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Indian
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COVERS GTMO LIKE THE SUNSHINE U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Volume VII, No. 19 Saturday, 12 May 1956



Seabees I eave For States, Group

Left May 7, Other Goes May 19

After six months of hard work, MCB-1 is getting that long awaited stateside rest. The Seabees are leaving Guantanamo Bay in two echelons. The First group left May 7 and the second one is scheduled to depart May 19.
The construction battalion arrived in Gtmo, their "second home", in Ngov., 1955 and picked up where they had left off in August of that year. This was the third time that the outfit had been stationed in Gtmo Bay.


11 Seniors To Be Graduated Friday At Exercises In School Auditorium


In the past, all of the Mobile Construction Battalions stationed on the East Coast have spent some time in Cuba. But MCB-1 started and finished the new housing projects.
As soon as the "First and the Finest", as MCB-1 is called, arrived in Gtmo laht November, they started work on the two main projects which consisted of building 60 units of the MEMQ type (married enlisted men's quarters) at Northwest Granadillo and 40 units of the MOQ type (married officers' quarters) at Caravella Point and West Bargo.
Aside from these projects there were smaller ones which also had to be done. The first one of these was the Seabee Trailer Park which was completed in December.
The Chief Petty Officers' Lounge was the next added addition and was finished in January.
In February the Base had its annual Carnival and MCB-1 had its part in it. They built three powerdriven rides which were a big hit with the children on the Base and they took part in numerous other activities during the Carnival.
The last small project to be completed by the builders was the repair of the Seabee's galley roof which was done in March, A sewage treatment plant was also started back in December and is now 85 percent complete awaiting special materials required to seal the tank.
Approximately 1,000 eight-hour man-days were put into these smaller jobs which took away precious help from the main projects.

As of this May, however, the 100 units of housing is finished having a total of 50,000 eight-hour man-days expended. Taking into consideration the lack of materials


at tines and the little amount of time available, an excellent, high quality job was done.
Not satisfied with what they had done, the Seabees made a good start on three more projects to be completed in the future by others. These consist of stripping and grading for quarters at Leeward Point, grading Sherman Avenue from Nob Hill to Northeast Gate and repairs to the present Seabee living quarters.
The first of those projects will be inactive for sometime, but repairs to the living quarters will be completed later this year since the security detachment which is left in Guantanamo Bay is working on it.


Busy Day Tomorrow

For Phone Exchange;

Mother's Day Calls

The long distance telephone wires on the Base are expected to burn all day tomorrow when American children send either kisses or greetings to their mothers.
The Base Public Works Telephone Department has announced that "in order to meet the expected high tide of callers come Mother's Day, May 13, three long-distance telephone operators will be on hand to accommodate every patron."
In was also disclosed that the service will be made on a "firstcome-first-serve" basis.
Long distance call rates on a 3-minute duration range from $2.00 to $10.00, depending upon the distance of the receiving end from the local office.
The telephone office is situated on Building No. 609, Marine Site No. 2.


INDIAN Photo
Members of the Naval Base High School Class of 1956 are left to right: Dolores Rogoz, Eunice Avila, Maryalice Murphy, Anita Sierra, Sarah Upp, Rebecca Dobbins, Philip Keenan, Timothy Reffett, Roger Getzewich and Patricia Fojt. Roberta Johnson is missing from the picture.
A four year scholastic journey for 11 Naval Base School seniors will end May 18. The young adults will be graduated from the Base school in commencement exercises next Friday evening beginning at 8:00 p.m. in the Chapel Hill auditorium.


RADM W. G. Cooper, Commander Naval Base, is slated to deliver the commencement address to this Class of 1956. RADM Cooper will be introduced by T. G. Scarborough, school superintendent.
During the graduation program, Miss Patricia Fojt, class valedictorian, will give a short talk as will Miss Rebecca Dobbins, class salutatorian.
School Band Will Play
The evening's exercises will open with a musical processional by the Naval Base school band. Following the processional, CDR J.J. Sullivan will give the invocation.
The band will furnish the traditional graduation marches. Included in the program is a vocal solo by Miss Maryalice Murphy.
Presentation of the diplomas to the graduates will be made by CAPT G.M. Holley, Naval Base Chief of Staff.
Legion Award Given
H. P. McNeal will bestow the American Legion Award to a boy and a girl in the graduating class.
Winners of the award were chosen earlier by their instructors and classmates. The two winners will receive handsome bronze medals.
LCDR K. G. Peterson will deliver the benediction near the end of the program which will be closed by the playing of a recessional by the school band.


Naval Station Library

Closed May 22-25

Mrs. H. L. Broughton, Naval Station librarian, has announced that the Naval Station Library will be closed for annual inventory May 22-25.
No one will be allowed to check out books after May 18. Mrs. Broughton said that all books will be due and must be returned to the library before Monday, May 21.


Leeward Pt. Paper

Changes Pub. Day

The publication day of the LEEWARD POINTER, a Naval Air Station paper, has been changed to Mondays instead of Fridays. The new publication day took effect April 30 according to an announcement made by the NAS Special Services Office.
The LEEWARD POINTER is a four-page mimeographed paper and is published weekly at the NAS Ad Building in accordance with NAVEXOS P-35, Rev 1945.
The paper features the NAS Suttlebutt column and local news bits on the front page. The second page is devoted to front page story jumps, movie schedule and laff lines. The third page carries sports news and the last page bills the entire day~by-day menu of the week.


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Page Two


Saturday, 12 May 1956


T INDIAN
The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a possible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.
RADM WILLIAM G. COOPER, Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo
Bay, Cuba.
CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo
Bay, Cuba..
-Editorial Staff
LTJG D. G. LaCasse ------------------------------Officer-Advisor
G. L. Henderson,I1OC ---------------------------------- Editor
J.C. Curxen, JOSN -------------- ---------------- Managing Editor
E. U. Orias,JO3 ---------------------------------- Feature Editoi
D. D. Hiaton, JOSN ----------- ----------------- Staff Reporter
THE'INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P.35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds.
Materials marked AFPS may be used by news media provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All material originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part or without crdit.All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.


EMs Should Grasp Opportunities

It's up to the individual to make his place in the world and to make his own opportunities, or so someone has said. But this isn't always so. Sometimes ,all he has to do is recognize the opportunities which have been made for him.
Such a -situation exists right now with the numerous opportunities for service in the navy as an officer. Recently it was announced that about 1,960 enlisted men received regular or reserve officer appointments yearly through seven programs.
In estimating the number of EMs to be chosen annually for appointments, the navy said about 200 will reach officer status by integration, 200 by selection as LDOs, 160 by appointments to the Naval Academy, 200 through NROTC programs, 400 by NavCad training, 200 by OCS and 600 by advancement to warrant officer.
Through these programs the navy will be procuring large numbers of officers during the coming months. For the enlisted man each one o= them offers a wide variety of interesting, educational and exciting possibilities.

Specifically, here is a run-down on the pilot procurement programs: There are two navy pilot procurement programs, the Aviation Officer Candidate program and Naval Aviation Cadet program. The former is open to college graduates, who are commissioned after four months of training and who, as commissioned officers, then proceed with flight training.

The latter provides an opportunity for the young man with only two years of college or the equivalent of, to enter flight training and become commissioned as a naval officer upon his successful completion of the course. Each of these programs offers that enviable and wonderful opportunity to earn those coveted "wings of gold" of a naval aviator.

An enlisted man HAS a chance to get ahead in the Navy, if he only wants to try.


Calendar of Events
Saturday, May 12
Square and Circle Club--Phillips Park7:30 p.m.
Monday, May 14
Sojourner's Club-Officers' Club-7 :00 p.m. O.E.S. Club-Girl Scout Hut-7 .:0 p.m.
Tuesday, May 15
Evening Art Class-Art Studio Bldg (Victory Hill)-7:30 p.m.
Business Meeting, 3:00 p.m. Art Studio
Bldg.
American Legion-FIt. Reserve Rm.-


7:30 p.m.
American Legion Auxiliary - Girl Scout
Hut- 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, May 16
Toastmaster's Club-Officers' Club6:30 p.m.
Payday-All military personnel.
Thursday, May 17
Navy Wives Club-Bingo (Villamar Lyceum)-1:30 p.m.
Felloweraft Club 1078-Community Auditorlum-7:30 p.m.
Friday, May 18
CPO Wives Club-Family Rm. (CPO Club)
-8:00 p.m.


The Chaplain's Corner

MOTHER WEARS AN APRON

Some people say that wearing an apron is a sign that company is coming. Now you may laugh at that but mother doesn't think it's so funny.
How many times have I heard her embarrassed and apologetic for being caught in her apron in the midst of her work. It seems that mother classifies this event as a number one crime. Hmm, let's see-a carpenter doesn't apologize for his overalls, nor the serviceman for his uniform, -nor the chef for his big white hat- they are signs of their profession. I believe that a mother's work is best symbolized by the apron.

Since cooking and cleaning are a part of the vocation of motherhood, God wills to look with infinite approval upon mothers in aprons. Come to think of it, God sees mother in her apron more than not.

Somehow in the course of almost every day mother's best lamp gets knocked over, or footprints find themselves on the newly scrubbed floor, or cowboys and running Indians flatten that nice cake in the oven, or any one of a million other things.
Where mother receives the patience and strength to bear up under all this-God only knows. But, thank heavens, God sees all this so that not even the smallest difficulty patiently borne according to God's will shall go unrewarded.

Jerome J. Sullivan
Chaplain, U. S. Navy


When a man enters the service, he becomes part of the military community. Wherever he is stationed, there are servicemen-often with their families-living and working together.
Being part of life at a base, ship or station can be a rewarding experience. Service people share many common interests, and most installations reflect this in a close-knit "small-town" spirit.
The military community is not the only one that affects the serviceman, however. During his tour of duty, he comes in contact with many civilians. At home and abroad, at work and on his own time, he meets the public.
And make no mistake about it: these meetings shape the community's attitude toward everyone who wears a uniform.
Civilians rarely see the military in action. The average layman knows only what he reads, what he is told-and what he sees.
If he sees sloppiness, drunkenness, thoughtless driving and rude behavior, he loses his respect for the armed forces. If he sees servicemen who act proud of themselves and the job they are doing, he'll be proud, too. (AFPS)


Sunday, 13 May 1956
Sundaic 0-v B Sunday, 7000-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday 1230-Na~l Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri.- 5--Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Waval Bae Cpel Co fssons: Saturday. )00---S0;1V00
-V!0. and daily before Massv Il PRO TESTANT SERVICES Sunday: 0930-Divine Worship (MCB-1 Chapel)
0930-Sunday School
0930-Adult Bible Class
1100-Divine Worship( Naval
Base Chapel)
1100-Divine Worship
(Lwd. Pt.)
1380-ellor--hip Hour
&6 MidZWrak BtTItw.St-d.:


Thursday I-F0-Chofr Rehearsal JEWISH SERVI CES Friday-100-Naval Base Chapel CHURCH OF CHRIST 1000-Bible Study


First Holy Communion Sun-I
day 19 Girls and 16 Boys at I
the 0900 Mass to be celebrated by Father Jerome J.
Sullivan.

4

1045-Worship Service
Community Auditorium CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Sunday-1000-Naval Base Library LATTER DAY SAINTS Sunday-1100-Naval Station Library Chaplains at this activity
CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN
(Catholic)
LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC USN
(Protestant)
LTJG C. C. Gaston, CHC, USNR
(Protestant)


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THE INDIAN


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Saturday, 12 May 1956


THE INDIAN


Gtmo Has 1,492 Members In 'Mosquito Fleet'


Lawlors Have Largest Family-7


Krugs Next In Line On Base With 6

by Ely U. Orias
This is not a story with a "Cheaper By the Dozen" slant but is one about paternity's boundless thoughts and deeds for their children. Children are the apple to every parent's eyes. And there are plenty of the kind here in Guantanamo Bay!

The U.S. Navy believes that a married sailor can best perform his job if he is physically close to his family's existence grind. Thus the Navy has mustered every possible effort to


bring families together.

Accordingly, here they are in Gtmo-closer and together! ! !
Taking up residence on the Base presently are 1,005 service families, 202 of which are officers' families, 711 are of the enlisted phalanx and 92 are of the civilian category.
A census conducted as to the exact number of children that make up the Gtmo Bay "mosquito fleet" has produced the following figures: On the Base there are 1,492 service children, 754 of which are either in the grade school or high school, 91 are kindergartens, 46 are in the nursery and the xemainder are either in the cradle or in the crib. Of these 1,492 children, 319 are of officers'; 1,062 are fathered by enlisted men and 111 are children of civilians.
Going deeper into the various ramifications of the census, the following human-interest aspects have been uncorked: Among the civilian families, 31 are devoid of


offsprings; among the enlisted families, 160 are childless and among the officers' families, 46' have no children.
Then without distinction as to what family category do they fall, the census found out that among the Base families there are 268 unions each having but one child, 219 with two children, 156 with three, 41 with four, 11 families with five children each, two with six and one family with seven children.
The Krugs
One of the two unions on the Base having six children is the Clifford J. Krug clan.
Clifford J. Krug, ADi, of NAS and the former Natalie T. Blanq were married on September 2, 1942. The 33 year old family man was born in St. Louis, Mo., while Mrs. Krug is a native of Memphis, Tennessee.
"Bread - winning," s a y s Mrs.


The Krugs


INDIAN Photo
The assembled Krugs shows Freddie, 5; Paula Irene, 7 and Clifford II, 8, foreground, left to right. Seated are Mrs. Natalie Krug; Mary Nancy, 13; Teresa, 11 and Mike, 212, who is on the lap of Papa C. J. Krug.



Ui


The Lawlors


Fleet Camera Party Photo
Standing behind their brood are CDR and Mrs. F. L. Lawlor. The seated seven Little Lawlors, left to right, are: Lindsey, 5; Robert (Pete), 7; twin brother and sister Bruce and Penny, 2Y2, Susan, 11 and Debbie, 9, who is holding Nancy Lee, 5 mos.


Krug, "is the responsibility of my husband; but the daily grind to keep the family well-fed and neatly clothed rests upon my shoulders."
The absence of a maid was evident in the Krug household until four days ago. "Consequently," declared Mrs. Krug, "I almost did everything. I washed 75 lbs. of clothes a week and served 168 meals during the same period."
Four of the Krug children are of school age. "The temporary absence of a TV set at home," says Mrs. Krug, "is a blessing. Understandably enough, my children have taken to much book-reading as a substitute thereof. Nancy and Terry," continued Mrs. Krug, "are average 'A' pupils despite being shifted around from one school to another whose teaching methods vary."
"And I tell you what," volunteered Mrs. Krug: "I have contributed much to the Navy's medical department by keeping the family in the pink of health."
The Lawlor Clan
And the biggest of all the families on the Base is the F. L. Lawlor family which is graced with seven "wonderful" children. The Lawlor children were born in different states, two of which are Pennsylvania born twins and the youngest in the family named Nancy Lee, five months, saw the first light of the world in Gtmo. Daddy Lawlor is a U.S. Navy Commander and presently the Executive Officer of the"Naval Air Station. Mrs. Lawlor, the former


Katherine E. McGuire of Boston, Mass., is a diminutive, doting mother. They were married 12 years ago in St. Augustine, Florida when the commander was an aviation instructor at Lee Field Naval Air Station, Florida and Mrs. Lawlor was visiting friends there.
The seven Little Lawlors demand plenty of working hours on the part of the parents. So they have two maids and a washer and a drier "which spins from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. daily."
"It's wonderful to have so many children," declared Mrs. Lawlor. "My husband and I don't have to go out and witness the wonders of human activity. We have plenty of those at home."
Delving on the subject of human activity, Mrs. Lawlor started out with the girls as being dance enthusiasts and the boys as equestrians. Then she singled out Susan, a sixth grader, as a book-worm; Debbie as the baby-sitter; Robert (Pete) as the Pee-Wee leaguer; Lindsey (a girl), as the treeclimber; twin brother and sister Penny and Bruce as "unto the bow the cord is-each being unhappy and frantic without the other" and the youngest, Nancy Lee as the family crier."
The 41 year old Commander was born in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. He's been in the Navy 18 years. A veteran -of the last global war, CDR Lawlor sports as many battle ribbons on his breast as he sports children in his heart.


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.,Page Four


Saturday, 12 May 1956


Snark Flies 2,000 Miles Following

Some Congressional Digs; And So?

It was disclosed recently that the Northrop Snark has flown 2,000 miles. This flight may have been made in response to some digs from Congress. Said one informed Washington observer:
"They proved a jet engine can fly 2,000 miles. What else?"


Possible explanation for the disclosure is found in the House budget hearings, where Rep. Daniel J. Flood (D-Pa.) questioned Reuben B. Robertson, Deputy Secretary of Defense. Both Robertson and Flood were recent visitors at Guantanamo Bay.
Speaking of the ballistic missile, Robertson said: "We are in a position to fire (log) distances in the immediate future." Later, Flood suggested that he do so, the next Saturday morning from the Pentagon plaza.
Robertson immediately made it clear that he meant to speak of the air-breathing missile not the ballistic missile. Flood came back with his challenge again: go out and do it by the end of the month.
Now it has been done by the air-breathing, jet engine-powered Snark, a weapon that was designed almost 10 years ago. Some USAF planners are arguing that the Snark should not go into full production except possible as a stop-gap weapon.
The Northrop missile is a pilotless bomber, subsonic but relatively cheap. Range is supposed to be 5,000 miles. Unmentioned in most of last week's publicity was the fact that USAF doesn't have a 2,000-mile test range.
Instrumentation now is being provided for 1,200 miles out of Cocoa, Fla., indicating there has been no need for a longer one.


Teenage Roundup
by Betty and Sharon
Were you there? At Eunice's party which was given by most everyone, but held at the Avila hacienda. It sure was fun, with all the very good records for dancing. The party was mainly for Dolores and Ronnie Rogoz, Bobbie Johnson and Rick Rooker who are leaving us in the near future.
Think of us when you're in the states and good luck. Dolores and Bobbie are going to college next fall and we wish them all kinds of success.
We have the juniors to thank for the Prom.
Did You See?
Jere Warren walking? Ralph A. taking it easy? The slumber party at Judy's? Geraldine looking sad? Vic finding his way home? Fire bug Fojt? Lover Boy, Roger? Nancy and Chuck walking the
-dog? Pris' new Home?


Am. Legion Aux,
There are disabled veterans of World War I and II and the Korean War in the Veterans' hospitals today.
They have convalescent work rooms where they make little red crepe flowers, replicas of the wild European poppies which bloom on the fields and war cemeteries in France and Belgium. They provide the only floral tribute to the battle dead.
This gives gainful occupation to thousands of veterans unable to do other work. It also helps provide for their families.
It is a valuable occupational therapy for it gives them something useful and interesting to do during long hospital hours. It also encourages a mental attitude helpful toward recovery.
The poppies this year are from the veterans' hospital in Maine. Contributions made by those who wear the poppies go almost entirely to rehabilitation and child welfare funds of the American Legion Auxiliary.
The entire proceeds of the American Legion Auxiliary Unit No. 1, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba in 1952-53 went to the Leprosarium in Carville, Louisiana. The next year it went to the hospital in Coral Gables, Florida, and last year it was given to the hospital in San Juan, Puerto Rico.


NAS Scuttlebutt
Thirteen men have received word that they have passed the Chief exams out of the original twentythree who took them.
"Long" Adams, "Short" Adams, Pete Anerine, and Lynch (the only one who can speak broken French with an Italian accent) of the Photo Lab went to Haiti over the weekend. On leave is "Cajun" Diemert in Little Ole' New Orleans.
In about another week, the new Ordnance Pistol House will be completed. It is said that Opening Day Party -will be held shortly after next payday.
Who was that homesick guy from VU-10 who helped in the kitchen in Quarters CB 8-B last Saturday? ? ? ? ?
The Administration department had a "bang-up" beach party -on Windmill Beach recently. Everyone had an intoxicating time.... The Party left the Personnel Office crewless for the entire afternoon, except for T. G. Shaw, YN2.
Special Services also recently had a fling. They went on a fishing trip which did not prove too successful in catching fish, but was still enjoyed by everyone as it was a change of the regular routine which is usually followed.
Raymond D. Hinrichs, YN3, has been attending the School of Naval Justice at Newport, Rhode Island, beginning May. The class will last nine weeks and after completion Hinrichs will take the Stenomask course (two week course in court reporting). Upon completion of the above classes, Hinrichs will return to the Air Station to assume duties as Yeoman in Charge of the Legal Department and Court Reporter.


American Legion Post Ham Radio News
Plans have now been completed by Dot Sumara and Reservations are in order for The business meeting of the the American Legion and Auxil- Guantanamo Amateur Radio club iary picnic. It will be held on Sat- was held Wednesday, May 2, at urday, May 26 at Yateras. Bar- the home of John Garvey. Present becued beef will be served at ap- were, Art Babine, KG4AV* Stan proximately 1400, however, get Sumara, W4BTH; Will Hamm, there as early as you like and en- KG4AF; Dick Cousins, KG4AD; joy the sand beach and swimming Dorothy Sumara, KG4AC; Walt while you wait for dinner. -Tllnwai_ KG4AN. Bb eTwitt


The cost of the meal will be $1.25 for Adults and .50� for children. It is anticipated that this picnic will be quite enjoyable with games, swimming, or if you like, fishing to fill the day. A Reservation committee will be appointed at the next meeting of the Post which is scheduled for Tuesday, May 15. All members of the Post and Auxiliary are urged to attend this meeting and if- you have friends who are eligible for membership, bring them out and get them signed up in time for this picnic.


KG4AR; John Garvey, K41HB; Joe Adriance, and Ralph Hurd.
Stateward bound are two of our hams, Jim Dempsey, KG4AK, and Will Hamm, KG4AF. Bon Voyage fellows.
A picnic was held out at Windmill Beach Sunday and a good time was had by all.
The next business meeting will be held at 1900 on Wednesday, June 6 at Hewitts, G..P. 13D. All licensed and prospective Hams are invited to attend.


Art Studio News
With the closing of the art show in the library the Art Studio settled down this week to organizing the interest in the fine arts hobby the show generated. Several Base residents expressed interest in evening art classes, and for their benefit, the Studio will be open Tuesday evenings, from 7 p.m. to
9 p.m.
The evening sessions will be devoted to sketching and painting; students are free to bring in work of their own, or to choose projects set up by the Studio Committee. Instruction will be available for beginning students. Marcia Fitch is in charge of the night classes.
Also as a result of the show, the Studio and the Naval Station Library have arranged for a continuing art display. Paintings by Jeanne Henry, Gloria Stanul, and Lennie Freeburg are now hanging in the library. The Studio plans to change the exhibit each month.
New officers were elected this week to run the Studio for the next three months. Phyllis Wild is the new president; Edrie Becker, treasurer; Clelia Allen, supplies; Emily Evren, publicity; Chita Morales, housekeeping. L e n n i e Freeburg will be in charge of projects, assisted by Vivian Hall and Edie Ware.


What's 0oin' Stateside
Some years ago a scientist named Pavlov learned a lot about emotions studying the rate of salivary secretions of a dog.
Now, the American Association for the Advancement of Science reports a saliva test may show how much emotional stress or tension a human is undergoing.
The University of Cincinnati marked 50 years of cooperative education April 19-25 with a halfcentury-of-progress industrial exhibit at its field house. More than 70 companies from 23 cities in 10 midwestern states helped produce exhibits based on the theme "Education and Industry at Work for Progress."
Cooperative education, started at the college level 50 years ago by Cincinnati's late dean, Herman Schneider, encourages college students to begin their actual vocational experience while still in college.
While they are earning their degrees, students of engineering applied arts and business administration alternately study theory in the classroom seven weeks and then apply their knowledge in industry.
In 1906, 27 students and 12 firms joined to start the program at the University. Now, more than 3,000 students at 34 cblleges in 12 states participate With 500 American corporations.


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THE INDIAN


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Saturday, 12 May 196


THE INDIAN


Mothers Have Their Day Tomorrow


American mothers, living or dead, will be catapulted into the highest pedestal of honor when their children turn out for the National observance of Mother's Day, tomorrow, May 13.
Mother's Day is a day set apart every year in honor of motherhood. It is the second Sunday in May. The day is celebrated in many churches and by family gatherings. One of the customs of the day is the wearing of a carnation. A colored carnation means that one's mother is living. A white carnation is worn if one's mother is dead.
A day for honoring mothers was observed many years ago in England. It was called Mothering Sunday, and came in mid-lent. The Yugoslavs and some of the other peoples have long observed similar days.
The first known suggestion for a Mother's Day in the United States was made by Julia Ward- Howe, author of "The Battle Hymn of the Republic," in 1872. She suggested the observance of a Mother's Day on June 2, as a day dedicated to peace. For several years she held an annual Mother's Day meeting in Boston.
In 1904, Frank E. Hering of South Bend, Ind., launched a campaign for Mother's Day at a convention of the Fraternal Order of Eagles in Kansas City, Mo. Three years later, Anna Jarvis of Philadelphia began a lifetime of effort to establish the nationwide observance of this day. It was she who selected the second Sunday in May as Mother's Day, and who orginated the custom of wearing carnations to honor mothers, living or dead.
Mother's Day received national recognition on May 8, 1914, through a resolution recommended that Mother's Day be observed by Congress and the Executive Department of the government. In the following year, the President of the United States was authorized to proclaim Mother's Day as a national observance each year.


CPO Wives
by Ellen Van Cleef
The regular business meeting of the CPO Wives was held Friday, May 3, at the Family Room. Added to the Roll Call were Rose Redmon and Mary Brown.
The entertainment chairman reported that the social this month on May 18 is to be a Bingo for members. A special invitation would be delivered to wives of the newly-appointed 'chiefs to be guests


at this Bingo.
Pres. Jane Whited announced that election time is near and that nominations for the offices of president; vice-president, secretary and treasurer would be held at the next meeting on June 1. Membership to the club is open to all chiefs' wives and marine wives of equivalent rate. Plan to join.

While some girls don't intend to marry until they are 30, others don't intend to be 30 until they marry.


The Medic
by J. F. Bertone & R. J. McNight
Newborn News
For this week on the Gtmo Birth Caravan there is a girl to CS2 and Mrs. Cecil E. Boswell, a girl to BM2 and Mrs. Jarvis Algon Baker, a boy to SK1 and Mrs. Elisha Monroe and a boy to HM2 and Mrs. Harold West.
New Troops
Three new Corpsmen arrived from the states for duty, this past week. J.H. Vinson, HMC, from FMF, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, W. E. Basham, HM2, from RecSta, Norfolk, Va. Also J. W. Reedy, HM2, USNH, Oakland, Calif.
Commendations
Captain I. Moe presented a letter of commendation to three Staff members this week: LCDR C. H. Johnson, MSC; J. G. Streetman, HM2, and F. C. Moore, HM3. They were commended for their outstanding performance of duty in the Optonietry Division and the Optical dispensing unit. LCDR Johnson's Commendations was originated by the Commanding Officer of the USS FORRESTAL for his excellent work in eye examinations on board that vessel.
Promotions
Word has come in that the Hospital has two new Chiefs. Putting on his new cap on May 16, will be Roy J. Hall, better known to a selected few as "The Chico". He will be promoted to HMCA. Hail is key man in the food service dept. For promotion to HMCA on November 16, is Morris Gordon. He is in charge of the Pharmacy.
The Medic's Reviews
King was all smiles this past week because Gtmo liberty was opened. Arriving back from leave with a smiling face was Miss Segin. By the way Cuddy, what is better, a junior first class or a senior second class? Mario, be sure when you go on an ambulance run that there is a stretcher in the ambulance.
Challenging Harding for the title of "Mr. Sackrat" and almost beating him out was McCafferty.



,SCUTTLEBUTT







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F T G Bulletin
There were three new arrivals during the past week. Wayne C. Morrison, YN1, was assigned to the Administrative department. He is from Glens Falls, N.Y. and married the former Miss Betty Smith of Spartanburg, S.C. They have one child Robert Earl 8 years old. Morrison has previously served at the Fleet Training Center Charleston S. C. and on the USS JOHNSON (DD-821).
Bruce R. Reber, ETSN, was assigned to the AS department. he is from Schulykill Haven, Pennsylvania. He has previously served on the USS PANDEMUS (ARL-18).
Leonard E. Harshbarger, BM2, is the new assistant barracks master-at-arms. He is from Baltimore, Maryland and married the former Miss Francis Green of Westernport, Md. They have two children, Lynda age 8 and Leonard age 4. Harshbarger has served previously on the USS WRANGEL (AE-12).
The Gunnery 22 bowling team had long awaited revenge for the drubbing Gunnery 21 gave them during the season. The challenge was issued and the match was played last Saturday. The result verified the season play with Gunnery 21 taking 3 out of 4 points plus a beer or two.
CDR Gardner after 40 months here and LT Dent after 14 months have decided to take up golf. The results are most hazardous for unsuspecting players in their vicinity. It is rumored that CDR Gardner shot a brillant 70, his first time out--for nine holes.


Supervisors' Assoc,
If you are a Group IVA or IVB U. S. Civil Service Supervisor (American whose principal duty is the direction of a group of employees of lower grade including responsibility for work assignments and active participation in personnel action affecting the subordinate employees) you are eligible to join the Guantanamo Bay Supervisors' Association L o c a l #51.
This Association has about 90% of the eligible supervisors on this Base as active members. If you are interested in this Association and would like to become a member, please contact our Membership Committee:
Wayne Sheppard Phone-8501 Joe West " -8111 Harry Morgan " -8299 Regular monthly meetings are held on the first Monday of the month at 1900 in Building #27. The next meeting will be June 4.
If you have a problem that affects the Base as a whole, bring it to our meeting. It will be discussed by the members and a solution sought. If no solution can be found the problem will be referred to higher authority for decision.


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Saturday. 12 May 1956


VU -10 Prop Blast

by 0. A. Porter, Jr
With prizes for the winning three, the VU-10 Intra-squadron Golf Tourney is off to a flying start. Among the favorites are C. A. Noell, Jr., AOC, D. E. Campbell, AE3, LT Tom Drace, and C. C. Roberts, ADC. They'll have plenty of trouble from a "dark-horse" contender, his unusual but effective "golfmanship", a form of psychological handicap.
Speaking of Chief Roberts, he has just received an appointment to the temporary rank of Ensign and will soon join the officer ranks. Congratulations, Chief, and the best of luck.
C. C. Brotherson, ADC, who has just completed 28 in the service, will be detached this month to start his last tour prior to retirement. He will finish his thirty with VX-1 in Key West, where he plans to devote his retirement to his first hobby of growing flowers, and fishing. During his tour with VU10 Chief' Brotherson served as Line Chief and as Leading Chief.
Mrs. E. Antulov and family departed on May 7 for the states, where they will soon be joined by E. Antulov, YNC, who has recelved orders for duty at Cory Field, Pensacola.
A. Welcome Aboard to the following men, who have just reported from NATTC, Norman, Oklahoma:
G. E. LE Master, AA
J. G. Luker, AA
A. C. McLaughlin, AA
V. L. Jochum, AA F. L. Leach, AN
J. Manetta, AA
In addition, C.D. Burke. AD3, recently reported on board from VX-3, NAS, Atlantic City. We know that you will enjoy Gtmo and your tour in VU-10.


Strikes 6

by Dolly
The Women's B back in the "ole" good scores were first games bowl and May 1.
New Officers league are as fol Marilyn Dunn; Peggy Duffy; Enders; treasurer and press; Dolly
Hi-Games
F. Grounds 212 G. Flood 181 J. Babcock 176
T. Enders 175 D. Aumann 171 G. Kraft 165 E, Coxon 164
N. Williams 161 D. Dickson 160


GTMO SPORTING CHIPS

by C. C. Drumright
Pro Shots Straight From the T. . . . There is definite progress being made in installing a booster pump in our water lines. . . . Greener pastures in the future my friends. The first round play for the men's championship will begin Sunday morning, May 13. A lot of close competition is expected in all flights. Our ringer tournament having provided a great deal of pleasure for lots of players is about to die now of old age, so finish up folks and we will cook up another golf stew of some type. During our last committee meeting held May 8 one fact established was the lack of members for our sub committees; it isn't to much work so lend a hand.
Liberal Arts Department. . . . A person is considered to be addressing the ball when they have placed their feet on the ground in position for and preparatory to making a stroke and has also grounded the club. The grounding of the club does not apply when in a hazard. A practice stroke may never be taken during the play of a hole, there is, however, a difference between a practice swing, which may be taken at any time or place provided the player does not violate such rules -as smoothing out the rough, move the ball, has not addressed the ball, etc.
Rimming the Cup around the 19th. . . . T. Drace, trophy hunter foiled, is still making the top flight. All no 19 holers wish speedy return to the T of one of our heartiest enthusiasts, Admiral Cooper, even though his return will mean diminishing returns to many of us. If our club champ keeps up his baseball those breaking putts will become a cinch. An individual blind bogey was conducted last Sunday Afternoon by Gurka, Dustin and Campbell, final results not available at this writing. Is said there may be a dark horse seen almost daily around 17 practice area by the name of Banker.
Special Mast . . . . It is kindly requested when you are playing and the green in front of you is vacant and players behind you are obviously faster, to wait and let them pass. Please bear in mind that once you allow another group to pass, you are obligated to wait until they are clearly out of range. The time element here is minor, but the over all results of bogging down play is major as when you hold off one group, you generally set up a chain reaction that goes back to the first T.



Local Speakers Improve Forensics


At Weekly Toastmaster Meetings


The name Toastmasters was adopted because of its pleasant associations. Mention of a toastmaster brings to mind a dinner occasion, an attractive social affair with good food and entertaining speeches, with wit, wise counsel and repartee.


our Toastmaster Club are to build personality, to improve speaking Spares abilities and to develop latent capacities for leadership and servAumann ice. We try through training and practice to improve our members owling League is in oral expression of thought, to swing and some develop their ability to appear turned in on the effectively before audiences, to ed on April 30 provide instruction and experience in chairmanship, to exemplify the elected for this value of training in parliamentary lows: president; procedure, conference and comv i c e - president; mittee techniques. secretary; June Have you ever heard your own Ruth McGowan, voice? Try reading or make a Aumann. speech with a tape recorder and then listen to the playback. It is M. Zeigler 169 doubtful if you would recognize
Hi-Averages the sounds coming from that tape. F. Grounds 161 Many people do not realize how G. Flood 160 their voice sounds to others until D. Aumann 153 taped.
M. Zeigler 152 All prospective members are reJ. Enders 151
G. Kraft 145 quired to attend two meetings as N. Williams 142 a guest before becoming a regular


member. After becoming a member and on completing the 12 basic speeches a Certificate of Merit is issued to the Toastmaster from the home office in Santa Anna, Calif. All Toastmaster Clubs are limited to 30 regular members. This ruling was made to insure each toastmaster a part in nearly every program either as a formal speaker, Toastmaster, Critic, Timer, Catcher, Lexicologist or as the Toastmaster for the evening.
There are formal speeches given at each meeting. Each speech should be six minutes long thus the speaker learns to time himself. One of the qualifications of a good speaker is the ability to time his speech to the second.
Toastmaster Club #92 meets every Wednesday at 1830 in the dining room of Officers' Club. Dinner is served for $1.50. The program starts about 1915 and is usually over at 2030. Two hours of fun and learning which will repay tremendous dividends to the man who wishes to improve his qualities of leadership. Toastmasters very early demonstrated that there is no other method of self expression which so quickly brings out a man's qualities for leadership as practice in public speaking.


NAS Team Wins

3 Pistol Matches

The Naval Air Station sent a sharpshooter Pistol Team to Fiesta of Five Flags Pistol Championship Matches at Pensacola, Florida, May 4-6.
Of the four Team Matches held, the Naval Air Station, Guantanamo Bay, won three of them. The .45 calibre team match with a 1027 out of 1200 team score. Center Fire Team Match with a 1023. .22 calibre Team Match was lost to Memphis Naval Station team 1099 to 1105.
Aggregate Team Match won with 3159.
The Naval Air Station Pistol Team consisted of M. C. Schoonderwoerd, ADC, Classification-Expert; J. B. Jocks, AO1, Classification-Expert; C. E. Tryon, BMC, Classification - Sharpshooter; L. C. James, A02, Classfication-Marksman.
llorty-six individual awards were won plus the three winning team plaques. These awards included spotting scopes which were won by Tryon and James for high shooter in their class. Three cartridge loading blocks, four panel awards and 37 place awards were won. Schoonderwoerd was second High Expert with a score of 2449.
There were five Expert teams and five Sharpshooter teams entered in this match with 60 or more competitors.


Soviet Navy Threat

To Atlantic Shipping

New York-Russia's Navy has the capability of attacking Atlantic shipping from the air "on a scale and intensity out of comparison with anything experienced in the broad oceans in the past," the intelligence officer for the Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic said last week.
If war should break out, the Russian navy now has six times the air strength available to Nazi Germany in 1939 with which to attack the sea lanes linking North America with western Europe; seven times the submarine strength,, and three times the heavy surface fleet.
These estimates were made by U.S. Admiral Jerauld Wright, commander of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization naval command, and his staff at an Overseas Press Club meeting. B e s i d e s increased numerical strength, the Russians have converted all navy fighter and light bomber units to jet aircraft. The NATO command expects the Soviet to soon outfit its submarines with guided missiles with nuclear warheads, posing an additional threat to ports and coastal region cities on both sides of the Atlantic.


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Page Six


THE INDIAN





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Saturday, 12 May 1956


THE INDIAN


THE SCOREBOOK


Marines Continue Winning 1 Run Games And Extra-Inning Contests, In 1st Place


by Joe Duffy
The intercommand baseball league completed its fourth week and the second circuit for the four competing clubs this week, with the Marines steadily pulling away from the field. The four clubs are as evenly matched as a handicapper could devise, however, the Marines have an old habit of winning the one-run decisions and the extra-inning games.
A revised Naval Air Station team has begun to loom as a threat to the Leatherneck's superiority, and are beginning to shape up to their pre-season expectations. However, they lost the golden opportunity last Sunday when they blew a four-run lead and then lost in overtime to the league leaders. The outcome of this game will certainly prove to be more important as the season gets older.


Marines 6, NAS 5
Mike Sivilli strolled home in the eleventh inning to break up a tie ballgame and provided the winning run for the Marine's second extra-inning triumph in succession. The strolling came about when a close call at second base ignited into an NAS rhubarb with the base umpire, without benefit of time out.
The Flyers, after yeilding a run to the Marines in the third, came back in their half of the inning to shell starter Phil Patton from the mound with a five-run explosion. Jette and Sandblom walked to start the inning and were followed by run producing singles by Lee Rogers, McCalmont and Waldrop before Furtney relieved on the mound.
After Tanzi lined out to Collins at third, Schaffer lashed a two-run double to left-center to complete the scoring for the inning, and the game as far as the Flyers were concerned. Furtney had little trouble over the rest of the route, scattering four singles while facing the minimum of three batters in all but the fifth and eleventh frames.
The Leathernecks tied it up in the sixth when McCalmont ran into a streak of wildness and issued five of his total seven walks. The walks came in succession forcing in two markers. With the sacks full, Hunter powered a long hit that was ruled a ground rule double, passing through the fence in right field, and good for the final two runs in the inning. Castellow then struck out for the final out and the stalemate was on until Sivilli's theft in the eleventh. Marines 001 004 000 01-6 12 1 NAS 005 000 000 00-5 10 2
VU10 13, Naval Base 7
The Mallards swept to a convincing 13-7 win over the Naval Base Indians to register their second league victory, both over the Indians, Scoring in multiples of three and two, the Mallards held complete command and kept the superior edge despite a four-run outburst by the Indians in the fifth frame, when three singles, two


walks and an error closed the gap to 8-5.
Two walks preceding a double by Postal and single by Montgomery accounted for the Mallard three runs in the initial frame. Another walk, bunt sacrifice, and singles by Morris and Bouffard produced two more tallies in the second and wrote finis for hurler Weingarten. Wildness plagued reliefer Schiller in the third as he hit the first three Mallard batsmen to face him and load the bases. An infield out produced one run, a second was balked in and the third crossed the plate as Milt Smith punched out the lone basehit of the frame.
This proved to be enough to win, but two more in the fifth and three in the ninth were added for insurance. Moe Morris led the winner's hit attack with a double and two singles to produce three markers, while Jim Postal rapped out a pair of two-basehits good for two runs. Scholl, Indian's first baseman, went 2 for 4 to drive in four runs, two of which came on a bases-loaded double in the sixth inning.
NavBase 100 042 000-7 9 5 VU-10 323 020 03x-13 12 2
NAS 7, VU-10 4
The rejuvenated, red-hot Naval Air Station Flyers made eight hits count when they were needed to down the VU-10 Mallards 7 to 4 in a game marred by thirteen errors.
The Flyers snapped a 4-4 tie in the eighth when Joe Sandblom doubled to score Tanzi all the way from first, then sewed it up with two more runs with the aid of singles by Williams and Watson and a pitcher's balk.
The Mallards held a two-run advantage until the fifth when Williams and Watson hit duplicating drives to right center that went for doubles and the first of three big runs. A succession of Mallard errors followed the blows to allow the Flyers to take the 4-3 lead. Montgomery walked in the Mallard qixth and eventually scored on two Flyers errors to knot the count at 4-all, that held until the


explosive eighth.
Bob Waldrop made his first mound appearance, and although giving a shaky performance, was effective in the pinches to gain the victory.
VU-10 021 001 000-4 7 6 NAS 100 030 03x-7 8 7


The Leaders
AB R
Scholl, NavBase 26 7 Pearson, NAS 14 5 McCalmont, NAS 19 6 Hunter, Marines 27 12 McCafferty, NavBase 18 5 Smith, M., VU-10 21 5 Bouffard, VU-10 22 2


RBI Ave. 9 .461 3 .428 3 .421 8 .407 1 .389 2 .381 2 .363


Home Runs: Hunter and Castellow
(Marines) 1.
Triples: Bland nad Hunter (Marines), Eells and Petinak (NavBase) and Waldrop (NAS) 1. Doubles: Dowd and Hunter (Marines), Scholl (NavBase), and
Pearson (NAS 3 each.
Runs Batted In: Bland (Marines)
and Scholl (NavBase) 9; Hunter
(Marine s) 8.
IP SO BBW L ERA
Dodwd, Marines 9 11 2 2 0 0.00 Streigle, VU-10 15 7 10 1 1 0.60 Montgomery ,VU-10 10 10 8 0 1 2.50 Furtney, Marines 25 19 11 2 0 2.52 Patton, Marines 23 20 9 2 0 3.12
The Standings
Marines 6 0 NAS 2 4 4 VU-10 2 4 4 NavBase 2 4 4
The Schedule
Mon. 14 Ma:,, 1900 NavBase vs Marines
ues. 15 May, 1900 NAS vs VU-10
Thurs. 17 May, 1900 VU-10 vs NavBase
NOTES ON THE MARGIN ....
The stalemate behind the Marines in the league standings is a pretty good indication of the league's balance. If only the Marines would cooperate, it could have been a four-way tie for first instead of the three-way tie for second, or last, depends on how you look at it.
The Naval Base Indians stand to lose their entire first-string outfield this month. Pete Petinak goes to Norfolk for duty, and Bob Eells will be on his way to the separation center: McCowan has his orders, so when he leaves, what does that leave for an outfield?
The Naval Air Station picked up a new keystone combination in their rejuvenation. A young fellow by the name of Watson took over at short and has been a shot in the arm to the club, while Chief Lee Rogers filled in at second base for the absent Roy Pearson. Lee Rogers, better known hereabouts for his golfing, joined the club along with Commander Al Rothenberg.


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The Fish Tale(s)
by Pat Aldridge
Diligent research has failed to turn up the fantastic Sea Serpent, sworn by creditable eye witnesses to inhabit the Caribbean. There are some weird creatures to be seen hereabouts.
Mention of the foretold has been preface to the telling about the funniest creature of all known to frequent Cuban waters. The name of this animal, is Monitee. The same creature is known as a Dugong in the Pacific.
As for its' physical description . . . can you imagine a two ton combination seal, walrus and ordinary moo cow? The pedal extrenbles are broad flippers and the rudder a broad, fiat tail. The head,
so say some, is similiar to that of a cow with large, soleful eyes. The Manitee is a highly playful, friendly creature with no apparant fear of man, in fact, a will to be a friend of man. Ted Ahlberg, one of our well known skin divers, has seen and cavorted with a giant Manitee here.
One fellow on the Florida coast made a real pet of a huge Manitee as was proven recently in motion pictures taken of the man and his strange playmate rolling about and playing tag with one another in the estuary. The Manitee would arrive daily in the waters in front of the chap's beach cottage announcing her presence with a weird cry impossible to imitate.
The female Manitee seems to have all the natural traits of any woman. The creature drinks fresh
water and may often be seen in the river and near springs which empty into the sea.
It is absolutely against the laws of almost every land, including Cuba, to destroy the Manitee for it is a rather a rare species. At one time it was sought for its food and fur value by commercial hunters.
She sat on Fehrman's bait trap the other day now Fehrman has to build a new one . . . little trap, big critter.


Ladies Golf Shots
Last Wednesday the lady golfers played the qualifying round for the Ladies Championship tournament. Matches are now being played to determine the winners of both an 18 hole and a nine hole tournament.
On May 1 the new monthly handicaps were posted. Lavaria Butler, Cynthia Holley, Audrey Page and Chris Whitton all became first flighters. Congratulations and keep improving. Kay Barton, Patty Patterson, Bucky Pierce and Margaret Wall all jumped to second flight.


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Saturday, 12 May 1956


THE INDIAN


Navy-BPPO- 1OND-Guantanamo


TV Tele Talk

Screen actor Keefe Brasselle stars in "The Talented Mr. Ripley" an intriguing story of a scheming actor who tries to impersonate a wealthy young man. See it on Studio One Monday.

M/Sgt. Ernie Bilko faces a double-horned dilemma as yearly bivouac time comes up and the Colonel is determined that for once Bilko won't wind up on sick call in the hospital with his pokerplaying side-kicks, in the episode entitled "Sick Call Ernie" on the Phil Silvers Show, "You'll Never Get Rich."
A benevolent Mama Bronson is taken advantage of by a typical "borrowing" neighbor on the *eet Millie Show. The situation gets out of hand when the new resident attempts to "borrow" a full course beef dinner Which Mama has prepared for guests.
Friday night Boxing is once again, brought from ST. Nicks Arena. A. four round semi-final precedes the main event between welter-weights Gean Poire and Danny Jo Porez. This will be a return match. Poirie has a 14-20 record while Porez has a 16-23 record. This 10 round match favors Poire 15-1 as he won the previous fight.
Jack Webb, Robert Cummings and Spike Jones receive the Colgate Achievement Award on the Colgate Variety Hour Saturday. Webb gets the award for the best dramatic show of the year; Cummings for the best comedy show of the year and Jones for having contributed the least to music on television.
A weak-willed young man, determined to retain his father's respect at all costs, discovers that a "white lie" can involve an innocent man in murder, during "The Guilty," a drama 'to be presented on Justice.
Ed Sullivan pays a special tribute to Lily Pons who is celebrating the 25th anniversary of her association with the Metropolitan Opera Company Sunday night. Other guests on the program will be popular songstress Pearl Ba.ey, British comedienne Joyce Grenfell and her dancers, comedian Myron Cohen, recording star Al Hibbler and the Lone Ranger along with Silver.


Saturday, May 12 4:00-Howdy Doody 4:15-Youth Wants to Know 5:00-Victory At Sea 5:30-Beat The Clock 6:00-Red Buttons 6:30-Life Begins at 80 7:00-Penny to a Million 7:30 Stage Show 8:00 Colgate Variety Hour 9:00-Here's The Show 9:30-Justice
Sunday, May 13
4:00-Roy Rogers 4:30-Winky Dink and- You 5:00-Mama 5:30-Hallmark Hall of Fame 6:00-Meet The Press 6:30-Star Tonight 7:00-You Are There 7:30-What's My Line 8:00-Toast of the Town 9:00-Loretta Young
9:30-Appointment With
Adventure
Monday, May 14


Cinema -


5:30-News Parade 7:30 5:45-Jane Froman 8 :006:00-United Nations 8 :30 6:15-I & E Time 9:00 6:30-Danny Thomas 7:00-I "Love Lucy 5:30 7:30-TV Top Tunes 5:45 8:00 Ethel & Albert 6:00 8:0-Cameo Theater 6:309:00-Studio One 7:00
Tuesday, May 15 7:305:30-News Parade 8:00 5:45 Tennessee Ernie Show 8:30 6:00-Highway Patrol 9:00 6:30 Phil Silvers 9:30 7:00 Meet Millie 7:30-Red Skelton 5:30 8:00-Stranger 5:45 8:30-T-Me In Action 6 :00 9:00 Cid Ceasar 6:15
Wednesday, May 16 6:305:30-News Parade 7:00 5:45-Jo Stafford 7:30 6:00-Those Whitting Girls 8:00 6 :30-I've Got a Secret 8:307:00-To Be Announced 9:00


Scoop


by D.D.H.
Nothin' old, nothin' new, so on with this week's movies!
Annapolis Story (A.A., in color) . . . John Derek, Kevin McCarthy and Diana Lynn. . . trials and tribulations of. an Annapolis student � . . might intrigue some people.
Never Say Goodbye (U.I., in color), one of the very few new ones this week. It is the story of a man and woman parted by suspicions and the Iron Curtain, who are reunited some years later. Rock Hudson, Cornell Borchers (she's a newcomer to Hollywood), and George Sanders star. Not the greatest in entertainment, but worth taking the time to see, if you like a love story.
The Shrike (U.I.), is probably the best of the week, bilt the movie was just here not too long ago. June Allyson and Jose Ferrer star in this one. The plot concerns a very possessive wife and what she does to her husband, through that almost violent possessiveness.
Will Any Gentleman (A.A.), is a ridiculous comedy and one that if you want to laugh, go see! George Cole and Veronica Hurst (two English players) star; Mum's the word on the plot, just go see it, a barrel of laughs guaranteed.
Prize of Gold (Col.), is a crime picture, this time dealing with the robbery of a shipment of gold off a military transport! Richard Widmark is convincing enough as the almost, but not quite villain and Mai Zeterling plays a very appealing love interest in the flick.
City of Shadows (Rep.) ... Vic-


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Send
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-This Is Your Life
-Eddie Cantor
-Foreign Intrigue
-Godfrey and Friends Thursday, May 17
-News Parade
-Eddie Fisher Professor Father
-My Little Margie
-You Bet Your Life
-Bob Cummings
-Johnny Carson Stage 7
-Dragnet
-Four Star Playhouse Friday, May 18
-News Parade
-Perry Como
-Big Picture
-I & E Time
-Truth or Consequences
-Our Miss Brooks
-Life of Riley
-Mr. & Mrs. North
-Crusader
-Boxing


tor McLaghlen and Kathleen Crowley . .. Grade B all the way then some, is this picture of the big city crime syndicates.
Court Martial of Billy Mitchell (W.B., in color) is a near documentary of the trial of the famed general who fought for an air force. Gary Cooper plays Mitchell and does a good job! Charles Bickford, Ralph Bellamy and Rod Steiger round out the all-star cast. A very good evening's entertainment!



Book - Nook

"THE REVOLT OF GUNNER ASCII," by Hans Kirst, is currently sweeping the book world as being one of the funniest books to result from World War II. The man in the title is a German soldier who declares his own private war on all the 'pomposity and goosestepping tactics of the Nazi officers. How he bungles his way through the war and comes out on top equals hilarious reading.
The Library has several new and up-to-date mysteries, too numerous to mention separately. However, one of the best is the Ellery Queen trilogy "THE WRIGHTSVILLE NUMBERS." It's a thick and hefty bookful of solid mystery reading by one of the all-time favorite mystery writers of today.

An interesting and inspiring book on a subject which Americans never tire of discussing Helen Keller, is TEACHER-ANNE SULLIVAN MACY," by Miss Keller herself. The subject was Helen Keller's teacher from the very beginning of her perceptive life, and the story of how a blind and deaf girl is introduced to the world of sensible reality is positively fascinating. A touching tribute from student to teacher.
Here's another compact little Modern Library volufhe entitled "THE BEST SHORT STORIES OF DOSTOEVSKY." About eight


WGBY Television Program


Saturday, May 12
NavSta-Annapolis Story-90 min. NAS-Three Ring Circus-104 min. Mar. Site-Sincerely Yours 127 min. Villa.-Teen-Age Crime Wave-100 min. Lwd. Pt.-Purple Mask-103 min. MCB-1-White Christmas-120 min.
Sunday, May 13
NavSta-Never Say Goodbye-96 min. NAS-Annapolis Story Mar. Site-I'll Cry Tomorrow-1l9 rmin. Villa. Sincerely Yours Lwd. Pt.-Teen-Age Crime Wave MCB-1 Purple Mask
Monday, May 14 NavSta-Shrike-94 min. NAS-Never Say Goodbye Mar. Site-Three Ring Circus Villa.-I'll Cry Tomorrow Lwd. Pt.-Sincerely Yours MCB-1-Ten-Age Crime Wave
Tuesday, May 15
NavSta-Will Any Gentleman-91 min. NAS Shrike
Mar. Site-Annapolis Story Villa.-Three Ring Circus Lwd. Pt.-I'll Cry Tomorrow MCB-1-Sincerely Yours
Wednesday, May 16 NavSta.-Prize of Gold 98 min. NAS-Will Any Gentleman Mar.Site-Never Say Goodbye Villa.-Annapolis Story Lwd. Pt.-Three Ring Circus MCB-1-I'll Cry Tomorrow
Thursday, May 17
NavtSa-City of Shadows-92 min. NAS-Prize of Gold Mar. Site-Shrike Villa.-Never Say Goobye Lwd. Pt.-Annapolis Story MCB-1-Three Ring Circus
Friilay, May 18
NavSta-Court Martial of Billy Mitchell112 min.
NAS City of Shadows Mar. Site-Will Any Gentleman Villa.-Shrike
Lwd. Pt.-Never Say Goodbye MCB-1-Annapolis Story

of his better short stories are included. Those who know him only as a novelist or playwright will discover in this book another medium of expression in which he also excelled.
New specialty books include "THE SHELL BOOK," "HOW TO MAKE BUILT-IN FURNITURE," and "HOW TO CLEAN EVERYTHING."
"THE FABULOUS FUTURE"
is a small but tremendously absorbing book. It comprises a collection of articles by eleven prominent Americans in the .fields of government, labor, and big business on What they think America will be like in 1980. It's rather an unusual topic, and the conclusions are surprising and thought-provoking.

A drunk was standing on a corner, leaning helplessly against a telephone pole. Finally a cop came up and nudged him with his stick. "Why don't you go home?" the officer advised.
The drunk roused and started walking round and round the pole, carefully feeling its surface with his hand. Finally, after about 10 rounds, he sat on the curb and sighed . . . "Silo use . . . I'm walled in."


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COVERS GTMO LIKE THE SUNSHINE U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Volume VII, No. 19 Saturday, 12 May 1956 Seabees Leave For States, Group Left May 7, Other Goes May 19 After six months of hard work, MCB-1 is getting that long awaited stateside rest. The Seabees are leaving Guantanamo Bay in two echelons. The First group left May 7 and the second one is scheduled to depart May 19. The construction battalion arrived in Gtmo, their "second home", in Nov., 1955 and picked up where they had left off in August of that year. This was the third time that the outfit had been stationed in Gtmo Bay. 11 Seniors To Be Graduated Friday At Exercises In School Auditorium In the past, all of the Mobile Construction Battalions stationed on the East Coast have spent some time in Cuba. But MCB-1 started and finished the new housing projects. As soon as the "First and the Finest", as MCB-1 is called, arrived in Gtmo lalt November, they started work on the two main projects which consisted of building 60 units of the MEMQ type (married enlisted men's quarters) at Northwest Granadillo and 40 units of the MOQ type (married officers' quarters) at Caravella Point and West Bargo. Aside from these projects there were smaller ones which also had to be done. The first one of these was the Seabee Trailer Park which was completed in December. The Chief Petty Officers' Lounge was the next added addition and was finished in January. In February the Base had its annual Carnival and MCB-1 had its part in it. They built three powerdriven rides which were a big hit with the children on the Base and they took part in numerous other activities during the Carnival. The last small project to be completed by the builders was the repair of the Seabee's galley roof which was done in March, A sewage treatment plant was also started back in December and is now 85 percent complete awaiting special materials required to seal the tank. Approximately 1,000 eight-hour man-days were put into these smaller jobs which took away precious help from the main projects. As of this May, however, the 100 units of housing is finished having a total of 50,000 eight-hour man-days expended. Taking into consideration the lack of materials at times and the little amount of time available, an excellent, high quality job was done. Not satisfied with what they had done, the Seabees made a good start on three more projects to be completed in the future by others. These consist of stripping and grading for quarters at Leeward Point, grading Sherman Avenue from Nob Hill to Northeast Gate and repairs to the present Seabee living quarters. The first of those projects will be inactive for sometime, but repairs to the living quarters will be completed later this year since the security detachment which is left in Guantanamo Bay is working on it. Busy Day Tomorrow For Phone Exchange; Mother's Day Calls The long distance telephone wires on the Base are expected to burn all day tomorrow when American children send either kisses or greetings to their mothers. The Base Public Works Telephone Department has announced that "in order to meet the expected high tide of callers come Mother's Day, May 13, three long-distance telephone operators will be on hand to accommodate every patron." In was also disclosed that the service will be made on a "firstcome-first-serve" basis. Long distance call rates on a 3-minute duration range from $2.00 to $10.00, depending upon the distance of the receiving end from the local office. The telephone office is situated on Building No. 609, Marine Site No. 2. INDIAN Photo Members of the Naval Base High School Class of 1956 are left to right: Dolores Rogoz, Eunice Avila, Maryalice Murphy, Anita Sierra, Sarah Upp, Rebecca Dobbins, Philip Keenan, Timothy Reffett, Roger Getzewich and Patricia Fojt. Roberta Johnson is missing from the picture. A four year scholastic journey for 11 Naval Base School seniors will end May 18. The young adults will be graduated from the Base school in commencement exercises next Friday evening beginning at 8:00 p.m. in the Chapel Hill auditorium. RADM W. G. Cooper, Commander Naval Base, is slated to deliver the commencement address to this Class of 1956. RADM Cooper will be introduced by T. G. Scarborough, school superintendent. During the graduation program, Miss Patricia Fojt, class valedictorian, will give a short talk as will Miss Rebecca Dobbins, class salutatorian. School Band Will Play The evening's exercises will open with a musical processional by the Naval Base school band. Following the processional, CDR J. J. Sullivan will give the invocation. The band will furnish the traditional graduation marches. Included in the program is a vocal solo by Miss Maryalice Murphy. Presentation of the diplomas to the graduates will be made by CAPT G. M. Holley, Naval Base Chief of Staff. Legion Award Given H. P. McNeal will bestow the American Legion Award to a boy and a girl in the graduating class. Winners of the award were chosen earlier by their instructors and classmates. The two winners will receive handsome bronze medals. LCDR K. G. Peterson will deliver the benediction near the end of the program which will be closed by the playing of a recessional by the school band. Naval Station Library Closed May 22-25 Mrs. H. L. Broughton, Naval Station librarian, has announced that the Naval Station Library will be closed for annual inventory May 22-25. No one will be allowed to check out books after May 18. Mrs. Broughton said that all books will be due and must be returned to the library before Monday, May 21. Leeward Pt. Paper Changes Pub. Day The publication day of the LEEWARD POINTER, a Naval Air Station paper, has been changed to Mondays instead of Fridays. The new publication day took effect April 30 according to an announcement made by the NAS Special Services Office. The LEEWARD POINTER is a four-page mimeographed paper and is published weekly at the NAS Ad Building in accordance with NAVEXOS P-35, Rev 1945. The paper features the NAS Suttlebutt column and local news bits on the front page. The second page is devoted to front page story jumps, movie schedule and laff lines. The third page carries sports news and the last page bills the entire day-by-day menu of the week.

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Page Two THE INDIAN The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a possible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. RADM WILLIAM G. COOPER, Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Editorial Staff LTJG D. G. LaCasse -------------------------------Officer-Advisor G. L. Henderson, -JOC --------------------------------------Editor J. C. Current: JOSN -----------------------------Managing Editor E. U. Orias, J03 -----------------------------------Feature Editor D. D. Hinton, JOSN --------------------------------Staff Reporter THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P.35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. Materials marked AFPS may be used by news media provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All material originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part or without credit. All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. EMs Should Grasp Opportunities It's up to the individual to make his place in the world and to make his own opportunities, or so someone has said. But this isn't always so. Sometimes all he has to do is recognize the opportunities which have been made for him. Such situation exists right now with the numerous opportunities for service in the navy as an officer. Recently it was announced that about 1,960 enlisted men received regular or reserve officer appointments yearly through seven programs. In estimating the number of EMs to be chosen annually for appointments, the navy said about 200 will reach officer status by integration, 200 by selection as LDOs, 160 by appointments to the Naval Academy, 200 through NROTC programs, 400 by NavCad training, 200 by OCS and 600 by advancement to warrant officer. Through these programs the navy will be procuring large numbers of officers during the coming months. For the enlisted man each one o_ them offers a wide variety of interesting, educational and exciting possibilities. Specifically, here is a run-down on the pilot procurement programs: There are two navy pilot procurement programs, the Aviation Officer Candidate program and Naval Aviation Cadet program. The former is open to college graduates, who are commissioned after four months of training and who, as commissioned officers, then proceed with flight training. The latter provides an opportunity for the young man with only two years of college or the equivalent of, to enter flight training and become commissioned as a naval officer upon his successful completion of the course. Each of these programs offers that enviable and wonderful opportunity to earn those coveted "wings of gold" of a naval aviator. An enlisted man HAS a chance to wants to try. Calendar of Events Saturday, May 12 Square and Circle Club-Phillips Park7:30 p.m. Monday, May 14 Sojourner's Club-Officers' Club-7:00 p.m. O.E.S. Club-Girl Scout Hut-7:B0 p.m. Tuesday, May 15 Evening Art Class-Art Studio Bldg (Victory Hill)-7:30 p.m. Business Meeting 3:00 p.m. Art Studio Bldg. American Legion-Flt. Reserve Rm.get ahead in the Navy, if he only 7:30 p.m. American Legion Auxiliary -Girl Scout Hut-7:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 16 Toastmaster's Club-Officers' Club6:30 p.m. Payday-All military personnel. Thursday, May 17 Navy Wives Club-Bingo (Villamar Lyceum)-1:30 p.m. Felloweraft Club 1078-Community Auditorium-7 :30 p.m. Friday, May 18 CPO Wives Club-Family Rm. (CPO Club) -8:00 p.m. The Chaplain's Corner MOTHER WEARS AN APRON Some people say that wearing an apron is a sign that company is coming. Now you may laugh at that but mother doesn't think it's so funny. How many times have I heard her embarrassed and apologetic for being caught in her apron in the midst of her work. It seems that mother classifies this event as a number one crime. Hmm, let's see-a carpenter doesn't apologize for his overalls, nor the serviceman for his uniform, -nor the chef for his big white hatthey are signs of their profession. I believe that a mother's work is best symbolized by the apron. Since cooking and cleaning are a part of the vocation of motherhood, God wills to look with infinite approval upon mothers in aprons. Come to think of it, God sees mother in her apron more than not. Somehow in the course of almost every day mother's best lamp gets knocked over, or footprints find themselves on the newly scrubbed floor, or cowboys and running Indians flatten that nice cake in the oven, or any one of a million other things. Where mother receives the patience and strength to bear up under all this-God only knows. But, thank heavens, God sees all this so that not even the smallest difficulty patiently borne according to God's will shall go unrewarded. Jerome J. Sullivan Chaplain, U. S. Navy When a man enters the service, he becomes part of the military community. Wherever he is stationed, there are servicemen-often with their families-living and working together. Being part of life at a base, ship or station can be a rewarding experience. Service people share many common interests, and most installations reflect this in a close-knit "small-town" spirit. The military community is not the only one that affects the serviceman, however. During his tour of duty, he comes in contact with many civilians. At home and abroad, at work and on his own time, he meets the public. And make no mistake about it: these meetings shape the community's attitude toward everyone who wears a uniform. Civilians rarely see the military in action. The average layman knows only what he reads, what he is told-and what he sees. If he sees sloppiness, drunkenness, thoughtless driving and rude behavior, he loses his respect for the armed forces. If he sees servicemen who act proud of themselves and the job they are doing, he'll be proud, too. (AFPS) Sunday, 13 May 1956 Cr'rHOLIC M SES Sunday, 7000-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0908-Naval ease Chapel f Sunday 1230-Nav I Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri.5-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800aval B C pc Co sions: Saturday, 00 1V00 -0, and daily before /as PRO STANT SERVICES Sunday: 0930-Divine Worship (MCB-1 Chapel) 0910-Sunday School 0918-Adult Hible Class 1100-ivine Worship) Naval Base Chapel) 1100-Divine Worship (Lwd. Pt.) 30-Pellov-hip Hour -Mid-WeeleBible-Study-Thursday: 00-Choir Rehearsal JEWISH S ICES Friday-10-Naval Base Chapel CHURCH OF CHRIST 1000-Bible Study First Holy Communion Sunday 19 Girls and 16 Boys at the 0900 Mass to be celebrated by Father Jerome J. Sullivan. 1045-Worship Service Community Auditorium CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Sunday-1000-Naval Base Library LATTER DAY SAINTS Sunday-1100-Naval Station Library Chaplains at this activity CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN (Catholic) LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN (Protestant) LTJG C. C. Gaston, CHC, USNR (Protestant) m 4m Saturday, 12 May 1956 THE INDIAN

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M Saturday, 12 May 1956 Gtmo Has 1,492 Members In 'Mosquito Fleet' Lawlors Have Largest Family-7 Krugs Next In Line On Base With 6 by Ely U. Orias This is not a story with a "Cheaper By the Dozen" slant but is one about paternity's boundless thoughts and deeds for their children. Children are the apple to every parent's eyes. And there are plenty of the kind here in Guantanamo Bay The U.S. Navy believes that a married sailor can best perform his job if he is physically close to his family's existence grind. Thus the Navy has mustered every possible effort to bring families together. Accordingly, here they are in Gtmo-closer and together! ! Taking up residence on the Base presently are 1,005 service families, 202 of which are officers' families, 711 are of the enlisted phalanx and 92 are of the civilian category. A census conducted as to the exact number of children that make up the Gtmo Bay "mosquito fleet" has produced the following figures: On the Base there are 1,492 service children, 754 of which are either in the grade school or high school, 91 are kindergartens, 46 are in the nursery and the remainder are either in the cradle or in the crib. Of these 1,492 children, 319 are of officers'; 1,062 are fathered by enlisted men and 111 are children of civilians. Going deeper into the various ramifications of the census, the following human-interest aspects have been uncorked: Among the civilian families, 31 are devoid of offsprings; among the enlisted families, 160 are childless and among the officers' families, 46 have no children. Then without distinction as to what family category do they fall, the census found out that among the Base families there are 268 unions each having but one child, 219 with two children, 156 with three, 41 with four, 11 families with five children each, two with six and one family with seven children. The Krugs One of the two unions on the Base having six children is the Clifford J. Krug clan. Clifford J. Krug, ADi, of NAS and the former Natalie T. Blanq were married on September 2, 1942. The 33 year old family man was born in St. Louis, Mo., while Mrs. Krug is a native of Memphis, Tennessee. "Bread -winning," s a y s Mrs. The Krugs INDIAN Photo The assembled Krugs shows Freddie, 5; Paula Irene, 7 and Clifford II, 8, foreground, left to right. Seated are Mrs. Natalie Krug; Mary Nancy, 13; Teresa, 11 and Mike, 22, who is on the lap of Papa C. J. Krug. a The Lawlors Fleet Camera Party Photo Standing behind their brood are CDR and Mrs. F. L. Lawlor. The seated seven Little Lawlors, left to right, are: Lindsey, 5; Robert (Pete), 7; twin brother and sister Bruce and Penny, 22, Susan, 11 and Debbie, 9, who is holding Nancy Lee, 5 mos. Krug, "is the responsibility of my husband; but the daily grind to keep the family well-fed and neatly clothed rests upon my shoulders." The absence of a maid was evident in the Krug household until four days ago. "Consequently." declared Mrs. Krug, "I almost did everything. I washed 75 lbs. of clothes a week and served 168 meals during the same period." Four of the Krug children are of school age. "The temporary absence of a TV set at home," says Mrs. Krug, "is a blessing. Understandably enough, my children have taken to much book-reading as a substitute thereof. Nancy and Terry," continued Mrs. Krug, "are average 'A' pupils despite being shifted around from one school to another whose teaching methods vary." "And I tell you what," volunteered Mrs. Krug: "I have contributed much to the Navy's medical department by keeping the family in the pink of health." The Lawlor Clan And the biggest of all the families on the Base is the F. L. Lawlor family which is graced with seven "wonderful" children. The Lawlor children were born in different states, two of which are Pennsylvania born twins and the youngest in the family named Nancy Lee, five months, saw the first light of the world in Gtmo. Daddy Lawlor is a U.S. Navy Commander and presently the Executive Officer of the Naval Air Station. Mrs. Lawlor, the former Katherine E. McGuire of Boston, Mass., is a diminutive, doting mother. They were married 12 years ago in St. Augustine, Florida when the commander was an aviation instructor at Lee Field Naval Air Station, Florida and Mrs. Lawlor was visiting friends there. The seven Little Lawlors demand plenty of working hours on the part of the parents. So they have two maids and a washer and a drier "which spins from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. daily." "It's wonderful to have so many children," declared Mrs. Lawlor. "My husband and I don't have to go out and witness the wonders of human activity. We have plenty of those at home." Delving on the subject of human activity, Mrs. Lawlor started out with the girls as being dance enthusiasts and the boys as equestrians. Then she singled out Susan, a sixth grader, as a book-worm; Debbie as the baby-sitter; Robert (Pete) as the Pee-Wee leaguer; Lindsey (a girl), as the treeclimber; twin brother and sister Penny and Bruce as "unto the bow the cord is-each being unhappy and frantic without the other" and the youngest, Nancy Lee as the family crier." The 41 year old Commander was born in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. He's been in the Navy 18 years. A veteran of the last global war, CDR Lawlor sports as many battle ribbons on his breast as he sports children in his heart. 0 sm m THE INDIAN M Page Three

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Page Four Snark Flies 2,000 Miles Following Some Congressional Digs; And So? It was disclosed recently that the Northrop Snark has flown 2,000 miles. This flight may have been made in response to some digs from Congress. Said one informed Washington observer: "They proved a jet engine can fly 2,000 miles. What else?" Possible explanation for the disclosure is found in the House budget hearings, where Rep. Daniel J. Flood (D-Pa.) questioned Reuben B. Robertson, Deputy Secretary of Defense. Both Robertson and Flood were recent visitors at Guantanamo Bay. Speaking of the ballistic missile, Robertson said: "We are in a position to fire (log) distances in the immediate future." Later, Flood suggested that he do so, the next Saturday morning from the Pentagon plaza. Robertson immediately made it clear that he meant to speak of the air-breathing missile not the ballistic missile. Flood came back with his challenge again: go out and do it by the end of the month. Now it has been done by the air-breathing, jet engine-powered Snark, a weapon that was designed almost 10 years ago. Some USAF planners are arguing that the Snark should not go into full production except possible as a stop-gap weapon. The Northrop missile is a pilotless bomber, subsonic but relatively cheap. Range is supposed to be 5,000 miles. Unmentioned in most of last week's publicity was the fact that USAF doesn't have a 2,000-mile test range. Instrumentation now is being provided for 1,200 miles out of Cocoa, Fla., indicating there has been no need for a longer one. Teenage Roundup by Betty and Sharon Were you there? At Eunice's party which was given by most everyone, but held at the Avila hacienda. It sure was fun, with all the very good records for dancing. The party was mainly for Dolores and Ronnie Rogoz, Bobbie Johnson and Rick Rooker who are leaving us in the near future. Think of us when you're in the states and good luck. Dolores and Bobbie are going to college next fall and we wish them all kinds of success. We have the juniors to thank for the Prom. Did You See? Jere Warren walking? Ralph A. taking it easy? The slumber party at Judy's? Geraldine looking sad? Vic finding his way home? Fire bug Fojt? Lover Boy, Roger? Nancy and Chuck walking the dog? Pris' new Home? Am. Legion Aux, There are disabled veterans of World War I and II and the Korean War in the Veterans' hospitals today. They have convalescent work rooms where they make little red crepe flowers, replicas of the wild European poppies which bloom on the fields and war cemeteries in France and Belgium. They provide the only floral tribute to the battle dead. This gives gainful occupation to thousands of veterans unable to do other work. It also helps provide for their families. It is a valuable occupational therapy for it gives them something useful and interesting to do during long hospital hours. It also encourages a mental attitude helpful toward recovery. The poppies this year are from the veterans' hospital in Maine. Contributions made by those who wear the poppies go almost entirely to rehabilitation and child welfare funds of the American Legion Auxiliary. The entire proceeds of the American Legion Auxiliary Unit No. 1, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba in 1952-53 went to the Leprosarium in Carville, Louisiana. The next year it went to the hospital in Coral Gables, Florida, and last year it was given to the hospital in San Juan, Puerto Rico. NAS Scuttlebutt Art Studio News Thirteen men have received word With the closing of the art show that they have passed the Chief in the library the Art Studio setexams out of the original twentytled down this week to organizing three who took them. "Long" Adams, "Short" Adams, Pete Anerine, and Lynch (the only one who can speak broken French with an Italian accent) of the Photo Lab went to Haiti over the weekend. On leave is "Cajun" Diemert in Little Ole' New Orleans. In about another week, the new Ordnance Pistol House will be completed. It is said that Opening Day Party will be held shortly after next payday. Who was that homesick guy from VU-10 who helped in the kitchen in Quarters CB 8-B last Saturday? ? ? ? ? The Administration department had a "bang-up" beach party on Windmill Beach recently. Everyone had an intoxicating time. The Party left the Personnel Office crewless for the entire afternoon, except for T. G. Shaw, YN2. Special Services also recently had a fling. They went on a fishing trip which did not prove too successful in catching fish, but was still enjoyed by everyone as it was a change of the regular routine which is usually followed. Raymond D. Hinrichs, YN3, has been attending the School of Naval Justice at Newport, Rhode Island, beginning May. The class will last nine weeks and after completion Hinrichs will take the Stenomask course (two week course in court reporting). Upon completion of the above classes, Hinrichs will return to the Air Station to assume duties as Yeoman in Charge of the Legal Department and Court Reporter. American Legion Post Ham Radio News Plans have now been completed and Reservations are in order for the American Legion and Auxil. iary picnic. It will be held on Saturday, May 26 at Yateras. Barbecued beef will be served at approximately 1400, however, get there as early as you like and enjoy the sand beach and swimming while you wait for dinner. The cost of the meal will be $1.25 for Adults and .500 for children. It is anticipated that this picnic will be quite enjoyable with games, swimming, or if you like, fishing to fill the day. A Reservation committee will be appointed at the next meeting of the Post which is scheduled for Tuesday, May 15. All members of the Post and Auxiliary are urged to attend this meeting and if you have friends who are eligible for membership, bring them out and get them signed up in time for this picnic. by Dot Sumara The business meeting of the Guantanamo Amateur Radio club was held Wednesday, May 2, at the home of John Garvey. Present were, Art Babine, KG4AV; Stan Sumara, W4BTH; Will Hamm, KG4AF; Dick Cousins, KG4AD; Dorothy Sumara, KG4AC; Walt Holloway, KG4AN; Bob Hewitt, KG4AR; John Garvey, K41HB; Joe Adriance, and Ralph Hurd. Stateward bound are two of our hams, Jim Dempsey, KG4AK, and Will Hainm, KG4AF. Bon Voyage fellows. A picnic was held out at Windmill Beach Sunday and a good time was had by all. The next business meeting will be held at 1900 on Wednesday, June 6 at Hewitts, G. P. 13D. All licensed and prospective Hams are invited to attend. the interest in the fine arts hobby the show generated. Several Base residents expressed interest in evening art classes, and for their benefit, the Studio will be open Tuesday evenings, from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. The evening sessions will be devoted to sketching and painting; students are free to bring in work of their own, or to choose projects set up by the Studio Committee. Instruction will be available for beginning students. Marcia Fitch is in charge of the night classes. Also as a result of the show, the Studio and the Naval Station Library have arranged for a continuing art display. Paintings by Jeanne Henry, Gloria Stanul, and Lennie Freeburg are now hanging in the library. The Studio plans to change the exhibit each month. New officers were elected this week to run the Studio for the next three months. Phyllis Wild is the new president; Edrie Becker, treasurer; Clelia Allen, supplies; Emily Evren, publicity; Chita Morales, housekeeping. L e n n i e Freeburg will be in charge of projects, assisted by Vivian Hall and Edie Ware. What's Doin' Stateside Some years ago a scientist named Pavlov learned a lot about emotions studying the rate of salivary secretions of a dog. Now, the American Association for the Advancement of Science reports a saliva test may show how much emotional stress or tension a human is undergoing. The University of Cincinnati marked 50 years of cooperative education April 19-25 with a halfcentury-of-progress industrial exhibit at its field house. More than 70 companies from 23 cities in 10 midwestern states helped produce exhibits based on the theme "Education and Industry at Work for Progress." Cooperative education, started at the college level 50 years ago by Cincinnati's late dean, Herman Schneider, encourages college students to begin their actual vocational experience while still in college. While they are earning their degrees, students of engineering applied arts and business administration alternately study theory in the classroom seven weeks and then apply their knowledge in industry. In 1906, 27 students and 12 firms joined to start the program at the University. Now, more than 3,000 students at 34 colleges in 12 states participate -with 500 American corporations. n U. M Saturday, 12 May 1956 THE INDIAN r

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Saturday, 12 May 1956 Mothers Have Their Day Tomorrow American mothers, living or dead, will be catapulted into the highest pedestal of honor when their children turn out for the National observance of Mother's Day, tomorrow, May 13. Mother's Day is a day set apart every year in honor of motherhood. It is the second Sunday in May. The day is celebrated in many churches and by family gatherings. One of the customs of the day is the wearing of a carnation. A colored carnation means that one's mother is living. A white carnation is worn if one's mother is dead. A day for honoring mothers was observed many years ago in England. It was called Mothering Sunday, and came in mid-lent. The Yugoslavs and some of the other peoples have long observed similar days. The first known suggestion for a Mother's Day in the United States was made by Julia Ward Howe, author of "The Battle Hymn of the Republic," in 1872. She suggested the observance of a Mother's Day on June 2, as a day dedicated to peace. For several years she held an annual Mother's Day meeting in Boston. In 1904, Frank E. Hering of South Bend, Ind., launched a campaign for Mother's Day at a convention of the Fraternal Order of Eagles in Kansas City, Mo. Three years later, Anna Jarvis of Philadelphia began a lifetime of effort to establish the nationwide observance of this day. It was she who selected the second Sunday in May as Mother's Day, and who orginated the custom of wearing carnations to honor mothers, living or dead. Mother's Day received national recognition on May 8, 1914, through a resolution recommended that Mother's Day be observed by Congress and the Executive Department of the government. In the following year, the President of the United States was authorized to proclaim Mother's Day as a national observance each year. CPO Wives by Ellen Van Cleef The regular business meeting of the CPO Wives was held Friday, May 3, at the Family Room. Added to the Roll Call were Rose Redmon and Mary Brown. The entertainment chairman reported that the social this month on May 18 is to be a Bingo for members. A special invitation would be delivered to wives of the newly-appointed chiefs to be guests at this Bingo. Pres. Jane Whited announced that election time is near and that nominations for the offices of president, vice-president, secretary and treasurer would be held at the next meeting on June 1. Membership to the club is open to all chiefs' wives and marine wives of equivalent rate. Plan to join. While some girls don't intend to marry until they are 30, others don't intend to be 30 until they marry. The Medic by J. F. Bertone & R. J. McNight Newborn News For this week on the Gtmo Birth Caravan there is a girl to CS2 and Mrs. Cecil E. Boswell, a girl to BM2 and Mrs. Jarvis Algon Baker, a boy to SK1 and Mrs. Elisha Monroe and a boy to HM2 and Mrs. Harold West. New Troops Three new Corpsmen arrived from the states for duty, this past week. J. H. Vinson, HMC, from FMF, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, W. E. Basham, HM2, from ReeSta, Norfolk, Va. Also J. W. Reedy, HM2, USNH, Oakland, Calif. Commendations Captain I. Moe presented a letter of commendation to three Staff members this week: LCDR C. H. Johnson, MSC; J. G. Streetman, HM2, and F. C. Moore, HM3. They were commended for their outstanding performance of duty in the Optometry Division and the Optical dispensing unit. LCDR Johnson's Commendations was originated by the Commanding Officer of the USS FORRESTAL for his excellent work in eye examinations on board that vessel. Promotions Word has come in that the Hospital has two new Chiefs. Putting on his new cap on May 16, will be Roy J. Hall, better known to a selected few as "The Chico". He will be promoted to HMCA. Hall is key man in the food service dept. For promotion to HMCA on November 16, is Morris Gordon. He is in charge of the Pharmacy. The Medic's Reviews King was all smiles this past week because Gtmo liberty was opened. Arriving back from leave with a smiling face was Miss Segin. By the way Cuddy, what is better, a junior first class or a senior second class? Mario, be sure when you go on an ambulance run that there is a stretcher in the ambulance. Challenging Harding for the title of "Mr. Sackrat" and almost beating him out was McCafferty. SCUTTLEBUTT C Ssftl think we ought to abarrdo# ship!, F T G Bulletin There were three new arrivals during the past week. Wayne C. Morrison, YN1, was assigned to the Administrative department. He is from Glens Falls, N.Y. and married the former Miss Betty Smith of Spartanburg, S.C. They have one child Robert Earl 8 years old. Morrison has previously served at the Fleet Training Center Charleston S. C. and on the USS JOHNSON (DD-821). Bruce R. Reber, ETSN, was assigned to the AS department. he is from Schulykill Haven, Pennsylvania. He has previously served on the USS PANDEMUS (ARL-18). Leonard E. Harshbarger, BM2, is the new assistant barracks master-at-arms. He is from Baltimore, Maryland and married the former Miss Francis Green of Westernport, Md. They have two children, Lynda age 8 and Leonard age 4. Harshbarger has served previously on the USS WRANGEL (AE-12). The Gunnery 22 bowling team had long awaited revenge for the drubbing Gunnery 21 gave them during the season. The challenge was issued and the match wras played last Saturday. The result verified the season play with Gunnery 21 taking 3 out of 4 points plus a beer or two. CDR Gardner after 40 months here and LT Dent after 14 months have decided to take up golf. The results are most hazardous for unsuspecting players in their vicinity. It is rumored that CDR Gardner shot a brillant 70, his first time out-for nine holes. Supervisors' Assoc, If you are a Group IVA or IVB U. S. Civil Service Supervisor (American whose principal duty is the direction of a group of employees of lower grade including responsibility for work assignments and active participation in personnel action affecting the subordinate employees) you are eligible to join the Guantanamo Bay Supervisors' Association L o c a 1 #51. This Association has about 90% of the eligible supervisors on this Base as active members. If you are interested in this Association and would like to become a member, please contact our Membership Committee: Wayne Sheppard Phone-8501 Joe West -8111 Harry Morgan -8299 Regular monthly meetings are held on the first Monday of the month at 1900 in Building #27. The next meeting will be June 4. If you have a problem that affects the Base as a whole, bring it to our meeting. It will be discussed by the members and a solution sought. If no solution can be found the problem will be referred to higher authority for decision. M m THE INDIAN e Page Five

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m Page Six dm VU -10 Prop Blast by 0. A. Porter, Jr With prizes for the winning three, the VU-10 Intra-squadron Golf Tourney is off to a flying start. Among the favorites are C. A. Noell, Jr., AOC, D. E. Campbell, AE3, LT Tom Drace, and C. C. Roberts, ADC. They'll have plenty of trouble from a "dark-horse" contender, his unusual but effective "golfmanship", a form of psychological handicap. Speaking of Chief Roberts, he has just received an appointment to the temporary rank of Ensign and will soon join the officer ranks. Congratulations, Chief, and the best of luck. C. C. Brotherson, ADC, who has just completed 281/2 in the service, will be detached this month to start his last tour prior to retirement. He will finish his thirty with VX-1 in Key West, where he plans to devote his retirement to his first hobby of growing flowers, and fishing. During his tour with VU10 Chief Brotherson served as Line Chief and as Leading Chief. Mrs. E. Antulov and family departed on May 7 for the states, where they will soon be joined by E. Antulov, YNC, who has received orders for duty at Cory Field, Pensacola. A. Welcome Aboard to the following men, who have just reported from NATTC, Norman, Oklahoma: G. E. LE Master, AA J. G. Luker, AA A. C. McLaughlin, AA V. L. Jochum, AA F. L. Leach, AN J. Manetta, AA In addition, C. D. Burke. AD3, recently reported on board from VX-3, NAS, Atlantic City. We know that you will enjoy Gtmo and your tour in VU-10. Strikes & Spares by Dolly Aumann The Women's Bowling League is back in the "ole" swing and some good scores were turned in on the first games bowled on April 30 and May 1. New Officers elected for this league are as follows: president; Marilyn Dunn; vice -president; Peggy Duffy; secretary; June Enders; treasurer; Ruth McGowan, and press; Dolly Aumann. Hi-Games F. Grounds G. Flood J. Babcock J. Enders D. Aumann G. Kraft E. Coxon N. Williams D. Dickson 212 181 176 175 171 165 164 161 160 M. Zeigler 169 Hi-Averages F. Grounds 161 G. Flood 160 D. Aumann 153 M. Zeigler 152 J. Enders 151 G. Kraft 145 N. Williams 142 GTMO SPORTING CHIPS by C. C. Drumright Pro Shots Straight From the T. ...There is definite progress being made in installing a booster pump in our water lines. ...Greener pastures in the future my friends. The first round play for the men's championship will begin Sunday morning, May 13. A lot of close competition is expected in all flights. Our ringer tournament having provided a great deal of pleasure for lots of players is about to die now of old age, so finish up folks and we will cook up another golf stew of some type. During our last committee meeting held May 8 one fact established was the lack of members for our sub committees; it isn't to much work so lend a hand. Liberal Arts Department. ...A person is considered to be addressing the ball when they have placed their feet on the ground in position for and preparatory to making a stroke and has also grounded the club. The grounding of the club does not apply when in a hazard. A practice stroke may never be taken during the play of a hole, there is, however, a difference between a practice swing, which may be taken at any time or place provided the player does not violate such rules as smoothing out the rough, move the ball, has not addressed the ball, etc. Rimming the Cup around the 19th. ...T. Drace, trophy hunter foiled, is still making the top flight. All no 19 holers wish speedy return to the T of one of our heartiest enthusiasts, Admiral Cooper, even though his return will mean diminishing returns to many of us. If our club champ keeps up his baseball those breaking putts will become a cinch. An individual blind bogey was conducted last Sunday Afternoon by Gurka, Dustin and Campbell, final results not available at this writing. Is said there may be a dark horse seen almost daily around 17 practice area by the name of Banker. Special Mast ....It is kindly requested when you are playing and the green in front of you is vacant and players behind you are obviously faster, to wait and let them pass. Please bear in mind that once you allow another group to pass, you are obligated to wait until they are clearly out of range. The time element here is minor, but the over all results of bogging down play is major as when you hold off one group, you generally set up a chain reaction that goes back to the first T. Local Speakers Improve Forensics At Weekly Toastmaster Meetings The name Toastmasters was adopted because of its pleasant associations. Mention of a toastmaster brings to mind a dinner occasion, an attractive social affair with good food and entertaining speeches, with wit, wise counsel and repartee. The fundamental reasons for our Toastmaster Club are to build personality, to improve speaking abilities and to develop latent capacities for leadership and service. We try through training and practice to improve our members in oral expression of thought, to develop their ability to appear effectively before audiences, to provide instruction and experience in chairmanship, to exemplify the value of training in parliamentary procedure, conference and committee techniques. Have you ever heard your own voice? Try reading or make a speech with a tape recorder and then listen to the playback. It is doubtful if you would recognize the sounds coming from that tape. Many people do not realize how their voice sounds to others until taped. All prospective members are required to attend two meetings as a guest before becoming a regular member. After becoming a member and on completing the 12 basic speeches a Certificate of Merit is issued to the Toastmaster from the home office in Santa Anna, Calif. All Toastmaster Clubs are limited to 30 regular members. This ruling was made to insure each toastmaster a part in nearly every program either as a formal speaker, Toastmaster, Critic, Timer, Catcher, Lexicologist or as the Toastmaster for the evening. There are formal speeches given at each meeting. Each speech should be six minutes long thus the speaker learns to time himself. One of the qualifications of a good speaker is the ability to time his speech to the second. Toastmaster Club #92 meets every Wednesday at 1830 in the dining room of Officers' Club. Dinner is served for $1.50. The program starts about 1915 and is usually over at 2030. Two hours of fun and learning which will repay tremendous dividends to the man who wishes to improve his qualities of leadership. Toastmasters very early demonstrated that there is no other method of self expression which so quickly brings out a man's qualities for leadership as practice in public speaking. S NAS Team Wins 3 Pistol Matches The Naval Air Station sent a sharpshooter Pistol Team to Fiesta of Five Flags Pistol Championship Matches at Pensacola, Florida, May 4-6. Of the four Team Matches held, the Naval Air Station, Guantanamo Bay, won three of them. The .45 calibre team match with a 1027 out of 1200 team score. Center Fire Team Match with a 1023. .22 calibre Team Match was lost to Memphis Naval Station team 1099 to 1105. Aggregate Team Match won with 3159. The Naval Air Station Pistol Team consisted of M. C. Schoonderwoerd, ADC, Classification-Expert; J. B. Jocks, AO1, Classification-Expert; C. E. Tryon, BMC, Classification -Sharpshooter; L. C. James, A02, Classfication-Marksman. Flbrty-six individual awards were won plus the three winning team plaques. These awards included spotting scopes which were won by Tryon and James for high shooter in their class. Three cartridge loading blocks, four panel awards and 37 place awards were won. Schoonderwoerd was second High Expert with a score of 2449. There were five Expert teams and five Sharpshooter teams entered in this match with 60 or more competitors. Soviet Navy Threat To Atlantic Shipping New York-Russia's Navy has the capability of attacking Atlantic shipping from the air "on a scale and intensity out of comparison with anything experienced in the broad oceans in the past," the intelligence officer for the Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic said last week. If war should break out, the Russian navy now has six times the air strength available to Nazi Germany in 1939 with which to attack the sea lanes linking North America with western Europe; seven times the sub marine strength,, and three times the heavy surface fleet. These estimates were made by U.S. Admiral Jerauld Wright, commander of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization naval command, and his staff at an Overseas Press Club meeting. B e s i d e s increased numerical strength, the Russians have converted all navy fighter and light bomber units to jet aircraft. The NATO command expects the Soviet to soon outfit its submarines with guided missiles with nuclear warheads, posing an additional threat to ports and coastal region cities on both sides of the Atlantic. S M Saturday, 12 May 1956 THE INDIAN

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M Saturday, 12 May 1956 THE SCOREBOOK Marines Continue Winning 1 Run Games And Extra-Inning Contests, In 1st Place by Joe Duffy The intercommand baseball league completed its fourth week and the second circuit for the four competing clubs this week, with the Marines steadily pulling away from the field. The four clubs are as evenly matched as a handicapper could devise, however, the Marines have an old habit of winning the one-run decisions and the extra-inning games. A revised Naval Air Station team has begun to loom as a threat to the Leatherneck's superiority, and are beginning to shape up to their pre-season expectations. However, they lost the golden opportunity last Sunday when they blew a four-run lead and then lost in overtime to the league leaders. The outcome of this game will certainly prove to be more important as the season gets o Marines 6, NAS 5 Mike Sivilli strolled home in the eleventh inning to break up a tie ballgame and provided the winning run for the Marine's second extra-inning triumph in succession. The strolling came about when a close call at second base ignited into an NAS rhubarb with the base umpire, without benefit of time out. The Flyers, after yeilding a run to the Marines in the third, came back in their half of the inning to shell starter Phil Patton from the mound with a five-run explosion. Jette and Sandblom walked to start the inning and were followed by run producing singles by Lee Rogers, McCalmont and Waldrop before Furtney relieved on the mound. After Tanzi lined out to Collins at third, Schaffer lashed a two-run double to left-center to complete the scoring for the inning, and the game as far as the Flyers were concerned. Furtney had little trouble over the rest of the route, scattering four singles while facing the minimum of three batters in all but the fifth and eleventh frames. The Leathernecks tied it up in the sixth when McCalmont ran into a streak of wildness and issued five of his total seven walks. The walks came in succession forcing in two markers. With the sacks full, Hunter powered a long hit that was ruled a ground rule double, passing through the fence in right field, and good for the final two runs in the inning. Castellow then struck out for the final out and the stalemate was on until Sivilli's theft in the eleventh. Marines 001 004 000 01-6 12 1 NAS 005 000 000 00-5 10 2 VU10 13, Naval Base 7 The Mallards swept to a convincing 13-7 win over the Naval Base Indians to register their second league victory, both over the Indians, Scoring in multiples of three and two, the Mallards held complete command and kept the superior edge despite a four-run outburst by the Indians in the fifth frame, when three singles. two walks and an error closed the gap to 8-5. Two walks preceding a double by Postal and single by Montgomery accounted for the Mallard three runs in the initial frame. Another walk, bunt sacrifice, and singles by Morris and Bouffard produced two more tallies in the second and wrote finis for hurler Weingarten. Wildness plagued reliefer Schiller in the third as he hit the first three Mallard batsmen to face him and load the bases. An infield out produced one run, a second was balked in and the third crossed the plate as Milt Smith punched out the lone basehit of the frame. This proved to be enough to win, but two more in the fifth and three in the ninth were added for insurance. Moe Morris led the winner's hit attack with a double and two singles to produce three markers, while Jim Postal rapped out a pair of two-basehits good for two runs. Scholl, Indian's first baseman, went 2 for 4 to drive in four runs, two of which came on a bases-loaded double in the sixth inning. NavBase 100 042 000-7 9 5 VU-10 323 020 03x-13 12 2 NAS 7, VU-10 4 The rejuvenated, red-hot Naval Air Station Flyers made eight hits count when they were needed to down the VU-10 Mallards 7 to 4 in a game marred by thirteen errors. The Flyers snapped a 4-4 tie in the eighth when Joe Sandblom doubled to score Tanzi all the way from first, then sewed it up with two more runs with the aid of singles by Williams and Watson and a pitcher's balk. The Mallards held a two-run advantage until the fifth when Williams and Watson hit duplicating drives to right center that went for doubles and the first of three big runs. A succession of Mallard errors followed the blows to allow the Flyers to take the 4-3 lead. Montgomery walked in the Mallard sixth and eventually scored on two Flyers errors to knot the count at 4-all, that held until the explosive eighth. Bob Waldrop made his first mound appearance, and although giving a shaky performance, was effective in the pinches to gain the victory. VU-10 021 001 000-4 7 6 NAS 100 030 03x-7 8 7 The Leaders AB R School, NavBase 26 7 Pearson, NAS 14 5 McCalmont, NAS 19 6 Hunter, Marines 27 12 McCafferty, NavBase 18 5 Smith, M., VU-10 21 5 Bouffard, VU-10 22 2 H 12 6 8 11 7 8 8 RBI Ave. 9 .461 3 .428 3 .421 8 .407 1 .389 2 .381 2 .363 Home Runs: Hunter and Castellow (Marines) 1. Triples: Bland nad Hunter (Marines), Eells and Petinak (NayBase) and Waldrop (NAS) 1. Doubles: Dowd and Hunter (Marines), Scholl (NavBase), and Pearson (NAS 3 each. Runs Batted In: Bland (Marines) and Scholl (NavBase) 9; Hunter (Marine s) 8. IP SO BB W L ERA Dodwd, Marines 9 11 2 Streigle, VU-10 15 7 10 Montgomery ,VU-10 10 10 8 Furtney, Marines 25 19 11 Patton, Marines 23 20 9 The Standings Marines 6 NAS 2 VU-10 2 NavBase 2 The Schedule 0.00 0.60 2.50 2.52 3.12 0 1 1 0 0 2 1 0 2 2 0 4 4 4 4 4 4 Mon. 14 Maj, 1900 NavBase vs Marines ues. 15 May, 1900 NAS vs VU-10 Thurs. 17 May, 1900 VU-10 vs NavBase NOTES ON THE MARGIN The stalemate behind the Marines in the league standings is a pretty good indication of the league's balance. If only the Marines would cooperate, it could have been a four-way tie for first instead of the three-way tie for second, or last, depends on how you look at it. The Naval Base Indians stand to lose their entire first-string outfield this month. Pete Petinak goes to Norfolk for duty, and Bob Eells will be on his way to the separation center: McCowan has his orders, so when he leaves, what does that leave for an outfield? The Naval Air Station picked up a new keystone combination in their rejuvenation. A young fellow by the name of Watson took over at short and has been a shot in the arm to the club, while Chief Lee Rogers filled in at second base for the absent Roy Pearson. Lee Rogers, better known hereabouts for his golfing, joined the club along with Commander Al Rothenberg. The Fish Tale(s) by Pat Aldridge Diligent research has failed to turn up the fantastic Sea Serpent, sworn by creditable eye witnesses to inhabit the Caribbean. There are some weird creatures to be seen hereabouts. Mention of the foretold has been preface to the telling about the funniest creature of all known to frequent Cuban waters. The name of this animal, is Monitee. The same creature is known as a Dugong in the Pacific. As for its' physical description ...can you imagine a two ton combination seal, walrus and ordinary moo cow? The pedal extremities are broad flippers and the rudder a broad, flat tail. The head, so say some, is similiar to that of a cow with large, soleful eyes. The Manitee is a highly playful, friendly creature with no apparant fear of man, in fact, a will to be a friend of man. Ted Ahlberg, one of our well known skin divers, has seen and cavorted with a giant Manitee here. One fellow on the Florida coast made a real pet of a huge Manitee as was proven recently in motion pictures taken of the man and his strange playmate rolling about and playing tag with one another, in the estuary. The Manitee would arrive daily in the waters in front of the chap's beach cottage announcing her presence with a weird cry impossible to imitate. The female Manitee seems to have all the natural traits of any woman. The creature drinks fresh water and may often be seen in the river and near springs which empty into the sea. It is absolutely against the laws of almost every land, including Cuba, to destroy the Manitee for it is a rather a rare species. At one time it was sought for its food and fur value by commercial hunters. She sat on Fehrman's bait trap the other day now Fehrman has to build a new one ...little trap, big critter. Ladies Golf Shots Last Wednesday the lady golfers played the qualifying round for the Ladies Championship tournament. Matches are now being played to determine the winners of both an 18 hole and a nine hole tournament. On May 1 the new monthly handicaps were posted. Lavaria Butler, Cynthia Holley, Audrey Page and Chris Whitton all became first fighters. Congratulations and keep improving. Kay Barton, Patty Patterson, Bucky Pierce and Margaret Wall all jumped to second flight. D M m THE INDIAN Page Seven

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a Saturday, 12 May 1956 THE INDIAN et Navy-BPPO-lOND-Guantanamo TV Tele Talk Screen actor Keefe Brasselle stars in "The Talented Mr. Ripley" an intriguing story of a scheming actor who tries to impersonate a wealthy young man. See it on Studio One Monday. M/Sgt. Ernie Bilko faces a double-horned dilemma as yearly bivouac time comes up and the Colonel is determined that for once Bilko won't wind up on sick call in the hospital with his pokerplaying side-kicks, in the episode entitled "Sick Call Ernie" on the Phil Silvers Show, "You'll Never Get Rich." A benevolent Mama Bronson is taken advantage of by a typical "borrowing" neighbor on the Meet Millie Show. The situation gets out of hand when the new resident attempts to "borrow" a full course beef dinner which Mama has prepared for guests. Friday night Boxing is once again brought from ST. Nicks Arena. A. four round semi-final precedes the main event between welter-weights Gean Poire and Danny Jo Porez. This will be a return match. Poirie has a 14-20 record while Porez has a 16-23 record. This 10 round match favors Poire 15-1 as he won the previous fight. Jack Webb, Robert Cummings and Spike Jones receive the Colgate Achievement Award on the Colgate Variety Hour Saturday. Webb gets the award for the best dramatic show of the year; Cummings for the best comedy show of the year and Jones for having contributed the least to music on television. A weak-willed young man, determined to retain his father's respect at all costs, discovers that a "white lie" can involve an innocent man in murder, during "The Guilty," a drama to be presented on Justice. Ed Sullivan pays a special tribute to Lily Pons who is celebrating the 25th anniversary of her association with the Metropolitan Opera Company Sunday night. Other guests on the program will be popular songstress Pearl Bailey, British comedienne Joyce Grenfell and her dancers, comedian Myron Cohen, recording star Al Hibbler and the Lone Ranger along with Silver. Saturday, May 12 4:00-Howdy Doody 4 :15-Youth Wants to Know 5:00-Victory At Sea 5:30-Beat The Clock 6:00-Red Buttons 6:30-Life Begins at 80 7:00-Penny to a Million 7:30-Stage Show 8:00-Colgate Variety Hour 9:00-Here's The Show 9:30-Justice Sunday, May 13 4:00-Roy Rogers 4:30-Winky Dink and You 5:00-Mama 5:30-Hallmark Hall of Fame 6:00-Meet The Press 6:30-Star Tonight 7:00-You Are There 7:30-What's My Line 8:00-Toast of the Town 9:00-Loretta Young 9:30-Appointment With Adventure Monday, May 14 5:30-News Parade 7:70-This to Your Life 5:45-Jane Froman 8:St-Eddie Castor S:00-United Nations 0:35-Foreign Intrigue 0:15-I & E Time 0:00-Godfrey and Friends 6:30-Danny Thomas Thursday, May 17 7:00-I Love Lucy 3:30-News Parade 7 :30-TV Top Tunes 5:45-Eddie Fioher 8:00-Ethel & Albert S:00-Prefecoor Father 8 :30-Cameo Theater 0:30-My Little Margie 9 :00-Studio One 7 :00-You Ret Your Life Tuesday, May 15 7:30-Bob Cummings 5:30-News Parade 0:00-Johnny Carson 5:45-Tennessee Ernie Show 0:30-Stage 7 6:00-Highway Patrol 0:00-Dragnet 6:30--Phil Silvers 0:30-Four Star Playhouse 7:00-Meet Millie Friday, May 18 7:30-Red Skelton 5:30-News Parade 8:00-Stranger 0:40-Perry Come 8:30-T-Men In Action 0:00-Big Picture 9:00-Cid Ceasar 0:10-0 & N Time Wednesday, May 16 0:30-Troth or Conoeqsences 5:30-News Parade 7:00-Our Miss Broos 5:45-Jo Stafford 7:30-Life o Riley 6:00-Those Whitting Girls 0:00-Mv. & Mrs. Ncrth 6:30-I've Got a Secret 8:30-Crusader 7:00-To Be Announced 0:00-Booing Cinema -Scoop by D.D.H. Nothin' old, nothin' new, so on with this week's movies! Annapolis Story (A.A., in color) ..John Derek, Kevin McCarthy and Diana Lynn. ..trials and tribulations of. an Annapolis student ...might intrigue some people. Never Say Goodbye (U.I., in color), one of the very few new ones this week. It is the story of a man and woman parted by suspicions and the Iron Curtain, who are reunited some years later. Rock Hudson, Cornell Borchers (she's a newcomer to Hollywood), and George Sanders star. Not the greatest in entertainment, but worth taking the time to see, if you like a love story. The Shrike (Ul.), is probably the best of the week, but the movie was just here not too long ago. June Allyson and Jose Ferrer star in this one. The plot concerns a very possessive wife and what she does to her husband, through that almost violent possessiveness. Will Any Gentleman (A.A.), is a ridiculous comedy and one that if you want to laugh, go see! George Cole and Veronica Hurst (two English players) star; Mum's the word on the plot, just go see it, a barrel of laughs guaranteed. Prize of Gold (Col.), is a crime picture, this time dealing with the robbery of a shipment of gold off a military transport! Richard Widmark is convincing enough as the almost, but not quite villain and Mai Zeterling plays a very appealing love interest in the flick. City of Shadows (Rep.) .VicFROM: 3 cent stamp TO: Send the Indian Home tor McLaghlen and Kathleen Crowley ...Grade B all the way then some, is this picture of the big city crime syndicates. Court Martial of Billy Mitchell (W.B., in color) is a near documentary of the trial of the famed general who fought for an air force. Gary Cooper plays Mitchell and does a good job! Charles Bickford, Ralph Bellamy and Rod Steiger round out the all-star cast. A very good evening's entertainment! Book -Nook "THE REVOLT OF GUNNER ASCH," by Hans Kirst, is currently sweeping the book world as being one of the funniest books to result from World War II. The man in the title is a German soldier who declares his own private war on all the pomposity and goosestepping tactics of the Nazi officers. How he bungles his way through the war and comes out on top equals hilarious reading. The Library has several new and up-to-date mysteries, too numerous to mention separately. However, one of the best is the Ellery Queen trilogy "THE WRIGHTSVILLE NUMBERS." It's a thick and hefty bookful of solid mystery reading by one of the all-time favorite mystery writers of today. An interesting and inspiring book on a subject which Americans never tire of discussing Helen Keller, is TEACHER-ANNE SULLIVAN MACY," by Miss Keller herself. The subject was Helen Keller's teacher from the very beginning of her perceptive life, and the story of how a blind and deaf girl is introduced to the world of sensible reality is positively fascinating. A touching tribute from student to teacher. Here's another compact little Modern Library volume entitled "THE BEST SHORT STORIES OF DOSTOEVSKY." About eight WGBY Television Program S Saturday, May 12 NavSta-Annapolis Story-90 min. NAS--Three Ring Circus-104 min. Mar. Site-Sincerely Yours-127 min. Villa.-Teen-Age Crime Wave-100 min. Lwd. Pt.-Purple Mask-103 min. MCB-1-White Christmas-120 min. Sunday, May 13 NavSta-Never Say Goodbye-96 min. NAS-Annapolis Story Mar. Site-I'll Cry Tomorrow-119 min, Villa.-Sincerely Yours Lwd. Pt.-Teen-Age Crime Wave MCB-1-Purple Mask Monday, May 14 NavSta-Shrike-94 min. NAS-Never Say Goodbye Mar. Site-Three Ring Circus Villa.-I'll Cry Tomorrow Lwd. Pt.-Sincerely Yours MCB-1-Ten-Age Crime Wave Tuesday, May 15 NavSta-Will Any Gentleman-91 min. NAS-Shrike Mar. Site-Annapolis Story Villa.-Three Ring Circus Lwd. Pt.-I'll Cry Tomorrow MCB-1-Sincerely Yours Wednesday, May 16 NavSta.-Prize of Gold-98 min. NAS-Will Any Gentleman Mar.Site-Never Say Goodbye Villa.-Annapolis Story Lwd. Pt.-Three Ring Circus MCB-1-I'll Cry Tomorrow Thursday, May 17 NaytSa-City of Shadows-92 min. NAS-Prize of Gold Mar. Site-Shrike Villa.-Never Say Goobye Lwd. Pt.-Annapolis Story MCB-1-Three Ring Circus Friday, May 18 NavSta-Court Martial of Billy Mitchell112 min. NAS-City of Shadows Mar. Site-Will Any Gentleman Villa.-Shrike Lwd. Pt.-Never Say Goodbye MCB-1-Annapolis Story of his better short stories are included. Those who know him only as a novelist or playwright will discover in this book another medium of expression in which he also excelled. New specialty books include "THE SHELL BOOK," "HOW TO MAKE BUILT-IN FURNITURE," and "HOW TO CLEAN EVERYTHING." "THE FABULOUS FUTURE" is a small but tremendously absorbing book. It comprises a collection of articles by eleven prominent Americans in the .fields of government, labor, and big business on what they think America will be like in 1980. It's rather an unusual topic, and the conclusions are surprising and thought-provoking. A drunk was standing on a corner, leaning helplessly against a telephone pole. Finally a cop came up and nudged him with his stick. "Why don't you go home?" the officer advised. The drunk roused and started walking round and round the pole, carefully feeling its surface with his hand. Finally, after about 10 rounds, he sat on the curb and sighed ..."Silo use ...I'm walled in."