precious rights. (AFPS) Sunday, 15 July 1956 CATHOLIC MASSES Sunday, 7000-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday. 1280-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Frl.-1646-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800, 1900 -2000, and daily before Mass PROTESTANT SERVICES 0930-Sunday School 0980-Sunday School 0980-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship (Naval Base Chapel) 1980-Fellowship Hour Wednesday: 1980-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal JEWISH SERVICES Friday-1900-Naval Base Chapel CaRaCH Oa CHRIST 1000-Bible Study 1045-Worship Service Community Auditorium LATER DAY SAINTS Sunday-1100-Naval Station Library CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Sunday-1000-NavSta Library CDR Peter R. McPhee arrived Monday to assume duties as the Naval Base protestant chaplain. Chaplain McPhee is now senior chaplain on the Base and is relieving LCDR Karl G. Peterson who will leave for the New London, Conn. submarine base this month. Chaplain McPhee's duty station before coming to Gtmo was the Naval Air Station in Corpus Christi, Texas where he was stationed for three years. At Corpus Christi CDR McPhee was senior chaplain and also served on the staff of Commander Naval Air Advanced Training. Entered Navy in 1941 He entered the Navy in 1941 after having a parish in Kittittas, Washington. Chaplain McPhee is make sure you meet your state's prepared to exercise one of your Calendar of Events Saturday, July 14 Rifle and Pistol Club-Monthly Pistol Match-NavSta Pistol Range-1:00 p.m. Jr. Rifle and Pistol Club-Classroom Instruction-Bldg. 27-1:00 p.m. Monday, July 16 Beginning today vehicle inspection for all civilians, Marine Exchange, Special Services, CPO Club and all other activities having Base-registered vehicles. This inspection lasts through July 18. Sojourner's Club-Officer's Club-7:30 p.m. O.E.S. Social Club-Girl Scout Hut7:30 p.m. Payday-all military personnel. Tuesday, July 17 American Legion-Flt. Reserve Rm. (Marina Pt.)-7:30 p.m. American Legion Auxiliary-Girl Scout Hut-7:30 p.m. Wednesday, July 18 Toastmaster's Club-Officers' Club6:30 p.m. Thursday, July 19 Navy Wives Club-Bingo-1:30 p.m. Felloweraft Club 1078-Community Auditorium-7:30 p.m. Friday, July 20 CPO Wives-Bingo-Family Rm. (CPO Club)--8:00 p.m. INDIAN Photo a Baptist minister and received his higher education at William Jewell in Liberty, Missouri, at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Fort Worth, Texas and at Berkeley Baptist Divinity School in Calif. During the second World War CDR McPhee served in the USS ZEILIN, a Marine transport, which made all the initial landings in 1942 and 1943 in the north and south Pacific. Ten years ago he spent a short stay in Gtmo while in the USS VALLEY FORGE. The new chaplain whose home is in Salt Lake City. Utah, came to Guantanamo on the JOHNSON with his wife and three boys, ages 8, 10 and 12. Reception Tuesday There will be a reception for Chaplain McPhee Tuesday, July 17, at 1900 at the Naval Base School patio. All who wish to greet the new protestant chaplain are invited. A third chaplain for Guantanamo is expected to arrive this Fall with duties at the Naval Air Station. He is CDR Allen Budd. And sometime in September CDR A. P. Finan will report to the Base from RecSta, Boston, Mass. as relief for CDR. J. J. Sullivan, Catholic chaplain. NO SUNDAY SCHOOL Due to painting and renovation of school rooms on Chapel Hill and Victory Hill, there will be no Protestant Sunday School tomorrow or the next Sunday. Classes will resume on Sunday July 29. What's Doin' Stateside Helen Dow Peck of Bethel, Conn., believed in Ouija boards, so much so that she left $178,000 to one John Gale Forbes because his name appeared on her Ouija board in 1919. When Mrs. Peck died recently, investigators were unable to turn up John Gale Forbes. Page Two

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M Sattikday, 14 July 1956 a0 THE INDIAN Summer Recreation Program Closed The summer recreation of the Naval Base School ended yesterday, July 13. During the preceding six weeks, approximately 500 Base children took advantage of the summer program which was patterned from similar programs set up in Stateside schools. Swimming classes for beginners, intermediates and swimmers were held at the Naval Station, NAS and Marine Site pools. Horseback riding lessons were also offered. During the afternoons, and activities program consisting of library study, etc, was held. According to Jack Brown, director of the summer activities, the summer program was a success and similar program will be set up in the coming summers' months. Registration for the school-year '56-'57 will be held on August 16, and classes will begin, August 20. Commanding Officers .. (Continued from Page One) commanding officer CAPT J. B. Stoll, DC, in formal change of command ceremonies, at the Dental Clinic, Friday Morning, July 13, at 9:00 a.m. CAPT Stoll will assume his former duties of Executive officer. For the past three years, CAPT Schneider has been on the staff of the U. S. Naval Dental School, NNMC, Bethesda, Md. He entered the naval service in 1936, after having graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Dentistry with the class of 1932. He has served as dental officer on several ships, with the Marine Corps and is also a graduate of the Industrial College of the Armed Forces, Washington, D. C. CAPT Schneider was accompanied to Gtmo by his wife, daughter, Jane and son, Robert. COL Penzold relieved LT COL W. C. Esterline, at the Marine formal change of command ceremonies, Wednesday, July 11, at 9:00 a.m. COL Esterline will assume the duties of executive officer. Prior to his arrival in Gtmo, COL Penzold served as Chief of Staff for Lant Raex, 2-56. COL Penzold is a graduate of the Virginia Military Institute with the class of 1936. He has served with numerous Marine commands and spent the war years, 1941 through 1945 in the central and western Pacific. He is also a graduate of the. Amphibious Warfare school, Quantico, Va., where he served as an instructor for three years. COL Penzold arrived in Gtmo accompanied by his wife and five daughters. Cuban Catholic Teachers Tour Base, Helicopter Demonstration At NAS INDIAN Photo At the Main Gate by the Base Police Headquarters, interpreters W. M. Mas, SN, NAS; L. Ramirez, PN3, NAS and Luis Rivera, AN, VU-10, left to right, pose with two of the six Cuban Catholic priests that headed the 138 Cuban Catholic teachers that toured the Base Sunday, July 8. Commander Naval Base and the local Holy Name Society played hosts to the Cubans from 1:00 p.m. until 5:30 p.m. LCDR Edward Kubicki, Holy Name Society president, was in charge of tour interpreters and guides who led the visitors throughout the afternoon jaunt which included the Base Chapel, school, Fleet landing, Marine site, Villamar and other housing areas, Fleet Recreation Center, I & E office and Phillips Park. Six buses transported the teachers to these points. At the Naval Air Station, the teachers were treated to a helicopter demonstration which was highlighted by the execution of a simulated rescue operation. After the tour the group was conveyed back to the Base school where coffee, refreshments and hors d'oeuvres were served. The visitors were all impressed by the hospitality of ComNavBase and felt that their convention which started out in Havana had wound up in the United States. The group left at 5:30. Few Seek Prize Money Offered In Contest To Name Base School So far only two entries have been received in the contest to name the Base dependents' school. Prizes of $25 and $10 are being offered for the best suggestion. The contest is open to all military personnel and civilian employees of naval activities at Guantanamo Bay. Their dependents are also eligible. Names suggested for the school should be those of prominent deceased Naval figures. They should be submitted in writing to Commander Naval Base, Attn: School Name Competition Judges, prior to July 31. Each name suggested must be accompanied by a written statement of not more than 100 words telling why the school should be so named. There is no limit to the number of entries a personmay submit. Three prize-winning names, togethe; with the reason for each, will be forwarded to the Chief of Naval Personnel who will choose from the three, the official school name. Little Theater Elects Semi-Annual Officers At the regular monthly meeting, Tuesday evening, July 10, the semi-annual election of officers was held. Elected to head the group are Don Wilkinson, president; Jim LeMar, vice-president; Joyce Stevenson, secretary, and Winnie Mathews, treasurer. Peggy Way was appointed director of the new Little Theater play "Laura" with Flo Schnake serving as assistant. Fred Hannibal was named technical director and Jane Whited, producer. Tentative dates for the play were set for August' 28 through September 1. All Base personnel are eligible' to become members of the Little Theater and are urged to attend the regular monthly meeting held on the second Tuesday of each month at 7:30 p.m. To guide you as to your particular state's absentee voting 'laws, AFPS is running a three part voting series. This article is the second in a series on registering to vote by absentee ballot. RHODE ISLAND Registration is permanent for those qualified voters who registered under the Per manent Registration Act of 1952 and have voted at least once since then. Servicemen, employees of religious and welfare agencies serving in the armed forces and their dependents, may vote without registering. All other persons desiring to vote must register in person at the office of the Board of Canvassers, place of residence, not latet than 60 days before election day. Kentucky Registration is permanent unless a person has failed to vote in any primary or general election for two consecutive years. Members of the armed forces 'and their dependents become registered when a Federal Post Card application for absence ballot is mailed to the county court clerk of residence. All other persons must register ia person at the above office by Sept 7. California Registration is permanent unless a voter failed to vote at either the last primary or general election. Members of the armed forces,' civilian employees serving outside the U.S., mem bers of welfare or religious agencies assist. ing the armed forces and their dependents need not apply for registration. They are automatically registered upon mailing a Federal Post Card application to the coun ty clerk of residence. All other unregistered persons should request an "Affidavit of Registration" from the above office at' least 90 days before election day. PENNSYLVANIA Registration is permanent unless a person has failed to vote at least once in past two years. Members of the armed forces are exempt from all registration requirements. All other persons must register in person with the County Board of Elections, county of residence, or wiht the Registration Commission, city of residence. This may be done any time before Sept. 18. For further information, consult your voting officer.-(APPS) Notice Complete information and details as to how the proposed Navy Exchange Trailer Park will be set up and to whom the trailers will be available is not yet known. According to Navy Exchange officials, as soon as complete information is available and has been made official, notices will appear in the INDIAN. Please, do not call the Navy Exchange for details concerning the new trailer park. e

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M Saturday, 14 July 1953 VU -10 Prop Blast FTG Chief Transfers To Fleet by 0. A. Porter Jr. The Intra-squadron Golf Tourney ended after a fast and surprising final week of competition. LT Tom N. Drace, who lead the tournament from the very first, walked off with top honors and first place. LT Drace was awarded as First Prize a new golf putter, which we know he will find useful when he burns up those Georgia links around Glynco. Although he entered competition late, LCDR C. Scott Ferguson came from behind to cop second place. He received a colorful set of club covers as his prize. D. E. Campbell, AE3, who was among the top contenders throughout the tournament, came through in Third position. He was awarded a rather sporty golf cap. D. E. Campbell will find that golf cap useful this week. He and C. C. Roberts, ADC, are currently in Norfolk, Virginia, where they are representing VU-10 in the annual AirLant golf tournament. The Mallards wish them both the best of luck. There are more cigars being passed around the hangar these days than we'll be able to smoke all year. Congratulations to LT Orland A. Porter Jr. on his recent promotion to that rank and to CWO Frank K. Hamel on his selection to the permanent rank of W-4. LT Porter and CWO Hamel are the third and fourth officers respectively that have been promoted in VU-10 within the past three weeks. This is in addition to the baby business, which right now is doing equally as well. Chief and Mrs. Standley Wenderlich are the proud parents of a new son, Thomas John. Young Tom weighed in at seven pounds eight ounces at 0027 on July 7. Chief and Mrs. J. P. Carroll have a new daughter, Eileen. Both mother and daughter Eileen, who are currently residing in Philadelphia, are doing fine. Two more reenlistments for the Mallards too. J. D. Mullins, ADI, recently reenlisted in the Navy for an additional four years. He received change of duty orders and this week he and Mrs. Mullins departed Gtmo for NAS, Lakehurst, where he will be attached to HU-2. W. M. Blanchard, A03, reenlisted for an additional six years. Congratulations to both of you. Welcome Back to B. G. Vail, BM3, who has been assigned to NAS for the past year, and to Chief L. H. Podgett, who returns from Norfolk TAD. Welcome aboard to D. F. Nicholson, AD2, who reports on board from VR-6 at McGuire AFB, Trenton. A. L. Gibeavlt, AD3, has been transferred to NAAS, Kingsville. Reserve, Over 19 Years In Navy INDIAN Photo CAPT F. S. Habecker, Commander Fleet Training Group, gives Michial Benedini, BTC, a farewell handshake one half hour before Benedini transferred to the Fleet Reserve and civilian life. Benedini had been in the Navy 19 years and nine months. He enlisted in Sprinfield, Mass. His duty stations while in the navy were the USS LEARY, the USS BENSON, the USS CLEVELAND, the USS TWINING, at the US Naval Recruiting Station in Philadelphia, in the USS FORREST ROYAL, the USS DES MOINES, and he came to the Fleet Training Group in Gtmo in August, 1953. With his transfer to the Fleet Reserve, Benedini has taken a position with the local Public Works department in the inspection branch. The Benedinis have two children. F T G Bulletin The results of the 4th of July FTG golf matches were no surprise as far as low gross is concerned. Mrs. Edie Ware was first low gross for women with a nice 82. J. L. Bland, GMC, was first low gross for men with a very nice 73. Mrs. Rita Bland made it a clean sweep for the Bland family by taking women's low net with a 75 followed close behind by Mrs. Audrey Page with a 76. J. F. Shea, BTC, walked off with the men's low net with a 65 and CAPT Murphy displayed a clear eye and cool determination to take second low net with a 68. The junior tournament, which was nine holes, was won by young "KJ" Skadowski with a 51, Jimmy Christie had a 52 and Jim Page a 62. Most of the talk around FTG on Monday morning concerned the weekend trip to Port-au-Prince on CAMBRIA. The ship's officers and men were perfect hosts and did everything they could to make the trip more pleasant. It seems that the sight-seers didn't miss a thing while ashore. The Casino, voodoo dancing, French cooking, the Iron Market, La Perchoir, The Riviera and, of course, the taxi drivers were much discussed. FTG extends best wishes for a good cruise to the five Coast Guardmen who reported aboard for duty last week. There are more to follow soon. Young Bill Sewell jr. arrived on board the Naval Hospital Sunday morning 8 July at 0357. He weighed in at 7 pounds 12 ounces. W. W. Sewell, YN3, of the Administrative department and his wife Judy are the proud parents. They are currently living in Caimanera. Three new men reported aboard this past week. Robert C. Sheldon, SO1, came from USS BROWNSON (DD-808). He had previously served in USS PURVIS (DD-709) and USS SARSFIELD (DD-837). He is married and has two children. His family is now in Portsmouth R. I. Thomas J. Anderson, BTC, reported from the Narraganset Bay, Fleet Training Group. He is married and has six children, five girls and finally a boy. He has previously served in USS SELFRIDGE (DD-357), USS TAYLOR (DD468), USS OKLAHOMA CITY (CL-91) and USS RICH (DD-820). John A. Perry, QMC, also reported from the Narraganset Bay, Fleet Training Group. He is married and has a six week old girl. He has previously served in USS WAUKESHA (AKA-84),, USS PC 1262, USS YMS 114, USS HECTOR (AR-7), and USS QUACHITA COUNTY (LST-1071). Fleet Reserve News Branch 100 held its regular monthly meeting Tuesday night 10 July. Out of 45 new members there were 31 shipmates present for their initiation into the Branch. They were shipmates, Abla, Atkeison, Campbell, Childers, Cochran, Coley, Dittrich, Duvall, French, Gibson, Gillis, Hague, Hayes, Horning, Josey, Klemis, Lanier, Mayfield, Nicholson, Nolan, Pedneault, Racek, Rahl, Ramsey, Remon, Rittenhouse, Striegel, Tricarico, Walezuk, Walmsley, and Wells. WELCOME SHIPMATES! Branch 100 is proud to say that we are getting a lot of new members. This is one of the responsibilities of each member. It only takes a few minutes to explain some of the things the Fleet Reserve Association does for the Navy career enlisted man. Let's all do our part to help make Branch 100 a bigger and better branch by getting more and more new members. There will be a picnic at Windmill Beach on 28 July for members of Branch 100 and their families and holders of FRA membership cards. The cost will be 500 per person and children free. It is requested that you contact your representative and let him know how many tickets you will want not later than Monday, 23 July. For further information on the picnic please contact one of the representatives listed below. Naval Station: Abla, Adams, French, Bonner, Horning, Kirwan, Powell, Schoonover. Naval Air Station: Boyd. Fleet Training Group: Huff. VU-10: Harrison. Leeward Point: Paulsen. Naval Supply Depot: Hohman. Marine Barracks: Campbell. Naval Hospital: Ryan. The above named shipmates are your contact for any Branch business. Trail Of The Eagle The Boy Scouts will hold their Court of Honor this coming Wednesday, July 18, at 8 p.m. at the School Auditorium on Chapel Hill. At this time the boys who have worked so hard to pass their tests before their counsellors and the Boards of Review which are held monthly, will be presented their Merit Badges and Advancement ratings. This is an occasion of great accomplishment for these boys and all parents are urged to attend this impressive ceremony. All Scout officials, friends and the public in general are also very cordially invited to attend. 9 Page Four THE INDIAN

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Saturday, 14 July 1956 THE INDIAN f Page Fiv The Medic Ships At Sea Are Land Extensions Pet Vaccination by W. A. Dal & R. A. Albrecht The Stork Club \ T NwaTiot he stork club uftome Nation Says Int. Law Is Still Available New additions to the stork clubOnoftem darypvion for the last few weeks are as fol-Onoftem darypvios lows ah glasto feCwek a Mrs Janby Ely U. Orias embodied in the Naval Base Reglows:ulations states that "it is obligakins, and boys to ADC and Mrs. Navy ships of the United States and other countries recognized by the story to have animals on the Base S. Wenderlich, YN3 and Mrs. United Nations, are not only floating hunks of steel but are floating vaccinated." W. Sewell, AE3 and Mrs. T. Long, and BM3 and Mrs. D. Sabol. Conlumps of soil as well! Owners wishing their animals gratulations to all and the best According to International Law, all public vessels other than commerinoculated for rabies may call of luck. cial, are exempt from local jurisdiction when within foreign territorial R. L. Hill, HM1, at 8685 or M. New Arrivals waters. These ships are, by fiction of International Law, considered part Gordon, HMI, at 8765 for arrange Arriving for duty recently were of the territory of the country which they represent. $1.Ew HM3s H. L. Johnson from NAS, S is e do n Pensacola, Florida and C. J. ThoPensacola~ ~ ~ Flrd n .J hSn tis soltahed vesselisn suHe may also investigate whether Rabies vaccination identification mas from the Naval Proving n s the contracting parties to a wedtags may be picked up by per Grounds, Dahlgreen, Va. K. O. rm nstefee we on Wadswork, hN, reported hr ft b ding he is going to solemnize are sons with pets that have already Wadswrk, N, rpoMt dee fotnbeodhehremlsa limit of the mother country. On competent. Also, he exercises disbeen innoculated, at the Base Hosfrom HCS, Bainbridge, Maryland. the high seas the ship is likewise cretionary preventive measures to pital medical storage office any-. Welcome aboard, men. insure that contraband articles as time during working hours. Bon Voyage defined by Customs regulations are M. A. Bilbo, HM3, departing for An international law principle not in transit, etc. duty aboard the USS WISCONknown as extraterritoriality supIn compliance with the home CPO W ives SIN; D. J. Sullivan, HM3 Rec Sta. ports this practice. By extratergovernment's foreign policy and Brooklyn for separation and H. E. ritoriality is meant the freedom commitments within the bounds of The regular business meeting Davis, HM2, NAS, Jacksonville for from arrest of certain persons reinternational practices, the comwas held in the Family Room of separation. Good Luck to all. siding in a foreign country by mending officer of a vessel "may the CPO Club, Friday, July 6. This Meet The MAA virtue of government employment, grant the right of asylum to poliwas the first meeting presided over The "local sheriffs" who see that These persons are: Ambassadors, tical or other refugees if he thinks by the new President, Doris Hays. good old USNH runs "4.0 gung-ho" ministers or other accredited dithe grant would enhance the inCalendar of events for the corand keep the troops in clean uniplomatic agents. Public vessels in terest of humanity." forms, shined shoes, squared hats foreign ports and armed forces But in 1910, at Corinto, Nicaand belts, are three pretty good crossing foreign territory with perragus a native, in fleeing from the beach party, and cake sale; but guys despite their tough job. mission also enjoy extraterritorial local police, swam out and climbed more talk about these when the They are Chief Master at Arms, privilege, aboard the USS PRINCETON and plans have been completed by the L. B. Whited, HMC, assistant MAA As a floating extension of the appealed for protection. Shortly entertainment committee. D. H. Willingham, HM1, and MAA rad h he D. .illngamHM, ad AA territory of the state, the ship can afteradthcie of police went The hospital committee for the W. E. Basham, HM2. Chief Whited be considered as exercising the on board and requested that the month are Doris Hays and Betty became a "blue-jacket" in August powers of sovereignty. It meets refugee be surrendered to him. Jenkins. Now that Marie Chandler of 1939 and has been in Gtmo the four requirements of a soyCAPT Hayes, the PRINCETON's and Emily Trapp are out of hossince May of 1955 at his present reign state as conceived by skipper, considered the local aupital let us not have any more position. He reported aboard from Aristotle. The manpower compleauthorities fully capable of handling members checking in there. the USS KIEINSMITH APD 134. meant of the vessel is its people, the case." Consequently, he turned Hostesses for the month are, "Little Willie" Willingham put the physical structure of the ship the refugee over without question. Marie Chandler, Loretta Craver on the garb of the U.S. Navy in takes the definite territory and the The fact of birth is another and Ida Ewards. 1940 and has been "on the rock inter-ship commands which are typical example attesting to the since November of 1955. He redirectly responsible to the ship's sovereignty extension of the home A cordial welcome is extended ported abroad from the USS AGcaptain denote shipboard organgovernment to the vessel wherever to all new arrivals on the Base. GRESSIVE MSD 422. "Little Wilsized government. The fourth refound. For instance, if a child is So that we may be acquainted lie's" M.A.A. experience includes aboard a pub atwo year hitch at USNH Charstatus of the ship which connotes out regard to the m s citigood time during your stay here. leston, S. C. "Boats" Basham beindependence from outside control. zenship, the child is deemed a came a "white hat" in 1942 and citizen of that country whose flag has been with us since May of this Occurrences aboard the vessel dethe vessel flies. This legal fiction year. Qsb year. mnigteeecs fsvrin i aldtepicpeo u oi He reported here from "home" powers are accorded full faith and the right of birthplace, to which The regular business meeting of after a short tour of civilian life. credit by other states and are conthe United States' the Scoo aitorium on hrsThese three men have the most sidered by them as "quasi" acts national law adheres. day, July 5. Five new members thankless job in the hospital but of the state to which the public In another instance, a foreign were added to the roll. They were still manage to keep cleanliness vessel belongs. Bonn fide acts of national may commit an infraction Ruth Leach, Eleanor Childers, Jean and order around the clock. its commanding officer toward a aboard a vessel. This case becomes Brown Flora Hi Hair doesn't grow too well in foreign power are deemed legitriable under the laws of the Craver. Jr. Quarters, leading proof of this timate. country represented by the ship. statement: McCafferty, Dal, ColeBut this right may be rendered Members volunteered for their maJhsoWdwrtHys Through its commanding officer ngtrbyhexrcsofx-turn meeting the transport' on maJohnson, Wadsworth, Hayesnuaoyb th exrie feand "Red on the Head" McCormick, a shiptradition if there is any. July 9, and also for Bingo for the plus Sullivan, Johnston, and Ouzoboard chief executive and a repIn time of war, the principle of patients on July 18. Discussion was nian--rsnaeo h edo i extraterritoriality may be violated held for a class in textile painting. Filibirdy gets seasick in mild government, governmental policies by belligerent states. But boaThe afternoon Bingo this month "Yippee" weather ---Babe S. pital ships, vessels engaged in at Villamar is on July 19 at writes a letter a day to Philly -as foreign, are put into operation. philanthropic or religious missions, 1:30 p.m. Bilbo has been seep wearing a In the execution of domestic carter ships designated for and This was the last business meet"white glove" ---The 0. R. policies the commanding officer is engaged in the exchange of war ing of our sponsors, Chaplain and and the Food Service tied this week guided by the rules prescribed by prisoners and other ships operatMrs. Peterson. We bid them farefor the Title "Fewest Working the home government. As an axing on account of a treaty or spawell and many thanks for all that Hours Per Day" ---164 days ample ha may issue a memorancil proclamation enjoy freedom they have done for us. till Christmas ---P. S. Kardum to all hands implementing the from intrusions and capture acOur next business meeting is on don caught his first fish on Ron's duly home-made absentee voting cording to the Hague Convention August 2, at 8:00 p.m. in the School head. law. of 1907. auditorium.

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ft Sauda,14Jly15 paid SI z GTMO SPORTING CHIPS by C. C. Drumright Straight Pitches. .The new section of the regular 18 hole course has been secured and will not be opened for several weeks, reason for this action was due to heavy maintenance required in the face lifting process. We are fortunate in still having 18 holes however, your front nine is what has commonly been called the ladies' nine. Your 10th T was formerly the first and your course after leaving the 10th green is to proceed to the regular No. 3 T, this hole is now your 11th, after this instead of hitting up old No. 4, you reverse and play the regular No. 11, this hole now being your No. 12, you then by-pass the regular No. 12 (short par three) and go to the regular No. 13th T and from here in all is as was. You need to use the blue score cards for this 18, handicap strokes are correct as listed. Our Liberal Arts Department. ...I use a club to pull my ball from under a bush or long grass, counting the operation as one storke. Did I score correctly? No. I loose the hole for not hitting at the ball "fairly" with the clubhead. In match play my ball strikes myself or my caddieI loose the hole. Rimmin The Cup Around The 19th. .Rogers out of commission due to injuries sustained playing ball, someone should tell him, Rotherberg is gone. Red Adams looking like a pro for nine holes, making the turn with a nice 31. Wish to caution all strangers. ...Bushes' turkey farm is barren. Big duel set for to-day, 1230, Place-Putting Green-Participants CDR Dobbins, Radioman Flanagan, Chief Englund and Mr. Griffin Weapons-Putters-Honor at stake-1st, 2nd and 3rd prizes from our last weeks blind bogey. Wrens Still On Top In P. League, Colts, Bears Tied For First In Little The Peewee league has the Wrens still on top berth with eight winnings and two loses. After the seventh week of league play, teams now stand as follows: Peewee Standings Teams W Wrens 8 Chis 7 Cubs 6 Eels 6 Owls 5 Lions 4 Pos 1 In the Little league the Colts L 2 5 5 5 5 8 9 and the Bears Pet. .800 .588 .545 .545 .600 .400 .100 are tied for first honor. Both teams have won nine games and suffered only two defeats thus far. Little League Standings Teams W L CB Pet, Colts 9 2 .648 Bears 9 2 .648 Eagles 7 4 .0% .688 Rams 6 8 .2 .500 Hawks 1 10 .6% .000 There are still a few vacancies for boys seven and eight years old in the Little League. Boys under seven are not desired at this time since the managers do not have sufficient time to spend training the boys to bring them up to par with the rest of the team members. Parents interested in having their sons assigned to a team may call LT Colbert at 8131 (office) or 8386 (home). 1OND Pistol Team Fails To Qualify For All-Navy Shoot At the Atlantic Fleet pistol competitions held at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina last week, 56 individual shooters and eight teams were recorded to have participated. : Six of the 56 individual shootera at the Lejeune pistol matches were .representatives from the Tenth ,Naval District. Of these six shooters which formed the ComTen team, five came from ComNavBase Gtmo and the sixth member of the team came from the ComTen Staff in San Juan, Puerto Rico. The team failed to qualify for the All-Navy pistol matches to be held at NAS Norfolk, Virginia, from July 17 through 19. One of the two teams entered by the Potomac River Command won the top flight honor at the Camp Lejeune shooting matches. The Potomac River Command pistol team will represent the Atlantic Fleet in the All-Navy pistol competitions. The local Rifle and Pistol club will sponsor a skeet shoot at the Marine skeet range open to all shooters on July 28. Details of the shoot will be in next week's INDIAN. 1st Games In 776 B. C. Modern Day Olympics Outstrips Old Grecian Counterpart In Size New York (AFPS)-The United States expects to send some 325 athletes to the 16th Olympiad in Melbourne, Australia, later this yearand when the contestants of more than 70 countries are counted the total may well reach into the thousands. While exact figures are unknown, it is probable that at their height the old games never had more than a few hundred competitors. Yet dynasties fell and rulers were deposed as a result of the scoring. The first Olympics in recorded history were held in 776 B.C., when one Coroebus was victorious in the equivalent of a 200-yard dash. Earlier contests are shrouded in myth and legend. There are many stories of the origin of the games. One of the most provocative says that King Oenamaus, who ruled the Greek city of Elis near Olympia, devised a grisly pastime. He ordered that his beautiful daughter Hippodamia could be won as a bride by anyone who could escape with her in a chariot. Her father would pursue the abductor in another chariot. If the suitor was caught he would be killed by the monarch's spear. Thirteen young men attempted and all 13 failed. A 14th aspirant was a youthful warrior named Pelops hired someone to sabotage the king's vehicle. During the race, the wheel fell off of Oenomaus' chariot and he was killed in the Strikes & Spares by Dolly Aumann The last two weeks have brought two of our beginners into some good games, Bette Johnson with 158 and Tex. Zarkou 153, which goes to show it can be done, and may be of encouragement to some who say they can not bowl good enough to get into our leagues. A meeting of captains and committee members was held on Friday and the date for the Bowling Banquet was set for August 7. It was decided we would have an evening affair this time, watch this column for time and place later. High-Games V. Hall D. Aumann J. Enders J. Darby D. Dickson M. Swords H. Hareh R. Garaudy G. Kraft ..McGowan Tea Bowleretts Alley-Katz Push-Overs Lilies of the A Gutter-Gals Down-Unders Spotlers Crickets 180 171 170 165 164 168 160 157 156 1m6 ISt Hight-Averages J. Darby 149 F. Grounds 147 M. Zeigler 147 D. Aumann 145 G. Rowan 145 G. Kraft 142 M. Swords 141 M. Marsh 141 ntdlas W-81 W-81 W.22 alleys W-22 W-18 w-ls W*12 W-11 1.9 IP9 L18 L-18 1.22 T-27 1.28 .29 crash. In celebration. Pelops is supposed to have founded the games as a thanksgiving ceremony to Zeus for his triumph. Whatever their origin, the games lasted for more than 10 centuries. After 410 B. C. the games reached their peak. It was the ambition of every city in Greece to have an Olympic champion. But after the Roman invasion the games gradually deteriorated. The athletes, instead of being satisfied with a simple olive wreath and municipal honors, began receiving money and other valuable prizes. The games were abolished as a public nuisance in 394 A.D. by Emperor Theodosius I of Rome. The games were revived in Athens in 1896,with athletes from nine nations competing. Ladies Golf Shots by Mae Hadley A week ago Friday the lady golfers played a match versus par tourney. Golf balls were awarded to the following winners: 18 Hole TournamentFirst place-tieCynthia Holley, Juanita Babcock Second place-Marion Caruthers 9 Hole TournamentFirst place-Edna Bush Second place-tieMillie Kuba. Mae Hadley Congratulations to Cynthia Holley for breaking 100 by two strokes and to Margaret Wall for making a birdie on No. 7. A welcome is extended to all ladies interested in playing golf. Anyone wishing to join the Ladies Golf club should be at the golf club house any Friday morning at 0800. Villamar Schedules Dance Next Friday The Villamar-Bargo Community Council will sponsor a community dance to be held at the Villamar lyceum Friday, July 20, from 8:00 p.m. to 12:00 p.m. Holders of Department of Defense ID card, Liquor Card, Commissary Permit, or Family passes may invite guests of their choice. The council pointed out however that guests will be admitted only if accompanied by their hosts. Julio Delgado and his Cha-ChaCha Orchestra will furnish the music. 9 M THE INDIAN

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Saturday, 14 July 1956 The Fish Tales VU-10, NAS Battle For Second Position While NavBase Cops Cellar, Marines 1st by Carlos Caballo by Pat Aldridge That Gray Nurse Shark, caught last week by Darian and Waite, just prior to the tournaments' beginning, is the same variety responsible for the deaths of an average of seventy persons annually off the coast of Australia. The danger is such, in fact, that the Australian government not only lays strong nets off shore but maintains a constant plane patrol hunting the ugly sea beasts. The biggest Shark entered, as of this writing, in the contest is a 125 pounder, a baby compared to those many others seen playing around in waters beneath the ATC dump. The two Tarpon entered, by yours truly and Ernie Guirey, are babes of the species, also, running a mere five and two pounds but, where those were hooked, there are some grand daddys to be had and they're biting. That particular spot is a seeming playground for Tarpon, Snook and Snapper for they can be seen in great numbers in all sizes although the Snook run larger than any we've noted elsewhere. One doesn't mess around with light test line and leader, either, for we lost two Snook when 40-test leader, unkinked and new, snapped like thread. Technique, unusual for Snook but applicable in this area, is still fishing with shrimp. The Tarpon hit this bait equally well and the bites come fast. Any tide, any time will assure a fine mess of pan sizers. Leeward Pointers should remember that there is an official weighin station for the tournament at the new "Fisherman's Wharf." There, too, for those who do not care to take a boat from main side, boats and motors may be rented and bait bought. Rental periods run differently than they do at the Naval Station Locker. There are just two periods, rental wise, designated morning and afternoon, but actually covering the 24 hour time lapse. The fee is $2 per period for boat and motor and, should it be rough out there, one having rented a vessel from Naval Air Station Locker, may leave it at the Leeward Locker and return by safer launch. And that's it for this time. "In the old days," Grandpa remembers, "when a young man began sowing wild oats, his father started the thrashing machine." Now that all the dust stirred up by a season of hard play is all but settled on Diamond No. 1, only the top and cellar positions are firmly in grasp. Everyone is the happier that the League-leading Marines cooperated by losing three games which makes them seem more human ...no one seems to like the idea of having an unbeatable superman in their midst. Second place honors are a different matter. With only four games still left to play, VU-10 and NAS are battling it out right down the line. The Flyers are the ones that downed the Marines twice and are always in the running no matter whom they play. The same can be said for VU-10's Mallards. Monday, July 23, will mark the first game of the play-offs. No one will actually be a favorite here and rabid partisan fans are the only ones that will go out on a limb to pick the winner. There will be two games, one each on Monday and Tuesday. Two teams will taste defeat and be out of the running. The two winning teams will then play each other for two out of three games. And, in view of the past, these two teams could easily be the two low teams in the League at the end of play. Fans who like their baseball had better not miss any of these play-off games. Marines 7, VU-TEN 2 Played Sunday, the game was an anti-climax because it could mean nothing in League Standings. The League-leading Leathernecks jumped to an early lead and were never headed. The Mallards didn't play their usual brand of ball and missed a good chance to help nail down second place. NAS 7, Naval Base 6 If anyone was in doubt about standings, this Monday night game should have dispelled it. It kept NAS in the running for second place honors and dug the cellar for Naval Base just a little deeper. A closely played game, the outcome was in doubt right up to the bottom half of the ninth inning. Winning pitcher was McCalmont, loser Schiller. NAS jumped into the lead in the second with one run and added two more in the third. Naval Base came back in the fifth and sixth with a total of three of their own to tie up the game 3-3. Ransom of the Flyers put his team back into the lead with a -grand-slam with no one on and they led 4-3 until the ninth. In this free-swinging inning, Naval Base collected three runs off of three hits and had high hopes. until NAS took a last crack at changing the score. Three men collected singles and the fourth a double resulting in three runs and the game ended 7-6, with no Flyers out. No telling what score would have resulted with a full inning of play. NAS 001 200 103-7 9 3 Naval Base 000 012 003-6 6 9 VU-TEN 3, NAS 2 This aerial dogfight between two usually high-flying teams was scoreless until late in the game. Most of the flight time performed by the ball was purely between the pitchers and catchers ...until the ninth inning. The game was one of the best played thus far in the season and had fans going wild right up to the winning run. Montgomery went all of the way for the Mallards and came up as winning pitcher. Loss is credited to Waldrop who was relieved by McCalmont in the bottom of the ninth with the score tied but the winning run on first. VU-10 was leading 2-1 as the ninth inning began in what appeared to be an insurmountable count. Not knowing this, the Flyers took Montgomery's offering and had men on 1st and 3rd with 2 out. Whittaker had 2 strikes and 1 ball with two away and lined one out just a little too far for King for a big double that scored the tying run. After retiring the Flyers, VU10 led off with Bouffard rapping out a single. It was at this point that McCalmont took over hurling duties from Waldrop. Bouffard promptly and safely stole second and advanced to third when Azzarita knocked a grounder to first for the second out. This brought up Postal who connected for a single, ending the game as Bouffard crossed home for the winning run. The Standings Teams Won Lost Marines 15 3 VU-10 10 9 NAS 9 11 Naval Base 4 15 The Schedule Sunday VU-10 vs Naval Base Tuesday Naval Base vs Marines Thursday NAS vs Marines Ham Radio News by Dot Sumara The business meeting of the Guantanamo Amateur Radio club was held Thursday, July 5, at the home of Dick Cousins. Present were Dick Cousins, KG4AD, Stan Sumara W4BTH, Dorothy Sumara KG4AC, Walt Holloway KG4AN, Bob Hewitt KG4AR, John Garvey KG4AZ, and Ralph Hurd. A new meeting place for August was discussed and the next meeting will be held at the Amateur Radio Station KG4AO which is located top side in the NAS Administration Bldg. We wish to welcome any one interested in "HAM" radio, to come up and join us. The next meeting will be at 1900, Aug. 1. The Club will be participating in the new coastal emergency net as a link between Puerto Rico and Florida during the hurricane season. Navy Unit Scouts Carribbean Storms Washington (AFPS) -An advance unit of navy "Hurricane Hunters" has been sent to San Juan, Puerto Rico, to scout the development of tropical storms in the breeding area east of the Antilles and in the Eastern Caribbean. The unit, a component of Airborne Early Warning Sq. 4, will operate in coordination with the Miami, Fla., Fleet Weather Cei+ tral. P2V Neptunes and WV-a Super Constellations will once again be used for reconnaissance flights in the storms, the Navy said. THE INDIAN Page Seven

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Saturday, 14 %taly 1956 ft sm TE INDIAN W Navy-BPPO-10ND-.Guantanamo Cinema -Sco~p Steve Allen and Ed Sullivan are running neck to neck in a race to see which one comes out on top with their Sunday night TV show. Allen is threatening to take over the No. 1 spot which Sullivan has held for so long. One of the reasons for Allen's threat to Sullivan was the appearance of Elvis Presley on his July 1, show. Gad!, what does this Presley have? From what I've heard of his records down here he is long on noise and short on actual singing talent. He has accomplished one thing however, and that is turning the one syllable word you into at least seven syllables. "Laura" the Little Theater's new play is on the way ...casting was held the past week and Peggy Way a well-known Little Theaterite was chosen director ...the recent surge of re-runs (some of which are not too hot) on the Base is due to the Exchange receiving only four new films a week ...cross the fingers and hope they dig up some oldies that are worth seeing again. Picnic (Col, in color) is one of the most awaited films to arrive on the Base in a long while. Here we have the Broadway hit made into a movie that somewhat expands on the original scope of the play. Bill Holden plays the stranger who comes to the little Kansas town and disrupts everything including the feminine hearts. Rosalind Russell is outstanding in her portrayal of the spinster school-teacher looking for a man. Kim Novak, Susan Strasberg, Betty Field and Arthur O'Connell complete the line-up. Two outstanding features are its direction by Joshua Logan and the background music from which the recent top-tenner came. Prodigal (MGM, in color). Here we have one of those spectacular melodramas set in ancient times. Edmund Purdom, playing the prodigal is betwitched, bothered and bewildered by pagan priestess Lana Turner. Lots of money went into this picture which turns out no better than can be expected. Three Hours to Kill (Col., in color) .Dana Andrews and Donna Reed. a horse-opera combined with suspense .okay if you don't want to go to Villamar to try for the jackpot. Unchained (W.B.), is a surprisingly interesting movie of California's Chino prison, an honorsystem institution. It deals with one man's fight to go straight after being sent to prison. Barbara Hale sad 1Eoy Hirsdi star. Again we have the theme melody from the picture that became very popular some time ago. Broken Star (U.A.), a new western starring Howard Duff, Bill Saturday, July 14 1:00 Winky Dink & You 1:30 Paul Winchell 2:00 Garry Moore 2:10 Melody Mal 1:00 Victory at Sea 1:30 Robt Q. Lewis 4:00 House Party 4:30 Two for the Money 5:00 Warner Bros. Presents Cheyenne" 6 :00 Seat the Clock 6:80 Masquerade Party 7:00 George Gobel 7:30 Your Hit Parade 8:00 Colgate Variety Hour 9:00 Stage Show 9:30 Star Tonight Sunday, July 15 1:00 WinkyDink & You 1:30 Contest Carnival 2:00 Lamp Unto My Feet 2:30 Adventure 3:00 Big Picture 3:10 You Are There 4:00 Ted Marck's Amateurs 5:00 Roy Rogers 5:30 That's My Boy 0:00 Royal Hawailans 6:30 What's My Line 7:00 Milton Berle 8:00 Ed Sullivan 9:00 U.S. Steel Hour Monday, July 16 5:30 News Parade 5:45 Perry Como 6:00 I&E Film 0:30 My Favorite Husband 7:00 Talent Scouts 7:30 Highway Patrol 8:00 Ethel & Albert 8:30 Medic 9:00 Studio One Tuesday, July 17 5:30 News Parade 0 :41 Perry Corns 6:00 Disneyland 7:00 Phil Silvers 7:30 Meet Millie 8:00 Guy Lombardo 8:30 Lineup 9:00 Robt Montgomery Wednesday, July 18 5:30 News Parade 5:41 Patti Page 6:00 Industry on Parade 6:10 Travelog 6:30 I've Got a Secret 7:00 This is Your Life 7:30 Star Stage 8:00 Godfrey & Friends 9:00 Kraft TV Theatre Thursday, July 19 5:30 News Parade 5:45 Perry Como 6:00 Stop the Music 6:30 Professional Father 7:00 Bob Cummings 7:80 You Bet Your Life 8:00 Dragnet 810 Dunninger Show 9:00 Climax Friday. July 20 5:80 News Parade 5:45 Perry Como 6:00 I&E Film 6:30 Dollar a Second 7:00 Ozzie & Harriet 7:30 Playhouse of Stars 8:00 Johnny Carson 8:30 Crusader 9:00 Boxing Radio Round-Up a Neon signs do not emblazon a "Welcome" or "Enter" above the inconspicuous main entrance to WGBY but visitors are always welcome. The extent of their tour of studios and control rooms will depend on the number of men available and their duties at that moment, Tours may be made anytime between 8 a.m. and 10:00 p.m. any day of the week. To avoid confusion, children should be accompanied by their parents unless previous arrangements have been made. NEW RECORDS: More music is pouring in at the present than can be listed .Some good, some bad and probably some that will emerge as hit tunes in a month or so. Betty Johnson has a couple, "Why Do You Cry" and "Clay Idol." Then there's "Bombolero" and "High Society" as done by Lew Douglas. "The Girl I Love" by The Cues, flip side being "Crackerjack." Lonnie Sattin teams with Earl Sheldon's orchestra to do "My Broken Dream" and "What Time Does The Sun Go Down." Williams and Lita Baron. Target Earth (A.A.) ...Virginia Grey and Richard Denning science-fiction ...a poor man's "War of the Worlds." Jubal (Col., in color), is a good western, in an off-beat vein. Set in the cattle country it turns out to be an absorbing character study of its stars, Glenn Ford, Ernest Borgnine, Rod Steiger and Valerie French. Steiger as usual, is memorable in his part! You western fans who go expecting to see Indiane, calvary and the works are going to be disappointed, but I'll still insist, (till they make a horseopera where the Indians win) that this is a dern good movie. Saturday, July 14 NavSta-Picnic-125 min. NAS-Ghost Town-92 min. Mar Site-Hell on Frisco Bay-98 min. Villa.-Crime Against Joe-94 min. Lwd. Pt.-High Society-88 min. Sunday. July 15 NavSta-Prodigal-112 min. NAS-Picnic Mar. Site-Athena-95 min. Villa.-Hell on Frisco Bay Lwd. Pt.-Crime Against Joe Monday, July 18 NavSta-Three Hours to Kill-105 min. NAS-Prodigal Mar. Site-Ghost Town Villa.-Athena Lwd. Pt.-Hell on Frisco Bay Tuesday, July 17 NavSta-Unchained-90 main. NAS-Three Hours to Hill Mar. Site-Picnic Villa.-Ghost Town Lwd. Pt.-Athena Wednesday, July 18 NavSta-Broken Star-89 min. NAS-Unchained Mar. Site-Prodigal Villa.-Picnic Lw. Pt.-Gohat Town Thursday. July 19 NavSta-Target Earth-96 min. NAS-Broken Star Mar. Sit-Three Hours to Kill Villa.-Prodigal Lwd. Pt.-Picnic Friday, July 20 NavSta-Jubal-113 min. NAS-Target Earth Mar. Site-Unchained Villa.-Three Hours to Kill Lwd. Pt.-Prodigal WGBY Television Program FROM: 3 cent stamp Send The INDIAN Home Book -Nook Winston S. Churchill, whose writing career almost matches in brilliance his political life, is on the book lists again. His new book A HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH SPEAKING PEOPLES is perhaps his most monumental work, and may be the best remembered of the hundred or more volumes which he has written. The Library has just received volume one, which traces the English race from its earlist beginnings to the rise of the Tudor dynasty in 1485. Three more volumes are projected, and all four will be avidly devoured by every discerning reader. New specialty books at the Library include the OUTBOARD BOATING HANDBOOK and the LA WS AND LANDSCAPING HANDBOOK. Both should prove to be popular in a climate like ours. Richard Nixon, a controversial figure in American politics today, now has his own biography in print. THIS IS NIXON, by James Keogh, is a short book which devotes a few chapters to the story of his life and meteoric rise in politics, and most of the remaining chapters to an explanation of his political philosophy. Another suitable book for election-year reading. .COMFORT ME WITH APPLES is a rather funny story about American life today by Peyer DeVries, who has already made his name in the field of the humorous novel. The setting is a small Connecticut town, and the action column in the newspaper. This book has already been voted one of the year's most entertaining stories. Smiley Blanton is an old-fashioned doctor who has written a convincing book about what's wrong with the world today. In LOVE OR PERISH he analyzes the problems of the twentieth century, both physical and moral, and candidly presents his solutionlove. The absence of intricate terminology and psychiatric formulas is a welcome change in a book of this sort. After a lifetime of experience with people and their problems, Dr. Blanton comes up with some down-to-earth, common sense answers.