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Indian

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Title:
Indian
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The Indian
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U.S. Naval Base ( Publisher )
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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U.S. Naval Base
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English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright, The Indian. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Sunday Supplement
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Gitmo Review
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Gitmo Gazette
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Guantanamo Gazette
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Daily Gazette
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Guantanamo Gazette
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Guantanamo Daily Gazette
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Guantanamo Bay Gazette

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Base Housing Areas To GetfPapoose', Delivery Scheduled To Begin July 15


The "Papoose" will become available July 15 to all Base housing areas under a NayBase Instruction issued recently.
Within the next two weeks "Papoose" boxes will be installed at various strategic points in the housing areas. Residents will be able to pick up daily, the news bulletins at these points.
Under the new housing area delivery system it has been requested that each family take only one copy of the "Papoose". Only enough for all housing areas will be printed. The papers will be in the pick-up boxes and available well before sunrise each day.
Boxes on Telephone Poles
The new "Papoose" boxes will be located on the following telephone poles in the housing areas:
On Victory Hill the boxes- will be on Poles one and 89. In East Bargo there will be one on the telephone pole next to RH lB.
In Central Bargo boxes will be located on Pole No. 4-205, between CB 56B and CB 57B; on Pole No. 4-198 between CB 20B and CB 21B; on Pole 4,-180 between CB lB and CB 12B and on Pole No. 4-186 between CB 35B and CB 37A.
On old Granadillo Point the box will be on the telephone pole in the rear of RH 77. In the new section there will be one on the metal pole next to GP 15P.
In the Nob Hill area pick-up boxes will be placed on the pole at- RH ,1B near the intersection at ADM Perry Circle; the pole behind RH 48 and the pole between RH 66 and 67.
Villamar Has 9 Pick-Up Boxes In Villamar they will be placed on the telephone pole in front of RH 95; on Pole No. 4-76 next to DH 123; Pole No. 95 between DH ,246 and DH 244; Pole No. 4-89 between DH 220 and DH 222; Pole
No. 4-101 between DH 303 and DH 304; Pole No. 4-113 between DH 411 and DH 412; the pole by the bus stop in front of RH 543; Pole No. 4-147 next to DH 635 and Pole No. 4-139.
Advertisements under the new system will be printed as approved. Lost and Found ads will be okayed as will For Sale and Want Ads, but not including clothing or articles of obvious small value.
SCertain "Notices" Okay
Notices of special meetings of any recognized organization will be approved, but notices of regularly Scheduled meetings will not be printed. Special events of any organization such as an Officer's Club dance or a Public Works picnic will be approved, but shall not exceed three inches of space or require any special treatment-


Exchange Garage

Plans Expansion
In the planning stage is a garage shed to be constructed behind the present NavSta Exchange Garage, according to an announcement made by W. E. Koenig, new NavSta Exchange Garage Manager.
The shed's dimensions are 125 feet wide and 100 feet long. When construction gets started and the project completed, new garage equipment will be installed.
Equipment under procurement: beam visual liner, wheel balancer, body straightener, break bander, etc.
When the shed is finally constructed, the present mechanics' workshop-will be converted into a salesroom where automobile accessories are to be stocked and a glass shop will be "fitted in" for the acceptance of repair and maintenance jobs on auto glass parts. Also, a workroom for the production of seat covers and convertible tops will be created.
The new manager of the local auto clinic is a Texan with 25 years of automotive experience. His staff includes 18 Cuban civilians, 12 of which are mechanics, two are gas men, three are parts men and an assistant manager.



Midshipmen Due


To' Arrive 24th,


13,000 Personnel

Guantanamo Bay will once again be the scene of "big league" fleet operations when Task Group 40.1 composed of 30 warships, drops anchor Tuesday, July 24.
Midshipman Cruise Alpa which constitutes the Task Group has a manpower complement of 13,000 which includes officers, midshipmen and enlisted personnel.
Ships actually participating in the operations are two battlewagons, two heavy cruisers and 16 destroyers. The ten submarines with the Group "will simply give the midshipmen the joy of an underwater cruise."
Fleet Training Group authorities revealied that the purpose of the cruise "is to acquaint and train the future officers of the Navy in matters dealing with shipboard evolution."
The Gtmo Task Group operations will be completed on Saturday, July 28.:


J





COVERS GTMO LIKE THE SUNSHINE U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Volume VII, No. 27 Saturday, 7 July 1956



Gtmo Red Cross Representative


Experiencing F
About to begin her third month of duty on a normal two-year stint, Miss Ruth Frederick, American Red Cross representative for Guantanamo Bay, says she "likes Gtmo."
Miss Frederick arrived on the "Caribbean Rock" May 10. She relieved Mrs. Helen Bowler who retired from the ARC and returned to the states after more than four years of duty on the Naval Base.


INDIAN Photo
This is Miss Frederick's first experience on a Naval establishment other than "over the phone" work with Navy stations close to the Army or Air Force bases where she has worked. And she readily admits it is quite different than


rst Navy Duty

working with the other branches of the Armed Services.
Came from Kirtland AFB
Her preceding duty station, before coming to Gtmo, was at Kirtland Air Force' Base.in Albuquerque, New Mexiqo. "This is the place," she says, "where the Air Force tests its atomic weapons. In fact, the crew of the plane which dropped the bomb at Bikini came from Kirtland."
"I did have a few slight contacts with the Navy while at Kirtland, said Miss Frederick. "They had an air weapons testing center there, on the Air Force Base grounds."
When told she was coming to Gtmo, Miss Frederick asked friends about the place. Some told her it was wonderful; others said it was absolutely terrible. But, "Now that I'm here, I like the place, the people and the climate-hot and dry, just like Albuquerque," said Miss Frederick.
Miss Frederick has been with the Red Cross 25 years. This is her fourth; overseas tour. During World War II she was in Europe on a Club Mobile distributing coffee and doughnuts to the troops.
Shortly after the start of the Korean conflict, she went to work in Japan, after having worked at various Red Cross headquarters in the world.,


Bos'n Lands 'Stuffed' Shark...
Here's a real fish tale, and as incredible as it may sound, it's the honest-injun truth!
A little over a week ago T. W. Waite, BM3, was on one of the piers near McCalla Field pursuing that great Gtmo pastime, fishing!
Using a shot line and a whole bonefish as bait, he suddently felt a tightening of the line. He quickly realized that this was no ordinary fish.
Extraordinary was right . . . for on the line he had a gray nurse shark, (the maneater) and it was a whopper!
The battle began! Arnold Darian, another fisherman present on the pier, gave Waite some much needed assistance. After a two hour battle they finally landed him on the pier.
Now come the vital statistics! The shark measured 10 feet six inches and weighed 325. It had a girth measuring 64,inches,
The story now takes on an air of disbelief, for upon cutting open the shark they discovered in its stomach, one whole goat, the skull of another, the horns of two others and half of a grapefruit.
Most discouraging factor 'of the catch was that it was caught ?rior to the beginning of the annual fishing tournament and is not be eligible!








THE INDIAN


.Saturday, 7 July 1956


7i THE INDIAN

'Tuhe Idiau's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve asa possible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentsofn~nel.
RADM WILLIAM G. COOPER, Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff C.:APT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo
Bay, Cuba.
Editorial Staff
LTJG D. G. LaCasse -------- -------------- ----------- Officer-Advisor
.LHendrs, JOC ---- - ---------- --------------------- Editor
. C. Curren, JOSN -------------------------- Managing Editor
E. U. Orias, JO3 ------------------------------ Feature Editor
D. .,Hinon, JOSN'-. - -------- ------------ Staff Reporter
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance
;i Nav;s P.35,- Revised Nov. 1945, and' financed with non-appropriated funds..
.aterials marked AFPS may be used by news media provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright' may nqt be used. All materials ,,originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part or without credit.
'A ll photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.


Rules On Emergency Vehicles

Many Base drivers, particularly newcomers, are confused as to what they should do upon the approach of an emergency vehicle or a truck bearing explosive material. The following,- information - is intended to. eliminate some of the misunderstanding concerning, this subject.
The basic rule is that whenever another vehicle :approaches giving warning by red lights, h6rn; 'or, siren, you will drive off the roadway and stop, remaining stopped, until the emergency vehicle has cleared the vicinity by at least' one hundred (100) yards. Remember that when an emergency occurs more than one such vehicle will be alerted, so be prepared for those 'ollowing.
Ordinarily emergency vehicles are associated with high .speed and so we may expect a fire engine, ambulance,, or police car in this group. However, there are times when it is necessary to escort large or disabled vehicles which might be'a hazard to 'other traffic, and slow speed may be involved. Regardless: of speed, if the escorting .vehicle displays a red warning light drive off the road and stop.
In the case of :explosive carrying .vehicles, there usually will not be an escorti The-explosive carrying truck will display ared flag, warning signs, and the headlights- will ,be on In this-case, DO NOT STOP OR PULL TOFF THE ROAD but- continue at, normal speed. If following, � keep'at least 200 yards distant. When the cargo isiparticularly hazardous, the'explosive carrying vehicle may be escorted by another'with a shining red light. In this event-you will. drive off the; road as in-the case of meeting an emergency vehicle.
The DDT spray truck is also classified as an emergency vehicle and so all approaching vehicles will pull to-the side of the road and stop until vision is clear for a distance of 100 feet.
A., 3.McGowani
Base Safety Engineer


Navy's LargeSunday 250 Cuban Teachers

School Still Growing Aboard Base Sunday


. Man, this simmer can be the coolest, no matter -what 01' Sol decides to, do. It all depends on how we use-our noodles, man.
Doctors -haven't cinched it, but they're pretty sure too much sun ,contributes to skin diseases. That's point one to remember. Get some sun but be smart about it.. Protect yourself.
Swimming can be.a great sport and its healthful, man. But water can be a killer. Don't showboat it; don't over estimate that breast-stroke; 6on't dive into an empty pool. That's point number two.
-When we sweat, man, dig the salt that pours out. But those happy little salt pills are the craziest. If you've had an active day, if you're reelingand keeling, down a salt:pill with a glass of water. That's point number three.
. Keep cool, man, and remenber these points. They're a pretty potent program for the good old summertime. (4PFS)


Sunday, 8 July 1956
CATHOLIC MASSES
Sunday, 7000-1*1val Base3 Chapel Sun da, 900-Nal Base Chapel Sunday, 1280--Naval Base Chapel
Mon. thru Frl.-164-Naval Base Chapel
Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel
Confessions: Saturday. 1700-1800, 1900
-2000, and daily before Mass PROTESTANT SERVICES
0930-Sunday School 0980-Sunday School
0930- Adult Bible Class
160-Divie Worship (Naa-l
Base Chapel)'
1930-Felowship Hour
Wednesday-. 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study
*Thursday~ 1900. -Ch~ifr Rehearsal JEWISH SERVICES il vrfdayr4~90-_Ns -Maze. Ch~qpel' CHURCH OF CHRIST 1000--Bible Study
* 10s-.Wor"hly Service .. Cdimmkityl Auditorium LATER DAY SAINTS
,Sunday-ll00-Naval Station Library
- Sunday-1000-NavSta Library,


Calandar of Events
Saturday, July 7
Jr. Rifte and Pistol Club-Classroom Lectures .... 1:00 p.m .... Bldg. 27.
Monday, July 9
Beginning today, vehicle inspection for
aUl enlisted personnel. Inspection will
be carried out tthrough July 14.
O.E.S. Chapter Meeting ... Community
Auditorium . .. 7:80 p.m.

Tuesday, July 10
Jr. Rifle and Pistol Club ... Monthly
meeting ... 1:00 p.m ..... Bldg. 27.
Little Theater ... Community Auditorium
... 7:80 p;m
Fleet Reperve Association . . . Community
Auditorium .. :00 p.m.
Hospital Service Volunteers . . . Medical
- ibrary (Hosp.) . 10:00 a.m.

Wednesday, July 11
Toastmaster's Club... ,fficers' Club6:80 p.m.
Thursday, July 12
-Felloworaft Club 1078 ... Community Auditorium . .. 7:30 p.m.


At 0930 each Sunday morning there convenes in Guantanamo Bay the Navy's largest Sunday School. The present enrollment of 660 is believed unchallenged by any other Navy Sunday School, and it is still growing.
Offering classes for tiny toddlers to adults, the Sunday School has
-the added attraction of convenient bus service.
Two-year-olds have a department of their own, kown as the Pre-Nursery department. Children of nursery -school 'age 'belong "to the Nursery department, kindergarten age to the Kindergarten department, primary gradesi;; and 3 compose Primary departments I, II, and III. Grades 4, 5, and 6
are in the Junior depaitent; grades 7 and 8 aid high' school students are in the Junior-Senior High Department. The Adult- Bible ,Class covers all beyond ;High School age.
It takes a large staff to run such a Sunday School, and more than 64 military personnel, civilian employees, and their dependents are woring in the Sunday School as superintendents, teachers, seeretaries,; pianists, and helpers.
Once upon a time the Sunday SchooU-as :small enoughto - get
-6stlin,-the- Base School iBiulding oni -Chapels Hill. Now- bursting at the, seams; the -Nufser, iKindergarteni-and: Primary',I, -have: been relocated in school bildings on Victory Hill.- Other departments, u including Pre-,Nurs-ry remain at Chapel Hill, but if the -Sunday


Commander Naval Base and the lacal,'Holy Name Society will jointly play hosts on the Base to 250 Cuban Catholic teachers from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 pm. tomorrow, July 8. . The teachers are expected-ito arrive at- Pier Baker, where six buses will whisk "them away for a Base guided tour.
Six interpreters will be on hand to make the "exchange of pleasantries" between the, visitors and the hosts "more lively and understandable on each side." -Included in the tour itinerary are the Base I&E offices, housing areas, stores and "other points of interest."

School continues to grow-as ap-pears likely--ore space is going to -be needed.
Buses follow the same route for Sunday School as they do for the school. The schedule is published below for the benefit of newcomers to the Base as well as others who may not have discovered the Navy's largest Sunday School.
Sunday School Bus Schedule
LOCATION TIME OF DEPARTURE
CABLE. STATION 0905 CORINASO POINT ,- 0910 OIL-POI0NT .. 0915
HOSPITAL ILL - 0915,
* - RA .IOpDfT .: - 0920 N1OB RILL :0905 .,.GIZANADILLO P.OINTS~ 0905 VILLAMAR * 0905 BA-RGO ,POINT 0910 MARINAi pOINT 0915 MARINE SITE 1 :0915 DEER POINT . 0915
- EVANS POINT 02


I


P*ge Two








Saturday, 7 July. 1956


Car Census....

Gtmo Has 1,132 Private Vehicles

Representinq 27 Makes. '30 Oldest


by Ely U. Orias
There are 1,132 private motor Vehicles on the Base as of June 23, representing 27 car "makes"i with one 1930 model as the most antiquated and seven 1956 models bding the latest.
Except for '32, '34, '44 and '45, models of '30 through '56 are represented.
Of these 1,132 cars, 215 are owned by officers; 731 are under ownership title of enlisted personnel; 179 are properties of American civilians except for a small number which are owned by Cubans and the remaining five are owned by the Naval Station. Special Services department.
Fords Top List
Among the 27 car "makes" running around the Base, Ford has the most in number with 246; Chevrolet takes second with 217 and Plymouth is third with 125.
Other "makes" and their corresponding numbers are: Pontiac, 83; Buick, 60; Mercury, 56; Oldsmobile, 49; Willys (Jeep), 44; Dodge, 43; Chrysler, 31; Nash, 28; Hudson, 27; De Soto, 18; Packard, 16; Cadillac,. 13;. Kaiser, eight; Crosley, six; Henry J., five; Lincoln, three; MG, two; Austin, one; Morris Minor, one; Frazer, one; All S t a t e, one; International (Truck), one, and Volkswagen, one.
Car transition on the Base is edified with the presence of one of the earliest and the latest in car model history. A year-to-year model and the number of cars identified with each model are as follows:
Model 1930-one; 193e1-on6; 1933one; 1935-one; 196-for; I97five'; 1938-1l; 1640-9'; lkl4-_291; 1942-ten; 1043-onC;' 19Y44S; 4163;' 194840; 1~94%6-M-; -19504U9; 1951-144; 1952-H3; 1958451; 196483; 1955-73 and 1956-seeenr.
Sedans Most Popular
The most popular car design is the "sedan" two-door or four-door style. Eight hundred thirty-two of the total number of cars on the


INDIAN Photo
Base are sedans, 302 of which are two-door and 530 are four-door.
Second most popular design is the "coupe" style. There are 122 coupes on the Base. Third in design popularity is the "station wagon" town and country with 46. Then, the "convertible" style steps in next with 43. After the "converts", Jeep style gears in with 38.
In the Scooter division, 160 twowheeled monsters aide under regitry on tieBase. Of these tandembike locomotives, 40 belong to officers; 107 are' registered under the names of enlisted' men and 13 are owned by civilians.
1k Makes"+ represented by 'the Base's seven 1956 models are: Fdr-a' bladk two-door sedan o*e by'Lawton B. Jenkins, AC2, of the NaVal Air Station; Chevrolet
---four-door black sedan titled by Frank C.- Owens; Buick-two-door sedani , red body, black top owned by Joseph Ramirez; Mercurygray body ainWhite top belonging to Myron J. Garroway, ETC, Naval Station: Pontiac- two-door sedan, ddk blue body and light bli'e tob bearing plate No. 0271; Studdbaker-two-door station wagon, dark green top with dark green body belonging to Carl R. Anderson, AM1, of VU-10 and a Willys station wagon owned by Mary M. Powers, civilian.
Broughton Owns Oldest Car
Owner of the most antiquated car on the Base is Hubert L. Broughton, civilian, of NavSta Public Works. His car is a 1930 two-door black coupe Chevrolet. Second oldest is another Chevrolet, a 199I1 two-door black coupe owned by Ray ]Fielding, civilian.
W.E. Koenig, 'Navy Exchange Garage Mgr.- iav'discfosed that "6ppe~ln!ateW 10'O00.: gallons of gasdi~e 6t a' total "cst .of $1,800 Are being serviced weekly by the Garage's gas line to the Base's #riv'ate car and scooter owners."
LCDR T.E. Bager, Base Provost Marshal Officer, reports that there are 3,298 registered motor vehicle


AideTo Air Navigation

Installed At Leeward
It's here! At Leeward Point, a V H F OMNI-Directional R a dio Range stands, unattended as- it sends radi' pulses on a 24-hour basis, to flying planes within a frequency range of 108-118 mega cycles.
Providing facilities never before available in radio range, the OMNI'S frequencies are' completely free from atmospheric static and from noise interference known as "precipitation static" such as rain, snow, dust, etc.
All-important feature of this new air navigation equipment is the fact that it is not limited to two or four courses which are common to the obsolescent radio range.
In a nutshell, the OMNI gives the pilot the discretion to position his aircraft on aly bea ing ha he thinks is adviable -Aldi stil gets to the place he's healiig fo .

Also to be installed on the Base "in the near fut1re" is 9the equipment known as TACAN. This apparatus will give the pilot his bearing and distance froi: hi 9tation in nautical miles.
and scooter drivers on the Base. The Provost Marshal also said that "a total 'of 461 traffic violatibns have been entered in the Base Police blotter from'. January 1, 1956 to June 30, 19 6."
According to Mrs. B. H. Chipparoni, Base Hospital Statistics Clerk, 12 persons have been hospitalized during the period January 1, 1956 to the present date "as, a result of injuries sustained in traffic accidents." There is no known traffic fatality within that period however.
The greatest number of nonnaval cars ever assembled at one time and at, one place within the past seven months occurred on the night of May 10, 1956, at the NavSta Commissary and Exchange parking area and its immediate vicinity. The movie "I'll Cry Tomorrow" shown that night at the NavSta lyceum was "allegedly" responsible for the mass assembly of, according to Base Police estimate, 300 cars!


Gtmo License Plates

Not Valid In States
Vehicle registration plated issued by the: Naval, Base are recognized only on the Naval Base and in nearby Cuba. The plates ar iot legalized li~efise, tags in an state of the United, Statet.

tinental United Statu wit-it 1u vately owned vehicle- must obtiin a valid U.S. state registration plate. The one issued by' the Base must, be turned in to, the Provost Marshal's office before leaving the Base.


i st of Series


How Toi Regist


In Hrome Stfe


For '56 E[lecti"ui
To guide~ you as, to your stafes particula r absentee voting, ,k, AFPS has prepared a three pat voting series. This: aifitie is- the first in a series' of artielles deaig wit: how you become, reg k i_"d in order to vote by abseI ntie bllot.
Maine
All' unregistered' rsitis+lt ex:c m hers of' the armed forced arid! ceti civilians, must register in persn at times and Places established~ by local' board 19Of registration.
Registration is permanent unless a per son has changed his name or his residence. 4dembers of the armeid' foi&A civilian emp2loyes serving outside the territorial limits of the U.S. and their spouse may Vote withotit making a form ' a aiilimtl'on for registration by comple ing' t eFed.; ergl PO'it Card application for anf absentee ballot and mailing it tb the clerk of your home town.
Missouri
All persons, except members of the 1rmd forces, i st regiter' in person if residing in a city or town -Wbere registration is required.
Registration is reqlr'ed' in cities havA, iig, a. population of 0,004 or morL, ii counties where there is a city of at least 400,000 population.
.All member of' th aime&' frces' mas vote by absentee prboces withoutV beiii registered.
Nebraska
Registration "is permanent in Doueas and Lancaster counties., In-. cities of over 7,000 PopulIafion, rer'e gilraztion is required this year.
Urirgisterbd, -iembis of' tb. armM~~ forces, civilian employees serving outside the territorial limits of the U.S. an& their spouses may make applicatibn for' reii tration when an absence ballot' is ' quested
Enter the statement "please mail registration forms" in the rnr1n of th Felera Post Card application' and' mai to the county clerk of residence or, if a resident of Douglas or Landcaster county to the election commissioner. All other qualified' persons my' register by albsentee by requested "regdtio~i forms" from one' of the above offices. These requests may be made at any time, but it is recommended that they he mad'e at least 90 days bWord elefitidn daj
New Yt~k
A nieiber of' the armn6d fce sa4 acompanying spouse, Parent of child;, ita qualified voter and a re4ident oft t h election district, becomes registered automatically when one of the foliowing ha" been properly filledi o tanild r~etun ei to the Division for Servicemi's, Votig; Offi of the Secretary of StAte, Albany 1,' N.Y.:' 1. Federal Post Card application 2. New Yo 'k Divi' o' for S~e 'emen 's ing Foni 1 ; 8. A: let=W c i; ++g Y6ti 6Nw York( a',d Prsebnt ffiilitdii' addretg, signed. by You and-aldependent* ho are also requiesting ballota..

Eic~' To tSiofo+ -n e
aecompisi~d, at the ofic oi th7toro eldctin,i home of r~si c t. iln b fore September 96.
PUERTO RIC1 and the, VIRGIN '8 LANDS have no provisions for absentee
voting.
For further information, eoti lt yulr
voting officer.-AFPS)


p


.... P f e


+


T E INDIAN







THE.INDIAN


A
Saturday, 7 July 1956


NAS Ordnance Builds Pistol House From Salvaged Packin Crates


NAS Photo Lab Photo
,.,,The "construction. gang" of the new NAS Pistol Range House threw a,"house warming party" June 20. Left to right, back row: M. F. Carey, AOl. J. B. Jocks, AO1; A. W.' Compton, Ao3; L. D. Ward, AN, and E. C. Sammons, AN.
'Middle row: T. R. Morrow, A02; T. A. Henderson, A02; R. Ploeckelma'nn, !A02; L. C. James, A02; G. L. Opperman,- AN; G.W. Paulsen, AOC; P. Ricks, AOC and R. R. Logan, AOC. Front row: LT R. D. Colbert, CDR B. M. Baiackin, LCDR G. W. S herley, ChGun R. E. Ziegler, R. L. Reiter, AN, and L. Depasquale, AO1.
The Naval Air Station Pistol Range House held a grand opening June 20, On hand to "do 'it up right" were the, Operations' Officer, CDR B- M. Barackman ,and the Public Works Officer, LT R. D. Colbert from NAS.
This house stands as visible proof of what can be done with a little inagination, some salvaged material, "can do" spirit and a "know how" crew. It was built by the: Ordnance division in-between their regular


duties.
-In charge of construction was Ray Ploeckelmann, AO2 The lum her was old packing crates that the division was able to salvage frbm the Navy Exchange, Special Services and the NAS Hobby

The NAS Hobby Shop served as the working place for the crew to do the cutting, planing and smoothing of the -lumber after the crates were disassembled. Old nails were saved since there was no' appropriation for the building. Concrete was donated by the Seabees. S'vSome days, as many as three
Sfour man-hours were spent working on the Range House. Other times, especially during the rain, all that could be done was for the fellows to go out to the site: and say "nuts."
When it came time for the painting, the inside was done first, inbetween rain showers. And then, each morning at quarters you could hear"maybe we can get one side done before the rain get's to it," and off the painters would' go, racing to see if the paint would dry before th rains came. Now finished, the Range House is 'ein -used to stow all gear 1rom ,rt-the JNAS Pistol 1kango. IAi the future, this Range, complete with the House, will be used for training and matches, both military and NRA.


Fleet Reserve News
The next regularly scheduled meeting of Branch 100 will be Tuesday, 10 July at the Community Auditorium at 2000. There are about 30 new members who are urged -to be present Tuesday for their initiation into the Branch.
Our regular monthly meetings are held on the 2nd Tuesday of each month. All members are urged to attend these meetings.
Your interest in taking a part in your local branch, is beneficial to you and the Fleet Reserve Association. So let's all give' the Branch a couple of hours of our time each month. You will find that it will be time well spent.


LAFRA News
The Ladies Auxiliary Fleet Reserve'Association held its monthly business meeting Tuesday evening at the Girl Scout Hut, Marina Point.
A discussion was held on holding a cake sale in tho near future, and: the, aims and benefitU of the unit were discUssed. .,Ndw :members of the unit who were initiated were Jeannie Gugliemo,. 'Eleanor Childers, Alice Snow, and Kathleen Steward ... Welcome Ladies to the unit.


Stampede ...

Commissary Swarmed

In Store's Biggest Day

The Naval Station Commissary Store's enlisted breakout men, customer -helpers and butchers fought valiantly when more than 800 "grocery -purchasing" wives swarmed the store Monday, July 2.
The all-day Commissary stampede found the breakout men busily filling the periodically empty grocery bins; butchers diligently hovered over their cutting boards and everyone gave a helping hand to the patrons as they carted away their groceries.
Adding music to the buying scene was the incessant jingle of the store's six cash registers.
According to Commissary insiders, last Monday's grocery spree "shattered all previous one day customer records."


F T G Bulletin,
Michial Benedini, BTC, of the Engineering department transfererd to the Fleet Reserve on Friday of this week. He has been with the Fleet Training Group for over two years and in the Navy just short of 20 years. The Benedini family likes Gtmo so well that he has accepted a position with the local Public Works department.
Two new men reported to the Gunnery department this week. Dan Davis, TM1, reported from the Ordnance department of the Naval Station Gtmo. Davis' parents are also residents of the Naval Base. Vincent J. Amorese, GMC, reported from USS SHENANDOAH.
He is married to the former Miss Marjorie Watkins of Bermuda and has four children. He served in USS CONCORD, USS SEMMES, USNS ANACOSTIA, USS O'HARA, and USS AULT.
The Communications department suffered a rough week by losing three Chief Radiomen. Chief Perry was transferred to the Naval Facility London, England; Chief Biondo went to the Fleet Training Center, Pearl Harbor; and Chief Dunn is reporting aboard USS LEYTE.
FTG has five hospital patients LCDR W. H. Wild; D. B. Clay, BMC; L. Luzzaro, SKC; H.P. Halt, RM3, and W. I. Atkeison, TMC. The rest of the command wish all a speedy recovery.

Lightning. fashed and'.' thunder blared as -TOmmy tried to sleep. Mother stealing into hS ream lest he be frightened, heard the tiny tot murmur: "Mumie, what's Daddy doing to the television set this time?"


NAS, VU -10 Picnic

Is Spanking Success

The annual Fourth of July picnic of the Naval Air Station and VU-10 held at Phillips Park Wednesday, was a spanking success! An estimated crowd of 1,000 persons including officers, enlisted personnel, their dependents and guests, milled about the Park premises all day.
Chief T. N. Douglass, Mgr. of the NAS EM Club and in charge of the picnic refreshments, reported that "8,000 lbs. of ice was broken; 270 cases of beer and 90 cases of soft drinks were consumed by the picnickers."
"Chow Down" at the party was piped by first class commissaryman Tony Morello, party food manager at 11:00 a.m. which continued until 4:00 p.m. Assiduously standing behind the chow line was Joseph LoCicero, CS2, NAS. Eight commissarymen from the Naval Air Station gave LoCicero a helping hand.
LoCicero revealed that 1,400 rations of ham, 1,400 rations of fried chicken, 1,000 stuffed celeries, 300 loaves of bread, five gallons of ketsup, 13 gallons of mayonnaise, and $50. worth of condiments were downed by the picnickers.
At the picnic games department which was under the supervision of LTJG G. F. Church, NAS Special Services Officer, softball, volleyball, penny scramble, toilet paper running contest, longest marriage revealation, rolling pin throwing to a dummy-husband contest, ball pitching and jitterbug contest to the strains of hillbilly music, were the highlights of the day's athletics.
At the penny scramble marathon, 50 children between the ages two to five scanned a sawdust-covered area where 1,000 pennies were dumped.


T-Age Advisory Group

Elects New Officers

The Teen-Age Advisory Group held a semi-annual election of officers, Monday evening, July 2.
Newly elected officers are: President, R. T Albright, NavSta Budget co - ordinator; Vice - President, CDR R. J. Mathews, Asst. Damage Control Officer, FTG; Secretary, Mrs. J. M. Darby; and LCDR G..W. Sherley, NAS Ordnance Officer. Also, on Saturday, evening June 30, the TeeniAge Club held an election of officers. Officers elected at this meeting- were: Doris Lewis, president; Nancy Lewis, vice-president; Diane Holloway, secretary and Sandy Sherley, treasurer.


Page. Four.











Marines Define Sportsmanship ... Devil Dogs ClinchBaseLeagueTtle


by TSgt. Burris
At the mention of baseball, or any sport for that matter, the question of sportsmanship arises. To Marines, that word carries a lot of meaning. Any uniformed person will immediately remark the Marines the world over are poor losers.
..What is a good loser? There is no such animal!! I Taking to thefield in sports is very much like taking to the field in cqmbat. Marines enter both with thefirm conviction they arethe I 3st and they fight with the strong determination to win.
Marines have never lost .a battle and seldom' ever have lost in the sports field. When a loss is suffered, the entire C3orp's suffers. Any person or team who leaves a field of sport with a big smile and a heart .full ,of joy- and good-fellowship toward the opposing person or team is no asset to his outfit
His pride and- determination aren't very strong and his outfit would be better off without ,him. No Marine nor Marine team has ever been guilt y of putting up their second best. They fight for every point every inch of the .way with every fair and sportsmanship weapon at their disposal.
Don't ever confuse a strong determination towin with a lack of good sportsmanship. Sportmanship and determination to win- go hand in hand and there is never any question about Marines being a determined breed.


R. & P. Club Juniors Strik es & Spares


Ih Safety Shootingi,

The Guantanamo Bay Rifle and Pistol club, Junior Division, has gone into high gear in their safety and shooting program.
- This Junior Division addition to the regular Rifle and Pistol club isr affiliated with the.National Rifle association and is sponsored by the local senior - outfit. -Its aim is to promote marksmanship instruction, wholesome competition, safety education and training in democratic principles.
Presently there, re 66aembers in the Junior Division, '20 of' which .have completed . classroom ;and firing for classification and awards. Fourteen members have ,already qualified as Pro-Marksman and are working on the Marksman,- classification.
Club du7es in the Junior Division are .10 per month, payable six
-months in advance Initial' targets are provided by the club while ammunition and weapons are provided by the -shoters. -
If 'any Base' youngster is interested ,in oing, the Junior Division, they should call LCDR L. G. Maxwell, phone 9-207 or 8-114, or :LT J. M. Ferarnte, phone 9-609 or 8-849. -


by Dolly Aumann


High-G J. Darby M. Marsh R. Garaudy G. Rowan F. Grounds E. Harville S. DiMaggi B. Johnson D. Clark" R. McGowa


ames


H g


176 F. Gro 178 J. Dar 170 M. Zei 169 G. Ro '169 D. Au 4166 M. Ma 0 162 G. Kr
159 G. Flo
158
an 157
Team-Standings


h-Averages unds 149 by 149 gler 147 van 145 nann 145 rsh 143 t ' 142 od 140


Bowleretts,, !,-,. Alley-Katz Push-Overs Lillies of theAlleys Gutter-Gals The Spoilers' - Down-Unders, Trhe Crickets


Ladies , Golf Shots
Last Friday the weekly event of the Ladies Golf Association was a Low Net-Low Putt Tournament. Golf balls were awarded the' following winners. 18 Hole TournamentLow Net-First place--Lois Cooper
Second place-Mary Goolsby
Low Putts-Evelyn Leach
9 Hole TournamentLow Net-Frst place-Fran Skadowvki
Second place-Florence Fortenberry Low Putts-Kay Barton


Cubans Rap Locals--AII-Star Game


by Carlos. Caballo


Play during the week was important in that the Marines eliminated any doubt as to which team was the best in the 'Leagub. Their win over Naval Base Monday night clinched the title and in a convincing fashion.
The fighting leathernecks during the seaSon have come from behind more than once to demonstrate that a fighting spirit and will to win can mean a lot' in the final score. They upheld the tradition of the Marine Corps in an admirable fashion and, as usual, gave the fans their best brand of ball playing. This has also been true of VU-10 and the NAS Flyers.
'in spite of the lopsided score,it iS� probable -that the Marines would ha1ve won by almost the same score no matter what Naval Base had done ... they were not to be denied. It is the personal opinion of the writer that the score was a true comparison of the two teams.
Marines 33, NavalBase 3
No, its not 'football season yet but, cheer up . . . it isn't far off. Our only question .. how did Naval Base get three runs? Only outstanding statistic compiled during the game . .outside of the Marines ,wearing out the plate by running across it . ... was 5 errors compiled by Petinak of Naval Base. Marines 363 326 028-38 24 -3 Naval Base 000 100 020- 3 84 14
Cuban All-Star 9, Naval Base
A ll-Star 3

This Fourth annual Guantanamo Bay classic-now stands even in the record book with two wins apiece for the Cubans and the Americans. The fast'Cuban team demonstrated the fact that give them' just a crack to squeeze through and they'll batter the door down. This Iwas good ball playing at its best
and, had it not been for one wild tinning in which the Cubans hammered'across 5 runs, an otherwise close game.
The' Naval 'Base jumped to an


The Standings Teams , Won Mariies 14' VU-10 9 NAS 8
Naval Base " - 4


LoIt


i


'Sunday Marines vs- VU-10 'M kiday- -Naval Base vs NAS" ,Wednesday. NAAss' VU'-16


What's Denl' Stateildeli
Scientists have found ,some of .the secrets of, the. mn iupps 's and they hope, to translate the knowledge into ways of preveiting 'the "disabling disease.

Medical researchers became in.terested in 'the 16-to,21 day 'gap between catching mumps and comi-g~dowfi with the tell.tale bunip. Through laboratory experiments, they found that, the disease: vimus is. a slowpoke in growth and re~production.
One' oil company is ignoring the trend. to claims of Super-Atomnic Jetifower, n G and pitchig i s ads toward motoring .sa ty, in-ota 'ses <: ... . I n big newspaper, a ds ,,drivers are- urged- to check their, qeqsigbt ,,w#4 0;second-tests. one; seier;ef q Qnvqpng tism other,,fdt ~are -shown up
_by Idiffer ent - pa, aerns. Iadfines
- oset te 'question, " Does this pi.ture bar you rfom drivingwiout glasses 7--


0


' Siivrdayi I 1ply 1956 ; z -


- early lead in the second ipning and 'held it, 2-0, until the !furth when the Qubans tbreatenedwith 8 hits but could only ga -13(r; one:,runi to trail 2-1. In the fifth, hoWever,,the SCubans-piled up five .moru iuns and was never in troubi from. there on. Credit .for ,the win goes tA. De LaCruz who was reliev d ,afi he fifth by Frieder'. 'Loser is' S'ehfle who, took over from, starter Montgomiery after three innings. Naval B ,ase tried two more hurlers, Waldrop and Furtney in succession, � : , : . I .? I;s 1; 1 C
- Cubans 000,151 010-9 ,,. 6 Naval Base -020 000 010--3 -6, ,2
NAS -10, Naval Base 4
Played Thursday nikhtF this game definitely ,relegate the! Naval Base to the Tdoubtful honor of permanent possessipn of -the cola.
-Also it ke epsm rNA inn ing for
-a .crack- at .second., 1-Highlight, Of the gamewher grand slamsT were not too plentiful was a homernm
-by Waldrop.


Vo


,TRI:INDIAN






w


8aturdiy, 7 July 1956


THE INDIAN


Navy-BPPO-1ND-Guntanamo


Cinema - Scoop
by D.D.H.
Probably one of the most advertised pictures recently released 'i "Trapeze." Reports are that it is very good. Burt Lancaster, Tony CirtiS and Gina Lollobrigida star, pt'. ,definitely one to look Sbr**rd toU
F ur new ones to the cireut this week, the best of which is: The Conqueror (RKO, in color), stars,, Susan Hayward and John Wayne. In this one Wayne is still on. a horse, but of all people, he portrays that famed ruler of ancl nt. times, Gengis Khan! Miss H. plays the Tartar princess he abducts! Lots of spectacle and plenty & oft'battles I Agnes- Moorehead and Ted ,de Corsia are in supporting roeit This picture is good ... ell at least as good ss a picture
_,01this type cmbel
',hoa ; Twn (Bel-Air Prod., re.le4sed th& iUA.), is another new %one+ aid agood westernl Patterned isomnewhatfr from- some other very good westerns, this adds up to a vehoar er study of- the east. It stais Kent Taylor, Marian' Carr and! John Smith!I The plot concerns a iioup of people who take refuge from some Indians in a deserted town! Definitely one that I think even non-western fans might enjoy ,
ell f Frisco Bay z(Jaguar Prod., released thru W.B., in color), is ouistandig~sfor its perromances and rates, a black mark
its below par story! Edward G. Robinson Alan Ladd and Joanne Dr#, are Starred, with Paul Stewart, Fay Wray and Perry +Lopez in supporting, roles. The story is a familiar one, and innocently condefined .man, setting out to get th guilty party. Ladd and RobinSsbofe' are those two parties respecitl by. Ladd is at his best and
_Eob4nson is superb in his role. Althogbh you've- seen similar stories beqre, you might enjoy the fine
-act g!'
Crime Agalnst Joe (U.A.) ... Julie London and John Bromfield . a crime drama... I refuse to !say anything, you can Judge fort yourself!I
--East of Eden (W.B., in color) ... Jares Dean, Julie !Harris, Raymo~d Massey, and Burl Ives ,... based on the. Steinbeck novel ... pled the S bore... is an, excellent ,ure, eone that if yoirtve't seen, don't miss!. ... Leo
Gorcey and the Bowery Boys coi' dealt out in such q4uantities ~tIA it, iW6' even iy. play.
.24i -be~~.foe. a for a ra ,thme orighla Ue law...!I

J.an'Powell, Debbie Reynolds, Vie Da4 nD n, Edmund Purdom and
-tiii:sn: rCaeri. .. a musical comedy .. average!


WGBY Television


Saturday, July 7
1:00 Winkly Dink & You 1:80 Paul Winchell 2:00 Garry Woore 2:80 Robt Q.Lewis 8 :00 Victory at Sea 3:30 House Party 4:00 Chance of a Lifetime 4:30 Two for the Money 5:00 Western Movie 6:00 Beat the Clock 6:30 Masquerade Party 7:00 George Gobel 7:80 Your Hit Parade 8:00 Colgate Comedy Hour 9:00 Stage Show 9:30 Damon Runyon Theatre
Sunday, July 8
1 :00 Winky Dink & You
1:30 Contest Carnival 2:30, Robt Q. Lewis
3 .00You Are There 4:00 Ted Mack's Amateurs 5:00 Roy Rogers 5:30 That's My Boy 6:00 Royal Hawailans 6:80 What's My Line


7:00 Jack Benny 7:80 Appt with Adventure 8:00 Ed Sullivan 9:00 Motorola TV Hour
Monday, Jaly9 5:30 News Parade 5:45 Perry Como 6:00 I&E Film 6:30 My Favorite Husband 7:00 I Love Lucy 7:30 Highway Patrol 8:00 Arthur Murray 8:80 Medic 9:00 Studio One
Tuesday, July 10
5:80 News Parade 5:45 Perry Como 6:00 Disneyland 7:00 Phill Silvers 7:80 BigTown 8:00 Guy Lombardo 8:30 The Lineup 9:00 Robt. Montgomery
Wednesday. July 11 5:30 News Parade 5:45 Eddie Fisher


Program
6:00 Industry on Parade 6:30 I've Got a Secret 7:00 This is Your Life 7:00 Screen Director's
Playhouse 8:00 Martha Raye 9:00 Kraft TV Theatre
Thursday, July 12 5:30 News Parade 5:46 Perry Como 6:00 Stop the Music 6:80 The Big Story 7:00 Bob Cummings 7:80 You Bet Your Life 8:00 Dragnet 8:30 Dunnlger Show 9:00 Climax
Friday, July 12 5:30 News Parade 5:45 Perry Como 6:00 Dollar a Second 6:30 Ozzie & Harriet 7:00 Mama 7:30 Playhouse of Stars 8:00 Johnny Carson 8:80 Crusader 9:00 Boxing


Book-Nook j&za


Here's a biographical collection which should appeal to everybody. Steve Allen jots down his observations on the nation's comedians in THE FUNNY MEN. Each of the' sixteen" sketches is aboutt a famous American gagster of radio and" TV, and the list runs from Fred Allen to Red Skelton. This ais light, reading .with a capital L.
For those, who ;enjoy reading poetry, EXILES AND MARRIAGES, by Donald Hall, should provide something new and modern. This young American poet writes , provocative lyrics about familiar topics, and his efforts have won for him an honored name in contemporary literature. Best. of all, he doesn't have to be deciphered.
WAR OR PEACE, by John Foster Dulles, -is a small volume in which the Secretary of State recounts the aims and accomplishments of present-day American foreign policy. Mr. Dulles' presentation is informal and readable, and is based largely on the personal experiences which 'he has had in shaping our foreign policy, and his personal contacts with the statesmen of the world.+ Here's a book which deserves a repeat appearance in this column. THE FORSYTE SAGA, by John Galsworthy, was written several years ago, but it has a popularity to it which has not diminished with time. Mr. Galsworthy, a now-deceased English writer of the highest calibre, introduces us to an upper-middle iass English family of London, and with him we follow their fortunes for 30 years. Here is a great novel, brilliant style, and good story all rolled into 9ne volume.


Saturday, July 7
NavSta-Conqueror--12S rin. NAS-Lone Ranger-94 min. Mar. Site-Tall Man Riding-102 rin. Villa.-tTnderwater--1 min. Lwd. Pt.-Emergency. Hospital-89 rmin.
Sunday. July 8
NavSta-East of Eden-15 rin. NAS-Conqueror Mar. Site-Magnificent Roughn~ks--90 rin.
Villa.-Tall Man Riding Lwd. Pt.-Unde-water
- lfM6nday, July 9 NavSta-High Society---B rin. NAS-,East I of. Eden Mar. Site--Lone Ranger Villa.-Magnificent Roughnecks Lwd. Pt.-Tall Man Riding
' Tuesday, July 10
NavSta-Crime AgainstJoe--94 min. NAS-High Society Mar. Site--Conqueror Villa.-Lone Ranger Lwd. Pt.-Magniflcent Roughnecks
Wednesday, July .11NavSta--Heli On Frisco Bay-g8 min. NAS-Crime Against Joe Mar. Site-East of Eden Villa.--Conqueror Lwd. Pt.--Lone RaIM
Thursday. 'July 12 NavSta-Athena-95 min NAS-Hell On Frisco Bay Mar. Site-High Society Villa.-East of Eden Lwd. Pt.-Conqueror
Friday, July 18
NavSta-Ghost Town-92 rin. NAS-Athena
Mar. Site-Crime Against Joe Villa.-High Society Lwd. Pt.-East of Eden


Radio Round-Up
The majority of WGBY listeners have become familiar with and accustomed to the fact that there are certain tunes, primarily from Broadway musicals, that cannot be aired locally. Including some of the better ones, some listeners are confused-by the fact that they hear these over Cuban stations and also over our bwn WGBY-TV. Why not radio?
The main reason is due to restrictions by copyright owners of the music, not by Petrillo's musicians. The Defense Department has been and will continue negotiations for release of restricted tunes and a new revised list will be out in the near future. The reason these tunes cannot be aired on programs as they are in the States is because of the decommercialization of programs.
Once this has been done, the program is not legally a rebroadcast but an entirely new program. Since commercials in TV are left intact, the Defense Department holds that the sponsor of the show S.. who holds world rights ... still retains rights to the songs
-and thus they can be heard here.
NEW MUSIC: Among the new tunes available for air are "I'm Gonna Steal You Away," by Dean Martin, and "Street of Love." Red .Nichols does "Cool Tango" and "Indiana." -You'd' never recognize the'latter due to the stlying. "That Certain Feeling" by Les Brown With- flip side 'IHit The Road To Dreamland." June Christy warbles "You Took Advantage Of Me" and "Intrigue.'
PROGRAMS: "Sunday With Garroway" onI day of same name at 8 p.m. finds Dave entertaining thiee talented gentlemen.... Author and newspaper editor, Jonathan Daniels . . . the singer-compbser, Jimmy Shelton... and musician-band leader Lionel Hampton. . Monday night at its usual spot of 9 p.m., is "X-Minus One." This week's story is "A Logic Named Joe." It presents a thrilling drama of a machine which helps man to do his ordinary thinking. Called a "logic" it can answer any, question concerning history, cooking, mathematics, etc. Then something goes wrong in the electronics of one machine ... and everyone becomes a robot of death.


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Full Text

PAGE 1

Base Housing Areas To Get'Papoose', Delivery Scheduled To Begin July 15 The "Papoose" will become available July 15 to all Base housing areas under a NayBase Instruction issued recently. Within the next two weeks "Papoose" boxes will be installed at various strategic points in the housing areas. Residents will be able to pick up daily, the news bulletins at these points. Under the new housing area delivery system it has been requested that each family take only one copy of the "Papoose". Only enough for all housing areas will be printed. The papers will be in the pick-up boxes and available well before sunrise each day. Boxes on Telephone Poles The new "Papoose" boxes will be located on the following telephone poles in the housing areas: On Victory Hill the boxes will be on Poles one and 89. In East Bargo there will be one on the telephone pole next to RH 11B. In Central Bargo boxes will be located on Pole No. 4-205, between CB 56B and CB 57B; on Pole No. 4-198 between CB 20B and CB 21B; on Pole 4-180 between CB 11B and CB 12B and on Pole No. 4-186 between CB 35B and CB 37A. On old Granadillo Point the box will be on the telephone pole in the rear of RH 77. In the new section there will be one on the metal pole next to GP 15P. In the Nob Hill area pick-up boxes will be placed on the pole at RH 31B near the intersection at ADM Perry Circle; the pole behind RH 48 and the pole between RH 66 and 67. Villamar Has 9 Pick-Up Boxes In Villamar they will be placed on the telephone pole in front of RH 95; on Pole No. 4-76 next to DH 123; Pole No. 95 between DH 246 and DH 244; Pole No. 4-89 between DH 220 and DH 222; Pole No. 4-101 between DH 303 and DH 304; Pole No. 4-113 between DH 411 and DH 412; the pole by the bus stop in front of RH 543; Pole No. 4-147 next to DH 635 and Pole No. 4-139. Advertisements under the new system will be printed as approved. Lost and Found ads will be okayed as will For Sale and Want Ads, but not including clothing or articles of obvious small value. Certain "Notices" Okay Notices of special meetings of any recognized organization will be approved, but notices of regularly scheduled meetings will not be printed. Special events of any organization such as an Officer's Club dance or a Public Works picnic will be approved, but shall not exceed three inches of space or require any special treatment. Exchange Garage Plans Expansion In the planning stage is a garage shed to be constructed behind the present NavSta Exchange Garage, according to an announcement made by W. E. Koenig, new NavSta Exchange Garage Manager. The shed's dimensions are 125 feet wide and 100 feet long. When construction gets started and the project completed, new garage equipment will be installed. Equipment under procurement: beam visual liner, wheel balancer, body straightener, break bander, etc. When the shed is finally constructed, the present mechanics' workshop will be converted into a salesroom where automobile accessories are to be stocked and a glass shop will be "fitted in" for the acceptance of repair and maintenance jobs on auto glass parts. Also, a workroom for the production of seat covers and convertible tops will be created. The new manager of the local auto clinic is a Texan with 25 years of automotive experience. His staff includes 18 Cuban civilians, 12 of which are mechanics, two are gas men, three are parts men and an assistant manager. Midshipmen Due To Arrive 24th, 13,000 Personnel Guantanamo Bay will once again be the scene of "big league" fleet operations when Task Group 40.1 composed of 30 warships, drops anchor Tuesday, July 24. Midshipman Cruise Alpa which constitutes the Task Group has a manpower complement of 13,000 which includes officers, midshipmen and enlisted personnel. Ships actually participating in the operations are two battlewagons, two heavy cruisers and 16 destroyers. The ten submarines with the Group "will simply give the midshipmen the joy of an underwater cruise." Fleet Training Group authorities revealed that the purpose of the cruise "is to acquaint and train the future officers of the Navy in matters dealing with shipboard evolution." The Gtmo Task Group operations will be completed on Saturday, July 28. COVERS GTMO LIKE THE SUNSHINE U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Volume VII, No. 27 Saturday, 7 July 1956 Gtmo Red Cross Representative Experiencing F About to begin her third month of duty on a normal two-year stint, Miss Ruth Frederick, American Red Cross representative for Guantanamo Bay, says she "likes Gtmo." Miss Frederick arrived on the "Caribbean Rock" May 10. She relieved Mrs. Helen Bowler who retired from the ARC and returned to the states after more than four years of duty on the Naval Base. INDIAN Photo This is Miss Frederick's first experience on a Naval establishment other than "over the phone" work with Navy stations close to the Army or Air Force bases where she has worked. And she readily admits it is quite different than first. Navy Duty working with the other branches of the Armed Services. Came from Kirtland AFB Her preceding duty station, before coming to Gtmo, was at Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, New Mexiqo. "This is the place," she says, "where the Air Force tests its atomic weapons. In fact, the crew of the plane which dropped the bomb at Bikini came from Kirtland." "I did have a few slight contacts with the Navy while at Kirtland, said Miss Frederick. "They had an air weapons testing center there, on the Air Force Base grounds." When told she was coming to Gtmo, Miss Frederick asked friends about the place. Some told her it was wonderful; others said it was absolutely terrible. But, "Now that I'm here, I like the place, the people and the climate-hot and dry, just like Albuquerque," said Miss Frederick. Miss Frederick has been with the Red Cross 25 years. This is her fourth overseas tour. During World War II she was in Europe on a Club Mobile distributing coffee and doughnuts to the troops. Shortly after the start of the Korean conflict, she went to work in Japan, after having worked at various Red Cross headquarters in the world. Bos'n Lands 'Stuffed' Shark Here's a real fish tale, and as incredible as it may sound, it's the honest-injun truth! A little over a week ago T. W. Waite, BM3, was on one of the piers near McCalla Field pursuing that great Gtmo pastime, fishing! Using a shot line and a whole bonefish as bait, he suddently felt a tightening of the line. He quickly realized that this was no ordinary fish. Extraordinary was right ...for on the line he had a gray nurse shark, (the maneater) and it was a whopper! The battle began! Arnold Darian, another fisherman present on the pier, gave Waite some much needed assistance. After a two hour battle they finally landed him on the pier. Now come the vital statistics! The shark measured 10 feet six inches and weighed 325. It had a girth measuring 64 inches. The story now takes on an air of disbelief, for upon cutting open the shark they discovered in its stomach, one whole goat, the skull of another, the horns of two others and half of a grapefruit. Most discouraging factor 'of the catch was that it was caught Prior to the beginning of the annual fishing tournament and is not be eligible!

PAGE 2

Pago Two P~ge Two THE INDIAN Saturday, 7 July 1956 TEINDIAN The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a possible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and content1&alefiAt personnel. RADM WILLIAM G. COOPER, Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Editorial Staff LTJG D. G. LaCasse -----------------------------Officer-Advisor G. L;. Henderson, JOC --------------------------------Editor J. C. Curren, JOSN ----------------------------Managing Editor E. U. Orias, JO3 -------------------------------Feature Editor D.D. Hinton, JOSN ------------------------------Staff Reporter THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P.35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. Materials marked AFPS may be used by news media provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may nqt be used. All materials originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part or without credit. All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. Rules On Emergency Vehicles Many Base drivers, particularly newcomers, are confused as to what they should do upon the approach of an emergency vehicle or a truck bearing explosive material. The following information is intended to eliminate some of the misunderstanding concerning this subject. The basic rule is that whenever another vehicle approaches giving warning by red lights, horn, or siren, you will drive off the roadway and stop, remaining stopped, until the emergency vehicle has cleared the vicinity by at least one hundred (100) yards. Remember that when an emergency occurs more than one such vehicle will be alerted, so be prepared for those following. Ordinarily emergency vehicles are associated with high speed and so we may expect a fire engine, ambulance, or police car in this group. However, there are times when it is necessary to escort large or disabled vehicles which might be a hazard to other traffic, and slow speed may be involved. Regardless of speed, if the escorting vehicle displays a red warning light, drive off the road and stop. In the case of explosive carrying vehicles, there usually will not be an escort. The explosive carrying truck will display a red flag, warning signs, and the headlights will be on. In this case, DO NOT STOP OR PULL OFF THE ROAD but continue at normal speed. If following, keep at least 200 yards distant. When the cargo is particularly hazardous, the explosive carrying vehicle may be escorted by another with a shining red light. In this event you will drive off the road as in the case of meeting an emergency vehicle. The DDT spray truck is also classified as an emergency vehicle and so all approaching vehicles will pull to the side of the road and stop until vision is clear for a distance of 100 feet. A. J. McGowan Base Safety Engineer Navy's LargeSunday 250 Cuban Teachers School Still Growing Aboard Base Sunday Man, this summer can be the coolest, no matter what 01' Sol decides to do. It all depends on how we use our noodles, man. Doctors haven't cinched it, but they're pretty sure too much sun contributes to skin diseases. That's point one to remember. Get some sun but be smart about it. Protect yourself. Swimming can be a great sport and its healthful, man. But water can be a killer. Don't showboat it; don't over estimate that breast-stroke; don't dive into an empty pool. That's point number two. When we sweat, man, dig the salt that pours out. But those happy little salt pills are the craziest. If you've had an active day, if you're reeling and keeling, down a salt pill with a glass of water. That's point number three. Keep cool, man, and remember these points. They're a pretty potent program for the good old summertime. (APFS) Sunday, 8 July 1956 CATHOLIC MASSES Sunday, 7000-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1280-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thra Fri.-1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800, 1900 -2000, and daily before Mass PROTESTANT SERVICES 0980-Sunday School 0980-Sunday School 0980-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship (Naval Base Chapel) 1980-Fellowship Hour Wednesday: 1980-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal JEWISH SERVICES Friday--1900-Naval Base Chapel CHURCH OF CHRIST 1000-Bible Study 1040--Worship Service Community Auditorium LATER DAY SAINTS Sunday-1100-Naval Station Library CHRISTIAN SCIENCE .Sumday,.+1000-NavSta Library Caldar of Events Saturday, July 7 Jr. Rifle and Pistol Club-Classroom Lectures ...1:00 p.m. Bldg. 27. Monday, July 9 Beginning today, vehicle inspection for all enlisted personnel. Inspection will be carried out through July 14. O.E.S. Chapter Meeting ...Community Auditorium ...7:80 p.m. Tuesday, July 10 Jr. Rifle and Pistol Club .Monthly meeting ...1:00 p.m. ...Bldg. 27. Little Theater ...Community Auditorium .7:30 p.m. Fleet Reserve Association ...Community Auditorium ..8:00 p.m. Hospital Service Volunteers .Medical Library (Hoop.) .'. .10:00 a.m. Wednesday, July 11 Toastmaster's Club .Officers' Club6:30 p.m. Thursday. July 12 Felloweraft Club 1078 .Community Auditorium ...7:10 p.m. At 0930 each Sunday morning there convenes in Guantanamo Bay the Navy's largest Sunday School. The present enrollment of 660 is believed unchallenged by any other Navy Sunday School, and it is still growing. Offering classes for tiny toddlers to adults, the Sunday School has the added attraction of convenient bus service. Two-year-olds have a department of their own, known as the Pre-Nursery department. Children of nursery school age belong to the Nursery department, kindergarten age to the Kindergarten department, primary grades 1, 2, and 3 compose Primary departments I, II, and III. Grades 4, 5, and 6 are in the Junior department; grades 7 and 8 and high school students are in the Junior-Senior High Department. The Adult Bible Class covers all beyond High School age. It takes a large staff to run such a Sunday School, and more than 64 military personnel, civilian employees, and their dependents are working in the Sunday School as superintendents, teachers, secretaries, pianists, and helpers. Once upon a time the Sunday School was small enough to get lost in the Base School Biulding .on Chapel Hill. Now bursting at the seams, the Nursery, Kindergarten, and Primary I, have been relocated in school buildings on Victory Hill. Other departments, including Pre-Nursery remain at Chapel Hill, but if the Sunday Commander Naval Base and the local Holy Name Society will jointly play hosts on the Base to 250 Cuban Catholic .teachers from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. tomorrow, July 8. The teachers are expected to arrive at Pier Baker, where six buses will whisk them away for a Base guided tour. Six interpreters will be on hand to make the "exchange of pleasantries" between the visitors and the hosts "more lively and understandable on each side." Included in the tour itinerary are the Base I&E offices, housing areas, stores and "other points of interest." School continues to grow-as appears likely-more space is going to be needed. Buses follow the same route for Sunday School as they do for the school. The schedule is published below for the benefit of newcomers to the Base as well as others who may not have discovered the Navy's largest Sunday School. Sunday School Bus Schedule LOCATION TIME OF DEPARTURE CABLE STATION CORINASO POINT OIL POINT HOSPITAL HILL RADIO POINT NOB HILL GRANADILLO POINTS VILLAMAR BARGO POINT MARINA POINT MARINE SITE 1 DEER POINT EVANS POINT 0905 0910 0915 0915 0920 0905 0905 0905 0910 0915 0915 0915 0920 Saturday, 7 July 1956 0 THE INDIAN

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Saturday, 7 July 1956 Car Census. Gtmo Has 1,132 Private Vehicles Representing 27 Makes. '30 Oldest by Ely U. Orias There are 1,132 private motor vehicles on the Base as of June 23, representing 27 car "makes" with one 1930 model as the most antiquated and seven 1956 models being the latest. Except for '32, '34, '44 and '45, models of '30 through '56 are represented. Of these 1,132 cars, 215 are owned by officers; 731 are under ownership title of enlisted personnel; 179 are properties of American civilians except for a small number which are owned by Cubans and the remaining five are owned by the Naval Station Special Services department. Fords Top List Among the 27 car "makes" running around the Base, Ford has the most in number with 246; Chevrolet takes second with 217 and Plymouth is third with 125. Other "makes" and their corresponding numbers are: Pontiac, 83; Buick, 60; Mercury, 56; Oldsmobile, 49; Willys (Jeep), 44; Dodge, 43; Chrysler, 31; Nash, 28; Hudson, 27; De Soto, 18; Packard, 16; Cadillac, 13; Kaiser, eight; Crosley, six; Henry J., five; Lincoln, three; MG, two; Austin, one; Morris Minor, one; Frazer, one; All S t a t e, one; International (Truck), one, and Volkswagen, one. Car transition on the Base is edified with the presence of one of the earliest and the latest in car model history. A year-to-year model and the number of cars identified with each model are as follows: Model 1930-one; 1931-one; 1933one; 1935-one; 1986-four; 1937five; 1938-11; 1940-31; 1941-29; 1942-ten; 1943-one; 1946-45; 194763; 194840; 1949-103; 1950429; 1951-144; 1952-58; 1953-151; 196483; 1955-73 and 1956-seven. Sedans Most Popular The most popular car design is the "sedan" two-door or four-door style. Eight hundred thirty-two of the total number of cars on the INDIAN Photo Base are sedans, 302 of which are two-door and 530 are four-door. Second most popular design is the "coupe" style. There are 122 coupes on the Base. Third in design popularity is the "station wagon" town and country with 46. Then, the "convertible" style steps in next with 43. After the "converts", Jeep style gears in with 38. In the Scooter division, 160 twowheeled monsters are under registry on the Base. Of these tandembike locomotives, 40 belong to officers; 107 are registered under the names of enlisted men and 13 are owned by civilians. "Makes" represented by the Base's seven 1956 models are: Ford-a black two-door sedan owned by Lawton B. Jenkins, AC2, of the Naval Air Station; Chevrolet --four-door black sedan titled by Frank C. Owens; Buick-two-door sedan, red body, black top owned by Joseph Ramirez; Mercurygray body andwirhite top belonging to Myron J. Garroway, ETC, Naval Station: Pontiactwo-door sedan, dark blue body and light blue top bearing plate No. 0271; Studebaker-two-door station wagon, dark green top with dark green body belonging to Carl R. Anderson, AM1, of VU-10 and a Willys station wagon owned by Mary M. Powers, civilian. Broughton Owns Oldest Car Owner of the most antiquated car on the Base is Hubert L. Broughton, civilian, of NavSta Public Works. His car is a 1930 two-door black coupe Chevrolet. Second oldest is another Chevrolet, a 1931 two-door black coupe owned by flay Fielding, civilian. W. E. Koenig, Navy Exchange Garage Mgr:;har-disclosed that "approximately 101000 gallons of gasoline at a total -cot of $1,800 are being serviced weekly by the Garage's gas line to the Base's private car and scooter owners." LCDR T. E. Bager, Base Provost Marshal Officer, reports that there are 3,298 registered motor vehicle Aide To Air Navigation Installed At Leeward It's here! At Leeward Point, a V H F OMNI-Directional R a d io Range stands unattended as it sends radio pulses on a 24-hour basis, to flying planes within a frequency range of 108-118 megacycles. Providing facilities never before available in radio range, the OMNI'S frequencies are completely free from atmospheric static and from noise interference known as "precipitation static" such as rain, snow, dust, etc. All-important feature of this new air navigation equipment is the fact that it is not limited to two or four courses which are common to the obsolescent radio range. In a nutshell, the OMNI gives the pilot the discretion to position his aircraft on any bearing he he thinks is advisable and still gets to the place he's heading for. Also to be installed on the Base "in the near future" is the equipment known as TACAN. This apparatus will give the pilot his bearing and distance from his station in nautical miles. and scooter drivers on the Base. The Provost Marshal also said that "a total of 461 traffic violations have been entered in the Base Police blotter from January 1, 1956 to June 30, 1956." According to Mrs. B. H. Chipparoni, Base Hospital Statistics Clerk, 12 persons have been hospitalized during the period January 1, 1956 to the present date "as a result of injuries sustained in traffic accidents." There is no known traffic fatality within that period however. The greatest number of nonnaval cars ever assembled at one time and at one place within the past seven months occurred on the night of May 10, 1956, at the NavSta Commissary and Exchange parking area and its immediate vicinity. The movie "I'll Cry Tomorrow" shown that night at the NavSta lyceum was "allegedly" responsible for the mass assembly of, according to Base Police estimate, 300 cars! Gtmo License Plates Not Valid In States Vehicle registration plates issued by the Naval Base are recognized only on the Naval Base and in nearby Cuba. The plates are not legalized license tags in any state of the United States Personnel returning to they edt1tinental United States with a privately owned vehicle must obtain a valid U.S. state registration plate. The one issued by the Base must be turned in to the Provost Marshal's office before leaving the Base. 1 st of Series How To Register In Home State For '56 Election To guide you as to your state' particular absentee voting laws, AFPS has prepared a three part voting series. This article is the first in a series of articles dealing with how you become registered in order to vote by absentee ballot. Maine All unregistered residents, except meibers of the armed forced and certain civilians, must register in person at times and places established by locar boards of registration. Registration is permanent unless a person has changed his name or his residence. Members of the armed forces, civilian employees serving outside the territorial limits of the U.S. and their spouse may vote without making a formal application for registration by completing the bederal Post Card application for ai absentee ballot and mailing it to the clerk of your home town. Missouri All persons, except members of the arined forces, muist register in person if residing in a city or town where registration is required. Registration is required in cities having a population of 10,000 or more; in counties where there is a city of at least 400,000 population. All members of the armed forces may vote by absentee process without betio registered. Nebraska Registration is permanent in Douglas and Lancaster counties. In cities of over 7,000 population, re-registration is required this year. Unregistered members of the armed forces, civilian employees serving outside the territorial limits of the U.S. .and their spouses may make application for rekistration when an absence ballot is re quested. Enter the statement "please mail registratioi forms" in the markin of the Federal Post Card application and mail to the county clerk of residence or, if a resident of Douglas or Landeaster county to the election commissioner. All other qualified persons may register by absentee by requested "registration forms" from one of the above offices. These requests may be made at any time, but it is recommended that they be made at least 90 days before election day. New York A member of the earned forces and accompanying spouse, liarent ofchild; if a qualified voter and a resident of the election district, becomes registered auto. matically when one of the following has been properly filled on talld returned to the Division for Servicenses's Votlh, Offic of the Secretary of State, Albany 1, N.Y.; 1. Federal Post Card application; 2, New York Division for Servicemen's Voting Foim 1; 0. A letter ebotaining yotif New York aid present military address, signed by you and all dependehtt who are also requiesting ballots Exioept tot thoet niamet above aild rsidents of flakstdi 15ff Bzoa'ie ehuitTeiS rekistttisbL Ii' peroti t red1ld 60'all other qtiilified -votere. Sick-tB~ yig ii6 acombplisihed at' the office oft4 thioard g elections, home of raid ence ant tim be"fore September 0. PUERTO RICO and the VIRGIN IS LANDS have no provisions for absentee voting. For further information, consult yotnr voting officer.-AFPS) 0 THE INDIAN Page Three 0

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Page. Four THE INDIAN Saturday, '7 July 1956 NAS Ordnance Builds Pistol House From Salvaged Packing Crates NAS Photo Lab Photo The "construction gang" of the new NAS Pistol Range House threw a "house warming party" June 20. Left to right, back row: M. F. Carey, AO1; J. B. Jocks, AO1; A. W. Compton, A03; L. D. Ward, AN, and E. C. Sammons, AN. Middle row: T. R. Morrow, A02; T. A. Henderson, A02; R. Ploeckelmann, A02; L. C. James, A02; G. L. Opperman, AN; G. W. Paulsen, AOC; P. Ricks, AOC and R. R. Logan, AOC. Front row: LT R. D. Colbert, CDR B. M. Barackman, LCDR G. W. Sherley, ChGun R. E. Ziegler, R. L. Reiter, AN, and L. Depasquale, AO1. The Naval Air Station Pistol Range House held a grand opening June 20: On hand to "do it up right" were the Operations Officer, CDR B. M. Barackman and the Public Works Officer, LT R. D. Colbert from NAS. This house stands as visible proof of what can be done with a little imagination, some salvaged material, "can do" spirit and a "know how" crew. It was built by the Ordnance division in-between their regular duties. In charge of construction was Ray Ploeckelmann, A02. The lumber was old packing crates that the division was able to salvage from the Navy Exchange, Special Services and the NAS Hobby Shops. The NAS Hobby Shop served as the working place for the crew to do the cutting, planing and smoothing of the lumber after the crates were disassembled. Old nails were saved since there was no appropriation for the building. Concrete was donated by the Seabees. Some days, as many as three or four man-hours were spent working on the Range House. Other times, especially during the rain, all that could be done was for the fellows to go out to the site and say "nuts." When it came time for the painting, the inside was done first, inbetween rain showers. And then, each morning at quarters you could hear "maybe we can get one side done before the rain get's to it," and off the painters would go, racing to see if the paint would dry before the rains came. Now finished, the Range House is being used to stow all gear from the NAS Pistol Range. In the future, this Range, complete with the House, will be used for training and matches, both military and NRA. Fleet Reserve News The next regularly scheduled meeting of Branch 100 will be Tuesday, 10 July at the Community Auditorium at 2000. There are about 30 new members who are urged to be present Tuesday for their initiation into the Branch. Our regular monthly meetings are held on the 2nd Tuesday of each month. All members are urged to attend these meetings. Your interest in taking a part in your local branch, is beneficial to you and the Fleet Reserve Association. So let's all give the Branch a couple of hours of our time each month. You will find that it will be time well spent. LAFRA News The Ladies Auxiliary Fleet Reserve Association held its monthly business meeting Tuesday evening at the Girl Scout Hut, Marina Point. A discussion was held on holding a cake sale in the near future, and the aims and benefits of the unit were discussed. New members of the unit who were initiated were Jeannie Gugliemo, Eleanor Childers, Alice Snow, and Kathleen Steward Welcome Ladies to the unit. Stampede .. Commiss NAS, VU -10 Picnic try Swarmed Is Spanking Success In Store's Biggest Day The Naval Station Commissary Store's enlisted breakout men, customer helpers and butchers fought valiantly when more than 800 "grocery -purchasing" wives swarmed the store Monday, July 2. The all-day Commissary stampede found the breakout men busily filling the periodically empty grocery bins; butchers diligently hovered over their cutting boards and everyone gave a helping hand to the patrons as they carted away their groceries. Adding music to the buying scene was the incessant jingle of the store's six cash registers. According to Commissary insiders, last Monday's grocery spree "shattered all previous one day customer records." F T 0 Bulletin Michial Benedini, BTC, of the Engineering department transfererd to the Fleet Reserve on Friday of this week. He has been with the Fleet Training Group for over two years and in the Navy just short of 20 years. The Benedini family likes Gtmo so well that he has accepted a position with the local Public Works department. Two new men reported to the Gunnery department this week. Dan Davis, TM1, reported from the Ordnance department of the Naval Station Gtmo. Davis' parents are also residents of the Naval Base. Vincent J. Amorese, GMC, reported from USS SHENANDOAH. He is married to the former Miss Marjorie Watkins of Bermuda and has four children. He served in USS CONCORD, USS SEMMES, USNS ANACOSTIA, USS O'HARA, and USS AULT. The Communications department suffered a rough week by losing three Chief Radiomen. Chief Perry was transferred to the Naval Facility London, England; Chief Biondo went to the Fleet Training Center, Pearl Harbor; and Chief Dunn is reporting aboard USS LEYTE. FTG has five hospital patients LCDR W. H. Wild; D. B. Clay, BMC; L. Luzzaro, SKC; H. P. Holt, RM3, and W. I. Atkeison, TMC. The rest of the command wish all a speedy recovery. Lightning flashed and. thunder blared as 'Tommy tried to sleep. Mother stealing into his room lest he be frightened, heard the tiny tot murmur: "Mumie, what's Daddy doing to the television set this time?" The annual Fourth" of July picnic of the Naval Air Station and VU-10 held at Phillips Park Wednesday, was a spanking success! An estimated crowd of 1,000 persons including officers, enlisted personnel, their dependents and guests, milled about the Park premises all day. Chief T. N. Douglass, Mgr. of the NAS EM Club and in charge of the picnic refreshments, reported that "8,000 lbs. of ice was broken; 270 cases of beer and 90 cases of soft drinks were consumed by the picnickers." "Chow Down" at the party was piped by first class commissaryman Tony Morello, party food manager at 11:00 a.m. which continued until 4:00 p.m. Assiduously standing behind the chow line was Joseph LoCicero, CS2, NAS. Eight commissarymen from the Naval Air Station gave LoCicero a helping hand. LoCicero revealed that 1,400 rations of ham, 1,400 rations of fried chicken, 1,000 stuffed celeries, 300 loaves of bread, five gallons of ketsup, 13 gallons of mayonnaise, and $50. worth of condiments were downed by the picnickers. At the picnic games department which was under the supervision of LTJG G. F. Church, NAS Special Services Officer, softball, volleyball, penny scramble, toilet paper running contest, longest marriage revealation, rolling pin throwing to a dummy-husband contest, ball pitching and jitterbug contest to the strains of hillbilly music, were the highlights of the day's athletics. At the penny scramble marathon, 50 children between the ages two to five scanned a sawdust-covered area where 1,000 pennies were dumped. T-Age Advisory Group Elects New Officers The Teen-Age Advisory Group held a semi-annual election of officers, Monday evening, July 2. Newly elected officers are: President, R. T. Albright, NavSta Budget co -ordinator; Vice -President, CDR R. J. Mathews, Asst. Damage Control Officer, FTG; Secretary, Mrs. J. M. Darby; and LCDR G. W. Sherley, NAS Ordnance Officer. Also, on Saturday, evening June 30, the Teen-Age Club held an election of officers. Officers elected at this meeting were: Doris Lewis, president; Nancy Lewis, vice-president; Diane Holloway, secretary and Sandy Sherley, treasurer. 9 Saturday, 7 July 1956 Page.Four THE INDIAN

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" Saturday, 7 July 1956 THE INDIAN Sagile Marines Define Sportsmanship .Devil Dogs Clinch Base League Title by TSgt. Burris At the mention of baseball, or any sport for that matter, the question of sportsmanship arises. To Marines, that word carries a lot of meaning. Any uniformed person will immediately remark the Marines the world over are poor losers. What is a good loser? There is no such animal! ! Taking to the field in sports is very much like taking to the field in combat. Marines enter both with the firm conviction they are the last and they fight with the strong determination to win. Marines have never lost a battle and seldom ever have lost in the sports field. When a loss is suffered, the entire Corps suffers. Any person or team who leaves a field of sport with a big smile and a heart full of joy and good-fellowship toward the opposing person or team is no asset to his outfit. His pride and determination aren't very strong and his outfit would be better off without him. No Marine nor Marine team has ever been guilty of putting up their second best. They fight for every point every inch of the way with every fair and sportsmanship weapon at their disposal. Don't ever confuse a strong determination to win with a lack of good sportsmanship. Sportmanship and determination to win go hand in hand and there is never any question about Marines being a determined breed. R. & P. Club Juniors Strikes Spares In Safety Shooting The Guantanamo Bay Rifle and Pistol club, Junior Division, has gone into high gear in their safety and shooting program. This Junior Division addition to the regular Rifle and Pistol club is affiliated with the National Rifle association and is sponsored by the local senior outfit. Its aim is to promote marksmanship instruction, wholesome competition, safety education and training in democratic principles. Presently there are 66 members in the Junior Division, 20 of which have completed classroom and firing for classification and awards. Fourteen members have already qualified as Pro-Marksman and are working on the Marksman classification. Club dues in the Junior Division are .10 per month, payable six months in advance. Initial targets are provided by the club while ammunition and weapons are provided by the shooters. If any Base youngster is interested in joining the Junior Division, they should call LCDR L. G. Maxwell, phone 9-207 or 8-114, or LT J. M. Ferarnte, phone 9-609 or 8-849. by Dolly Aumann High-Games J. Darby 176 M. Marsh 178 R. Garaudy 170 G. Rowan 169 F. Grounds 169 E. Harville 166 S. DiMaggio 162 B. Johnson 159 D. Clark 158 R. McGowan 157 High-Averages F. Grounds 149 J. Darby 149 M. Zeigler 147 G. Rowan 145 D. Aumann 145 M. Marsh 143 G. Kraft 142 G. Flood 140 Team-Standings Bowleretts Alley-Katz Push-Overs Lillies of the Alleys Gutter-Gals The Spoilers Down-Unders. The Crickets w-29 W-28 W-21 W-21 W-15 w-11 W-10 W-9 L-7 L-8 L-15 L-15 L-21 L-25 L-26 L-27 Ladies Golf Shots Last Friday the weekly event of the Ladies Golf Association was a Low Net-Low Putt Tournament. Golf balls were awarded the following winners. 18 Hole TournamentLow Net-First place-Lois Cooper Second place-Mary Goolsby Low Putts-Evelyn Leach 9 Hole TournamentLow Net-First place-Fran Skadowski Second place-Florence Fortenberry Low Putts-Kay Barton Cubans Rap Locals--All-Star Game by Carlos Caballo Play during the week was important in that the Marines eliminated any doubt as to which team was the best in the League. Their win over Naval Base Monday night clinched the title and in a convincing fashion. The fighting leathernecks during the season have come from behind more than once to demonstrate that a fighting spirit and will to win can mean a lot in the final score. They upheld the tradition of the Marine Corps in an admirable fashion and, as usual, gave the fans their best brand of ball playing. This has also been true of VU-10 and the NAS Flyers. In spite of the lopsided score,. it is probable that the Marines would have won by almost the same score no matter what Naval Base had done ...they were not to be denied. It is the personal opinion of the writer that the score was a true comparison of the two teams. Marines 33, Naval Base 3 No, it's not football season yet but cheer up ...it isn't far off. Our only question .how did Naval Base get three runs? Only outstanding statistic compiled during the game .outside of the Marines wearing out the plate by running across it ...was 5 errors compiled by Petinak of Naval Base. Marines 363 326 028-33 24 3 Naval Base 000 100 0203 4 14 early lead in the second inning and held it 2-0 until the fourth when the Cubans threatened with 8 hits but could only ga: nor one run to trail 2-1. In the fifth, however, the Cubans piled up five more runs and was never in troubic from there on. Credit for the win goes to. De LaCruz who was relieved ,after the fifth by Frieder. Loser is Schiller who took over from starter Montgomery after three innings. Naval Base tried two more hurlers,. Waldrop and Furtney in succession. Cubans 000 151 010-9 8. 6 Naval Base 020 000 010-3 6. 2 NAS 10, Naval Base 4 Played Thursday night, this game definitely relegated the Naval Base to the doubtful honor of permanent possession of the cellar. Also, it keeps NAS. in running for a crack at second. Highlight of the game where grand slams were not too plentiful was a homertm by Waldrop. The Standings Teams Marines VU-10 NAS Naval Base Won Lost 14 3 9 8 8 10 4 14 The Schedule Sunday Marines vs VU-10 Monday Naval Base vs NAS Wednesday NAS vs VU-10 Cuban All-Star 9, Naval Base S All-Star 3 iat's Dell, Statasil This Fourth annual Guantanamo Bay classic now stands even in the record book with two wins apiece for the Cubans and the Americans. The fast Cuban team demonstrated the fact that give them just a crack to squeeze through and they'll batter the door down. This was good ball playing at its best and, had it not been for one wild inning in which the Cubans hammered across 5 runs, an otherwise close game. The Naval Base jumped to an Scientists have found some of the secrets of, the mumps virus and they hope to translate the knowledge into ways of preventing the disabling disease. Medical researchers became interested in the 16 to 21 day gap between catching mumps and coming down with the tell-tale bumps. Through laboratory experiments, they found that the disease virus is a slowpoke in growth and reproduction. One oil company is ignoring the trend to claims of Super-Atomic Jet-Power GO and pitching its ads toward motoring safety instead. In big newspaper ads drivers are urged to check their eyesight with 30-second tests. One series of convering lines detests, astigmatism;, other* faults. are shown up ly different patterns. Headlines pose the question, "Does this picture bar you rfom driving without glasses?"

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4w Saturday, 7 July 1956 THE INDIAN Navy-BPPO-10ND-Guantanamo Cinema -Scoop by D.D.H. Probably one of the most advertised pictures recently released is "Trapeze." Reports are that it is very good. Burt Lancaster, Tony Curtis and Gina Lollobrigida star, it's definitely one to look lbrward .to! Four new ones to the eircut this week, the best of which is: The Conqueror (RKO, in color), stars Susan Hayward and John Wayne. In this one Wayne is still on a horse, but of all people, he portrays that famed ruler of ancient times, Gengis Khanl Miss H. plays the Tartar princess he abducts! Lots of spectacle and plenty of battles! Agnes Moorehead and Ted de Corsia are in supporting roles! This picture is good well at least as good as a picture of This type can bel Ghost Town (Bel-Air Prod., released thru U.A.), is another new one and a good western! Patterned somewhat from some other very good westerns, this adds up to a character study of the cast. It stabs Kent Taylor, Marian Carr and John Smith! The plot concerns a gkoup of people who take refuge from some Indians in a deserted town! Definitely one that I think even non-western fans might enjoy! #ell ,of Frisco Bay (Jaguar Prod., released thru W. B., in color), is outstanding for its performiances and rates a black mark for its below par story! Edward G. Robinson Alan Ladd and Joanne Dr i are starred, with Paul Stewart, Fay Wray and Perry Lopez in supporting roles. The story is a fa iliar one, and innocently condemmed man setting out to get the guilty party. Ladd and Robinso#ttare those two parties respectively. Ladd is at his best and Robinson is superb in his role. Altho gh you've seen similar stories before, you might enjoy the fine act}ng! Prime Against Joe (U.A.) .. Julie London and John Bromfield .a crime drama .I refuse to say anything, you can judge for; yourself! .East of Eden (W.B., in color) James Dean, Julie Harris, Raymod Massey, and Burl Ives based on the Steinbeck novel played the Base before .this is an excellent picture, one that if you haven't seen, don't misel High Society (A.A.) .Leo Gorcey and the Bowery Boys corn dealt out in such quantities that it isn't even funny .played he Base before ...as for a -zaf g, there oughts be a law.! Atena (MGM, in color) .. Jand Powell, Debbie Reynolds, Vic Danlone, Edmund Purdom and Louis Calhern ...a musical comedy .average! Saturday, July 7 1:00 Winkly Dink & You 1:30 Paul Winchell 2:00 Garry Moore 2:30 Robt Q. Lewis 3:00 Victory at Sea 3:30 House Party 4:00 Chance of a Lifetime 4:30 Two for the Money 6:00 Western Movie 6:00 Beat the Clock 6:30 Masquerade Party 7:00 George Gobel 7:30 Your Hit Parade 8:00 Colgate Comedy Hour 9:00 Stage Show 9:30 Damon Runyon Theatre Sunday, July 8 1:00 Winky Dink & You 1:30 Contest Carnival 2:30 Robt Q. Lewis 3 :00 You Are There. 4:00 Ted Mack's Amateurs 5:00 Roy Rogers 5:30 That's My Boy 6:00 Royal Hawalians 6:30 What's My Line 7:00 Jack Benny 7:30 Appt with Adventure 8:00 Ed Sullivan 9:00 Motorola TV Hour Monday, July 0:30 News Parade 5:45 Perry Como 6:00 I&E Film 6:30 My Favorite Husband 7:00 I Love Lucy 7:30 Highway Patrol 8:00 Arthur Murray 8:30 Medic 9:00 Studio One Tuesday, July 10 5:30 News Parade 5:45 Perry Como 6:00 Disneyland 7:00 Phill Silvers 7:30 BigTown 8:00 Guy Lombardo 8:30 The Lineup 9:00 Robt. Montgomery Wednesday. July 11 5:30 News Parade 5:45 Eddie Fisher 6:00 Industry on Parade 6:30 I've Got a Secret 7:00 This is Your Life 7:30 Screen Director's Playhouse 0:00 Martha Raye 9:00 Kraft TV Theatre Thursday, July 12 5:30 News Parade 5:45 Perry Como 6:00 Stop the Music 6:30 The Big Story 7:00 Bob Cummings 7:30 You Bet Your Life 8:00 Dragnet 8:30 Dunniger Show 9:00 Climax Frday, July 12 5:30 News Parade 5:45 Perry Como 6:00 Dollar a Second 6:30 Ozzie & Harriet 7:00 Mama 7:30 Playhouse of Stars 8:00 Johnny Carson 8:30 Crusader 9:00 Boxing Book-Nook ov LOa Here's a biographical collection which should appeal to everybody. Steve Allen jots down his observations on the nation's comedians in THE FUNNY MEN. Each of the sixteen sketches is about a famous American gagster of radio and TV, and the list runs from Fred Allen to Red Skelton. This is light reading with a capital L. For those who enjoy reading poetry, EXILES AND MARRIAGES, by Donald Hall, should provide something new and modern. This young American poet writes provocative lyrics about familiar topics, and his efforts have won for him an honored name in contemporary literature. Best of all, he doesn't have to be deciphered. WAR OR PEACE, by John Foster Dulles, is a small volume in which the Secretary of State recounts the aims and accomplishments of present-day American foreign policy. Mr. Dulles' presentation is informal and readable, and is based largely on the personal experiences which 'he has had in shaping our foreign policy, and his personal contacts with the statesmen of the world. Here's a book which deserves a repeat appearance in this column. THE FORSYTE SAGA, by John Galsworthy, was written several yeqrs ago, but it has a popularity to it which has not diminished with time. Mr. Galsworthy, a now-deceased English writer of the highest calibre, introduces us to any upper-middle class English family of London, and with him we follow their fortunes for 80 years. Here is a great novel, brilliant style, and good story all rolled into gne volume. 6 Saturday, July 7 NavSta-Conqueror-123 min. NAS-Lone Ranger-94 min. Mar. Site-Tall Man Riding-102 min. Villa.-Underwater-111 min. Lwd. Pt.-Emergency Hospital-89 min. Sunday, July 8 NavSta-East of Eden-115 min. NAS-Conqueror Mar. Site-Magnificent Roughnecks90 min. Villa.-Tall Man Riding Lwd. Pt.-Underwater Monday, July 9 NavSta-High Society-88 min. NAS-East of. Eden Mar. Site-Lone Ranger Villa.-Magnificent Roughnecks Lwd. Pt.-Tall Man Riding Tuesday, July 10 NavSta-Crime Against Joe-94 min. NAS-High Society Mar. Site-Conqueror Villa.-Lone Ranger Lwd. Pt.-Magnificent Roughnecls Wednesday, July 11 NavSta-Hell On Frisco Bay-98 min. NAS-Crime Against Joe Mar. Site-East of Eden Villa.-Conqueror Lwd. Pt.-Lone Ranger Thursday, July 12 NavSta-Athena-95 min. NAS-Hell On Frisco Bay Mar. Site-High Society Villa.-East of Eden Lwd. Pt.-Conqueror Friday, July 18 NavSta-Ghost Town-92 min. NAS-Athena Mar. Site-Crime Against Joe Villa.-High Society Lwd. Pt.-East of Eden WGBY Television Program FROM: 3 cent stamp TO: Send The INDIAN Home 9 Radio Round-Up The majority of WGBY listeners have become familiar with and accustomed to the fact that there are certain tunes, primarily from Broadway musicals, that cannot be aired locally. Including some of the better ones, some listeners are confused by the fact that they hear these over Cuban stations and also over our own WGBY-TV. Why not radio? The main reason is due to restrictions by copyright owners of the music, not by Petrillo's musicians. The Defense Department has been and will continue negotiations for release of restricted tunes and a new revised list will be out in the near future. The reason these tunes cannot be aired on programs as they are in the States is because of the decommercialization of programs. Once this has been done, the program is not legally a rebroadcast but an entirely new program. Since commercials in TV are left intact, the Defense Department holds that the sponsor of the show .who holds world rights still retains rights to the songs and thus they can be heard here. NEW MUSIC: Among the new tunes available for air are "I'm Gonna Steal You Away," by Dean Martin, and "Street of Love." Red Nichols does "Cool Tango" and "Indiana." You'd never recognize the latter due to the stlying. "That Certain Feeling" by Les Brown with flip side '!Hit The Road To Dreamland." June Christy warbles "You Took Advantage Of Me" and "Intrigue." PROGRAMS: "Sunday With Garroway" on day of same name at 8 p.m. finds Dave entertaining three talented gentlemen. Author and newspaper editor, Jonathan Daniels ...the singer-composer, Jimmy Shelton .and musician-band leader Lionel Hampton. Monday night at its usual spot of 9 p.m. is "X-Minus One." This week's story is "A Logic Named Joe." It presents a thrilling drama of a machine which helps man to do his ordinary thinking. Called a "logic" it can answer any question concerning history, cooking, mathematics, etc. Then something goes wrong in the electronics of one machine ...and everyone becomes a robot of death.


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